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Sample records for controlling cyp1a1 gene

  1. CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms increase lung cancer risk in a high-incidence region of Spain: a case control study

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    San Jose Carmen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A rural region in south-west Spain has one of the highest lung cancer incidence rates of the country, as revealed by a previous epidemiological 10-year follow-up study. The present work was undertaken to ascertain the role of CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms and their interaction with tobacco smoking in the development of the disease in this location. Methods One-hundred-and-three cases of lung cancer and 265 controls participated in the study. The participants were screened for the presence of four CYP1A1 polymorphisms, namely MspI, Ile462Val, T3205C, and Thr461Asn. Lung cancer risk was estimated as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI using unconditional logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, and smoking. Results The distribution of the variant CYP1A1 alleles was different from that described for other Caucasian populations, with CYP1A1*2A showing an uncommonly high frequency (p CYP1A1*2B allele (carrying MspI and Ile462Val mutations was strongly associated with high lung cancer risk (OR = 4.59, CI:1.4-12.6, p p p = 0.04. Moreover, the Thr461Asn polymorphism was found to be associated with SCLC in a Caucasian population for the first time to our knowledge (OR = 8.33, CI: 1.3-15.2, p = 0.04. Conclusion The results suggest that CYP1A1 polymorphisms contribute to increase lung cancer susceptibility in an area with an uncommon high incidence rate.

  2. Cigarette smoking, dietary habits and genetic polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP1A1 metabolic genes: A case-control study in oncohematological diseases.

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    Cerliani, María Belén; Pavicic, Walter; Gili, Juan Antonio; Klein, Graciela; Saba, Silvia; Richard, Silvina

    2016-10-10

    To analyze the association between oncohematological diseases and GSTT1/GSTM1/CYP1A1 polymorphisms, dietary habits and smoking, in an argentine hospital-based case-control study. This hospital-based case-control study involved 125 patients with oncohematological diseases and 310 control subjects. A questionnaire was used to obtain sociodemographic data and information about habits. Blood samples were collected, and DNA was extracted using salting out methods. Deletions in GSTT1 and GSTM1 (null genotypes) were addressed by PCR. CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism was detected by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratio (OR) and 95%CI were calculated to estimate the association between each variable studied and oncohematological disease. Women showed lower risk of disease compared to men (OR 0.52, 95%CI: 0.34-0.82, P = 0.003). Higher levels of education (> 12 years) were significantly associated with an increased risk, compared to complete primary school or less (OR 3.68, 95%CI: 1.82-7.40, P tobacco, none of the smoking categories showed association with oncohematological diseases. Regarding dietary habits, consumption of grilled/barbecued meat 3 or more times per month showed significant association with an increased risk of disease (OR 1.72, 95%CI: 1.08-2.75, P = 0.02). Daily consumption of coffee also was associated with an increased risk (OR 1.77, 95%CI: 1.03-3.03, P = 0.03). Results for GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP1A1 polymorphisms showed no significant association with oncohematological diseases. When analyzing the interaction between polymorphisms and tobacco smoking or dietary habits, no statistically significant associations that modify disease risk were found. We reported an increased risk of oncohematological diseases associated with meat and coffee intake. We did not find significant associations between genetic polymorphisms and blood cancer.

  3. A novel CYP1A1 gene polymorphism and the risk of head and neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patients showing this mutation have the mean age of 51.75 (±15.7). Therefore, mutation in CYP1A1 gene may be one of several factors that increase the chance of developing head and neck cancer. Key words: Cytochrome P450 1A1 gene (CYP1A1), head and neck cancer (HNC), mutation, novel polymorphism, ...

  4. Effect of CYP1A1 gene polymorphism and psychological distress on seminal analysis parameters.

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    Singh, Aditi; Koner, Bidhan Chandra; Ray, Prakash Chandra; Prasad, Sudha; Jamatia, Elvia; Masroor, Mirza; Singh, Vijay Kumar

    2016-05-24

    Psychological factor alters fertility hormones and contributes to male infertility. Anxiety and depression are common manifestations of psychological distress. Cytochrome P-4501A1 (CYP1A1) metabolizes xenobiotics and fertility hormones that influence male fertility. The effect of CYP1A1 polymorphism on male fertility has remained controversial. The present study was designed to assess the effect of psychological distress and CYP1A1 polymorphisms and their interactions on parameters of seminal analysis. Eighty male partners of infertile couples were evaluated for level of distress using Hospital anxiety and depression score (HADS) questionnaire. As per WHO guidelines (2010), sperm count, motility and morphology were assessed and subjects were classified as (a) subjects having normal sperm characteristics and (b) subjects having abnormal sperm characteristics. CYP1A1 polymorphisms were detected by ASO-PCR. The significant odd's ratio indicates that psychological distress (OR:10.54; CI:3.72-29.84; P psychological distress, CYP1A1*4 and CYP1A1*2C polymorphisms significantly affect but do not interact among them to influence sperm parameters. It is concluded that CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms and psychological distress act independently but do not interact with each other in pathogenesis of male infertility.

  5. Breast cancer risk, fungicide exposure and CYP1A1*2A gene-environment interactions in a province-wide case control study in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

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    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; VanLeeuwen, John; Cribb, Alastair; Andreou, Pantelis; Guernsey, Judith Read

    2012-05-01

    Scientific certainty regarding environmental toxin-related etiologies of breast cancer, particularly among women with genetic polymorphisms in estrogen metabolizing enzymes, is lacking. Fungicides have been recognized for their carcinogenic potential, yet there is a paucity of epidemiological studies examining the health risks of these agents. The association between agricultural fungicide exposure and breast cancer risk was examined in a secondary analysis of a province-wide breast cancer case-control study in Prince Edward Island (PEI) Canada. Specific objectives were: (1) to derive and examine the level of association between estimated fungicide exposures, and breast cancer risk among women in PEI; and (2) to assess the potential for gene-environment interactions between fungicide exposure and a CYP1A1 polymorphism in cases versus controls. After 1:3 matching of 207 cases to 621 controls by age, family history of breast cancer and menopausal status, fungicide exposure was not significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.46-1.17). Moreover, no statistically significant interactions between fungicide exposure and CYP1A1*2A were observed. Gene-environment interactions were identified. Though interpretations of findings are challenged by uncertainty of exposure assignment and small sample sizes, this study does provide grounds for further research.

  6. Breast Cancer Risk, Fungicide Exposure and CYP1A1*2A Gene-Environment Interactions in a Province-Wide Case Control Study in Prince Edward Island, Canada

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    Judith Read Guernsey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific certainty regarding environmental toxin-related etiologies of breast cancer, particularly among women with genetic polymorphisms in estrogen metabolizing enzymes, is lacking. Fungicides have been recognized for their carcinogenic potential, yet there is a paucity of epidemiological studies examining the health risks of these agents. The association between agricultural fungicide exposure and breast cancer risk was examined in a secondary analysis of a province-wide breast cancer case-control study in Prince Edward Island (PEI Canada. Specific objectives were: (1 to derive and examine the level of association between estimated fungicide exposures, and breast cancer risk among women in PEI; and (2 to assess the potential for gene-environment interactions between fungicide exposure and a CYP1A1 polymorphism in cases versus controls. After 1:3 matching of 207 cases to 621 controls by age, family history of breast cancer and menopausal status, fungicide exposure was not significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.46–1.17. Moreover, no statistically significant interactions between fungicide exposure and CYP1A1*2A were observed. Gene-environment interactions were identified. Though interpretations of findings are challenged by uncertainty of exposure assignment and small sample sizes, this study does provide grounds for further research.

  7. [Relationship between CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels in coke oven workers].

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    Nie, Ji-sheng; Zhang, Hong-mei; Sun, Jian-ya; Zeng, Ping; Zhang, Ling; Niu, Qiao

    2009-05-01

    To study the associations of CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms with levels of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among coke oven workers. 223 male workers from a coke plant (76, 82 and 65 workers in oven top group, oven-side group and oven-bottom group respectively) and 119 controls without occupational polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure were selected. The MspI gene polymorphism in CYP1A1 3' flanking region and the genotypes at I462V site in exon 7 of CYP1A1 were detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and allele specific amplification (ASA). The urinary 1-hydroxypyrene of coke oven workers in oven-top, oven-side and oven-bottom (3.77+/-0.64, 3.57+/-0.49, 3.26+/-0.80 micromol/mol Cr) were significantly higher than controls (2.80+/-1.02 micromol/mol Cr) (P0.05). In oven-top group and oven-side group, the subjects with Val/Val genotype in exon 7 of CYP1A1 had significantly higher urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels than those with Ile/Val or Ile/Ile genotype, and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene of Ile-Val genotype were also significantly higher than Ile/Ile genotype (Poven workers (OR in oven top group, oven-side group and oven-bottom group was 24.926, 4.226 and 6.729 respectively) and subjects with m2/m2 genotype in CYP1A1 3' flanking region (OR=4.031) or with Val/Val or Ile/Val genotype in exon 7 of CYP1A1 (OR were 5.524 and 3.811) had elevated urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (greater than 95 percentile of control group, 3.876 micromol/mol Cr). BAP concentration of work environment contributes to the elevated urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels, and the exposed BAP levels were regulated by the CYP1A1 MspI and I462V genotypes. Genetic polymorphism of CYP1A1 gene could be a susceptible biomarker in coke oven workers which was involved in the individual susceptibility on metabolism of PAHs.

  8. CYP1A1 genotypes and haplotypes and risk of oral cancer: a case-control study in South Indians

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    Lakshmi Balaji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CYP1A1 gene encodes for the enzyme, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, which is involved in the biotransformation of various aromatic tobacco precarcinogens. In the present study, the association between CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms (IVS1-728G > A, Thr461Asn and Ile462Val, and the risk of oral cancer, was examined among 157 patients with oral cancer and 132 age-matched controls, in a south Indian population. The strength of the association between CYP1A1 variants and oral cancer was estimated by logistic regression. It was found that Thr461Asn was not polymorphic. Both IVS1-728G > A and Ile462Val frequencies were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the control group. There were no significant differences in genotype or haplotype frequencies between controls and cases with oral cancer. Hence, CYP1A1 SNPs can be considered as not being associated with oral cancer at either the genotype or haplotype levels in the population studied.

  9. [DIO2, TPO, CYP1A1 AND CYP1A2 gene polymorphism in women with thyroid disease].

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    Kochetova, O V; Gaynullina, M K; Viktorova, T V

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of polymorphisms of genes CYP1A1 (2454A > G,-3798T> C); CYP1A2 (-163C > A,-2467delT); TPO (2173A > C, 769G > T); DIO2 (274A > G) in women from the oil organic synthesis plant and the control group with thyroid disease (autoimmune thyroiditis and nodular goiter) has been performed. Molecular genetic markers of predisposition to the development of thyroid disease are: GG genotype and allele G gene DIO2 (274A > G), CT and CC genotypes of the gene CYP1A1 (-3798T > C), associated with the development of nodular goiter, and DD genotypes TD CYP1A2 gene (-2467delT), associated with the development of autoimmune thyroiditis. There was shown an association of polymorphic variants of the gene DIO2 (274A > G) with elevated levels of antibodies to TPO and TPO gene (2173A > C) with elevated levels of free T4.

  10. UV-induced CYP1A1 gene expression in human cells is mediated by tryptophan.

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    Wei, Y D; Rannug, U; Rannug, A

    1999-04-01

    Induction of cytochrome P-4501A1 (CYP1A1) activity by UV has been observed earlier in animal studies via a mechanism that has not yet been resolved. Our previous data have indicated that formylated indolocarbazoles which are formed by UV irradiation of tryptophan solutions are very potent Ah-receptor agonists. To evaluate the effect of UV light on cytochrome P4501A1 gene expression, we studied the induction of CYP1A1 mRNA by UV irradiation of cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line), primary human blood lymphocytes and mouse Hepa-1 cells. The cells were exposed to UV light delivered by a bank of 6 Philips TL20/12RS sun lamps emitting primarily in the UVB range in the absence and presence of tryptophan. A semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-linked polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for analysis of gene expression in the treated cells. The results show that the CYP1A1 mRNA level induced by UV in the presence of tryptophan was higher than that induced by UV alone in both HaCaT cells and lymphocytes after 3 h of incubation post-UV irradiation. To find out if the induction by UV light is caused by the formation of an Ah receptor ligand, Hepa-1 wild-type and Ah receptor deficient c12 cell lines were applied. Wild-type (wt) cells were inducible either by the tryptophan photoproduct 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) or by UV-irradiation but very low or undetectable levels were observed in the c12 cells. This shows that the induction of gene expression by FICZ and UV is Ah receptor dependent. Together, these results indicate that UV-induced CYP1A1 gene expression in mammalian cells is mediated by an Ah receptor ligand formed from tryptophan. Thus, the photoproducts of tryptophan are suggested to be mediators of light via binding to the Ah receptor and as such also could have a role in light-regulated biological rhythms.

  11. TLR2 Controls Intestinal Carcinogen Detoxication by CYP1A1

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    Do, Khoa; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt

    2012-01-01

    of ligands for TLR2 of bacterial origin seems to be crucial for detoxication of luminal carcinogens by CYP1A1 in the intestine. This unprecedented finding indicates a complex interplay between the immune system of the host and intestinal bacteria with detoxication mechanisms. This highlights the relevance...

  12. Associations of CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms and risk of breast cancer in Indian women: a meta-analysis

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    Eloisa Singian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reported associations of CYP1A1 polymorphisms with breast cancer have been inconsistent. In this meta-analysis examining breast cancer associations of three CYP1A1 polymorphisms (M1, M2 and M4 among Indian women may yield information that may be of clinical and epidemiological use for this particular demography. We searched MEDLINE using PubMed and Embase for association studies. From seven published case-control studies, we estimated overall associations and applied subgroup analysis to explore differential effects. All three polymorphisms exhibited overall increased risk, significant in M1 (OR 1.61-1.65, p = 0.04 and M4 (OR 2.02-3.92, p = 0.02-0.04. Differential effects were observed only in the M1 polymorphism where M1 effects were significant in South Indians (OR 2.20-4.34, p < 0.0001 but not the North population, who were at reduced risk (OR 0.64-0.77, p = 0.03-0.55. These populations were not materially different in regard to M2 and M4 as did the women stratified by menopausal status. In this meta-analysis, M1 and M4 effects may render Indian women susceptible, but may be limited by heterogeneity of the studies. Differential effects of the M1 polymorphism in breast cancer render South Indians susceptible compared to those in the North.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and COMT genes in Greenlandic Inuit and Europeans

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    Ghisari, Mandana; Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2013-01-01

    . Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the genotype and allele frequencies of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 Ile462Val (rs1048943), CYP1B1 Leu432Val (rs1056836) and catechol-O-methyltransferase COMT Val158Met (rs4680) in Greenlandic Inuit (n=254) and Europeans (n=262) and explore...

  14. Associations between polymorphisms in the AHR and CYP1A1-CYP1A2 gene regions and habitual caffeine consumption.

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    Josse, Andrea R; Da Costa, Laura A; Campos, Hannia; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2012-09-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) from populations of European descent identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1A2 (CYP1A1-CYP1A2) genes that are associated with habitual caffeine and coffee consumption. We examined whether these SNPs (AHR: rs6968865 and rs4410790; CYP1A1-CYP1A2: rs2472297 and rs2470893) and 6 additional tag SNPs in the AHR gene were associated with habitual caffeine consumption in a Costa Rican population. Subjects were from a case-control study of gene-diet interactions and myocardial infarction. Subjects with hypertension or missing information on smoking, caffeine intake, or genotype were excluded. Subjects were genotyped by using polymerase chain reaction with mass spectrometry-based detection, and caffeine intake was assessed by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Compared with subjects who consumed caffeine/d, subjects who consumed >400 mg caffeine/d were more likely to be carriers of the T, C, or T allele for rs6968865, rs4410790, and rs2472297, respectively. The corresponding ORs and 95% CIs were 1.41 (1.03, 1.93), 1.41 (1.04, 1.92), and 1.55 (1.01, 2.36). Multivariate-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for rs6968865 were 1.44 (1.03, 2.00) for all subjects, 1.75 (1.16, 2.65) for nonsmokers, 1.15 (0.58, 2.30) for current smokers, 2.42 (1.45, 4.04) for subjects >57 y old, and 1.00 (0.65, 1.56) for subjects ≤57 y old. A similar effect modification was observed for rs4410790 but not for rs2472297. Our findings show that previous associations between SNPs in AHR and CYP1A1-CYP1A2 and caffeine and coffee consumption from GWASs in European populations are also observed in an ethnically distinct Costa Rican population, but age and smoking are important effect modifiers.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms in CYP1A1, CYP1B1, COMT, GSTP1 and NAT2 genes and association with bladder cancer risk in a French cohort.

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    Fontana, Luc; Delort, Laetitia; Joumard, Laurie; Rabiau, Nadege; Bosviel, Remy; Satih, Samir; Guy, Laurent; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Chamoux, Alain; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique J

    2009-05-01

    Tobacco smoking and environmental exposures are the main known risk factors for bladder cancer (BC) via exposure to chemical carcinogens. Genetic differences in the metabolism of chemicals have been suggested to be associated with individual susceptibility to BC. Polymorphisms in genes coding to metabolising enzymes, resulting in variation of carcinogen detoxification efficiency, may therefore change the response of individuals to chemical carcinogens and be associated with an increased BC risk. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between functional polymorphisms in CYP1A1, CYP1B1, COMT, GSTP1 and NAT2 genes and BC risk, through a hospital-based case-control study. The genotyping of 11 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) was carried out on DNA of 51 bladder cancer male patients and 45 male controls. The technique of MGB (Minor Groove Binder) probes that utilize allelic discrimination with the Taqman(R) method was used. Individuals with NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes had a significant increase in risk of BC compared to individuals with NAT2 rapid acetylators (OR adjusted for smoking status=2.70; 95% CI, 1.10-6.61). GSTP1 Ile(105)Val variants (deletion of one - Ile/Val- and two -Val/Val-, null genotype- copies) showed a marginal increased risk of BC with OR adjusted for smoking status of 2.27 (95% CI, 0.97-5.31) compared to individuals carrying wild-type genotype (Ile/Ile). No statistically significant effects on BC risk with CYP1A1, CYP11B1 and COMT genotypes were observed. The results are consistent with previous literature among Caucasian populations.

  16. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 gene is related to circulating PCB118 levels in a population-based sample

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    Lind, Lars [Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Penell, Johanna [Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Syvänen, Anne-Christine; Axelsson, Tomas [Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Ingelsson, Erik [Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Morris, Andrew P.; Lindgren, Cecilia [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Salihovic, Samira; Bavel, Bert van [MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro (Sweden); Lind, P. Monica, E-mail: monica.lind@medsci.uu.se [Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    Several of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), i.e. the dioxin-like PCBs, are known to induce the P450 enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 by activating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ah)-receptor. We evaluated if circulating levels of PCBs in a population sample were related to genetic variation in the genes encoding these CYPs. In the population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study (1016 subjects all aged 70), 21 SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes were genotyped. Sixteen PCB congeners were analysed by high-resolution chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/ HRMS). Of the investigated relationships between SNPs in the CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 and six PCBs (congeners 118, 126, 156, 169, 170 and 206) that captures >80% of the variation of all PCBs measured, only the relationship between CYP1A1 rs2470893 was significantly related to PCB118 levels following strict adjustment for multiple testing (p=0.00011). However, there were several additional SNPs in the CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that showed nominally significant associations with PCB118 levels (p-values in the 0.003–0.05 range). Further, several SNPs in the CYP1B1 gene were related to both PCB156 and PCB206 with p-values in the 0.005–0.05 range. Very few associations with p<0.05 were seen for PCB126, PCB169 or PCB170. Genetic variation in the CYP1A1 was related to circulating PCB118 levels in the general elderly population. Genetic variation in CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 might also be associated with other PCBs. - Highlights: • We studied the relationship between PCBs and the genetic variation in the CYP genes. • Cross sectional data from a cohort of elderly were analysed. • The PCB levels were evaluated versus 21 SNPs in three CYP genes. • PCB 118 was related to variation in the CYP1A1 gene.

  17. CYP1A1 genetic polymorphism and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on pulmonary function in the elderly: haplotype-based approach for gene-environment interaction.

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    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Kim, Jin Hee; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-08-29

    Lung function may be impaired by environmental pollutants not only acting alone, but working with genetic factors as well. Few epidemiologic studies have been conducted to explore the interplay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposure and genetic polymorphism on lung function in the elderly. For genetic polymorphism, haplotype is considered a more informative unit than single nucleotide polymorphism markers. Therefore, we examined the role of haplotype based-CYP1A1 polymorphism in the effect of PAHs exposure on lung function in 422 participants from a community-based panel of elderly adults in Seoul, Korea. Linear mixed effect models were fit to evaluate the association of PAH exposure markers (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol) with FVC, FEV₁, FEV₁/FVC, and FEF₂₅₋₇₅, and then the interaction with CYP1A1 haplotype constructed from three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the gene (rs4646421/rs4646422/rs1048943). Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels were inversely associated with FEV₁/FVC (ppolymorphisms on lung functions. Our findings suggest that PAH exposure producing 1-hydroxypyrene as a metabolite compromises lung function in the elderly, and that haplotype-based CYP1A1 polymorphism modifies the risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CYP1A1 m1 and m2 polymorphisms: genetic susceptibility to lung cancer Polimorfismos dos alelos m1 e m2 do gene CYP1A1: Susceptibilidade genética para o cancro do pulmão

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    Paula Mota

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is considered an environment-related disease that develops as a consequence of exposure to mutagenic agents, namely those present in tobacco. The CYP1A1 gene codifies the phase I enzyme aryl hydrocarbon hydroxilase (AHH belonging to the cytochrome P450 system that plays a major role in the bio-activation of tobacco procarcinogenes. Two CYP1A1 polymorphisms, m1 (T6235C transition and m2 (A4889G transition, are associated with greater enzymatic activity and have been described as genetic susceptibility factors for lung cancer. The aim of this study was to verify if this association holds true in blood samples of 175 lung cancer patients and 217 non-cancer patients from Portugal’s midlands region. The samples were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay. The allelic frequencies of the mutant alleles were 0.12 for allele C and 1.14 for allele G in the control population. The results were not statistically different from those alleles in the patient population. There was also no statistically significant difference in genotype distribution in lung cancer patients and controls even when combining high risk genotypes. In our control sample, as in other populations of different ethnic origin, both polymorphisms also seem to be in linkage disequilibrium. We conclude that in this sample of the Portuguese population, CYP1A1 m1 and m2 polymorphisms are too rare to be of clinical relevance, and do not seem to be associated with susceptibility to lung cancer.O cancro do pulmão é considerado uma doença relacionada com o meio ambiente, consequência da exposição a agentes mutagénicos, nomeadamente os presentes no fumo do tabaco. O gene CYP1A1 codifica a enzima aril hidrocarboneto hidroxilase (AHH, da fase I, do sistema multienzimático do citocromo P450, que desempenha uma função preponderante na bioactivação dos procarcinogénios do tabaco. Dois polimorfismos do CYP1A1, m1 (transição T6235C e m2 (transição A

  19. Placental mitochondrial DNA and CYP1A1 gene methylation as molecular signatures for tobacco smoke exposure in pregnant women and the relevance for birth weight.

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    Janssen, Bram G; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Byun, Hyang-Min; Roels, Harry A; Cuypers, Ann; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Nawrot, Tim S

    2017-01-04

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy results in an increased risk of low birth weight through perturbations in the utero-placental exchange. Epigenetics and mitochondrial function in fetal tissues might be molecular signatures responsive to in utero tobacco smoke exposure. In the framework of the ENVIRONAGE birth cohort, we investigated the effect of self-reported tobacco smoke exposure during pregnancy on birth weight and the relation with placental tissue markers such as, (1) relative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content as determined by real-time quantitative PCR, (2) DNA methylation of specific loci of mtDNA (D-loop and MT-RNR1), and (3) DNA methylation of the biotransformation gene CYP1A1 (the last two determined by bisulfite-pyrosequencing). The total pregnant mother sample included 255 non-smokers, 65 former-smokers who had quit smoking before pregnancy, and 62 smokers who continued smoking during pregnancy. Smokers delivered newborns with a birth weight on average 208 g lower [95% confidence interval (CI) -318 to -99, p = 0.0002] than mothers who did not smoke during pregnancy. In the smoker group, the relative mtDNA content was lower (-21.6%, 95% CI -35.4 to -4.9%, p = 0.01) than in the non-smoker group; whereas, absolute mtDNA methylation levels of MT-RNR1 were higher (+0.62%, 95% CI 0.21 to 1.02%, p = 0.003). Lower CpG-specific methylation of CYP1A1 in placental tissue (-4.57%, 95% CI -7.15 to -1.98%, p methylation nor any other investigated molecular signature was observed for the association between tobacco smoke exposure and birth weight. mtDNA content, methylation of specific loci of mtDNA, and CYP1A1 methylation in placental tissue may serve as molecular signatures for the association between gestational tobacco smoke exposure and low birth weight.

  20. Polimorfismos dos alelos m1 e m2 do gene CYP1A1: Susceptibilidade genética para o cancro do pulmão

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    Paula Mota

    2010-01-01

    to mutagenic agents, namely those present in tobacco. The CYP1A1 gene codifies the phase I enzyme aryl hydrocarbon hydroxilase (AHH belonging to the cytochrome P450 system that plays a major role in the bio-activation of tobacco procarcinogenes. Two CYP1A1 polymorphisms, m1 (T6235C transition and m2 (A4889G transition, are associated with greater enzymatic activity and have been described as genetic susceptibility factors for lung cancer.The aim of this study was to verify if this association holds true in blood samples of 175 lung cancer pa tients and 217 non-cancer patients from Portugal’s midlands region. The samples were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay. The allelic frequencies of the mutant alleles were 0.12 for allele C and 1.14 for allele G in the control population. The results were not statistically different from those alleles in the patient population. There was also no statistically significant difference in genotype distribution in lung cancer patients and controls even when combining high risk genotypes. In our control sample, as in other populations of different ethnic origin, both polymorphisms also seem to be in linkage disequilibrium. We conclude that in this sample of the Portuguese population, CYP1A1 m1 and m2 polymorphisms are too rare to be of clinical relevance, and do not seem to be associated with susceptibility to lung cancer.Rev Port Pneumol 2010; XVI (1: 89-98 Palavras-chave: Cancro do pulmão, tabaco, citocromo p450, CYP1A1, desequilíbrio de ligação, Key-words: Lung cancer, smoking, cytochrome P450, CYP1A1, linkage disequilibrium

  1. [The role of mutation of gene cyp1A1 and benzapilene in cytogenetic changes of urinary tract epitheliocytes in oil industry workers employed in the oil fields of the North of West Siberia].

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    Il'inskikh, N N; Il'inskikh, E N; Il'inskikh, I N; Iamkovaia, E V

    2011-01-01

    The examination of 477 oil industry workers and office personnel (control) employed in the oil fields of the North of Tomsk and Tyumen regions has detected increased number of epithelyocytes with micronuclei and an elevated urine level ofbenzapilene in workers employed in oil production. Especially pronounced changes of the above parameters were observed in men with mutant alleles Val of CYP1A1 gene. An enhanced mutation process in oil production workers may be due to a resultant action of different factors on human genome. Involved may be both mutagens and factors of comutagenic nature. The results obtained in this study suggest a conclusion about urgent need of introduction of new scientifically validated criteria of selection of personnel for oil production in the North of the West Siberia. Health examination of the applicants must include genotyping.

  2. Análise de polimorfismos nos genes CYP1A1, CYP17, COMT, GSTM1, receptor de estrogênios e progesterona em mulheres com carcinoma de ovário

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Daniela Batista [UNIFESP

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the association between polymorphisms of cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17), progesterone receptor (PROGINS), gluthatione S-transferase (GSTM1), Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), and cytochrome P450c1A1 CYP1A1) genes in patients with and without ovarian cancer and to analyze the eventual association of these polymorphisms with clinical and pathological variables. Methods: A total of 103 ovarian cancer patients were seen at the Oncological Surgery Outpatients Clinic, Depart...

  3. Camel milk modulates the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korashy, Hesham M; El Gendy, Mohamed A M; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; El-Kadi, Ayman O

    2012-01-01

    There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), and cancer-protective genes, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1) and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1), in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE)-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  4. Camel Milk Modulates the Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Regulated Genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in Murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 Cells

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    Hesham M. Korashy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1, and cancer-protective genes, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1 and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  5. Interaction between maternal passive smoking during pregnancy and CYP1A1 and GSTs polymorphisms on spontaneous preterm delivery.

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    Yi-Juan Luo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to examine the association between maternal passive smoking during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous PTD and to explore the potential interaction of the single or joint gene polymorphism of CYP1A1 and GSTs with maternal passive smoking on the risk of spontaneous PTD. METHOD: We investigated whether the association between maternal passive smoking and PTD can be modified by 2 metabolic genes, i.e. cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1 and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, in a case-control study with 198 spontaneous preterm and 524 term deliveries in Shenzhen and Foshan, China. We used logistic regression to test gene-passive smoking interaction, adjusting for maternal socio-demographics and prepregnancy body mass index. RESULTS: Overall, maternal passive smoking during pregnancy was associated with higher risk of PTD (adjusted odds ratio = 2.20 [95% confidence interval: 1.56-3.12]. This association was modified by CYP1A1 and GSTs together, but not by any single genotype. For cross-categories of CYP1A1 Msp I and GSTs, maternal passive smoking was associated with higher risk of PTD among those women with CYP1A1 "TC/CC"+ GSTs "null", but not among women with other genotypes; and this interaction was significant (OR = 2.66 [95% CI: 1.19-5.97]; P-value: 0.017. For cross-categories of CYP1A1 BsrD I and GSTs, maternal passive smoking was associated with higher risk of PTD only among those women with CYP1A1"AG/GG"+ GSTs "null", but not among women with other genotypes; and this interaction was significant (OR = 3.00 [95% CI: 1.17-7.74]; P-value: 0.023. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of CYP1A1 and GSTs can help to identify vulnerable pregnant women who are subject to high risk of spontaneous PTD due to passive smoking.

  6. Association Studies of CYP1A1 Exon7 Polymorphism and -GSTM1 Interaction with Esophageal Cancer Risk: a Meta-Analysis in the Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Ping; Xu, Da-Feng; Xu, Wei-Hua; Ma, Zhi-Chao; Yao, Jia; Fu, Sheng-Miao

    2016-09-01

    Although many epidemiological studies have investigated the CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphism and -GSTM1 interaction with esophageal cancer (EC), definite conclusions cannot be drawn. This study was conducted to explore this association in the Chinese population using meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biology Medicine databases published through August 2015. The association of CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphisms and EC risk was estimated by odds ratio (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In addition, the interaction between the CYP1A1 exon7 and GSTM1 genotypes was assessed. A total of 13 case-control studies including 1781 EC cases and 1996 controls were included in this metaanalysis. Overall, significantly increased EC risk was associated with the CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphism (G vs. A OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.14 - 1.64; GG vs. AA: OR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.22 - 2.79; GG vs. AG: OR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.01 - 1.96; GG + AG vs. AA: OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.28 - 1.68; GG vs. AA + AG: OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10 - 2.31). In a subgroup analyses stratified by geographic areas, histopathology type and source of controls, the significant risk was found in hospital-based population, in South and North China. Analysis of CYP1A1- GSTM1 interaction did find synergistic interaction between these two genes. This meta-analysis provides the evidence that CYP1A1 exon7 polymorphism may contribute to the EC development in the Chinese population, and CYP1A1- GSTM1 interaction might elevate the risk.

  7. Distribution of composite CYP1A1 genotypes in Africans, African-Americans and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garte, S J; Trachman, J; Crofts, F; Toniolo, P; Buxbaum, J; Bayo, S; Taioli, E

    1996-01-01

    We present the genotype distribution of the CYP1A1 gene in a sample of over 300 subjects of various ethnic origins. Genotypes are presented as composites of eight possible alleles, taking into account the three major polymorphisms, including a recently described African-American-specific MspI RFLP. A new nomenclature system is presented for clarifying the various haplotypes. Interesting interracial differences in allelic frequencies and admixture rates were observed for the three polymorphisms. Because of the importance of the CYP1A1 gene (which encodes the aromatic hydrocarbon hydroxylase) as a biomarker of genetic susceptibility to environmental carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, these data may provide a useful reference for future studies of relationships between CYP1A1 genotype and disease susceptibility.

  8. CYP1A1 m1 and m2 polymorphisms: genetic susceptibility to lung cancer

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    Paula Mota

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is considered an environment-related disease that develops as a consequence of exposure to mutagenic agents, namely those present in tobacco. The CYP1A1 gene codifies the phase I enzyme aryl hydrocarbon hydroxilase (AHH belonging to the cytochrome P450 system that plays a major role in the bio-activation of tobacco procarcinogenes. Two CYP1A1 polymorphisms, m1 (T6235C transition and m2 (A4889G transition, are associated with greater enzymatic activity and have been described as genetic susceptibility factors for lung cancer.The aim of this study was to verify if this association holds true in blood samples of 175 lung cancer patients and 217 non-cancer patients from Portugal's midlands region. The samples were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay.The allelic frequencies of the mutant alleles were 0.12 for allele C and 1.14 for allele G in the control population. The results were not statistically different from those alleles in the patient population. There was also no statistically significant difference in genotype distribution in lung cancer patients and controls even when combining high risk genotypes. In our control sample, as in other populations of different ethnic origin, both polymorphisms also seem to be in linkage disequilibrium. We conclude that in this sample of the Portuguese population, CYP1A1 m1 and m2 polymorphisms are too rare to be of clinical relevance, and do not seem to be associated with susceptibility to lung cancer. Resumo: O cancro do pulmão é considerado uma doença relacionada com o meio ambiente, consequência da exposição a agentes mutagénicos, nomeadamente os presentes no fumo do tabaco. O gene CYP1A1 codifica a enzima aril hidrocarboneto hidroxilase (AHH, da fase I, do sistema multienzimático do citocromo P450, que desempenha uma função preponderante na bioactivação dos procarcinogénios do tabaco. Dois polimorfismos do CYP1A1, m1 (transi

  9. Differential inducibility of rat pulmonary CYP1A1 by cigarette smoke and wood smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iba, Michael M; Fung, Jacqueline; Chung, Le; Zhao, Jason; Winnik, Bozena; Buckley, Brian T; Chen, Lung Chi; Zelikoff, Judith T; Kou, Yu Ru

    2006-07-14

    Mainstream cigarette smoke (CS) and wood smoke (WS) were compared in terms of their pulmonary CYP1A1 inducibility. The inducibility was assessed in pulmonary microsomes from rats exposed to freshly generated CS or WS and in rat lung explants treated with extracts of CS or WS total particulate matter (TPM). Mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100, an effect established for CS and WS in previous studies, was also examined as a test of the biological activity of the smoke samples in the present study. Pulmonary microsomal CYP1A1 activity (as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase), was induced 4.4-fold and 8.3-fold following exposure of rats to smoke from a single cigarette and three cigarettes, respectively, relative to the activity in control rats. The induction was paralleled by elevated CYP1A1 mRNA level (by northern blot analysis). WS, in contrast to CS, induced neither pulmonary CYP1A1 activity nor mRNA in exposed rats. CYP1A1 protein (by western blot analysis) was induced in cultured rat lung explants by extracts of CS TPM or by a high concentration (496 nM) of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) but not by extracts of WS TPM or a low concentration (0.110 nM) of B[a]P. The induction by high B[a]P concentration was inhibited by extracts of CS or WS TPM, with the inhibition by extracts of WS TPM (75%) being greater than that by extracts of CS TPM (31%). Extracts of CS TPM were as mutagenic as extracts of WS TPM to Salmonella typhimurium TA98 but were more mutagenic than extracts of WS TPM to Salmonella typhimurium TA100. The results show that CS and WS are mutagenic but that WS differs from CS in its inability to induce pulmonary CYP1A1.

  10. Epigenetic Determinants of CYP1A1 Induction by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist 3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126

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    Sabine U. Vorrink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, including cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A1, are regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. 3,3',4,4',5-Penta chlorobiphenyl (PCB 126 is a potent ligand for AhR and can thus induce the expression of CYP1A1. Interestingly, we observed that human carcinoma cell lines derived from different types of epithelial cells displayed divergent degrees of CYP1A1 induction after exposure to PCB 126. Since epigenetic mechanisms are known to be involved in cell type-specific gene expression, we sought to assess the epigenetic determinants of CYP1A1 induction in these carcinoma cell lines. In contrast to HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells, HeLa cervical carcinoma cells showed significantly lower levels of CYP1A1 mRNA expression following PCB 126 exposure. Our results show that the two cell lines maintained differences in the chromatin architecture along the CYP1A1 promoter region. Furthermore, treatment with the epigenetic modifiers, trichostatin A (TSA and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC, significantly increased the expression of CYP1A1 after PCB 126 treatment in HeLa cells. However, we did not observe apparent differences in methylation levels or specific location of CpG DNA methylation between the two cell lines in the analyzed CYP1A1 promoter region. Taken together, our findings suggest that the differences in CYP1A1 expression between HepG2 and HeLa cells are due to differences in the chromatin architecture of the CYP1A1 promoter and thus establish a role of epigenetic regulation in cell-specific CYP1A1 expression.

  11. Induction of CYP1A1 in rat liver after ingestion of mussels contaminated by Erika fuel oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaty, Sylvie; Rodius, Francois; Vasseur, Paule [Universite de Metz: CNRS UMR 7146, Lab., Interactions Ecotoxicite, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes, Metz (France); Lanhers, Marie-Claire; Burnel, Daniel [Universite de Nancy I, Faculte de Medecine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2008-02-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known to be specific inducers of CYP1A1 expression in vertebrates. CYP1A1 induction has been widely studied in mammal cell cultures or in vivo, in conditions of exposure to single PAH chemicals. Here, we studied the possible transfer of PAH to rats via the food chain in environmentally-relevant conditions. Rats were fed for 2 days with PAH-contaminated mussels sampled on coasts polluted by the Erika oil-tanker wreck. CYP1A1 expression was investigated by measuring mRNA levels and EROD enzymatic activity over the 84 h following the last ingestion. CYP1A1 expression in treated rats was compared to controls fed with mussels free from PAH contamination. The results showed that ingestion of PAH-contaminated mussels induced CYP1A1 mRNA and EROD activity. Increase of transcriptional level and of EROD activity was transient with a peak within 12 h and a return to basal levels within 36 h. (orig.)

  12. The CYP1A1 and GSTM1 Genetic Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Endometriosis in Women from South India

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    Roya Rozati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endometriosis is one of the most commonly encountered benign problems in gynaecology. It is frequently associated with chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia and dyspareunia, which lead to infertility. We determined the possible association between CYP1A1 MspI and GSTM1 null polymorphism in the pathogenesis of endometriosis.Materials and Methods: Ninety seven cases of endometriosis diagnosed by laparoscopy and one hundred two women without endometriosis were laparoscopically confirmed. Genomic DNA of heparinised blood were collected and null gene polymorphisms in GSTM1 and CYP1A1 genes coding for detoxification enzymes were identified by the PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP method.Results: The GSTM1 null mutation showed significant association (p<0.03 found between risk of endometriosis and GSTM1 null deletion with an odd ratio (OR of 2.12, 95% CI: 1.04-4.31.The number of null genotype was more in stage III-IV cases compared to stage I-II. In contrast, we did not find significant association with the CYP1A1 MspI genotype.Conclusion: The study results suggest that women having high risk association with the GSTM1null polymorphism, but no association with the CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism for endometriosis in south Indian women.

  13. Dopamine D2-Receptor Antagonists Down-Regulate CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 in the Rat Liver.

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    P Harkitis

    Full Text Available Dopaminergic systems regulate the release of several hormones including growth hormone (GH, thyroid hormones, insulin, glucocorticoids and prolactin (PRL that play significant roles in the regulation of various Cytochrome P450 (CYP enzymes. The present study investigated the role of dopamine D2-receptor-linked pathways in the regulation of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 that belong to a battery of genes controlled by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR and play a crucial role in the metabolism and toxicity of numerous environmental toxicants. Inhibition of dopamine D2-receptors with sulpiride (SULP significantly repressed the constitutive and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P-induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B expression in the rat liver. The expression of AhR, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 and AhR nuclear translocator (ARNT was suppressed by SULP in B[a]P-treated livers, whereas the AhRR expression was increased by the drug suggesting that the SULP-mediated repression of the CYP1 inducibility is due to inactivation of the AhR regulatory system. At signal transduction level, the D2-mediated down-regulation of constitutive CYP1A1/2 and CYP1B1 expression appears to be mediated by activation of the insulin/PI3K/AKT pathway. PRL-linked pathways exerting a negative control on various CYPs, and inactivation of the glucocorticoid-linked pathways that positively control the AhR-regulated CYP1 genes, may also participate in the SULP-mediated repression of both, the constitutive and induced CYP1 expression. The present findings indicate that drugs acting as D2-dopamine receptor antagonists can modify several hormone systems that regulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, and may affect the toxicity and carcinogenicity outcome of numerous toxicants and pre-carcinogenic substances. Therefore, these drugs could be considered as a part of the strategy to reduce the risk of exposure to environmental pollutants and pre-carcinogens.

  14. The interaction between smoking and CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism on lung cancer: a meta-analysis in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-P; Wang, C-P; Li, L-H; Tang, Y-F; Li, W-C

    2017-09-01

    Many studies have examined the interaction between CYP1A1 MspI gene polymorphism and smoking for the risk of lung cancer risk in Chinese, but their results have been inconsistent. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed to ascertain this issue. PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid and other Chinese databases were searched to include all the relevant studies. Smoking status was categorised as 'smokers' and 'non-smokers.' The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fixed or random effect model. Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity, source of control and geographical location were also conducted. This meta-analysis identified 13 studies containing 2248 lung cases and 3079 controls. Overall, a significant association between lung cancer and the variants of CYP1A1 MspI was found among smokers (type B and type C combined vs. type A: OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.15-3.11, P = 0.000 for heterogeneity), whereas not found among non-smokers. Similar to the overall results, stratified analyses showed that the increased risk of lung cancer was observed in population-based studies and north China among smokers (OR = 1.65, 95%CI = 1.03-2.66; OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.14-3.53). Our meta-analysis showed that there was an interaction between the CYP1A1 MspI and smoking on the risk of lung cancer in the Chinese population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Chul [Department of Food Science and Culinary, International University of Korea, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression.

  16. CYP1A1, CYP1B1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genetic variants and breast cancer risk in Mexican women

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    Angélica García-Martínez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate if variants in the genes CYP1A1 (T3801C and A4889G, CYP1B1 (G119T, GSTM1 (indel and GSTT1 (indel are associated with breast cancer (BC among Mexican women. Materials and methods. 952 incident cases with histologically confirmed BC were matched by age(± 5 years and zone of residence with 998 healthy population controls. Genetic variants in genes CYP1A1, CYP1B1, GSTM1 and GSTT1were genotyped by allelic discrimination and multiplex PCR. In a subsample of women, 105 markers for ancestry were determined. Results. An increased BC risk, independent of other BC risk factors, was observed among carriers of CYP1B1 G119T genotype (T/T vs. G/G: OR=1.9; 95%CI 1.4-2.5. Conclusion. Our results support the existence of genetic susceptibility for BC conferred by CYP1B1 G119T variant among Mexican women.

  17. Effects of anthocyanins on the AhR-CYP1A1 signaling pathway in human hepatocytes and human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenickova, Alzbeta; Anzenbacherova, Eva; Pavek, Petr; Soshilov, Anatoly A; Denison, Michael S; Zapletalova, Michaela; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2013-07-31

    Anthocyanins are plant pigments occurring in flowers and berry fruits. Since a phenomenon of food-drug interactions is increasingly emerging, we examined the effects of 21 major anthocyanins and the extracts from 3 food supplements containing anthocyanins on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 signaling pathway in human hepatocytes and human hepatic HepG2 and intestinal LS174T cancer cells. Pelargonidin-3-O-rutinoside (PEL-2) and cyanidin-3,5-O-diglucoside (CYA-3) dose-dependently activated AhR, as revealed by gene reporter assay. PEL-2 and CYA-3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA but not protein in HepG2 and LS174T cells. Neither compounds induced CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in four different primary human hepatocytes cultures. The effects of PEL-2 and CYA-3 on AhR occurred by ligand-dependent and ligand-independent mechanisms, respectively, as demonstrated by ligand binding assay. In a direct enzyme inhibition assay, none of the antocyanins tested inhibited the CYP1A1 marker activity to less than 50% even at 100 μM concentration. PEL-2 and CYA-3 at 100 μM inhibited CYP1A1 to 79% and 65%, respectively. In conclusion, with exception of PEL-2 and CYA-3, there were no effects of 19 major anthocyanins and 3 food supplements containing anthocyanins on AhR-CYP1A1 signaling, implying zero potential of these compounds for food-drug interactions with respect to AhR-CYP1A1 pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 Hepatic Enzymes after Oral Administration of Chios Mastic Gum to Male Wistar Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanou, Efrosini S.; Kyriakopoulou, Katerina; Emmanouil, Christina; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Machera, Kyriaki

    2014-01-01

    Chios mastic gum (CMG), a resin derived from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, is known since ancient times for its pharmacological activities. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes are among the most involved in the biotransformation of chemicals and the metabolic activation of pro-carcinogens. Previous studies referring to the modulation of these enzymes by CMG have revealed findings of unclear biological and toxicological significance. For this purpose, the modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes in the liver of male Wistar rats following oral administration of CMG extract (CMGE), at the levels of mRNA and CYP1A1 enzyme activity, was compared to respective enzyme modulation following oral administration of a well-known bioactive natural product, caffeine, as control compound known to involve hepatic enzymes in its metabolism. mRNA levels of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 were measured by reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction and their relative quantification was calculated. CYP1A1 enzyme induction was measured through the activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD). The results indicated that administration of CMGE at the recommended pharmaceutical dose does not induce significant transcriptional modulation of Cyp1a1/2 and subsequent enzyme activity induction of CYP1A1 while effects of the same order of magnitude were observed in the same test system following the administration of caffeine at the mean daily consumed levels. The outcome of this study further confirms the lack of any toxicological or biological significance of the specific findings on liver following the administration of CMGE. PMID:24950217

  19. Modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 hepatic enzymes after oral administration of Chios mastic gum to male Wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrosini S Katsanou

    Full Text Available Chios mastic gum (CMG, a resin derived from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, is known since ancient times for its pharmacological activities. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes are among the most involved in the biotransformation of chemicals and the metabolic activation of pro-carcinogens. Previous studies referring to the modulation of these enzymes by CMG have revealed findings of unclear biological and toxicological significance. For this purpose, the modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes in the liver of male Wistar rats following oral administration of CMG extract (CMGE, at the levels of mRNA and CYP1A1 enzyme activity, was compared to respective enzyme modulation following oral administration of a well-known bioactive natural product, caffeine, as control compound known to involve hepatic enzymes in its metabolism. mRNA levels of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 were measured by reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction and their relative quantification was calculated. CYP1A1 enzyme induction was measured through the activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD. The results indicated that administration of CMGE at the recommended pharmaceutical dose does not induce significant transcriptional modulation of Cyp1a1/2 and subsequent enzyme activity induction of CYP1A1 while effects of the same order of magnitude were observed in the same test system following the administration of caffeine at the mean daily consumed levels. The outcome of this study further confirms the lack of any toxicological or biological significance of the specific findings on liver following the administration of CMGE.

  20. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 polymorphisms and risk of lung cancer among never smokers: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzlaff, A S; Cote, M L; Bock, C H; Land, S J; Santer, S K; Schwartz, D R; Schwartz, A G

    2005-12-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily of enzymes catalyse one of the first steps in the metabolism of carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitroaromatics and arylamines. Polymorphisms within the CYP1A1 gene have been shown to be associated with lung cancer risk, predominantly among Asian populations. Despite functional evidence of a possible role of CYP1B1 in lung cancer susceptibility, only a few studies have evaluated polymorphisms in this gene in relation to lung cancer susceptibility. This population-based study evaluates polymorphisms in both of these CYP genes within never smokers, most of whom had environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. Cases (n = 160) were identified through the metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program, and age, sex and race-matched population-based controls (n = 181) were identified using random digit dialing. Neither CYP1A1 MspI nor CYP1A1 Ile(462)Val was associated with lung cancer susceptibility among Caucasians or African-Americans. Among Caucasians, however, CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val was significantly associated with lung cancer susceptibility odds ratio (OR) for at least one valine allele = 2.87 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.63-5.07]. Combinations of this Phase I enzyme polymorphism along with selected Phase II enzyme polymorphisms (GSTM1 null, GSTP1 Ile(105)Val and NQO1 C(609)T) were evaluated. The combination of CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val and NQO1 C(609)T appeared to be associated with the highest risk of lung cancer (OR = 4.14, 95% CI 1.60-10.74), although no combinations differed significantly from the risk associated with CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val alone. When individuals were stratified by household ETS exposure (yes/no), CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val alone and in combination with Phase II enzyme polymorphisms was more strongly associated with increased lung cancer susceptibility among those with at least some household ETS exposure. Additional studies will be required to further validate these findings

  1. Changes in first trimester fetal CYP1A1 and AHRR DNA methylation and mRNA expression in response to exposure to maternal cigarette smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fa, Svetlana; Larsen, Trine Vilsbøll; Bilde, Katrine

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking increases the risk of intrauterine growth retardation, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and diseases later in life. Exposure can result in postnatal global and gene-specific DNA methylation changes, with the latter well documented for the CYP1A1 and AHRR...

  2. CYP1A1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and TP53 Polymorphisms and Risk of Gallbladder Cancer in Bolivians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kazuaki; Loza, Ernesto; Roig, Guido Villa-Gomez; Nozaki, Ryoko; Asai, Takao; Ikoma, Toshikazu; Tsuchiya, Yasuo; Kiyohara, Chikako; Yamamoto, Masaharu; Nakamura, Kazutoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Plurinational State of Bolivia (Bolivia) has a high incidence rate of gallbladder cancer (GBC). However, the genetic and environmental risk factors for GBC development are not well understood. We aimed to assess whether or not cytochrome P450 (CYP1A1), glutathione S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1), theta 1 (GSTT1) and tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53) genetic polymorphisms modulate GBC susceptibility in Bolivians. This case-control study covered 32 patients with GBC and 86 healthy subjects. GBC was diagnosed on the basis of histological analysis of tissues at the Instituto de Gastroenterologia Boliviano-Japones (IGBJ); the healthy subjects were members of the staff at the IGBJ. Distributions of the CYP1A1 rs1048943 and TP53 rs1042522 polymorphisms were assayed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletion polymorphisms were detected by a multiplex PCR assay. The frequency of the GSTM1 null genotype was significantly higher in GBC patients than in the healthy subjects (odds ratio [OR], 2.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-5.37; age-adjusted OR, 3.53; 95% CI, 1.29-9.66; age- and sex-adjusted OR, 3.40; 95% CI, 1.24-9.34). No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of CYP1A1, GSTT1, or TP53 polymorphisms between the two groups. The GSTM1 null genotype was associated with increased GBC risk in Bolivians. Additional studies with larger control and case populations are warranted to confirm the association between the GSTM1 deletion polymorphism and GBC risk suggested in the present study.

  3. Phenotype refinement strengthens the association of AHR and CYP1A1 genotype with caffeine consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, George; Taylor, Amy E; Davey Smith, George; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-01-01

    Two genetic loci, one in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and 1A2 (CYP1A2) gene region (rs2472297) and one near the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene (rs6968865), have been associated with habitual caffeine consumption. We sought to establish whether a more refined and comprehensive assessment of caffeine consumption would provide stronger evidence of association, and whether a combined allelic score comprising these two variants would further strengthen the association. We used data from between 4,460 and 7,520 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a longitudinal birth cohort based in the United Kingdom. Self-report data on coffee, tea and cola consumption (including consumption of decaffeinated drinks) were available at multiple time points. Both genotypes were individually associated with total caffeine consumption, and with coffee and tea consumption. There was no association with cola consumption, possibly due to low levels of consumption in this sample. There was also no association with measures of decaffeinated drink consumption, indicating that the observed association is most likely mediated via caffeine. The association was strengthened when a combined allelic score was used, accounting for up to 1.28% of phenotypic variance. This was not associated with potential confounders of observational association. A combined allelic score accounts for sufficient phenotypic variance in caffeine consumption that this may be useful in Mendelian randomization studies. Future studies may therefore be able to use this combined allelic score to explore causal effects of habitual caffeine consumption on health outcomes.

  4. CYP1A1, CYP2E1 Y RIESGO A CÁNCER GÁSTRICO EN UNA POBLACIÓN COLOMBIANA DE ALTA INCIDENCIA CYP1A1, CYP2E1 AND GASTRIC CANCER RISK IN A HIGH-INCIDENCE COLOMBIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Castaño-Molina

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue probar la hipótesis de que en casos y controles, de una población colombiana con alta incidencia de cáncer gástrico, muestran diferencias significativas entre las frecuencias de los polimorfismos genéticos CYP1A1*2A y CYP2E1*5A; y a la vez, probar si hay diferencias entre el hábito del tabaquismo, el consumo de alcohol y el estrato socioeconómico; así como también sus posibles interacciones. Durante dos años consecutivos se diagnosticaron y confirmaron ochenta y siete casos nuevos de pacientes afectados por cáncer gástrico y se colectaron igual número de controles pareados por edad y del mismo grupo poblacional, pertenecientes a la comunidad “paisa” del departamento de Caldas. Se genotipificaron por medio de PCR-RFLPs para los polimorfismos CYP1A1*2A y CYP2E1*5A. Además, se tuvo en cuenta las variables socioeconómicas y el estilo de vida, con respecto al tabaquismo y al consumo de alcohol. Los resultados encontrados sugieren que los portadores del alelo CYP2E1-c2, asociado con mayor actividad metabólica, tienen mayor riesgo a desarrollar cáncer gástrico (OR=3,6 CI95% 1,6-8,1/p=0,002. En contraste, la frecuencia del alelo CYP1A1-m2, también asociado con mayor actividad enzimática, mostró similar frecuencia entre los dos grupos. El tabaquismo y el estrato socioeconómico bajo, también mostraron diferencias significativas. En conclusión, se evidencia una interacción significativa entre gen-ambiente, particularmente entre el tabaquismo y los alelos bioactiavantes CYP2E1-c2 y CYP1A1-m2, que pueden alterar la susceptibilidad a cáncer gástrico en esta región Andina del noroeste de Sur América caracterizada por alta incidencia de esta neoplasiaThe aim was to test the hypothesis that some cases and controls, in a Colombian population with a high incidence of gastric cancer, show significant differences among the frequencies of CYP1A1*2A, CYP2E1*5A gene polymorphisms and simultaneously to test the

  5. Effects of artificial sweeteners on the AhR- and GR-dependent CYP1A1 expression in primary human hepatocytes and human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenickova, Alzbeta; Pecova, Michaela; Bachleda, Petr; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2013-12-01

    Food constituents may cause a phenomenon of food-drug interactions. In the current study, we examined the effects of artificial sweeteners (aspartame, acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharin) on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-dependent expression of CYP1A1 in human hepatocytes, hepatic HepG2 and intestinal LS174T cancer cell lines. Sweeteners were tested in concentrations up to those occurring in non-alcoholic beverages. Basal and ligand-inducible AhR- and GR-dependent reporter gene activation in stably transfected HepG2 and HeLa cells, respectively, were not affected by either of the sweeteners tested after 24h of incubation. The expression of CYP1A1 mRNA and protein in primary cultures of human hepatocytes and in LS174T and HepG2 cells was not induced by any of the tested sweeteners. Overall, aspartame, acesulfame, saccharin and cyclamate had no effects on CYP1A1 expression and transcriptional activities of AhR and GR. These data imply the safety of artificial sweeteners in terms of interference with AhR, GR and CYP1A1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of interaction between CYP1A1 genetic polymorphisms and smoking on coronary artery disease in the Han of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dao-Di; Xie, Wei; Yu, Zai-Xin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association of CYP1A1 genotype and additional gene-smoking interaction with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk based on a Chinese case-control study. A total of 1862 participants (1134 men, 728 women) were selected, including 620 CAD patients and 1242 normal controls. Logistic regression was performed to investigate association of CYP1A1 genotype, gene-gene, and gene-smoking interaction with CAD. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) was used to screen the best gene-gene and gene-smoking interaction combination, cross-validation consistency, the testing balanced accuracy, and the sign test, to assess if each selected interaction was calculated. The carriers of homozygous mutant of rs4886605 polymorphism and heterozygous of rs4646903 are associated with increased CAD risk than those with wild-type homozygotes; OR (95% CI) was 1.98 (1.53-2.61) and 1.58 (1.24-1.96), respectively. The carriers of homozygous mutant of rs1048943 polymorphism is associated with decreased CAD risk than those with wild-type homozygotes, OR (95% CI) = 0.75 (0.60-0.93). GMDR model indicated a potential gene-gene interaction between rs4886605 and rs4646903 and a potential gene-smoking interaction between rs4886605 and smoking. Participants with rs4886605-CT or TT and rs4646903-TC or CC genotype have the highest CAD risk, compared to participants with rs4886605-CC and rs4646903-TT genotype; OR (95% CI) was 2.72 (2.03-3.61). In addition, we also found that smokers with rs4886605-CT or TT genotype have the highest CAD risk, compared to nonsmokers with rs4886605-CC genotype; OR (95% CI) was 3.07 (2.23-3.96). rs4886605 and rs4646903 are associated with increased CAD risk, but rs1048943 is associated with decreased CAD risk; we also found gene-gene interaction between rs4886605 and rs4646903 and gene-environment interaction between rs4886605 and smoking.

  7. Association of CYP1A1*2A Polymorphism with Idiopathic Non-Obstructive Azoospermia in A South Indian Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalaka Ramgir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is the inability of a couple to conceive after one and a half years of unprotected sex. Male infertility, which accounts for almost half of infertility cases, is considered as a major problem all over the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CYP1A1 polymorphisms with idiopathic non-obstructive azoospermia in a South Indian cohort. Materials and Methods: An experimental study was conducted with idiopathic nonobstructive azoospermia. A total of 120 infertile and 80 fertile samples were collected, and DNA was then extracted from all samples. The CYP1A1*2A polymorphism genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. Results: The genotype distribution of CYP1A1*2A polymorphism showed significant difference between patients and controls. Moreover, the CC genotype was associated with decreased risk of idiopathic non-obstructive azoospermia in comparison with the TT and TC genotypes. Conclusion: The current experimental study identified that the CT genotype of CYP1A1*2A polymorphism may contribute to the pathogenesis of male infertility in the South Indian population.

  8. CYP1A1 expression in breast milk cells of Japanese population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonemoto, Junzo; Shiizaki, Kazuhiro; Sone, Hideko; Morita, Masatosi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Uechi, Hiroto [Uechi Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, Utsunomiya (Japan); Masuzaki, Yuko; Koizumi, Atsuko; Matzumura, Toru [Metocean Environment Inc., Ohigawa (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins are persistent, lipophilic compounds that are ubiquitous in the environment. Concern over the reproductive and developmental toxicity of dioxins has been growing since they have endocrine-disrupting properties and have adversely affected the health of offspring in experimental and epidemiological studies. Monitoring of maternal body burdens of dioxins and their biological responses to dioxin exposure is needed to estimate the potential health risk to their offspring. Breast milk has been used for monitoring dioxins in humans for decades. Breast milk has some advantages in exposure monitoring. Sampling is non-invasive, and dioxin levels are relatively high because of the high lipid content. It is assumed that mammary glands are exposed to a higher level of dioxins than other tissues since mammary glands synthesize and store milk fat. Breast milk contains leukocytes and exfoliated ductal epithelial cells. If these cells responded to dioxins and expressed CYP enzymes, a sensitive biomarker for dioxin exposure, they would be useful as biomarkers for dioxin exposure. In the present study, the expression of CYP enzymes in intact milk cells or cells cultured with TCDD was investigated. In addition, breast milk samples were collected from mothers within one week of childbearing, and the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA in milk cells was determined. The relationship between CYP1A1 mRNA expression in milk cells and dioxin levels in the cream layer of breast milk was analyzed.

  9. Association of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 polymorphisms with bone mineral density variations in postmenopausal Mexican-Mestizo women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Bertha; Vilchis, Felipe; Rojano-Mejía, David; Coral Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Aguirre-García, María Del Carmen; Canto, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    Herein, we investigated potential associations between polymorphisms of genes related to estrogen metabolism and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. This was a cross-sectional study, in which two hundred and ninety postmenopausal Mexican-Mestizo women were studied. The BMD of the lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN) was measured. The distribution of the genetic polymorphisms, including rs1799814 and rs1048943 at CYP1A1 as well as rs1056836 at CYP1B1, were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP), and DNA sequencing. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were tested, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) was calculated by direct correlation (r2). Moreover, haplotype analysis was performed. All polymorphisms were in HWE. The genotype and allele distributions of the three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) studied showed no significant differences. However, statistical significance was reached when constructing haplotypes. The CG haplotype in CYP1A1 was associated with variations in LS and FN BMD after adjustment for covariates (p = 0.021 and 0.045, respectively), but the association with TH BMD was not significant. These results suggested that the CG haplotype in CYP1A1 may play an important role in the mechanism of osteoporosis and may be useful as a genetic marker.

  10. Metabolic gene polymorphism frequencies in control populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garte, S.; Gaspari, L.; Alexandrie, A.K.; Ambrosone, C.; Autrup, H.; Autrup, J.L.; Baranova, H.; Bathum, L.; Benhamou, S.; Boffetta, P.; Bouchardy, C.; Breskvar, K.; Brockmoller, J.; Cascorbi, I.; Clapper, M.L.; Coutelle, C.; Daly, A.; Dell'Omo, M.; Dolzan, V.; Dresler, C.M.; Fryer, A.; Haugen, A.; Hein, D.W.; Hildesheim, A.; Hirvonen, A.; Hsieh, L.L.; Ingelman-Sundberg, M.; Kalina, I.; Kang, D.; Kihara, M.; Kiyohara, C.; Kremers, P.; Lazarus, P.; Marchand, L. le; Lechner, M.C.; Lieshout, E.M.M. van; London, S.; Manni, J.J.; Maugard, C.M.; Morita, S.; Nazar-Stewart, V.; Noda, K.; Oda, Y.; Parl, F.F.; Pastorelli, R.; Persson, I.; Peters, W.H.M.; Rannug, A.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Risch, A.; Roelandt, L.; Romkes, M.; Ryberg, D.; Salagovic, J.; Schoket, B.; Seidegard, J.; Shields, P.G.; Sim, E.; Sinnet, D.; Strange, R.C.; Stucker, I.; Sugimura, H.; To-Figueras, J.; Vineis, P.; Yu, M.C.; Taioli, E.

    2001-01-01

    Using the International Project on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens (GSEC) database containing information on over 15,000 control (noncancer) subjects, the allele and genotype frequencies for many of the more commonly studied metabolic genes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, CYP2D6, GSTM1, GSTT1,

  11. Metabolic gene polymorphism frequencies in control populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garte, Seymour; Gaspari, Laura; Alexandrie, Anna-Karin

    2001-01-01

    Using the International Project on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens (GSEC) database containing information on over 15,000 control (noncancer) subjects, the allele and genotype frequencies for many of the more commonly studied metabolic genes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, CYP2D6, GSTM1, GSTT...

  12. Genome-wide association analysis of coffee drinking suggests association with CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and NRCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, N; Byrne, E; Johnson, J; Chenevix-Trench, G; Walter, S; Nolte, I M; Vink, J M; Rawal, R; Mangino, M; Teumer, A; Keers, J C; Verwoert, G; Baumeister, S; Biffar, R; Petersmann, A; Dahmen, N; Doering, A; Isaacs, A; Broer, L; Wray, N R; Montgomery, G W; Levy, D; Psaty, B M; Gudnason, V; Chakravarti, A; Sulem, P; Gudbjartsson, D F; Kiemeney, L A; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Stefansson, K; van Rooij, F J A; Aulchenko, Y S; Hottenga, J J; Rivadeneira, F R; Hofman, A; Uitterlinden, A G; Hammond, C J; Shin, S-Y; Ikram, A; Witteman, J C M; Janssens, A C J W; Snieder, H; Tiemeier, H; Wolfenbuttel, B H R; Oostra, B A; Heath, A C; Wichmann, E; Spector, T D; Grabe, H J; Boomsma, D I; Martin, N G; van Duijn, C M

    2012-11-01

    Coffee consumption is a model for addictive behavior. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on coffee intake from 8 Caucasian cohorts (N=18 176) and sought replication of our top findings in a further 7929 individuals. We also performed a gene expression analysis treating different cell lines with caffeine. Genome-wide significant association was observed for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q24 region. The two SNPs rs2470893 and rs2472297 (P-values=1.6 × 10(-11) and 2.7 × 10(-11)), which were also in strong linkage disequilibrium (r(2)=0.7) with each other, lie in the 23-kb long commonly shared 5' flanking region between CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 genes. CYP1A1 was found to be downregulated in lymphoblastoid cell lines treated with caffeine. CYP1A1 is known to metabolize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are important constituents of coffee, whereas CYP1A2 is involved in the primary metabolism of caffeine. Significant evidence of association was also detected at rs382140 (P-value=3.9 × 10(-09)) near NRCAM-a gene implicated in vulnerability to addiction, and at another independent hit rs6495122 (P-value=7.1 × 10(-09))-an SNP associated with blood pressure-in the 15q24 region near the gene ULK3, in the meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. Our results from GWASs and expression analysis also strongly implicate CAB39L in coffee drinking. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed significantly enriched ubiquitin proteasome (P-value=2.2 × 10(-05)) and Parkinson's disease pathways (P-value=3.6 × 10(-05)).

  13. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorrink, Sabine U. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Severson, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Kulak, Mikhail V. [Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Futscher, Bernard W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Domann, Frederick E., E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  14. Primary DNA damage and genetic polymorphisms for CYP1A1, EPHX and GSTM1 in workers at a graphite electrode manufacturing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airoldi Luisa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The results of a cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate whether genetic polymorphisms (biomarkers of susceptibility for CYP1A1, EPHX and GSTM1 genes that affect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH activation and detoxification might influence the extent of primary DNA damage (biomarker of biologically effective dose in PAH exposed workers are presented. PAH-exposure of the study populations was assessed by determining the concentration of 1-hydroxypyrene (1OHP in urine samples (biomarker of exposure dose. Methods The exposed group consisted of workers (n = 109 at a graphite electrode manufacturing plant, occupationally exposed to PAH. Urinary 1OHP was measured by HPLC. Primary DNA damage was evaluated by the alkaline comet assay in peripheral blood leukocytes. Genetic polymorphisms for CYP1A1, EPHX and GSTM1 were determined by PCR or PCR/RFLP analysis. Results 1OHP and primary DNA damage were significantly higher in electrode workers compared to reference subjects. Moreover, categorization of subjects as normal or outlier highlighted an increased genotoxic risk OR = 2.59 (CI95% 1.32–5.05 associated to exposure to PAH. Polymorphisms in EPHX exons 3 and 4 was associated to higher urinary concentrations of 1OHP, whereas none of the genotypes analyzed (CYP1A1, EPHX, and GSTM1 had any significant influence on primary DNA damage as evaluated by the comet assay. Conclusion The outcomes of the present study show that molecular epidemiology approaches (i.e. cross-sectional studies of genotoxicity biomarkers can play a role in identifying common genetic risk factors, also attempting to associate the effects with measured exposure data. Moreover, categorization of subjects as normal or outlier allowed the evaluation of the association between occupational exposure to PAH and DNA damage highlighting an increased genotoxic risk.

  15. CYP1A1, CYP2E1 Y RIESGO A CÁNCER GÁSTRICO EN UNA POBLACIÓN COLOMBIANA DE ALTA INCIDENCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO CASTAÑO-MOLINA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue probar la hipótesis de que en casos y controles, de una población colombiana con alta incidencia de cáncer gástrico, muestran diferencias significativas entre las frecuencias de los polimorfismos genéticos CYP1A1*2A y CYP2E1*5A; y a la vez probar si hay diferencias entre el hábito del tabaquismo, el consumo de alcohol y el estrato socioeconómico; así como también sus posibles interacciones. Durante dos años consecutivos se diagnosticaron y confirmaron 87 casos nuevos de pacientes afectados por cáncer gástrico y se colectaron igual número de controles pareados por edad y del mismo grupo poblacional, pertenecientes a la comunidad “paisa” del departamento de Caldas. Se genotipificaron por medio de PCR-RFLPs para los polimorfismos CYP1A1*2A y CYP2E1* 5A. Además, se tuvo en cuenta las variables socioeconómicas y el estilo de vida, con respecto al tabaquismo y al consumo de alcohol. Los resultados encontrados sugieren que los portadores del alelo CYP2E1-c2, asociado con mayor actividad metabólica, tienen mayor riesgo a desarrollar cáncer gástrico (OR=3,6 CI 95% 1,6-8,1/p=0,002. En contraste, la frecuencia del alelo CYP1A1-m2, también asociado con mayor actividad enzimática, mostró similar frecuencia entre los dos grupos. El tabaquismo y el estrato socioeconómico bajo, también mostraron diferencias significativas. En conclusión, se evidencia una interacción significativa entre gen-ambiente, particularmente entre el tabaquismo y los alelos bioactiavantes CYP2E1-c2 y CYP1A1-m2, que pueden alterar la susceptibilidad a cáncer gástrico en esta región Andina del noroeste de Sur América caracterizada por alta incidencia de esta neoplasia.

  16. CYP1A1, CYP2E1 Y RIESGO A CÁNCER GÁSTRICO EN UNA POBLACIÓN COLOMBIANA DE ALTA INCIDENCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Castaño

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue probar la hipótesis de que en casos y controles, de una población colombiana con alta incidencia de cáncer gástrico, muestran diferencias significativas entre las frecuencias de los polimorfismos genéticos CYP1A1-m2 y CYP2E1-c2; y a la vez, probar si hay diferencias entre el hábito del tabaquismo, el consumo de licor y el estrato socioeconómico; así como también sus posibles interacciones. Ochenta y siete pacientes afectados por cáncer gástrico e igual número de controles, del mismo grupo poblacional, genéticamente aislado, pertenecientes a la comunidad “paisa” del departamento de Caldas, fueron genotipíficados por medio de PCR-RFLPs para los polimorfismos CYP1A1-m2 y CYP2E1-c2. Además, se tuvo en cuenta las variables socioeconómicas y el estilo de vida, con respecto al tabaquismo y al consumo de alcohol. Los resultados encontrados sugieren que los portadores del polimorfismo CYP2E1-c2, asociado con mayor actividad metabólica, tienen mayor riesgo a desarrollar cáncer gástrico (OR=3.6, CI95% 1.6-8.1/p=0,002. En contraste, la frecuencia del polimorfismo CYP1A1*2A (MspI, también asociado con mayor actividad enzimática, mostró similar frecuencia entre los dos grupos. El tabaquismo y el estrato socioeconómico bajo, también mostraron diferencias significativas. En conclusión, se evidencia interacción significativa entre gen-ambiente, particularmente entre el tabaquismo y los alelos bioactiavantes CYP2E1- c2 y CYP1A1-m2, que pueden alterar la susceptibilidad a cáncer de estómago en esta región Andina del noroeste de Sur América.

  17. Increased CYP1A1 expression in human exfoliated urothelial cells of cigarette smokers compared to non-smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerrenhaus, Angelika; Roos, Peter H. [Institute for Occupational Physiology at the University Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Mueller, Tina [Institute for Occupational Physiology at the University Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); University Dortmund, Department of Statistics, Mathematical Statistics with Applications in Biometrics, Dortmund (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, arylamines and nitrosamines, constituents of cigarette smoke, are known inducers of bladder cancer. The biochemical response of the target tissue, the bladder urothelium, following inhalation of cigarette smoke has not been studied so far. We used exfoliated transitional urothelial cells from human urine samples to analyze effects of smoking on induction of the cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1A1. Samples of 40 subjects, including male and female smokers and non-smokers, were examined. A prerequisite for the immunofluorescence microscopic analysis of the cells was the enrichment of the urothelial cell population. This was achieved by a new method which is based on magnetic cell sorting exploiting specific binding of immobilized Griffonia simplicifolia lectin to the surface of urothelial cells. Immunostaining of the final cell preparation with a monoclonal antibody to CYP1A1 showed that about 6% of the urothelial cells of non-smokers stained positive for CYP1A1. However, this fraction of positive cells was more than 44% of the urothelial cells in samples from cigarette smokers. In spite of the individual variation, the difference was statistically significant. There were no gender-related differences in the portion of CYP1A1 expressing urothelial cells of smokers and non-smokers. In essence, we show for the first time that human urothelial cells respond to cigarette smoking by induction of CYP1A1. The approach opens new fields of mechanistic and biomarker research with respect to the pathogenetic processes of cancer development in the human bladder. (orig.)

  18. Pengaruh asam askorbat terhadap kadar timbal fetus dan aktivitas enzim sitokrom P450 1A1 (CYP1A1 pada induk mencit terintoksikasi timbal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Christyaningsih

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lead contamination occurs through air pollution and industry, enter the body through respiratory and digestive tract. High lead content will accumulate and affect adversely the cognitive function, causing neuropsychological dysfunction, encephalopathy, hyperactivity and other problems in children, disrupt the central nervous system and the immune system of children as well. This experimental research was randomized control group post-test only design. The experiment used of 27 pregnant mice, divided into three groups: negative control group, which were given distilled water, positive control group were exposed only to lead and the third group were exposed to lead and administered ascorbic acid. 25 mg/kg/day/orally neutral lead acetate was given during gestation day 7 to 16, and ascorbic acid 64 mg/kg/day/orally, started on gestation day 9 to 16. Treatment group with ascorbic acid supplementation had the lowest CYP1A1 enzyme activity compared to positive and negative control groups. This results confirmed by the molecular weight of CYP1A1 enzyme ranges 53.7 to 59.2 kDa, and the western blotting test showed the same thin band both two groups. The lowest of the average lead concentration in the head of fetal mice was found on the group of mice that treated with vitamin C. Supplementation of ascorbic acid can protect the liver and fetuses, by suspected mechanism that ascorbic acid could chelate the lead and excrete it via urine.

  19. A novel CYP1A1 gene polymorphism and the risk of head and neck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-15

    , mutation, novel polymorphism, Pakistani population. INTRODUCTION. Head and neck cancer (HNC) includes the cancers of oral cavity, larynx and pharynx and is the sixth most frequent cancer worldwide and is particularly, ...

  20. Regulation of Human Cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1: A Plausible Target for Chemoprevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Santes-Palacios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cytochrome P450 1A1 (hCYP1A1 has been an object of study due to its role in precarcinogen metabolism; for this reason it is relevant to know more in depth the mechanisms that rule out its expression and activity, which make this enzyme a target for the development of novel chemiopreventive agents. The aim of this work is to review the origin, regulation, and structural and functional characteristics of CYP1A1 letting us understand its role in the bioactivation of precarcinogen and the consequences of its modulation in other physiological processes, as well as guide us in the study of this important protein.

  1. A practical strategy to design and develop an isoform-specific fluorescent probe for a target enzyme: CYP1A1 as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zi-Ru; Feng, Lei; Jin, Qiang; Cheng, Hailing; Li, Yan; Ning, Jing; Yu, Yang; Ge, Guang-Bo; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2017-04-01

    The development of isoform-specific probe(s) for a target enzyme with multiple homologs is always challenging. Herein, a practical strategy was used to design and develop an isoform-specific probe for CYP1A1, a key cytochrome P450 isoenzyme involved in xenobiotic metabolism and bioactivation. On the basis of the subtle differences in 3D structure and substrate preference between CYP1A1 and its homolog CYP1A2, we proposed that it was possible to design a CYP1A1-specific probe via local modification of the reaction site on known CYP1A substrates. To validate this hypothesis, 4-hydroxy-1,8-naphthalimide (HN) was selected as the basic fluorophore due to its excellent optical properties, while a series of O-alkylated HN derivatives were prepared to evaluate their specificity towards CYP1A1. Our results revealed that the introduction of a chloroethyl to HN could get the best isoform selectivity towards CYP1A1 over other CYPs including CYP1A2. The newly developed probe NBCeN exhibited excellent specificity, high sensitivity, and a ratiometric fluorescence response following CYP1A1-catalyzed O-dechloroethylation. NBCeN was successfully used to real-time monitor the activity of CYP1A1 in complex biological samples and to rapidly screen CYP1A1 modulators in living systems. NBCeN could also be used for two-photon imaging of intracellular CYP1A1 in living cells and tissues with high ratiometric imaging resolution and deep tissue penetration. All these findings demonstrated that local modification of non-specific substrates was a practical strategy to develop an isoform-specific probe for a target isoenzyme, while NBCeN could serve as a specific imaging tool to explore the biological functions of CYP1A1 in complex biological systems.

  2. Fenofibrate Attenuates Malignant Hypertension by Suppression of the Renin-angiotensin System: A Study in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 Transgenic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jíchová, Šárka; Doleželová, Šárka; Kopkan, Libor; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-12-01

    Malignant hypertension is a life-threatening condition, and its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the role of interaction of the renin-angiotensin system with 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE), a product of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent ω-hydroxylase pathway, in the pathophysiology of angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Malignant hypertension was induced by 12 days׳ dietary administration of 0.3 % indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates a mouse renin gene. We hypothesized that chronic administration of fenofibrate, 190mg/kg body weight, a lipid-lowering drug, should increase renal production of 20-HETE, a tubular transport inhibitor; an expected increase in sodium excretion would oppose the development of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure was monitored by radiotelemetry, and at the end of the experiment rats were prepared for renal functional studies to evaluate in vivo the pressure-natriuresis relationship in response to stepwise reductions in renal arterial pressure (RAP). In I3C-induced rats, the treatment with fenofibrate significantly attenuated hypertension and improved the slope of the pressure-natriuresis relationship. Although fenofibrate treatment increased kidney gene and protein expression of CYP4A1, a major isoform responsible for 20-HETE formation, it did not increase renal 20-HETE concentration. On the contrary, fenofibrate treatment significantly suppressed renin gene expression, plasma renin activity and plasma and kidney ANG II levels. Fenofibrate treatment significantly attenuated the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced CYP1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats, and the mechanism responsible for antihypertensive action was fenofibrate-induced suppression of renin-angiotensin system activity. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  3. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression: Comparing ‘humanized’ mouse lines and wild-type mice; comparing human and mouse hepatoma-derived cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Shigeyuki; Endo, Kaori; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Makishima, Makoto; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Nebert, Daniel W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and rodent cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes sometimes exhibit striking species-specific differences in substrate preference and rate of metabolism. Human risk assessment of CYP substrates might therefore best be evaluated in the intact mouse by replacing mouse Cyp genes with human CYP orthologs; however, how “human-like” can human gene expression be expected in mouse tissues? Previously a bacterial-artificial-chromosome-transgenic mouse, carrying the human CYP1A1_CYP1A2 locus and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2 orthologs, was shown to express robustly human dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and basal versus inducible CYP1A2 (mRNAs, proteins, enzyme activities) in each of nine mouse tissues examined. Chimeric mice carrying humanized liver have also been generated, by transplanting human hepatocytes into a urokinase-type plasminogen activator(+/+)_severe-combined-immunodeficiency (uPA/SCID) line with most of its mouse hepatocytes ablated. Herein we compare basal and dioxin-induced CYP1A mRNA copy numbers, protein levels, and four enzymes (benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, acetanilide 4-hydroxylase, methoxyresorufin O-demethylase) in liver of these two humanized mouse lines versus wild-type mice; we also compare these same parameters in mouse Hepa-1c1c7 and human HepG2 hepatoma-derived established cell lines. Most strikingly, mouse liver CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities are between 38- and 170-fold higher than human CYP1A1-specific enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA), whereas mouse versus human CYP1A2 enzyme activities (per unit of mRNA) are within 2.5-fold of one another. Moreover, both the mouse and human hepatoma cell lines exhibit striking differences in CYP1A mRNA levels and enzyme activities. These findings are relevant to risk assessment involving human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 substrates, when administered to mice as environmental toxicants or drugs. PMID:19285097

  4. RNAi-based screening identifies kinases interfering with dioxin-mediated up-regulation of CYP1A1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gilot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a transcription factor activated by several environmental pollutants, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, and involved in carcinogenesis and various physiological processes, including immune response and endocrine functions. Characterization of kinases-related AhR transduction pathway remains an important purpose.We performed a kinome-wide siRNA screen in human mammary MCF-7 cells to identify non redundant protein kinases implicated in the up-regulation of cytochrome P-450 (CYP 1A1 activity, an AhR referent target, in response to TCDD exposure. To this aim, we monitored CYP1A1-related ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD activity and quantified cell density. This normalization was crucial since it allowed us to focus only on siRNA affecting EROD activity and discard siRNA affecting cell density. Analyses of the cell density data allowed us to identify several hits already well-characterized as effectors of the cell cycle and original hits. Collectively, these data fully validated the protocol and the siRNA library. Next, 22 novel candidates were identified as kinases potentially implicated in the up-regulation of CYP1A1 in response to TCDD, without alteration of cell survival or cell proliferation. The siRNA library screen gave a limited number of hits (approximately 3%. Interestingly, four of them are able to bind calmodulin among which the IP3 kinase A (ITPKA and pregnancy up-regulated non-ubiquitously expressed CaM kinase (PNCK, also named CaMKIβ. Remarkably, for both proteins, their kinase activity depends on the calmodulin binding. Involvement of ITPKA and PNCK in TCDD-mediated CYP1A1 up-regulation was further validated by screening-independent expression knock-down. PNCK was finally shown to regulate activation of CaMKIα, a CaMKI isoform previously reported to interplay with the AhR pathway.These data fully support a role for both IP3-related kinase and CaMK isoforms in the AhR signaling

  5. CYP1A1, CYP2E1 Y RIESGO A CÁNCER GÁSTRICO EN UNA POBLACIÓN COLOMBIANA DE ALTA INCIDENCIA

    OpenAIRE

    EDUARDO CASTAÑO-MOLINA; MARIO SANTACOLOMA; LÁZARO ARANGO; MAURICIO CAMARGO

    2009-01-01

    El objetivo fue probar la hipótesis de que en casos y controles, de una población colombiana con alta incidencia de cáncer gástrico, muestran diferencias significativas entre las frecuencias de los polimorfismos genéticos CYP1A1*2A y CYP2E1*5A; y a la vez probar si hay diferencias entre el hábito del tabaquismo, el consumo de alcohol y el estrato socioeconómico; así como también sus posibles interacciones. Durante dos años consecutivos se diagnosticaron y confirmaron 87 casos nuevos de pacien...

  6. CYP1A1, CYP2E1 Y RIESGO A CÁNCER GÁSTRICO EN UNA POBLACIÓN COLOMBIANA DE ALTA INCIDENCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño Eduardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    El objetivo fue probar la hipótesis de que en casos y controles, de una población colombiana con alta incidencia de cáncer gástrico, muestran diferencias significativas entre las frecuencias de los polimorfismos genéticos CYP1A1-m2 y CYP2E1-c2; y a la vez, probar si hay diferencias entre el hábito del tabaquismo, el consumo de licor y el estrato socioeconómico; así como también sus posibles interacciones. Ochenta y siete pacientes afectados por cáncer gástrico e igual número de controles, del mismo grupo poblacional, genéticamente aislado, pertenecientes a la comunidad “paisa” del departamento de Caldas, fueron genotipíficados por medio de PCR-RFLPs para los polimorfismos CYP1A1-m2 y CYP2E1-c2. Además, se tuvo en cuenta las variables socioeconómicas y el estilo de vida, con respecto al tabaquismo y al consumo de alcohol. Los resultados encontrados sugieren que los portadores del polimorfismo CYP2E1-c2, asociado con mayor actividad metabólica, tienen mayor riesgo a desarrollar cáncer gástrico (OR=3.6, CI95% 1.6-8.1/p=0,002. En contraste, la frecuencia del polimorfismo CYP1A1*2A (MspI, también asociado con mayor actividad enzimática, mostró similar frecuencia entre los dos grupos. El tabaquismo y el estrato socioeconómico bajo, tambi

  7. Bergamottin is a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A1 and is antimutagenic in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olguín-Reyes, S; Camacho-Carranza, R; Hernández-Ojeda, S; Elinos-Baez, M; Espinosa-Aguirre, J J

    2012-09-01

    Grapefruit juice (GJ) is a well known Cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitor; CYP3A is one of the most affected subfamily leading to anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic effects when GJ is administered to experimental animals in combination with mutagenic/carcinogenic agents metabolized by CYP3A. Bergamottin, naringin and dihydroxybergamottin are three main constituents contained within GJ and their inhibitory effect against CYP3A4 has been well documented. Reports suggest that CYP3A is not the only one affected but CYP1A and 2B are also affected by GJ. To explore this last possibility in depth we tested the in vitro capacity of bergamottin, naringin and dihydroxybergamottin to inhibit the activity of CYP1A and 2B subfamilies and found that bergamottin showed the strongest inhibitory effect and naringin showed no inhibition at all. Therefore, we decided to biochemically characterize the inhibitory properties of bergamottin. CYP1A1 Supersome® used in this study showed a Km(app)=0.0723 μM and a Vm(app)=6.141 μU/pmol with substrate ethoxyresorufin, and the biochemical characterization of bergamottin CYP1A1 inhibitory effect revealed that it is a competitive inhibitor with a Ki=10.703 nM. We also confirmed the antimutagenicity of this compound against the mutagenic effect of 3-methylcholanthrene and benzo[a]pyrene in the Ames test. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Constitutive and inducible expression of cytochromes P4501A (CYP1A1 and CYP1A2) in normal prostate and prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Kenneth M; Cutroneo, Kenneth R

    2004-02-01

    Constitutive and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) inducible expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in prostate cancer and normal prostate epithelial cells were examined by immunoblotting. Androgen independent prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 have constitutive expression of CYP1A and CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, respectively. Four micromolar B[a]P did not appear to induce CYP1A1 or CYP1A2 expression in DU145 or PC3 cells. The androgen dependent prostate cancer cell line, LnCap, also has constitutive expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2. However, both CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 are induced by treatment of LnCap cells with 4 microM B[a]P. Untreated normal prostate and primary prostate tumor cells have no detectable CYP1A1 expression. Treatment with 4 microM B[a]P induced CYP1A1 expression in both normal and primary tumor prostate cells. Constitutive CYP1A2 expression was detected in normal prostate cells with little or no induction by exposure to 4 microM B[a]P. Primary prostate tumor cells did not show constitutive expression of CYP1A2. However, CYP1A2 was induced by 4 microM B[a]P in primary prostate tumor cells. These observations indicate that hormonal and cancer specific factors affect the expression and induction of the phase I metabolic enzymes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in prostate cells. These observations may be related to the potential smoking-linked higher risk of prostate cancer development and morbidity of prostate cancer patients who smoke. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Banerjee, Basu Dev, E-mail: banerjeebd@hotmail.com [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Rai, Arvind [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37 {+-} 2.15 vs. 6.24 {+-} 1.37 tail% DNA, p < 0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3 PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C, CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes on DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workers exposed to some OPs demonstrated increased DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2D6 *3 PM and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes are associated with DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes can increase DNA damage.

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Gyun [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Eun Hee [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction. - Highlights: • CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. • CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. • CAPE induced HIF-1α induction. • CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 expression.

  11. Cardiac remodeling during and after renin-angiotensin system stimulation in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heijnen, Bart Fj; Pelkmans, Leonie Pj; Danser, Ah Jan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-induced cardiac remodeling and its reversibility in the presence and absence of high blood pressure (BP) in Cyp1a1-Ren2 transgenic inducible hypertensive rats (IHR). In IHR (pro)renin levels and BP can be dose-dependently titrated by oral...... administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C). Young (four-weeks old) and adult (30-weeks old) IHR were fed I3C for four weeks (leading to systolic BP >200 mmHg). RAS-stimulation was stopped and animals were followed-up for a consecutive period. Cardiac function and geometry was determined echocardiographically...... and the hearts were excised for molecular and immunohistochemical analyses. Echocardiographic studies revealed that four weeks of RAS-stimulation incited a cardiac remodeling process characterized by increased left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, decreased LV volumes, and shortening of the left ventricle...

  12. Expression and inducibility of CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1 by β-naphthoflavone and CYP2B22, CYP3As by rifampicin in heart regions and coronary arteries of pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Andrea; Puccinelli, Emanuela; Gervasi, Pier Giovanni; Longo, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the constitutive and inducible expression of the CYP genes (1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2B22, 3A22, 3A29 and 3A46), related transcriptional factors (AhR, CAR, PXR, and Nrf2) and the antioxidant enzymes SOD, catalase, GSSH-reductase and GSH-peroxidase were investigated in the liver, heart regions and coronary arteries of control pigs and pigs treated with β-naphthoflavone (βNF) or with rifampicin (RIF). Real-time PCR experiments and enzymatic or immunoblot assays showed that CYP1A1 was predominantly enhanced by βNF in a similar manner in all the heart regions, whereas antioxidant enzyme activity was not affected. The rifampicin treatment resulted in an induction of CYP2B22 and CYP3As, at the transcriptional, activity and protein level in liver but not in heart nor in the coronary arteries, despite the expression of CAR and PXR in the cardiac tissues. These results obtained in vivo suggest that pig cardiac tissues may represent a useful model for humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fangxing, E-mail: fxyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Zhuang, Shulin [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Liu, Weiping, E-mail: wliu@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  14. Pacific Ocean–Wide Profile of CYP1A1 Expression, Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios, and Organic Contaminant Burden in Sperm Whale Skin Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard-Codding, Céline A.J.; Clark, Rebecca; Fossi, Maria Cristina; Marsili, Letizia; Maltese, Silvia; West, Adam G.; Valenzuela, Luciano; Rowntree, Victoria; Polyak, Ildiko; Cannon, John C.; Pinkerton, Kim; Rubio-Cisneros, Nadia; Mesnick, Sarah L.; Cox, Stephen B.; Kerr, Iain; Payne, Roger; Stegeman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ocean pollution affects marine organisms and ecosystems as well as humans. The International Oceanographic Commission recommends ocean health monitoring programs to investigate the presence of marine contaminants and the health of threatened species and the use of multiple and early-warning biomarker approaches. Objective We explored the hypothesis that biomarker and contaminant analyses in skin biopsies of the threatened sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) could reveal geographical trends in exposure on an oceanwide scale. Methods We analyzed cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) expression (by immunohistochemistry), stable nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (as general indicators of trophic position and latitude, respectively), and contaminant burdens in skin biopsies to explore regional trends in the Pacific Ocean. Results Biomarker analyses revealed significant regional differences within the Pacific Ocean. CYP1A1 expression was highest in whales from the Galapagos, a United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization World Heritage marine reserve, and was lowest in the sampling sites farthest away from continents. We examined the possible influence of the whales’ sex, diet, or range and other parameters on regional variation in CYP1A1 expression, but data were inconclusive. In general, CYP1A1 expression was not significantly correlated with contaminant burdens in blubber. However, small sample sizes precluded detailed chemical analyses, and power to detect significant associations was limited. Conclusions Our large-scale monitoring study was successful at identifying regional differences in CYP1A1 expression, providing a baseline for this known biomarker of exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists. However, we could not identify factors that explained this variation. Future oceanwide CYP1A1 expression profiles in cetacean skin biopsies are warranted and could reveal whether globally distributed chemicals occur at biochemically

  15. First detection of CYP1A1 and CYP2B induction in Mediterranean cetacean skin biopsies and cultured fibroblasts by Western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossi, Maria Cristina; Casini, Silvia; Bucalossi, Daniela; Marsili, Letizia

    2008-07-01

    The need to develop powerful tools to detect exposure and effects of POPs and emerging contaminants in Mediterranean cetaceans led us to develop a suite of sensitive non-lethal biomarkers in integument biopsies of free-ranging animals. In order to propose induction of CYP1A1 and CYP2B, detected by Western blot analysis, as biomarkers of exposure to OCs, PAHs and PBDEs, a three-phase experimental protocol (in vitro experiments, calibration experiments and field applications) was followed using fibroblast cell cultures and biopsies of Mediterranean Stenella coeruleoalba and Tursiops truncatus. This methodology was confirmed to be sensitive and stable in comparison to previous methods used to detect CYP1A1 in biopsies, enabling analysis of several inducible proteins in non-lethal samples and analysis of material from stranded animals.

  16. Predicting drug metabolism by CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1: insights from MetaSite, molecular docking and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragyan, Preeti; Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Rathod, Vijay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2014-11-01

    Recently, CYP1 enzymes are documented for selective metabolism of anticancer leads in cancer prevention and/or progression. Elucidation of specificity of substrates/inhibitors of CYP1 isoforms plays a vital role in design of more selective and potent anticancer leads. However, an area of concern is the broad range of substrate specificities and planar nature of substrates with limited dataset which makes it difficult to predict their site of metabolism (SOM) accurately. In the present study, various models for prediction of site of metabolism in case of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 substrates were developed using MetaSite, molecular docking, and quantum chemical descriptors. The predictive accuracy of MetaSite, molecular docking, and quantum chemical descriptors in identifying experimental site of metabolism was analyzed at three levels; top rank, top three ranks, and top five ranks. Two quantum chemical descriptors, chemical hardness and local nucleophilicity are proposed for the prediction of CYP-mediated SOM for the first time. The predictive accuracy shown by chemical hardness at top three ranks was 83.3, 85.7, and 84.6 % for CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1, respectively, whereas local nucleophilicity gave poor predictions of 50, 42.8, and 46.2 %, respectively. The predictability of chemical hardness descriptor outperformed at all three levels of ranks for CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1. Hence, we propose chemical hardness as an useful quantum chemical descriptor for prediction of metabolically vulnerable prints in CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 mediated metabolism and support the optimization efforts in drug discovery and development programs.

  17. Genome Editing of the CYP1A1 Locus in iPSCs as a Platform to Map AHR Expression throughout Human Development

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    Brenden W. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a ligand activated transcription factor that increases the expression of detoxifying enzymes upon ligand stimulation. Recent studies now suggest that novel endogenous roles of the AHR exist throughout development. In an effort to create an optimized model system for the study of AHR signaling in several cellular lineages, we have employed a CRISPR/CAS9 genome editing strategy in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs to incorporate a reporter cassette at the transcription start site of one of its canonical targets, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1. This cell line faithfully reports on CYP1A1 expression, with luciferase levels as its functional readout, when treated with an endogenous AHR ligand (FICZ at escalating doses. iPSC-derived fibroblast-like cells respond to acute exposure to environmental and endogenous AHR ligands, and iPSC-derived hepatocytes increase CYP1A1 in a similar manner to primary hepatocytes. This cell line is an important innovation that can be used to map AHR activity in discrete cellular subsets throughout developmental ontogeny. As further endogenous ligands are proposed, this line can be used to screen for safety and efficacy and can report on the ability of small molecules to regulate critical cellular processes by modulating the activity of the AHR.

  18. Action of Halowax 1051 on Enzymes of Phase I (CYP1A1 and Phase II (SULT1A and COMT Metabolism in the Pig Ovary

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    Justyna Barć

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs are a group of organochlorinated compounds exhibiting dioxin-like properties. Previously published data showed the direct action of PCN-rich Halowax 1051 on ovarian follicular steroidogenesis. Taking into consideration that the observed biological effects of PCNs may be frequently side effects of metabolites generated by their detoxification, the aim of this study was to determine the activity and expression of enzymes involved in phase I (cytochrome P450, family 1 (CYP1A1 and phase II (sulfotransferase (SULT1A and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT detoxification metabolism. Cocultures of granulosa and theca interna cells collected from sexually mature pigs were exposed to 1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL of Halowax 1051 for 1 to 48 hours, after which levels and activities of CYP1A1, SULT1A, and COMT were measured. Dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 activity and expression were observed. High doses of Halowax 1051 were inhibitory to COMT and SULT1A activity and reduced their protein levels. In conclusion, fast activation of phase I enzymes with simultaneous inhibition of phase II enzymes indicates that the previously observed effect of Halowax 1051 on follicular steroidogenesis may partially result from metabolite action occurring locally in ovarian follicles.

  19. Effect of Flavonoids on Glutathione Level, Lipid Peroxidation and Cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 Expression in Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Cell Lines

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    Lidija Vuković

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are phytochemicals exhibiting a wide range of biological activities, among which are antioxidant activity, the ability to modulate activity of several enzymes or cell receptors and possibility to interfere with essential biochemical pathways. Using human laryngeal carcinoma HEp2 cells and their drug-resistant CK2 subline, we examined the effect of five flavonoids, three structurally related flavons (quercetin, fisetin, and myricetin, one flavonol (luteolin and one glycosilated flavanone (naringin for: (i their ability to inhibit mitochondrial dehydrogenases as an indicator of cytotoxic effect, (ii their influence on glutathione level, (iii antioxidant/prooxidant effects and influence on cell membrane permeability, and (iv effect on expression of cytochrome CYP1A1. Cytotoxic action of the investigated flavonoids after 72 hours of treatment follows this order: luteolin>quercetin>fisetin>naringin>myricetin. Our results show that CK2 were more resistant to toxic concentrations of flavonoids as compared to parental cells. Quercetin increased the total GSH level in both cell lines. CK2 cells are less perceptible to lipid peroxidation and damage caused by free radicals. Quercetin showed prooxidant effect in both cell lines, luteolin only in HEp2 cells, whereas other tested flavonoids did not cause lipid peroxidation in the tested cell lines. These data suggest that the same compound, quercetin, can act as a prooxidant, but also, it may prevent damage in cells caused by free radicals, due to the induction of GSH, by forming less harmful complex. Quercetin treatment damaged cell membranes in both cell lines. Fisetin caused higher cell membrane permeability only in HEp2 cells. However, these two compounds did not enhance the damage caused by hydrogen peroxide. Quercetin, naringin, myricetin and fisetin increased the expression of CYP1A1 in both cell lines, while luteolin decreased basal level of CYP1A1 only in HEp2 cells. In conclusion, small

  20. Detoxification enzyme activities (CYP1A1 and GST) in the skin of humpback whales as a function of organochlorine burdens and migration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson Nash, S; Dawson, A; Burkhard, M; Waugh, C; Huston, W

    2014-10-01

    The activities of glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P-450 1A1 (CYP1A1) enzymes were measured in freshly extracted epidermis of live-biopsied, migrating, southern hemisphere humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). The two quantified enzyme activities did not correlate strongly with each other. Similarly, neither correlated strongly with any of the organochlorine compound groups previously measured in the superficial blubber of the sample biopsy core, likely reflecting the anticipated low levels of typical aryl-hydrocarbon receptor ligands. GST activity did not differ significantly between genders or between northward (early migration) or southward (late migration) migrating cohorts. Indeed, the inter-individual variability in GST measurements was relatively low. This observation raises the possibility that measured activities were basal activities and that GST function was inherently impacted by the fasting state of the sampled animals, as seen in other species. These results do not support the implementation of CYP1A1 or GST as effective biomarkers of organochlorine contaminant burdens in southern hemisphere populations of humpback whales as advocated for other cetacean species. Further investigation of GST activity in feeding versus fasting cohorts may, however, provide some insight into the fasting metabolism of these behaviourally adapted populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enzymatic characterization of in vitro-expressed Baikal seal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1: implication of low metabolic potential of CYP1A2 uniquely evolved in aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hisato; Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Takeshita, Yoko; Kubota, Akira; Hirakawa, Shusaku; Isobe, Tomohiko; Hirano, Masashi; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the catalytic function of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1 enzymes in aquatic mammals. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) activities including methoxy- (MROD), ethoxy- (EROD), pentoxy- (PROD), and benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation (BROD), and 2- and 4-hydroxylation activities of 17β-estradiol (E2) were measured by using yeast-expressed Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica) CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 proteins. Heterologous protein expression of the Baikal seal CYP1s (bsCYP1s) in yeast microsomes was confirmed by reduced CO-difference spectra and immunoblotting. Heterologously expressed human CYP1 enzyme (hCYP1) activities were simultaneously measured and compared with those of bsCYP1 isozymes. Recombinant bsCYP1A1 protein showed the highest Vmax of EROD, followed by MROD, PROD, and BROD, similar to that of hCYP1A1. Vmax/Km ratios of all AROD activities catalyzed by bsCYP1A1 were lower than those catalyzed by hCYP1A1, suggesting less potential for AROD by bsCYP1A1. Enzymatic assays for bsCYP1A2 showed no or minimal AROD activities, while hCYP1A2 displayed MROD and EROD activities. bsCYP1B1 showed an AROD profile (EROD>BROD>MROD>PROD) similar to that of hCYP1B1; however, Vmax/Km ratios of all AROD activities by bsCYP1B1 were higher. Yeast microsomes containing bsCYP1A1 and 1B1 and hCYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 metabolized E2 to 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2, whereas bsCYP1A2 showed no such activity. Comparison of 4- and 2-hydroxylations of E2 by CYP1As suggests that bsCYP1A1, hCYP1A1, and 1A2 preferentially catalyze 2- rather than 4-hydroxylation. As for CYP1B1, the Vmax/Km ratios suggest that both Baikal seal and human CYPs catalyze 4- rather than 2-hydroxylation. Interspecies comparison showed that bsCYP1B1 has higher metabolic potencies for both E2 hydroxylations than does hCYP1B1, whereas the activity of bsCYP1A1 was lower than that of hCYP1A1. Messenger RNA expression levels of bsCYP1s in the liver of Baikal seals indicated that bsCYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes contributed to 16

  2. Evaluation of CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2 m-RNA induction in rat liver slices using the NanoString technology: a novel tool for drug discovery lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamanda, Jairam R; Kumari, Pramila; Murgolo, Nicholas; Benbow, Larry; Lin, Xinjie; Nomeir, Amin A

    2009-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction in rodents and humans is considered a liability for new chemical entities (NCEs) in drug discovery. In particular, CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2 have been associated with the induction of liver tumors in oncogenicity studies during safety evaluation studies of potential drugs. In our laboratory, real time PCR (Taqman) has been used to quantify the induction of rat hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2 in precision -cut rat liver slices. A novel technology that does not require m-RNA isolation or RT-PCR, (developed by NanoString Technologies) has been investigated to quantify CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2 induction in rat liver slices. Seventeen commercially available compounds were evaluated using both Taqman and NanoString technologies. Precision-cut rat liver slices were incubated with individual compounds for 24 hr at 37 degrees C in a humidified CO(2) incubator and CYP1A1 and CYP2B1/2 m-RNA were quantified. The results from the NanoString technology were similar to those of the Taqman(R) with a high degree of correlation for both CYP isoforms (r(2)>0.85). Therefore, NanoString provides an additional new technology to evaluate the induction of CYP1A1 and 2B1/2, as well as potentially other enzymes or transporters in rat liver slices.

  3. Interactions between Cigarette Smoking and Polymorphisms of Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Genes: The Risk of Oral Leukoplakia

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    Yu-Fen Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This case-control study investigates the role of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes, including glutathione S-transferases (GSTs and cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1 and 2E1 (CYP2E1, in the susceptibility to oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs.

  4. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 enzymes and their influence on cardiovascular risk and lipid profile in people who live near a natural gas plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašalić, Daria; Marinković, Natalija

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to see whether genetic polymorphisms of the enzymes CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 are associated with higher risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and whether they affect lipid profile in 252 subjects living near a natural gas plant, who are likely to be exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fasting serum concentrations of biochemical parameters were determined with standard methods. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP 1A1 rs4646903, rs1048943, rs4986883, and rs1799814 were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFPL), while GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions were detected with multiplex PCR. Cardiovascular risk was assessed with Framingham risk score, and the subjects divided in two groups: >10% risk and ≤10% risk. The two groups did not differ in the genotype frequencies. MANCOVA analysis, which included lipid parameters, glucose, and BMI with sex, age, hypertension and smoking status as covariates, showed a significant difference between the GSTT1*0 and GSTT1*1 allele carriers (p=0.001). UNIANCOVA with same covariates showed that total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly higher in GSTT1*1 allele carriers than in GSTT1*0 carriers (p<0.001 and p=0.006, respectively). Our findings suggest that CYP1A1, GSTM1, and GSTT1 polymorphisms are not associated with the higher risk of CAD, but that GSTT1 affects lipid profile.

  5. Up-regulation of CYP1A1 and phase II enzymes by 5-ring isomeric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in precision-cut rat hepatic slices: Importance of molecular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushparajah, Daphnee; Lewis, Dfv; Ioannides, Costas

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: (a) to evaluate the role of molecular shape on the interaction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with the Ah receptor and CYP1A1 upregulation, and (b) to evaluate the potential of PAHs to induce epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferase, two major enzymes involved in their metabolism. In order to achieve these objectives, precision-cut rat liver slices were incubated with a range of concentrations of seven 5-ring isomeric PAHs, namely benzo[c]chrysene, benzo[b]chrysene, benzo[g]chrysene, dibenzo[a,j]anthracene, dibenzo[a,c]anthracene, picene and pentacene, for 24h. All compounds, with the exception of pentacene, elevated the O-deethylation of ethoxyresorufin, an activity associated with CYP1A1; induction of this enzyme by the various PAHs correlated with their avidity for the Ah receptor. None of the PAHs studied increased epoxide hydrolase activity, monitored using benzo[a]pyrene 4,5-oxide. Of the seven PAHs, only benzo[g]chrysene elevated glutathione S-transferase activity, measured using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole as substrates. No relationship could be established between length or length/width and interaction with the Ah receptor and CYP1A1 up-regulation indicating that other structural or electronic factors are likely to be more important. Finally, 5-ring PAHs are poor inducers of the epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferase enzyme systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Alteration in the Expression of Cytochrome P450s (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A11 in the Liver of Mouse Induced by Microcystin-LR

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    Bangjun Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are cyclic heptapeptide toxins and can accumulate in the liver. Cytochrome P450s (CYPs play an important role in the biotransformation of endogenous substances and xenobiotics in animals. It is unclear if the CYPs are affected by MCs exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of microcystin-LR (MCLR on cytochrome P450 isozymes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A11 at mRNA level, protein content, and enzyme activity in the liver of mice the received daily, intraperitoneally, 2, 4, and 8 µg/kg body weight of MCLR for seven days. The result showed that MCLR significantly decreased ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD (CYP1A1 and erythromycin N-demthylase (ERND (CYP3A11 activities and increased aniline hydroxylase (ANH activity (CYP2E1 in the liver of mice during the period of exposure. Our findings suggest that MCLR exposure may disrupt the function of CYPs in liver, which may be partly attributed to the toxicity of MCLR in mice.

  7. Increased exposure of vitamin A by Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat extract in rat was not via induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP2B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Pan, Xian; Chen, Guanming; Li, Jia; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong; Jin, Shi; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guangji

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat (CM) extract on the pharmacokinetics of retinol and activities of cytochrome P450s (CYP450s) related to retinoid metabolism. Rats were treated with CM extract for 15 d. Plasma concentrations of retinol were measured following oral administration of retinol (45 mg/kg). Basal levels of retinol and retinoic acid in serum and liver were also measured. 7-Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, phenacetin-O-deethylase activity, and 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activities were used to assay the activities of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP2B1 in hepatic microsomes of rats, respectively. Protein expressions of the 3 CYP450s were measured by western blot. Our studies demonstrated that CM extract dose-dependently increased basal level of retinol in serum. In pharmacokinetic experiment, CM extract dose-dependently increased plasma concentrations of retinol after oral administration of retinol to rats treated with CM extract. But activities and expressions of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP2B1 in hepatic microsomes of rats were also induced by CM extract. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Genome-wide association analysis of coffee drinking suggests association with CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and NRCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, N.; Byrne, E.; Johnson, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Walter, S.; Nolte, I.M.; Vink, J.M.; Rawal, R.; Mangino, M.; Teumer, A.; Keers, J.C.; Verwoert, G.; Baumeister, S.; Biffar, R.; Petersmann, A.; Dahmen, N.; Doering, A.; Isaacs, A.; Broer, L.; Wray, N.R.; Montgomery, G.W.; Levy, D.; Psaty, B.M.; Gudnason, V.; Chakravarti, A.; Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.; van Rooij, F.J.A.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hammond, C.J.; Shin, S.Y.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Snieder, H.; Tiemeier, H.; Wolfenbuttel, B.H.R.; Oostra, B.A.; Heath, A.C.; Wichmann, E.; Spector, T.D.; Grabe, H.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.; van Duijn, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee consumption is a model for addictive behavior. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on coffee intake from 8 Caucasian cohorts (N18 176) and sought replication of our top findings in a further 7929 individuals. We also performed a gene expression analysis

  9. Genome-wide association analysis of coffee drinking suggests association with CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and NRCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Amin (Najaf); E.M. Byrne (Elaine); J.L. Johnson (Joel L.); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); S. Walter (Stefan); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); J. Vink (Jaap); R. Rawal (R.); M. Mangino (Massimo); A. Teumer (Alexander); J.C. Keers (J. C.); G.C. Verwoert (Germaine); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); R. Biffar (Reiner); A. Petersmann (Astrid); N. Dahmen (N.); A. Doering (Angela); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); L. Broer (Linda); N.R. Wray (Naomi); G.W. Montgomery; D. Levy (Daniel); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); P. Sulem (Patrick); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); K. Stefansson (Kari); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); B. Hofman; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); S.Y. Shin (So Youn); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); H. Snieder (Harold); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); B.H.R. Wolfenbuttel; B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.C. Heath; E. Wichmann (Eric); T.D. Spector (Timothy); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.G. Martin; C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCoffee consumption is a model for addictive behavior. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on coffee intake from 8 Caucasian cohorts (N=18 176) and sought replication of our top findings in a further 7929 individuals. We also performed a gene expression

  10. Genome-wide association analysis of coffee drinking suggests association with CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and NRCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, N.; Byrne, E.; Johnson, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Walter, S.; Nolte, I.M.; kConFab, I.; Vink, J.M.; Rawal, R.; Mangino, M.; Teumer, A.; Keers, J.C.; Verwoert, G.; Baumeister, S.; Biffar, R.; Petersmann, A.; Dahmen, N.; Doering, A.; Isaacs, A.; Broer, L.; Wray, N.R.; Montgomery, G.W.; Levy, D.; Psaty, B.M.; Gudnason, V.; Chakravarti, A.; Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.; van Rooij, F.J.; Aulchenko, Y.S.; Hottenga, J.J.; Rivadeneira, F.R.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Hammond, C.J.; Shin, S.Y.; Ikram, A.; Witteman, J.C.; Janssens, A.C.; Snieder, H.; Tiemeier, H.; Wolfenbuttel, B.H.; Oostra, B.A.; Heath, A.C.; Wichmann, E.; Spector, T.D.; Grabe, H.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.; van Duijn, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee consumption is a model for addictive behavior. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on coffee intake from 8 Caucasian cohorts (N=18 176) and sought replication of our top findings in a further 7929 individuals. We also performed a gene expression analysis

  11. Genome-wide association analysis of coffee drinking suggests association with CYP1A1/CYP1A2 and NRCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, N.; Byrne, E.; Johnson, J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Walter, S.; Nolte, I. M.; Vink, J. M.; Rawal, R.; Mangino, M.; Teumer, A.; Keers, J. C.; Verwoert, G.; Baumeister, S.; Biffar, R.; Petersmann, A.; Dahmen, N.; Doering, A.; Isaacs, A.; Broer, L.; Wray, N. R.; Montgomery, G. W.; Levy, D.; Psaty, B. M.; Gudnason, V.; Chakravarti, A.; Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D. F.; Kiemeney, L. A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.; Van Rooij, F. J. A.; Aulchenko, Y. S.; Hottenga, J. J.; Rivadeneira, F. R.; Hofman, A.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Hammond, C. J.; Shin, S-Y; Ikram, A.; Witteman, J. C. M.; Janssens, A. C. J. W.; Snieder, H.; Tiemeier, H.; Wolfenbuttel, B. H. R.; Oostra, B. A.; Heath, A. C.; Wichmann, E.; Spector, T. D.; Grabe, H. J.; Boomsma, D. I.; Martin, N. G.; Van Duijn, C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee consumption is a model for addictive behavior. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on coffee intake from 8 Caucasian cohorts (N = 18 176) and sought replication of our top findings in a further 7929 individuals. We also performed a gene expression analysis

  12. Pengaruh asam askorbat terhadap kadar timbal fetus dan aktivitas enzim sitokrom P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) pada induk mencit terintoksikasi timbal

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Christyaningsih; Harianto Notopuro; Win Darmanto; Diah Titik Mutiarawati

    2010-01-01

    Lead contamination occurs through air pollution and industry, enter the body through respiratory and digestive tract. High lead content will accumulate and affect adversely the cognitive function, causing neuropsychological dysfunction, encephalopathy, hyperactivity and other problems in children, disrupt the central nervous system and the immune system of children as well. This experimental research was randomized control group post-test only design. The experiment used of 27 pregnant mice, ...

  13. Areca nut components affect COX-2, cyclin B1/cdc25C and keratin expression, PGE2 production in keratinocyte is related to reactive oxygen species, CYP1A1, Src, EGFR and Ras signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chi Chang

    Full Text Available Chewing of betel quid (BQ increases the risk of oral cancer and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF, possibly by BQ-induced toxicity and induction of inflammatory response in oral mucosa.Primary gingival keratinocytes (GK cells were exposed to areca nut (AN components with/without inhibitors. Cytotoxicity was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl- thiazol- 2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. mRNA and protein expression was evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blotting. PGE2/PGF2α production was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.Areca nut extract (ANE stimulated PGE2/PGF2α production, and upregulated the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1 and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1, but inhibited expression of keratin 5/14, cyclinB1 and cdc25C in GK cells. ANE also activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, Src and Ras signaling pathways. ANE-induced COX-2, keratin 5, keratin 14 and cdc25C expression as well as PGE2 production were differentially regulated by α-naphthoflavone (a CYP 1A1/1A2 inhibitor, PD153035 (EGFR inhibitor, pp2 (Src inhibitor, and manumycin A (a Ras inhibitor. ANE-induced PGE2 production was suppressed by piper betle leaf (PBL extract and hydroxychavicol (two major BQ components, dicoumarol (aQuinone Oxidoreductase--NQO1 inhibitor and curcumin. ANE-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited by catalase and enhanced by dicoumarol, suggesting that AN components may contribute to the pathogenesis of OSF and oral cancer via induction of aberrant differentiation, cytotoxicity, COX-2 expression, and PGE2/PGF2α production.CYP4501A1, reactive oxygen species (ROS, EGFR, Src and Ras signaling pathways could all play a role in ANE-induced pathogenesis of oral cancer. Addition of PBL into BQ and curcumin consumption could inhibit the ANE-induced inflammatory response.

  14. Study of the possible role of polymorphisms of the detoxication and coagulation system genes in pathogenesis of pregnancy loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyin I. E.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study association of polymorphisms of the genes of the first CYP1A1 (T6235C and second GSTM1 («0», GSTT1 («0», GSTP1 (A313G phases of detoxication system as well as polymorphic variants of the genes of proteins of coagulation system F2 (G20210A, F5 (G1691A, and folate metabolism system MTHFR (C677T with pathogenesis of pregnancy loss. Methods. Polymorphic variants were analyzed using PCR followed by RFLP analysis in 86 healthy individuals and in 109 patients with different types of pregnancy loss. Results. Unfavorable polymorphic variants GSTP1 (313G and CYP1A1 (6235C were observed more frequently in the patients with pregnancy loss comparing to the control group. Conclusions. We assume that the 313G polymorphic variant of GSTP1 gene may be considered as a factor of hereditary susceptibility to pregnancy loss.

  15. Modulation of mRNA expression and activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, GPx and GSTP1 by the Salicornia freitagii extract in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase I-II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes are responsible for the detoxification and elimination of activated carcinogens, acting as important biomarkers for chemoprevention. Among them, cytochrome P450s plays a prominent role in the metabolic activation of xenobiotics. The herb Salicornia freitagii (SF (Amaranthaceae is known for its anticancer, antioxidant, antidiabetic and antiinflammatory activities. In this study, we determined the bioactive phenolics in the SF methanol extract and investigated its antiproliferative potential in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated the modulation of some phase I and II enzyme (CYP 1A1, 1A2, 2E1, GSTP1 and GPx mRNA expression and enzymatic activities by the SF extract and its major bioactive phenolic compounds. LC/MS-MS analysis showed that the main phenolic compounds of the methanolic SF extract are vanillic acid (48 μg/100g and p-coumaric acid (10.8 μg/100g. SF extract, vanillic acid and p-coumaric acid exhibited high antiproliferative activities in HT-29 cells, with IC50 values of 81.79μg/mL, 98.8 μM and 221.6 μM, respectively. The mRNA expression levels of CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 were decreased, while those of GSTP1 and GPx in HT-29 cells were increased after application of either the SF extract or vanillic acid. The SF extract by itself also increased the activities of GPx and GSTP1 enzymes 1.68- and 1.49-fold, respectively. Our data indicate that the SF extract and its major bioactive compound, vanillic acid, could exert a modulatory effect on the expression of enzymes that are involved in xenobiotic activation and detoxification pathways in the gastrointestinal tract. For this reason, SF can be considered as a natural source of chemopreventive agents.

  16. Association of oxidative stress gene polymorphisms with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, Santoshi Kumari; Jangala, Madhavi; Putta, Padmavathi; Koralla, Raja Meganadh; Akka, Jyothy

    2016-11-30

    Presbycusis is characterised by etiopathological changes in the cochlea of the inner ear due to genetic and environmental factors and has a serious impact on quality of life. The present study was aimed to evaluate the role of oxidant stress gene polymorphisms in the development of presbycusis. 220 subjects with confirmed presbycusis from ENT specialists of MAA ENT hospital, Hyderabad, India from 2012 to 2014 were considered for the study. 270 age and sex matched controls were included in the study. Analysis of gene polymorphisms of SNPs cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) 3801 T>C, 2455 A>G and 2453 A>C; glutathione S transferase (GST) T1 and M1; N-acetyl transferase (NAT2) 282 C>T and 857 G>A; uncoupled proteins (UCP1) (-3826) A>G and (UCP2) (866)G>A was carried out. Variations in the allelic and genotypic frequencies obtained were computed and analysed using appropriate statistical methods. The results of the study indicated that CYP1A1 gene polymorphism at 2453 C>A (adjusted OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.01-2.87) and 2455 A>G (adjusted OR: 1.87, 95% CI: 1.07-3.37), double null genotype of GSTM1 and GSTT1 (adjusted OR: 8.88, 95% CI: 4.10-19.19), NAT2 gene at C282T (adjusted OR: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.02-3.11) and G590 A (adjusted OR: 1.83, 95% CI 1.20-3.63) and UCP2 (-866) G>A (adjusted OR: 12.39; 95% CI: 6.51-23.56) showed increased risk for presbycusis while CYP1A1 at 3801 T>C and UCP1 (-3286) A>G exhibited no association. The haplotype combinations of T-G-A of CYP1A1 at 3801, 2455 and 2453 positions as well as T-A of NAT2*6 at 282 and 590 positions were found to contribute significant risk for the onset of presbycusis. Gene polymorphisms of CYP1A1 (A2455G, C2453A), NAT2*6 (C282T, G590 A), GST T1/M1 (double null genotype) and UCP2 (G-866 A) were found to contribute significant risk to presbycusis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. INDUCTION OF CYP1A1 AD CYP1B1 AND FORMATION OF DNA ADDUCTS IN C57BL/6, BALB/C, AND F1 MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO EXPOSURE TO 3-METHYLCHOLANTHRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal mice are more sensitive to chemical carcinogens than are adults. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated differences in the mutational spectrum induced in the Ki-ras gene from lung tumors isolated from [D2 x B6D2F1]F2 mice and Balb/c mice treated in utero with 3�m...

  18. Environmental Exposures, Genetic Polymorphisms and p53 Mutational Spectra in a Case-Control Study of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shields, eter

    1999-01-01

    .... Other genetic analyses are completed for MEH3, MEH4, CYP2D6, GSTMl, GST-T and CYP1A1. We have been validating a p53 mutational spectra detection technology using the Affymetrix gene chip array...

  19. Individual Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Congeners Produce Tissue- and Gene-Specific Effects on Thyroid Hormone Signaling during Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giera, Stefanie; Bansal, Ruby; Ortiz-Toro, Theresa M.; Taub, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are industrial chemicals linked to developmental deficits that may be caused in part by disrupting thyroid hormone (TH) action by either reducing serum TH or interacting directly with the TH receptor (TR). Individual PCB congeners can activate the TR in vitro when the metabolic enzyme cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) is induced, suggesting that specific PCB metabolites act as TR agonists. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we compared two combinations of PCB congeners that either activate the TR (PCB 105 and 118) or not (PCB 138 and 153) in the presence or absence of a PCB congener (PCB 126) that induces CYP1A1 in vitro. Aroclor 1254 was used as a positive control, and a group treated with propylthiouracil was included to characterize the effects of low serum TH. We monitored the effects on TH signaling in several peripheral tissues by measuring the mRNA expression of well-known TH-response genes in these tissues. Aroclor 1254 and its component PCB 105/118/126 reduced total T4 to the same extent as that of propylthiouracil but increased the expression of some TH target genes in liver. This effect was strongly correlated with CYP1A1 expression supporting the hypothesis that metabolism is necessary. Effects were gene and tissue specific, indicating that tissue-specific metabolism is an important component of PCB disruption of TH action and that PCB metabolites interact in complex ways with the TR. These are essential mechanisms to consider when evaluating the health risks of contaminant exposures, for both PCB and other polycyclic compounds known to interact with nuclear hormone receptors. PMID:21540284

  20. Multiple analytical approaches reveal distinct gene-environment interactions in smokers and non smokers in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhshan Ihsan

    Full Text Available Complex disease such as cancer results from interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Studying these factors singularly cannot explain the underlying pathogenetic mechanism of the disease. Multi-analytical approach, including logistic regression (LR, classification and regression tree (CART and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, was applied in 188 lung cancer cases and 290 controls to explore high order interactions among xenobiotic metabolizing genes and environmental risk factors. Smoking was identified as the predominant risk factor by all three analytical approaches. Individually, CYP1A1*2A polymorphism was significantly associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.69;95%CI = 1.11-2.59,p = 0.01, whereas EPHX1 Tyr113His and SULT1A1 Arg213His conferred reduced risk (OR = 0.40;95%CI = 0.25-0.65,p<0.001 and OR = 0.51;95%CI = 0.33-0.78,p = 0.002 respectively. In smokers, EPHX1 Tyr113His and SULT1A1 Arg213His polymorphisms reduced the risk of lung cancer, whereas CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2C and GSTP1 Ile105Val imparted increased risk in non-smokers only. While exploring non-linear interactions through CART analysis, smokers carrying the combination of EPHX1 113TC (Tyr/His, SULT1A1 213GG (Arg/Arg or AA (His/His and GSTM1 null genotypes showed the highest risk for lung cancer (OR = 3.73;95%CI = 1.33-10.55,p = 0.006, whereas combined effect of CYP1A1*2A 6235CC or TC, SULT1A1 213GG (Arg/Arg and betel quid chewing showed maximum risk in non-smokers (OR = 2.93;95%CI = 1.15-7.51,p = 0.01. MDR analysis identified two distinct predictor models for the risk of lung cancer in smokers (tobacco chewing, EPHX1 Tyr113His, and SULT1A1 Arg213His and non-smokers (CYP1A1*2A, GSTP1 Ile105Val and SULT1A1 Arg213His with testing balance accuracy (TBA of 0.6436 and 0.6677 respectively. Interaction entropy interpretations of MDR results showed non-additive interactions of tobacco chewing with

  1. Association study between sick building syndrome and polymorphisms of seven human detoxification genes in the Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaka, Yasunari; Kikuti, Yukie Y; Mizutani, Akiko; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Kakuta, Kazuhiko; Oka, Akira; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Sakabe, Kou; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Kimura, Minoru

    2010-03-01

    Sick building syndrome (SBS) is a chronic disorder caused by exposure to diverse indoor environmental or chemical pollutants. This study examined the association between seven detoxification genes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, and NAT2) and SBS in the Japanese population. One hundred eighty patients with SBS and 401 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. We examined the prevalence for total of eleven genetic polymorphisms of detoxification genes. However, no statistically significant differences in allele and genotype frequency distributions of eleven genetic polymorphisms of these detoxification genes were found between patients and controls. On this basis, we conclude that the polymorphisms that we assessed for the detoxification genes do not contribute to the etiology of SBS. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of dietary intake and genetic factors on hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hong-Mei; Song, Young-Jin; Yun, Hyo-Yung; Park, Joo-Seung; Kim, Heon

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Hypermethylation of the promoter of the hMLH1 gene, which plays an important role in mismatch repair during DNA replication, occurs in more than 30% of human gastric cancer tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of environmental factors, genetic polymorphisms of major metabolic enzymes, and microsatellite instability on hypermethylation of the promoter of the hMLH1 gene in gastric cancer. METHODS: Data were obtained from a hospital-based, case-control study of gastric cancer. One hundred and ten gastric cancer patients and 220 age- and sex-matched control patients completed a structured questionnaire regarding their exposure to environmental risk factors. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter, polymorphisms of the GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, ALDH2 and L-myc genes, microsatellite instability and mutations of p53 and Ki-ras genes were investigated. RESULTS: Both smoking and alcohol consumption were associated with a higher risk of gastric cancer with hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter. High intake of vegetables and low intake of potato were associated with increased likelihood of gastric cancer with hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter. Genetic polymorphisms of the GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, ALDH2, and L-myc genes were not significantly associated with the risk of gastric cancer either with or without hypermethylation in the promoter of the hMLH1 gene. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 promoter was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI): 10 of the 14 (71.4%) MSI-positive tumors showed hypermethylation, whereas 28 of 94 (29.8%) the MSI-negative tumors were hypermethylated at the hMLH1 promoter region. Hypermethylation of the hMLH1 gene promoter was significantly inversely correlated with mutation of the p53 gene. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption may influence the development of hMLH1-positive gastric cancer. Most dietary factors and

  3. Maternal smoking, xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants, and gastroschisis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mary M; Reefhuis, Jennita; Gallagher, Margaret L; Mulle, Jennifer G; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Koontz, Deborah A; Sturchio, Cynthia; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Witte, John S; Richter, Patricia; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-06-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is one proposed risk factor for gastroschisis, but reported associations have been modest, suggesting that differences in genetic susceptibility might play a role. We included 108 non-Hispanic white and 62 Hispanic families who had infants with gastroschisis, and 1,147 non-Hispanic white and 337 Hispanic families who had liveborn infants with no major structural birth defects (controls) in these analyses. DNA was extracted from buccal cells collected from infants and mothers, and information on periconceptional smoking history was obtained from maternal interviews, as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. We analyzed five polymorphisms in three genes that code for enzymes involved in metabolism of some cigarette smoke constituents (CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and NAT2). Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) independently for maternal smoking and maternal and infant gene variants, and to assess joint associations of maternal smoking and maternal or infant gene variants with gastroschisis. In analyses adjusted for maternal age at delivery and stratified by maternal race-ethnicity, we identified three suggestive associations among 30 potential associations with sufficient numbers to calculate ORs: CYP1A1*2A for non-Hispanic white mothers who smoked periconceptionally (aOR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15-0.98), and NAT2*6 for Hispanic non-smoking mothers (aOR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.12-4.19) and their infants (aOR = 2.11, 95% CI 1.00-4.48). This analysis does not support the occurrence of effect modification between periconceptional maternal smoking and most of the xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme gene variants assessed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Association of xenobiotic-metabolizing gene polymorphisms with childhood atopic diseases in Russian patients from the Republic of Bashkortostan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Iu Iu; Gra, O A; Karunas, A S; Khuzina, A Kh; Ramazanova, N N; Iuldasheva, A A; Biktasheva, A R; Etkina, E I; Nasedkina, T V; Goldenkova-Pavlova, I V; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes of biotransformation system involved in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds are effective mechanism of protection from negative environmental factors. Decreasing activity or insufficient synthesis of biotransformation system enzymes caused by genetic polymorphism form the risk of various complex diseases, including atopic. Using allele-specific hybridization on the biochip the frequencies of xenobiotic-metabolizing gene polymorphisms in Russian children with bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitisand healthy donors from the Republic of Bashkortostan have been determined. The analysis of polymorphisms in CYP1A1, GSTT1, GSTM1, NAT2, MTHFR, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes didn't reveal any association with atopic diseases. The frequencies of CYP2D6*1934G/G genotype and CYP2D6*1934G allele were significantly higher among boys with rhinitis symptoms than in control group.

  5. Indole-3-propionic acid suppresses indoxyl sulfate-induced expression of fibrotic and inflammatory genes in proximal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yisireyili, Maimaiti; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Saito, Shinichi; Murohara, Toyoaki; Niwa, Toshimitsu

    2017-11-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) induces fibrosis and inflammation in kidneys via oxidative stress through the induction of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Furthermore, IS is a potent endogenous agonist for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which regulates the transcription of genes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. Indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) is an antioxidant and has been reported to be neuroprotective. We determined whether IPA suppresses IS-induced expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 in proximal tubular cells. The effects of IS on the expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 were studied using normotensive rats and hypertensive rats. The effects of IPA on IS-induced expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 were studied using proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Furthermore, the effects of IPA on IS-induced expression and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) were studied in HK-2 cells. Administration of IS induced the expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 in the tubular cells of rat kidneys. IPA significantly suppressed IS-induced mRNA and protein expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 in HK-2 cells. IPA suppressed the IS-induced expression and phosphorylation of Stat3 in HK-2 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of Stat3 inhibited the IS-induced mRNA and protein expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 in HK-2 cells. In conclusion, IPA suppressed the IS-induced expression of AHR, CYP1A1, TGF-β1, and MCP-1 through suppression of Stat3 in proximal tubular cells. Thus, IPA suppresses IS-induced expression of fibrotic and inflammatory genes in proximal tubular cells.

  6. Polymorphisms in genes related to activation or detoxification of carcinogens might interact with smoking to increase renal cancer risk: Results from The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, K.M.; Schouten, L.J.; Dijk, B.A.C. van; Houwelingen, K. van; Hulsbergen-Kaa, C.A. van de; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Houwelingen, K. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Metabolic gene polymorphisms have previously been suggested as risk factors for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These polymorphisms are involved in activation or detoxification of carcinogens in cigarette smoke which is another RCC risk factor. We evaluated gene-environment interactions between CYP1A1,

  7. Modulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor target genes in circulating lymphocytes from dairy cows bred in a dioxin-like PCB contaminated area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolami, Flavia, E-mail: flavia.girolami@unito.it [Department of Animal Pathology, University of Turin, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Spalenza, Veronica, E-mail: veronica.spalenza@unito.it [Department of Animal Production, Epidemiology and Ecology, University of Turin, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Carletti, Monica, E-mail: monica.carletti@unito.it [Department of Animal Pathology, University of Turin, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Sacchi, Paola, E-mail: paola.sacchi@unito.it [Department of Animal Production, Epidemiology and Ecology, University of Turin, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Rasero, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.rasero@unito.it [Department of Animal Production, Epidemiology and Ecology, University of Turin, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy); Nebbia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.nebbia@unito.it [Department of Animal Pathology, University of Turin, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    Animal productions (i.e. fish, eggs, milk and dairy products) represent the major source of exposure to dioxins, furans, and dioxin-like (DL) polychlorobiphenyls for humans. The negative effects of these highly toxic and persistent pollutants are mediated by the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) that elicits the transcriptional induction of several genes, including those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Previously we demonstrated the presence and functioning of the AHR signaling pathway in primary cultures of bovine blood lymphocytes. The aim of the present study was to investigate by real time PCR the expression and the inducibility of selected target genes (i.e. AHR, AHR nuclear translocator (ARNT), AHR repressor, CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) in uncultured cells from dairy cows naturally exposed to DL-compounds. The study was carried out on two groups of animals bred in a highly polluted area and characterized by a different degree of contamination, as assessed by bulk milk TEQ values, and a control group reared in an industry free area. Bovine lymphocytes expressed only AHR, ARNT and CYP1B1 genes to a detectable level; moreover, only CYP1B1 expression appeared to be correlated to TEQ values, being higher in the most contaminated group, and decreasing along with animal decontamination. Finally, lymphocytes from exposed cows displayed a lower inducibility of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 after the in vitro treatment with a specific AHR ligand. In conclusion, our results indicate that DL-compound contaminated cows may display significant changes in AHR-target gene expression of circulating lymphocytes. - Highlights: ► The expression of AHR-target genes in blood bovine lymphocytes was evaluated. ► The lymphocyte CYP1B1 expression appears to be related to bulk milk TEQ values. ► Blood lymphocytes from dairy cows might represent a matrix for dioxin biomonitoring.

  8. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  9. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Effects of Tobacco Smoke on Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Cao

    Full Text Available This study was designed to explore the effects of tobacco smoke on gene expression through bioinformatics analyses. Gene expression profile GSE17913 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs in buccal mucosa tissues between 39 active smokers and 40 never smokers were identified. Gene Ontology Specifically, the DEG distribution in the pathway of Metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 was shown in Fig 2[corrected] were performed, followed by protein-protein interaction (PPI network, transcriptional regulatory network as well as miRNA-target regulatory network construction. In total, 88 up-regulated DEGs and 106 down-regulated DEGs were identified. Among these DEGs, cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were enriched in the Metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 pathway. In the PPI network, tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, zeta (YWHAZ, and CYP1A1 were hub genes. In the transcriptional regulatory network, transcription factors of MYC associated factor X (MAX and upstream transcription factor 1 (USF1 regulated many overlapped DEGs. In addition, protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, D (PTPRD was regulated by multiple miRNAs in the miRNA-DEG regulatory network. CYP1A1, CYP1B1, YWHAZ and PTPRD, and TF of MAX and USF1 may have the potential to be used as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in tobacco smoke-related pathological changes.

  10. Role of CYP1A1 (T6235C) polymorphism and cigarette smoking in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T6235C) polymorphism and cigarette smoking in the development of coronary heart disease in Tunisian population. Amani Achour Ikbel Zaag Latifa Gueddah Besma Trimeche Foued Ben Hadj Slama Ramzi Zemni. Research Note Volume 90 Issue ...

  11. Maneb and paraquat-induced modulation of toxicant responsive genes in the rat liver: comparison with polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Israr; Shukla, Smriti; Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Pandey, Haushila Prasad; Singh, Chetna

    2010-12-05

    Experimental studies have shown that toxicant responsive genes, cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a critical role in pesticide-induced toxicity. CYPs play pro-oxidant role and GSTs offer protection in maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ)-induced brain and lung toxicities. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated exposures of MB and/or PQ on lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione content (GSH) and toxicant responsive genes, i.e., CYP1A1, 1A2, 2E1, GSTA4-4, GSTA1-1 and GSTA3-3 in the liver and to correlate the same with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A significant augmentation in LPO and reduction in GSH content was observed in a time of exposure dependent manner in the liver and PMNs of MB and/or PQ treated animals. The expression and catalytic activity of CYP2E1 and GSTA4-4 were significantly increased following MB and/or PQ exposure both in the liver and PMNs. Although the expression of GSTA3-3 was increased, the expression of GSTA1-1 was unaltered after MB and/or PQ treatment in both the liver and PMNs. MB augmented the expression and catalytic activity of CYP1A1 in the liver, however, CYP1A2 was unaffected. PQ, on the other hand, significantly increased hepatic CYP1A2 expression and catalytic activity. MB and/or PQ did not produce any significant changes in CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in PMNs. The results of the study thus demonstrate that MB and PQ differentially regulate hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 while LPO, GSH, CYP2E1, GSTA4-4 and GSTA3-3 are modulated in the similar fashions both in the liver and PMNs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of cord blood cytochrome P450 1A1 gene according to the air pollution level of the maternal residence area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Kelishadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to compare the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1 gene expression in the cord blood of infants born from mothers living in low- and high-air polluted areas. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Spring 2012 in Isfahan, the second large and air-polluted city in Iran. The study comprised 60 neonates, consisting of 30 infants born from mothers residing in areas with high levels of air pollution and an equal number of infants born in areas with a lower air pollution level. The umbilical cord blood sample was taken immediately after birth. The relative gene expression levels of CYP1A1 were examined using real time-polymerase chain reaction method. Results: CYP1A1 gene expression level was 3.3-fold higher in the group living in areas with higher pollution level than in the other group (P = 0.01. No significant difference existed in the mean values of maternal age, gestational age, the newborns′ birth weight, and the gender distribution between the two groups. Conclusion: This study provides confirmatory evidence of prenatal health hazards of ambient air pollution and highlights the need for pollution prevention programs to protect women of childbearing age and their children. The clinical implications of this study finding should be confirmed in future longitudinal studies.

  13. Epigenetic control of gene regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria, Massimiliano; Rossi, Vincenzo

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotes, including plants, the genome is compacted into chromatin, which forms a physical barrier for gene transcription. Therefore, mechanisms that alter chromatin structure play an essential role in gene regulation. When changes in the chromatin states are inherited trough mitotic or meiotic cell division, the mechanisms responsible for these changes are defined as epigenetic. In this paper, we review data arising from genome-wide analysis of the epigenetic landscapes in different plant species to establish the correlation between specific epigenetic marks and transcription. In the subsequent sections, mechanisms of epigenetic control of gene regulation mediated by DNA-binding transcription factors and by transposons located in proximity to genes are illustrated. Finally, plant peculiarities for epigenetic control of gene regulation and future perspectives in this research area are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Epigenetic Control of cellular and developmental processes in plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clock Genes Control Cortical Critical Period Timing

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Yohei; Ye, Zhanlei; Hensch, Takao K.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control a variety of physiological processes, but whether they may also time brain development remains largely unknown. Here, we show that circadian clock genes control the onset of critical period plasticity in the neocortex. Within visual cortex of Clock-deficient mice, the emergence of circadian gene expression was dampened, and the maturation of inhibitory parvalbumin (PV)-cell networks slowed. Loss of visual acuity in response to brief monocular deprivation was concomit...

  15. Polymorphisms in metabolic genes, their combination and interaction with tobacco smoke and alcohol consumption and risk of gastric cancer: a case-control study in an Italian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Torre Giuseppe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The distribution and the potential gene-gene and gene-environment interaction of selected metabolic genetic polymorphisms was investigated in relation to gastric cancer risk in an Italian population. Methods One hundred and seven cases and 254 hospital controls, matched by age and gender, were genotyped for CYP1A1, CYP2E1, mEH, GSTM1, GSTT1, NAT2 and SULT1A1 polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis was performed for EPHX1 exons 3 and 4, as well as CYP2E1 RsaI (*5 alleles and CYP2E1 DraI (*5A or *6 alleles. The effect modification by alcohol and cigarette smoking was tested with the heterogeneity test, while the attributable proportion (AP was used to measure the biological interaction from the gene-gene interaction analysis. Results Gastric cancer risk was found to be associated with the inheritance of GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 2.10, 95%CI: 1.27–3.44 and the SULT1A1 His/His genotype (OR = 2.46, 95%CI: 1.03–5.90. No differences were observed for the haplotype distributions among cases and controls. For the first time an increased risk was detected among individuals carrying the *6 variant allele of CYP2E1 if ever-drinkers (OR = 3.70; 95%CI: 1.45–9.37 with respect to never-drinkers (OR = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.22–1.46 (p value of heterogeneity among the two estimates = 0.001. Similarly, the effect of SULT1A1 variant genotype resulted restricted to ever-smokers, with an OR of 2.58 (95%CI: 1.27–5.25 for the carriers of His allele among smokers, and an OR of 0.86 (95%CI: 0.45–1.64 among never-smokers (p value of heterogeneity among the two estimates = 0.03. The gene-gene interaction analyses demonstrated that individuals with combined GSTT1 null and NAT2 slow acetylators had an additional increased risk of gastric cancer, with an OR of 3.00 (95%CI: 1.52–5.93 and an AP of 52%. Conclusion GSTT1, SULT1A1 and NAT2 polymorphisms appear to modulate individual's susceptibility to gastric cancer in this Italian population, particularly

  16. Combinatorial Control of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Bhattacharjee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and diversity of eukaryotic organisms are a feat of nature’s engineering. Pulling the strings of such an intricate machinery requires an even more masterful and crafty approach. Only the number and type of responses that they generate exceed the staggering proportions of environmental signals perceived and processed by eukaryotes. Hence, at first glance, the cell’s sparse stockpile of controlling factors does not seem remotely adequate to carry out this response. The question as to how eukaryotes sense and respond to environmental cues has no single answer. It is an amalgamation, an interplay between several processes, pathways, and factors—a combinatorial control. A short description of some of the most important elements that operate this entire conglomerate is given in this paper.

  17. Etiological study of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in an endemic region: a population-based case control study in Huaian, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Weimin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous exposure to various environmental carcinogens and genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME are associated with many types of human cancers, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Huaian, China, is one of the endemic regions of ESCC, but fewer studies have been done in characterizing the risk factors of ESCC in this area. The aims of this study is to evaluate the etiological roles of demographic parameters, environmental and food-borne carcinogens exposure, and XME polymorphisms in formation of ESCC, and to investigate possible gene-gene and gene-environment interactions associated with ESCC in Huaian, China. Methods A population based case-control study was conducted in 107 ESCC newly diagnosed cases and 107 residency- age-, and sex-matched controls in 5 townships of Huaian. In addition to regular epidemiological and food frequency questionnaire analyses, genetic polymorphisms of phase I enzymes CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, and CYP2E1, and phase II enzymes GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX were assessed from genomic DNA using PCR based techniques. Results Consuming acrid food, fatty meat, moldy food, salted and pickled vegetables, eating fast, introverted personality, passive smoking, a family history of cancer, esophageal lesion, and infection with Helicobacter pylori were significant risk factors for ESCC (P GSTT1 null genotype was higher in cases (59.4% compared to controls (47.2% with an odds ratio (OR of 1.68 and 95% confidence interval (CI from 0.96 to 2.97 (P = 0.07, especially in males (OR = 2.78; 95% CI = 1.22–6.25; P = 0.01. No associations were found between polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2A6, CYP2E1, GSTM1, GSTP1, and EPHX and ESCC (P > 0.05. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that dietary and environmental exposures, some demographic parameters and genetic polymorphism of GSTT1 may play important roles in the development of ESCC in Huaian

  18. Clock genes control cortical critical period timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yohei; Ye, Zhanlei; Hensch, Takao K

    2015-04-08

    Circadian rhythms control a variety of physiological processes, but whether they may also time brain development remains largely unknown. Here, we show that circadian clock genes control the onset of critical period plasticity in the neocortex. Within visual cortex of Clock-deficient mice, the emergence of circadian gene expression was dampened, and the maturation of inhibitory parvalbumin (PV) cell networks slowed. Loss of visual acuity in response to brief monocular deprivation was concomitantly delayed and rescued by direct enhancement of GABAergic transmission. Conditional deletion of Clock or Bmal1 only within PV cells recapitulated the results of total Clock-deficient mice. Unique downstream gene sets controlling synaptic events and cellular homeostasis for proper maturation and maintenance were found to be mis-regulated by Clock deletion specifically within PV cells. These data demonstrate a developmental role for circadian clock genes outside the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which may contribute mis-timed brain plasticity in associated mental disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene expression profiling of cytochromes P450, ABC transporters and their principal transcription factors in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex of alcoholics, smokers and drug-free controls by qRT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Francesca; de Waziers, Isabelle; Dutheil, Mary; Vincent, Marc; Wilce, Peter A; Dodd, Peter R; Beaune, Philippe; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2015-01-01

    1. Ethanol consumption and smoking alter the expression of certain drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, potentially influencing the tissue-specific effects of xenobiotics. 2. Amygdala (AMG) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) are brain regions that modulate the effects of alcohol and smoking, yet little is known about the expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in these tissues. 3. Here, we describe the first study on the expression of 19 P450s, their redox partners, three ABC transporters and four related transcription factors in the AMG and PFC of smokers and alcoholics by quantitative RT-PCR. 4. CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C18, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP2J2, CYP2S1, CYP2U1, CYP4X1, CYP46, adrenodoxin and NADPH-P450 reductase, ABCB1, ABCG2, ABCA1, and transcription factors aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and proliferator-activated receptor α were quantified in both areas. CYP2A6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, adrenodoxin reductase and the nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor were detected but below the limit of quantification. CYP1A2 and CYP2W1 were not detected. 5. Adrenodoxin expression was elevated in all case groups over controls, and smokers showed a trend toward higher CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. 6. Our study shows that most xenobiotic-metabolizing P450s and associated redox partners, transporters and transcription factors are expressed in human AMG and PFC.

  20. a positive control plasmid for reporter gene assay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    903 for ... qualification as a positive control for luciferase reporter gene assays. Key words: Reporter gene plasmid, luciferase assay, .... tissue-specific promoters by gene gun. Br. J. Dermatol. 144: 34-39. Naylor LH (1999).

  1. Sequence variants at CYP1A1-CYP1A2 and AHR associate with coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulem, P.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Geller, F.; Prokopenko, I.; Feenstra, B.; Aben, K.K.H.; Franke, B.; Heijer, M. den; Kovacs, P.; Stumvoll, M.; Magi, R.; Yanek, L.R.; Becker, L.C.; Boyd, H.A.; Stacey, S.N.; Walters, G.B.; Jonasdottir, A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Holm, H.; Gudjonsson, S.A.; Rafnar, T.; Bjornsdottir, G.; Becker, D.M.; Melbye, M.; Kong, A.; Tonjes, A.; Thorgeirsson, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Stefansson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Coffee is the most commonly used stimulant and caffeine is its main psychoactive ingredient. The heritability of coffee consumption has been estimated at around 50%. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies of coffee consumption among coffee drinkers from Iceland (n =

  2. Sequence variants at CYP1A1-CYP1A2 and AHR associate with coffee consumption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sulem, P; Gudbjartsson, D.F; Geller, F; Prokopenko, I; Feenstra, B; Aben, K.K.H; Franke, B; Heijer, M. den; Kovacs, P; Stumvoll, M; Magi, R; Yanek, L.R; Becker, L.C; Boyd, H.A; Stacey, S.N; Walters, G.B; Jonasdottir, A; Thorleifsson, G; Holm, H; Gudjonsson, S.A; Rafnar, T; Bjornsdottir, G; Becker, D.M; Melbye, M; Kong, A; Tonjes, A; Thorgeirsson, T; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M; Stefansson, K

    2011-01-01

    .... The heritability of coffee consumption has been estimated at around 50%. We performed a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies of coffee consumption among coffee drinkers from Iceland (n = 2680), The Netherlands (n = 2791...

  3. Selenitetriglicerydes affect CYP1A1 and QR activity by involvement of reactive oxygen species and Nrf2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchocki, Piotr; Misiewicz-Krzemińska, Irena; Skupińska, Katarzyna; Niedźwiecka, Katarzyna; Lubelska, Katarzyna; Fijałek, Zbigniew; Kasprzycka-Guttman, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Selenitetriglycerides are a group of compounds that contain selenium (Se) (IV). In this paper, we present the results of examinations of three structurally-related selenitetriglicerydes that contain various Se concentrations: 2%, 5% and 7% Selol. The present study concentrates on the effect of Selol on phase 1 and 2 enzyme activity and the implications of free radicals and the nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway in the activity of this compound. The cytotoxic and cytostatic activities of the three kinds of Selol were evaluated; however, the cytotoxic effect was observed only for 7% Selol. Our results show that 2% Selol acts as a monofunctional inducer of phase 2 enzyme activity, and the induction is mediated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Selol 7% acts in an opposite manner and induces phase 1 with simultaneous inhibition of phase 2 enzyme activity. The differential effect can be associated with the increase in Se content, leading to a change in the structure of the compound.

  4. Diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease affects expression of major cytochrome P450 genes in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Noji, Keiko; Shinozaki, Shohei; Suzuki, Sachina; Umegaki, Keizo; Shimokado, Kentaro

    2016-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with impaired liver function, and resveratrol could suppress NAFLD progression. This study examined the effects of NAFLD on the expression of major cytochrome P450 (CYP) subtypes in the liver and whether the expression could be attenuated by resveratrol. C57BL/6 mice (male, 10 weeks of age) were fed a high-fat and high-sucrose (HFHS) diet to induce NAFLD. Major Cyp subtype mRNA expression in the liver was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Body and liver weights at 4 and 12 weeks were significantly higher in mice fed the HFHS diet compared with control. The HFHS diet significantly increased the accumulation of cholesterol and triglycerides at 12 weeks. Under this condition, the HFHS diet increased the expression of Cyp1a2 and decreased that of Cyp3a11 at 1 week and thereafter. On the other hand, Cyp1a1, 2b10 and 2c29 mRNA expression levels in the liver were significantly increased at 12 weeks only. Resveratrol (0.05% (w/w) in diet) slightly suppressed lipid accumulation in the liver, but failed to recover impaired Cyp gene expression levels in NAFLD. Drug metabolism may be impaired in NAFLD, and each Cyp subtype is regulated in a different manner. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Gene networks controlling Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid Seosamh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The formation of flowers is one of the main models for studying the regulatory mechanisms that underlie plant development and evolution. Over the past three decades, extensive genetic and molecular analyses have led to the identification of a large number of key floral regulators and to detailed insights into how they control flower morphogenesis. In recent years, genome-wide approaches have been applied to obtaining a global view of the gene regulatory networks underlying flower formation. Furthermore, mathematical models have been developed that can simulate certain aspects of this process and drive further experimentation. Here, we review some of the main findings made in the field of Arabidopsis thaliana flower development, with an emphasis on recent advances. In particular, we discuss the activities of the floral organ identity factors, which are pivotal for the specification of the different types of floral organs, and explore the experimental avenues that may elucidate the molecular mechanisms and gene expression programs through which these master regulators of flower development act. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Tight blood glycaemic and blood pressure control in experimental diabetic nephropathy reduces extracellular matrix production without regression of fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Bryan R; Betz, Boris; Sheldrake, Tara A; Manning, Jonathan R; Dunbar, Donald R; Dobyns, Abigail; Hughes, Jeremy; Mullins, John J

    2014-12-01

    Regression of albuminuria and renal fibrosis occurs in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) following tight control of blood glucose and blood pressure, however the pathways that promote regression remain poorly understood and we wished to characterize these using a rodent model. Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin in Cyp1a1mRen2 rats and hypertension was generated by inducing renin transgene expression with dietary indole-3-carbinol (I-3-C) for 28 weeks. At this point an 'injury cohort' was culled, while in a 'reversal cohort' glycaemia was tightly controlled using insulin implants and blood pressure normalized by withdrawing dietary I-3-C for a further 8 weeks. Pathways activated during and following reversal of diabetes and hypertension were assessed by microarray profiling. Tight control of blood glucose and blood pressure reduced albuminuria and renal hypertrophy, but had no impact on renal fibrosis. 85 genes were up-regulated specifically during the injury phase, including genes encoding multiple myofibroblast and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Conversely, 314 genes remained persistently elevated during reversal including genes linked to innate/adaptive immunity, phagocytosis, lysosomal processing and degradative metalloproteinases (MMPs). Despite increased MMP gene expression, MMP activity was suppressed during both injury and reversal, in association with up-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) protein. Physical separation of the TIMP-1/MMP complexes during zymography of tissue homogenate restored MMP activity. Normalization of blood glucose and pressure ameliorates albuminuria and inhibits excess ECM production, however persistent TIMP-1 expression hinders attempts at ECM remodelling. Therapies which counteract the action of TIMPs may accelerate scar resolution. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. The Number of Genes Controlling Resistance in Beans to Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At V3, two to many genes were found to control resistance with segregation ratios that were significantly (P≤0.05) different from that of three gene pairs. In some crosses transgressive segregation was observed. By application of appropriate variances to the equation provided by Stanisfield's formula, the number of genes in ...

  8. Locus control regions and gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractGene therapy is a procedure in which exogenous genetic material is introduced into the cells of a patient in order to correct an genetic error or to provide the cells of the patient with a new functional property. Correction can be achieved by gene targeting via homologous recombination,

  9. A gene-based information gain method for detecting gene-gene interactions in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Huang, Dongli; Guo, Maozu; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Lv, Hongchao; Wang, Limei

    2015-11-01

    Currently, most methods for detecting gene-gene interactions (GGIs) in genome-wide association studies are divided into SNP-based methods and gene-based methods. Generally, the gene-based methods can be more powerful than SNP-based methods. Some gene-based entropy methods can only capture the linear relationship between genes. We therefore proposed a nonparametric gene-based information gain method (GBIGM) that can capture both linear relationship and nonlinear correlation between genes. Through simulation with different odds ratio, sample size and prevalence rate, GBIGM was shown to be valid and more powerful than classic KCCU method and SNP-based entropy method. In the analysis of data from 17 genes on rheumatoid arthritis, GBIGM was more effective than the other two methods as it obtains fewer significant results, which was important for biological verification. Therefore, GBIGM is a suitable and powerful tool for detecting GGIs in case-control studies.

  10. The effect of cigarette smoke and arsenic exposure on urothelial carcinoma risk is modified by glutathione S-transferase M1 gene null genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Chi-Jung [Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau [Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shiue, Horng-Sheng [Department of Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Chien-Tien [Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Yu-Mei, E-mail: ymhsueh@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Inter-individual variation in the metabolism of xenobiotics, caused by factors such as cigarette smoking or inorganic arsenic exposure, is hypothesized to be a susceptibility factor for urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, our study aimed to evaluate the role of gene–environment interaction in the carcinogenesis of UC. A hospital-based case–control study was conducted. Urinary arsenic profiles were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography–hydride generator-atomic absorption spectrometry. Genotyping was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Information about cigarette smoking exposure was acquired from a lifestyle questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to estimate the UC risk associated with certain risk factors. We found that UC patients had higher urinary levels of total arsenic, higher percentages of inorganic arsenic (InAs%) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA%) and lower percentages of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA%) compared to controls. Subjects carrying the GSTM1 null genotype had significantly increased UC risk. However, no association was observed between gene polymorphisms of CYP1A1, EPHX1, SULT1A1 and GSTT1 and UC risk after adjustment for age and sex. Significant gene–environment interactions among urinary arsenic profile, cigarette smoking, and GSTM1 wild/null polymorphism and UC risk were observed after adjustment for potential risk factors. Overall, gene–environment interactions simultaneously played an important role in UC carcinogenesis. In the future, large-scale studies should be conducted using tag-SNPs of xenobiotic-metabolism-related enzymes for gene determination. -- Highlights: ► Subjects with GSTM1 null genotype had significantly increased UC risk. ► UC patients had poor arsenic metabolic ability compared to controls. ► GSTM1 null genotype may modify arsenic related UC risk.

  11. Interactions between urinary 4-tert-octylphenol levels and metabolism enzyme gene variants on idiopathic male infertility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Qin

    Full Text Available Octylphenol (OP and Trichlorophenol (TCP act as endocrine disruptors and have effects on male reproductive function. We studied the interactions between 4-tert-Octylphenol (4-t-OP, 4-n- Octylphenol (4-n-OP, 2,3,4-Trichlorophenol (2,3,4-TCP, 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP urinary exposure levels and polymorphisms in selected xenobiotic metabolism enzyme genes among 589 idiopathic male infertile patients and 396 controls in a Han-Chinese population. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS was used to measure alkylphenols and chlorophenols in urine. Polymorphisms were genotyped using the SNPstream platform and the Taqman method. Among four phenols that were detected, we found that only exposure to 4-t-OP increased the risk of male infertility (P(trend = 1.70×10(-7. The strongest interaction was between 4-t-OP and rs4918758 in CYP2C9 (P(inter = 6.05×10(-7. It presented a significant monotonic increase in risk estimates for male infertility with increasing 4-t-OP exposure levels among men with TC/CC genotype (low level compared with non-exposed, odds ratio (OR = 2.26, 95% confidence intervals (CI = 1.06, 4.83; high level compared with non-exposed, OR = 9.22, 95% CI = 2.78, 30.59, but no associations observed among men with TT genotype. We also found interactions between 4-t-OP and rs4986894 in CYP2C19, and between rs1048943 in CYP1A1, on male infertile risk (P(inter = 8.09×10(-7, P(inter = 3.73×10(-4, respectively.We observed notable interactions between 4-t-OP exposure and metabolism enzyme gene polymorphisms on idiopathic infertility in Han-Chinese men.

  12. Validating internal controls for quantitative plant gene expression studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunner Amy M

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR has greatly improved the ease and sensitivity of quantitative gene expression studies. However, accurate measurement of gene expression with this method relies on the choice of a valid reference for data normalization. Studies rarely verify that gene expression levels for reference genes are adequately consistent among the samples used, nor compare alternative genes to assess which are most reliable for the experimental conditions analyzed. Results Using real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of 10 poplar (genus Populus housekeeping genes, we demonstrate a simple method for determining the degree of stability of gene expression over a set of experimental conditions. Based on a traditional method for analyzing the stability of varieties in plant breeding, it defines measures of gene expression stability from analysis of variance (ANOVA and linear regression. We found that the potential internal control genes differed widely in their expression stability over the different tissues, developmental stages and environmental conditions studied. Conclusion Our results support that quantitative comparisons of candidate reference genes are an important part of real-time RT-PCR studies that seek to precisely evaluate variation in gene expression. The method we demonstrated facilitates statistical and graphical evaluation of gene expression stability. Selection of the best reference gene for a given set of experimental conditions should enable detection of biologically significant changes in gene expression that are too small to be revealed by less precise methods, or when highly variable reference genes are unknowingly used in real-time RT-PCR experiments.

  13. Validating internal controls for quantitative plant gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Amy M; Yakovlev, Igor A; Strauss, Steven H

    2004-08-18

    Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) has greatly improved the ease and sensitivity of quantitative gene expression studies. However, accurate measurement of gene expression with this method relies on the choice of a valid reference for data normalization. Studies rarely verify that gene expression levels for reference genes are adequately consistent among the samples used, nor compare alternative genes to assess which are most reliable for the experimental conditions analyzed. Using real-time RT-PCR to study the expression of 10 poplar (genus Populus) housekeeping genes, we demonstrate a simple method for determining the degree of stability of gene expression over a set of experimental conditions. Based on a traditional method for analyzing the stability of varieties in plant breeding, it defines measures of gene expression stability from analysis of variance (ANOVA) and linear regression. We found that the potential internal control genes differed widely in their expression stability over the different tissues, developmental stages and environmental conditions studied. Our results support that quantitative comparisons of candidate reference genes are an important part of real-time RT-PCR studies that seek to precisely evaluate variation in gene expression. The method we demonstrated facilitates statistical and graphical evaluation of gene expression stability. Selection of the best reference gene for a given set of experimental conditions should enable detection of biologically significant changes in gene expression that are too small to be revealed by less precise methods, or when highly variable reference genes are unknowingly used in real-time RT-PCR experiments.

  14. Mitotic bookmarking of genes: a novel dimension to epigenetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Young, Daniel W; Montecino, Martin A; Lian, Jane B; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2010-08-01

    Regulatory machinery is focally organized in the interphase nucleus. The information contained in these focal nuclear microenvironments must be inherited during cell division to sustain physiologically responsive gene expression in progeny cells. Recent results suggest that focal mitotic retention of phenotypic transcription factors at promoters together with histone modifications and DNA methylation--a mechanism collectively known as gene bookmarking--is a novel parameter of inherited epigenetic control that sustains cellular identity after mitosis. The epigenetic signatures imposed by bookmarking poise genes for activation or suppression following mitosis. We discuss the implications of phenotypic transcription factor retention on mitotic chromosomes in biological control and disease.

  15. Genes, Parenting, Self-Control, and Criminal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Stephen J; McNulty, Thomas L

    2016-03-01

    Self-control has been found to predict a wide variety of criminal behaviors. In addition, studies have consistently shown that parenting is an important influence on both self-control and offending. However, few studies have examined the role that biological factors may play in moderating the relationship between parenting, self-control, and offending. Using a sample of adolescent males drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 3,610), we explore whether variants of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene interact with parenting to affect self-control and offending. Results reveal that parenting interacts with these genes to influence self-control and offending, and that the parenting-by-gene interaction effect on offending is mediated by self-control. The effects of parenting on self-control and offending are most pronounced for those who carry plasticity alleles for both MAOA and DAT1. Thus, MAOA and DAT1 may be implicated in offending because they increase the negative effects of parenting on self-control. Implications for theory are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Gene regulatory networks and the role of robustness and stochasticity in the control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Lesley T.; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In any given cell, thousands of genes are expressed and work in concert to ensure the cell's function, fitness, and survival. Each gene, in turn, must be expressed at the proper time and in the proper amounts to ensure the appropriate functional outcome. The regulation and expression of some genes are highly robust; their expression is controlled by invariable expression programs. For instance, developmental gene expression is extremely similar in a given cell type from one individual to another. The expression of other genes is more variable: Their levels are noisy and are different from cell to cell and from individual to individual. This can be highly beneficial in physiological responses to outside cues and stresses. Recent advances have enabled the analysis of differential gene expression at a systems level. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) involving interactions between large numbers of genes and their regulators have been mapped onto graphic diagrams that are used to visualize the regulatory relationships. The further characterization of GRNs has already uncovered global principles of gene regulation. Together with synthetic network biology, such studies are starting to provide insights into the transcriptional mechanisms that cause robust versus stochastic gene expression and their relationships to phenotypic robustness and variability. Here, we discuss GRNs and their topological properties in relation to transcriptional and phenotypic outputs in development and organismal physiology. PMID:21324878

  17. Changes in cytochrome P450 gene expression and enzyme activity induced by xenobiotics in rabbits in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Palócz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As considerable inter-species differences exist in xenobiotic metabolism, developing new pharmaceutical therapies for use in different species is fraught with difficulties. For this reason, very few medicines have been registered for use in rabbits, despite their importance in inter alia meat and fur production. We have developed a rapid and sensitive screening system for drug safety in rabbits based on cytochrome P450 enzyme assays, specifically CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A6, employing an adaptation of the luciferin-based clinical assay currently used in human drug screening. Short-term (4-h cultured rabbit primary hepatocytes were treated with a cytochrome inducer (phenobarbital and 2 inhibitors (alpha-naphthoflavone and ketoconazole. In parallel, and to provide verification, New Zealand white rabbits were dosed with 80 mg/kg phenobarbital or 40 mg/kg ketoconazole for 3 d. Ketoconazole significantly increased CYP3A6 gene expression and decreased CYP3A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo. CYP1A1 activity was decreased by ketoconazole in vitro and increased in vivo. This is the first report of the inducer effect of ketoconazole on rabbit cytochrome isoenzymes in vivo. Our data support the use of a luciferin-based assay in short-term primary hepatocytes as an appropriate tool for xenobiotic metabolism assays and short-term toxicity testing in rabbits.

  18. Gene sequences for cytochromes p450 1A1 and 1A2: the need for biomarker development in sea otters (Enhydra lutris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sharon E; Cobb, Michael E; Oris, James T; Anderson, Jack W

    2008-11-01

    There has been recent public concern regarding the impacts of environmental pollution on populations of otters. Population level impacts have been seen with otter (Lutra lutra) populations in Europe due to polychlorinated biphenyls, and with some segments of the Prince William Sound, AK, sea otter (Enhydra lutris) population following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Despite public interest in these animals and their ecological significance, there are few tools that allow for the study of otter's response to contaminant exposure. Cytochrome p450 1A (CYP1A) performs the first step in metabolizing many xenobiotics, including many polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. CYP1A induction is a frequently used biomarker of exposure to these compounds. Despite the potential importance of this gene in ecological risk assessment, the complete coding sequence has not been published for any otter species. This study's objective was to isolate the gene for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in sea otters using a series of PCR-based approaches. The coding sequences from CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 from sea otters were identified and published in GenBank. Both CYP1A sequences are homologous to those obtained from marine mammals and other carnivores. These sequences will be useful as tools for researchers assessing contaminant exposure in mustelid populations.

  19. Chromatin—a global buffer for eukaryotic gene control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Moshkin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of eukaryotic DNA is embedded into nucleosome arrays formed by DNA wrapped around a core histone octamer. Nucleosome is a fundamental repeating unit of chromatin guarding access to the genetic information. Here, I will discuss two facets of nucleosome in eukaryotic gene control. On the one hand, nucleosome acts as a regulatory unit, which controls gene switches through a set of post-translational modifications occurring on histone tails. On the other hand, global configuration of nucleosome arrays with respect to nucleosome positioning, spacing and turnover acts as a tuning parameter for all genomic functions. A “histone code” hypothesis extents the Jacob-Monod model for eukaryotic gene control; however, when considering factors capable of reconfiguring entire nucleosome array, such as ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, this model becomes limited. Global changes in nucleosome arrays will be sensed by every gene, yet the transcriptional responses might be specific and appear as gene targeted events. What determines such specificity is unclear, but it’s likely to depend on initial gene settings, such as availability of transcription factors, and on configuration of new nucleosome array state.

  20. Regulatory states in the developmental control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Isabelle S

    2017-09-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that gene expression in multicellular organisms is controlled by the combinatorial function of multiple transcription factors. This indicates that not the individual transcription factors or signaling molecules, but the combination of expressed regulatory molecules, the regulatory state, should be viewed as the functional unit in gene regulation. Here, I discuss the concept of the regulatory state and its proposed role in the genome-wide control of gene expression. Recent analyses of regulatory gene expression in sea urchin embryos have been instrumental for solving the genomic control of cell fate specification in this system. Some of the approaches that were used to determine the expression of regulatory states during sea urchin embryogenesis are reviewed. Significant developmental changes in regulatory state expression leading to the distinct specification of cell fates are regulated by gene regulatory network circuits. How these regulatory state transitions are encoded in the genome is illuminated using the sea urchin endoderm-mesoderms cell fate decision circuit as an example. These observations highlight the importance of considering developmental gene regulation, and the function of individual transcription factors, in the context of regulatory states. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. New Regulatory Gene That Contributes to Control of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Starch Utilization Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu Hong; Cho, Diedre; Wang, Gui-Rong; Salyers, Abigail A.

    2001-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron uses starch as a source of carbon and energy. Early steps in the pathway of starch utilization, such as starch binding and starch hydrolysis, are encoded by sus genes, which have been characterized previously. The sus structural genes are expressed only if cells are grown in medium containing maltose or higher oligomers of glucose. Regulation of the sus structural genes is mediated by SusR, an activator that is encoded by a gene located next to the sus structural genes. A strain with a disruption in susR cannot grow on starch but can still grow on maltose and maltotriose. A search for transposon-generated mutants that could not grow on maltose and maltotriose unexpectedly located a gene, designated malR, which regulates expression of an α-glucosidase not controlled by SusR. Although a disruption in susR did not affect expression of the malR controlled gene, a disruption in malR reduced expression of the sus structural genes. Thus, MalR appears to participate with SusR in regulation of the sus genes. Results of transcriptional fusion assays and reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that malR is expressed constitutively. Moreover, multiple copies of malR provided on a plasmid (5 to 10 copies per cell) more than doubled the amount of α-glucosidase activity in cell extracts. Our results demonstrate that the starch utilization system of B. thetaiotaomicron is controlled on at least two levels by the regulatory proteins SusR and MalR. PMID:11717279

  2. Achieving HIV-1 Control through RNA-Directed Gene Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Klemm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection has been transformed by combined anti-retroviral therapy (ART, changing a universally fatal infection into a controllable infection. However, major obstacles for an HIV-1 cure exist. The HIV latent reservoir, which exists in resting CD4+ T cells, is not impacted by ART, and can reactivate when ART is interrupted or ceased. Additionally, multi-drug resistance can arise. One alternate approach to conventional HIV-1 drug treatment that is being explored involves gene therapies utilizing RNA-directed gene regulation. Commonly known as RNA interference (RNAi, short interfering RNA (siRNA induce gene silencing in conserved biological pathways, which require a high degree of sequence specificity. This review will provide an overview of the silencing pathways, the current RNAi technologies being developed for HIV-1 gene therapy, current clinical trials, and the challenges faced in progressing these treatments into clinical trials.

  3. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri: Control of Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-04

    RR04106 411d019 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) U. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression...communication - - 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) The lux genes of Vibrio fischeri encode the ability of this...Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium START DATE: 15 August 1988

  4. Air pollutants, genes and early childhood acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rakesh; Topinka, Jan; Joad, Jesse P; Dostal, Miroslav; Sram, Radim J; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-09-01

    Studies have reported gene-by-environment interaction for chronic respiratory conditions but none on acute illnesses in children. We investigated, longitudinally, whether genotype modifies the relationship of environmental exposures (second-hand tobacco smoke, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, particulate matter acute bronchitis in children below two years. A random sample of 1133 children, born between 1994 and 1998, in two districts of the Czech Republic, was followed-up from birth, of which 793 were genotyped. Pediatric records were abstracted for respiratory illnesses. Second-hand tobacco smoke exposure from household members was obtained through questionnaires and verified using urine cotinine. Air monitoring provided estimates of ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and PM2.5. Additionally, we collected information on a range of potential confounders including breastfeeding history, indoor fuel use, other children in household, maternal characteristics, ambient temperature etc. DNA was extracted from tissues taken from the middle of the placenta, opposite the umbilical cord. We examined six single nucleotide polymorphisms (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, CYP1A1 MspI, EPHX1 exon 3 and 4) and one (EPHX1) diplotype. To investigate effect measure modification we constructed logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations (for repeated observations) stratified by genotypes. The EPHX1 low activity diplotype consistently imparts greater susceptibility to bronchitis from second-hand tobacco smoke, polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and PM2.5. Each of these three classes of exposure also showed elevated risk for bronchitis in the presence of either one or two histidines at exon 3 and exon 4 of EPHX1. Additional effect modifiers include CYP1A1 and GSTT1. Several xenobiotic metabolizing genes may modify the impact of second-hand tobacco smoke and ambient air pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and PM2.5, on acute bronchitis in preschool children

  5. The Number of Genes Controlling Resistance in Beans to Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten crosses were made between resistant (R), susceptible (S), RxS susceptible and Intermediate (I), SxI and RxR bean lines to common bacterial blight. The F1 were advanced to F2 and in each cross over 250 F2 plants were used to evaluate for the number of genes controlling resistance using Mendelian genetics and ...

  6. A single recessive gene controls fragrance in cucumber (Cucumis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-10

    Apr 10, 2013 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH NOTE. A single recessive gene controls fragrance ... bitaceae. Cucumber fruits are consumed as a vegetable fresh or cooked or in pickled form. Over 95% of the cucumber ... Keywords. fragrance; aroma; cucumber; Cucumis sativus. Journal of Genetics, Vol.

  7. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-12-21

    To analyze colorectal carcinogenesis and age-related DNA methylation alterations of gene sequences associated with epigenetic clock CpG sites. In silico DNA methylation analysis of 353 epigenetic clock CpG sites published by Steve Horvath was performed using methylation array data for a set of 123 colonic tissue samples [64 colorectal cancer (CRC), 42 adenoma, 17 normal; GEO accession number: GSE48684]. Among the differentially methylated age-related genes, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1) promoter methylation was further investigated in colonic tissue from 8 healthy adults, 19 normal children, 20 adenoma and 8 CRC patients using bisulfite-specific PCR followed by methylation-specific high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. mRNA expression of age-related "epigenetic clock" genes was studied using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 whole transcriptome data of 153 colonic biopsy samples (49 healthy adult, 49 adenoma, 49 CRC, 6 healthy children) (GEO accession numbers: GSE37364, GSE10714, GSE4183, GSE37267). Whole promoter methylation analysis of genes showing inverse DNA methylation-gene expression data was performed on 30 colonic samples using methyl capture sequencing. Fifty-seven age-related CpG sites including hypermethylated PPP1R16B, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated MGP, PIPOX were differentially methylated between CRC and normal tissues (P genes were changed, while in adenoma samples 102 genes showed differential expression compared with normal colonic tissue (P 0.5). The change of expression for several genes including SYNE1, CLEC3B, LTBP3 and SFRP1, followed the same pattern in aging and carcinogenesis, though not for all genes (e.g., MGP). Several age-related DNA methylation alterations can be observed during CRC development and progression affecting the mRNA expression of certain CRC- and adenoma-related key control genes.

  8. An in vivo and in vitro comparison of CYP gene induction in mice using liver slices and quantitative RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignoni, Marcella; de Kanter, Ruben; Grossi, Pietro; Saturno, Grazia; Barbaria, Elena; Monshouwer, Mario

    2006-02-01

    The scope of this study was to compare in vitro and in vivo cytochrome P450 (CYP) gene induction in mice, using liver slices as an in vitro model. We have chosen to study mice to be able to better interpret CYP induction during long-term safety studies in this species. Mouse liver slices were incubated with beta-naphthoflavone (betaNF), phenobarbital (PB) or dexamethasone (DEX) for 24 h. In addition, in an in vivo study, mice were treated with the same compounds for three days. The mRNA expression of cyp1a1, cyp1a2, cyp2b10 and cyp3a11, which are important for drug metabolism and inducible by xenobiotics, were investigated in vivo and in vitro by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Both in mouse liver slices and in vivo, betaNF was found to be a potent inducer of cyp1a1 and to a lesser extent of cyp1a2. All three compounds induced cyp2b10 mRNA levels, while the cyp3a11 mRNA level was induced only by DEX. Overall, these data demonstrated a good predictive in vitro-in vivo correlation of CYP induction.

  9. Towards resolving the transcription factor network controlling myelin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Debra L; Denarier, Eric; Friedman, Hana C; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Peterson, Alan C

    2011-10-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is produced from spirally-wrapped oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of inherited or acquired myelin abnormalities in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, it plays a critical role in nervous system function. Myelin sheath production coincides with rapid up-regulation of numerous genes. The complexity of their subsequent expression patterns, along with recently recognized heterogeneity within the oligodendrocyte lineage, suggest that the regulatory networks controlling such genes drive multiple context-specific transcriptional programs. Conferring this nuanced level of control likely involves a large repertoire of interacting transcription factors (TFs). Here, we combined novel strategies of computational sequence analyses with in vivo functional analysis to establish a TF network model of coordinate myelin-associated gene transcription. Notably, the network model captures regulatory DNA elements and TFs known to regulate oligodendrocyte myelin gene transcription and/or oligodendrocyte development, thereby validating our approach. Further, it links to numerous TFs with previously unsuspected roles in CNS myelination and suggests collaborative relationships amongst both known and novel TFs, thus providing deeper insight into the myelin gene transcriptional network.

  10. Automated large-scale control of gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mehmet; Alhajj, Reda; Polat, Faruk

    2010-04-01

    Controlling gene regulatory networks (GRNs) is an important and hard problem. As it is the case in all control problems, the curse of dimensionality is the main issue in real applications. It is possible that hundreds of genes may regulate one biological activity in an organism; this implies a huge state space, even in the case of Boolean models. This is also evident in the literature that shows that only models of small portions of the genome could be used in control applications. In this paper, we empower our framework for controlling GRNs by eliminating the need for expert knowledge to specify some crucial threshold that is necessary for producing effective results. Our framework is characterized by applying the factored Markov decision problem (FMDP) method to the control problem of GRNs. The FMDP is a suitable framework for large state spaces as it represents the probability distribution of state transitions using compact models so that more space and time efficient algorithms could be devised for solving control problems. We successfully mapped the GRN control problem to an FMDP and propose a model reduction algorithm that helps find approximate solutions for large networks by using existing FMDP solvers. The test results reported in this paper demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Cloning of embryonal stem cell-specific genes: characterization of the transcriptionally controlled gene esg-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, P; MacLean-Hunter, S; Ehlert, F; Möröy, T; Müller, R

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated, by differential library screening, eight cDNAs representing genes that are specifically expressed in the embryonal stem cell line IMT-11, when compared to the parietal endoderm-like cell line PYS-2 or to NIH3T3 fibroblasts. One of these genes, embryonal stem cell gene 1 (esg-1), was analyzed in detail. esg-1 mRNA is found at high levels in both IMT-11 and F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and disappears during the differentiation of the stem cells. Furthermore, expression of the gene was found to be extremely low in, or absent from, oocytes and fertilized eggs, but it is strongly induced at the 2-cell stage, reaching maximum levels at the 4-cell stage. In contrast, esg-1 expression is detectable neither in midgestation embryos nor in neonatal tissues. These results strongly suggest that esg-1 is expressed specifically or at least predominantly in embryonal stem cells. Antibodies directed against a glutathione S-transferase-esg-1 fusion product detect a protein of M(r) approximately 14,000 in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, but not in differentiated cells. Apart from the esg-1 gene, which contains two introns, there are at least seven esg-1-related pseudogenes in the mouse genome that differ from the esg-1 gene by the presence of multiple point mutations, by the lack of intervening sequences, and/or by the presence of a polyadenylated stretch at the 3' end. The esg-1 gene is under stringent transcriptional control in differentiating and differentiated cells, as shown by both nuclear run-on assays and the transient F9 stem cell-specific expression of constructs consisting of esg-1 upstream sequences fused to a luciferase reporter gene.

  12. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bivalent Epigenetic Control of Oncofetal Gene Expression in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Frietze, Seth E; Gordon, Jonathan A; Heath, Jessica L; Messier, Terri; Hong, Deli; Boyd, Joseph R; Kang, Mingu; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms of epigenetic control that include DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNAs, and mitotic gene bookmarking play pivotal roles in stringent gene regulation during lineage commitment and maintenance. Experimental evidence indicates that bivalent chromatin domains, i.e., genome regions that are marked by both H3K4me3 (activating) and H3K27me3 (repressive) histone modifications, are a key property of pluripotent stem cells. Bivalency of developmental genes during the G 1 phase of the pluripotent stem cell cycle contributes to cell fate decisions. Recently, some cancer types have been shown to exhibit partial recapitulation of bivalent chromatin modifications that are lost along with pluripotency, suggesting a mechanism by which cancer cells reacquire properties that are characteristic of undifferentiated, multipotent cells. This bivalent epigenetic control of oncofetal gene expression in cancer cells may offer novel insights into the onset and progression of cancer and may provide specific and selective options for diagnosis as well as for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Interaction of cytochrome P4501A1 genotypes with other risk factors and susceptibility to lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Parag P.; Singh, Arvind P.; Singh, Madhu; Mathur, Neeraj [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Pant, Mohan C. [Department of Radiotherapy, King George' s Medical University, Shahmina Road, Lucknow 226001 (India); Mishra, Bhartendu N. [Department of Biotechnology, IET, Sitapur Road, Lucknow 226021 (India); Parmar, Devendra [Developmental Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P.O. Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)], E-mail: parmar_devendra@hotmail.com

    2008-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of death throughout the world with cigarette smoking being established as the major etiological factor in lung cancer. Since not much information is available regarding the polymorphism in drug metabolizing enzymes and lung cancer risk in the Indian population, the present case-control study attempted to investigate the association of polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and glutathione-S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) with risk to squamous cell carcinoma of lung malignancy. Patients suffering from lung cancer (n = 200) and visiting OPD facility of Department of Radiotherapy, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, were included in the study. Equal number (n = 200) of age and sex matched healthy individuals were also enrolled in the study. Our data revealed that the variant genotypes of CYP1A1*2A, CYP1A1*2C and CYP1A1*4 were found to be over represented in the lung cancer patients when compared to controls. CYP1A1*2A variant genotypes (combined heterozygous and mutant genotypes) revealed significant association towards the lung cancer risk (OR: 1.93, 95%CI: 1.28-2.89, p = 0.002). Likewise, GSTM1 null genotypes were found to be over represented in patients when compared to controls. Haplotype analysis revealed that CYP1A1 haplotype, C-G-C increased the lung cancer risk (OR: 3.90, 95%CI: 1.00-15.04, p = 0.025) in the patients. The lung cancer risk was increased several two-to fourfold in the patients carrying the genotype combinations of CYP1A1*2A and GSTM1 suggesting the role of gene-gene interaction in lung cancer. Cigarette smoking or tobacco chewing or alcohol consumption was also found to interact with CYP1A1 genotypes in increasing the risk to lung cancer further demonstrating the role of gene-environment interaction in development of lung cancer.

  15. Gene networks controlling the initiation of flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Frank; Riechmann, José L

    2010-12-01

    The onset of flower formation is a key regulatory event during the life cycle of angiosperm plants, which marks the beginning of the reproductive phase of development. It has been shown that floral initiation is under tight genetic control, and deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms has been a main area of interest in plant biology for the past two decades. Here, we provide an overview of the developmental and genetic processes that occur during floral initiation. We further review recent studies that have led to the genome-wide identification of target genes of key floral regulators and discuss how they have contributed to an in-depth understanding of the gene regulatory networks controlling early flower development. We focus especially on a master regulator of floral initiation in Arabidopsis thaliana APETALA1 (AP1), but also outline what is known about the AP1 network in other plant species and the evolutionary implications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene Controlling High Milk Lactoferrin Content in Holstein Friesian Cows

    OpenAIRE

    Cece Sumantri

    2006-01-01

    Lactoferrin is considered as an antimicrobial and antiviral protein, therefore milk that contains high lactoferrin is potential for health-enhancing nutraceuticals for food and pharmaceutical applications . The main objective of this paper is to discuss in more detail about lactoferrin function and how gene could control high lactoferrin content in milk . Milk lactoferrin content is still various among individual . Therefore, selection should be carried out to increase lactoferrin content in ...

  17. Statistical Quality Control of Microarray Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Lu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about how to control the quality of microarray expression data. Since gene-expression microarrays have become almost as widely used as measurement tools in biological research, we survey microarray experimental data to see possibilities and problems to control microarray expression data. We use both variable measure and attribute measure to visualize microarray expression data. According to the attribute data's structure, we use control charts to visualize fold change and t-test attributes in order to find the root causes. Then, we build data mining prediction models to evaluate the output. According to the accuracy of the prediction model, we can prove control charts can effectively visualize root causes.

  18. CROSS-REACTIVITY OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST PEPTIDE 277-294 OF RAINBOW TROUT CYP1A1 WITH HEPATIC CYP1A AMONG FISH. (R823881)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractExposure to a variety of xenobiotics, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), results in the induction of CYP1A and related biological activity. Historically, antibodies against purified CYP1A have been raised...

  19. Characterization of the transgenic CA-AhR mouse - cell specific expression of the CA-AhR using CYP1A1 as a marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnberg, S.; Lindstam, M.; Andersson, P.; Hanberg, A. [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Poellinger, L. [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    The risk assessments of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs performed by WHO and EU lead to major concerns. The tolerable daily intake for humans has been assessed to be within the range of human exposures occurring in the general population today. Dioxins are known to adversely impair reproduction and affect development of reproductive organs, as well as the early development of the immune and the nervous systems. The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) mediates most toxic effects of dioxins, such as 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and PCBs. In order to study the mechanisms of toxicity of ligands of the Ah receptor we have created a transgenic mouse model expressing a constitutively active Ah receptor (CA-AhR). The mutant Ah receptor is expressed and functionally active in most (or all) organs. Consequently, the CA-AhR mice show several of the well-known effects of dioxin exposure. Since the CA-AhR is continuously active at a relatively low level and from early development, this model resembles the human exposure scenario and is thus suitable for studies on mechanisms of action of Ah receptor ligands.

  20. AAC as a Potential Target Gene to Control Verticillium dahliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium dahliae invades the roots of host plants and causes vascular wilt, which seriously diminishes the yield of cotton and other important crops. The protein AAC (ADP, ATP carrier is responsible for transferring ATP from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. When V. dahliae protoplasts were transformed with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting the VdAAC gene, fungal growth and sporulation were significantly inhibited. To further confirm a role for VdAAC in fungal development, we generated knockout mutants (ΔVdACC. Compared with wild-type V. dahliae (Vd wt, ΔVdAAC was impaired in germination and virulence; these impairments were rescued in the complementary strains (ΔVdAAC-C. Moreover, when an RNAi construct of VdAAC under the control of the 35S promoter was used to transform Nicotiana benthamiana, the expression of VdAAC was downregulated in the transgenic seedlings, and they had elevated resistance against V. dahliae. The results of this study suggest that VdAAC contributes to fungal development, virulence and is a promising candidate gene to control V. dahliae. In addition, RNAi is a highly efficient way to silence fungal genes and provides a novel strategy to improve disease resistance in plants.

  1. Genes Acting on Transcriptional Control during Abiotic Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glacy Jaqueline da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses are the major cause of yield loss in crops around the world. Greater genetic gains are possible by combining the classical genetic improvement with advanced molecular biology techniques. The understanding of mechanisms triggered by plants to meet conditions of stress is of fundamental importance for the elucidation of these processes. Current genetically modified crops help to mitigate the effects of these stresses, increasing genetic gains in order to supply the agricultural market and the demand for better quality food throughout the world. To obtain safe genetic modified organisms for planting and consumption, a thorough grasp of the routes and genes that act in response to these stresses is necessary. This work was developed in order to collect important information about essential TF gene families for transcriptional control under abiotic stress responses.

  2. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppée Jean-Yves

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III to As(V as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III. To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54 of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III in this microorganism.

  3. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M; Baehrecke, Eric H; Duncan, Ian

    2012-02-21

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates.

  4. Validation of endogenous control genes for gene expression studies on human ocular surface epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Kulkarni

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate a panel of ten known endogenous control genes (ECG with quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qPCR, for identification of stably expressed endogenous control genes in the ocular surface (OS epithelial regions including cornea, limbus, limbal epithelial crypt and conjunctiva to normalise the quantitative reverse transcription PCR data of genes of interest expressed in above-mentioned regions. METHOD: The lasermicrodissected (LMD OS epithelial regions of cryosectioned corneoscleral buttons from the cadaver eyes were processed for RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis to detect genes of interest with qPCR. Gene expression of 10 known ECG--glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, beta actin (ACTB, peptidylprolyl isomerase (PPIA, TATA-box binding protein (TBP1, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT1, beta glucuronidase (GUSB, Eucaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (18S, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, ribosomal protein, large, P0 (RPLP0--was measured in the OS epithelial regions by qPCR method and the data collected was further analysed using geNorm software. RESULTS: The expression stability of ecgs in the os epithelial regions in increasing order as determined with genorm software is as follows: ACTB<18Sgenes of interest. The results from this study are broadly applicable to quantitative reverse transcription PCR studies on human OS epithelium and provide evidence for the use

  5. A Grhl2-dependent gene network controls trophoblast branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walentin, Katharina; Hinze, Christian; Werth, Max; Haase, Nadine; Varma, Saaket; Morell, Robert; Aue, Annekatrin; Pötschke, Elisabeth; Warburton, David; Qiu, Andong; Barasch, Jonathan; Purfürst, Bettina; Dieterich, Christoph; Popova, Elena; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Yurtdas, Zeliha Yesim; Kilic, Ergin; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M

    2015-03-15

    Healthy placental development is essential for reproductive success; failure of the feto-maternal interface results in pre-eclampsia and intrauterine growth retardation. We found that grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2), a CP2-type transcription factor, is highly expressed in chorionic trophoblast cells, including basal chorionic trophoblast (BCT) cells located at the chorioallantoic interface in murine placentas. Placentas from Grhl2-deficient mouse embryos displayed defects in BCT cell polarity and basement membrane integrity at the chorioallantoic interface, as well as a severe disruption of labyrinth branching morphogenesis. Selective Grhl2 inactivation only in epiblast-derived cells rescued all placental defects but phenocopied intraembryonic defects observed in global Grhl2 deficiency, implying the importance of Grhl2 activity in trophectoderm-derived cells. ChIP-seq identified 5282 GRHL2 binding sites in placental tissue. By integrating these data with placental gene expression profiles, we identified direct and indirect Grhl2 targets and found a marked enrichment of GRHL2 binding adjacent to genes downregulated in Grhl2(-/-) placentas, which encoded known regulators of placental development and epithelial morphogenesis. These genes included that encoding the serine protease inhibitor Kunitz type 1 (Spint1), which regulates BCT cell integrity and labyrinth formation. In human placenta, we found that human orthologs of murine GRHL2 and its targets displayed co-regulation and were expressed in trophoblast cells in a similar domain as in mouse placenta. Our data indicate that a conserved Grhl2-coordinated gene network controls trophoblast branching morphogenesis, thereby facilitating development of the site of feto-maternal exchange. This might have implications for syndromes related to placental dysfunction. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Dinucleotide controlled null models for comparative RNA gene prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Tanja; Washietl, Stefan

    2008-05-27

    Comparative prediction of RNA structures can be used to identify functional noncoding RNAs in genomic screens. It was shown recently by Babak et al. [BMC Bioinformatics. 8:33] that RNA gene prediction programs can be biased by the genomic dinucleotide content, in particular those programs using a thermodynamic folding model including stacking energies. As a consequence, there is need for dinucleotide-preserving control strategies to assess the significance of such predictions. While there have been randomization algorithms for single sequences for many years, the problem has remained challenging for multiple alignments and there is currently no algorithm available. We present a program called SISSIz that simulates multiple alignments of a given average dinucleotide content. Meeting additional requirements of an accurate null model, the randomized alignments are on average of the same sequence diversity and preserve local conservation and gap patterns. We make use of a phylogenetic substitution model that includes overlapping dependencies and site-specific rates. Using fast heuristics and a distance based approach, a tree is estimated under this model which is used to guide the simulations. The new algorithm is tested on vertebrate genomic alignments and the effect on RNA structure predictions is studied. In addition, we directly combined the new null model with the RNAalifold consensus folding algorithm giving a new variant of a thermodynamic structure based RNA gene finding program that is not biased by the dinucleotide content. SISSIz implements an efficient algorithm to randomize multiple alignments preserving dinucleotide content. It can be used to get more accurate estimates of false positive rates of existing programs, to produce negative controls for the training of machine learning based programs, or as standalone RNA gene finding program. Other applications in comparative genomics that require randomization of multiple alignments can be considered. SISSIz

  7. Dinucleotide controlled null models for comparative RNA gene prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesell Tanja

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative prediction of RNA structures can be used to identify functional noncoding RNAs in genomic screens. It was shown recently by Babak et al. [BMC Bioinformatics. 8:33] that RNA gene prediction programs can be biased by the genomic dinucleotide content, in particular those programs using a thermodynamic folding model including stacking energies. As a consequence, there is need for dinucleotide-preserving control strategies to assess the significance of such predictions. While there have been randomization algorithms for single sequences for many years, the problem has remained challenging for multiple alignments and there is currently no algorithm available. Results We present a program called SISSIz that simulates multiple alignments of a given average dinucleotide content. Meeting additional requirements of an accurate null model, the randomized alignments are on average of the same sequence diversity and preserve local conservation and gap patterns. We make use of a phylogenetic substitution model that includes overlapping dependencies and site-specific rates. Using fast heuristics and a distance based approach, a tree is estimated under this model which is used to guide the simulations. The new algorithm is tested on vertebrate genomic alignments and the effect on RNA structure predictions is studied. In addition, we directly combined the new null model with the RNAalifold consensus folding algorithm giving a new variant of a thermodynamic structure based RNA gene finding program that is not biased by the dinucleotide content. Conclusion SISSIz implements an efficient algorithm to randomize multiple alignments preserving dinucleotide content. It can be used to get more accurate estimates of false positive rates of existing programs, to produce negative controls for the training of machine learning based programs, or as standalone RNA gene finding program. Other applications in comparative genomics that require

  8. Genetic control of eosinophilia in mice: gene(s) expressed in bone marrow-derived cells control high responsiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadas, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    A heterogeneity in the capacity of strains of mice to mount eosinophilia is described. BALB/c and C3H are eosinophil high responder strains (EO-HR) and CBA and A/J are eosinophil low responder strains (EO-LR), judged by the response of blood eosinophils to Ascaris suum, and the response of blood, bone marrow, and spleen eosinophils to keyhole limpet hemocyanin given 2 days after 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. Some of the gene(s) for high responsiveness appear to be dominant because (EO-HR x EO-LR)F/sub 1/ mice were intermediate to high responders. This gene is expressed in bone marrow-derived cells because radiation chimeras of the type EO-HR..-->..F/sub 1/ were high responders and EO-LR..-->..F/sub 1/ were low responders. This description of a genetic control of eosinophilia in mice may be useful in understanding the role of this cell in parasite immunity and allergy.

  9. Phenobarbital-induced expression of cytochrome P450 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, P

    2000-01-01

    In contrast to the well-known Ah receptor-mediated regulation of the CYP1A1 gene by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the molecular mechanism by which phenobarbital (PB) and PB-like inducers affect transcription of CYP genes remains unknown; no receptor for these chemicals has been found to date. However, in the last 5 years PB-responsive sequences have been identified in the 5' flanking regions of several P450 genes. The phenobarbital-responsive enhancer unit (PBRU) of CYP2B gene family members contain two potential nuclear receptor binding sites (NR1 and NR2) that flank a nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) binding motif. The nuclear factors that regulate PBRU activity have not yet been characterized. It seems that PB may activate multiple nuclear orphan receptors to induce various CYP genes. CYP2B and CYP3A genes appear to be targets for the orphan receptors CAR and PXR, respectively. It is also possible that the pleiotropic effects of PB can, in part, be explained by the ability of the CAR-RXR heterodimer to bind to a variety of nuclear receptor binding motifs. The induction of cytochromes P450 may result in interactions between xenobiotics and in the interference of xenobiotic metabolism and endogenous signalling pathways.

  10. Regulation of clock-controlled genes in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bozek

    Full Text Available The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs.Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCKratioBMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, RORalpha and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4alpha. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1 and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1 are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including

  11. Regulation of Clock-Controlled Genes in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Heine, Markus; Dame, Christof; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    The complexity of tissue- and day time-specific regulation of thousands of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) suggests that many regulatory mechanisms contribute to the transcriptional output of the circadian clock. We aim to predict these mechanisms using a large scale promoter analysis of CCGs. Our study is based on a meta-analysis of DNA-array data from rodent tissues. We searched in the promoter regions of 2065 CCGs for highly overrepresented transcription factor binding sites. In order to compensate the relatively high GC-content of CCG promoters, a novel background model to avoid a bias towards GC-rich motifs was employed. We found that many of the transcription factors with overrepresented binding sites in CCG promoters exhibit themselves circadian rhythms. Among the predicted factors are known regulators such as CLOCK∶BMAL1, DBP, HLF, E4BP4, CREB, RORα and the recently described regulators HSF1, STAT3, SP1 and HNF-4α. As additional promising candidates of circadian transcriptional regulators PAX-4, C/EBP, EVI-1, IRF, E2F, AP-1, HIF-1 and NF-Y were identified. Moreover, GC-rich motifs (SP1, EGR, ZF5, AP-2, WT1, NRF-1) and AT-rich motifs (MEF-2, HMGIY, HNF-1, OCT-1) are significantly overrepresented in promoter regions of CCGs. Putative tissue-specific binding sites such as HNF-3 for liver, NKX2.5 for heart or Myogenin for skeletal muscle were found. The regulation of the erythropoietin (Epo) gene was analysed, which exhibits many binding sites for circadian regulators. We provide experimental evidence for its circadian regulated expression in the adult murine kidney. Basing on a comprehensive literature search we integrate our predictions into a regulatory network of core clock and clock-controlled genes. Our large scale analysis of the CCG promoters reveals the complexity and extensiveness of the circadian regulation in mammals. Results of this study point to connections of the circadian clock to other functional systems including metabolism, endocrine

  12. Robust Tests for Additive Gene-Environment Interaction in Case-Control Studies Using Gene-Environment Independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Gang; Lee, Seunggeun; Lee, Alice W

    2018-01-01

    There have been recent proposals advocating the use of additive gene-environment interaction instead of the widely used multiplicative scale, as a more relevant public health measure. Using gene-environment independence enhances the power for testing multiplicative interaction in case-control stu...

  13. Ellis Englesberg and the discovery of positive control in gene regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Based on his work with the Escherichia coli l-arabinose operon, Ellis Englesberg proposed in 1965 that the regulatory gene araC was an "activator gene" required for positive control of the ara operon...

  14. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Joanne R; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies.

  15. Tissue-specific control elements of the Thy-1 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vidal; E. Spanopoulou; R. Morris (Roger); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractWe have exploited the structural homology, but different patterns of expression of the murine and human Thy-1 genes to map a number of tissue-specific enhancer elements in the genes. All of these are located downstream from the site of transcriptional initiation. The human gene contains

  16. PLETHORA Genes Control Regeneration by a Two-step Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, Abdul; Durgaprasad, Kavya; Sugimoto, Kaoru; Du, Yujuan; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Trivedi, Zankhana B.; Abhayadev, Pazhoor V.; Pinon, Violaine; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.; Scheres, Ben; Prasad, Kalika

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Regeneration, a remarkable example of developmental plasticity displayed by both plants and animals, involves successive developmental events driven in response to environmental cues. Despite decades of study on the ability of the plant tissues to regenerate complete fertile shoot system after inductive cues, the mechanisms by which cells acquire pluripotency and subsequently regenerate complete organs remain unknown. Results Here we show that three PLETHORA (PLT) genes, PLT3, PLT5 and PLT7 regulate de novo shoot regeneration in Arabidopsis by controlling two distinct developmental events. Cumulative loss of function of these three genes causes the intermediate cell mass, callus, to be incompetent to form shoot progenitors, whereas induction of PLT5 or PLT7 can render shoot regeneration hormone-independent. We further show that PLT3, PLT5 and PLT7 establish pluripotency by activating root stem cell regulators PLT1 and PLT2, as reconstitution of either PLT1 or PLT2 in the plt3; plt5-2; plt7 mutant re-established the competence to regenerate shoot progenitor cells, but did not lead to the completion of shoot regeneration. PLT3, PLT5 and PLT7 additionally regulate and require the shoot-promoting factor CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 to complete the shoot formation program. Conclusions Our findings uncouple the acquisition of competence to regenerate shoot progenitor cells from completion of shoot formation, indicating a two-step mechanism of de novo shoot regeneration that operates in all tissues irrespective of their origin. Our studies reveal intermediate developmental phases of regeneration and provide a deeper understanding into the mechanistic basis of regeneration. PMID:25819565

  17. A Bayesian Semiparametric Approach to Learning About Gene-Gene Interactions in Case-Control Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Durba; Bhattacharya, Sourabh

    2014-01-01

    Gene-gene interactions are often regarded as playing significant roles in influencing variabilities of complex traits. Although much research has been devoted to this area, to date a comprehensive statistical model that adequately addresses the highly dependent structures associated with the interactions between the genes, multiple loci of every gene, various and unknown number of sub-populations that the subjects arise from, seem to be lacking. In this paper, we propose and develop a novel B...

  18. Identification QTLs Controlling Genes for Se Uptake in Lentil Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Duygu; Sever, Tugce; Aldemir, Secil; Yagmur, Bulent; Temel, Hulya Yilmaz; Kaya, Hilal Betul; Alsaleh, Ahmad; Kahraman, Abdullah; Ozkan, Hakan; Vandenberg, Albert; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an excellent source of protein and carbohydrates and is also rich in essential trace elements for the human diet. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for human health and nutrition, providing protection against several diseases and regulating important biological systems. Dietary intake of 55 μg of Se per day is recommended for adults, with inadequate Se intake causing significant health problems. The objective of this study was to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) of genes controlling Se accumulation in lentil seeds using a population of 96 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from the cross “PI 320937” × “Eston” grown in three different environments for two years (2012 and 2013). Se concentration in seed varied between 119 and 883 μg/kg. A linkage map consisting of 1,784 markers (4 SSRs, and 1,780 SNPs) was developed. The map spanned a total length of 4,060.6 cM, consisting of 7 linkage groups (LGs) with an average distance of 2.3 cM between adjacent markers. Four QTL regions and 36 putative QTL markers, with LOD scores ranging from 3.00 to 4.97, distributed across two linkage groups (LG2 and LG5) were associated with seed Se concentration, explaining 6.3–16.9% of the phenotypic variation. PMID:26978666

  19. Identification QTLs Controlling Genes for Se Uptake in Lentil Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Duygu; Sever, Tugce; Aldemir, Secil; Yagmur, Bulent; Temel, Hulya Yilmaz; Kaya, Hilal Betul; Alsaleh, Ahmad; Kahraman, Abdullah; Ozkan, Hakan; Vandenberg, Albert; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an excellent source of protein and carbohydrates and is also rich in essential trace elements for the human diet. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for human health and nutrition, providing protection against several diseases and regulating important biological systems. Dietary intake of 55 μg of Se per day is recommended for adults, with inadequate Se intake causing significant health problems. The objective of this study was to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) of genes controlling Se accumulation in lentil seeds using a population of 96 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from the cross "PI 320937" × "Eston" grown in three different environments for two years (2012 and 2013). Se concentration in seed varied between 119 and 883 μg/kg. A linkage map consisting of 1,784 markers (4 SSRs, and 1,780 SNPs) was developed. The map spanned a total length of 4,060.6 cM, consisting of 7 linkage groups (LGs) with an average distance of 2.3 cM between adjacent markers. Four QTL regions and 36 putative QTL markers, with LOD scores ranging from 3.00 to 4.97, distributed across two linkage groups (LG2 and LG5) were associated with seed Se concentration, explaining 6.3-16.9% of the phenotypic variation.

  20. Identification QTLs Controlling Genes for Se Uptake in Lentil Seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Ates

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is an excellent source of protein and carbohydrates and is also rich in essential trace elements for the human diet. Selenium (Se is an essential micronutrient for human health and nutrition, providing protection against several diseases and regulating important biological systems. Dietary intake of 55 μg of Se per day is recommended for adults, with inadequate Se intake causing significant health problems. The objective of this study was to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL of genes controlling Se accumulation in lentil seeds using a population of 96 recombinant inbred lines (RILs developed from the cross "PI 320937" × "Eston" grown in three different environments for two years (2012 and 2013. Se concentration in seed varied between 119 and 883 μg/kg. A linkage map consisting of 1,784 markers (4 SSRs, and 1,780 SNPs was developed. The map spanned a total length of 4,060.6 cM, consisting of 7 linkage groups (LGs with an average distance of 2.3 cM between adjacent markers. Four QTL regions and 36 putative QTL markers, with LOD scores ranging from 3.00 to 4.97, distributed across two linkage groups (LG2 and LG5 were associated with seed Se concentration, explaining 6.3-16.9% of the phenotypic variation.

  1. Control of human papillomavirus gene expression by alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sheila V; Faizo, Arwa Ali A

    2017-03-02

    Human papillomaviruses possess circular double stranded DNA genomes of around 8kb in size from which multiple mRNAs are synthesized during an infectious life cycle. Although at least three viral promoters are used to initiate transcription, viral mRNAs are largely the product of processing of pre-mRNAs by alternative splicing and polyadenylation. The HPV life cycle and viral gene expression are tightly linked to differentiation of the epithelium the virus infects: there is an orchestrated production of viral mRNAs and proteins. In this review we describe viral mRNA expression and the roles of the SR and hnRNP proteins that respectively positively and negatively regulate splicing. We discuss HPV regulation of splicing factors and detail the evidence that the papillomavirus E2 protein has splicing-related activities. We highlight the possibility that HPV-mediated control of splicing in differentiating epithelial cells may be necessary to accomplish the viral replication cycle. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Control of gene expression by CRISPR-Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci and their associated cas (CRISPR-associated) genes provide adaptive immunity against viruses (phages) and other mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. While most of the early work has largely been dominated by examples of CRISPR-Cas systems directing the cleavage of phage or plasmid DNA, recent studies have revealed a more complex landscape where CRISPR-Cas loci might be involved in gene regulation. In this review, we summarize the role of these loci in the regulation of gene expression as well as the recent development of synthetic gene regulation using engineered CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:24273648

  3. Pharmacogenetic Variation in Over 100 Genes in Patients Receiving Acenocumarol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Gonzalez-Covarrubias

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Coumarins are widely prescribed worldwide, and in Mexico acenocumarol is the preferred form. It is well known that despite its efficacy, coumarins show a high variability for dose requirements. We investigated the pharmacogenetic variation of 110 genes in patients receiving acenocumarol using a targeted NGS approach. We report relevant population differentiation for variants on CYP2C8, CYP2C19, CYP4F11, CYP4F2, PROS, and GGCX, VKORC1, CYP2C18, NQO1. A higher proportion of novel-to-known variants for 10 genes was identified on 41 core pharmacogenomics genes related to the PK (29, PD (3, of coumarins, and coagulation proteins (9 including, CYP1A1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and F8, and a low proportion of novel-to-known variants on CYP2E1, VKORC1, and SULT1A1/2. Using a Bayesian approach, we identified variants influencing acenocumarol dosing on, VKORC1 (2, SULT1A1 (1, and CYP2D8P (1 explaining 40–55% of dose variability. A collection of pharmacogenetic variation on 110 genes related to the PK/PD of coumarins is also presented. Our results offer an initial insight into the use of a targeted NGS approach in the pharmacogenomics of coumarins in Mexican Mestizos.

  4. Gene co-expression network analysis identifies porcine genes associated with variation in metabolizing fenbendazole and flunixin meglumine in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeremy T; Ashwell, Melissa S; Baynes, Ronald E; Brooks, James D; Yeatts, James L; Maltecca, Christian

    2017-05-02

    Identifying individual genetic variation in drug metabolism pathways is of importance not only in livestock, but also in humans in order to provide the ultimate goal of giving the right drug at the right dose at the right time. Our objective was to identify individual genes and gene networks involved in metabolizing fenbendazole (FBZ) and flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine liver. The population consisted of female and castrated male pigs that were sired by boars represented by 4 breeds. Progeny were randomly placed into groups: no drug (UNT), FLU or FBZ administered. Liver transcriptome profiles from 60 animals with extreme (i.e. fast or slow drug metabolism) pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles were generated from RNA sequencing. Multiple cytochrome P450 (CYP1A1, CYP2A19 and CYP2C36) genes displayed different transcript levels across treated versus UNT. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis identified 5 and 3 modules of genes correlated with PK parameters and a portion of these were enriched for biological processes relevant to drug metabolism for FBZ and FLU, respectively. Genes within identified modules were shown to have a higher transcript level relationship (i.e. connectivity) in treated versus UNT animals. Investigation into the identified genes would allow for greater insight into FBZ and FLU metabolism.

  5. The Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SkQ1 Downregulates Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Genes in the Retina of OXYS Rats with AMD-Like Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Perepechaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 is a novel drug thought to retard development of age-related diseases. It has been shown that SkQ1 reduces clinical signs of retinopathy in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats, which are a known animal model of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The aim of this work was to test whether SkQ1 affects transcriptional activity of AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, which are considered as AMD-associated genes in the retina of OXYS and Wistar rats. Our results showed that only AhR and AhR-dependent genes were sensitive to SkQ1. Dietary supplementation with SkQ1 decreased the AhR mRNA level in both OXYS and Wistar rats. At baseline, the retinal Cyp1a1 mRNA level was lower in OXYS rats. SkQ1 supplementation decreased the Cyp1a1 mRNA level in Wistar rats, but this level remained unchanged in OXYS rats. Baseline Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA expression was stronger in OXYS than in Wistar rats. In the OXYS strain, Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 mRNA levels decreased as a result of SkQ1 supplementation. These data suggest that the Cyp1a2 and Cyp1b1 enzymes are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD-like retinopathy of OXYS rats and are possible therapeutic targets of SkQ1.

  6. Segregation of genes controlling seed colour in sesame ( Sesamum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic analysis of seed colour was carried out on crosses involving nine accessions of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) from Nigeria. Inheritance studies showed that different gene actions were responsible for the expression of this important character. In three of the crosses, single gene action was observed, while in two ...

  7. Clinical infection control in gene therapy : A multidisciplinary conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, ME; Jordan, CT; Chang, SMW; Conrad, C; Gerberding, JL; Kaufman, HL; Mayhall, CG; Nolta, JA; Pilaro, AM; Sullivan, S; Weber, DJ; Wivel, NA

    2000-01-01

    Gene therapy is being studied for the treatment of a variety of acquired and inherited disorders. Retroviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, adeno-associated viruses, herpesviruses, and others are being engineered to transfer genes into humans. Treatment protocols using recombinant viruses are being

  8. Autonomous Silencing as Well as Competition Controls γ-Globin Gene Expression during Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Man; Han, Hemei; Xiang, Ping; Li, Qiliang; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the control of the γ-globin gene during development, we produced transgenic mice in which sequences of the β-gene promoter were replaced by equivalent sequences of the γ-gene promoter in the context of a human β-globin locus yeast artificial chromosome (βYAC) and analyzed the effects on globin gene expression during development. Replacement of 1,077 nucleotides (nt) of the β-gene promoter by 1,359 nt of the γ promoter resulted in striking inhibition of the γ-promoter/β-gene exp...

  9. Noise propagation in synthetic gene circuits for metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Diego A; Lugagne, Jean-Baptiste; Stan, Guy-Bart V

    2015-02-20

    Dynamic control of enzyme expression can be an effective strategy to engineer robust metabolic pathways. It allows a synthetic pathway to self-regulate in response to changes in bioreactor conditions or the metabolic state of the host. The implementation of this regulatory strategy requires gene circuits that couple metabolic signals with the genetic machinery, which is known to be noisy and one of the main sources of cell-to-cell variability. One of the unexplored design aspects of these circuits is the propagation of biochemical noise between enzyme expression and pathway activity. In this article, we quantify the impact of a synthetic feedback circuit on the noise in a metabolic product in order to propose design criteria to reduce cell-to-cell variability. We consider a stochastic model of a catalytic reaction under negative feedback from the product to enzyme expression. On the basis of stochastic simulations and analysis, we show that, depending on the repression strength and promoter strength, transcriptional repression of enzyme expression can amplify or attenuate the noise in the number of product molecules. We obtain analytic estimates for the metabolic noise as a function of the model parameters and show that noise amplification/attenuation is a structural property of the model. We derive an analytic condition on the parameters that lead to attenuation of metabolic noise, suggesting that a higher promoter sensitivity enlarges the parameter design space. In the theoretical case of a switch-like promoter, our analysis reveals that the ability of the circuit to attenuate noise is subject to a trade-off between the repression strength and promoter strength.

  10. Digital Signal Processing and Control for the Study of Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Jun

    2016-04-22

    Thanks to the digital revolution, digital signal processing and control has been widely used in many areas of science and engineering today. It provides practical and powerful tools to model, simulate, analyze, design, measure, and control complex and dynamic systems such as robots and aircrafts. Gene networks are also complex dynamic systems which can be studied via digital signal processing and control. Unlike conventional computational methods, this approach is capable of not only modeling but also controlling gene networks since the experimental environment is mostly digital today. The overall aim of this article is to introduce digital signal processing and control as a useful tool for the study of gene networks.

  11. Positive control of enzyme synthesis by gene C in the L-arabinose system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englesberg, E; Irr, J; Power, J; Lee, N

    1965-10-01

    Englesberg, Ellis (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa.), Joseph Irr, Joseph Power, and Nancy Lee. Positive control of enzyme synthesis by gene C in the l-arabinose system. J. Bacteriol 90:946-957. 1965.-The l-arabinose gene complex consists of genes D, A, B, and C, linked in that order between the markers thr and leu, and an unlinked gene E. Genes D, A, B, and E are the structural genes for three inducible enzymes and permease, respectively. Gene C, with two mutant alleles, C(-) and C(c), is the regulatory gene exhibiting positive and negative control. C(-) mutants are deficient and C(c) mutants are constitutive for all three enzymes and permease. Complementation analysis, employing sexual merozygotes (A(-)C(+) x A(+)C(-)), with six different C(-) mutants, demonstrates that C(-) is recessive to C(+) (positive control). A total of 61 C(c) mutants, isolated as clones resistant to d-fucose inhibition, are linked to the leu ara region of the chromosome, and the 22 C(c) mutants that were analyzed in detail mapped within the C gene among the C(-) mutant sites. C(c) mutants produce various but coordinate levels of the two enzymes measured, and permease. Complementation analysis (A(-)C(c) x A(+)C(-), A(-)C(c) x A(+)C(+)) shows that C(c) is dominant to C(-) (positive control) and recessive to C(+) (negative control). Deletion mutants that extend into the C gene are l-arabinose permease-negative, thus supporting the positive regulatory role of the C gene. The name "activator gene" is proposed for genes of the C type to accentuate their positive role in gene expression. A working model consistent with these results is presented.

  12. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  13. Changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes by single-walled carbon nanotubes in human respiratory tract cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitoshi, Kotaro; Katoh, Miki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Ando, Yoshinori; Nadai, Masayuki

    2012-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted attention for biomedical and biotechnological applications, such as drug delivery. However, there are concerns about the safety of SWCNTs for use in humans. To investigate the potential use of SWCNTs for targeted drug delivery to the lung, we examined their effect on drug-metabolizing enzymes in primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells from two donors and the lung carcinoma A549 cell line. Exposure of NHBE and A549 cells to SWCNTs dysregulated some of the important drug-metabolizing enzymes expressed in the human respiratory organs. Exposure of NHBE cells to SWCNTs for 24 h had a pronounced effect on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNAs, which were reduced to less than 1% of control cells. These effects were also observed in A549 cells. Exposure of A549, HepG2 hepatic carcinoma cells, and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells to tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induced the expression and enzymatic activity of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which were also suppressed by SWCNTs, suggesting that SWCNTs down-regulated both basal and induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 activities. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the down-regulatory effect of SWCNTs may be due to inhibition of activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding to the enhancer regions of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes. Down-regulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes by SWCNTs may affect the defense mechanisms by reducing procarcinogen bioactivation in the human lung.

  14. flu, a metastable gene controlling surface properties of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Diderichsen, B

    1980-01-01

    flu, a gene of Escherichia coli K-12, was discovered and mapped between his and shiA. It is shown that flu is a metastable gene that changes frequently between the flu+ and flu states. flu+ variants give stable homogeneous suspensions, are piliated, and form glossy colonies. flu variants aggregate, fluff and sediment from suspensions, are nonpiliated, and form frizzy colonies. flu+ and flu variants can be isolated from most strains. Implications of these observations are discussed, and it is ...

  15. Normalization of gene expression measurements in tumor tissues: comparison of 13 endogenous control genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, J.B. de; Roelofs, R.W.; Giesendorf, B.A.J.; Pennings, J.L.; Waas, E.T.; Feuth, A.B.; Swinkels, D.W.; Span, P.N.

    2005-01-01

    For interpretation of quantitative gene expression measurements in clinical tumor samples, a normalizer is necessary to correct expression data for differences in cellular input, RNA quality, and RT efficiency between samples. In many studies, a single housekeeping gene is used for normalization.

  16. Circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled genes in the rat retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Cailotto, Cathy; Dijk, Frederike; Bergen, Arthur; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2005-01-01

    The circadian expression patterns of genes encoding for proteins that make up the core of the circadian clock were measured in rat retina using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Transcript levels of several genes previously used for normalization of qPCR assays were determined and the effect of

  17. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirjana Devi Shrestha

    Full Text Available The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076 with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains.

  18. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ts' o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    All projects are working toward a goal for describing the three dimensional nuclear topography in terms of relative spatial relationships among genes (specific DNA sequence). Methods are now being perfected to detect these genes, quantitatively and spatially, to perturb these genes specifically, and to measure the perturbation in order to assure specificity. We are developing methods to assay, after perturbation of the target DNA within living cells, whether or not only the target sequence are attacked while other sequences remain unharmed. We are now at the stage to do chemical gene modification or masking within living cells in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Soon, we will be able to study the function and the physical location of each gene in living cells with exquisite specificity. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  19. Design parameters to control synthetic gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Welch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Production of proteins as therapeutic agents, research reagents and molecular tools frequently depends on expression in heterologous hosts. Synthetic genes are increasingly used for protein production because sequence information is easier to obtain than the corresponding physical DNA. Protein-coding sequences are commonly re-designed to enhance expression, but there are no experimentally supported design principles. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify sequence features that affect protein expression we synthesized and expressed in E. coli two sets of 40 genes encoding two commercially valuable proteins, a DNA polymerase and a single chain antibody. Genes differing only in synonymous codon usage expressed protein at levels ranging from undetectable to 30% of cellular protein. Using partial least squares regression we tested the correlation of protein production levels with parameters that have been reported to affect expression. We found that the amount of protein produced in E. coli was strongly dependent on the codons used to encode a subset of amino acids. Favorable codons were predominantly those read by tRNAs that are most highly charged during amino acid starvation, not codons that are most abundant in highly expressed E. coli proteins. Finally we confirmed the validity of our models by designing, synthesizing and testing new genes using codon biases predicted to perform well. CONCLUSION: The systematic analysis of gene design parameters shown in this study has allowed us to identify codon usage within a gene as a critical determinant of achievable protein expression levels in E. coli. We propose a biochemical basis for this, as well as design algorithms to ensure high protein production from synthetic genes. Replication of this methodology should allow similar design algorithms to be empirically derived for any expression system.

  20. Robust Tests for Additive Gene-Environment Interaction in Case-Control Studies Using Gene-Environment Independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Lee, Seunggeun; Lee, Alice W; Wu, Anna H; Bandera, Elisa V; Jensen, Allan; Rossing, Mary Anne; Moysich, Kirsten B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Doherty, Jennifer A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Gayther, Simon A; Modugno, Francesmary; Massuger, Leon; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Ramus, Susan J; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Kjaer, Susanne K; Webb, Penelope M; Ness, Roberta B; Menon, Usha; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D; Risch, Harvey; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2018-02-01

    There have been recent proposals advocating the use of additive gene-environment interaction instead of the widely used multiplicative scale, as a more relevant public health measure. Using gene-environment independence enhances statistical power for testing multiplicative interaction in case-control studies. However, under departure from this assumption, substantial bias in the estimates and inflated type I error in the corresponding tests can occur. In this paper, we extend the empirical Bayes (EB) approach previously developed for multiplicative interaction, which trades off between bias and efficiency in a data-adaptive way, to the additive scale. An EB estimator of the relative excess risk due to interaction is derived, and the corresponding Wald test is proposed with a general regression setting under a retrospective likelihood framework. We study the impact of gene-environment association on the resultant test with case-control data. Our simulation studies suggest that the EB approach uses the gene-environment independence assumption in a data-adaptive way and provides a gain in power compared with the standard logistic regression analysis and better control of type I error when compared with the analysis assuming gene-environment independence. We illustrate the methods with data from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Toxoplasma gondii gene expression is under the control of regulatory pathways acting through chromatin structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bougdour A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity state of a gene is determined by a complex regulatory network of co-acting factors affecting the structure of the chromatin into which the gene is embedded. While significant changes of the transcriptome occur during cell differentiation in apicomplexan parasites, basic mechanisms controlling gene expression are still unknown. Recent studies support and expand the concept of the chromatin environment being key factor for the control of transcriptional activity in these lower eukaryotes organisms. Here, we review recent advances in the field of epigenetic gene regulation in Toxoplasma gondii, the model apicomplexan.

  2. Sensor-coupled fractal gene regulatory networks for locomotion control of a modular snake robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahadat, Payam; Christensen, David Johan; Katebi, Serajeddin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study fractal gene regulatory network (FGRN) controllers based on sensory information. The FGRN controllers are evolved to control a snake robot consisting of seven simulated ATRON modules. Each module contains three tilt sensors which represent the direction of gravity in the co......In this paper we study fractal gene regulatory network (FGRN) controllers based on sensory information. The FGRN controllers are evolved to control a snake robot consisting of seven simulated ATRON modules. Each module contains three tilt sensors which represent the direction of gravity...

  3. Identifying the most suitable endogenous control for determining gene expression in hearts from organ donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Enrique

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is a useful tool for assessing gene expression in different tissues, but the choice of adequate controls is critical to normalise the results, thereby avoiding differences and maximizing sensitivity and accuracy. So far, many genes have been used as a single reference gene, without having previously verified their value as controls. This practice can lead to incorrect conclusions and recent evidence indicates a need to use the geometric mean of data from several control genes. Here, we identified an appropriate set of genes to be used as an endogenous reference for quantifying gene expression in human heart tissue. Results Our findings indicate that out of ten commonly used reference genes (GADPH, PPIA, ACTB, YWHAZ, RRN18S, B2M, UBC, TBP, RPLP and HPRT, PPIA, RPLP and GADPH show the most stable gene transcription levels in left ventricle specimens obtained from organ donors, as assessed using geNorm and Normfinder software. The expression of TBP was found to be highly regulated. Conclusion We propose the use of PPIA, RPLP and GADPH as reference genes for the accurate normalisation of qRT-PCR performed on heart tissue. TBP should not be used as a control in this type of tissue.

  4. Quorum sensing-controlled gene expression in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de

    1998-01-01

    Quorum sensing in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) involves peptides that are directly sensed by membrane-located histidine kinases, after which the signal is transmitted to an intracellular response regulator. This regulator in turn activates transcription of target genes, that commonly include the

  5. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene at the bottom of the sex-determination cascade is the best charac- terized candidate so far, and is .... down of tra-2 in these insects results in complete reversal of genotypically female .... tributing the antagonistic effect of sex-specific Dsx proteins on their downstream ...

  6. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire’s specificity, we performed single-cell RNAseq and DNA methylation analysis in Aire-sufficient and -deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire’s target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clust...

  7. Flexible, AAV-equipped Genetic Modules for Inducible Control of Gene Expression in Mammalian Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin K Dogbevia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling gene expression in mammalian brain is of utmost importance to causally link the role of gene function to cell circuit dynamics under normal conditions and disease states. We have developed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches for inducible and reversible control of gene expression in a cell type specific and brain subregion selective manner. Here, we characterize a two-virus approach to efficiently and reliably switch gene expression on and off, repetitively, both in vitro and in vivo. Our recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-Tet approach is highly flexible and it has great potential for application in basic and biomedical neuroscience research and gene therapy.

  8. Versatile control of Plasmodium falciparum gene expression with an inducible protein-RNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfless, Stephen J; Wagner, Jeffrey C; Niles, Jacquin C

    2014-11-05

    The available tools for conditional gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum are limited. Here, to enable reliable control of target gene expression, we build a system to efficiently modulate translation. We overcame several problems associated with other approaches for regulating gene expression in P. falciparum. Specifically, our system functions predictably across several native and engineered promoter contexts, and affords control over reporter and native parasite proteins irrespective of their subcellular compartmentalization. Induction and repression of gene expression are rapid, homogeneous and stable over prolonged periods. To demonstrate practical application of our system, we used it to reveal direct links between antimalarial drugs and their native parasite molecular target. This is an important outcome given the rapid spread of resistance, and intensified efforts to efficiently discover and optimize new antimalarial drugs. Overall, the studies presented highlight the utility of our system for broadly controlling gene expression and performing functional genetics in P. falciparum.

  9. Chromatin regulation and gene centrality are essential for controlling fitness pleiotropy in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqi Zhou

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a wide range of phenotypes that are due to loss-of-function or null mutations. Previously, the functions of gene products that distinguish essential from nonessential genes were characterized. However, the functions of products of non-essential genes that contribute to fitness remain minimally understood.Using data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we investigated several gene characteristics, which we are able to measure, that are significantly associated with a gene's fitness pleiotropy. Fitness pleiotropy is a measurement of the gene's importance to fitness. These characteristics include: 1 whether the gene's product functions in chromatin regulation, 2 whether the regulation of the gene is influenced by chromatin state, measured by chromatin regulation effect (CRE, 3 whether the gene's product functions as a transcription factor (TF and the number of genes a TF regulates, 4 whether the gene contains TATA-box, and 5 whether the gene's product is central in a protein interaction network. Partial correlation analysis was used to study how these characteristics interact to influence fitness pleiotropy. We show that all five characteristics that were measured are statistically significantly associated with fitness pleiotropy. However, fitness pleiotropy is not associated with the presence of TATA-box when CRE is controlled. In particular, two characteristics: 1 whether the regulation of a gene is more likely to be influenced by chromatin state, and 2 whether the gene product is central in a protein interaction network measured by the number of protein interactions were found to play the most important roles affecting a gene's fitness pleiotropy.These findings highlight the significance of both epigenetic gene regulation and protein interaction networks in influencing the fitness pleiotropy.

  10. The dilp2/5 genes control diapause inducibility

    OpenAIRE

    Schiesari, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Many holometabolous insects hibernate by triggering diapause, an “actively-induced” dormancy that blocks developmental functions. Yet, the nature of signals enhancing the plasticity of developmental system and underlying diapause inducibility is still elusive. We show that the “Insulin/IGF” dilp2/5 genes, encoding for developmental hormones, antagonize diapause switch in D. melanogaster and their modulation is pivotal in sensitizing the developmental system to environmental perturbations. Fun...

  11. Systematic targeted integration to study Albumin gene control elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchari Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available To study transcriptional regulation by distant enhancers, we devised a system of easily modified reporter plasmids for integration into single-copy targeting cassettes in clones of HuH7, a human hepatocellular carcinoma. The plasmid constructs tested transcriptional function of a 35-kb region that contained the rat albumin gene and its upstream flanking region. Expression of integrants was analyzed in two orientations, and compared to transient expression of non-integrated plasmids. Enhancers were studied in their natural positions relative to the promoter and localized by deletion. All constructs were also analyzed by transient transfection assays. In addition to the known albumin gene enhancer (E1 at -10 kb, we demonstrated two new enhancers, E2 at -13, and E4 at +1.2 kb. All three enhancers functioned in both transient assays and integrated constructs. However, chromosomal integration demonstrated several differences from transient expression. For example, analysis of E2 showed that enhancer function within the chromosome required a larger gene region than in transient assays. Another conserved region, E3 at -0.7 kb, functioned as an enhancer in transient assays but inhibited the function of E1 and E2 when chromosomally integrated. The enhancers did not show additive or synergistic behavior,an effect consistent with competition for the promoter or inhibitory interactions among enhancers. Growth arrest by serum starvation strongly stimulated the function of some integrated enhancers, consistent with the expected disruption of enhancer-promoter looping during the cell cycle.

  12. Systematic targeted integration to study Albumin gene control elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Tian, Jianmin; Bouhassira, Eric E; Locker, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    To study transcriptional regulation by distant enhancers, we devised a system of easily modified reporter plasmids for integration into single-copy targeting cassettes in clones of HuH7, a human hepatocellular carcinoma. The plasmid constructs tested transcriptional function of a 35-kb region that contained the rat albumin gene and its upstream flanking region. Expression of integrants was analyzed in two orientations, and compared to transient expression of non-integrated plasmids. Enhancers were studied in their natural positions relative to the promoter and localized by deletion. All constructs were also analyzed by transient transfection assays. In addition to the known albumin gene enhancer (E1 at -10 kb), we demonstrated two new enhancers, E2 at -13, and E4 at +1.2 kb. All three enhancers functioned in both transient assays and integrated constructs. However, chromosomal integration demonstrated several differences from transient expression. For example, analysis of E2 showed that enhancer function within the chromosome required a larger gene region than in transient assays. Another conserved region, E3 at -0.7 kb, functioned as an enhancer in transient assays but inhibited the function of E1 and E2 when chromosomally integrated. The enhancers did not show additive or synergistic behavior,an effect consistent with competition for the promoter or inhibitory interactions among enhancers. Growth arrest by serum starvation strongly stimulated the function of some integrated enhancers, consistent with the expected disruption of enhancer-promoter looping during the cell cycle.

  13. E-selectin gene in essential hypertension: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kamna; Chandra, Sudhir; Narang, Rajiv; Bhatia, Jagriti; Saluja, Daman

    2018-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial cell dysfunction. E-selectin, an endothelial cell adhesion molecule, is specific for endothelial cell activation. Polymorphism in E-selectin gene has recently been identified among which Leu554Phe E-selectin gene polymorphism is least investigated in essential hypertension. This study reports the association of E-selectin gene Leu554Phe polymorphism and the expression of E-selectin gene in patients with essential hypertension. We analysed the Leu554Phe polymorphism and expression of E-selectin gene in 250 patients with essential hypertension and 250 normal healthy controls. Genotyping of Leu554Phe polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and the expression of E-selectin gene at mRNA and protein levels were carried out by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. A significant association of E-selectin genotypes (CT + TT) with essential hypertension (P E-selectin gene in patients with essential hypertension was ~12-fold higher as compared to control. We observed an elevated level of E-selectin protein expression (up to 1.9 times) in patients as compared to controls. A significant association of E-selectin (Leu554Phe) gene and increased expression of E-selectin gene at mRNA and protein levels in patients might be related to the genetic predisposition to develop essential hypertension. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  14. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multi-level and interdisciplinary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ts' o, P.O.P.

    1992-08-01

    This progress report describes gains made in three projects entitled (1) 3-Dimensional nuclear topography of genes and chromosomes in interphase nuclei, (2) Sequence specific identification and perturbation of the genomic DNA in living cells by nonionic oligonucleotide analogs (Matagen), and Resolution and isolation of specific DNA restriction fragments.(DT)

  15. Identifying Genes Controlling Ferulate Cross-Linking Formation in Grass Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de O. Buanafina, Marcia Maria [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2013-10-16

    This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on cell wall properties.

  16. Functional reversion to identify controlling genes in multigenic responses: analysis of floral abortion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John S. Boyer; John E. McLaughlin

    .... Identifying the controlling genes has proven difficult. However, in a few instances, it has been possible to reverse the phenotype by physiological or biochemical means without altering the genetics of the organism...

  17. Agrobacterium tumefaciens exoR controls acid response genes and impacts exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Brynn C; Tomlinson, Amelia D; Morton, Elise R; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative plant pathogen and the causative agent of crown gall disease. The initial stage of infection involves attachment to plant tissues, and subsequently, biofilms may form at these sites. This study focuses on the periplasmic ExoR regulator, which was identified based on the severe biofilm deficiency of A. tumefaciens exoR mutants. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed to elucidate the complete ExoR regulon. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan is a dramatic phenotype of exoR mutants. Comparative expression analyses revealed that the core ExoR regulon is unaffected by succinoglycan synthesis. Several findings are consistent with previous observations: genes involved in succinoglycan biosynthesis, motility, and type VI secretion are differentially expressed in the ΔexoR mutant. In addition, these studies revealed new functional categories regulated by ExoR, including genes related to virulence, conjugation of the pAtC58 megaplasmid, ABC transporters, and cell envelope architecture. To address how ExoR exerts a broad impact on gene expression from its periplasmic location, a genetic screen was performed to isolate suppressor mutants that mitigate the exoR motility phenotype and identify downstream components of the ExoR regulatory pathway. This suppression analysis identified the acid-sensing two-component system ChvG-ChvI, and the suppressor mutant phenotypes suggest that all or most of the characteristic exoR properties are mediated through ChvG-ChvI. Subsequent analysis indicates that exoR mutants are simulating a response to acidic conditions, even in neutral media. This work expands the model for ExoR regulation in A. tumefaciens and underscores the global role that this regulator plays on gene expression. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Gene expression analysis in prostate cancer: the importance of the endogenous control.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vajda, Alice

    2013-03-01

    Aberrant gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is the gold-standard for quantifying gene expression, and commonly employs a house-keeping gene (HKG) as an endogenous control to normalize results; the choice of which is critical for accurate data interpretation. Many factors, including sample type, pathological state, and oxygen levels influence gene expression including putative HKGs. The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of commonly used HKGs for qRT-PCR in prostate cancer.

  19. Role of feedback and network architecture in controlling virulence gene expression in Bordetella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapat, Mahendra Kumar; Saini, Supreet

    2013-11-01

    Bordetella is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for causing whooping cough in a broad range of host organisms. For successful infection, Bordetella controls expression of four distinct classes of genes (referred to as class 1, 2, 3, and 4 genes) at distinct times in the infection cycle. This control is executed by a single two-component system, BvgAS. Interestingly, the transmembrane component of the two-component system, BvgS, consists of three phospho-transfer domains leading to phosphorylation of the response regulator, BvgA. Phosphorylated BvgA then controls expression of virulence genes and also controls bvgAS transcription. In this work, we perform simulations to characterize the role of the network architecture in governing gene expression in Bordetella. Our results show that the wild-type network is locally optimal for controlling the timing of expression of the different classes of genes involved in infection. In addition, the interplay between environmental signals and positive feedback aids the bacterium identify precise conditions for and control expression of virulence genes.

  20. Control of Gene Expression in Senescence through Transcriptional Read-Through of Convergent Protein-Coding Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Muniz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Antisense RNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate their corresponding sense RNAs and are generally produced from specific promoters. We uncover here a family of antisense RNAs, named START RNAs, produced during cellular senescence by transcriptional read-through at convergent protein-coding genes. Importantly, START RNAs repress the expression of their corresponding sense RNAs. In proliferative cells, we found that the Pol II elongation rate is limited downstream of TTS at START loci, allowing transcription termination to occur before Pol II reaches the convergent genes, thus preventing antisense RNA production and interference with the expression of the convergent genes. START RNAs are repressed by H2A.Z histone variant, whose local occupancy decreases in senescence. Our results thus uncover a mechanism of gene expression regulation relying on read-through antisense transcript production at convergent genes, underlining the functional importance of chromatin regulation in the control of RNA pol II elongation rate at intergenic regions.

  1. Liver glucokinase gene expression is controlled by the onecut transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannoy, V J; Decaux, J F; Pierreux, C E; Lemaigre, F P; Rousseau, G G

    2002-08-01

    Glucokinase plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and the expression of its gene is differentially regulated in pancreatic beta cells and in the liver through distinct promoters. The factors that determine the tissue-specific expression of the glucokinase gene are not known. Putative binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-6, the prototype of the ONECUT family of transcription factors, are present in the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene and hnf6 knockout mice are diabetic [corrected]. We hypothesized that HNF-6 controls the activity of the hepatic glucokinase promoter. We tested the binding of recombinant HNF-6 to DNA sequences from the mouse hepatic glucokinase promoter in vitro and the effect of HNF-6 on promoter activity in transfected cells. We investigated in vivo the role of HNF-6 in mice by examining the effect of inactivating the hnf6 gene on glucokinase gene-specific deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitive sites in liver chromatin and on liver glucokinase mRNA concentration. HNF-6 bound to the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene and stimulated its activity. Inactivation of the hnf6 gene did not modify the pattern of deoxyribonuclease I hypersensitive sites but was associated with a decrease of liver glucokinase mRNA to half the control value. Although HNF-6 is not required to open chromatin of the hepatic promoter of the glucokinase gene, it stimulates transcription of the glucokinase gene in the liver. This could partly explain the diabetes observed in hnf6 knockout mice.

  2. Fractal gene regulatory networks for robust locomotion control of modular robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahadat, Payam; Christensen, David Johan; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2010-01-01

    Designing controllers for modular robots is difficult due to the distributed and dynamic nature of the robots. In this paper fractal gene regulatory networks are evolved to control modular robots in a distributed way. Experiments with different morphologies of modular robot are performed and the ......Designing controllers for modular robots is difficult due to the distributed and dynamic nature of the robots. In this paper fractal gene regulatory networks are evolved to control modular robots in a distributed way. Experiments with different morphologies of modular robot are performed...

  3. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...... fermentation processes in which the escape of genetically modified cells would be considered highly risky....

  4. Rapid and tunable method to temporally control gene editing based on conditional Cas9 stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturk, Serif; Shirole, Nitin H; Nowak, Dawid G; Corbo, Vincenzo; Pal, Debjani; Vaughan, Alexander; Tuveson, David A; Trotman, Lloyd C; Kinney, Justin B; Sordella, Raffaella

    2017-02-22

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for studying gene function. Here, we describe a method that allows temporal control of CRISPR/Cas9 activity based on conditional Cas9 destabilization. We demonstrate that fusing an FKBP12-derived destabilizing domain to Cas9 (DD-Cas9) enables conditional Cas9 expression and temporal control of gene editing in the presence of an FKBP12 synthetic ligand. This system can be easily adapted to co-express, from the same promoter, DD-Cas9 with any other gene of interest without co-modulation of the latter. In particular, when co-expressed with inducible Cre-ER T2 , our system enables parallel, independent manipulation of alleles targeted by Cas9 and traditional recombinase with single-cell specificity. We anticipate this platform will be used for the systematic characterization and identification of essential genes, as well as the investigation of the interactions between functional genes.

  5. p21 as a transcriptional co-repressor of S-phase and mitotic control genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Ferrándiz

    Full Text Available It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562 with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene. Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling in Blood Provides Reproducible Molecular Insights into Asthma Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Qiu, Weiliang; Martinez, Fernando D; Strunk, Robert C; Lemanske, Robert F; Liu, Andrew H; Gilliland, Frank D; Millstein, Joshua; Gauderman, W James; Ober, Carole; Krishnan, Jerry A; White, Steven R; Naureckas, Edward T; Nicolae, Dan L; Barnes, Kathleen C; London, Stephanie J; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Carey, Vincent J; Weiss, Scott T; Raby, Benjamin A

    2017-01-15

    Maintaining optimal symptom control remains the primary objective of asthma treatment. Better understanding of the biologic underpinnings of asthma control may lead to the development of improved clinical and pharmaceutical approaches. To identify molecular pathways and interrelated genes whose differential expression was associated with asthma control. We performed gene set enrichment analyses of asthma control in 1,170 adults with asthma, each with gene expression data derived from either whole blood (WB) or unstimulated CD4(+) T lymphocytes (CD4), and a self-reported asthma control score representing either the preceding 6 months (chronic) or 7 days (acute). Our study comprised a discovery WB cohort (n = 245, chronic) and three independent, nonoverlapping replication cohorts: a second WB set (n = 448, acute) and two CD4 sets (n = 300, chronic; n = 77, acute). In the WB discovery cohort, we found significant overrepresentation of genes associated with asthma control in 1,106 gene sets from the Molecular Signatures Database (false discovery rate, asthma control and implicate a novel biologic target (TREM-1).

  7. Function and control of the ssg genes in streptomyces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traag, Bjørn Alwin

    2008-01-01

    Streptomycetes are Gram-positive soil-dwelling bacteria, in appearance similar to filamentous fungi. The SsgA-like proteins or SALPs, of which streptomycetes typically have at least five paralogues, control specific steps of sporulation-specific cell division in streptomycetes. The expression level

  8. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States); Rise, Matthew L. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Spitsbergen, Jan M. [Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, 220 Nash Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Hori, Tiago S. [Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1 Marine Lab Road, St. John' s, NL, A1C 5S7 (Canada); Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven [Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McGraw, Joseph E. [School of Pharmacy, Concordia University Wisconsin, 12800 North Lake Shore Drive, Mequon, WI 53097 (United States); Goetz, Giles [School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, 1122 Northeast Boat Street, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Carvan, Michael J., E-mail: carvanmj@uwm.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Lapham Hall, 3209 N. Maryland Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 600 E Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53204 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •First report of the effects of dietary TCDD in juvenile trout smaller than 20 g. •TCDD uptake was estimated using published models and confirmed by GC. •First report of dietary TCDD-induced lesions in nasal epithelium in any species. •Several useful biomarkers are identified from microarray-based transcriptomics analysis. -- Abstract: The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down

  9. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spela Kos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed. Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene.

  10. Control of sleep by a network of cell cycle genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Dinis J S; Machado, Daniel R; Koh, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is essential for health and cognition, but the molecular and neural mechanisms of sleep regulation are not well understood. We recently reported the identification of TARANIS (TARA) as a sleep-promoting factor that acts in a previously unknown arousal center in Drosophila. tara mutants exhibit a dose-dependent reduction in sleep amount of up to ∼60%. TARA and its mammalian homologs, the Trip-Br (Transcriptional Regulators Interacting with PHD zinc fingers and/or Bromodomains) family of proteins, are primarily known as transcriptional coregulators involved in cell cycle progression, and contain a conserved Cyclin-A (CycA) binding homology domain. We found that tara and CycA synergistically promote sleep, and CycA levels are reduced in tara mutants. Additional data demonstrated that Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) antagonizes tara and CycA to promote wakefulness. Moreover, we identified a subset of CycA expressing neurons in the pars lateralis, a brain region proposed to be analogous to the mammalian hypothalamus, as an arousal center. In this Extra View article, we report further characterization of tara mutants and provide an extended discussion of our findings and future directions within the framework of a working model, in which a network of cell cycle genes, tara, CycA, and Cdk1, interact in an arousal center to regulate sleep.

  11. tCRISPRi: tunable and reversible, one-step control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Tian; Jun, Yonggun; Erickstad, Michael J.; Brown, Steven D.; Parks, Adam; Court, Donald L.; Jun, Suckjoon

    2016-12-01

    The ability to control the level of gene expression is a major quest in biology. A widely used approach employs deletion of a nonessential gene of interest (knockout), or multi-step recombineering to move a gene of interest under a repressible promoter (knockdown). However, these genetic methods are laborious, and limited for quantitative study. Here, we report a tunable CRISPR-cas system, “tCRISPRi”, for precise and continuous titration of gene expression by more than 30-fold. Our tCRISPRi system employs various previous advancements into a single strain: (1) We constructed a new strain containing a tunable arabinose operon promoter PBAD to quantitatively control the expression of CRISPR-(d)Cas protein over two orders of magnitude in a plasmid-free system. (2) tCRISPRi is reversible, and gene expression is repressed under knockdown conditions. (3) tCRISPRi shows significantly less than 10% leaky expression. (4) Most important from a practical perspective, construction of tCRISPRi to target a new gene requires only one-step of oligo recombineering. Our results show that tCRISPRi, in combination with recombineering, provides a simple and easy-to-implement tool for gene expression control, and is ideally suited for construction of both individual strains and high-throughput tunable knockdown libraries.

  12. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV) in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses...... the KIR3DL1-KIR3DS1 locus, encoding receptors that interact with specific HLA-Bw4 molecules to regulate the activation of lymphocyte subsets including natural killer (NK) cells. We quantified the number of copies of KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 in a large HIV-1 positive cohort, and showed that an increase in KIR3...... amounts of these activating and inhibitory KIR play a role in regulating the peripheral expansion of highly antiviral KIR3DS1+ NK cells, which may determine differences in HIV-1 control following infection....

  13. Bootstrapping of gene-expression data improves and controls the false discovery rate of differentially expressed genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goddard Mike E

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ordinary-, penalized-, and bootstrap t-test, least squares and best linear unbiased prediction were compared for their false discovery rates (FDR, i.e. the fraction of falsely discovered genes, which was empirically estimated in a duplicate of the data set. The bootstrap-t-test yielded up to 80% lower FDRs than the alternative statistics, and its FDR was always as good as or better than any of the alternatives. Generally, the predicted FDR from the bootstrapped P-values agreed well with their empirical estimates, except when the number of mRNA samples is smaller than 16. In a cancer data set, the bootstrap-t-test discovered 200 differentially regulated genes at a FDR of 2.6%, and in a knock-out gene expression experiment 10 genes were discovered at a FDR of 3.2%. It is argued that, in the case of microarray data, control of the FDR takes sufficient account of the multiple testing, whilst being less stringent than Bonferoni-type multiple testing corrections. Extensions of the bootstrap simulations to more complicated test-statistics are discussed.

  14. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkova, Blanka [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Chvatalova, Irena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Lnenickova, Zdena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Milcova, Alena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Tulupova, Elena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Farmer, Peter B. [Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Sram, Radim J. [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2007-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in general population. These effects may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to respirable air particles. It is expected that metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms may modulate individual susceptibility to PAH exposure. This study investigates relationships between exposure to PAHs, polymorphisms of these genes and DNA adducts in group of occupationally exposed policemen (EXP, N = 53, males, aged 22-50 years) working outdoors in the downtown area of Prague and in matched 'unexposed' controls (CON, N = 52). Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was evaluated by personal samplers during working shift prior to collection of biological samples. Bulky-aromatic DNA adducts were analyzed in lymphocytes by {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay. Polymorphisms of metabolizing (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, CYP1A1-MspI) and DNA repair (XRCC1, XPD) genes were determined by PCR-based RFLP assays. As potential modifiers and/or cofounders, urinary cotinine levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, plasma levels of vitamins A, C, E and folates by HPLC, cholesterol and triglycerides using commercial kits. During the sampling period ambient particulate air pollution was as follows: PM10 32-55 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, PM2.5 27-38 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, c-PAHs 18-22 ng/m{sup 3}; personal exposure to c-PAHs: 9.7 ng/m{sup 3} versus 5.8 ng/m{sup 3} (P < 0.01) for EXP and CON groups, respectively. The total DNA adduct levels did not significantly differ between EXP and CON groups (0.92 {+-} 0.28 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.82 {+-} 0.23 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0.065), whereas the level of the B[a]P-'like' adduct was significantly higher in exposed group (0.122 {+-} 0.036 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.099 {+-} 0.035 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0

  15. Gene expression profiling of the Notch-AhR-IL22 axis at homeostasis and in response to tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbusch, Marc; Rodler, Severin; Song, Shangqing; Romoli, Simone; Marschner, Julian A; Kraft, Franziska; Holderied, Alexander; Kumar, Santosh; Mulay, Shrikant R; Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Kumar Devarapu, Satish; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-12-22

    Notch and interleukin-22 (IL-22) signaling are known to regulate tissue homeostasis and respond to injury in humans and mice, and the induction of endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) ligands through Notch links the two pathways in a hierarchical fashion. However in adults, the species-, organ- and injury-specific gene expression of the Notch-AhR-IL22 axis components is unknown. We therefore performed gene expression profiling of DLL1, DLL3, DLL4, DLK1, DLK2, JAG1, JAG2, Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, Notch4, ADAM17/TNF-α ADAM metalloprotease converting enzyme (TACE), PSEN1, basigin (BSG)/CD147, RBP-J, HES1, HES5, HEY1, HEYL, AHR, ARNT, ARNT2, CYP1A1, CYP24A1, IL-22, IL22RA1, IL22RA2, IL10RB, and STAT3 under homeostatic conditions in ten mature murine and human organs. Additionally, the expression of these genes was assessed in murine models of acute sterile inflammation and progressive fibrosis. We show that there are organ-specific gene expression profiles of the Notch-AhR-IL22 axis in humans and mice. Although there is an overall interspecies congruency, specific differences between human and murine expression signatures do exist. In murine tissues with AHR/ARNT expression CYP1A1 and IL-22 were correlated with HES5 and HEYL expression, while in human tissues no such correlation was found. Notch and AhR signaling are involved in renal inflammation and fibrosis with specific gene expression changes in each model. Despite the presence of all Notch pathway molecules in the kidney and a model-specific induction of Notch ligands, IL-22 was only up-regulated in acute inflammation, but rapidly down-regulated during regeneration. This implies that for targeting injury responses, e.g. via IL-22, species-specific differences, injury type and time points have to be considered. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Prolactin as a Candidate Gene Controlling Molting and Egg Production of Duck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triana Susanti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of molting is a crucial problem in the local ducks that need to be handled from many aspects including genetic aspect. Handling of molting genetically can be done quickly and accurately when the control genes have been found. The search for marker genes of molting can be conducted in poultry through broodiness naturally, because its physiological processes are related to the continuity of egg production. This paper describes the mechanism of molting, the relationship of molting with prolactin hormone and the association of prolactin gene polymorphism with molting and egg production. Molting and egg production were influenced by the prolactin hormone, that may be controlled by the prolactin gene. High concentration of prolactin hormone will inhibit the function of pituitary gland, decreasing production of gonadotrophin hormone (follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone hence ovulation ceased. This will stop egg production and at the same time molting proccess occurred.

  17. Technical note: Evaluation of endogenous control gene expression in bovine neutrophils by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR using microfluidics gene expression arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookenden, M A; Walker, C G; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; Murray, A; Dukkipati, V S R; Heiser, A; Roche, J R

    2017-08-01

    Reverse-transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-qPCR) is commonly used for assessing the cellular response to changes in physiologic and pathologic conditions. The selection of stable endogenous control genes is an important step of any RT-qPCR study, as expression can vary depending on the experimental environment. Our objective was to identify endogenous control genes in circulating neutrophils isolated from cows during the peripartum period. To do this, we used microfluidics gene expression arrays (Fluidigm, San Francisco, CA) for RT-qPCR analysis. Selection of the endogenous control genes was based on previous research investigating gene expression in neutrophils. The selected genes included ACTB, B2M, G6PD, GAPDH, GCH1, GOLGA5, OSBPL2, PGK1, RPL13A, RPL19, RPS9, SDHA, SMUG1, SNRPA, TBP, UXT, and YWHAZ. Four genes (GAPDH, GOLGA5, PGK1, and UXT) did not provide satisfactory quantification results using the selected method and were therefore excluded from the analyses. The suitability of the remaining 13 genes for use as endogenous control genes was assessed using geNorm and Normfinder. The gene pair with the greatest stability using geNorm was RPL13A and RPL19, whereas Normfinder ranked RPL19 and YWHAZ as the most stable pair. The 2 genes deemed most suitable for the experimental design were RPL19 and YWHAZ, which were selected for subsequent gene expression analysis. This study highlights that genes used as endogenous controls for relative quantification should be assessed on an experimental basis, even if the genes have been used in previous research. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prolactin as a Candidate Gene Controlling Molting and Egg Production of Duck

    OpenAIRE

    Triana Susanti

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of molting is a crucial problem in the local ducks that need to be handled from many aspects including genetic aspect. Handling of molting genetically can be done quickly and accurately when the control genes have been found. The search for marker genes of molting can be conducted in poultry through broodiness naturally, because its physiological processes are related to the continuity of egg production. This paper describes the mechanism of molting, the relationship of molting with...

  19. Genomic profiling reveals Pitx2 controls expression of mature extraocular muscle contraction-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuefang; Gong, Bendi; Kaminski, Henry J

    2012-04-18

    To assess the influence of the Pitx2 transcription factor on the global gene expression profile of extraocular muscle (EOM) of mice. Mice with a conditional knockout of Pitx2, designated Pitx2(Δflox/Δflox) and their control littermates Pitx2(flox/flox), were used. RNA was isolated from EOM obtained at 3, 6, and 12 weeks of age and processed for microarray-based profiling. Pairwise comparisons were performed between mice of the same age and differentially expressed gene lists were generated. Select genes from the profile were validated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and protein immunoblot. Ultrastructural analysis was performed to evaluate EOM sarcomeric structure. The number of differentially expressed genes was relatively small. Eleven upregulated and 23 downregulated transcripts were identified common to all three age groups in the Pitx2-deficient extraocular muscle compared with littermate controls. These fell into a range of categories including muscle-specific structural genes, transcription factors, and ion channels. The differentially expressed genes were primarily related to muscle contraction. We verified by protein and ultrastructural analysis that myomesin 2 was expressed in the Pitx2-deficient mice, and this was associated with development of M lines evident in their orbital region. The global transcript expression analysis uncovered that Pitx2 primarily regulates a relatively select number of genes associated with muscle contraction. Pitx2 loss led to the development of M line structures, a feature more typical of other skeletal muscle.

  20. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N = 324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend.

  1. The application of finite state machine in modeling and control of gene mutation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Hu, Wensong; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2013-12-01

    This paper extends our previous study on discrete events system formulations of DNA hybridization, and focuses discussions on metabolism and gene mutation in molecular biology. Finite state machine (FSM) theory is extensively applied to represent key concepts and analyzes the processes related to the biological phenomena mentioned above. The goal is to mathematically represent and interpret the process of gene mutation and the effects on structures of protein macro molecule caused by gene mutation. We hope the proposed model will provide a foothold for introducing the information science and the control theory tools in molecular biology.

  2. Differentially correlated genes in co-expression networks control phenotype transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lina D; Vyshenska, Dariia; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Morgun, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Co-expression networks are a tool widely used for analysis of "Big Data" in biology that can range from transcriptomes to proteomes, metabolomes and more recently even microbiomes. Several methods were proposed to answer biological questions interrogating these networks. Differential co-expression analysis is a recent approach that measures how gene interactions change when a biological system transitions from one state to another. Although the importance of differentially co-expressed genes to identify dysregulated pathways has been noted, their role in gene regulation is not well studied. Herein we investigated differentially co-expressed genes in a relatively simple mono-causal process (B lymphocyte deficiency) and in a complex multi-causal system (cervical cancer). Co-expression networks of B cell deficiency (Control and BcKO) were reconstructed using Pearson correlation coefficient for two mus musculus datasets: B10.A strain (12 normal, 12 BcKO) and BALB/c strain (10 normal, 10 BcKO). Co-expression networks of cervical cancer (normal and cancer) were reconstructed using local partial correlation method for five datasets (total of 64 normal, 148 cancer). Differentially correlated pairs were identified along with the location of their genes in BcKO and in cancer networks. Minimum Shortest Path and Bi-partite Betweenness Centrality where statistically evaluated for differentially co-expressed genes in corresponding networks.    Results: We show that in B cell deficiency the differentially co-expressed genes are highly enriched with immunoglobulin genes (causal genes). In cancer we found that differentially co-expressed genes act as "bottlenecks" rather than causal drivers with most flows that come from the key driver genes to the peripheral genes passing through differentially co-expressed genes. Using in vitro knockdown experiments for two out of 14 differentially co-expressed genes found in cervical cancer (FGFR2 and CACYBP), we showed that they play

  3. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93

    OpenAIRE

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M.; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Duncan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the...

  4. Forecasting Model of Gene Enzyme Polymorphism Detoxification in Patients Suffered from HFRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Hasanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study gene enzyme polymorphism of xenobiotic detoxification in patients suffered from HFRS influenced by disease severityProceedings : Molecular genetic checkup has been done in 292 patients suffered from HFRS and 426 seronegative donors.DNA samples isolated from lymphocytes of peripheral gene enzyme were used for molecular genetic checkup. Phenic-chloroform extraction method was applied to isolate DNA. The given DNA was used for polymerase chain reaction of DNA synthesis. Polymorphous CYP1A1 and GSTP1 gene locus analysis was performed on an automatic basis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA synthesis in a thermal cycle «Terzik» produced «DNK–techologiya» ( Moscow city with the use of locus specific and oligonucleotide primers.Outcomings: Glutathion-S-transferase class π with A313G locus of AG heterozygous genotype is typical for people of Bashkortostan due to underlying risk for HFRS. A combination of genotypes in the form of cytochrome P-450A1 with polymorphous locus A2455G and glutathione-S-transferase class π with A313G locus of AG can be found only in case of severe form of HFRS.

  5. Prolactin receptor gene polymorphism and the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ju; Choi, Young Min; Lee, Sung Ki; Yang, Kwang Moon; Paik, Eun Chan; Jeong, Hyeon Jeong; Jun, Jong Kwan; Han, Ae Ra; Hwang, Kyu Ri; Hong, Min A

    2017-10-05

    Since the first study was published reporting the candidate association between the prolactin receptor gene intron C/T polymorphism (rs37389) and recurrent miscarriage, no replication study has been performed. In this study, we investigated the role of the prolactin receptor gene C/T polymorphism in 311 Korean women with recurrent pregnancy loss and 314 controls. Genotyping for prolactin receptor gene intron C/T polymorphism was performed using a TaqMan assay. The significance of difference in the genotype distribution was assessed using a chi-square test, and continuous variables were compared using a Student's t-test. The genotype distribution of the prolactin receptor gene C/T polymorphism in the recurrent pregnancy loss group did not differ from that in the control group (CC/CT/TT rates were 49.8%/41.5%/8.7% and 52.5%/37.6%/9.9% for the recurrent pregnancy loss patient and control groups, respectively, p = .587). When the analysis was restricted to patients with three or more consecutive spontaneous miscarriages or patients without prior live birth, there were also no differences in the genotype distribution between these subgroups and controls. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggest that the prolactin receptor gene intron C/T polymorphism is not a major determinant of the development of recurrent pregnancy loss. Impact statement What is already known: Many studies have investigated whether there is a genetic component for the risk of recurrent pregnancy loss. Recently, one study investigated whether genetic polymorphisms involved in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis would be associated with recurrent miscarriage. Among 35 polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes, genotype distribution with regard to the prolactin receptor gene intron C/T polymorphism (rs37389) differed between the recurrent miscarriage and the control groups. Since this study reporting the candidate association between the prolactin receptor gene and

  6. Copy number variation of KIR genes influences HIV-1 control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelak, Kimberly; Need, Anna C; Fellay, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide screen for large structural variants showed that a copy number variant (CNV) in the region encoding killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) associates with HIV-1 control as measured by plasma viral load at set point in individuals of European ancestry. This CNV encompasses...... the KIR3DL1-KIR3DS1 locus, encoding receptors that interact with specific HLA-Bw4 molecules to regulate the activation of lymphocyte subsets including natural killer (NK) cells. We quantified the number of copies of KIR3DS1 and KIR3DL1 in a large HIV-1 positive cohort, and showed that an increase in KIR3...... individuals with multiple copies of KIR3DL1, in the presence of KIR3DS1 and the appropriate ligands, inhibit HIV-1 replication more robustly, and associated with a significant expansion in the frequency of KIR3DS1+, but not KIR3DL1+, NK cells in their peripheral blood. Our results suggest that the relative...

  7. Controlling false discoveries in multidimensional directional decisions, with applications to gene expression data on ordered categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenge; Sarkar, Sanat K; Peddada, Shyamal D

    2010-06-01

    Microarray gene expression studies over ordered categories are routinely conducted to gain insights into biological functions of genes and the underlying biological processes. Some common experiments are time-course/dose-response experiments where a tissue or cell line is exposed to different doses and/or durations of time to a chemical. A goal of such studies is to identify gene expression patterns/profiles over the ordered categories. This problem can be formulated as a multiple testing problem where for each gene the null hypothesis of no difference between the successive mean gene expressions is tested and further directional decisions are made if it is rejected. Much of the existing multiple testing procedures are devised for controlling the usual false discovery rate (FDR) rather than the mixed directional FDR (mdFDR), the expected proportion of Type I and directional errors among all rejections. Benjamini and Yekutieli (2005, Journal of the American Statistical Association 100, 71-93) proved that an augmentation of the usual Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) procedure can control the mdFDR while testing simple null hypotheses against two-sided alternatives in terms of one-dimensional parameters. In this article, we consider the problem of controlling the mdFDR involving multidimensional parameters. To deal with this problem, we develop a procedure extending that of Benjamini and Yekutieli based on the Bonferroni test for each gene. A proof is given for its mdFDR control when the underlying test statistics are independent across the genes. The results of a simulation study evaluating its performance under independence as well as under dependence of the underlying test statistics across the genes relative to other relevant procedures are reported. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to a time-course microarray data obtained by Lobenhofer et al. (2002, Molecular Endocrinology 16, 1215-1229). We identified several important cell-cycle genes, such as DNA

  8. Meta-analysis of gene-environment interaction exploiting gene-environment independence across multiple case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Jason P; Rice, John D; Li, Shi; Stringham, Heather M; Boehnke, Michael; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2017-10-30

    Multiple papers have studied the use of gene-environment (G-E) independence to enhance power for testing gene-environment interaction in case-control studies. However, studies that evaluate the role of G-E independence in a meta-analysis framework are limited. In this paper, we extend the single-study empirical Bayes type shrinkage estimators proposed by Mukherjee and Chatterjee (2008) to a meta-analysis setting that adjusts for uncertainty regarding the assumption of G-E independence across studies. We use the retrospective likelihood framework to derive an adaptive combination of estimators obtained under the constrained model (assuming G-E independence) and unconstrained model (without assumptions of G-E independence) with weights determined by measures of G-E association derived from multiple studies. Our simulation studies indicate that this newly proposed estimator has improved average performance across different simulation scenarios than the standard alternative of using inverse variance (covariance) weighted estimators that combines study-specific constrained, unconstrained, or empirical Bayes estimators. The results are illustrated by meta-analyzing 6 different studies of type 2 diabetes investigating interactions between genetic markers on the obesity related FTO gene and environmental factors body mass index and age. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Validation of housekeeping genes as an internal control for gene expression studies in Giardia lamblia using quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Fierro, Francisco; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio

    2016-04-25

    The analysis of transcript levels of specific genes is important for understanding transcriptional regulation and for the characterization of gene function. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a powerful tool to quantify gene expression. The objective of this study was to identify reliable housekeeping genes in Giardia lamblia. Twelve genes were selected for this purpose, and their expression was analyzed in the wild type WB strain and in two strains with resistance to nitazoxanide (NTZ) and metronidazole (MTZ), respectively. RefFinder software analysis showed that the expression of the genes is different in the three strains. The integrated data from the four analyses showed that the NADH oxidase (NADH) and aldolase (ALD) genes were the most steadily expressed genes, whereas the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was the most unstable. Additionally, the relative expression of seven genes were quantified in the NTZ- and MTZ-resistant strains by RT-qPCR, using the aldolase gene as the internal control, and the results showed a consistent differential pattern of expression in both strains. The housekeeping genes found in this work will facilitate the analysis of mRNA expression levels of other genes of interest in G. lamblia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (PrIITE) enables absolute control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rita; Hansen, Lars; Hintze, John; Almeida, Raquel; Larsen, Sylvester; Coskun, Mehmet; Davidsen, Johanne; Mitchelmore, Cathy; David, Leonor; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tetracycline-based inducible systems provide powerful methods for functional studies where gene expression can be controlled. However, the lack of tight control of the inducible system, leading to leakiness and adverse effects caused by undesirable tetracycline dosage requirements, has proven to be a limitation. Here, we report that the combined use of genome editing tools and last generation Tet-On systems can resolve these issues. Our principle is based on precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (coined PrIITE) targeted to: (i) exons of an endogenous gene of interest (GOI) and (ii) a safe harbor locus. Using PrIITE cells harboring a GFP reporter or CDX2 transcription factor, we demonstrate discrete inducibility of gene expression with complete abrogation of leakiness. CDX2 PrIITE cells generated by this approach uncovered novel CDX2 downstream effector genes. Our results provide a strategy for characterization of dose-dependent effector functions of essential genes that require absence of endogenous gene expression. PMID:28472465

  12. Use of Multicopy Transposons Bearing Unfitness Genes in Weed Control: Four Example Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan; Levy, Avraham A.

    2014-01-01

    We speculate that multicopy transposons, carrying both fitness and unfitness genes, can provide new positive and negative selection options to intractable weed problems. Multicopy transposons rapidly disseminate through populations, appearing in approximately 100% of progeny, unlike nuclear transgenes, which appear in a proportion of segregating populations. Different unfitness transgenes and modes of propagation will be appropriate for different cases: (1) outcrossing Amaranthus spp. (that evolved resistances to major herbicides); (2) Lolium spp., important pasture grasses, yet herbicide-resistant weeds in crops; (3) rice (Oryza sativa), often infested with feral weedy rice, which interbreeds with the crop; and (4) self-compatible sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), which readily crosses with conspecific shattercane and with allotetraploid johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). The speculated outcome of these scenarios is to generate weed populations that contain the unfitness gene and thus are easily controllable. Unfitness genes can be under chemically or environmentally inducible promoters, activated after gene dissemination, or under constitutive promoters where the gene function is utilized only at special times (e.g. sensitivity to an herbicide). The transposons can be vectored to the weeds by introgression from the crop (in rice, sorghum, and Lolium spp.) or from planted engineered weed (Amaranthus spp.) using a gene conferring the degradation of a no longer widely used herbicide, especially in tandem with an herbicide-resistant gene that kills all nonhybrids, facilitating the rapid dissemination of the multicopy transposons in a weedy population. PMID:24820021

  13. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  14. Achilles is a circadian clock-controlled gene that regulates immune function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Terry, Erin E; Fejer, Edith; Gamba, Diana; Hartmann, Natalie; Logsdon, Joseph; Michalski, Daniel; Rois, Lisa E; Scuderi, Maria J; Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional/translational feedback loop that drives the rhythmic expression of downstream mRNAs. Termed "clock-controlled genes," these molecular outputs of the circadian clock orchestrate cellular, metabolic, and behavioral rhythms. As part of our on-going work to characterize key upstream regulators of circadian mRNA expression, we have identified a novel clock-controlled gene in Drosophila melanogaster, Achilles (Achl), which is rhythmic at the mRNA level in the brain and which represses expression of antimicrobial peptides in the immune system. Achilles knock-down in neurons dramatically elevates expression of crucial immune response genes, including IM1 (Immune induced molecule 1), Mtk (Metchnikowin), and Drs (Drosomysin). As a result, flies with knocked-down Achilles expression are resistant to bacterial challenges. Meanwhile, no significant change in core clock gene expression and locomotor activity is observed, suggesting that Achilles influences rhythmic mRNA outputs rather than directly regulating the core timekeeping mechanism. Notably, Achilles knock-down in the absence of immune challenge significantly diminishes the fly's overall lifespan, indicating a behavioral or metabolic cost of constitutively activating this pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that (1) Achilles is a novel clock-controlled gene that (2) regulates the immune system, and (3) participates in signaling from neurons to immunological tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tulipa gesneriana and Lilium longiflorum PEBP Genes and Their Putative Roles in Flowering Time Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeggangers, Hendrika A C F; Rosilio-Brami, Tamar; Bigas-Nadal, Judit; Rubin, Noam; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Nunez de Caceres Gonzalez, Francisco F; Saadon-Shitrit, Shani; Nijveen, Harm; Hilhorst, Henk W M; Immink, Richard G H; Zaccai, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Floral induction in Tulipa gesneriana and Lilium longiflorum is triggered by contrasting temperature conditions, high and low temperature, respectively. In Arabidopsis, the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), a member of the PEBP (phosphatidyl ethanolamine-binding protein) gene family, is a key player in flowering time control. In this study, one PEBP gene was identified and characterized in lily (LlFT) and three PEBP genes were isolated from tulip (TgFT1, TgFT2 and TgFT3). Overexpression of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in an early flowering phenotype for LlFT and TgFT2, but a late flowering phenotype for TgFT1 and TgFT3. Overexpression of LlFT in L. longiflorum also resulted in an early flowering phenotype, confirming its proposed role as a flowering time-controlling gene. The tulip PEBP genes TgFT2 and TgFT3 have a similar expression pattern in tulip, but show opposite effects on the timing of flowering in Arabidopsis. Therefore, the difference between these two proteins was further investigated by interchanging amino acids thought to be important for the FT function. This resulted in the conversion of phenotypes in Arabidopsis upon overexpressing the substituted TgFT2 and TgFT3 genes, revealing the importance of these interchanged amino acid residues. Based on all obtained results, we hypothesize that LlFT is involved in creating meristem competence to flowering-related cues in lily, and TgFT2 is considered to act as a florigen involved in the floral induction in tulip. The function of TgFT3 remains unclear, but, based on our observations and phylogenetic analysis, we propose a bulb-specific function for this gene. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Testing the circadian gene hypothesis in prostate cancer: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Stevens, Richard G; Hoffman, Aaron E; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Kwon, Erika M; Ostrander, Elaine A; Davis, Scott; Zheng, Tongzhang; Stanford, Janet L

    2009-12-15

    Circadian genes are responsible for maintaining the ancient adaptation of a 24-hour circadian rhythm and influence a variety of cancer-related biological pathways, including the regulation of sex hormone levels. However, few studies have been undertaken to investigate the role of circadian genes in the development of prostate cancer, the most common cancer type among men (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer). The current genetic association study tested the circadian gene hypothesis in relation to prostate cancer by genotyping a total of 41 tagging and amino acid-altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 10 circadian-related genes in a population-based case-control study of Caucasian men (n = 1,308 cases and 1,266 controls). Our results showed that at least one SNP in nine core circadian genes (rs885747 and rs2289591 in PER1; rs7602358 in PER2; rs1012477 in PER3; rs1534891 in CSNK1E; rs12315175 in CRY1; rs2292912 in CRY2; rs7950226 in ARNTL; rs11133373 in CLOCK; and rs1369481, rs895521, and rs17024926 in NPAS2) was significantly associated with susceptibility to prostate cancer (either overall risk or risk of aggressive disease), and the risk estimate for four SNPs in three genes (rs885747 and rs2289591 in PER1, rs1012477 in PER3, and rs11133373 in CLOCK) varied by disease aggressiveness. Further analyses of haplotypes were consistent with these genotyping results. Findings from this candidate gene association study support the hypothesis of a link between genetic variants in circadian genes and prostate cancer risk, warranting further confirmation and mechanistic investigation of circadian biomarkers in prostate tumorigenesis.

  17. Genes controlling seed dormancy and pre-harvest sprouting in a rice-wheat-barley comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chengdao; Ni, Peixiang; Francki, Michael

    2004-01-01

    . A major QTL controlling both pre-harvest sprouting and seed dormancy has been identified on the long arm of barley chromosome 5H, and it explains over 70% of the phenotypic variation. Comparative genomics approaches among barley, wheat and rice were used to identify candidate gene(s) controlling seed...... dormancy and hence one aspect of pre-harvest sprouting. The barley seed dormancy/pre-harvest sprouting QTL was located in a region that showed good synteny with the terminal end of the long arm of rice chromosome 3. The rice DNA sequences were annotated and a gene encoding GA20-oxidase was identified...... was syntenic to both rice chromosome 3 and 11. In both cases, corresponding QTLs for seed dormancy have been mapped in rice. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-May...

  18. A single gene (yes controls pigmentation of eyes and scales in Heliothis virescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Brown

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A yellow-eyed mutant was discovered in a strain of Heliothis virescens, the tobacco budworm, that already exhibited a mutation for yellow scale, y. We investigated the inheritance of these visible mutations as candidate markers for transgenesis. Yellow eye was controlled by a single, recessive, autosomal factor, the same type of inheritance previously known for y. Presence of the recombinant mutants with yellow scales with wild type eyes in test crosses indicated independent segregation of genes for these traits. The recombinant class with wild type scales and yellow eyes was completely absent and there was a corresponding increase of the double mutant parental class having yellow scales and yellow eyes. These results indicated that a single factor for yellow eye also controls yellow scales independently of y. This gene was named yes, for yellow eye and scale. We hypothesize that yes controls both eye and scale color through a deficiency in transport of pigment precursors in both the ommochrome and melanin pathways. The unlinked gene y likely controls an enzyme affecting the melanin pathway only. Both y and yes segregated independently of AceIn, acetylcholinesterase insensitivity, and sodium channel hscp, which are genes related to insecticide resistance.

  19. Gene expression in cell lines from propionic acidemia patients, carrier parents, and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Bush, William S; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-08-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn of metabolism which usually presents with metabolic acidosis and accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionate among other toxins. Examining the gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from PA patients, their carrier parents and age/sex-matched controls at normal glucose and low glucose growth conditions demonstrated differences among and between these groups. Using three-way ANOVA analysis, four DAVID clusters of response were identified of which three of the four clusters showed that LCLs from carrier parents had an intermediate response between healthy controls and PA patients. These differences included changes in expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, mitochondrial related genes, and transcriptional regulation. In addition, differences also were observed in expression of genes involved in transendothelial migration and focal adhesion at normal growth conditions when comparing the LCLs from PA patients and controls. These studies demonstrate transcriptional differences between LCLs from PA patients, their parents and biochemically normal controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Lech (Karolina); K. Ackermann (Katrin); V.L. Revell (Victoria); O.S.C.A.R. Lao; D.J. Skene (Debra); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human

  1. Controlled Gene Expression Systems for Lactococcus lactis with the Food-Grade Inducer Nisin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1996-01-01

    The kinetics, control, and efficiency of nisin-induced expression directed by the nisA promoter region were studied in Lactococcus lactis with transcriptional and translational fusions to the gusA reporter gene. In the nisin-producing L. lactis strain NZ9700, the specific β-glucuronidase activity

  2. R gene-controlled host specificity in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leguminous plants can enter into root nodule symbioses with nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria known as rhizobia. An intriguing but still poorly understood property of the symbiosis is its host specificity, which is controlled at multiple levels involving both rhizobial and host genes. Here we report the...

  3. Assessment of CcpA-mediated catabolite control of gene expression in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buist Girbe

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The catabolite control protein CcpA is a transcriptional regulator conserved in many Gram-positives, controlling the efficiency of glucose metabolism. Here we studied the role of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 CcpA in regulation of metabolic pathways and expression of enterotoxin genes by comparative transcriptome analysis of the wild-type and a ccpA-deletion strain. Results Comparative analysis revealed the growth performance and glucose consumption rates to be lower in the B. cereus ATCC 14579 ccpA deletion strain than in the wild-type. In exponentially grown cells, the expression of glycolytic genes, including a non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that mediates conversion of D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 3-phospho-D-glycerate in one single step, was down-regulated and expression of gluconeogenic genes and genes encoding the citric acid cycle was up-regulated in the B. cereus ccpA deletion strain. Furthermore, putative CRE-sites, that act as binding sites for CcpA, were identified to be present for these genes. These results indicate CcpA to be involved in the regulation of glucose metabolism, thereby optimizing the efficiency of glucose catabolism. Other genes of which the expression was affected by ccpA deletion and for which putative CRE-sites could be identified, included genes with an annotated function in the catabolism of ribose, histidine and possibly fucose/arabinose and aspartate. Notably, expression of the operons encoding non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe and hemolytic enterotoxin (Hbl was affected by ccpA deletion, and putative CRE-sites were identified, which suggests catabolite repression of the enterotoxin operons to be CcpA-dependent. Conclusion The catabolite control protein CcpA in B. cereus ATCC 14579 is involved in optimizing the catabolism of glucose with concomitant repression of gluconeogenesis and alternative metabolic pathways. Furthermore, the results point to metabolic control

  4. Rapid evolution of regulatory element libraries for tunable transcriptional and translational control of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erqing Jin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering cell factories for producing biofuels and pharmaceuticals has spurred great interests to develop rapid and efficient synthetic biology tools customized for modular pathway engineering. Along the way, combinatorial gene expression control through modification of regulatory element offered tremendous opportunity for fine-tuning gene expression and generating digital-like genetic circuits. In this report, we present an efficient evolutionary approach to build a range of regulatory control elements. The reported method allows for rapid construction of promoter, 5′UTR, terminator and trans-activating RNA libraries. Synthetic overlapping oligos with high portion of degenerate nucleotides flanking the regulatory element could be efficiently assembled to a vector expressing fluorescence reporter. This approach combines high mutation rate of the synthetic DNA with the high assembly efficiency of Gibson Mix. Our constructed library demonstrates broad range of transcriptional or translational gene expression dynamics. Specifically, both the promoter library and 5′UTR library exhibits gene expression dynamics spanning across three order of magnitude. The terminator library and trans-activating RNA library displays relatively narrowed gene expression pattern. The reported study provides a versatile toolbox for rapidly constructing a large family of prokaryotic regulatory elements. These libraries also facilitate the implementation of combinatorial pathway engineering principles and the engineering of more efficient microbial cell factory for various biomanufacturing applications.

  5. Quality controls in cellular immunotherapies: rapid assessment of clinical grade dendritic cells by gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-02-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers.

  6. The ribosome assembly gene network is controlled by the feedback regulation of transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Margaritis, Thanasis; Rodríguez-Galán, Olga; Pelechano, Vicent; Begley, Victoria; Millán-Zambrano, Gonzalo; Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz; Pérez-Ortín, José E; de la Cruz, Jesús; Holstege, Frank C P; Chávez, Sebastián

    2017-09-19

    Ribosome assembly requires the concerted expression of hundreds of genes, which are transcribed by all three nuclear RNA polymerases. Transcription elongation involves dynamic interactions between RNA polymerases and chromatin. We performed a synthetic lethal screening in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a conditional allele of SPT6, which encodes one of the factors that facilitates this process. Some of these synthetic mutants corresponded to factors that facilitate pre-rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. We found that the in vivo depletion of one of these factors, Arb1, activated transcription elongation in the set of genes involved directly in ribosome assembly. Under these depletion conditions, Spt6 was physically targeted to the up-regulated genes, where it helped maintain their chromatin integrity and the synthesis of properly stable mRNAs. The mRNA profiles of a large set of ribosome biogenesis mutants confirmed the existence of a feedback regulatory network among ribosome assembly genes. The transcriptional response in this network depended on both the specific malfunction and the role of the regulated gene. In accordance with our screening, Spt6 positively contributed to the optimal operation of this global network. On the whole, this work uncovers a feedback control of ribosome biogenesis by fine-tuning transcription elongation in ribosome assembly factor-coding genes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianqing; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xinmin; Hu, Jiliang; Song, Weijian; Luo, Jie; Jiang, Shan; Yan, Fei; Zhai, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373). Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  8. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  9. Fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes during wastewater chlorination: implication for antibiotic resistance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated fates of nine antibiotic-resistant bacteria as well as two series of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treated by various doses of chlorine (0, 15, 30, 60, 150 and 300 mg Cl2 min/L). The results indicated that chlorination was effective in inactivating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Most bacteria were inactivated completely at the lowest dose (15 mg Cl2 min/L). By comparison, sulfadiazine- and erythromycin-resistant bacteria exhibited tolerance to low chlorine dose (up to 60 mg Cl2 min/L). However, quantitative real-time PCRs revealed that chlorination decreased limited erythromycin or tetracycline resistance genes, with the removal levels of overall erythromycin and tetracycline resistance genes at 0.42 ± 0.12 log and 0.10 ± 0.02 log, respectively. About 40% of erythromycin-resistance genes and 80% of tetracycline resistance genes could not be removed by chlorination. Chlorination was considered not effective in controlling antimicrobial resistance. More concern needs to be paid to the potential risk of antibiotic resistance genes in the wastewater after chlorination.

  10. Control of Drosophila head segment identity by the bZIP homeotic gene cnc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, J; Mahaffey, J W; Deutsch, E; Vani, K

    1995-01-01

    Mutational analysis of cap'n'collar (cnc), a bZIP transcription factor closely related to the mammalian erythroid factor NF-E2 (p45), indicates that it acts as a segment-specific selector gene controlling the identity of two cephalic segments. In the mandibular segment, cnc has a classical homeotic effect: mandibular structures are missing in cnc mutant larvae and replaced with duplicate maxillary structures. We propose that cnc functions in combination with the homeotic gene Deformed to specify mandibular development. Labral structures are also missing in cnc mutant larvae, where a distinct labral primordia is not properly maintained in the developing foregut, as observed by the failure to maintain and elaborate patterns of labral-specific segment polarity gene expression. Instead, the labral primordium fuses with the esophageal primordium to contribute to formation of the esophagus. The role of cnc in labral development is reciprocal to the role of homeotic gene forkhead, which has an identical function in the maintenance of the esophageal primordium. This role of homeotic selector genes for the segment-specific maintenance of segment polarity gene expression is a unique feature of segmentation in the preoral head region of Drosophila.

  11. Control of sulfate concentration by miR395-targeted APS genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur nutrition is crucial for plant growth and development, as well as crop yield and quality. Inorganic sulfate in the soil is the major sulfur source for plants. After uptake, sulfate is activated by ATP sulfurylase, and then gets assimilated into sulfur-containing metabolites. However, the mechanism of regulation of sulfate levels by ATP sulfurylase is unclear. Here, we investigated the control of sulfate levels by miR395-mediated regulation of APS1/3/4. Sulfate was over-accumulated in the shoots of miR395 over-expression plants in which the expression of the APS1, APS3, and APS4 genes was suppressed. Accordingly, reduced expression of miR395 caused a decline of sulfate concentration. In agreement with these results, over-expression of the APS1, APS3, and APS4 genes led to the reduction of sulfate levels. Differential expression of these three APS genes in response to sulfate starvation implied that they have different functions. Further investigation revealed that the regulation of sulfate levels mediated by miR395 depends on the repression of its APS targets. Unlike the APS1, APS3, and APS4 genes, which encode plastid-localized ATP sulfurylases, the APS2 gene encodes a cytosolic version of ATP sulfurylase. Genetic analysis indicated that APS2 has no significant effect on sulfate levels. Our data suggest that miR395-targeted APS genes are key regulators of sulfate concentration in leaves.

  12. Identification of endogenous control genes for normalisation of real-time quantitative PCR data in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A H

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression analysis has many applications in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic care. Relative quantification is the most widely adopted approach whereby quantification of gene expression is normalised relative to an endogenously expressed control (EC) gene. Central to the reliable determination of gene expression is the choice of control gene. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a panel of candidate EC genes from which to identify the most stably expressed gene(s) to normalise RQ-PCR data derived from primary colorectal cancer tissue. RESULTS: The expression of thirteen candidate EC genes: B2M, HPRT, GAPDH, ACTB, PPIA, HCRT, SLC25A23, DTX3, APOC4, RTDR1, KRTAP12-3, CHRNB4 and MRPL19 were analysed in a cohort of 64 colorectal tumours and tumour associated normal specimens. CXCL12, FABP1, MUC2 and PDCD4 genes were chosen as target genes against which a comparison of the effect of each EC gene on gene expression could be determined. Data analysis using descriptive statistics, geNorm, NormFinder and qBasePlus indicated significant difference in variances between candidate EC genes. We determined that two genes were required for optimal normalisation and identified B2M and PPIA as the most stably expressed and reliable EC genes. CONCLUSION: This study identified that the combination of two EC genes (B2M and PPIA) more accurately normalised RQ-PCR data in colorectal tissue. Although these control genes might not be optimal for use in other cancer studies, the approach described herein could serve as a template for the identification of valid ECs in other cancer types.

  13. No control genes required: Bayesian analysis of qRT-PCR data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V Matz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Model-based analysis of data from quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is potentially more powerful and versatile than traditional methods. Yet existing model-based approaches cannot properly deal with the higher sampling variances associated with low-abundant targets, nor do they provide a natural way to incorporate assumptions about the stability of control genes directly into the model-fitting process. RESULTS: In our method, raw qPCR data are represented as molecule counts, and described using generalized linear mixed models under Poisson-lognormal error. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is used to sample from the joint posterior distribution over all model parameters, thereby estimating the effects of all experimental factors on the expression of every gene. The Poisson-based model allows for the correct specification of the mean-variance relationship of the PCR amplification process, and can also glean information from instances of no amplification (zero counts. Our method is very flexible with respect to control genes: any prior knowledge about the expected degree of their stability can be directly incorporated into the model. Yet the method provides sensible answers without such assumptions, or even in the complete absence of control genes. We also present a natural Bayesian analogue of the "classic" analysis, which uses standard data pre-processing steps (logarithmic transformation and multi-gene normalization but estimates all gene expression changes jointly within a single model. The new methods are considerably more flexible and powerful than the standard delta-delta Ct analysis based on pairwise t-tests. CONCLUSIONS: Our methodology expands the applicability of the relative-quantification analysis protocol all the way to the lowest-abundance targets, and provides a novel opportunity to analyze qRT-PCR data without making any assumptions concerning target stability. These procedures have been

  14. Detection of anabolic androgenic steroid abuse in doping control using mammalian reporter gene bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Corine J; Sterk, Saskia S; van de Heijning, Monique P M; Brouwer, Abraham; Stephany, Rainer W; van der Burg, Bart; Sonneveld, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are a class of steroid hormones related to the male hormone testosterone. They are frequently detected as drugs in sport doping control. Being similar to or derived from natural male hormones, AAS share the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) as common mechanism of action. The mammalian androgen responsive reporter gene assay (AR CALUX bioassay), measuring compounds interacting with the AR can be used for the analysis of AAS without the necessity of knowing their chemical structure beforehand, whereas current chemical-analytical approaches may have difficulty in detecting compounds with unknown structures, such as designer steroids. This study demonstrated that AAS prohibited in sports and potential designer AAS can be detected with this AR reporter gene assay, but that also additional steroid activities of AAS could be found using additional mammalian bioassays for other types of steroid hormones. Mixtures of AAS were found to behave additively in the AR reporter gene assay showing that it is possible to use this method for complex mixtures as are found in doping control samples, including mixtures that are a result of multi drug use. To test if mammalian reporter gene assays could be used for the detection of AAS in urine samples, background steroidal activities were measured. AAS-spiked urine samples, mimicking doping positive samples, showed significantly higher androgenic activities than unspiked samples. GC-MS analysis of endogenous androgens and AR reporter gene assay analysis of urine samples showed how a combined chemical-analytical and bioassay approach can be used to identify samples containing AAS. The results indicate that the AR reporter gene assay, in addition to chemical-analytical methods, can be a valuable tool for the analysis of AAS for doping control purposes.

  15. Identification of critical regulatory genes in cancer signaling network using controllability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Vandana; Sunitha, V.; Bagler, Ganesh

    2017-05-01

    Cancer is characterized by a complex web of regulatory mechanisms which makes it difficult to identify features that are central to its control. Molecular integrative models of cancer, generated with the help of data from experimental assays, facilitate use of control theory to probe for ways of controlling the state of such a complex dynamic network. We modeled the human cancer signaling network as a directed graph and analyzed it for its controllability, identification of driver nodes and their characterization. We identified the driver nodes using the maximum matching algorithm and classified them as backbone, peripheral and ordinary based on their role in regulatory interactions and control of the network. We found that the backbone driver nodes were key to driving the regulatory network into cancer phenotype (via mutations) as well as for steering into healthy phenotype (as drug targets). This implies that while backbone genes could lead to cancer by virtue of mutations, they are also therapeutic targets of cancer. Further, based on their impact on the size of the set of driver nodes, genes were characterized as indispensable, dispensable and neutral. Indispensable nodes within backbone of the network emerged as central to regulatory mechanisms of control of cancer. In addition to probing the cancer signaling network from the perspective of control, our findings suggest that indispensable backbone driver nodes could be potentially leveraged as therapeutic targets. This study also illustrates the application of structural controllability for studying the mechanisms underlying the regulation of complex diseases.

  16. Dissecting the logical types of network control in gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertz Marcel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bacterium Escherichia coli the transcriptional regulation of gene expression involves both dedicated regulators binding specific DNA sites with high affinity and also global regulators – abundant DNA architectural proteins of the bacterial nucleoid binding multiple sites with a wide range of affinities and thus modulating the superhelical density of DNA. The first form of transcriptional regulation is predominantly pairwise and specific, representing digitial control, while the second form is (in strength and distribution continuous, representing analog control. Results Here we look at the properties of effective networks derived from significant gene expression changes under variation of the two forms of control and find that upon limitations of one type of control (caused e.g. by mutation of a global DNA architectural factor the other type can compensate for compromised regulation. Mutations of global regulators significantly enhance the digital control, whereas in the presence of global DNA architectural proteins regulation is mostly of the analog type, coupling spatially neighboring genomic loci. Taken together our data suggest that two logically distinct – digital and analog – types of control are balancing each other. Conclusion By revealing two distinct logical types of control, our approach provides basic insights into both the organizational principles of transcriptional regulation and the mechanisms buffering genetic flexibility. We anticipate that the general concept of distinguishing logical types of control will apply to many complex biological networks.

  17. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  18. Screening by microarray analysis for genes that alter prostate development in C57BL/6J mice exposed in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsako, Seiichiroh; Lin, Tienmin; Peterson, R.E. [Wisconsin Univ. (United States); Suzuki, Junko S.; Wu, Qing; Tohyama, Chiharu [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Takei, Teiji [Ministry of the Environment, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    The administration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to pregnant rats and mice leads to a disruption of prostate development in the male offspring. Although it is not clear if this phenomenon occurs in human populations exposed to TCDD, the observed effect level is low among the various endpoints of TCDD developmental toxicity in animal studies. Clarification of the mechanism by which the effect is produced at the molecular level would help substantiate male reproductive toxicity caused by in utero TCDD exposure as a model for human health risk assessment. In both rats and mice, a critical window for TCDD disruption of prostate development in late pregnancy has been illustrated. The primary alteration in gene expression that presumably causes this phenomenon depends on the fetal aryl hydrocarbon receptor gene being expressed in the fetal urogenital sinus from which the outgrowth of prostatic buds occurs. In the male offspring of mice exposed to TCDD on gestation day 13 (GD 13), severe inhibitory developmental effects were found on ventral prostate development. These effects were significantly lower when in utero TCDD exposure occurred after GD 16 than GD 13. Upon administration of TCDD to the dam on GD 13, cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1 were induced in the urogenital complex of the male offspring on postnatal day 14. Thus, ''dioxin biomarker genes'' are responsive to in utero and lactational TCDD exposure during the neonatal stage of development. This suggests that key TCDD responsive genes involved in disrupting prostate development would be genes other than CYP1A1 and CYP1B1. In the present study we administered a single dose of TCDD to mouse dams during the critical window (GD 13 or GD 14) for impairing prostate development, or later during a less TCDD sensitive period (GD 17). Microarray techniques were then used to compare gene expression profiles of the fetus versus the urogenital sinus in order to identify genes

  19. β-Actin-dependent global chromatin organization and gene expression programs control cellular identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin; Almuzzaini, Bader; Drou, Nizar; Kremb, Stephan; Yousif, Ayman; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Östlund; Gunsalus, Kristin; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2017-11-03

    During differentiation and development, cell fate and identity are established by waves of genetic reprogramming. Although the mechanisms are largely unknown, during these events, dynamic chromatin reorganization is likely to ensure that multiple genes involved in the same cellular functions are coregulated, depending on the nuclear environment. In this study, using high-content screening of embryonic fibroblasts from a β-actin knockout (KO) mouse, we found major chromatin rearrangements and changes in histone modifications, such as methylated histone (H)3-lysine-(K)9. Genome-wide H3K9 trimethylation-(Me)3 landscape changes correlate with gene up- and down-regulation in β-actin KO cells. Mechanistically, we found loss of chromatin association by the Brahma-related gene (Brg)/Brahma-associated factor (BAF) chromatin remodeling complex subunit Brg1 in the absence of β-actin. This actin-dependent chromatin reorganization was concomitant with the up-regulation of sets of genes involved in angiogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and myofibroblast features in β-actin KO cells. Some of these genes and phenotypes were gained in a β-actin dose-dependent manner. Moreover, reintroducing a nuclear localization signal-containing β-actin in the knockout cells affected nuclear features and gene expression. Our results suggest that, by affecting the genome-wide organization of heterochromatin through the chromatin-binding activity of the BAF complex, β-actin plays an essential role in the determination of gene expression programs and cellular identity.-Xie, X., Almuzzaini, B., Drou, N., Kremb, S., Yousif, A., Östlund Farrants, A.-K., Gunsalus, K., Percipalle, P. β-Actin-dependent global chromatin organization and gene expression programs control cellular identity. © FASEB.

  20. Intragenic controls utilizing radiation-induced alternative transcript regions improves gene expression biodosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Helen B; Sprung, Carl N

    2014-03-01

    Ionizing-radiation exposure can be life threatening if given to the whole body. In addition, whole body radiation exposure can affect large numbers of people such as after a nuclear reactor accident, a nuclear explosion or a radiological terrorist attack. In these cases, an accurate biodosimeter is essential for triage management. One of the problems for biodosimetry in general is the interindividual variation before and after exposure, which can make it challenging to assign an accurate dose. To begin to address this challenge, lymphocyte cell lines were exposed to 0, 1, 2 and 5 Gy ionizing radiation from a ¹³⁷Cs source at a dose rate of 0.6 Gy/min. Alternative transcripts with regions showing large differential responses to ionizing radiation were determined from exon array data. Gene expression analysis was then performed on isolated mRNA using qRT-PCR with normalization to intergenic (PGK1, GAPDH) and novel intragenic regions for candidate radiation-responsive genes, PPM1D and MDM2. Our studies show that the use of a cis-associated expression reference improved the potential dose prediction approximately 2.3-8.3 fold and provided an advantage for dose prediction compared to distantly or trans-located control ionizing radiation nonresponsive genes. This approach also provides an alternative gene expression normalization method to potentially reduce interindividual variations when untreated basal gene expression levels are unavailable. Using associated noninduced regions of ionizing radiation-induced genes provides a way to estimate basal gene expression in the irradiated sample. This strategy can be utilized as a biodosimeter on its own or to enhance other gene expression candidates for biodosimetry. This normalization strategy may also be generally applicable for other quantitative PCR strategies where normalization is required for a particular response.

  1. In vivo gene regulation in Salmonella spp. by a salicylate-dependent control circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, José Luis; Becker, Pablo Daniel; Camacho, Eva María; Cebolla, Angel; Link, Claudia; Santero, Eduardo; Guzmán, Carlos Alberto

    2007-11-01

    Systems allowing tightly regulated expression of prokaryotic genes in vivo are important for performing functional studies of bacterial genes in host-pathogen interactions and establishing bacteria-based therapies. We integrated a regulatory control circuit activated by acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) in attenuated Salmonella enterica that carries an expression module with a gene of interest under control of the XylS2-dependent Pm promoter. This resulted in 20-150-fold induction ex vivo. The regulatory circuit was also efficiently induced by ASA when the bacteria resided in eukaryotic cells, both in vitro and in vivo. To validate the circuit, we administered Salmonella spp., carrying an expression module encoding the 5-fluorocytosine-converting enzyme cytosine deaminase in the bacterial chromosome or in a plasmid, to mice with tumors. Induction with ASA before 5-fluorocytosine administration resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the regulatory control circuit to selectively switch on gene expression during bacterial infection.

  2. VRK2 gene expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesli, Martin; Wirgenes, Katrine Verena; Hughes, Timothy; Bettella, Francesco; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Hoseth, Eva S; Nerhus, Mari; Lagerberg, Trine V; Steen, Nils E; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Dieset, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2016-08-01

    Common variants in the Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, but the relevance of its encoded protein VRK2 in the disorder remains unclear. To identify potential differences in VRK2 gene expression levels between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified (PNOS) and healthy controls. VRK2 mRNA level was measured in whole blood in 652 individuals (schizophrenia, n = 201; bipolar disorder, n = 167; PNOS, n = 61; healthy controls, n = 223), and compared across diagnostic categories and subcategories. Additionally, we analysed for association between 1566 VRK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms and mRNA levels. We found lower VRK2 mRNA levels in schizophrenia compared with healthy controls (Pdisorder (Pdisorder (P = 0.00026). Expression quantitative trait loci in close proximity to the transcription start site of the short isoforms of the VRK2 gene were identified. Altered VRK2 gene expression seems specific for schizophrenia and PNOS, which is in accordance with findings from genome-wide association studies. These results suggest that reduced VRK2 mRNA levels are involved in the underlying mechanisms in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  3. Modeling suggests that gene circuit architecture controls phenotypic variability in a bacterial persistence network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Rachel S; Dunlop, Mary J

    2012-05-20

    Bacterial persistence is a non-inherited bet-hedging mechanism where a subpopulation of cells enters a dormant state, allowing those cells to survive environmental stress such as treatment with antibiotics. Persister cells are not mutants; they are formed by natural stochastic variation in gene expression. Understanding how regulatory architecture influences the level of phenotypic variability can help us explain how the frequency of persistence events can be tuned. We present a model of the regulatory network controlling the HipBA toxin-antitoxin system from Escherichia coli. Using a biologically realistic model we first determine that the persistence phenotype is not the result of bistability within the network. Next, we develop a stochastic model and show that cells can enter persistence due to random fluctuations in transcription, translation, degradation, and complex formation. We then examine alternative gene circuit architectures for controlling hipBA expression and show that networks with more noise (more persisters) and less noise (fewer persisters) are straightforward to achieve. Thus, we propose that the gene circuit architecture can be used to tune the frequency of persistence, a trait that can be selected for by evolution. We develop deterministic and stochastic models describing how the regulation of toxin and antitoxin expression influences phenotypic variation within a population. Persistence events are the result of stochastic fluctuations in toxin levels that cross a threshold, and their frequency is controlled by the regulatory topology governing gene expression.

  4. Modeling suggests that gene circuit architecture controls phenotypic variability in a bacterial persistence network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Rachel S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial persistence is a non-inherited bet-hedging mechanism where a subpopulation of cells enters a dormant state, allowing those cells to survive environmental stress such as treatment with antibiotics. Persister cells are not mutants; they are formed by natural stochastic variation in gene expression. Understanding how regulatory architecture influences the level of phenotypic variability can help us explain how the frequency of persistence events can be tuned. Results We present a model of the regulatory network controlling the HipBA toxin-antitoxin system from Escherichia coli. Using a biologically realistic model we first determine that the persistence phenotype is not the result of bistability within the network. Next, we develop a stochastic model and show that cells can enter persistence due to random fluctuations in transcription, translation, degradation, and complex formation. We then examine alternative gene circuit architectures for controlling hipBA expression and show that networks with more noise (more persisters and less noise (fewer persisters are straightforward to achieve. Thus, we propose that the gene circuit architecture can be used to tune the frequency of persistence, a trait that can be selected for by evolution. Conclusions We develop deterministic and stochastic models describing how the regulation of toxin and antitoxin expression influences phenotypic variation within a population. Persistence events are the result of stochastic fluctuations in toxin levels that cross a threshold, and their frequency is controlled by the regulatory topology governing gene expression.

  5. Apple SEPALLATA1/2-like genes control fruit flesh development and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Hilary S; Yao, Jia-Long; Tomes, Sumathi; Sutherland, Paul W; Nieuwenhuizen, Niels; Gunaseelan, Kularajathevan; Winz, Robert A; David, Karine M; Schaffer, Robert J

    2013-03-01

    Flowering plants utilize different floral structures to develop flesh tissue in fruits. Here we show that suppression of the homeologous SEPALLATA1/2-like genes MADS8 and MADS9 in the fleshy fruit apple (Malus x domestica) leads to sepaloid petals and greatly reduced fruit flesh. Immunolabelling of cell-wall epitopes and differential staining showed that the developing hypanthium (from which the apple flesh develops) of MADS8/9-suppressed apple flowers lacks a tissue layer, and the remaining flesh tissue of fully developed apples has considerably smaller cells. From these observations, it is proposed that MADS8 and MADS9 control the development of discrete zones within the hypanthium tissue, and therefore fruit flesh, and also act as foundations for development of different floral organs. At fruit maturity, the MADS8/9-suppressed apples do not ripen in terms of both developmentally controlled ripening characters, such as starch degradation, and ethylene-modulated ripening traits. Transient assays suggest that, like the RIN gene in tomato, the MADS9 gene acts as a transcriptional activator of the ethylene biosynthesis enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase 1. The existence of a single class of genes that regulate both flesh formation and ripening provides an evolutionary tool for controlling two critical aspects of fleshy fruit development. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The use of artificial microRNA technology to control gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamens, Andrew L; McHale, Marcus; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an effective trigger of RNA silencing, and several classes of endogenous small RNA (sRNA), processed from dsRNA substrates by DICER-like (DCL) endonucleases, are essential in controlling gene expression. One such sRNA class, the microRNAs (miRNAs) control the expression of closely related genes to regulate all aspects of plant development, including the determination of leaf shape, leaf polarity, flowering time, and floral identity. A single miRNA sRNA silencing signal is processed from a long precursor transcript of nonprotein-coding RNA, termed the primary miRNA (pri-miRNA). A region of the pri-miRNA is partially self-complementary allowing the transcript to fold back onto itself to form a stem-loop structure of imperfectly dsRNA. Artificial miRNA (amiRNA) technology uses endogenous pri-miRNAs, in which the miRNA and miRNA* (passenger strand of the miRNA duplex) sequences have been replaced with corresponding amiRNA/amiRNA* sequences that direct highly efficient RNA silencing of the targeted gene. Here, we describe the rules for amiRNA design, as well as outline the PCR and bacterial cloning procedures involved in the construction of an amiRNA plant expression vector to control target gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  7. Haplotype Analysis of the Melanopsin Gene in Seasonal Affective Disorder and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-19

    found that the seven repeat allele of the Dopamine-4 Receptor gene ( DRD4 ) was associated with obesity and binge eating in a group of women with SAD...Levitan et aI., 2004a; Levitan et aI., 2004b). However, it is unknown if the seven repeat allele of DRD4 is more common in individuals with SAD compared...to controls or if this DRD4 variation is associated with seasonality, in general. Clock genes and SAD. Individuals with SAD may have dysregulated

  8. Linking cell structure to gene regulation: signaling events and expression controls on the model genes PAI-1 and CTGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarakoon, Rohan; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete; Higgins, Paul J

    2010-10-01

    signaling control elements leading to the induction of PAI-1 and CTGF in response to modifications in cell shape. The purpose of this review is to highlight our current understanding of "cell deformation"-responsive signaling cascades focusing on the potential value of targeting such pathways, and their model response genes (e.g., PAI-1, and CTGF), as a therapeutic option for the treatment of fibrotic diseases. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire’s specificity, we performed single-cell RNAseq and DNA methylation analysis in Aire-sufficient and -deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire’s target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clusters activated in concert in a proportion of mTECs. These microclusters differed between individual mice, and thus suggest an organization of the DNA or of the epigenome that results from stochastic determinism, but is bookmarked and stable through mTEC divisions, ensuring more effective presentation of self-antigens, and favoring diversity of self-tolerance between individuals. PMID:26237550

  10. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    The transcription factor Aire controls immunological tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire's specificity, we performed single-cell RNA-seq and DNA-methylation analysis of Aire-sufficient and Aire-deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire's target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA-methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clusters activated in concert in a proportion of mTECs. These microclusters differed between individual mice. Thus, our results suggest an organization of the DNA or of the epigenome that results from stochastic determinism but is 'bookmarked' and stable through mTEC divisions, which ensures more effective presentation of self antigens and favors diversity of self-tolerance between individuals.

  11. A derepression system based on the Bacillus subtilis sporulation pathway offers dynamic control of heterologous gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Reindert; Veening, Jan-Willem; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    By rewiring the sporulation gene-regulatory network of Bacillus subtilis, we generated a novel expression system relying on derepression. The gene of interest is placed under the control of the abrB promoter, which is active only when Spo0A is absent, and Spo0A is controlled via an IPTG

  12. Association of vitamin D receptor gene variants with polycystic ovary syndrome: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touraj Mahmoudi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D and insulin play an important role in susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, and therefore vitamin D receptor (VDR, parathyroid hormone (PTH, and insulin receptor (INSR gene variants might be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the possible associations between polymorphisms in VDR, PTH, and INSR genes and the risk of PCOS. Materials and Methods: VDR, PTH, and INSR gene variants were genotyped in 35 women with PCOS and 35 controls using Polymerase chain reaction – Restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Furthermore, serum levels of glucose and insulin were measured in all participants. Results: No significant differences were observed for the VDR FokI, VDR Tru9I, VDR TaqI, PTH DraII, INSR NsiI, and INSR PmlI gene polymorphisms between the women with PCOS and controls. However, after adjustment for confounding factors, the VDR BsmI “Bb” genotype and the VDR ApaI "Aa" genotype were significantly under transmitted to the patients (p= 0.016; OR= 0.250; 95% CI= 0.081-0.769, and p= 0.017; OR= 0.260; 95% CI= 0.086-0.788, respectively. Furthermore, in the women with PCOS, insulin levels were lower in the participants with the INSR NsiI "NN" genotype compared with those with the "Nn + nn" genotypes (P= 0.045. Conclusion: The results showed an association between the VDR gene BsmI and ApaI polymorphisms and PCOS risk. These data also indicated that the INSR "NN" genotype was a marker of decreased insulin in women with PCOS. Our findings, however, do not lend support to the hypothesis that PTH gene DraII variant plays a role in susceptibility to PCOS.

  13. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Karolina; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human peripheral blood during a sleep/sleep deprivation (S/SD) study and a constant routine (CR) study. Blood expression levels of 9 candidate CCGs (SREBF1, TRIB1, USF1, THRA1, SIRT1, STAT3, CAPRIN1, MKNK2, and ROCK2), were measured across 48 h in 12 participants in the S/SD study and across 33 h in 12 participants in the CR study. Statistically significant rhythms in expression were observed for STAT3, SREBF1, TRIB1, and THRA1 in samples from both the S/SD and the CR studies, indicating that their rhythmicity is driven by the endogenous clock. The MKNK2 gene was significantly rhythmic in the S/SD but not the CR study, which implies its exogenously driven rhythmic expression. In addition, we confirmed the circadian expression of PER1, PER3, and REV-ERBα in the CR study samples, while BMAL1 and HSPA1B were not significantly rhythmic in the CR samples; all 5 genes previously showed significant expression in the S/SD study samples. Overall, our results demonstrate that rhythmic expression patterns of clock and selected clock-controlled genes in human blood cells are in part determined by exogenous factors (sleep and fasting state) and in part by the endogenous circadian timing system. Knowledge of the exogenous and endogenous regulation of gene expression rhythms is needed prior to the selection of potential candidate marker genes for future applications in medical and forensic settings. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. Ancestral genes can control the ability of horizontally acquired loci to confer new traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Deborah Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Horizontally acquired genes typically function as autonomous units conferring new abilities when introduced into different species. However, we reasoned that proteins preexisting in an organism might constrain the functionality of a horizontally acquired gene product if it operates on an ancestral pathway. Here, we determine how the horizontally acquired pmrD gene product activates the ancestral PmrA/PmrB two-component system in Salmonella enterica but not in the closely related bacterium Escherichia coli. The Salmonella PmrD protein binds to the phosphorylated PmrA protein (PmrA-P, protecting it from dephosphorylation by the PmrB protein. This results in transcription of PmrA-dependent genes, including those conferring polymyxin B resistance. We now report that the E. coli PmrD protein can activate the PmrA/PmrB system in Salmonella even though it cannot do it in E. coli, suggesting that these two species differ in an additional component controlling PmrA-P levels. We establish that the E. coli PmrB displays higher phosphatase activity towards PmrA-P than the Salmonella PmrB, and we identified a PmrB subdomain responsible for this property. Replacement of the E. coli pmrB gene with the Salmonella homolog was sufficient to render E. coli resistant to polymyxin B under PmrD-inducing conditions. Our findings provide a singular example whereby quantitative differences in the biochemical activities of orthologous ancestral proteins dictate the ability of a horizontally acquired gene product to confer species-specific traits. And they suggest that horizontally acquired genes can potentiate selection at ancestral loci.

  15. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a “seesaw model” in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  16. The oil palm Shell gene controls oil yield and encodes a homologue of SEEDSTICK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajinder; Leslie Low, Eng-Ti; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Chin, Ting Ngoot; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Amiruddin, Mohd Din; Rosli, Rozana; Abdul Manaf, Mohamad Arif; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Halim, Mohd Amin; Azizi, Norazah; Lakey, Nathan; Smith, Steven W; Budiman, Muhammad A; Hogan, Michael; Bacher, Blaire; Van Brunt, Andrew; Wang, Chunyan; Ordway, Jared M; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    A key event in the domestication and breeding of the oil palm, Elaeis guineensis, was loss of the thick coconut-like shell surrounding the kernel. Modern E. guineensis has three fruit forms, dura (thick-shelled), pisifera (shell-less) and tenera (thin-shelled), a hybrid between dura and pisifera1–4. The pisifera palm is usually female-sterile but the tenera yields far more oil than dura, and is the basis for commercial palm oil production in all of Southeast Asia5. Here, we describe the mapping and identification of the Shell gene responsible for the different fruit forms. Using homozygosity mapping by sequencing we found two independent mutations in the DNA binding domain of a homologue of the MADS-box gene SEEDSTICK (STK) which controls ovule identity and seed development in Arabidopsis. The Shell gene is responsible for the tenera phenotype in both cultivated and wild palms from sub-Saharan Africa, and our findings provide a genetic explanation for the single gene heterosis attributed to Shell, via heterodimerization. This gene mutation explains the single most important economic trait in oil palm, and has implications for the competing interests of global edible oil production, biofuels and rainforest conservation6. PMID:23883930

  17. Determination of internal controls for quantitative gene expression of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis at nitrogen stress condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-02-01

    Isochrysis zhangjiangensis is a potential marine microalga for biodiesel production, which accumulates lipid under nitrogen limitation conditions, but the mechanism on molecular level is veiled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides the possibility to investigate the gene expression levels, and a valid reference for data normalization is an essential prerequisite for firing up the analysis. In this study, five housekeeping genes, actin (ACT), α-tubulin (TUA), ß-tubulin (TUB), ubiquitin (UBI), 18S rRNA (18S) and one target gene, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were used for determining the reference. By analyzing the stabilities based on calculation of the stability index and on operating the two types of software, geNorm and bestkeeper, it showed that the reference genes widely used in higher plant and microalgae, such as UBI, TUA and 18S, were not the most stable ones in nitrogen-stressed I. zhangjiangensis, and thus are not suitable for exploring the mRNA expression levels under these experimental conditions. Our results show that ACT together with TUB is the most feasible internal control for investigating gene expression under nitrogen-stressed conditions. Our findings will contribute not only to future qPCR studies of I. zhangjiangensis, but also to verification of comparative transcriptomics studies of the microalgae under similar conditions.

  18. Scab resistance in 'Geneva' apple is conditioned by a resistance gene cluster with complex genetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaanse, Héloïse; Bassett, Heather C M; Kirk, Christopher; Gardiner, Susan E; Deng, Cecilia; Groenworld, Remmelt; Chagné, David; Bus, Vincent G M

    2016-02-01

    Apple scab, caused by the fungal pathogen Venturia inaequalis, is one of the most severe diseases of apple worldwide. It is the most studied plant-pathogen interaction involving a woody species using modern genetic, genomic, proteomic and bioinformatic approaches in both species. Although 'Geneva' apple was recognized long ago as a potential source of resistance to scab, this resistance has not been characterized previously. Differential interactions between various monoconidial isolates of V. inaequalis and six segregating F1 and F2 populations indicate the presence of at least five loci governing the resistance in 'Geneva'. The 17 chromosomes of apple were screened using genotyping-by-sequencing, as well as single marker mapping, to position loci controlling the V. inaequalis resistance on linkage group 4. Next, we fine mapped a 5-cM region containing five loci conferring both dominant and recessive scab resistance to the distal end of the linkage group. This region corresponds to 2.2 Mbp (from 20.3 to 22.5 Mbp) on the physical map of 'Golden Delicious' containing nine candidate nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) resistance genes. This study increases our understanding of the complex genetic basis of apple scab resistance conferred by 'Geneva', as well as the gene-for-gene (GfG) relationships between the effector genes in the pathogen and resistance genes in the host. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Kindness in the blood: A randomized controlled trial of the gene regulatory impact of prosocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Coffey, S Katherine; Fritz, Megan M; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; Cole, Steve W

    2017-07-01

    Prosocial behavior is linked to longevity, but few studies have experimentally manipulated prosocial behavior to identify the causal mechanisms underlying this association. One possible mediating pathway involves changes in gene expression that may subsequently influence disease development or resistance. In the current study, we examined changes in a leukocyte gene expression profile known as the Conserved Transcriptional Response to Adversity (CTRA) in 159 adults who were randomly assigned for 4 weeks to engage in prosocial behavior directed towards specific others, prosocial behavior directed towards the world in general, self-focused kindness, or a neutral control task. Those randomized to prosocial behavior towards specific others demonstrated improvements (i.e., reductions) in leukocyte expression of CTRA indicator genes. No significant changes in CTRA gene expression were observed in the other 3 conditions. These findings suggest that prosocial behavior can causally impact leukocyte gene expression profiles in ways that might potentially help explain the previously observed health advantages associated with social ties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Control of Plant Trichome Development by a Cotton Fiber MYB GeneW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shui; Wang, Jia-Wei; Yu, Nan; Li, Chun-Hong; Luo, Bin; Gou, Jin-Ying; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2004-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp) plants produce seed trichomes (cotton fibers) that are an important commodity worldwide; however, genes controlling cotton fiber development have not been characterized. In Arabidopsis thaliana the MYB gene GLABRA1 (GL1) is a central regulator of trichome development. Here, we show that promoter of a cotton fiber gene, RD22-like1 (RDL1), contains a homeodomain binding L1 box and a MYB binding motif that confer trichome-specific expression in Arabidopsis. A cotton MYB protein GaMYB2/Fiber Factor 1 transactivated the RDL1 promoter both in yeast and in planta. Real-time PCR and in situ analysis showed that GaMYB2 is predominantly expressed early in developing cotton fibers. After transferring into Arabidopsis, GL1∷GaMYB2 rescued trichome formation of a gl1 mutant, and interestingly, 35S∷GaMYB2 induced seed-trichome production. We further demonstrate that the first intron of both GL1 and GaMYB2 plays a role in patterning trichomes: it acts as an enhancer in trichome and a repressor in nontrichome cells, generating a trichome-specific pattern of MYB gene expression. Disruption of a MYB motif conserved in intron 1 of GL1, WEREWOLF, and GaMYB2 genes affected trichome production. These results suggest that cotton and Arabidopsis use similar transcription factors for regulating trichomes and that GaMYB2 may be a key regulator of cotton fiber development. PMID:15316114

  1. Control of plant trichome development by a cotton fiber MYB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shui; Wang, Jia-Wei; Yu, Nan; Li, Chun-Hong; Luo, Bin; Gou, Jin-Ying; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2004-09-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp) plants produce seed trichomes (cotton fibers) that are an important commodity worldwide; however, genes controlling cotton fiber development have not been characterized. In Arabidopsis thaliana the MYB gene GLABRA1 (GL1) is a central regulator of trichome development. Here, we show that promoter of a cotton fiber gene, RD22-like1 (RDL1), contains a homeodomain binding L1 box and a MYB binding motif that confer trichome-specific expression in Arabidopsis. A cotton MYB protein GaMYB2/Fiber Factor 1 transactivated the RDL1 promoter both in yeast and in planta. Real-time PCR and in situ analysis showed that GaMYB2 is predominantly expressed early in developing cotton fibers. After transferring into Arabidopsis, GL1::GaMYB2 rescued trichome formation of a gl1 mutant, and interestingly, 35S::GaMYB2 induced seed-trichome production. We further demonstrate that the first intron of both GL1 and GaMYB2 plays a role in patterning trichomes: it acts as an enhancer in trichome and a repressor in nontrichome cells, generating a trichome-specific pattern of MYB gene expression. Disruption of a MYB motif conserved in intron 1 of GL1, WEREWOLF, and GaMYB2 genes affected trichome production. These results suggest that cotton and Arabidopsis use similar transcription factors for regulating trichomes and that GaMYB2 may be a key regulator of cotton fiber development.

  2. Evidence of major gene control of cortical bone loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, D; Ginsburg, E; Livshits, G; Pavlovsky, O; Kobyliansky, E

    2000-12-01

    Cortical index (CI) is the ratio of the combined cortical thickness to the total diameter of the bone. It serves for the assessment of the geometric properties of bone and for indirect evaluation of bone mass. CI is a useful predictor of osteoporosis. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis of major gene control of CI variation in a large sample of pedigrees from Chuvashia, Russia. Complex segregation analysis revealed that the major gene model of CI inheritance is the best fitting and most parsimonious for the present data. Parameters of the genotype-gender specific dependence of CI variation on age were estimated simultaneously with other parameters in the segregation analysis. The results of analysis showed that not only the baseline level of CI but also the age at onset of the involutive bone changes (inflection point) and the rate of the CI decrease with age (slope coefficient) are under control of the same major gene. Non-major gene effects shared by pedigree members (residual familial correlations) were found to be statistically insignificant. Approximately 73% of inter-individual variation in CI was attributable to the effects explicitly included in the model. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of the plant circadian gene regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, C Esteban; Romanowski, Andrés; Yanovsky, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock drives rhythms in multiple physiological processes allowing plants to anticipate and adjust to periodic changes in environmental conditions. These physiological rhythms are associated with robust oscillations in the expression of thousands of genes linked to the control of photosynthesis, cell elongation, biotic and abiotic stress responses, developmental processes such as flowering, and the clock itself. Given its pervasive effects on plant physiology, it is not surprising that circadian clock genes have played an important role in the domestication of crop plants and in the improvement of crop productivity. Therefore, identifying the principles governing the dynamics of the circadian gene regulatory network in plants could strongly contribute to further speed up crop improvement. Here we provide an historical as well as a current description of our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in plants. This work focuses on the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory layers that control the very core of the circadian clock, and some of its complex interactions with signaling pathways that help synchronize plant growth and development to daily and seasonal changes in the environment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Polycomb and Hox Genes Control JNK-Induced Remodeling of the Segment Boundary during Drosophila Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Roumengous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In segmented tissues, anterior and posterior compartments represent independent morphogenetic domains, which are made of distinct lineages separated by boundaries. During dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryo, specific “mixer cells” (MCs are reprogrammed in a JNK-dependent manner to express the posterior determinant engrailed (en and cross the segment boundary. Here, we show that JNK signaling induces de novo expression of en in the MCs through repression of Polycomb (Pc and release of the en locus from the silencing PcG bodies. Whereas reprogramming occurs in MCs from all thoracic and abdominal segments, cell mixing is restricted to the central abdominal region. We demonstrate that this spatial control of MC remodeling depends on the antagonist activity of the Hox genes abdominal-A and Abdominal-B. Together, these results reveal an essential JNK/en/Pc/Hox gene regulatory network important in controlling both the plasticity of segment boundaries and developmental reprogramming.

  5. Ellis Englesberg and the discovery of positive control in gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Based on his work with the Escherichia coli l-arabinose operon, Ellis Englesberg proposed in 1965 that the regulatory gene araC was an "activator gene" required for positive control of the ara operon. This challenged the widely held belief in a universal mechanism of negative regulation proposed earlier by Jacob and Monod. For years, Englesberg's model was met with deep skepticism. Despite much frustration with complex ad hoc explanations used to challenge his model, Englesberg persisted until the evidence for positive control in ara and other systems became overwhelming. Englesberg's pioneering work enriched the original operon model and had a lasting impact in opening new and exciting ways of thinking about transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Light-controlled inhibition of malignant glioma by opsin gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Tu, J; Pan, J-Q; Luo, H-L; Liu, Y-H; Wan, J; Zhang, J; Wei, P-F; Jiang, T; Chen, Y-H; Wang, L-P

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive cancers with low survival rates and poor prognosis because of their highly proliferative and invasive capacity. In the current study, we describe a new optogenetic strategy that selectively inhibits glioma cells through light-controlled membrane depolarization and cell death. Transfer of the engineered opsin ChETA (engineered Channelrhodopsin-2 variant) gene into primary human glioma cells or cell lines, but not normal astrocytes, unexpectedly decreased cell proliferation and increased mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, upon light stimulation. These optogenetic effects were mediated by membrane depolarization-induced reductions in cyclin expression and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Importantly, the ChETA gene transfer and light illumination in mice significantly inhibited subcutaneous and intracranial glioma growth and increased the survival of the animals bearing the glioma. These results uncover an unexpected effect of opsin ion channels on glioma cells and offer the opportunity for the first time to treat glioma using a light-controllable optogenetic approach. PMID:24176851

  7. Transfer of toxin genes to alternate bacterial hosts for mosquito control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are vector of serious human and animal diseases, such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, among others. The use of biological control agents has provide an environmentally safe and highly specific alternative to the use of chemical insecticides in the control of vector borne diseases. Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus produce toxic proteins to mosquito larvae. Great progress has been made on the biochemical and molecular characterization of such proteins and the genes encoding them. Nevertheless, the low residuality of these biological insecticides is one of the major drawbacks. This article present some interesting aspects of the mosquito larvae feeding habits and review the attempts that have been made to genetically engineer microorganisms that while are used by mosquito larvae as a food source should express the Bacillus toxin genes in order to improve the residuality and stability in the mosquito breeding ponds.

  8. Natural changes in light interact with circadian regulation at promoters to control gene expression in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock interacts with other regulatory pathways to tune physiology to predictable daily changes and unexpected environmental fluctuations. However, the complexity of circadian clocks in higher organisms has prevented a clear understanding of how natural environmental conditions affect circadian clocks and their physiological outputs. Here, we dissect the interaction between circadian regulation and responses to fluctuating light in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. We demonstrate that natural changes in light intensity substantially affect the expression of hundreds of circadian-clock-controlled genes, many of which are involved in key steps of metabolism. These changes in expression arise from circadian and light-responsive control of RNA polymerase recruitment to promoters by a network of transcription factors including RpaA and RpaB. Using phenomenological modeling constrained by our data, we reveal simple principles that underlie the small number of stereotyped responses of dusk circadian genes to changes in light. PMID:29239721

  9. Circadian clock gene expression in brain regions of Alzheimer 's disease patients and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermakian, Nicolas; Lamont, Elaine Waddington; Boudreau, Philippe; Boivin, Diane B

    2011-04-01

    Circadian oscillators have been observed throughout the rodent brain. In the human brain, rhythmic expression of clock genes has been reported only in the pineal gland, and little is known about their expression in other regions. The investigators sought to determine whether clock gene expression could be detected and whether it varies as a function of time of day in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and cingulate cortex, areas known to be involved in decision making and motivated behaviors, as well as in the pineal gland, in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and aged controls. Relative expression levels of PERIOD1 (PER1 ), PERIOD2 (PER2), and Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1) were detected by quantitative PCR in all 3 brain regions. A harmonic regression model revealed significant 24-h rhythms of PER1 in the BNST of AD subjects. A significant rhythm of PER2 was found in the cingulate cortex and BNST of control subjects and in all 3 regions of AD patients. In controls, BMAL1 did not show a diurnal rhythm in the cingulate cortex but significantly varied with time of death in the pineal and BNST and in all 3 regions for AD patients. Notable differences in the phase of clock gene rhythms and phase relationships between genes and regions were observed in the brains of AD compared to those of controls. These results indicate the presence of multiple circadian oscillators in the human brain and suggest altered synchronization among these oscillators in the brain of AD patients. © 2011 Sage Publications

  10. Genes controlling vaccine responses and disease resistance to respiratory viral pathogens in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Elizabeth J; Baxter, Rebecca; Leach, Richard J; Jann, Oliver C

    2012-07-15

    Farm animals remain at risk of endemic, exotic and newly emerging viruses. Vaccination is often promoted as the best possible solution, and yet for many pathogens, either there are no appropriate vaccines or those that are available are far from ideal. A complementary approach to disease control may be to identify genes and chromosomal regions that underlie genetic variation in disease resistance and response to vaccination. However, identification of the causal polymorphisms is not straightforward as it generally requires large numbers of animals with linked phenotypes and genotypes. Investigation of genes underlying complex traits such as resistance or response to viral pathogens requires several genetic approaches including candidate genes deduced from knowledge about the cellular pathways leading to protection or pathology, or unbiased whole genome scans using markers spread across the genome. Evidence for host genetic variation exists for a number of viral diseases in cattle including bovine respiratory disease and anecdotally, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). We immunised and vaccinated a cattle cross herd with a 40-mer peptide derived from FMDV and a vaccine against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Genetic variation has been quantified. A candidate gene approach has grouped high and low antibody and T cell responders by common motifs in the peptide binding pockets of the bovine major histocompatibility complex (BoLA) DRB3 gene. This suggests that vaccines with a minimal number of epitopes that are recognised by most cattle could be designed. Whole genome scans using microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers has revealed many novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) and SNP markers controlling both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, some of which are in genes of known immunological relevance including the toll-like receptors (TLRs). The sequencing, assembly and annotation of livestock genomes and is continuing apace. In

  11. Genes and QTLs controlling inflorescence and stem branch architecture in Leymus (Poaceae: Triticeae) Wildrye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steven R; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Kevin B

    2013-01-01

    Grass inflorescence and stem branches show recognizable architectural differences among species. The inflorescence branches of Triticeae cereals and grasses, including wheat, barley, and 400-500 wild species, are usually contracted into a spike formation, with the number of flowering branches (spikelets) per node conserved within species and genera. Perennial Triticeae grasses of genus Leymus are unusual in that the number of spikelets per node varies, inflorescences may have panicle branches, and vegetative stems may form subterranean rhizomes. Leymus cinereus and L. triticoides show discrete differences in inflorescence length, branching architecture, node number, and density; number of spikelets per node and florets per spikelet; culm length and width; and perimeter of rhizomatous spreading. Quantitative trait loci controlling these traits were detected in 2 pseudo-backcross populations derived from the interspecific hybrids using a linkage map with 360 expressed gene sequence markers from Leymus tiller and rhizome branch meristems. Alignments of genes, mutations, and quantitative trait loci controlling similar traits in other grass species were identified using the Brachypodium genome reference sequence. Evidence suggests that loci controlling inflorescence and stem branch architecture in Leymus are conserved among the grasses, are governed by natural selection, and can serve as possible gene targets for improving seed, forage, and grain production.

  12. CONTROL DE DISPOSITIVOS INTRATUBARIOS ESSURE MEDIANTE ESTUDIO DE IMÁGENES

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci A,Paolo; Solá D,Vicente; Avilés L,Guillermo; Pardo S,Jack

    2007-01-01

    Objetivo: Comparar la efectividad en la detección y control del dispositivo intratubario (DIT) Essure por medio de la radiografía abdominopélvica y el ultrasonido. Método: Control de los primeros 5 casos de esterilización tubaria ambulatoria con Essure, después de 1 y 2 años de su inserción, mediante radiografía abdominopélvica y ecografía transvaginal. Resultados: Ambos exámenes de imágenes permitieron corroborar la presencia del dispositivo Essure en las 5 pacientes, al completar su primer ...

  13. Fractal gene regulatory networks for robust locomotion control of modular robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahadat, Payam; Christensen, David Johan; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2010-01-01

    Designing controllers for modular robots is difficult due to the distributed and dynamic nature of the robots. In this paper fractal gene regulatory networks are evolved to control modular robots in a distributed way. Experiments with different morphologies of modular robot are performed...... and the results show good performance compared to previous results achieved using learning methods. Furthermore, some experiments are performed to investigate evolvability of the achieved solutions in the case of module failure and it is shown that the system is capable of come up with new effective solutions....

  14. Efficacious and safe tissue-selective controlled gene therapy approaches for the cornea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv R Mohan

    2011-04-01

    -treated and untreated control corneas. These findings suggest that defined gene therapy approaches are safe for delivering genes into keratocytes in vivo and has potential for treating corneal disorders in human patients.

  15. Translational control of small heat shock genes in mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria by RNA thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimdins, Annika; Klinkert, Birgit; Aschke-Sonnenborn, Ursula; Kaiser, Friederike M; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria constitute a heterogeneous phylum of oxygen-producing, photosynthetic prokaryotes. They are susceptible to various stress conditions like heat, salt, or light stress, all inducing the cyanobacterial heat shock response (HSR). Cyanobacterial small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are known to preserve thylakoid membrane integrity under stress conditions, thereby protecting the photosynthesis machinery. In Synechocystis sp PCC 6803, synthesis of the sHsp Hsp17 is regulated by an RNA thermometer (RNAT) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hsp17 mRNA. RNATs are direct temperature sensors that control expression of many bacterial heat shock and virulence genes. They hinder translation at low temperatures by base pairing, thus blocking ribosome access to the mRNA.   To explore the temperature range in which RNATs act, we studied various RNAT candidates upstream of sHsp genes from mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria. The mesophilic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc sp chromosomally encode two sHsps each. Reporter gene studies suggested RNAT-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of shsp expression in both organisms. Detailed structural analysis of the two A. variabilis candidates revealed two novel RNAT types. The first, avashort, regulates translation primarily by masking of the AUG translational start codon. The second, featuring an extended initial hairpin, thus named avalong, presumably makes use of complex tertiary interaction. The 5'-UTR of the small heat shock gene hspA in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus is predicted to adopt an extended secondary structure. Structure probing revealed that the ribosome binding site was blocked at temperatures below 55 °C. The results of this study demonstrate that cyanobacteria commonly use RNATs to control expression of their small heat shock genes.

  16. Gene expression profiling of asthma phenotypes demonstrates molecular signatures of atopy and asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howrylak, Judie A; Moll, Matthew; Weiss, Scott T; Raby, Benjamin A; Wu, Wei; Xing, Eric P

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have used cluster analysis to identify phenotypic clusters of asthma with differences in clinical traits, as well as differences in response to therapy with anti-inflammatory medications. However, the correspondence between different phenotypic clusters and differences in the underlying molecular mechanisms of asthma pathogenesis remains unclear. We sought to determine whether clinical differences among children with asthma in different phenotypic clusters corresponded to differences in levels of gene expression. We explored differences in gene expression profiles of CD4(+) lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of 299 young adult participants in the Childhood Asthma Management Program study. We obtained gene expression profiles from study subjects between 9 and 14 years of age after they participated in a randomized, controlled longitudinal study examining the effects of inhaled anti-inflammatory medications over a 48-month study period, and we evaluated the correspondence between our earlier phenotypic cluster analysis and subsequent follow-up clinical and molecular profiles. We found that differences in clinical characteristics observed between subjects assigned to different phenotypic clusters persisted into young adulthood and that these clinical differences were associated with differences in gene expression patterns between subjects in different clusters. We identified a subset of genes associated with atopic status, validated the presence of an atopic signature among these genes in an independent cohort of asthmatic subjects, and identified the presence of common transcription factor binding sites corresponding to glucocorticoid receptor binding. These findings suggest that phenotypic clusters are associated with differences in the underlying pathobiology of asthma. Further experiments are necessary to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Model checking optimal finite-horizon control for probabilistic gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ou; Guo, Zonghao; Niu, Yun; Liao, Wenyuan

    2017-12-14

    Probabilistic Boolean networks (PBNs) have been proposed for analyzing external control in gene regulatory networks with incorporation of uncertainty. A context-sensitive PBN with perturbation (CS-PBNp), extending a PBN with context-sensitivity to reflect the inherent biological stability and random perturbations to express the impact of external stimuli, is considered to be more suitable for modeling small biological systems intervened by conditions from the outside. In this paper, we apply probabilistic model checking, a formal verification technique, to optimal control for a CS-PBNp that minimizes the expected cost over a finite control horizon. We first describe a procedure of modeling a CS-PBNp using the language provided by a widely used probabilistic model checker PRISM. We then analyze the reward-based temporal properties and the computation in probabilistic model checking; based on the analysis, we provide a method to formulate the optimal control problem as minimum reachability reward properties. Furthermore, we incorporate control and state cost information into the PRISM code of a CS-PBNp such that automated model checking a minimum reachability reward property on the code gives the solution to the optimal control problem. We conduct experiments on two examples, an apoptosis network and a WNT5A network. Preliminary experiment results show the feasibility and effectiveness of our approach. The approach based on probabilistic model checking for optimal control avoids explicit computation of large-size state transition relations associated with PBNs. It enables a natural depiction of the dynamics of gene regulatory networks, and provides a canonical form to formulate optimal control problems using temporal properties that can be automated solved by leveraging the analysis power of underlying model checking engines. This work will be helpful for further utilization of the advances in formal verification techniques in system biology.

  18. Cytochrome P450 1A1 exon 7 polymorphism and susceptibility to lung cancer in the Chinese population: an updated meta-analysis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiu-Ping; Hu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Although many epidemiologic studies have investigated the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) exon 7 gene polymorphism and its association with lung cancer (LC), definitive conclusions cannot be drawn. To clarify the effects of CYP1A1 exon 7 polymorphism on the risk of LC, an updated meta-analysis was performed in the Chinese population. Related studies were identified from PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, the Chinese Wanfang Data Knowledge Service Platform, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and the Chinese Biology Medicine (CBM) databases until October 2014. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of the associations. A total of 25 articles including 3,540 LC cases and 5,284 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, significant association was found between CYP1A1 exon 7 polymorphism and LC risk when all studies in the Chinese population were pooled into this meta-analysis (GG versus AA: OR = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.46-2.01; GG versus AG: OR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.21-1.64; GG + AG versus AA: OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 1.16-1.62; GG versus AA + AG: OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.32-1.76). In subgroup analyses stratified by ethnicity, source of controls, and geographical locations, significantly increased risk was found in Chinese Han people, in population-based studies, in hospital-based studies, in South China, and in North China. This meta-analysis provides the evidence that CYP1A1 exon 7 polymorphism may contribute to LC development in the Chinese population, and studies with a larger sample size and wider population spectrum are warranted to verify this finding.

  19. Combinations of cytochrome P-450 genotypes and risk of early-onset lung cancer in Caucasians and African Americans: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, M L; Wenzlaff, A S; Bock, C H; Land, S J; Santer, S K; Schwartz, D R; Schwartz, A G

    2007-03-01

    Polymorphisms in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes in humans are associated with reduction of enzymatic activity towards several substrates, including those found in tobacco smoke. To investigate the potential role these polymorphisms have as modulators of early-onset lung cancer risk, a population-based case-control study involving early-onset lung cancer cases was performed. Biological samples were available for 383 individuals diagnosed prior to 50 years of age identified from the metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program and 449 age, race and sex-matched controls ascertained through random digit dialing. Genotype frequencies varied significantly by race for CYP1A1 Ile(462)Val and CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val genotypes, so all analyses were stratified by race. No association was seen between lung cancer risk and polymorphisms in CYP1A1 Msp1 or CYP1B1 Leu(432)Val for Caucasians or African Americans, after adjusting for age at diagnosis, sex, pack years of smoking and family history of lung cancer. In Caucasians, those with the IIe/Val genotype at CYP1A1 Ile(462)Val locus were at decreased risk of having lung cancer compared to those with the lle/lle genotype, after adjusting for age at diagnosis, sex, pack years of smoking and family history of cancer (OR=0.41 95% Cl 0.19-0.90). These results were not replicated among the African American population, nor were they modified by amount of smoking.

  20. The physics of protein-DNA interaction networks in the control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Protein-DNA interaction networks play a central role in many fundamental cellular processes. In gene regulation, physical interactions and reactions among the molecular components together with the physical properties of DNA control how genes are turned on and off. A key player in all these processes is the inherent flexibility of DNA, which provides an avenue for long-range interactions between distal DNA elements through DNA looping. Such versatility enables multiple interactions and results in additional complexity that is remarkably difficult to address with traditional approaches. This topical review considers recent advances in statistical physics methods to study the assembly of protein-DNA complexes with loops, their effects in the control of gene expression, and their explicit application to the prototypical lac operon genetic system of the E. coli bacterium. In the last decade, it has been shown that the underlying physical properties of DNA looping can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including the balance between robustness and sensitivity of the induction process. These physical properties are largely dependent on the free energy of DNA looping, which accounts for DNA bending and twisting effects. These new physical methods have also been used in reverse to uncover the actual in vivo free energy of looping double-stranded DNA in living cells, which was not possible with existing experimental techniques. The results obtained for DNA looping by the lac repressor inside the E. coli bacterium showed a more malleable DNA than expected as a result of the interplay of the simultaneous presence of two distinct conformations of looped DNA.

  1. A bistable switch and anatomical site control Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression in the intestine.

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    Alex T Nielsen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP and cholera toxin (CT were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a

  2. Initial experience with GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in the Arkansas Tuberculosis Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Naveen; Saba, Hamida; Marco, Asween; Samant, Rohan; Mukasa, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most significant causes of death from an infectious agent. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is still a great challenge. The GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay is a novel integrated diagnostic system for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and rapid detection of Rifampin (RIF) resistance in clinical specimens. In 2012, the Arkansas Tuberculosis Control Program introduced GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay to replace the labour-intensive Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Direct (MTD) assay. To rapidly diagnose TB within two hours and to simultaneously detect RIF resistance. Describe the procedure used to introduce GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in the Arkansas Tuberculosis Control Program.Characterise the current gap in rapid M. tuberculosis diagnosis in Arkansas.Assess factors that predict acid fast bacilli (AFB) smearnegative but culture-positive cases in Arkansas.Illustrate, with two case reports, the role of GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in reduction of time to confirmation of M. tuberculosis diagnosis in the first year of implementation. Between June 2012 and June 2013, all AFB sputum smearpositive cases and any others, on request by the physician, had GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay performed as well as traditional M. tuberculosis culture and susceptibilities using Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 and Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) slants. Surveillance data for January 2009-June 2013 was analysed to characterise sputum smear-negative but culture-positive cases. Seventy-one TB cases were reported from June 2012- June 2013. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay identified all culture-positive cases as well as three cases that were negative on culture. Also, this rapid assay identified all six smear-negative but M. tuberculosis culture-positive cases; two of these cases are described as case reports. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay has made rapid TB diagnosis possible, with tremendous potential in determining isolation of TB suspects on one

  3. Accurate normalization of real-time quantitative RT-PCR data by geometric averaging of multiple internal control genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandesompele, Jo; De Preter, Katleen; Pattyn, Filip; Poppe, Bruce; Van Roy, Nadine; De Paepe, Anne; Speleman, Frank

    2002-06-18

    Gene-expression analysis is increasingly important in biological research, with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) becoming the method of choice for high-throughput and accurate expression profiling of selected genes. Given the increased sensitivity, reproducibility and large dynamic range of this methodology, the requirements for a proper internal control gene for normalization have become increasingly stringent. Although housekeeping gene expression has been reported to vary considerably, no systematic survey has properly determined the errors related to the common practice of using only one control gene, nor presented an adequate way of working around this problem. We outline a robust and innovative strategy to identify the most stably expressed control genes in a given set of tissues, and to determine the minimum number of genes required to calculate a reliable normalization factor. We have evaluated ten housekeeping genes from different abundance and functional classes in various human tissues, and demonstrated that the conventional use of a single gene for normalization leads to relatively large errors in a significant proportion of samples tested. The geometric mean of multiple carefully selected housekeeping genes was validated as an accurate normalization factor by analyzing publicly available microarray data. The normalization strategy presented here is a prerequisite for accurate RT-PCR expression profiling, which, among other things, opens up the possibility of studying the biological relevance of small expression differences.

  4. Genetic control of lithium sensitivity and regulation of inositol biosynthetic genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason King

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lithium (Li(+ is a common treatment for bipolar mood disorder, a major psychiatric illness with a lifetime prevalence of more than 1%. Risk of bipolar disorder is heavily influenced by genetic predisposition, but is a complex genetic trait and, to date, genetic studies have provided little insight into its molecular origins. An alternative approach is to investigate the genetics of Li(+ sensitivity. Using the social amoeba Dictyostelium, we previously identified prolyl oligopeptidase (PO as a modulator of Li(+ sensitivity. In a link to the clinic, PO enzyme activity is altered in bipolar disorder patients. Further studies demonstrated that PO is a negative regulator of inositol(1,4,5trisphosphate (IP(3 synthesis, a Li(+ sensitive intracellular signal. However, it was unclear how PO could influence either Li(+ sensitivity or risk of bipolar disorder. Here we show that in both Dictyostelium and cultured human cells PO acts via Multiple Inositol Polyphosphate Phosphatase (Mipp1 to control gene expression. This reveals a novel, gene regulatory network that modulates inositol metabolism and Li(+ sensitivity. Among its targets is the inositol monophosphatase gene IMPA2, which has also been associated with risk of bipolar disorder in some family studies, and our observations offer a cellular signalling pathway in which PO activity and IMPA2 gene expression converge.

  5. Control of Pelvic Girdle Development by Genes of the Pbx Family and Emx2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capellini, Terence D.; Handschuh, Karen; Quintana, Laura; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Di Giacomo, Giuseppina; Fantini, Sebastian; Vaccari, Giulia; Clarke, Shoa L.; Wenger, Aaron M.; Bejerano, Gill; Sharpe, James; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Selleri, Licia

    2011-01-01

    Genes expressed in the somatopleuric mesoderm, the embryonic domain giving rise to the vertebrate pelvis, appear important for pelvic girdle formation. Among such genes, Pbx family members and Emx2 were found to genetically interact in hindlimb and pectoral girdle formation. Here, we generated compound mutant embryos carrying combinations of mutated alleles for Pbx1, Pbx2, and Pbx3, as well as Pbx1 and Emx2, to examine potential genetic interactions during pelvic development. Indeed, Pbx genes share overlapping functions and Pbx1 and Emx2 genetically interact in pelvic formation. We show that in compound Pbx1;Pbx2 and Pbx1;Emx2 mutants, pelvic mesenchymal condensation is markedly perturbed, indicative of an upstream control by these homeoproteins. We establish that expression of Tbx15, Prrx1, and Pax1, among other genes involved in the specification and development of select pelvic structures, is altered in our compound mutants. Lastly, we identify potential Pbx1-Emx2-regulated enhancers for Tbx15, Prrx1, and Pax1, using bioinformatics analyses. PMID:21455939

  6. XRN2 Autoregulation and Control of Polycistronic Gene Expresssion in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Takashi S Miki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available XRN2 is a conserved 5'→3' exoribonuclease that complexes with proteins that contain XRN2-binding domains (XTBDs. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans, the XTBD-protein PAXT-1 stabilizes XRN2 to retain its activity. XRN2 activity is also promoted by 3'(2',5'-bisphosphate nucleotidase 1 (BPNT1 through hydrolysis of an endogenous XRN inhibitor 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (PAP. Here, we find through unbiased screening that loss of bpnt-1 function suppresses lethality caused by paxt-1 deletion. This unexpected finding is explained by XRN2 autoregulation, which occurs through repression of a cryptic promoter activity and destabilization of the xrn-2 transcript. De-repression appears to be triggered such that more robust XRN2 perturbation, by elimination of both PAXT-1 and BPNT1, is less detrimental to worm viability than absence of PAXT-1 alone. Indeed, we find that two distinct XRN2 repression mechanisms are alleviated at different thresholds of XRN2 inactivation. Like more than 15% of C. elegans genes, xrn-2 occurs in an operon, and we identify additional operons under its control, consistent with a broader function of XRN2 in polycistronic gene regulation. Regulation occurs through intercistronic regions that link genes in an operon, but a part of the mechanisms may allow XRN2 to operate on monocistronic genes in organisms lacking operons.

  7. Brd4 binds to active enhancers to control cell identity gene induction in adipogenesis and myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Park, Young-Kwon; Park, Sarah; Jang, Younghoon; Waring, Nicholas; Dey, Anup; Ozato, Keiko; Lai, Binbin; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    2017-12-20

    The epigenomic reader Brd4 is an important drug target for cancers. However, its role in cell differentiation and animal development remains largely unclear. Using two conditional knockout mouse strains and derived cells, we demonstrate that Brd4 controls cell identity gene induction and is essential for adipogenesis and myogenesis. Brd4 co-localizes with lineage-determining transcription factors (LDTFs) on active enhancers during differentiation. LDTFs coordinate with H3K4 mono-methyltransferases MLL3/MLL4 (KMT2C/KMT2D) and H3K27 acetyltransferases CBP/p300 to recruit Brd4 to enhancers activated during differentiation. Brd4 deletion prevents the enrichment of Mediator and RNA polymerase II transcription machinery, but not that of LDTFs, MLL3/MLL4-mediated H3K4me1, and CBP/p300-mediated H3K27ac, on enhancers. Consequently, Brd4 deletion prevents enhancer RNA production, cell identity gene induction and cell differentiation. Interestingly, Brd4 is dispensable for maintaining cell identity genes in differentiated cells. These findings identify Brd4 as an enhancer epigenomic reader that links active enhancers with cell identity gene induction in differentiation.

  8. GWAS, QTL mapping and gene expression analyses in Brassica napus reveal genetic control of branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yajun; Wu, Daoming; Wei, Dayong; Fu, Ying; Cui, Yixin; Dong, Hongli; Tan, Chuandong; Qian, Wei

    2017-11-21

    Branch number is an important trait in plant architecture that can influence crop yield and quality in Brassica napus. Here, we detected the QTLs responsible for branch number in a DH population and its reconstructed F2 population over two years. Further, a GWAS research on branch number was performed using a panel of 327 accessions with 33186 genomic SNPs from the 60 K Brassica Illumina® Infinium SNP array. Through combining linkage analysis and association mapping, a new QTL was fine mapped onto C03. Subsequently, we tested the correlations between the SNP polymorphisms and mRNA expression levels of genes in the target interval to identify potential loci or genes that control branch number through expression. The results show that 4 SNP loci are associated with the corresponding gene expression levels, and one locus (BnaC03g63480D) exhibited a significant correlation between the phenotype variation and gene expression levels. Our results provide insights into the genetic basis for branching morphogenesis and may be valuable for optimizing architecture in rapeseed breeding.

  9. Dissecting dynamic genetic variation that controls temporal gene response in yeast.

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    Avital Brodt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variation in regulatory circuits controlling gene expression is a powerful source of functional information. The study of associations among genetic variants and gene expression provides important insights about cell circuitry but cannot specify whether and when potential variants dynamically alter their genetic effect during the course of response. Here we develop a computational procedure that captures temporal changes in genetic effects, and apply it to analyze transcription during inhibition of the TOR signaling pathway in segregating yeast cells. We found a high-order coordination of gene modules: sets of genes co-associated with the same genetic variant and sharing a common temporal genetic effect pattern. The temporal genetic effects of some modules represented a single state-transitioning pattern; for example, at 10-30 minutes following stimulation, genetic effects in the phosphate utilization module attained a characteristic transition to a new steady state. In contrast, another module showed an impulse pattern of genetic effects; for example, in the poor nitrogen sources utilization module, a spike up of a genetic effect at 10-20 minutes following stimulation reflected inter-individual variation in the timing (rather than magnitude of response. Our analysis suggests that the same mechanism typically leads to both inter-individual variation and the temporal genetic effect pattern in a module. Our methodology provides a quantitative genetic approach to studying the molecular mechanisms that shape dynamic changes in transcriptional responses.

  10. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayah, Zaid H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ghebeh, Hazem [Stem Cell & Tissue Re-Engineering, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Alhaider, Abdulqader A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Camel Biomedical Research Unit, College of Pharmacy and Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); El-Kadi, Ayman O.S. [Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Korashy, Hesham M., E-mail: hkorashy@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  11. The Caenorhabditis Elegans Gene Sdc-2 Controls Sex Determination and Dosage Compensation in Xx Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, C.; Meyer, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a new X-linked gene, sdc-2, that controls the hermaphrodite (XX) modes of both sex determination and X chromosome dosage compensation in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in sdc-2 cause phenotypes that appear to result from a shift of both the sex determination and dosage compensation processes in XX animals to the XO modes of expression. Twenty-eight independent sdc-2 mutations have no apparent effect in XO animals, but cause two distinct phenotypes in XX animals: masculinization, reflecting a defect in sex determination, and lethality or dumpiness, reflecting a disruption in dosage compensation. The dosage compensation defect can be demonstrated directly by showing that sdc-2 mutations cause elevated levels of several X-linked transcripts in XX but not XO animals. While the masculinization is blocked by mutations in sex determining genes required for male development (her-1 and fem-3), the lethality, dumpiness and overexpression of X-linked genes are not, indicating that the effect of sdc-2 mutations on sex determination and dosage compensation are ultimately implemented by two independent pathways. We propose a model in which sdc-2 is involved in the coordinate control of both sex determination and dosage compensation in XX animals and acts in the regulatory hierarchy at a step prior to the divergence of the two pathways. PMID:2759421

  12. Lactation undernutrition leads to multigenerational molecular programming of hypothalamic gene networks controlling reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Monika M; Mendoza, Tamra; Kozak, Leslie P

    2016-05-04

    Reproductive success is dependent on development of hypothalamic circuits involving many hormonal systems working in concert to regulate gonadal function and sexual behavior. The timing of pubertal initiation and progression in mammals is likely influenced by the nutritional and metabolic state, leading us to the hypothesis that transient malnutrition experienced at critical times during development may perturb pubertal progression through successive generations. To test this hypothesis we have utilized a mouse model of undernutrition during suckling by exposing lactating mothers to undernutrition. Using a combination of transcriptomic and biological approaches, we demonstrate that molecular programming of hypothalamus may perturb gender specific phenotypes across generations that are dependent on the nutritional environment of the lactation period. Lactation undernutrition in first (F1) generation offspring affected body composition, reproductive performance parameters and influenced the expression of genes responsible for hypothalamic neural circuits controlling reproductive function of both sexes. Strikingly, F2 offspring showed phenotypes similar to F1 progeny; however, they were sex and parental nutritional history specific. Here, we showed that deregulated expression of genes involved in kisspeptin signaling within the hypothalamus is strongly associated with a delay in the attainment of puberty in F1 and F2 male and female offspring. The early developmental plasticity of hypothalamus when challenged with undernutrition during postnatal development not only leads to altered expression of genes controlling hypothalamic neural circuits, altered body composition, delayed puberty and disturbed reproductive performance in F1 progeny, but also affects F2 offspring, depending on parental malnutrition history and in sexually dimorphic manner.

  13. Comprehensive Comparative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of the Legume Genes Controlling the Nodulation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhenzhen; Pingault, Lise; Nourbakhsh-Rey, Mehrnoush; Libault, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max, and Phaseolus vulgaris) to identify key regulatory protein coding genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species.

  14. Comprehensive comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses of the legume genes controlling the nodulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen eQiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients and one of the major factors limiting crop productivity. Having the goal to perform a more sustainable agriculture, there is a need to maximize biological nitrogen fixation, a feature of legumes. To enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiotic partner fixing and assimilating the atmospheric nitrogen for the plant, researchers took advantage of genetic and genomic resources developed across different legume models (e.g. Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Glycine max and Phaseolous vulgaris to identify key regulatory genes of the nodulation process. In this study, we are presenting the results of a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis to highlight orthologous and paralogous relationships between the legume genes controlling nodulation. Mining large transcriptomic datasets, we also identified several orthologous and paralogous genes characterized by the induction of their expression during nodulation across legume plant species. This comprehensive study prompts new insights into the evolution of the nodulation process in legume plant and will benefit the scientific community interested in the transfer of functional genomic information between species.

  15. Exposure of the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata to sediments contaminated with heavy metals down-regulates the gene expression of stress biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Benhamed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals incidence in the aquatic environment and its accumulation in fish are under constant review. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata specimens were exposed for two weeks to sediments highly concentrated in metals, collected at the Portman Bay (Murcia, Spain. The metals bioaccumulation was tested in liver, muscle and skin. The potential of the sediment exposure to induce variation of the stress biomarkers genes was conducted in liver and skin. Results revealed that sediments were highly contaminated with metals. However, following 2 weeks exposure to the sediments, Cd accumulates only in liver. Interestingly, the expression of the genes mta, hsp 70 and hsp 90 were significantly down-regulated in skin. Nevertheless, cyp1a1 gene was up-regulated only in liver. Results uphold that the stress response magnitude was organ-dependent and the skin was the most responsive tissue to metal stress conditions. These results suggest that skin should be considered as target organ for biomarkers analysis in fishes.

  16. CYTOKINE GENES AS GENETIC MARKERS OF CONTROLLED AND UNCONTROLLED ATOPIC BRONCHIAL ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Smolnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic bronchial asthma (ABA is a multifactorial disease; its development is dependent on many environmental and genetic factors. Genetic risk factors can affect the clinical phenotype of ABA and the level of therapeutic control over the disease. Cytokine genes are crucially important in pathogenesis of ABA as they encode proteins participating in immune response and development of inflammation in bronchi. It was suggested that the therapeutic control of the disease is genetically mediated and depends on the presence of one or another allele in genes of mediators, participating in ABA pathogenesis. The knowledge about genetic markers will allow to predict clinical course of ABA in children. We carried out the analysis of association between genes of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines with the level of therapeutic control of ABA. In children with controlled and uncontrolled ABA (CABA and UABA, respectively; n = 110, and in general a population sample (n = 138, we analysed 11 polymorphisms: IL2 (rs2069762, IL4 (rs2070874 и rs2243250, IL5 (rs2069812, IL10 (rs1800872 and rs1800896, IL12B (rs3212227, TNFA (rs1800629 and rs1800630, TGFB1 (rs1800469, and IFNG (rs2069705, encoding cytokines actively participating at the development of allergic inflammation. According to results of present study, the prevalence of alleles and genotypes of the analysed loci in the East Siberia Caucasians is consistent with the data in other world Caucasian populations. We have found statistically significant differences between UABA and control groups for the prevalence of IL2 (rs2069762 polymorphism: GG genotype was more common in control group (14.1% compared to 5.9%, р = 0.03. It was shown that the IL2*T allele and ТТ genotype of the rs2069762 are associated with the increased risk of uncontrolled ABA. A comparison of the haplotypes of IL4 (rs2070874 and rs2243250 gene with correction for sex and age within an additive model revealed that the most common

  17. The ASK1 gene regulates development and interacts with the UFO gene to control floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yang, M; Solava, J; Ma, H

    1999-09-01

    Normal flower development likely requires both specific and general regulators. We have isolated an Arabidopsis mutant ask1-1 (for -Arabidopsis skp1-like1-1), which exhibits defects in both vegetative and reproductive development. In the ask1-1mutant, rosette leaf growth is reduced, resulting in smaller than normal rosette leaves, and internodes in the floral stem are shorter than normal. Examination of cell sizes in these organs indicates that cell expansion is normal in the mutant, but cell number is reduced. In the mutant, the numbers of petals and stamens are reduced, and many flowers have one or more petals with a reduced size. In addition, all mutant flowers have short stamen filaments. Furthermore, petal/stamen chimeric organs are found in many flowers. These results indicate that the ASK1 gene affects the size of vegetative and floral organs. The ask1 floral phenotype resembles somewhat that of the Arabidopsis ufo mutants in that both genes affect whorls 2 and 3. We therefore tested for possible interactions between ASK1 and UFO by analyzing the phenotypes of ufo-2 ask1-1 double mutant plants. In these plants, vegetative development is similar to that of the ask1-1 single mutant, whereas the floral defects are more severe than those in either single mutant. Interior to the first whorl, the double mutant flowers have more sepals or sepal-like organs than are found in ufo-2, and less petals than ask1-1. Our results suggest that ASK1 interacts with UFO to control floral organ identity in whorls 2 and 3. This is very intriguing because ASK1 is very similar in sequence to the yeast SKP1 protein and UFO contains an F-box, a motif known to interact with SKP1 in yeast. Although the precise mechanism of ASK1 and UFO action is unknown, our results support the hypothesis that these two proteins physically interact in vivo. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. RNA- and protein-mediated control of Listeria monocytogenes virulence gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Alice; Cossart, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The model opportunistic pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has been the object of extensive research, aiming at understanding its ability to colonize diverse environmental niches and animal hosts. Bacterial transcriptomes in various conditions reflect this efficient adaptability. We review here our current knowledge of the mechanisms allowing L. monocytogenes to respond to environmental changes and trigger pathogenicity, with a special focus on RNA-mediated control of gene expression. We highlight how these studies have brought novel concepts in prokaryotic gene regulation, such as the ‘excludon’ where the 5′-UTR of a messenger also acts as an antisense regulator of an operon transcribed in opposite orientation, or the notion that riboswitches can regulate non-coding RNAs to integrate complex metabolic stimuli into regulatory networks. Overall, the Listeria model exemplifies that fine RNA tuners act together with master regulatory proteins to orchestrate appropriate transcriptional programmes. PMID:27217337

  19. Rapid identification of genes controlling virulence and immunity in malaria parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Abkallo, Hussein M.

    2017-07-13

    Identifying the genetic determinants of phenotypes that impact disease severity is of fundamental importance for the design of new interventions against malaria. Here we present a rapid genome-wide approach capable of identifying multiple genetic drivers of medically relevant phenotypes within malaria parasites via a single experiment at single gene or allele resolution. In a proof of principle study, we found that a previously undescribed single nucleotide polymorphism in the binding domain of the erythrocyte binding like protein (EBL) conferred a dramatic change in red blood cell invasion in mutant rodent malaria parasites Plasmodium yoelii. In the same experiment, we implicated merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) and other polymorphic proteins, as the major targets of strain-specific immunity. Using allelic replacement, we provide functional validation of the substitution in the EBL gene controlling the growth rate in the blood stages of the parasites.

  20. Effect of Genetic Polymorphisms and Long-Term Tobacco Exposure on the Risk of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verde, Zoraida; Santiago, Catalina; Chicharro, Luis Miguel; Reinoso-Barbero, Luis; Tejerina, Alejandro; Bandrés, Fernando; Gómez-Gallego, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco smoke contains many potentially harmful compounds that may act differently and at different stages in breast cancer development. The focus of this work was to assess the possible role of cigarette smoking (status, dose, duration or age at initiation) and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in tobacco carcinogen metabolism (CYP1A1, CYP2A6) or in DNA repair (XRCC1, APEX1, XRCC3 and XPD) in breast cancer development. Methods: We designed a case control study with 297 patients, 217 histologically verified breast cancers (141 smokers and 76 non-smokers) and 80 healthy smokers in a cohort of Spanish women. Results: We found an association between smoking status and early age at diagnosis of breast cancer. Among smokers, invasive carcinoma subtype incidence increased with intensity and duration of smoking (all Ptrend cancer (OR = 7.12 (1.98–25.59)). Conclusions: Our results support the main effect of CYP1A1 in estrogenic metabolism rather than in tobacco carcinogen activation in breast cancer patients and also confirmed the hypothesis that CYP1A1 Ile462Val, in association with long periods of active smoking, could be a breast cancer risk factor. PMID:27754415

  1. Cohesins: chromatin architects in chromosome segregation, control of gene expression and much more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero, José L

    2009-07-01

    Cells have evolved to develop molecules and control mechanisms that guarantee correct chromosome segregation and ensure the proper distribution of genetic material to daughter cells. In this sense, the establishment, maintenance, and removal of sister chromatid cohesion is one of the most fascinating and dangerous processes in the life of a cell because errors in the control of these processes frequently lead to cell death or aneuploidy. The main protagonist in this mechanism is a four-protein complex denominated the cohesin complex. In the last 10 years, we have improved our understanding of the key players in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion during cell division in mitosis and meiosis. The last 2 years have seen an increase in evidence showing that cohesins have important functions in non-dividing cells, revealing new, unexplored roles for these proteins in the control of gene expression, development, and other essential cell functions in mammals.

  2. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Gohlke

    Full Text Available Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes

  3. A Hh-driven gene network controls specification, pattern and size of the Drosophila simple eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hidalgo, Daniel; Domínguez-Cejudo, María A; Amore, Gabriele; Brockmann, Anette; Lemos, María C; Córdoba, Antonio; Casares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    During development, extracellular signaling molecules interact with intracellular gene networks to control the specification, pattern and size of organs. One such signaling molecule is Hedgehog (Hh). Hh is known to act as a morphogen, instructing different fates depending on the distance to its source. However, how Hh, when signaling across a cell field, impacts organ-specific transcriptional networks is still poorly understood. Here, we investigate this issue during the development of the Drosophila ocellar complex. The development of this sensory structure, which is composed of three simple eyes (or ocelli) located at the vertices of a triangular patch of cuticle on the dorsal head, depends on Hh signaling and on the definition of three domains: two areas of eya and so expression--the prospective anterior and posterior ocelli--and the intervening interocellar domain. Our results highlight the role of the homeodomain transcription factor engrailed (en) both as a target and as a transcriptional repressor of hh signaling in the prospective interocellar region. Furthermore, we identify a requirement for the Notch pathway in the establishment of en maintenance in a Hh-independent manner. Therefore, hh signals transiently during the specification of the interocellar domain, with en being required here for hh signaling attenuation. Computational analysis further suggests that this network design confers robustness to signaling noise and constrains phenotypic variation. In summary, using genetics and modeling we have expanded the ocellar gene network to explain how the interaction between the Hh gradient and this gene network results in the generation of stable mutually exclusive gene expression domains. In addition, we discuss some general implications our model may have in some Hh-driven gene networks.

  4. RNA sequencing identifies gene regulatory networks controlling extracellular matrix synthesis in intervertebral disk tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riester, Scott M; Lin, Yang; Wang, Wei; Cong, Lin; Mohamed Ali, Abdel-Moneim; Peck, Sun H; Smith, Lachlan J; Currier, Bradford L; Clark, Michelle; Huddleston, Paul; Krauss, William; Yaszemski, Michael J; Morrey, Mark E; Abdel, Matthew P; Bydon, Mohamad; Qu, Wenchun; Larson, Annalise N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Nassr, Ahmad

    2017-12-11

    Degenerative disk disease of the spine is a major cause of back pain and disability. Optimization of regenerative medical therapies for degenerative disk disease requires a deep mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling the structural integrity of spinal tissues. In this investigation, we sought to identify candidate regulatory genes controlling extracellular matrix synthesis in spinal tissues. To achieve this goal we performed high throughput next generation RNA sequencing on 39 annulus fibrosus and 21 nucleus pulposus human tissue samples. Specimens were collected from patients undergoing surgical discectomy for the treatment of degenerative disk disease. Our studies identified associations between extracellular matrix genes, growth factors, and other important regulatory molecules. The fibrous matrix characteristic of annulus fibrosus was associated with expression of the growth factors platelet derived growth factor beta (PDGFB), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC), and fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9). Additionally we observed high expression of multiple signaling proteins involved in the NOTCH and WNT signaling cascades. Nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix related genes were associated with the expression of numerous diffusible growth factors largely associated with the transforming growth signaling cascade, including transforming factor alpha (TGFA), inhibin alpha (INHA), inhibin beta A (INHBA), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP2, BMP6), and others. this investigation provides important data on extracellular matrix gene regulatory networks in disk tissues. This information can be used to optimize pharmacologic, stem cell, and tissue engineering strategies for regeneration of the intervertebral disk and the treatment of back pain. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Novel Genes Involved in Controlling Specification of Drosophila FMRFamide Neuropeptide Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivik, Caroline; Bahrampour, Shahrzad; Ulvklo, Carina; Nilsson, Patrik; Angel, Anna; Fransson, Fredrik; Lundin, Erika; Renhorn, Jakob; Thor, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    The expression of neuropeptides is often extremely restricted in the nervous system, making them powerful markers for addressing cell specification . In the developing Drosophila ventral nerve cord, only six cells, the Ap4 neurons, of some 10,000 neurons, express the neuropeptide FMRFamide (FMRFa). Each Ap4/FMRFa neuron is the last-born cell generated by an identifiable and well-studied progenitor cell, neuroblast 5-6 (NB5-6T). The restricted expression of FMRFa and the wealth of information regarding its gene regulation and Ap4 neuron specification makes FMRFa a valuable readout for addressing many aspects of neural development, i.e., spatial and temporal patterning cues, cell cycle control, cell specification, axon transport, and retrograde signaling. To this end, we have conducted a forward genetic screen utilizing an Ap4-specific FMRFa-eGFP transgenic reporter as our readout. A total of 9781 EMS-mutated chromosomes were screened for perturbations in FMRFa-eGFP expression, and 611 mutants were identified. Seventy-nine of the strongest mutants were mapped down to the affected gene by deficiency mapping or whole-genome sequencing. We isolated novel alleles for previously known FMRFa regulators, confirming the validity of the screen. In addition, we identified novel essential genes, including several with previously undefined functions in neural development. Our identification of genes affecting most major steps required for successful terminal differentiation of Ap4 neurons provides a comprehensive view of the genetic flow controlling the generation of highly unique neuronal cell types in the developing nervous system. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Cell-Type-Specific Epigenetic Editing at the Fosb Gene Controls Susceptibility to Social Defeat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter J; Burek, Dominika J; Lombroso, Sonia I; Neve, Rachael L; Robison, Alfred J; Nestler, Eric J; Heller, Elizabeth A

    2018-01-01

    Chronic social defeat stress regulates the expression of Fosb in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to promote the cell-type-specific accumulation of ΔFosB in the two medium spiny neuron (MSN) subtypes in this region. ΔFosB is selectively induced in D1-MSNs in the NAc of resilient mice, and in D2-MSNs of susceptible mice. However, little is known about the consequences of such selective induction, particularly in D2-MSNs. This study examined how cell-type-specific control of the endogenous Fosb gene in NAc regulates susceptibility to social defeat stress. Histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) were targeted specifically to Fosb using engineered zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs). Fosb-ZFPs were fused to either the transcriptional repressor, G9a, which promotes histone methylation or the transcriptional activator, p65, which promotes histone acetylation. These ZFPs were expressed in D1- vs D2-MSNs using Cre-dependent viral expression in the NAc of mice transgenic for Cre recombinase in these MSN subtypes. We found that stress susceptibility is oppositely regulated by the specific cell type and HPTM targeted. We report that Fosb-targeted histone acetylation in D2-MSNs or histone methylation in D1-MSNs promotes a stress-susceptible, depressive-like phenotype, while histone methylation in D2-MSNs or histone acetylation in D1-MSNs increases resilience to social stress as quantified by social interaction behavior and sucrose preference. This work presents the first demonstration of cell- and gene-specific targeting of histone modifications, which model naturally occurring transcriptional phenomena that control social defeat stress behavior. This epigenetic-editing approach, which recapitulates physiological changes in gene expression, reveals clear differences in the social defeat phenotype induced by Fosb gene manipulation in MSN subtypes.

  7. Chiari malformation type I: a case-control association study of 58 developmental genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aintzane Urbizu

    Full Text Available Chiari malformation type I (CMI is a disorder characterized by hindbrain overcrowding into an underdeveloped posterior cranial fossa (PCF, often causing progressive neurological symptoms. The etiology of CMI remains unclear and is most likely multifactorial. A putative genetic contribution to CMI is suggested by familial aggregation and twin studies. Experimental models and human morphometric studies have suggested an underlying paraxial mesoderm insufficiency. We performed a case-control association study of 303 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP across 58 candidate genes involved in early paraxial mesoderm development in a sample of 415 CMI patients and 524 sex-matched controls. A subgroup of patients diagnosed with classical, small-PCF CMI by means of MRI-based PCF morphometry (n = 186, underwent additional analysis. The genes selected are involved in signalling gradients occurring during segmental patterning of the occipital somites (FGF8, Wnt, and retinoic acid pathways and from bone morphogenetic proteins or BMP, Notch, Cdx and Hox pathways or in placental angiogenesis, sclerotome development or CMI-associated syndromes. Single-marker analysis identified nominal associations with 18 SNPs in 14 genes (CDX1, FLT1, RARG, NKD2, MSGN1, RBPJ1, FGFR1, RDH10, NOG, RARA, LFNG, KDR, ALDH1A2, BMPR1A considering the whole CMI sample. None of these overcame corrections for multiple comparisons, in contrast with four SNPs in CDX1, FLT1 and ALDH1A2 in the classical CMI group. Multiple marker analysis identified a risk haplotype for classical CMI in ALDH1A2 and CDX1. Furthermore, we analyzed the possible contributions of the most significantly associated SNPs to different PCF morphometric traits. These findings suggest that common variants in genes involved in somitogenesis and fetal vascular development may confer susceptibility to CMI.

  8. CASCADE, a platform for controlled gene amplification for high, tunable and selection-free gene expression in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Buron, Line Due; Jarczynska, Zofia Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Over-expression of a gene by increasing its copy number is often desirable in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may facilitate elucidation of enzyme functions, and in cell factory design it is used to increase production of proteins and metabolites. Current methods are typically...... exploiting expression from the multicopy 2 μ-derived plasmid or by targeting genes repeatedly into sequences like Ty or rDNA; in both cases, high gene expression levels are often reached. However, with 2 μ-based plasmid expression, the population of cells is very heterogeneous with respect to protein...... production; and for integration into repeated sequences it is difficult to determine the genetic setup of the resulting strains and to achieve specific gene doses. For both types of systems, the strains often suffer from genetic instability if proper selection pressure is not applied. Here we present a gene...

  9. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with chronic fatigue syndrome and matched control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whistler, Toni; Jones, James F; Unger, Elizabeth R; Vernon, Suzanne D

    2005-03-24

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS.

  10. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and matched control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Elizabeth R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Results Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS.

  11. Drought Response in Wheat: Key Genes and Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Root System Architecture and Transpiration Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kulkarni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as, drought, heat, salinity, and flooding threaten global food security. Crop genetic improvement with increased resilience to abiotic stresses is a critical component of crop breeding strategies. Wheat is an important cereal crop and a staple food source globally. Enhanced drought tolerance in wheat is critical for sustainable food production and global food security. Recent advances in drought tolerance research have uncovered many key genes and transcription regulators governing morpho-physiological traits. Genes controlling root architecture and stomatal development play an important role in soil moisture extraction and its retention, and therefore have been targets of molecular breeding strategies for improving drought tolerance. In this systematic review, we have summarized evidence of beneficial contributions of root and stomatal traits to plant adaptation to drought stress. Specifically, we discuss a few key genes such as, DRO1 in rice and ERECTA in Arabidopsis and rice that were identified to be the enhancers of drought tolerance via regulation of root traits and transpiration efficiency. Additionally, we highlight several transcription factor families, such as, ERF (ethylene response factors, DREB (dehydration responsive element binding, ZFP (zinc finger proteins, WRKY, and MYB that were identified to be both positive and negative regulators of drought responses in wheat, rice, maize, and/or Arabidopsis. The overall aim of this review is to provide an overview of candidate genes that have been identified as regulators of drought response in plants. The lack of a reference genome sequence for wheat and non-transgenic approaches for manipulation of gene functions in wheat in the past had impeded high-resolution interrogation of functional elements, including genes and QTLs, and their application in cultivar improvement. The recent developments in wheat genomics and reverse genetics, including the availability of a

  12. The Sporothrix schenckii Gene Encoding for the Ribosomal Protein L6 Has Constitutive and Stable Expression and Works as an Endogenous Control in Gene Expression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Martínez-Álvarez, José A.; Clavijo-Giraldo, Diana M.; Hernández, Nahúm V.; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2017-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is one of the causative agents of sporotrichosis, a worldwide-distributed mycosis that affects humans and other mammals. The interest in basic and clinical features of this organism has significantly increased in the last years, yet little progress in molecular aspects has been reported. Gene expression analysis is a set of powerful tools that helps to assess the cell response to changes in the extracellular environment, the genetic networks controlling metabolic pathways, and the adaptation to different growth conditions. Most of the quantitative methodologies used nowadays require data normalization, and this is achieved measuring the expression of endogenous control genes. Reference genes, whose expression is assumed to suffer minimal changes regardless the cell morphology, the stage of the cell cycle or the presence of harsh extracellular conditions are commonly used as controls in Northern blotting assays, microarrays, and semi-quantitative or quantitative RT-PCR. Since the biology of the organisms is usually species specific, it is difficult to find a reliable group of universal genes that can be used as controls for data normalization in experiments addressing the gene expression, regardless the taxonomic classification of the organism under study. Here, we compared the transcriptional stability of the genes encoding for elongation factor 1A, Tfc1, a protein involved in transcription initiation on Pol III promoters, ribosomal protein L6, histone H2A, β-actin, β-tubulin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, UAF30, the upstream activating factor 30, and the transcription initiation factor TFIID subunit 10, during the fungal growth in different culture media and cell morphologies. Our results indicated that only the gene encoding for the ribosomal protein L6 showed a stable and constant expression. Furthermore, it displayed not transcriptional changes when S. schenckii infected larvae of Galleria mellonella or interacted with immune

  13. The Sporothrix schenckii Gene Encoding for the Ribosomal Protein L6 Has Constitutive and Stable Expression and Works as an Endogenous Control in Gene Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Trujillo-Esquivel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sporothrix schenckii is one of the causative agents of sporotrichosis, a worldwide-distributed mycosis that affects humans and other mammals. The interest in basic and clinical features of this organism has significantly increased in the last years, yet little progress in molecular aspects has been reported. Gene expression analysis is a set of powerful tools that helps to assess the cell response to changes in the extracellular environment, the genetic networks controlling metabolic pathways, and the adaptation to different growth conditions. Most of the quantitative methodologies used nowadays require data normalization, and this is achieved measuring the expression of endogenous control genes. Reference genes, whose expression is assumed to suffer minimal changes regardless the cell morphology, the stage of the cell cycle or the presence of harsh extracellular conditions are commonly used as controls in Northern blotting assays, microarrays, and semi-quantitative or quantitative RT-PCR. Since the biology of the organisms is usually species specific, it is difficult to find a reliable group of universal genes that can be used as controls for data normalization in experiments addressing the gene expression, regardless the taxonomic classification of the organism under study. Here, we compared the transcriptional stability of the genes encoding for elongation factor 1A, Tfc1, a protein involved in transcription initiation on Pol III promoters, ribosomal protein L6, histone H2A, β-actin, β-tubulin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, UAF30, the upstream activating factor 30, and the transcription initiation factor TFIID subunit 10, during the fungal growth in different culture media and cell morphologies. Our results indicated that only the gene encoding for the ribosomal protein L6 showed a stable and constant expression. Furthermore, it displayed not transcriptional changes when S. schenckii infected larvae of Galleria mellonella or

  14. Different control mechanisms regulate glucoamylase and protease gene transcription in Aspergillus oryzae in solid-state and submerged fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, R. te; Biezen, N. van; Vos, W.M. de; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation (SSF) with Aspergillus oryzae results in high levels of secreted protein. However, control mechanisms of gene expression in SSF have been only poorly studied. In this study we show that both glucoamylase (glaB) and protease (alpA, nptB) genes are highly expressed during

  15. Ultrasound-induced hyperthermia for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in bone repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher; Padilla, Frédéric; Zhang, Man; Vilaboa, Nuria; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian; Franceschi, Renny

    2012-10-01

    Spatial and temporal control over the expression of growth/differentiation factors is of great interest for regeneration of bone, but technologies capable of providing tight and active control over gene expression remain elusive. We propose the use of focused ultrasound for the targeted activation of heat shock-sensitive expression systems in engineered bone. We report in vitro results with cells that express firefly luciferase (fLuc) under the control of a heat shock protein promoter. Cells were embedded in fibrin scaffolds and exposed to focused ultrasound, using a custom 3.3MHz transducer (focal length 4", f-number 1.33", focal dimension 1.2mm lateral FWHM) in CW mode for 2-20 minutes at intensities ISPTA=120-440 W/cm2. The kinetics of ultrasound-mediated activation of the cells was compared with that of strictly thermal activation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed fLuc expression in an area ≥2.5mm in diameter at the position of the ultrasound focus, and the diameter and intensity of the signal increased with the amplitude of the acoustic energy. We also found that ultrasound activated fLuc expression with substantially shorter exposures than thermal activation. Our results demonstrate the potential for focused ultrasound to selectively activate the expression of a gene of interest in an engineered tissue and suggest that focused ultrasound activates the heat shock pathway by a combination of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms.

  16. A red light-controlled synthetic gene expression switch for plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Konrad; Siegel, David; Rodriguez Jahnke, Fernando; Gerrer, Katrin; Wend, Sabrina; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2014-07-01

    On command control of gene expression in time and space is required for the comprehensive analysis of key plant cellular processes. Even though some chemical inducible systems showing satisfactory induction features have been developed, they are inherently limited in terms of spatiotemporal resolution and may be associated with toxic effects. We describe here the first synthetic light-inducible system for the targeted control of gene expression in plants. For this purpose, we applied an interdisciplinary synthetic biology approach comprising mammalian and plant cell systems to customize and optimize a split transcription factor based on the plant photoreceptor phytochrome B and one of its interacting factors (PIF6). Implementation of the system in transient assays in tobacco protoplasts resulted in strong (95-fold) induction in red light (660 nm) and could be instantaneously returned to the OFF state by subsequent illumination with far-red light (740 nm). Capitalizing on this toggle switch-like characteristic, we demonstrate that the system can be kept in the OFF state in the presence of 740 nm-supplemented white light, opening up perspectives for future application of the system in whole plants. Finally we demonstrate the system's applicability in basic research, by the light-controlled tuning of auxin signalling networks in N. tabacum protoplasts, as well as its biotechnological potential for the chemical-inducer free production of therapeutic proteins in the moss P. patens.

  17. Ellis Englesberg and the Discovery of Positive Control in Gene Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Based on his work with the Escherichia coli l-arabinose operon, Ellis Englesberg proposed in 1965 that the regulatory gene araC was an “activator gene” required for positive control of the ara operon. This challenged the widely held belief in a universal mechanism of negative regulation proposed earlier by Jacob and Monod. For years, Englesberg’s model was met with deep skepticism. Despite much frustration with complex ad hoc explanations used to challenge his model, Englesberg persisted u...

  18. A novel hypothesis for the gene expression for the control of atopic and other hereditary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Okudaira

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of RNA polymerase proteins and transcription factor proteins for the expression of genetic information in DNA clearly indicates that the process is influenced by certain proteins in the body and/or in the environment, which is totally opposite to the 'central dogma' of Crick. In this article, we present a working hypothesis (helical hypothesis that may explain the programmed nature of various biological events simply and naturally. Future investigations on the factors that regulate the gene transcription of cytokine clusters, including intereukin (IL-4 and IL-5, may provide an answer for controlling atopic as well as other hereditary (genetic diseases.

  19. The nuclear IκB family of proteins controls gene regulation and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory IκB family of proteins is subdivided into two groups based on protein localization in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. These proteins interact with NF-κB, a major transcription factor regulating the expression of many inflammatory cytokines, by modulating its transcriptional activity. However, nuclear IκB family proteins not only interact with NF-κB to change its transcriptional activity, but they also bind to chromatin and control gene expression. This review provides an overview of nuclear IκB family proteins and their role in immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Dolganov, N. A.; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit...... controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted...

  1. Synthetic feedback control using an RNAi-based gene-regulatory device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Ryan J; Winkler, Sally M; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis within mammalian cells is achieved through complex molecular networks that can respond to changes within the cell or the environment and regulate the expression of the appropriate genes in response. The development of biological components that can respond to changes in the cellular environment and interface with endogenous molecules would enable more sophisticated genetic circuits and greatly advance our cellular engineering capabilities. Here we describe a platform that combines a ligand-responsive ribozyme switch and synthetic miRNA regulators to create an OFF genetic control device based on RNA interference (RNAi). We developed a mathematical model to highlight important design parameters in programming the quantitative performance of RNAi-based OFF control devices. By modifying the ribozyme switch integrated into the system, we demonstrated RNAi-based OFF control devices that respond to small molecule and protein ligands, including the oncogenic protein E2F1. We utilized the OFF control device platform to build a negative feedback control system that acts as a proportional controller and maintains target intracellular protein levels in response to increases in transcription rate. Our work describes a novel genetic device that increases the level of silencing from a miRNA in the presence of a ligand of interest, effectively creating an RNAi-based OFF control device. The OFF switch platform has the flexibility to be used to respond to both small molecule and protein ligands. Finally, the RNAi-based OFF switch can be used to implement a negative feedback control system, which maintains target protein levels around a set point level. The described RNAi-based OFF control device presents a powerful tool that will enable researchers to engineer homeostasis in mammalian cells.

  2. Large scale RNAi screen in Tribolium reveals novel target genes for pest control and the proteasome as prime target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Julia; Dao, Van Anh; Majumdar, Upalparna; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schwirz, Jonas; Schultheis, Dorothea; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Leboulle, Gérard; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stanke, Mario; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-09-03

    Insect pest control is challenged by insecticide resistance and negative impact on ecology and health. One promising pest specific alternative is the generation of transgenic plants, which express double stranded RNAs targeting essential genes of a pest species. Upon feeding, the dsRNA induces gene silencing in the pest resulting in its death. However, the identification of efficient RNAi target genes remains a major challenge as genomic tools and breeding capacity is limited in most pest insects impeding whole-animal-high-throughput-screening. We use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a screening platform in order to identify the most efficient RNAi target genes. From about 5,000 randomly screened genes of the iBeetle RNAi screen we identify 11 novel and highly efficient RNAi targets. Our data allowed us to determine GO term combinations that are predictive for efficient RNAi target genes with proteasomal genes being most predictive. Finally, we show that RNAi target genes do not appear to act synergistically and that protein sequence conservation does not correlate with the number of potential off target sites. Our results will aid the identification of RNAi target genes in many pest species by providing a manageable number of excellent candidate genes to be tested and the proteasome as prime target. Further, the identified GO term combinations will help to identify efficient target genes from organ specific transcriptomes. Our off target analysis is relevant for the sequence selection used in transgenic plants.

  3. Fatty Acid Desaturase 1 (FADS1) Gene Polymorphisms Control Human Hepatic Lipid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Athinarayanan, Shaminie; Jiang, Guanglong; Chalasani, Naga; Zhang, Min; Liu, Wanqing

    2014-01-01

    Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) genes and their variants have been associated with multiple metabolic phenotypes including liver enzymes and hepatic fat accumulation but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to delineate the role of FADSs in modulating lipid composition in human liver. We performed a targeted lipidomic analysis of a variety of phospholipids, sphingolipids and ceramides among 154 human liver tissue samples. The associations between previously Genome-wide Association Studies (GWAS)-identified six FADS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and these lipid levels as well as total hepatic fat content (HFC) were tested. The potential function of these SNPs in regulating transcription of 3 FADS genes (FADS1, FADS2 and FADS3) in the locus was also investigated. We found that while these SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 >0.8), the rare alleles of these SNPs were consistently and significantly associated with the accumulation of multiple very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), with C47H85O13P (C36:4), a phosphatidylinositol (PI) and C43H80O8PN (C38:3), a phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) reached the Bonferroni corrected significance (pFADS1 (p=0.0018 for rs174556), but not FADS2 or FADS3 (p>0.05). Conclusion Our findings revealed critical insight into the mechanism underlying FADS1 and its polymorphisms in modulating hepatic lipid deposition by altering gene transcription and controlling lipid composition in human livers. PMID:25123259

  4. Rb and p53 gene deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from irradiated and control mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Woloschak, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted on mouse lung adenocarcinoma tissues that were formalin-treated and paraffin-embedded 25 years ago to investigate the large gene deletions of mRb and p53 in B6CF{sub 1} male mice. A total of 80 lung tissue samples from irradiated mice and 40 lung samples from nonirradiated controls were randomly selected and examined in the mRb portion of this study. The results showed a significant (P < 0.05) higher percentage of mRb deletions in lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to 60 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses than those from mice receiving 24 once-weekly {gamma}-ray doses at low doses and low dose rates; however, the percentage was not significantly different (P > 0.05) from that for spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas or lung adenocarcinomas from mice exposed to single-dose {gamma} irradiation at a similar total dose. mRb fragments 3 (71%) and 5 (67%), the parts of the gene that encoded the pocket binding region of Rb protein to adenovirus E1A and SV40 T-antigen, were the most frequently deleted fragments. p53 gene deletion analysis was carried out on normal lungs and lung adenocarcinomas that were initially found to bear mRb deletions. Exons 1,4,5,6, and 9 were chosen to be analyzed.

  5. Cryptic Transcription and Early Termination in the Control of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Colin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on yeast transcriptome have revealed the presence of a large set of RNA polymerase II transcripts mapping to intergenic and antisense regions or overlapping canonical genes. Most of these ncRNAs (ncRNAs are subject to termination by the Nrd1-dependent pathway and rapid degradation by the nuclear exosome and have been dubbed cryptic unstable transcripts (CUTs. CUTs are often considered as by-products of transcriptional noise, but in an increasing number of cases they play a central role in the control of gene expression. Regulatory mechanisms involving expression of a CUT are diverse and include attenuation, transcriptional interference, and alternative transcription start site choice. This review focuses on the impact of cryptic transcription on gene expression, describes the role of the Nrd1-complex as the main actor in preventing nonfunctional and potentially harmful transcription, and details a few systems where expression of a CUT has an essential regulatory function. We also summarize the most recent studies concerning other types of ncRNAs and their possible role in regulation.

  6. Do motor control genes contribute to interindividual variability in decreased movement in patients with pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Bikash K

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because excessive reduction in activities after back injury may impair recovery, it is important to understand and address the factors contributing to the variability in motor responses to pain. The current dominant theory is the "fear-avoidance model", in which the some patients' heightened fears of further injury cause them to avoid movement. We propose that in addition to psychological factors, neurochemical variants in the circuits controlling movement and their modification by pain may contribute to this variability. A systematic search of the motor research literature and genetic databases yielded a prioritized list of polymorphic motor control candidate genes. We demonstrate an analytic method that we applied to 14 of these genes in 290 patients with acute sciatica, whose reduction in movement was estimated by items from the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Results We genotyped a total of 121 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 14 of these genes, which code for the dopamine D2 receptor, GTP cyclohydrolase I, glycine receptor α1 subunit, GABA-A receptor α2 subunit, GABA-A receptor β1 subunit, α-adrenergic 1C, 2A, and 2C receptors, serotonin 1A and 2A receptors, cannabinoid CB-1 receptor, M1 muscarinic receptor, and the tyrosine hydroxylase, and tachykinin precursor-1 molecules. No SNP showed a significant association with the movement score after a Bonferroni correction for the 14 genes tested. Haplotype analysis of one of the blocks in the GABA-A receptor β1 subunit showed that a haplotype of 11% frequency was associated with less limitation of movement at a nominal significance level value (p = 0.0025 almost strong enough to correct for testing 22 haplotype blocks. Conclusion If confirmed, the current results may suggest that a common haplotype in the GABA-A β1 subunit acts like an "endogenous muscle relaxant" in an individual with subacute sciatica. Similar methods might be applied a larger set of

  7. An in vivo RNA interference screen identifies gene networks controlling Drosophila melanogaster blood cell homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augé Benoit

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In metazoans, the hematopoietic system plays a key role both in normal development and in defense of the organism. In Drosophila, the cellular immune response involves three types of blood cells: plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes. This last cell type is barely present in healthy larvae, but its production is strongly induced upon wasp parasitization or in mutant contexts affecting larval blood cell homeostasis. Notably, several zygotic mutations leading to melanotic mass (or "tumor" formation in larvae have been associated to the deregulated differentiation of lamellocytes. To gain further insights into the gene regulatory network and the mechanisms controlling larval blood cell homeostasis, we conducted a tissue-specific loss of function screen using hemocyte-specific Gal4 drivers and UAS-dsRNA transgenic lines. Results By targeting around 10% of the Drosophila genes, this in vivo RNA interference screen allowed us to recover 59 melanotic tumor suppressor genes. In line with previous studies, we show that melanotic tumor formation is associated with the precocious differentiation of stem-cell like blood progenitors in the larval hematopoietic organ (the lymph gland and the spurious differentiation of lamellocytes. We also find that melanotic tumor formation can be elicited by defects either in the fat body, the embryo-derived hemocytes or the lymph gland. In addition, we provide a definitive confirmation that lymph gland is not the only source of lamellocytes as embryo-derived plasmatocytes can differentiate into lamellocytes either upon wasp infection or upon loss of function of the Friend of GATA cofactor U-shaped. Conclusions In this study, we identify 55 genes whose function had not been linked to blood cell development or function before in Drosophila. Moreover our analyses reveal an unanticipated plasticity of embryo-derived plasmatocytes, thereby shedding new light on blood cell lineage relationship, and

  8. Expression of novel Alzheimer's disease risk genes in control and Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Karch

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD etiology is influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors. Large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS for LOAD have identified 10 novel risk genes: ABCA7, BIN1, CD2AP, CD33, CLU, CR1, EPHA1, MS4A6A, MS4A6E, and PICALM. We sought to measure the influence of GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and gene expression levels on clinical and pathological measures of AD in brain tissue from the parietal lobe of AD cases and age-matched, cognitively normal controls. We found that ABCA7, CD33, and CR1 expression levels were associated with clinical dementia rating (CDR, with higher expression being associated with more advanced cognitive decline. BIN1 expression levels were associated with disease progression, where higher expression was associated with a delayed age at onset. CD33, CLU, and CR1 expression levels were associated with disease status, where elevated expression levels were associated with AD. Additionally, MS4A6A expression levels were associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque scores, with elevated expression levels being associated with more advanced brain pathology. We failed to detect an association between GWAS SNPs and gene expression levels in our brain series. The minor allele of rs3764650 in ABCA7 is associated with age at onset and disease duration, and the minor allele of rs670139 in MS4A6E was associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque score. These findings suggest that expression of some GWAS genes, namely ABCA7, BIN1, CD33, CLU, CR1 and the MS4A family, are altered in AD brains.

  9. FOXP3 gene variations and susceptibility to autism: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sayad, Arezou; Omrani, Mir Davood; Komaki, Alireza; Eftekharian, Mohammad Mahdi; Taheri, Mohammad

    2017-01-05

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a group of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders associated with immune system dysregulation. There are supporting evidences for the role of Forkhead Box P3 (FOXP3) gene as a lineage specification factor of regulatory T cells in the pathogenesis of ASD. The aim of this study was to explore possible relationship between genetic variants rs2232365 and rs3761548 of FOXP3 and ASD in 523 ASD patients versus 472 control individuals. Allele frequency analyses showed significant overpresentation of rs2232365-G allele in cases versus controls. In addition, rs2232365 GG genotype was associated with ASD in dominant inheritance model. Haplotype analysis revealed no significant association of any estimated block of rs2232365/rs3761548 with ASD. Our study indicated that rs2232365 is associated with ASD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FKF1, a clock-controlled gene that regulates the transition to flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D C; Lasswell, J; Rogg, L E; Cohen, M A; Bartel, B

    2000-04-28

    Plant reproduction requires precise control of flowering in response to environmental cues. We isolated a late-flowering Arabidopsis mutant, fkf1, that is rescued by vemalization or gibberellin treatment. We positionally cloned FKF1, which encodes a novel protein with a PAS domain similar to the flavin-binding region of certain photoreceptors, an F box characteristic of proteins that direct ubiquitin-mediated degradation, and six kelch repeats predicted to fold into a beta propeller. FKF1 mRNA levels oscillate with a circadian rhythm, and deletion of FKF1 alters the waveform of rhythmic expression of two clock-controlled genes, implicating FKF1 in modulating the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

  11. The Complement Control-Related Genes CSMD1 and CSMD2 Associate to Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håvik, Bjarte; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Rietschel, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia often suffer from cognitive dysfunction, including impaired learning and memory. We recently demonstrated that long-term potentiation in rat hippocampus, a mechanistic model of learning and memory, is linked to gene expression changes in immunity......-related processes involved in complement activity and antigen presentation. We therefore aimed to examine whether key regulators of these processes are genetic susceptibility factors in schizophrenia. METHODS: Analysis of genetic association was based on data mining of genotypes from a German genome......-wide association study and a multiplex GoldenGate tag single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based assay of Norwegian and Danish case-control samples (Scandinavian Collaboration on Psychiatric Etiology), including 1133 patients with schizophrenia and 2444 healthy control subjects. RESULTS: Allelic associations were...

  12. DNA Nanotechnology for Precise Control over Drug Delivery and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Chava; Xie, Sibai; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Yi

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine has been growing exponentially due to its enhanced drug targeting and reduced drug toxicity. It uses the interactions where nanotechnological components and biological systems communicate with each other to facilitate the delivery performance. At this scale, the physiochemical properties of delivery systems strongly affect their capacities. Among current delivery systems, DNA nanotechnology shows many advantages because of its unprecedented engineering abilities. Through molecular recognition, DNA nanotechnology can be used to construct a variety of nanostructures with precisely controllable size, shape, and surface chemistry, which can be appreciated in the delivery process. In this review, different approaches that are currently used for the construction of DNA nanostructures are reported. Further, the utilization of these DNA nanostructures with the well-defined parameters for the precise control in drug delivery and gene therapy is discussed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prickaerts Peggy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1. The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs, all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the

  14. Polymorphisms in prothrombotic genes in young stroke patients in Greece: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranellou, Kyriaki; Paraskeva, Anteia; Kyriazopoulos, Panagiotis; Batistatou, Anna; Evangelou, Aggelos; El-Aly, Mahmoud; Zis, Panagiotis; Tavernarakis, Antonios; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms of ischemic stroke in young adults are poorly understood. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the frequency of common variations in prothrombotic genes between young patients with ischemic stroke and controls. Fifty-one cases of first-ever ischemic stroke and 70 community-based controls aged below 50 years were studied. In both groups, the insertion/deletion 4G/5G variation (-675 4G/5G PAI-1) as well as the single-nucleotide polymorphism-844 G/A of the PAI-1 (-844 G/A PAI-1) gene promoter, factor V Leiden (FVL) G1691Α, the prothrombin variant (allele 20210A, FIIG20210A), factor XIII-A Val34Leu polymorphism (FXIII-AVal34Leu) and C677T methylenotetrahydrofolate reductase (C677T MTHFR) polymorphism have been assessed. The -675 4G/5G PAI-1 allele distribution differed significantly between patients and controls (P = 0.020), but no difference was found regarding the distribution of -844 G/A PAI-1 (P = 0.493), FVL (P = 0.199), FIIG20210A (P = 0.410), FXIII-AVal34leu (P = 0.160) and C677T MTHFR (P = 0.788). A lower frequency of 5G/5G genotype and a higher frequency of the 4G/5G genotype of the PAI -675 4G/5G polymorphism was found in young ischemic stroke patients compared to healthy controls. Further epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the differences between different geographic areas, and prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the possible protective role of 5G/5G polymorphism.

  15. Identification of two key genes controlling chill haze stability of beer in barley (Hordeum vulgare L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lingzhen; Huang, Yuqing; Dai, Fei; Ning, Huajiang; Li, Chengdao; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping

    2015-06-11

    In bright beer, haze formation is a serious quality problem, degrading beer quality and reducing its shelf life. The quality of barley (Hordeum vulgare L) malt, as the main raw material for beer brewing, largely affects the colloidal stability of beer. In this study, the genetic mechanism of the factors affecting beer haze stability in barley was studied. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of alcohol chill haze (ACH) in beer was carried out using a Franklin/Yerong double haploid (DH) population. One QTL, named as qACH, was detected for ACH, and it was located on the position of about 108 cM in chromosome 4H and can explain about 20 % of the phenotypic variation. Two key haze active proteins, BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd were identified by proteomics analysis. Bioinformatics analysis showed that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd had the same position as qACH in the chromosome. It may be deduced that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd are candidate genes for qACH, controlling colloidal stability of beer. Polymorphism comparison between Yerong and Franklin in the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd detected the corresponding gene specific markers, which could be used in marker-assisted selection for malt barley breeding. We identified a novel QTL, qACH controlling chill haze of beer, and two key haze active proteins, BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd. And further analysis showed that BATI-CMb and BATI-CMd might be the candidate genes associated with beer chill haze.

  16. Genes controlling plant growth habit in Leymus (Triticeae): maize barren stalk1 (ba1), rice lax panicle, and wheat tiller inhibition (tin3) genes as possible candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parminder Kaur; Steven R. Larson; B. Shaun Bushman; Richard R.-C. Wang; Ivan W. Mott; David Hole; Jyothi Thimmapuram; George Gong; Lei Liu

    2008-01-01

    Leymus cinereus and L. triticoides are large caespitose and rhizomatous perennial grasses, respectively. Previous studies detected quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling rhizome spreading near the viviparous1 (vp1) gene markers on linkage groups LG3a and LG3b in two families, TTC1 and TTC2, derived from Leymus triticoides x Leymus cinereus hybrids. The wheat tiller...

  17. The gene cortex controls mimicry and crypsis in butterflies and moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Nicola J; Pardo-Diaz, Carolina; Whibley, Annabel; Supple, Megan A; Saenko, Suzanne V; Wallbank, Richard W R; Wu, Grace C; Maroja, Luana; Ferguson, Laura; Hanly, Joseph J; Hines, Heather; Salazar, Camilo; Merrill, Richard M; Dowling, Andrea J; ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Llaurens, Violaine; Joron, Mathieu; McMillan, W Owen; Jiggins, Chris D

    2016-06-02

    The wing patterns of butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are diverse and striking examples of evolutionary diversification by natural selection. Lepidopteran wing colour patterns are a key innovation, consisting of arrays of coloured scales. We still lack a general understanding of how these patterns are controlled and whether this control shows any commonality across the 160,000 moth and 17,000 butterfly species. Here, we use fine-scale mapping with population genomics and gene expression analyses to identify a gene, cortex, that regulates pattern switches in multiple species across the mimetic radiation in Heliconius butterflies. cortex belongs to a fast-evolving subfamily of the otherwise highly conserved fizzy family of cell-cycle regulators, suggesting that it probably regulates pigmentation patterning by regulating scale cell development. In parallel with findings in the peppered moth (Biston betularia), our results suggest that this mechanism is common within Lepidoptera and that cortex has become a major target for natural selection acting on colour and pattern variation in this group of insects.

  18. Mutation screening of NOS1AP gene in a large sample of psychiatric patients and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nygren Gudrun

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene encoding carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1AP is located on chromosome 1q23.3, a candidate region for schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Previous genetic and functional studies explored the role of NOS1AP in these psychiatric conditions, but only a limited number explored the sequence variability of NOS1AP. Methods We analyzed the coding sequence of NOS1AP in a large population (n = 280, including patients with schizophrenia (n = 72, ASD (n = 81 or OCD (n = 34, and in healthy volunteers controlled for the absence of personal or familial history of psychiatric disorders (n = 93. Results Two non-synonymous variations, V37I and D423N were identified in two families, one with two siblings with OCD and the other with two brothers with ASD. These rare variations apparently segregate with the presence of psychiatric conditions. Conclusions Coding variations of NOS1AP are relatively rare in patients and controls. Nevertheless, we report the first non-synonymous variations within the human NOS1AP gene that warrant further genetic and functional investigations to ascertain their roles in the susceptibility to psychiatric disorders.

  19. [Competing risks of death and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in case-control studies of gene-disease association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Javier; Prieto-Salceda, Dolores; Combarros, Onofre; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Berciano, José

    2005-01-01

    To study the impact of competing risks on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and their consequences in case-control studies of gene-late onset disease association. Based on a population born in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for a particular gene, the genetic composition when the gene is associated with a lethal early-onset disease and its consequences on a late-onset disease can be deduced. Odds ratios estimates are unbiased in case-control studies when controls are sampled by density, even if the controls are in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium. An example in which a mutant gene is associated with early mortality is presented, producing a departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; as a result, controls in later ages are in disequilibrium, producing an odds ratio equal to 1.61. Although the main causes of Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium in controls are selection bias or genotyping error, a competing risk of death associated with the mutant gene would also result in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium among controls.

  20. Expression Profile of Genes Potentially Associated with Adequate Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sâmia Cruz Tfaile Corbi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing research in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D, there are few studies showing the impact of the poor glycemic control on biological processes occurring in T2D. In order to identify potential genes related to poorly/well-controlled patients with T2D, our strategy of investigation included a primary screen by microarray (Human Genome U133 in a small group of individuals followed by an independent validation in a greater group using RT-qPCR. Ninety patients were divided as follows: poorly controlled T2D (G1, well-controlled T2D (G2, and normoglycemic individuals (G3. After using affy package in R, differentially expressed genes (DEGs were prospected as candidate genes potentially relevant for the glycemic control in T2D patients. After validation by RT-qPCR, the obtained DEGs were as follows—G1 + G2 versus G3: HLA-DQA1, SOS1, and BRCA2; G2 versus G1: ENO2, VAMP2, CCND3, CEBPD, LGALS12, AGBL5, MAP2K5, and PPAP2B; G2 versus G3: HLA-DQB1, MCM4, and SEC13; and G1 versus G3: PPIC. This demonstrated a systemic exacerbation of the gene expression related to immune response in T2D patients. Moreover, genes related to lipid metabolisms and DNA replication/repair were influenced by the glycemic control. In conclusion, this study pointed out candidate genes potentially associated with adequate glycemic control in T2D patients, contributing to the knowledge of how the glycemic control could systemically influence gene expression.

  1. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H; Novak, John T; Knocke, William R; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1-a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10-a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457-0.829, P horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community.

  2. Expression Profile of Genes Related to Drug Metabolism in Human Brain Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelis Stavrinou

    Full Text Available Endogenous and exogenous compounds as well as carcinogens are metabolized and detoxified by phase I and II enzymes, the activity of which could be crucial to the inactivation and hence susceptibility to carcinogenic factors. The expression of these enzymes in human brain tumor tissue has not been investigated sufficiently. We studied the association between tumor pathology and the expression profile of seven phase I and II drug metabolizing genes (CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH3A1, AOX1, GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM3 and some of their proteins.Using qRT-PCR and western blotting analysis the gene and protein expression in a cohort of 77 tumors were investigated. The major tumor subtypes were meningioma, astrocytoma and brain metastases, -the later all adenocarcinomas from a lung primary.Meningeal tumors showed higher expression levels for AOX1, CYP1B1, GSTM3 and GSTP1. For AOX1, GSTM and GSTP1 this could be verified on a protein level as well. A negative correlation between the WHO degree of malignancy and the strength of expression was identified on both transcriptional and translational level for AOX1, GSTM3 and GSTP1, although the results could have been biased by the prevalence of meningiomas and glioblastomas in the inevitably bipolar distribution of the WHO grades. A correlation between the gene expression and the protein product was observed for AOX1, GSTP1 and GSTM3 in astrocytomas.The various CNS tumors show different patterns of drug metabolizing gene expression. Our results suggest that the most important factor governing the expression of these enzymes is the histological subtype and to a far lesser extent the degree of malignancy itself.

  3. A nucleotide metabolite controls stress-responsive gene expression and plant development.

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    Hao Chen

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress, such as drought and high salinity, activates a network of signaling cascades that lead to the expression of many stress-responsive genes in plants. The Arabidopsis FIERY1 (FRY1 protein is a negative regulator of stress and abscisic acid (ABA signaling and exhibits both an inositol polyphosphatase and a 3',5'-bisphosphate nucleotidase activity in vitro. The FRY1 nucleotidase degrades the sulfation byproduct 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (PAP, yet its in vivo functions and particularly its roles in stress gene regulation remain unclear. Here we developed a LC-MS/MS method to quantitatively measure PAP levels in plants and investigated the roles of this nucleotidase activity in stress response and plant development. It was found that PAP level was tightly controlled in plants and did not accumulate to any significant level either under normal conditions or under NaCl, LiCl, cold, or ABA treatments. In contrast, high levels of PAP were detected in multiple mutant alleles of FRY1 but not in mutants of other FRY1 family members, indicating that FRY1 is the major enzyme that hydrolyzes PAP in vivo. By genetically reducing PAP levels in fry1 mutants either through overexpression of a yeast PAP nucleotidase or by generating a triple mutant of fry1 apk1 apk2 that is defective in the biosynthesis of the PAP precursor 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS, we demonstrated that the developmental defects and superinduction of stress-responsive genes in fry1 mutants correlate with PAP accumulation in planta. We also found that the hypersensitive stress gene regulation in fry1 requires ABH1 but not ABI1, two other negative regulators in ABA signaling pathways. Unlike in yeast, however, FRY1 overexpression in Arabidopsis could not enhance salt tolerance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PAP is critical for stress gene regulation and plant development, yet the FRY1 nucleotidase that catabolizes PAP may not be an in vivo salt

  4. A nucleotide metabolite controls stress-responsive gene expression and plant development

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2011-10-19

    Abiotic stress, such as drought and high salinity, activates a network of signaling cascades that lead to the expression of many stress-responsive genes in plants. The Arabidopsis FIERY1 (FRY1) protein is a negative regulator of stress and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and exhibits both an inositol polyphosphatase and a 3?,5?-bisphosphate nucleotidase activity in vitro. The FRY1 nucleotidase degrades the sulfation byproduct 3?-phosphoadenosine-5?-phosphate (PAP), yet its in vivo functions and particularly its roles in stress gene regulation remain unclear. Here we developed a LC-MS/MS method to quantitatively measure PAP levels in plants and investigated the roles of this nucleotidase activity in stress response and plant development. It was found that PAP level was tightly controlled in plants and did not accumulate to any significant level either under normal conditions or under NaCl, LiCl, cold, or ABA treatments. In contrast, high levels of PAP were detected in multiple mutant alleles of FRY1 but not in mutants of other FRY1 family members, indicating that FRY1 is the major enzyme that hydrolyzes PAP in vivo. By genetically reducing PAP levels in fry1 mutants either through overexpression of a yeast PAP nucleotidase or by generating a triple mutant of fry1 apk1 apk2 that is defective in the biosynthesis of the PAP precursor 3?-phosphoadenosine-5?-phosphosulfate (PAPS), we demonstrated that the developmental defects and superinduction of stress-responsive genes in fry1 mutants correlate with PAP accumulation in planta. We also found that the hypersensitive stress gene regulation in fry1 requires ABH1 but not ABI1, two other negative regulators in ABA signaling pathways. Unlike in yeast, however, FRY1 overexpression in Arabidopsis could not enhance salt tolerance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PAP is critical for stress gene regulation and plant development, yet the FRY1 nucleotidase that catabolizes PAP may not be an in vivo salt toxicity target

  5. Fine Mapping and Characterization of Candidate Genes that Control Resistance to Cercospora sojina K. Hara in Two Soybean Germplasm Accessions.

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    Anh-Tung Pham

    Full Text Available Frogeye leaf spot (FLS, caused by the fungus Cercospora sojina K. Hara, may cause a significant yield loss to soybean growers in regions with a warm and humid climate. Two soybean accessions, PI 594891 and PI 594774, were identified to carry a high level of resistance similar to that conditioned by the Rcs3 gene in 'Davis'. Previously, we reported that the resistance to FLS in these two plant introductions (PIs was controlled by a novel gene (s on chromosome 13 that is different from Rcs3. To fine-map the novel FLS resistance gene(s in these two PIs, F2: 3 seeds from the crosses between PI 594891 and PI 594774, and the FLS susceptible genotype 'Blackhawk' were genotyped with SNP markers that were designed based on the SoySNP50k iSelect BeadChip data to identify recombinant events and locate candidate genes. Analysis of lines possessing key recombination events helped narrow down the FLS-resistance genomic region in PI 594891 from 3.3 Mb to a 72.6 kb region with five annotated genes. The resistance gene in PI 594774 was fine-mapped into a 540 kb region that encompasses the 72.6 kb region found in PI 594891. Sequencing five candidate genes in PI 594891 identified three genes that have several mutations in the promoter, intron, 5', and 3' UTR regions. qPCR analysis showed a difference in expression levels of these genes in both lines compared to Blackhawk in the presence of C. sojina. Based on phenotype, genotype and haplotype analysis results, these two soybean accessions might carry different resistance alleles of the same gene or two different gene(s. The identified SNPs were used to develop Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP assays to detect the resistance alleles on chromosome 13 from the two PIs for marker-assisted selection.

  6. Sex genes for genomic analysis in human brain: internal controls for comparison of probe level data extraction.

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    Ellis Steven P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic studies of complex tissues pose unique analytical challenges for assessment of data quality, performance of statistical methods used for data extraction, and detection of differentially expressed genes. Ideally, to assess the accuracy of gene expression analysis methods, one needs a set of genes which are known to be differentially expressed in the samples and which can be used as a "gold standard". We introduce the idea of using sex-chromosome genes as an alternative to spiked-in control genes or simulations for assessment of microarray data and analysis methods. Results Expression of sex-chromosome genes were used as true internal biological controls to compare alternate probe-level data extraction algorithms (Microarray Suite 5.0 [MAS5.0], Model Based Expression Index [MBEI] and Robust Multi-array Average [RMA], to assess microarray data quality and to establish some statistical guidelines for analyzing large-scale gene expression. These approaches were implemented on a large new dataset of human brain samples. RMA-generated gene expression values were markedly less variable and more reliable than MAS5.0 and MBEI-derived values. A statistical technique controlling the false discovery rate was applied to adjust for multiple testing, as an alternative to the Bonferroni method, and showed no evidence of false negative results. Fourteen probesets, representing nine Y- and two X-chromosome linked genes, displayed significant sex differences in brain prefrontal cortex gene expression. Conclusion In this study, we have demonstrated the use of sex genes as true biological internal controls for genomic analysis of complex tissues, and suggested analytical guidelines for testing alternate oligonucleotide microarray data extraction protocols and for adjusting multiple statistical analysis of differentially expressed genes. Our results also provided evidence for sex differences in gene expression in the brain prefrontal cortex

  7. Evaluation of external RNA controls for the standardisation of gene expression biomarker measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaswarapu Ramnath

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling is an important approach for detecting diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and predicting drug safety. The development of a wide range of technologies and platforms for measuring mRNA expression makes the evaluation and standardization of transcriptomic data problematic due to differences in protocols, data processing and analysis methods. Thus, universal RNA standards, such as those developed by the External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC, are proposed to aid validation of research findings from diverse platforms such as microarrays and RT-qPCR, and play a role in quality control (QC processes as transcriptomic profiling becomes more commonplace in the clinical setting. Results Panels of ERCC RNA standards were constructed in order to test the utility of these reference materials (RMs for performance characterization of two selected gene expression platforms, and for discrimination of biomarker profiles between groups. The linear range, limits of detection and reproducibility of microarray and RT-qPCR measurements were evaluated using panels of RNA standards. Transcripts of low abundance (≤ 10 copies/ng total RNA showed more than double the technical variability compared to higher copy number transcripts on both platforms. Microarray profiling of two simulated 'normal' and 'disease' panels, each consisting of eight different RNA standards, yielded robust discrimination between the panels and between standards with varying fold change ratios, showing no systematic effects due to different labelling and hybridization runs. Also, comparison of microarray and RT-qPCR data for fold changes showed agreement for the two platforms. Conclusions ERCC RNA standards provide a generic means of evaluating different aspects of platform performance, and can provide information on the technical variation associated with quantification of biomarkers expressed at different levels of physiological abundance

  8. Optimization of the Lactococcus lactis nisin-controlled gene expression system NICE for industrial applications

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    Mond James

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nisin-controlled gene expression system NICE of Lactococcus lactis is one of the most widely used expression systems in Gram-positive bacteria. Despite its widespread use, no optimization of the culture conditions and nisin induction has been carried out to obtain maximum yields. As a model system induced production of lysostaphin, an antibacterial protein (mainly against Staphylococcus aureus produced by S. simulans biovar. Staphylolyticus, was used. Three main areas need optimization for maximum yields: cell density, nisin-controlled induction and protein production, and parameters specific for the target-protein. Results In a series of pH-controlled fermentations the following parameters were optimized: pH of the culture, use of NaOH or NH4OH as neutralizing agent, the addition of zinc and phosphate, the fermentation temperature, the time point of induction (cell density of the culture, the amount of nisin added for induction and the amount of three basic medium components, i.e. yeast extract, peptone and lactose. For each culture growth and lysostaphin production was followed. Lysostaphin production yields depended on all parameters that were varied. In the course of the optimization a three-fold increase in lysostaphin yield was achieved from 100 mg/l to 300 mg/l. Conclusion Protein production with the NICE gene expression system in L. lactis strongly depends on the medium composition, the fermentation parameters and the amount of nisin added for induction. Careful optimization of key parameters lead to a significant increase in the yield of the target protein.

  9. Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantoft, Thomas M; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Engkilde, Kaare; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Hellgren, Lars I

    2017-02-22

    To investigate the pathophysiological pathways leading to symptoms elicitation in multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) by comparing gene expression in MCS participants and healthy controls before and after a chemical exposure optimised to cause symptoms among MCS participants.The first hypothesis was that unexposed and symptom-free MCS participants have similar gene expression patterns to controls and a second hypothesis that MCS participants can be separated from controls based on differential gene expression upon a controlled n-butanol exposure. Participants were exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol while seated in a windowed exposure chamber for 60 min. A total of 26 genes involved in biochemical pathways found in the literature have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCS and other functional somatic syndromes were selected. Expression levels were compared between MCS and controls before, within 15 min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure. Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper. 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls. 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels. MCS participants and controls displayed similar gene expression levels both at baseline and after the exposure and the computed AUC values were likewise comparable between the 2 groups. The intragroup variation in expression levels among MCS participants was noticeably greater than the controls. MCS participants and controls have similar gene expression levels at baseline and it was not possible to separate MCS participants from controls based on gene expression measured after the

  10. Genes controlling plant growth habit in Leymus (Triticeae): maize barren stalk1 (ba1), rice lax panicle, and wheat tiller inhibition (tin3) genes as possible candidates.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Paraminder; Larson, Steven R; Bushman, B.S.; Wang, Richard R; Mott, Ivan W; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Gong, George; Liu, Lei

    2008-01-01

    Leymus cinereus and L. triticoides are large caespitose and rhizomatous perennial grasses, respectively. Previous studies detected quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling rhizome spreading near the viviparous1 (vp1) gene markers on linkage groups LG3a and LG3b in two families, TTC1 and TTC2, derived from Leymus triticoides x Leymus cinereus hybrids. The wheat tiller inhibition gene (tin3) is located on Triticum monococcum chromosome 3 A(m)L near vp1. Triticeae group 3 is reportedly collinea...

  11. Identification of potential internal control genes for real-time PCR analysis during stress response in Pyropia haitanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Jianhua; Huang, Aiyou; He, Linwen; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2017-11-01

    Pyropia haitanensis has prominent stress-resistance characteristics and is endemic to China. Studies into the stress responses in these algae could provide valuable information on the stress-response mechanisms in the intertidal Rhodophyta. Here, the effects of salinity and light intensity on the quantum yield of photosystem II in Py. haitanensis were investigated using pulse-amplitude-modulation fluorometry. Total RNA and genomic DNA of the samples under different stress conditions were isolated. By normalizing to the genomic DNA quantity, the RNA content in each sample was evaluated. The cDNA was synthesized and the expression levels of seven potential internal control genes were evaluated using qRT-PCR method. Then, we used geNorm, a common statistical algorithm, to analyze the qRT-PCR data of seven reference genes. Potential genes that may constantly be expressed under different conditions were selected, and these genes showed stable expression levels in samples under a salinity treatment, while tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and actin showed stability in samples stressed by strong light. Based on the results of the pulse amplitude-modulation fluorometry, an absolute quantification was performed to obtain gene copy numbers in certain stress-treated samples. The stably expressed genes as determined by the absolute quantification in certain samples conformed to the results of the geNorm screening. Based on the results of the software analysis and absolute quantification, we proposed that elongation factor 3 and 18S ribosomal RNA could be used as internal control genes when the Py. haitanensis blades were subjected to salinity stress, and that α-tubulin and 18S ribosomal RNA could be used as the internal control genes when the stress was from strong light. In general, our findings provide a convenient reference for the selection of internal control genes when designing experiments related to stress responses in Py. haitanensis.

  12. Identification of potential internal control genes for real-time PCR analysis during stress response in Pyropia haitanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Jianhua; Huang, Aiyou; He, Linwen; Niu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guangce

    2017-01-01

    Pyropia haitanensis has prominent stress-resistance characteristics and is endemic to China. Studies into the stress responses in these algae could provide valuable information on the stress-response mechanisms in the intertidal Rhodophyta. Here, the effects of salinity and light intensity on the quantum yield of photosystem II in Py. haitanensis were investigated using pulse-amplitude-modulation fluorometry. Total RNA and genomic DNA of the samples under different stress conditions were isolated. By normalizing to the genomic DNA quantity, the RNA content in each sample was evaluated. The cDNA was synthesized and the expression levels of seven potential internal control genes were evaluated using qRT-PCR method. Then, we used geNorm, a common statistical algorithm, to analyze the qRT-PCR data of seven reference genes. Potential genes that may constantly be expressed under different conditions were selected, and these genes showed stable expression levels in samples under a salinity treatment, while tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and actin showed stability in samples stressed by strong light. Based on the results of the pulse amplitude-modulation fluorometry, an absolute quantification was performed to obtain gene copy numbers in certain stress-treated samples. The stably expressed genes as determined by the absolute quantification in certain samples conformed to the results of the geNorm screening. Based on the results of the software analysis and absolute quantification, we proposed that elongation factor 3 and 18S ribosomal RNA could be used as internal control genes when the Py. haitanensis blades were subjected to salinity stress, and that α-tubulin and 18S ribosomal RNA could be used as the internal control genes when the stress was from strong light. In general, our findings provide a convenient reference for the selection of internal control genes when designing experiments related to stress responses in Py. haitanensis.

  13. A real-time control system of gene expression using ligand-bound nucleic acid aptamer for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Xun; Yang, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Lv, Liping; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhao, Zhenmin; Guan, Ningzi; Dong, Lichun; Chen, Rachel

    2017-07-01

    Artificial control of bio-functions through regulating gene expression is one of the most important and attractive technologies to build novel living systems that are useful in the areas of chemical synthesis, nanotechnology, pharmacology, cell biology. Here, we present a novel real-time control system of gene regulation that includes an enhancement element by introducing duplex DNA aptamers upstream promoter and a repression element by introducing a RNA aptamer upstream ribosome binding site. With the presence of ligands corresponding to the DNA aptamers, the expression of the target gene can be potentially enhanced at the transcriptional level by strengthening the recognition capability of RNAP to the recognition region and speeding up the separation efficiency of the unwinding region due to the induced DNA bubble around the thrombin-bound aptamers; while with the presence of RNA aptamer ligand, the gene expression can be repressed at the translational level by weakening the recognition capability of ribosome to RBS due to the shielding of RBS by the formed aptamer-ligand complex upstream RBS. The effectiveness and potential utility of the developed gene regulation system were demonstrated by regulating the expression of ecaA gene in the cell-free systems. The realistic metabolic engineering application of the system has also tested by regulating the expression of mgtC gene and thrombin cDNA in Escherichia coli JD1021 for controlling metabolic flux and improving thrombin production, verifying that the real-time control system of gene regulation is able to realize the dynamic regulation of gene expression with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus

    2017-01-01

     min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure. Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper. 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons...... fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls. 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels. MCS participants and controls...

  15. Distinct clpP genes control specific adaptive responses in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedhila, Sinda; Msadek, Tarek; Nel, Patricia; Lereclus, Didier

    2002-10-01

    ClpP and ClpC are subunits of the Clp ATP-dependent protease, which is ubiquitous among prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The role of these proteins in stress tolerance, stationary-phase adaptive responses, and virulence in many bacterial species has been demonstrated. Based on the amino acid sequences of the Bacillus subtilis clpC and clpP genes, we identified one clpC gene and two clpP genes (designated clpP1 and clpP2) in Bacillus thuringiensis. Predicted proteins ClpP1 and ClpP2 have approximately 88 and 67% amino acid sequence identity with ClpP of B. subtilis, respectively. Inactivation of clpC in B. thuringiensis impaired sporulation efficiency. The clpP1 and clpP2 mutants were both slightly susceptible to salt stress, whereas disruption of clpP2 negatively affected sporulation and abolished motility. Virulence of the clp mutants was assessed by injecting bacteria into the hemocoel of Bombyx mori larvae. The clpP1 mutant displayed attenuated virulence, which appeared to be related to its inability to grow at low temperature (25 degrees C), suggesting an essential role for ClpP1 in tolerance of low temperature. Microscopic examination of clpP1 mutant cells grown at 25 degrees C showed altered bacterial division, with cells remaining attached after septum formation. Analysis of lacZ transcriptional fusions showed that clpP1 was expressed at 25 and 37 degrees C during the entire growth cycle. In contrast, clpP2 was expressed at 37 degrees C but not at 25 degrees C, suggesting that ClpP2 cannot compensate for the absence of ClpP1 in the clpP1 mutant cells at low temperature. Our study demonstrates that ClpP1 and ClpP2 control distinct cellular regulatory pathways in B. thuringiensis.

  16. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 gene controls tooth root development in coordination with formation of the periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakian, Audrey; Yang, Wu-Chen; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Cui, Yong; Harris, Marie A; Villarreal, Demitri; Feng, Jerry Q; Macdougall, Mary; Harris, Stephen E

    2013-06-01

    Formation of the periodontium begins following onset of tooth-root formation in a coordinated manner after birth. Dental follicle progenitor cells are thought to form the cementum, alveolar bone and Sharpey's fibers of the periodontal ligament (PDL). However, little is known about the regulatory morphogens that control differentiation and function of these progenitor cells, as well as the progenitor cells involved in crown and root formation. We investigated the role of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Bmp2) in these processes by the conditional removal of the Bmp2 gene using the Sp7-Cre-EGFP mouse model. Sp7-Cre-EGFP first becomes active at E18 in the first molar, with robust Cre activity at postnatal day 0 (P0), followed by Cre activity in the second molar, which occurs after P0. There is robust Cre activity in the periodontium and third molars by 2 weeks of age. When the Bmp2 gene is removed from Sp7(+) (Osterix(+)) cells, major defects are noted in root, cellular cementum and periodontium formation. First, there are major cell autonomous defects in root-odontoblast terminal differentiation. Second, there are major alterations in formation of the PDLs and cellular cementum, correlated with decreased nuclear factor IC (Nfic), periostin and α-SMA(+) cells. Third, there is a failure to produce vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) in the periodontium and the pulp leading to decreased formation of the microvascular and associated candidate stem cells in the Bmp2-cKO(Sp7-Cre-EGFP). Fourth, ameloblast function and enamel formation are indirectly altered in the Bmp2-cKO(Sp7-Cre-EGFP). These data demonstrate that the Bmp2 gene has complex roles in postnatal tooth development and periodontium formation.

  17. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) vs. their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1—a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10—a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic) or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic) while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate [tet(G)] remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O), tet(W), and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457–0.829, P digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130–0.486, P = 0.075–0.612). However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O) and tet(W) ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and/or horizontal gene transfer between raw sludge bacteria and the digester microbial community. PMID:27014196

  18. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Lu

    Full Text Available In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  19. Prolactin promoter gene as marker assisted selection (MAS for the control of broodiness of Kampung chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tike Sartika

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary research about MAS (Marker Assisted Selection was conducted to detect broodiness trait of Kampung chicken. MAS currently is very important in situations, where the accuracy of selection is low, such as, traits with low heritability, e.g. broodiness trait and egg production. Prolactin promoter was selected as a marker gene for broodiness because it plays a critical part in the neuroendocrine cascade which is triggered at the onset of broodiness. DNA samples were collected from low and highbroodiness samples on basic population (G0 each 24 samples, and from selected population (G3 each 28 samples. As control population without broody behavior was used 16 samples White Leghorn (WL chicken. Prolactin promoter gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. PCR product was analyzed using electrophoresis agarose gel 2%. The results showed four types of bands represent in the Kampung chicken, three types called as wild type band and one type as the WL band. The chickens with low and high broodiness on G0 generation have 75 and 87.5% of wild type band while in the G3 generation was decreased to 25 and 75%. Conclusions of the research indicated that the selected breed of the Kampung chicken on G3 generation increased WL band like White Leghorn chicken as much as 31,25% from the G0 generation.

  20. A major gene controls mimicry and crypsis in butterflies and moths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Nicola J.; Pardo-Diaz, Carolina; Whibley, Annabel; Supple, Megan; Saenko, Suzanne V.; Wallbank, Richard W. R.; Wu, Grace C.; Maroja, Luana; Ferguson, Laura; Hanly, Joseph J.; Hines, Heather; Salazar, Camilo; Merrill, Richard; Dowling, Andrea; ffrench-Constant, Richard; Llaurens, Violaine; Joron, Mathieu; McMillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2016-01-01

    The wing patterns of butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are diverse and striking examples of evolutionary diversification by natural selection1,2. Lepidopteran wing colour patterns are a key innovation, consisting of arrays of coloured scales. We still lack a general understanding of how these patterns are controlled and if there is any commonality across the 160,000 moth and 17,000 butterfly species. Here, we identify a gene, cortex, through fine-scale mapping using population genomics and gene expression analyses, which regulates pattern switches in multiple species across the mimetic radiation in Heliconius butterflies. cortex belongs to a fast evolving subfamily of the otherwise highly conserved fizzy family of cell cycle regulators3, suggesting that it most likely regulates pigmentation patterning through regulation of scale cell development. In parallel with findings in the peppered moth (Biston betularia)4, our results suggest that this mechanism is common within Lepidoptera and that cortex has become a major target for natural selection acting on colour and pattern variation in this group of insects. PMID:27251285

  1. The HCL gene of Medicago truncatula controls Rhizobium-induced root hair curling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoira, R; Timmers, A C; Maillet, F; Galera, C; Penmetsa, R V; Cook, D; Dénarié, J; Gough, C

    2001-05-01

    The symbiotic infection of the model legume Medicago truncatula by Sinorhizobium meliloti involves marked root hair curling, a stage where entrapment of the microsymbiont occurs in a chamber from which infection thread formation is initiated within the root hair. We have genetically dissected these early symbiotic interactions using both plant and rhizobial mutants and have identified a M. truncatula gene, HCL, which controls root hair curling. S. meliloti Nod factors, which are required for the infection process, induced wild-type epidermal nodulin gene expression and root hair deformation in hcl mutants, while Nod factor induction of cortical cell division foci was reduced compared to wild-type plants. Studies of the position of nuclei and of the microtubule cytoskeleton network of hcl mutants revealed that root hair, as well as cortical cells, were activated in response to S. meliloti. However, the asymmetric microtubule network that is typical of curled root hairs, did not form in the mutants, and activated cortical cells did not become polarised and did not exhibit the microtubular cytoplasmic bridges characteristic of the pre-infection threads induced by rhizobia in M. truncatula. These data suggest that hcl mutations alter the formation of signalling centres that normally provide positional information for the reorganisation of the microtubular cytoskeleton in epidermal and cortical cells.

  2. Precision control of recombinant gene transcription for CHO cell synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam J; James, David C

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of mammalian cell factories for biopharmaceutical production will be genetically engineered to possess both generic and product-specific manufacturing capabilities that may not exist naturally. Introduction of entirely new combinations of synthetic functions (e.g. novel metabolic or stress-response pathways), and retro-engineering of existing functional cell modules will drive disruptive change in cellular manufacturing performance. However, before we can apply the core concepts underpinning synthetic biology (design, build, test) to CHO cell engineering we must first develop practical and robust enabling technologies. Fundamentally, we will require the ability to precisely control the relative stoichiometry of numerous functional components we simultaneously introduce into the host cell factory. In this review we discuss how this can be achieved by design of engineered promoters that enable concerted control of recombinant gene transcription. We describe the specific mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that affect promoter function during bioproduction processes, and detail the highly-specific promoter design criteria that are required in the context of CHO cell engineering. The relative applicability of diverse promoter development strategies are discussed, including re-engineering of natural sequences, design of synthetic transcription factor-based systems, and construction of synthetic promoters. This review highlights the potential of promoter engineering to achieve precision transcriptional control for CHO cell synthetic biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Behavior of QQ-plots and genomic control in studies of gene-environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Voorman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies of gene-environment interaction (GxE GWAS are becoming popular. As with main effects GWAS, quantile-quantile plots (QQ-plots and Genomic Control are being used to assess and correct for population substructure. However, in G x E work these approaches can be seriously misleading, as we illustrate; QQ-plots may give strong indications of substructure when absolutely none is present. Using simulation and theory, we show how and why spurious QQ-plot inflation occurs in G x E GWAS, and how this differs from main-effects analyses. We also explain how simple adjustments to standard regression-based methods used in G x E GWAS can alleviate this problem.

  4. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2017-01-17

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication 'bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  5. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication `bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic control of gene expression by CRISPR–Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Albert; Qi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The discovery and adaption of bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems has revolutionized the way researchers edit genomes. Engineering of catalytically inactivated Cas variants (nuclease-deficient or nuclease-deactivated [dCas]) combined with transcriptional repressors, activators, or epigenetic modifiers enable sequence-specific regulation of gene expression and chromatin state. These CRISPR–Cas-based technologies have contributed to the rapid development of disease models and functional genomics screening approaches, which can facilitate genetic target identification and drug discovery. In this short review, we will cover recent advances of CRISPR–dCas9 systems and their use for transcriptional repression and activation, epigenome editing, and engineered synthetic circuits for complex control of the mammalian genome. PMID:28649363

  7. Transcriptional control of two ribosome-inactivating protein genes expressed in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawade, Kensuke; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    SoRIP1 and SoRIP2 are ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP: EC 3.2.2.22) genes identified in spinach (Spinacia oleracea). They are differentially expressed in a development-dependent manner during spinach somatic embryogenesis. Here, we isolated genomic clones of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2. These two RIP genes have different genomic organization. Phylogenetic analysis of predicted amino acid sequences of RIPs in Caryophyllales plants revealed that they are divided into two major subfamilies, corresponding to SoRIP1 and SoRIP2. To gain further insight into the transcriptional control of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2, we obtained their 5'-flanking sequences by inverse PCR. Comparison of two 5'-flanking sequences revealed the characteristic cis elements in each region that confer differential transcriptional control. In the 5'-flanking region of SoRIP1, we found several motifs with functions related to embryonic development. The 5'-flanking region of SoRIP2 contains some defense-responsive motifs. Expression of SoRIP1 was detected in various tissues. In particular, SoRIP1 was highly expressed in the early immature fruits, and immunohistochemistry showed that SoRIP1 accumulated in the peripheral region of the immature embryo, with weaker expression in internal cells. During fruit development, the expression of SoRIP2 was low. However, the accumulation of SoRIP2 was conspicuous in the epidermis of the immature embryo. The expression of SoRIP2, but not SoRIP1, in leaves was induced by salicylic acid treatment. This differential transcriptional regulation of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2 suggests that the corresponding proteins may have different functions, one being related to embryonic development and the other to embryo defense.

  8. Statistical analysis of genomic protein family and domain controlled annotations for functional investigation of classified gene lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masseroli Marco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing protein family and domain based annotations constitute important information to understand protein functions and gain insight into relations among their codifying genes. To allow analyzing of gene proteomic annotations, we implemented novel modules within GFINDer, a Web system we previously developed that dynamically aggregates functional and phenotypic annotations of user-uploaded gene lists and allows performing their statistical analysis and mining. Results Exploiting protein information in Pfam and InterPro databanks, we developed and added in GFINDer original modules specifically devoted to the exploration and analysis of functional signatures of gene protein products. They allow annotating numerous user-classified nucleotide sequence identifiers with controlled information on related protein families, domains and functional sites, classifying them according to such protein annotation categories, and statistically analyzing the obtained classifications. In particular, when uploaded nucleotide sequence identifiers are subdivided in classes, the Statistics Protein Families&Domains module allows estimating relevance of Pfam or InterPro controlled annotations for the uploaded genes by highlighting protein signatures significantly more represented within user-defined classes of genes. In addition, the Logistic Regression module allows identifying protein functional signatures that better explain the considered gene classification. Conclusion Novel GFINDer modules provide genomic protein family and domain analyses supporting better functional interpretation of gene classes, for instance defined through statistical and clustering analyses of gene expression results from microarray experiments. They can hence help understanding fundamental biological processes and complex cellular mechanisms influenced by protein domain composition, and contribute to unveil new biomedical knowledge about the codifying genes.

  9. Polymorphisms in immunoregulatory genes and the risk of histologic chorioamnionitis in Caucasoid women: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Annells, Margaret F; Hart, Prue H; Mullighan, Charles G; Heatley, Susan L; Robinson, Jeffrey S; McDonald, Helen M

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Chorioamnionitis is a common underlying cause of preterm birth (PTB). It is hypothesised that polymorphisms in immunoregulatory genes influence the host response to infection and subsequent preterm birth. The relationship between histologic chorioamnionitis and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 11 immunoregulatory genes was examined in a case-control study. Methods Placentas of 181 Caucasoid women with spontaneous PTB prior to 35 weeks were examined for histologic chor...

  10. Somatosensory Modulation of Salivary Gene Expression and Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Steven Michael; Maron, Jill Lamanna; Alterovitz, Gil; Song, Dongli; Wilson, Bernard Joseph; Jegatheesan, Priya; Govindaswami, Balaji; Lee, Jaehoon; Rosner, Austin Oder

    2017-06-14

    Despite numerous medical advances in the care of at-risk preterm neonates, oral feeding still represents one of the first and most advanced neurological challenges facing this delicate population. Objective, quantitative, and noninvasive assessment tools, as well as neurotherapeutic strategies, are greatly needed in order to improve feeding and developmental outcomes. Pulsed pneumatic orocutaneous stimulation has been shown to improve nonnutritive sucking (NNS) skills in preterm infants who exhibit delayed or disordered nipple feeding behaviors. Separately, the study of the salivary transcriptome in neonates has helped identify biomarkers directly linked to successful neonatal oral feeding behavior. The combination of noninvasive treatment strategies and transcriptomic analysis represents an integrative approach to oral feeding in which rapid technological advances and personalized transcriptomics can safely and noninvasively be brought to the bedside to inform medical care decisions and improve care and outcomes. The study aimed to conduct a multicenter randomized control trial (RCT) to combine molecular and behavioral methods in an experimental conceptualization approach to map the effects of PULSED somatosensory stimulation on salivary gene expression in the context of the acquisition of oral feeding habits in high-risk human neonates. The aims of this study represent the first attempt to combine noninvasive treatment strategies and transcriptomic assessments of high-risk extremely preterm infants (EPI) to (1) improve oral feeding behavior and skills, (2) further our understanding of the gene ontology of biologically diverse pathways related to oral feeding, (3) use gene expression data to personalize neonatal care and individualize treatment strategies and timing interventions, and (4) improve long-term developmental outcomes. A total of 180 extremely preterm infants from three neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) will be randomized to receive either PULSED or

  11. CASCADE, a platform for controlled gene amplification for high, tunable and selection-free gene expression in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Buron, Line Due; Jarczynska, Zofia Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Over-expression of a gene by increasing its copy number is often desirable in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may facilitate elucidation of enzyme functions, and in cell factory design it is used to increase production of proteins and metabolites. Current methods are typically exploi...... production of two fluorescent proteins, the enzyme β-galactosidase the fungal polyketide 6-methyl salicylic acid and the plant metabolite vanillin glucoside....

  12. Survival of Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria and Horizontal Gene Transfer Control Antibiotic Resistance Gene Content in Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer H.; Novak, John T.; Knocke, William R.; Pruden, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp.) and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp.) anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts ...

  13. Control of gene transfer on a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer by the incorporation of carbonate and fluoride ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Yushin; Oyane, Ayako; Sogo, Yu; Ito, Atsuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Tsurushima, Hideo

    2011-07-01

    Gene transfer techniques are useful tools for controlling cell behavior, such as proliferation and differentiation. We have recently developed an efficient area-specific gene transfer system using a DNA-fibronectin-apatite composite layer (DF-Ap layer). In this system, partial dissolution of the composite layer is likely to be a crucial step for gene transfer. In the present study, layer solubility was adjusted by incorporating various contents of carbonate or fluoride ions into the DF-Ap layer via ionic substitution for the apatite crystals. Carbonate ion incorporation increased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby increasing the efficiency of gene transfer on the layer. In contrast, the incorporation of fluoride ions decreased the solubility of the DF-Ap layer, thereby decreasing the efficiency and delaying the timing of gene transfer on the layer dose-dependently. The present gene transfer system with controllable efficiency and timing would be useful in tissue engineering applications because cell differentiation can be induced effectively by regulating appropriate gene expression with suitable timing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parameters controlling the gene-targeting frequency at the Sphingomonas species rrn site and expression of the methyl parathion hydrolase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J; Zhang, R; Cui, Z; He, J; Gu, L; Li, S

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the key parameters controlling the exogenous methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) gene mpd-targeting frequency at the ribosomal RNA operon (rrn) site of Sphingomonas species which has a wide range of biotechnological applications. Targeting vectors with different homology lengths and recipient target DNA with different homology identities were used to investigate the parameters controlling the targeting frequency at the Sphingomonas species rrn site. Targeting frequency decreased with the reduction of homology length, and the minimal size for normal homologous recombination was >100 bp. Homologous recombination could succeed even if there were 3-4% mismatches; however, targeting frequency decreased with increasing sequence divergence. The Red recombination system could increase the targeting frequency to some extent. Targeting of the mpd gene to the rrn site did not affect cell viability and resulted in an increase of MPH-specific activity in recombinants. Targeting frequency was affected by homology length, identity and the Red recombination system. The rrn site is a good target site for the expression of exogenous genes. This work is useful as a foundation for a better understanding of recombination events involving homologous sequences and for the improved manipulation of Sphingomonas genes in biotechnological applications.

  15. Differentially correlated genes in co-expression networks control phenotype transitions [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina D. Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Co-expression networks are a tool widely used for analysis of “Big Data” in biology that can range from transcriptomes to proteomes, metabolomes and more recently even microbiomes. Several methods were proposed to answer biological questions interrogating these networks. Differential co-expression analysis is a recent approach that measures how gene interactions change when a biological system transitions from one state to another. Although the importance of differentially co-expressed genes to identify dysregulated pathways has been noted, their role in gene regulation is not well studied. Herein we investigated differentially co-expressed genes in a relatively simple mono-causal process (B lymphocyte deficiency and in a complex multi-causal system (cervical cancer. Methods: Co-expression networks of B cell deficiency (Control and BcKO were reconstructed using Pearson correlation coefficient for two mus musculus datasets: B10.A strain (12 normal, 12 BcKO and BALB/c strain (10 normal, 10 BcKO. Co-expression networks of cervical cancer (normal and cancer were reconstructed using local partial correlation method for five datasets (total of 64 normal, 148 cancer. Differentially correlated pairs were identified along with the location of their genes in BcKO and in cancer networks. Minimum Shortest Path and Bi-partite Betweenness Centrality where statistically evaluated for differentially co-expressed genes in corresponding networks.    Results: We show that in B cell deficiency the differentially co-expressed genes are highly enriched with immunoglobulin genes (causal genes. In cancer we found that differentially co-expressed genes act as “bottlenecks” rather than causal drivers with most flows that come from the key driver genes to the peripheral genes passing through differentially co-expressed genes. Using in vitro knockdown experiments for two out of 14 differentially co-expressed genes found in cervical cancer (FGFR2 and

  16. Cloning, sequencing, and expression in Escherichia coli of a cytochrome P450 gene from Cunninghamella elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R F; Cao, W W; Khan, A A; Cerniglia, C E

    2000-07-01

    A polyclonal antibody against microsomes of a fungus, Cunninghamella elegans, was used to screen a C. elegans cDNA library. A cDNA clone, containing an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 389 amino acids (aa), was obtained. GenBank comparison (BLAST) showed that the protein was closely related to P450 because a heme-binding region, which is highly conserved in all P450 sequences, was found in the ORF protein. Using an oligo probe designed from this C. elegans heme-binding region to rescreen the cDNA library, we obtained three new clones. Sequence comparison showed that the three clones, with different length cDNA inserts, were from the same mRNA of the C. elegans P450 gene. One clone had the full C. elegans P450 gene, encoding 473 aa with a molecular mass of 54958.60, whereas the 389 was a part of the 473 aa without the N-terminal. The entire C. elegans P450 gene was successfully subcloned and overexpressed in a plasmid-Escherichia coli system (pQE30). Immunostaining with three antibodies (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, and CYP3A1) against mammalian P450 enzymes and benzidine staining for hemoproteins showed positive results for the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli. A phylogenetic tree was constructed by comparison of other fungal P450s to the C. elegans sequence. The C. elegans P450 clustered close to the cyp51 family and was named cyp509A1 by the International Committee on the Nomenclature for Cytochrome P450 Enzymes.

  17. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Elías-Villalobos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis.

  18. Selection of reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis in a predatory biological control agent, Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxiao; Pan, Huipeng; Noland, Jeffrey Edward; Zhang, Deyong; Zhang, Zhanhong; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-12-10

    Reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying gene expression across various biological processes, of which requires a set of suited reference genes to normalize the expression data. Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), is one of the most extensively used biological control agents in the field to manage arthropod pest species. In this study, expression profiles of 16 housekeeping genes selected from C. maculata were cloned and investigated. The performance of these candidates as endogenous controls under specific experimental conditions was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper, and ΔCt method. In addition, RefFinder, a comprehensive platform integrating all the above-mentioned algorithms, ranked the overall stability of these candidate genes. As a result, various sets of suitable reference genes were recommended specifically for experiments involving different tissues, developmental stages, sex, and C. maculate larvae treated with dietary double stranded RNA. This study represents the critical first step to establish a standardized RT-qPCR protocol for the functional genomics research in a ladybeetle C. maculate. Furthermore, it lays the foundation for conducting ecological risk assessment of RNAi-based gene silencing biotechnologies on non-target organisms; in this case, a key predatory biological control agent.

  19. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I

    2015-08-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis.

  20. Survival of antibiotic resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer control antibiotic resistance gene content in anaerobic digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hafer Miller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding fate of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB versus their antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs during wastewater sludge treatment is critical in order to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance through process optimization. Here, we spiked high concentrations of tetracycline-resistant bacteria, isolated from mesophilic (Iso M1-1- a Pseudomonas sp. and thermophilic (Iso T10- a Bacillus sp. anaerobic digested sludge, into batch digesters and monitored their fate by plate counts and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR of their corresponding tetracycline ARGs. In batch studies, spiked ARB plate counts returned to baseline (thermophilic or 1-log above baseline (mesophilic while levels of the ARG present in the spiked isolate (tet(G remained high in mesophilic batch reactors. To compare results under semi-continuous flow conditions with natural influent variation, tet(O, tet(W, and sul1 ARGs, along with the intI1 integrase gene, were monitored over a 9-month period in the raw feed sludge and effluent sludge of lab-scale thermophilic and mesophilic anaerobic digesters. sul1 and intI1 in mesophilic and thermophilic digesters correlated positively (Spearman rho = 0.457 to 0.829, P<0.05 with the raw feed sludge. There was no correlation in tet(O or tet(W ratios in raw sludge and mesophilic digested sludge or thermophilic digested sludge (Spearman rho = 0.130 to 0.486, P = 0.075 to 0.612. However, in the thermophilic digester, the tet(O and tet(W ratios remained consistently low over the entire monitoring period. We conclude that the influent sludge microbial composition can influence the ARG content of a digester, apparently as a result of differential survival or death of ARBs or horizontal gene transfer of genes between raw sludge ARBs and the digester microbial community. Notably, mesophilic digestion was more susceptible to ARG intrusion than thermophilic digestion, which may be attributed to a higher rate of ARB survival and

  1. Targeted killing effects of double CD and TK suicide genes controlled by survivin promoter on gastric cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xian-Run; Li, Jian-Sheng; Niu, Ying; Miao, Li

    2011-02-01

    Suicide genes such as cytosine deaminase (CD) and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) encode products that convert nontoxic substances (prodrugs) into toxic metabolites. Studies in recent years indicated that survivin(sur) expression was associated with the biological behaviors of gastric carcinoma. In the present study, targeted killing effects of double CD and TK suicide genes controlled by survivin promoter on gastric cancer cell were investigated, the recombinant pSCT vector containing CD and TK genes driven by sur promoter was constructed and transfected into SGC-7901 cells. After adding the CCV and 5-FC, the effects of double suicide genes on cell growth, cell cycle and proliferation were determined by MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that sur promoter could specifically drive the expression of double CD/TK gene in SGC-7901 cells, whereas not in the normal GES-1 cell. After using CCV and 5-FC, the growth of SGC-7901 cells was inhibited. G1 phase proportion was significantly higher in SGC-7901 cells transfected with double suicide genes than the untransfected cells. These results suggest that CD and TK double suicide genes driven by sur promoter could provide a new approach for enhancing selective suicide gene therapy of CD/5-FC for the treatment of advanced gastric carcinoma.

  2. Comparison of gene expression and genome-wide DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and conventionally bred controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fei, Gao; Luo, Yonglun; Li, Shengting

    2011-01-01

    Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural...... breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF). Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver), using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation......-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK) and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls...

  3. Epigenetic control of virulence gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a LysR-type transcription regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Turner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation within an isogenic bacterial population is thought to ensure the survival of a subset of cells in adverse conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa variably expresses several phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and the production of CupA fimbriae. Here we describe a previously unidentified bistable switch in P. aeruginosa. This switch controls the expression of a diverse set of genes, including aprA, which encodes the secreted virulence factor alkaline protease. We present evidence that bistable expression of PA2432, herein named bexR (bistable expression regulator, which encodes a LysR-type transcription regulator, controls this switch. In particular, using DNA microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter gene fusions, we identify genes directly under the control of BexR and show that these genes are bistably expressed. Furthermore, we show that bexR is itself bistably expressed and positively autoregulated. Finally, using single-cell analyses of a GFP reporter fusion, we present evidence that positive autoregulation of bexR is necessary for bistable expression of the BexR regulon. Our findings suggest that a positive feedback loop involving a LysR-type transcription regulator serves as the basis for an epigenetic switch that controls virulence gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

  4. Assessment of Control Tissue for Gene and Protein Expression Studies: A Comparison of Three Alternative Lung Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R. Passmore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of an appropriate control group in human research is essential in investigating the level of a pathological disorder. This study aimed to compare three alternative sources of control lung tissue and to determine their suitability for gene and protein expression studies. Gene and protein expression levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and gelatinase families and their receptors were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene expression levels of VEGFA, placental growth factor (PGF, and their receptors, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1, and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR as well as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and the inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were significantly higher in lung cancer resections. The gene expression level of MMP-9 was significantly lower in the corresponding samples. Altered protein expression was also detected, depending on the area assessed. The results of this study show that none of the three control groups studied are completely suitable for gene and protein studies associated with the VEGF and gelatinase families, highlighting the need for researchers to be selective in which controls they opt for.

  5. Hierarchical Control of Nitrite Respiration by Transcription Factors Encoded within Mobile Gene Clusters of Thermus thermophilus.

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    Alvarez, Laura; Quintáns, Nieves G; Blesa, Alba; Baquedano, Ignacio; Mencía, Mario; Bricio, Carlos; Berenguer, José

    2017-12-01

    Denitrification in Thermus thermophilus is encoded by the nitrate respiration conjugative element (NCE) and nitrite and nitric oxide respiration (nic) gene clusters. A tight coordination of each cluster's expression is required to maximize anaerobic growth, and to avoid toxicity by intermediates, especially nitric oxides (NO). Here, we study the control of the nitrite reductases (Nir) and NO reductases (Nor) upon horizontal acquisition of the NCE and nic clusters by a formerly aerobic host. Expression of the nic promoters PnirS, PnirJ, and PnorC, depends on the oxygen sensor DnrS and on the DnrT protein, both NCE-encoded. NsrR, a nic-encoded transcription factor with an iron-sulfur cluster, is also involved in Nir and Nor control. Deletion of nsrR decreased PnorC and PnirJ transcription, and activated PnirS under denitrification conditions, exhibiting a dual regulatory role never described before for members of the NsrR family. On the basis of these results, a regulatory hierarchy is proposed, in which under anoxia, there is a pre-activation of the nic promoters by DnrS and DnrT, and then NsrR leads to Nor induction and Nir repression, likely as a second stage of regulation that would require NO detection, thus avoiding accumulation of toxic levels of NO. The whole system appears to work in remarkable coordination to function only when the relevant nitrogen species are present inside the cell.

  6. Probing the Limits to MicroRNA-Mediated Control of Gene Expression.

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    Araks Martirosyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the 'ceRNA hypothesis', microRNAs (miRNAs may act as mediators of an effective positive interaction between long coding or non-coding RNA molecules, carrying significant potential implications for a variety of biological processes. Here, inspired by recent work providing a quantitative description of small regulatory elements as information-conveying channels, we characterize the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated regulation in terms of the optimal information flow achievable between modulator (transcription factors and target nodes (long RNAs. Our findings show that, while a sufficiently large degree of target derepression is needed to activate miRNA-mediated transmission, (a in case of differential mechanisms of complex processing and/or transcriptional capabilities, regulation by a post-transcriptional miRNA-channel can outperform that achieved through direct transcriptional control; moreover, (b in the presence of large populations of weakly interacting miRNA molecules the extra noise coming from titration disappears, allowing the miRNA-channel to process information as effectively as the direct channel. These observations establish the limits of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional cross-talk and suggest that, besides providing a degree of noise buffering, this type of control may be effectively employed in cells both as a failsafe mechanism and as a preferential fine tuner of gene expression, pointing to the specific situations in which each of these functionalities is maximized.

  7. Synthetic biosensors for precise gene control and real-time monitoring of metabolites.

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    Rogers, Jameson K; Guzman, Christopher D; Taylor, Noah D; Raman, Srivatsan; Anderson, Kelley; Church, George M

    2015-09-03

    Characterization and standardization of inducible transcriptional regulators has transformed how scientists approach biology by allowing precise and tunable control of gene expression. Despite their utility, only a handful of well-characterized regulators exist, limiting the complexity of engineered biological systems. We apply a characterization pipeline to four genetically encoded sensors that respond to acrylate, glucarate, erythromycin and naringenin. We evaluate how the concentration of the inducing chemical relates to protein expression, how the extent of induction affects protein expression kinetics, and how the activation behavior of single cells relates to ensemble measurements. We show that activation of each sensor is orthogonal to the other sensors, and to other common inducible systems. We demonstrate independent control of three fluorescent proteins in a single cell, chemically defining eight unique transcriptional states. To demonstrate biosensor utility in metabolic engineering, we apply the glucarate biosensor to monitor product formation in a heterologous glucarate biosynthesis pathway and identify superior enzyme variants. Doubling the number of well-characterized inducible systems makes more complex synthetic biological circuits accessible. Characterizing sensors that transduce the intracellular concentration of valuable metabolites into fluorescent readouts enables high-throughput screening of biological catalysts and alleviates the primary bottleneck of the metabolic engineering design-build-test cycle. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. [The effect of polymorphism of genes of xenobiotics detoxication on the frequencies of spontaneous and induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sal'nikova, L E; Akaeva, E A; Elisova, T V; Kuznetsova, G I; Kuz'mina, N S; Vesnina, I N; Lapteva, N Sh; Chumachenko, A G; Romanchuk, V A; Rubanovich, A V

    2009-01-01

    Here presented the data on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of peripheral blood of 97 volunteers depending on genotypes by genes of xenobiotics detoxication before and after gamma-irradiation with dose of 1 Gy in vitro. The frequencies of aberrations were estimated by analyzing not less than 500-1000 metaphases per person. The data of cytogenetic analysis were compared with the results of PCR-genotyping of loci GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, CYP1A1, CYP2D6, NAT2, and MTHFR. The significant differences by the frequencies of aberrations between "single-locus" genotypes were not found except for GSTM1 locus, for which the enhanced frequency of spontaneous aberrations of chromosome type in "positive" genotypes compared to "zero" ones, i.e., homozygotes by deletion (p = 0.04) was observed. The minimum frequency of spontaneous aberrations of chromosome type was recorded for carriers of double homozygotes by deletion of GSTM1-GSTT1: 0.0006 +/- 0.0003 against 0.0027 +/- 0.0003 for the rest of genotypes (p = 0.016 by the Mann-Witney test). The frequency of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations was correlated with the total amount of minor alleles in loci GSTP1, NAT2, and MTHFR (r = 0.25 at p = 0.0065).

  9. CFTR gene mutations and polymorphism are associated with non-obstructive azoospermia: From case-control study.

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    Jiang, Lingying; Jin, Jiamin; Wang, Shasha; Zhang, Fuxing; Dai, Yongdong; Shi, Libing; Zhang, Songying

    2017-08-30

    A variety of experimental studies have yielded evidence that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein participates in the process of spermatogenesis. However, the association between CFTR gene and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) disease remained to be a question. First, we reviewed available data from the PubMed and Embase databases before May 2016 to find the most common mutations of CFTR gene in NOA patients. Second, an original case-control study was conducted on NOA patients (n=100) and a control group consisting of fertile males (n=100), selected from August 2015 to March 2017, to detect CFTR gene mutations and polymorphism. Peripheral blood samples from NOA patients and normal controls were analyzed for the presence of specific sequences of CFTR gene by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by direct sequencing. From our comprehensive review, 12 case-control studies were found concerning the relation between CFTR gene mutations and polymorphism and NOA disease. Fifty-four mutations were mentioned and IVS8 poly-T, TG repeats, F508del and R117H mutations were the most common ones. Based on that, we detected IVS8 poly-T, TG repeats, F508del, R117H and M470V mutations in our case control study. We found that the T5 allele was present at a significantly higher rate in NOA patients than in the control group (5.00% versus 0.00%, pmutations were not found in either group. In conclusion, the polyvariant mutant genes of CFTR: T5 allele and TG12-T5-V470 genotype are correlated with NOA, but F508del and R117H mutations have low possibility to be associated with NOA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis and Screening for Potential Target Genes for RNAi-Mediated Pest Control of the Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

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    Hang Li

    Full Text Available The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner, is a serious pest worldwide that causes significant losses in crops. Unfortunately, genetic resources for the beet armyworm is extremely scarce. To improve these resources we sequenced the transcriptome of S. exigua representing all stages including eggs, 1(st to 5(th instar larvae, pupae, male and female adults using the Illumina Solexa platform. We assembled the transcriptome with Trinity that yielded 31,414 contigs. Of these contigs, 18,592 were annotated as protein coding genes by Blast searches against the NCBI nr database. It has been shown that knockdown of important insect genes by dsRNAs or siRNAs is a feasible mechanism to control insect pests. The first key step towards developing an efficient RNAi-mediated pest control technique is to find suitable target genes. To screen for effective target genes in the beet armyworm, we selected nine candidate genes. The sequences of these genes were amplified using the RACE strategy. Then, siRNAs were designed and chemically synthesized. We injected 2 µl siRNA (2 µg/µl into the 4(th instar larvae to knock down the respective target genes. The mRNA abundance of target genes decreased to different levels (∼20-94.3% after injection of siRNAs. Knockdown of eight genes including chitinase7, PGCP, chitinase1, ATPase, tubulin1, arf2, tubulin2 and arf1 caused a significantly high level of mortality compared to the negative control (P<0.05. About 80% of the surviving insects in the siRNA-treated group of five genes (PGCP, chitinase1, tubulin1, tubulin2 and helicase showed retarded development. In chitinase1-siRNA and chitinase7-siRNA administered groups, 12.5% survivors exhibited "half-ecdysis". In arf1-siRNA and arf2-siRNA groups, the body color of 15% became black 48 h after injections. In summary, the transcriptome could be a valuable genetic resource for identification of genes in S. exigua and this study provided putative targets for RNAi pest

  11. Genetic Polymorphisms in Vitamin D Metabolism and Signaling Genes and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study.

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    Tess V Clendenen

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D metabolism and signaling genes have been inconsistently associated with risk of breast cancer, though few studies have examined SNPs in vitamin D-related genes other than the vitamin D receptor (VDR gene and particularly have not examined the association with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA gene which may be a key vitamin D pathway gene. We conducted a nested case-control study of 734 cases and 1435 individually matched controls from a population-based prospective cohort study, the Northern Sweden Mammary Screening Cohort. Tag and functional SNPs were genotyped for the VDR, cytochrome p450 24A1 (CYP24A1, and RXRA genes. We also genotyped specific SNPs in four other genes related to vitamin D metabolism and signaling (GC/VDBP, CYP2R1, DHCR7, and CYP27B1. SNPs in the CYP2R1, DHCR7, and VDBP gene regions that were associated with circulating 25(OHD concentration in GWAS were also associated with plasma 25(OHD in our study (p-trend <0.005. After taking into account the false discovery rate, these SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer risk, nor were any of the other SNPs or haplotypes in VDR, RXRA, and CYP24A1. We observed no statistically significant associations between polymorphisms or haplotypes in key vitamin D-related genes and risk of breast cancer. These results, combined with the observation in this cohort and most other prospective studies of no association of circulating 25(OHD with breast cancer risk, do not support an association between vitamin D and breast cancer risk.

  12. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

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    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  13. Identification of Most Stable Endogenous Control Genes for MicroRNA Quantification in the Developing Mouse Lung

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    Bouhaddioui, Wafae; Provost, Pierre R.; Tremblay, Yves

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non coding RNAs acting as negative regulators. miRNA are involved in lung development and pulmonary diseases. Measurement of their levels by qPCR is directly influenced by the stability of normalization gene(s), which can be affected by the experimental conditions. The developing lung is a changing tissue and one normalization gene showing stability on one developmental day may be modulated over time. Moreover, some developmental events are affected by sex, which also has to be considered. In this study, we compared stability of five putative control genes in the lung between sexes from the pseudoglandular to the alveolar stages and in adult lungs. Expression of sno135, sno142, sno202, sno234, and sno251 was studied by qPCR in male and female lung samples collected at seven time points from GD 15.5 to PN 30. Cq values of sno251 showed the highest variation across the different developmental stages, while sno234 was the most stable gene. Gene expression stability was studied by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Our data showed that ranking of genes based on expression stability changed according to developmental time and sex. sno135/sno234 and sno142/sno234 were proposed as best combinations of normalization genes when both sexes and all the studied developmental stages are considered. Normalization of let7-a RNA levels with different pairs of control genes proposed by geNorm and NormFinder gave similar data, while the use of less stable genes introduced a statistically significant difference on PN 0. In conclusion, variations in stability of normalization