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Sample records for controller fluidic device

  1. Gaseous Fluidics Control Device

    OpenAIRE

    Brahim, Dennai; Rachid KHELFAOUI; Boumedienne BENYOUCEF; Belkacem DRAOUI; Abdelkader SLIMANI

    2008-01-01

    Fluidics is a new technology arising from a re-appraisal of a very old technology, namely fluid power and its control. Fluidic technology based on natural oscillation phenomena is a relevant topic in several strategic areas. This technology of using the flow characteristics of liquids or gases to operate a control system is fairly old; it was in the 1960s that researchers started to use fluidics. Important contributions from fluidic logic technologies are associated with the fluid behavior kn...

  2. Gaseous Fluidics Control Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim, DENNAI

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluidics is a new technology arising from a re-appraisal of a very old technology, namely fluid power and its control. Fluidic technology based on natural oscillation phenomena is a relevant topic in several strategic areas. This technology of using the flow characteristics of liquids or gases to operate a control system is fairly old; it was in the 1960s that researchers started to use fluidics. Important contributions from fluidic logic technologies are associated with the fluid behavior known as the “Coanda effect”. A lot of attention has been paid to the transport phenomena in the micro geometries because micro fabrication enables us to manufacture low channels ranging from few micrometers to few hundred micrometers. This paper describes a new actuator for flow control applications. The gas diffusion, control is very important operation in the fields of nature and industry.

  3. Autopulsed Mini Fluidic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid KHELFAOUI

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The fluidic oscillator is a new micro-scale actuator developed for flow control applications. Mixing in micro channels is an important problem because the flow is always laminar flow even though the velocity may be high. The principal constraints when designing a mixer are the flow rate required through that particular section of the micro-device, the fluid properties of the streams to be mixed and the desired level of mixing. This paper describes a new actuator for flow mixing applications with nozzle size equal 1.18 mm. The gas diffusion, mixing is very important operation in the fields of nature and industry. Now, it is desired to improve the mixing. In this paper, first the performance of fluidic oscillator mixer operated by gas is made clear simulation.

  4. Autopulsed Mini Fluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Rachid KHELFAOUI; Boumedienne BENYOUCEF; Brahim, DENNAI; Abdelhak MAAZOUZI

    2007-01-01

    The fluidic oscillator is a new micro-scale actuator developed for flow control applications. Mixing in micro channels is an important problem because the flow is always laminar flow even though the velocity may be high. The principal constraints when designing a mixer are the flow rate required through that particular section of the micro-device, the fluid properties of the streams to be mixed and the desired level of mixing. This paper describes a new actuator for flow mixing applications w...

  5. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention...... is adapted to receive one or more replaceable solid support(s) (40) onto which chemical entities (41) are attached, said device comprising a base (1, 60, 80, 300, 400, 10, 70, 140, 20, 90, 120, 150, 30, 100), one or more inlet(s) (5), one or more outlet(s) (6). The base and the solid support (40) defines......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  6. CFD Analysis of the Safety Injection Tank and Fluidic Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Oan; Nietiadi, Yohanes Setiawan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Addad, Yacine [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-05-15

    One of the most important components in the ECCS is the safety injection tank (SIT). Inside the SIT, a fluidic device is installed, which passively controls the mass flow of the safety injection and eliminates the need for low pressure safety injection pumps. As more passive safety mechanisms are being pursued, it has become more important to understand flow structure and the loss mechanism within the fluidic device. Current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations have had limited success in predicting the fluid flow accurately. This study proposes to find a more exact result using CFD and more realistic modeling to predict the performance during accident scenarios more accurately. The safety injection tank with fluidic device was analyzed thoroughly using CFD. The preliminary calculation used 60,000 meshes for the initial test calculation. The results fit the experimental results surprisingly despite its coarse grid. Nonetheless, the mesh resolution was increased to capture the vortex in the fluidic device precisely. Once a detailed CFD computation is finished, a small-scale experiment will be conducted for the given conditions. Using the experimental results and the CFD model, physical models can be improved to fit the results more accurately.

  7. Customizable 3D Printed ?Plug and Play? Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Jaffery, Hussain; Doran, David; Hezwani, Mohammad; Robbins, Phillip J.; Yoshida, Mari; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM)-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as wate...

  8. Dynamics of fluidic devices with applications to rotor pitch links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarborough, Lloyd H., III

    Coupling a Fluidic Flexible Matrix Composite (F2MC) to an air-pressurized fluid port produces a fundamentally new class of tunable vibration isolator. This fluidlastic device provides significant vibration reduction at an isolation frequency that can be tuned over a broad frequency range. The material properties and geometry of the F2MC element, as well as the port inertance, determine the isolation frequency. A unique feature of this device is that the port inertance depends on pressure so the isolation frequency can be adjusted by changing the air pressure. For constant port inertance, the isolation frequency is largely independent of the isolated mass so the device is robust to changes in load. A nonlinear model is developed to predict isolator length and port inertance. The model is linearized and the frequency response calculated. Experiments agree with theory, demonstrating a tunable isolation range from 9 Hz to 36 Hz and transmitted force reductions of up to 60 dB at the isolation frequency. Replacing rigid pitch links on rotorcraft with coupled fluidic devices has the potential to reduce the aerodynamic blade loads transmitted through the pitch links to the swashplate. Analytical models of two fluidic devices coupled with three different fluidic circuits are derived. These passive fluidlastic systems are tuned, by varying the fluid inertances and capacitances of each fluidic circuit, to reduce the transmitted pitch-link loads. The different circuit designs result in transmitted pitch link loads reduction at up to three main rotor harmonics. The simulation results show loads reduction at the targeted out-of-phase and in-phase harmonics of up to 88% and 93%, respectively. Experimental validation of two of the fluidic circuits demonstrates loads reduction of up to 89% at the out-of-phase isolation frequencies and up to 81% at the in-phase isolation frequencies. Replacing rigid pitch links on rotorcraft with fluidic pitch links changes the blade torsional

  9. Chips: How to build and implement fluidic devices in flow based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Víctor; Avivar, Jessica; Moreno, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The development of automatic analyzers based on flow techniques involves the use and continuous innovation of fluidic devices. New trends tend toward miniaturization of sophisticated fluidic platforms requiring continuous advances in this field. The availability of a mechanic and electronic workshop together with the know-how to build new fluidic devices provides the tools for the creation of innovative instrumentation and stimulates the creativity of analytical chemists. Thus, in this review we present how to build and use flow-based fluidic devices, together with the tools required, such as computerized controlled lathes, milling machines, laser engraver machines, low-temperature co-fired ceramics technology and 3D printers, highlighting their strong and weak points. In addition, some flow based methods exploiting innovative fluidic platforms are also presented as a way of example of the possible devices these tools can provide and their potential applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Separation control with fluidic oscillators in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H.-J.; Woszidlo, R.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2017-08-01

    The present study assesses the applicability of fluidic oscillators for separation control in water. The first part of this work evaluates the properties of the fluidic oscillators including frequency, cavitation effects, and exerted thrust. Derived from the governing internal dynamics, the oscillation frequency is found to scale directly with the jet's exit velocity and the size of the fluidic oscillator independent of the working fluid. Frequency data from various experiments collapse onto a single curve. The occurrence of cavitation is examined by visual inspection and hydrophone measurements. The oscillation frequency is not affected by cavitation because it does not occur inside the oscillators. The spectral information obtained with the hydrophone provide a reliable indicator for the onset of cavitation at the exit. The performance of the fluidic oscillators for separation control on a bluff body does not seem to be affected by the presence of cavitation. The thrust exerted by an array of fluidic oscillators with water as the working fluid is measured to be even larger than theoretically estimated values. The second part of the presented work compares the performance of fluidic oscillators for separation control in water with previous results in air. The array of fluidic oscillators is installed into the rear end of a bluff body model. The drag improvements based on force balance measurements agree well with previous wind tunnel experiments on the same model. The flow field is examined by pressure measurements and with particle image velocimetry. Similar performance and flow field characteristics are observed in both water and air.

  11. Formation and Control of Fluidic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Darren Roy (Inventor); Weitz, David A. (Inventor); Marquez-Sanchez, Manuel (Inventor); Cheng, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention generally relates to systems and methods for the formation and/or control of fluidic species, and articles produced by such systems and methods. In some cases, the invention involves unique fluid channels, systems, controls, and/or restrictions, and combinations thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention allows fluidic streams (which can be continuous or discontinuous, i.e., droplets) to be formed and/or combined, at a variety of scales, including microfluidic scales. In one set of embodiments, a fluidic stream may be produced from a channel, where a cross-sectional dimension of the fluidic stream is smaller than that of the channel, for example, through the use of structural elements, other fluids, and/or applied external fields, etc. In some cases, a Taylor cone may be produced. In another set of embodiments, a fluidic stream may be manipulated in some fashion, for example, to create tubes (which may be hollow or solid), droplets, nested tubes or droplets, arrays of tubes or droplets, meshes of tubes, etc. In some cases, droplets produced using certain embodiments of the invention may be charged or substantially charged, which may allow their further manipulation, for instance, using applied external fields. Non-limiting examples of such manipulations include producing charged droplets, coalescing droplets (especially at the microscale), synchronizing droplet formation, aligning molecules within the droplet, etc. In some cases, the droplets and/or the fluidic streams may include colloids, cells, therapeutic agents, and the like.

  12. Rapid development of paper-based fluidic diagnostic devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available DEVELOPMENT OF PAPER-BASED FLUIDIC DIAGNOSTIC DEVICES S. Smith1*, H. Chen2, K. Moodley3, T. Joubert4 & K. Land5 1-5Department of Materials Science and Manufacturing Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, South Africa 1ssmith@csir.co.za,2jchen...

  13. Development of fluidic device in SIT for Korean Next Generation Reactor I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Bong Hyun; Lee, Joon; Bae, Yoon Young; Park, Jong Kyun

    1999-07-01

    The KNGR is to install a Fluidic Device at the bottom of the inner space of the SIT (Safety Injection Tank) to control the flow rate of safety injection coolant from SIT during LBLOCA. During the past two years, a scale model test to obtain the required flow characteristics of the device under the KNGR specific conditions has been performed using the experience and existing facility of AEA Technology (UK) with appropriate modifications. The performance verification test is to be performed this year to obtain optimum characteristics and design data of full size fluidic device. The purpose of the model test was to check the feasibility of developing the device and to produce a generic flow characteristic data. The test was performed in approximately 1/7 scale in terms of flow rate with full height and pressure. This report presents the details ofsystem performance requirements for the device, design procedure for the fluidic device to be used, test facility and test method. The time dependent flow, pressure and Euler number are presented as characteristics curves and the most stable and the most effective flow control characteristic parameters were recommended through the evaluation. A method to predict the size of the fluidic device is presented. And a sizing algorithm, which can be used to conveniently determine the major geometric data of the device for various operating conditions, and a FORTRAN program to produce the prediction of performance curves have been developed. (author). 32 refs., 15 tabs., 47 figs.

  14. Topology optimization of flexible micro-fluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreissl, Sebastian; Pingen, Georg; Evgrafov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    A multi-objective topology optimization formulation for the design of dynamically tunable fluidic devices is presented. The flow is manipulated via external and internal mechanical actuation, leading to elastic deformations of flow channels. The design objectives characterize the performance...... in the undeformed and deformed configurations. The layout of fluid channels is determined by material topology optimization. In addition, the thickness distribution, the distribution of active material for internal actuation, and the support conditions are optimized. The coupled fluid-structure response...

  15. Performance Study of a Fluidic Hammer Controlled by an Output-Fed Bistable Fluidic Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a no-moving-component output-fed bistable fluidic oscillator to control fluid flows into a parallel path has been recognized for a considerable time, but as yet it is not so widely adopted as its obvious benefits would deserve. This may be attributed to the encountered problems associated with its jet behavior, complicated by its loading characteristics. In order to investigate a typical case for the application of the output-fed fluidic oscillator, this paper elaborates on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation method for studying the performance of a fluidic hammer controlled by an output-fed bistable fluidic oscillator. Given that couple mechanism exists between the flow field in the fluidic oscillator and the impact body, dynamic mesh technique and a user-defined function written in C programming language were used to update the mesh in the simulations. In terms of the evaluation of performance, the focus is on the single-impact energy and output power of the fluidic hammer in this study, to investigate the effect of different parameters of the impact body on them. Experimental tests based on the noncontact measuring method were conducted to verify the simulation results, by which the accuracy and reliability of this CFD simulation method was proved.

  16. A 3D printed fluidic device that enables integrated features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kari B; Lockwood, Sarah Y; Martin, R Scott; Spence, Dana M

    2013-06-18

    Fluidic devices fabricated using conventional soft lithography are well suited as prototyping methods. Three-dimensional (3D) printing, commonly used for producing design prototypes in industry, allows for one step production of devices. 3D printers build a device layer by layer based on 3D computer models. Here, a reusable, high throughput, 3D printed fluidic device was created that enables flow and incorporates a membrane above a channel in order to study drug transport and affect cells. The device contains 8 parallel channels, 3 mm wide by 1.5 mm deep, connected to a syringe pump through standard, threaded fittings. The device was also printed to allow integration with commercially available membrane inserts whose bottoms are constructed of a porous polycarbonate membrane; this insert enables molecular transport to occur from the channel to above the well. When concentrations of various antibiotics (levofloxacin and linezolid) are pumped through the channels, approximately 18-21% of the drug migrates through the porous membrane, providing evidence that this device will be useful for studies where drug effects on cells are investigated. Finally, we show that mammalian cells cultured on this membrane can be affected by reagents flowing through the channels. Specifically, saponin was used to compromise cell membranes, and a fluorescent label was used to monitor the extent, resulting in a 4-fold increase in fluorescence for saponin treated cells.

  17. Customizable 3D Printed ‘Plug and Play’ Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Jaffery, Hussain; Doran, David; Hezwani, Mohammad; Robbins, Phillip J.; Yoshida, Mari; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM)-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O) droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves. PMID:26558389

  18. Customizable 3D Printed 'Plug and Play' Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Soichiro; Jaffery, Hussain; Doran, David; Hezwani, Mohammad; Robbins, Phillip J; Yoshida, Mari; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM)-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O) droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves.

  19. Customizable 3D Printed 'Plug and Play' Millifluidic Devices for Programmable Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Tsuda

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D printing is actively sought after in recent years as a promising novel technology to construct complex objects, which scope spans from nano- to over millimeter scale. Previously we utilized Fused deposition modeling (FDM-based 3D printer to construct complex 3D chemical fluidic systems, and here we demonstrate the construction of 3D milli-fluidic structures for programmable liquid handling and control of biological samples. Basic fluidic operation devices, such as water-in-oil (W/O droplet generators for producing compartmentalized mono-disperse droplets, sensor-integrated chamber for online monitoring of cellular growth, are presented. In addition, chemical surface treatment techniques are used to construct valve-based flow selector for liquid flow control and inter-connectable modular devices for networking fluidic parts. As such this work paves the way for complex operations, such as mixing, flow control, and monitoring of reaction / cell culture progress can be carried out by constructing both passive and active components in 3D printed structures, which designs can be shared online so that anyone with 3D printers can reproduce them by themselves.

  20. Fluidic Oscillator Having Decoupled Frequency and Amplitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koklu, Mehti (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A fluidic oscillator having independent frequency and amplitude control includes a fluidic-oscillator main flow channel having a main flow inlet, a main flow outlet, and first and second control ports disposed at opposing sides thereof. A fluidic-oscillator controller has an inlet and outlet. A volume defined by the main flow channel is greater than the volume defined by the controller. A flow diverter coupled to the outlet of the controller defines a first fluid flow path from the controller's outlet to the first control port and defines a second fluid flow path from the controller's outlet to the second control port.

  1. Compact Fluidic Actuator Arrays For Flow Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the proposed research is to design, develop and demonstrate fluidic actuator arrays for aerodynamic separation control and drag reduction....

  2. Compact Fluidic Actuator Arrays for Flow Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the proposed research is to design, develop and demonstrate fluidic actuator arrays for aerodynamic separation control and drag reduction....

  3. Separation of Cells using a Fluidic MEMS Device and a Quantitative Analysis of Cell Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Takaaki; Ishida, Yasuaki

    Fluidic micro electro mechanical system (fluidic MEMS) devices, composed of a micro pump, mixer, valve, reactor, sensor and an electric circuit on a chip, have been widely applied in biotechnology and medical analyses. This study describes the design and fabrication of a fluidic MEMS device that can separate living leukocyte cells from a single droplet of blood (red corpuscles flowed toward the exit of the fluidic MEMS device. The separation rate of the red corpuscles has been achieved to 91 ± 9% in a unit area of 0.1 mm2. Further, the change in an area of a living leukocyte cell separated in the chip, was quantitatively analyzed. This study proposes a method for separating and measuring living cells in a fluidic MEMS device.

  4. Investigation of Combustion Control in a Dump Combustor Using the Feedback Free Fluidic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.; Casiano, Matthew J.; Anderson, William E.; Heister, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A feedback free fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into a single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. The fluidic oscillator uses internal fluid dynamics to create an unsteady outlet jet at a specific frequency. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the combustor dump plane. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide with an overall O/F ratio of 11.7. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics enabling the study of a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared against equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 67% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. Additionally, computational fluid dynamics analysis of the combustor gives insight into the flow field interaction of the fluidic oscillators. The results indicate that open loop high frequency propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate.

  5. Nano scale devices: Fabrication, actuation, and related fluidic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hao

    Using external actuating magnetic fields to manipulate magnetic parts is an efficient method to manipulate mesoscopic actable devices. Extensive researches have explored the potentials of self-assembly techniques based on capillary force, static charge force, drying, surface tension, and even dynamic fields as a low cost method for ordered 2D or 3D super-lattice structures for new materials and devices. But the ability of tunable patterning nano-particles for designed actable devices is still a requirement yet to be met. Utilizing anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes as templates, soft-magnetic nanowires around 200 nm in diameter, 10 microns long have been fabricated. In this thesis, I describe a method to assemble these magnetic nanowires into a two dimension Wigner structure, of which the wire-wire distance is conveniently adjustable during the fabrication procedure. Using geometric tailored magnetic fields, we can plant these self-assembled magnetic nanowires with desired patterns into a thin soft polymer support layer. The final devices may be readily actuated by an external actuating magnetic field (a self-designed magnetic system, 3-dimensional force microscope (3DFM)) with precise patterns and frequencies in a micro-fluidic system. This method offers a general method to fabricate mesoscopic devices from a wide range of materials with magnetic dipoles to desired structures. And the actable devices themselves can find direct usage in low Re number flow mixing and bio-physical fluidic dynamic researches. The beating of cilia and flagella, slender cylinders 250 nanometers in diameter with lengths from 7 to 50 microns, is responsible for many important biological functions such as organism feeding, propulsion, for bacterial clearance in the lungs and for the right-left asymmetry in vertebrates. The hydrodynamics produced by these beating structures, including mixing, shear and extensional flows, is not understood. We developed an experimental model system for

  6. Integrated component fluidic servovalves and position control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormley, D. N.; Lee, K. M.

    1983-04-01

    The operating characteristics of fluidic laminar proportional amplifier (+PA's) operating on hydraulic oil have been determined as a function of pressure and temperature. The useful operating range of these elements has been defined for application in multistage gain blocks and summing amplifiers. An operational servovalve constructed from LPA's has been developed and coupled with a fluidic position feedback transducer, summing amplifier and ram to construct a closed loop position control system. Static and dynamic experimental evaluation of the servosystem has shown that its performance is comparable to that of a servo employing electrohydraulic components. This development effort has demonstrated the capability to develop high performance, closed loop servo components from standard, integrated component fluidic elements.

  7. A multiscale fluidic device for the study of dendrite-mediated cell to cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Sean; Majeska, Robert; Schaffler, Mitchell; Vazquez, Maribel

    2017-08-08

    Many cell types communicate by means of dendritic extensions via a multi-tiered set of geometric and chemical cues. Until recently, mimicking the compartmentalized in vivo cellular environment of dendrite-expressing cells such as osteocytes and motor neurons in a spatially and temporally controllable manner was limited by the challenges of in vitro device fabrication at submicron scales. Utilizing the improved resolution of current fabrication technology, we have designed a multiscale device, the Macro-micro-nano system, or Mμn, composed of two distinct cell-seeding and interrogation compartments separated by a nanochannel array. The array enables dendrite ingrowth, while providing a mechanism for fluidic sequestration and/or temporally-mediated diffusible signaling between cell populations. Modeling of the Mμn system predicted the ability to isolate diffusible signals, namely ATP. Empirical diffusion studies verified computational modeling. In addition, cell viability, dendrite interaction with the nanoarray, and cellular purinergic response to heat shock were experimentally evaluated within the device for both osteocytes and motor neurons. Our results describe a novel in vitro system in which dendrite-expressing cell types can be studied within nano-environments that mimic in vivo conditions. In particular, the Mμn system enables real-time observation of cell to cell communication between cell populations in distinct, but fluidically coupled regions.

  8. Investigation of combustion control in a dump combustor using the feedback free fluidic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.

    The feedback free fluidic oscillator uses the unsteady nature of two colliding jets to create a single oscillating outlet jet with a wide sweep angle. These devices have the potential to provide additional combustion control, boundary layer control, thrust vectoring, and industrial flow deflection. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, CFD, was used to analyze the jet oscillation frequency over a range of operating conditions and to determine the effect that geometric changes in the oscillator design have on the frequency. Results presented illustrate the changes in jet oscillation frequency with gas type, gas temperature, operating pressure, pressure ratio across the oscillator, aspect ratio of the oscillator, and the frequency trends with various changes to the oscillator geometry. A fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the dump plane using 15% of the oxidizer flow. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide at an O/F of 11.66. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics for studying a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared with equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 60% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. The results indicate open loop propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, 3-D CFD, was conducted to determine the

  9. Numerical Simulation of Fluidic Actuators for Flow Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Veer N.; Koklu, Mehti; Wygnanski, Israel L.; Fares, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Active flow control technology is finding increasing use in aerospace applications to control flow separation and improve aerodynamic performance. In this paper we examine the characteristics of a class of fluidic actuators that are being considered for active flow control applications for a variety of practical problems. Based on recent experimental work, such actuators have been found to be more efficient for controlling flow separation in terms of mass flow requirements compared to constant blowing and suction or even synthetic jet actuators. The fluidic actuators produce spanwise oscillating jets, and therefore are also known as sweeping jets. The frequency and spanwise sweeping extent depend on the geometric parameters and mass flow rate entering the actuators through the inlet section. The flow physics associated with these actuators is quite complex and not fully understood at this time. The unsteady flow generated by such actuators is simulated using the lattice Boltzmann based solver PowerFLOW R . Computed mean and standard deviation of velocity profiles generated by a family of fluidic actuators in quiescent air are compared with experimental data. Simulated results replicate the experimentally observed trends with parametric variation of geometry and inflow conditions.

  10. 'My sweat my health': Real time sweat analysis using wearable micro-fluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Curto, Vincenzo F.; Angelov, Nikolay; Coyle, Shirley; Byrne, Robert; Hughes, Sarah; Moyna, Niall; Diamond, Dermot; Benito-Lopez, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In this work a robust, non-invasive and wearable micro-fluidic system was developed and employed to analyse pH of sweat in real time during exercise. The device is incorporated in an optical detection platform designed to provide real-time information on sweat composition. The device has been tested by monitoring the pH of sweat during 55 minutes of cycling activity. During these trials, the data obtained by the micro-fluidic system was compared to pH measurements obtained in parallel studies...

  11. Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Majumdar, Arunava [Orinda, CA; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA; Karnik, Rohit [Cambridge, MA

    2011-03-01

    Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

  12. "Fluidic batteries" as low-cost sources of power in paper-based microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Nicole K; Yeung, Kimy; Pillion, Marley B; Phillips, Scott T

    2012-04-24

    This communication describes the first paper-based microfluidic device that is capable of generating its own power when a sample is added to the device. The microfluidic device contains galvanic cells (that we term "fluidic batteries") integrated directly into the microfluidic channels, which provides a direct link between a power source and an analytical function within the device. This capability is demonstrated using an example device that simultaneously powers a surface-mount UV LED and conducts an on-chip fluorescence assay.

  13. Investigation of injection molding of orthogonal fluidic connector for microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Cao, Dong; Zhao, Wei; Song, Man-cang; Liu, Jun-shan

    2017-02-01

    Orthogonal fluidic connections are essential for developing multilayered microfluidic devices. At present, most orthogonal connectors are realized by a horizontal channel and a vertical channel in different plates. Therefore, some extra alignment and adhesion processes for precise plate assembly are required. In this paper, the method of injection molding is proposed to make a one-body-type orthogonal connector in a single plastic plate. The connector was composed of a cantilevered tube and the other in the substrate. An injection mold was developed in which a side core-pulling mechanism and an ejection mechanism of push-pipes were combined to form the mold for an orthogonal connector. Both the type and the location of gate were optimized for the mold. The results showed that the fan gate in the middle position of the plate was the most suitable in term of both defect control and practicability. The effect of melt temperature was numerically investigated and then verified experimentally. With the optimized parameters, the relative length and the relative wall thickness of a cantilevered tube in the plastic part can reach 98.89% and 99.80%, respectively. Furthermore, using the plastic part as a cover plate, a three-layer plastic microfluidic device was conveniently fabricated for electrochemical detection.

  14. Optimal Control of Airfoil Flow Separation using Fluidic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi, Arireza F.

    This thesis deals with the control of flow separation around a symmetric airfoils with the aid of multiple synthetic jet actuators (SJAs). CFD simulation methods have been implemented to uncover the flow separation regimes and associated properties such as frequencies and momentum ratio. In the first part of the study, the SJA was studied thoroughly. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were performed for one individual cavity; the time history of SJA of the outlet velocity profile and the net momentum imparted to the flow were analyzed. The studied SJA is asymmetrical and operates with the aid of a piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic circular plate actuator. A three-dimensional mesh for the computational domain of the SJA and the surrounding volume was developed and was used to evaluate the details of the airflow conditions inside the SJA as well as at the outlet. The vibration of the PZT ceramic actuator was used as a boundary condition in the computational model to drive the SJA. Particular attention was given to developing a predictive model of the SJA outlet velocity. Results showed that the SJA velocity output is correlated to the PZT ceramic plate vibration, especially for the first frequency mode. SJAs are a particular class of zero net mass flux (ZNMF) fluidic devices with net imparted momentum to the flow. The net momentum imparted to the flow in the separated region is such that positive enhancement during AFC operations is achieved. Flows around the NACA 0015 airfoil were simulated for a range of operating conditions. Attention was given to the active open and closed loop control solutions for an airfoil with SJA at different angles of attack and flap angles. A large number of simulations using RANS & LES models were performed to study the effects of the momentum ratio (Cμ) in the range of 0 to 11% and of the non-dimensional frequency, F+, in the range of 0 to 2 for the control of flow separation at a practical angle of attack and flap angle. The optimum value of C

  15. Fabrication of fluidic devices with 30 nm nanochannels by direct imprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Palmarelli, Anna Laura; Liang, Xiaogan

    2011-01-01

    . Furthermore, the devices are made of all-transparent materials, and the method allows flexibility for the type of substrates used. The active material (an inorganic-organic hybrid polymer) used for the fabrication of the device has been carefully chosen, so it has adequate surface properties (inert...... and hydrophilic) for its direct use for biological applications. Devices having 30 nm wide, 30 nm deep nanochannels have been fabricated, and the successful performance of the fluidic system and the continuity of the nanochannels have been proven by flow tests. © 2011 American Vacuum Society....

  16. An in-mold packaging process for plastic fluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y E; Lee, K H; Je, T J; Choi, D S; Kim, S K

    2011-01-01

    Micro or nanofluidic devices have many channel shapes to deliver chemical solutions, body fluids or any fluids. The channels in these devices should be covered to prevent the fluids from overflowing or leaking. A typical method to fabricate an enclosed channel is to bond or weld a cover plate to a channel plate. This solid-to-solid bonding process, however, takes a considerable amount of time for mass production. In this study, a new process for molding a cover layer that can enclose open micro or nanochannels without solid-to-solid bonding is proposed and its feasibility is estimated. First, based on the design of a model microchannel, a brass microchannel master core was machined and a plastic microchannel platform was injection-molded. Using this molded platform, a series of experiments was performed for four process or mold design parameters. Some feasible conditions were successfully found to enclosed channels without filling the microchannels for the injection molding of a cover layer over the plastic microchannel platform. In addition, the bond strength and seal performance were estimated in a comparison with those done by conventional bonding or welding processes.

  17. Closed-cycle power supply for fluidic control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.; Mangion, C.

    1972-01-01

    Power supply utilizes small quantities of two-phase fluid of suitable thermodynamic properties for circulation in a capillary-pumped heat transfer loop. Fluid is vaporized in evaporator, passed through fluidic system load, condensed, pumped by multistage capillary pump, and returned to the evaporator.

  18. Novel High Precision Optoelectronic Device Fabrication Technique Using Guided Fluidic Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brahm Pal; Onozawa, Kazutoshi; Yamanaka, Kazuhiko; Tojo, Tomaki; Ueda, Daisuke

    High precision assembly of laser diodes (LDs) on silicon wafer substrates for use in advanced optoelectronic devices is an important issue from a mass production point of view. An acceptable alternative to replace an obsolete pick and place flip chip bonding robotic technology with a simple, low cost and high speed technique is desired for industrial applications. We have investigated a novel assembling technique with micrometer order accuracy for LDs and other microchips. Its feasibility for rapidly assembling a large number of high power edge emitting LDs is practically demonstrated. A 150 mUm thick nickel metal mask is used to confine as well as guide the unassembled LDs into the recesses by its restricted displacements. This technique is based on guiding the LDs within a suitable fluidic medium and the assembling process is performed in two steps: (i) coarse precision with a confinement mask to bring LDs near the recesses to achieve high assembling efficiency and (ii) fine precision due to the electrode patterns on the base surface of LDs, under fluidic as well as gravitational force. The assembly of 80 red LDs of the same size and of 40 pairs of red and infrared LDs of two different sizes is successfully demonstrated within less than ±2 mUm precision and 100% efficiency in a few seconds after transferring them into a confinement mask region.

  19. Development of a millimetrically scaled biodiesel transesterification device that relies on droplet-based co-axial fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, S. I.; Huang, Y. C.; Cheng, C. H.; Cheng, C. M.; Yang, J. T.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated a fluidic system that adheres to new concepts of energy production. To improve efficiency, cost, and ease of manufacture, a millimetrically scaled device that employs a droplet-based co-axial fluidic system was devised to complete alkali-catalyzed transesterification for biodiesel production. The large surface-to-volume ratio of the droplet-based system, and the internal circulation induced inside the moving droplets, significantly enhanced the reaction rate of immiscible liquids used here - soybean oil and methanol. This device also decreased the molar ratio between methanol and oil to near the stoichiometric coefficients of a balanced chemical equation, which enhanced the total biodiesel volume produced, and decreased the costs of purification and recovery of excess methanol. In this work, the droplet-based co-axial fluidic system performed better than other methods of continuous-flow production. We achieved an efficiency that is much greater than that of reported systems. This study demonstrated the high potential of droplet-based fluidic chips for energy production. The small energy consumption and low cost of the highly purified biodiesel transesterification system described conforms to the requirements of distributed energy (inexpensive production on a moderate scale) in the world.

  20. Fluidics: Basic components and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, J. W.

    1983-08-01

    Since its discovery at Harry Diamond Lab. in 1959, fluidics has gradually been developed into a viable technology. This report describes fluidic components and systems now in use or ready for use in many applications. The fluidic technology provides sensing, computing, and controlling functions with fluid power through interaction of fluid streams. Since fluidics can perform these functions without mechanical moving parts that will wear out, it has the advantages of simplicity and reliability. Other advantages are the low cost, environmental insensitivity, and safety of fluidic systems. Commercial applications of fluidics in the aerospace industry, include medicine, and personal-use items. The first aerospace application in production in the United States was for the thrust-reverser control for a DC-10 airplane. In industry, fluidics has been applied to air-conditioning controls, machine controls, process controls, and production-line controls. One of the first commercial applications of fluidics was for life-support medical equipment. For military use, fluidics has been successfully applied to a fluidic generator to convert pneumatic energy into electrical energy, a fluidic stability augmentation system for helicopters, and a pressure-regulating system for aircraft. Under development are rate sensing circuits for roll rate control of cannon-launched guided projectiles and missiles, and a fluidic capillary pyrometer for continuous temperature measurements in high-temperature process control.

  1. Organic Solvent and Surfactant Resistant Paper-Fluidic Devices Fabricated by One-Step Embossing of Nonwoven Polypropylene Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Ho Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, we report a physical method for the fabrication of organic solvent and surfactant-resistant barriers on paper-based fluidic devices. When nonwoven polypropylene sheet is embossed with a steel mold, the embossed region acts as a physical barrier that can prevent the flow of liquids. Embossed polypropylene barriers not only block water, but also block organic solvents and surfactants, which are known to be difficult to handle on previous paper-based devices. Various amounts of embossing pressures were tested to determine the minimum embossing pressure required for leakproof barrier formation. The compatibility of the barrier was also investigated with several surfactants and organic solvents. As a demonstration, a lysis buffer, which was known to leak through wax-printed barriers, was used to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli O157:H7. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first to report a one-step fabrication method of paper-fluidic devices capable of handling surfactants and organic solvents, including alcohols.

  2. Experimental control of a fluidic pinball using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raibaudo, Cedric; Zhong, Peng; Noack, Bernd R.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    The wake stabilization of a triangular cluster of three rotating cylinders was investigated in the present study. Experiments were performed at Reynolds number Re 6000, and compared with URANS-2D simulations at same flow conditions. 2D2C PIV measurements and constant temperature anemometry were used to characterize the flow without and with actuation. Open-loop actuation was first considered for the identification of particular control strategies. Machine learning control was also implemented for the experimental study. Linear genetic programming has been used for the optimization of open-loop parameters and closed-loop controllers. Considering a cost function J based on the fluctuations of the velocity measured by the hot-wire sensor, significant performances were achieved using the machine learning approach. The present work is supported by the senior author's (R. J. Martinuzzi) NSERC discovery Grant. C. Raibaudo acknowledges the financial support of the University of Calgary Eyes-High PDF program.

  3. Field-effect flow control for microfabricated fluidic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.; Schlautmann, Stefan; Hendrikse, J.; van den Berg, Albert

    1999-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) inside a microfabricated fluid channel can be controlled by a perpendicular electric field of 1.5 megavolts per centimeter generated by a voltage of only 50 volts. A microdevice called a "flowFET," with functionality comparable to that of

  4. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  5. Manipulating fluids: Advances in micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh

    This dissertation describes work in three inter-related areas---micro-fluidics, opto-fluidics and fluidic self-assembly. Micro-fluidics has gotten a boost in recent years with the development of multilayered elastomeric devices made of poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), allowing active elements like valves and pumps. However, while PDMS has many advantages, it is not resistant to organic solvents. New materials and/or new designs are needed for solvent resistance. I describe how novel fluorinated elastomers can replace PDMS when combined with the three dimensional (3-D) solid printing. I also show how another 3-D fabrication method, multilayer photo-lithography, allows for fabrication of devices integrating filters. In general, 3-D fabrications allow new kinds of micro-fluidic devices to be made that would be impossible to emulate with two dimensional chips. In opto-fluidics, I describe a number of experiments with quantum dots both inside and outside chips. Inside chips, I manipulate quantum dots using hydrodynamic focusing to pattern fine lines, like a barcode. Outside chips, I describe our attempts to create quantum dot composites with micro-spheres. I also show how evaporated gold films and chemical passivation can then be used to enhance the emission of quantum dots. Finally, within fluids, self assembly is an attractive way to manipulate materials, and I provide two examples: first, a DNA-based energy transfer molecule that relies on quantum mechanics and self-assembles inside fluids. This kind of molecular photonics mimics parts of the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and bacteria. The second example of self-assembly in fluids describes a new phenomena---the surface tension mediated self assembly of particles like quantum dots and micro-spheres into fine lines. This self assembly by capillary flows can be combined with photo-lithography, and is expected to find use in future nano- and micro-fabrication schemes. In conclusion, advances in fludics, integrating

  6. Graphene and permalloy integration in functional fluidic and solid-state devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beld, Wesley Theodorus Eduardus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work of this thesis is to develop novel technologies for functional micro- and nanofluidic devices, as well as exploring the functionality of first examples of such devices. The research thereby is mainly centered round graphene,and involved its synthesis, device fabrication, raman

  7. Robust and Optimal Control of Magnetic Microparticles inside Fluidic Channels with Time-Varying Flow Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam S.M. Khalil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy using magnetic microparticles and nanoparticles has the potential to mitigate the negative side-effects associated with conventional medical treatment. Major technological challenges still need to be addressed in order to translate these particles into in vivo applications. For example, magnetic particles need to be navigated controllably in vessels against flowing streams of body fluid. This paper describes the motion control of paramagnetic microparticles in the flowing streams of fluidic channels with time-varying flow rates (maximum flow is 35 ml.hr−1. This control is designed using a magnetic-based proportional-derivative (PD control system to compensate for the time-varying flow inside the channels (with width and depth of 2 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. First, we achieve point-to-point motion control against and along flow rates of 4 ml.hr−1, 6 ml.hr−1, 17 ml.hr−1, and 35 ml.hr−1. The average speeds of single microparticle (with average diameter of 100 μm against flow rates of 6 ml.hr−1 and 30 ml.hr−1 are calculated to be 45 μm.s−1 and 15 μm.s−1, respectively. Second, we implement PD control with disturbance estimation and compensation. This control decreases the steady-state error by 50%, 70%, 73%, and 78% at flow rates of 4 ml.hr−1, 6 ml.hr−1, 17 ml.hr−1, and 35 ml.hr−1, respectively. Finally, we consider the problem of finding the optimal path (minimal kinetic energy between two points using calculus of variation, against the mentioned flow rates. Not only do we find that an optimal path between two collinear points with the direction of maximum flow (middle of the fluidic channel decreases the rise time of the microparticles, but we also decrease the input current that is supplied to the electromagnetic coils by minimizing the kinetic energy of the microparticles, compared to a PD control with disturbance compensation.

  8. Flash μ-fluidics: a rapid prototyping method for fabricating microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Buttner, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidics has advanced in terms of design and structures; however, fabrication methods are time-consuming or expensive relative to facility costs and equipment needed. This work demonstrates a fast and economically viable 2D/3D maskless digital light-projection method based on a stereolithography process. Unlike other fabrication methods, one exposure step is used to form the whole device. Flash microfluidics is achieved by incorporating bonding and channel fabrication of complex structures in just 2.5 s to 4 s and by fabricating channel heights between 25 μm and 150 μm with photopolymer resin. The features of this fabrication technique, such as time and cost saving and easy fabrication, are used to build devices that are mostly needed in microfluidic/lab-on-chip systems. Due to the fast production method and low initial setup costs, the process could be used for point of care applications. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Nanobiomimetic Active Shape Control - Fluidic and Swarm-Intelligence Embodiments for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoli, S.

    The concepts of Active Shape Control ( ASC ) and of Generalized Quantum Holography ( GQH ), respectively embodying a closer approach to biomimicry than the current macrophysics-based attempts at bioinspired robotic systems, and realizing a non-connectionistic, life-like kind of information processing that allows increasingly depths of mimicking of the biological structure-function solidarity, which have been formulated in physical terms in previous papers, are here further investigated for application to bioinspired flying or swimming robots for planetary exploration. It is shown that nano-to-micro integration would give the deepest level of biomimicry, and that both low and very low Reynolds number ( Re ) fluidics would involve GQH and Fiber Bundle Topology ( FBT ) for processing information at the various levels of ASC bioinspired robotics. While very low Re flows lend themselves to geometrization of microrobot dynamics and to FBT design, the general design problem is geometrized through GQH , i.e. made independent of dynamic considerations, thus allowing possible problems of semantic dyscrasias in highly complex hierarchical dynamical chains of sensing information processing actuating to be overcome. A roadmap to near- and medium-term nanostructured and nano-to-micro integration realizations is suggested.

  10. Fabrication, sensation and control of fluidic elastomer actuators and their application towards hand orthotics and prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huichan

    Due to their continuous and natural motion, fluidic elastomer actuators (FEAs) have shown potential in a range of robotic applications including prosthetics and orthotics. Despite their advantages and rapid developments, robots using these actuators still have several challenging issues to be addressed. First, the reliable production of low cost and complex actuators that can apply high forces is necessary, yet none of existing fabrication methods are both easy to implement and of high force output. Next, compliant or stretchable sensors that can be embedded into their bodies for sophisticated functions are required, however, many of these sensors suffer from hysteresis, fabrication complexity, chemical safety and environmental instability, and material incompatibility with soft actuators. Finally, feedback control for FEAs is necessary to achieve better performance, but most soft robots are still "open-loop". In this dissertation, I intend to help solve the above issues and drive the applications of soft robotics towards hand orthotics and prosthetics. First, I adapt rotational casting as a new manufacturing method for soft actuators. I present a cuboid soft actuator that can generate a force of >25 N at its tip, a near ten-fold increase over similar actuators previously reported. Next, I propose a soft orthotic finger with position control enabled via embedded optical fiber. I monitor both the static and dynamic states via the optical sensor and achieve the prescribed curvatures accurately and with stability by a gain-scheduled proportional-integral-derivative controller. Then I develop the soft orthotic fingers into a low-cost, closed-loop controlled, soft orthotic glove that can be worn by a typical human hand and helpful for grasping light objects, while also providing finger position control. I achieve motion control with inexpensive, binary pneumatic switches controlled by a simple finite-state-machine. Finally, I report the first use of stretchable optical

  11. Indexing film with a fluidic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Fluidic sensor is used to measure passage of film without mechanical contact with counting device. Same sensor system may be used for different sizes of film. System has two fluidic sensors and operates on principle of electrically recording interruptions in air stream.

  12. Smart Windows: Ultrathin Fluidic Laminates for Large?Area Fa?ade Integration and Smart Windows (Adv. Sci. 3/2017)

    OpenAIRE

    Heiz, Benjamin P. V.; Pan, Zhiwen; Lautenschl?ger, Gerhard; Sirtl, Christin; Kraus, Matthias; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    In article number 1600362, Lothar Wondraczek and co?workers present glass?glass fluidic devices for large?area integration with adaptive fa?ades and smart windows, enabling harnessing and dedicated control of liquids for added functionality in the building envelope by wrapping buildings into a fluidic layer.

  13. Improved DNA extraction efficiency from low level cell numbers using a silica monolith based micro fluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkary, Loay; Kemp, Cordula; Shaw, Kirsty J; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2012-10-31

    The evaluation of a micro fluidic system with an integrated silica monolith for performing DNA extraction from limited biological samples has been carried out. Low DNA target concentrations usually require the addition of carrier RNA to ensure desired extraction efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a micro fluidic extraction system with increasingly efficient extraction performances for biological samples containing DNA without the need of adding carrier nucleic acids. All extracted DNA showed successful amplification via the polymerase chain reaction demonstrating both the effectiveness of the proposed system at removing potential inhibitors and yielding good quality DNA. The work presented here beneficially identifies reduced sample volumes/concentrations as suitable for processing with respect to downstream analysis by enabling pre-concentration of the biological sample, particularly important when dealing with clinical or forensic specimens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Process control device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1994-09-09

    A process control device comprises a memory device for memorizing a plant operation target, a plant state or a state of equipments related with each other as control data, a read-only memory device for storing programs, a plant instrumentation control device or other process control devices, an input/output device for performing input/output with an operator, and a processing device which conducts processing in accordance with the program and sends a control demand or a display demand to the input/output device. The program reads out control data relative to a predetermined operation target, compares and verify them with actual values to read out control data to be a practice premise condition which is further to be a practice premise condition if necessary, thereby automatically controlling the plant or requiring or displaying input. Practice presuming conditions for the operation target can be examined succesively in accordance with the program without constituting complicated logical figures and AND/OR graphs. (N.H.).

  15. Design and implementation of fluidic micro-pulleys for flow control on centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroori, Salar; Kulinsky, Lawrence; Kido, Horacio; Madou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    Microfluidic discs have been employed in a variety of applications for chemical analyses and biological diagnostics. These platforms offer a sophisticated fluidic toolbox, necessary to perform processes that involve sample preparation, purification, analysis, and detection. However, one of the weaknesses of such systems is the uni-directional movement of fluid from the disc center to its periphery due to the uni-directionality of the propelling centrifugal force. Here we demonstrate a mechanism for fluid movement from the periphery of a hydrophobic disc toward its center that does not rely on the energy supplied by any peripheral equipment. This method utilizes a ventless fluidic network that connects a column of working fluid to a sample fluid. As the working fluid is pushed by the centrifugal force to move toward the periphery of the disc, the sample fluid is pulled up toward the center of the disc analogous to a physical pulley where two weights are connected by a rope passed through a block. The ventless network is analogous to the rope in the pulley. As the working fluid descends, it creates a negative pressure that pulls the sample fluid up. The sample and working fluids do not come into direct contact and it allows the freedom to select a working fluid with physical properties markedly different from those of the sample. This article provides a demonstration of the "micro-pulley" on a disc, discusses underlying physical phenomena, provides design guidelines for fabrication of micro-pulleys on discs, and outlines a vision for future micro-pulley applications.

  16. Device Oriented Project Controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  17. Innovative solar control devices

    OpenAIRE

    Erhorn, H.; Erhorn-Kluttig, H.

    2010-01-01

    Buildings are the EU's largest energy users, consuming over 40 % of Europe's total primary energy. One way of cutting this consumption is by avoiding or reducing cooling energy through proper solar shading. This paper presents examples of innovative solar control devices and emphasizes their relevance for the energy performance of buildings.

  18. Radiographic quality control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate eight radiographic quality control (QC) devices, which noninvasively measure the output from a variety of diagnostic x-ray production systems. When used as part of a quality assurance (QA) program, radiographic QC devices help ensure that x-ray equipment is working within acceptable limits. This in turn helps ensure that high-quality images are achieved with appropriate radiation doses and that resources are used efficiently (for example, by minimizing the number of repeat exposures required). Our testing focused on the physical performance, ease of use, and service and maintenance characteristics that affect the use of these devices for periodic, routine measurements of x-ray system parameters. We found that all the evaluated models satisfactorily measure all the parameters normally needed for a QA program. However, we did identify a number of differences among the models--particularly in the range of exposure levels that can be effectively measured and the ease of use. Three models perform well for a variety of applications and are very easy to use; we rate them Preferred. Three additional models have minor limitations but otherwise perform well; we rate them Acceptable. We recommend against purchasing two models because, although each performs acceptably for most applications, neither model can measure low levels of radiation. This Evaluation covers devices designed to measure the output of x-ray tubes noninvasively. These devices, called radiographic quality control (QC) devices, or QC meters, are typically used by medical physicists, x-ray engineers, biomedical engineers, and suitably trained radiographic technologists to make QC measurements. We focus on the use of these devices as part of an overall quality assurance (QA) program. We have not evaluated their use for other applications, such as acceptance testing. To be included in this study, a device must be able to measure the exposure- and kVp-related characteristics of most x

  19. Contaminate Control Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Robert H. (Inventor); Flynn, Kenneth P. (Inventor); Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A contaminate control device for filtering contaminates from a gas such as air is provided. The device includes a housing having a first inlet and a first outlet. An axial flow filter is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the axial flow filter has a second inlet and a second outlet. A second filter disposed about the axial flow filter and is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the second filter having a third inlet on an inner diameter and a third outlet disposed on an outer diameter. A flow restrictor is fluidly coupled between the second inlet and the first inlet.

  20. Cursor Control Device Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Phillips

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of cursor positioning may provide guidelines for improvements in cursor control. Four experiments addressed efficiency of cursor control devices (Mouse, Digitising Pen, Accupoint, Trackball. Participants moved a cursor leftwards, upwards or rightwards, positioning it in large or small targets situated in near or far space on the computer screen. Cursor coordinates were sampled every 5 ms. The number of submovements and the proportion of time spent in deceleration were analysed. Participants could not plan movements controlled by an Accupoint. Cursor trajectories were more variable in near space for detachable manipulanda due to potential cartesian coordinate system incompatibilities

  1. Stimuli Responsive Fluidics Controls on a Paper-Based Bacterial Detection Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Siyu; Phillips, Elizabeth; Linnes, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading causes of death around the world. Point-of-care devices using nucleic acid amplification are sensitive enough to diagnose these diseases, however, often require complex and time-intensive sample preparation steps that are not integrated with the detection process. A rapid, sensitive, and integrated sample-to-result diagnostic device will permit disease treatment planning at the point-of-care. Paper-based detection assays are a promising platform to integrat...

  2. An inkjet-printed electrowetting valve for paper-fluidic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Charmaine K W; He, Fei; Nugen, Sam R

    2013-09-07

    Paper-fluidic devices have become an emerging trend for micro total analysis systems (microTAS) in the bioengineering field due to their ability to maintain the rapid, sensitive and specific attributes of microfluidic devices. Subsequently, paper-fluidic devices are also more portable, have a lower production cost and are easier to use. However, one of the obstacles in developing paper fluidic devices is the limited ability to control the rate of fluid flow during an assay. In our project, we use electrowetting on dielectrics where a dielectric, which is normally hydrophobic, is polarized and becomes hydrophilic. We have fabricated paper-fluidic devices by inkjet printing and spraying conductive hydrophobic electrodes/valves in conjunction with conductive hydrophilic electrodes which are able to stop the fluid front of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The hydrophobic valves were then actuated by an applied potential which altered the fluorinated monolayer on the electrode. As the applied potential between the electrodes was increased, the amount of time for the fluid front to pass the valve decreased because the monolayer was altered faster. However, we did not observe significant differences in time as we increased the distance between the electrodes. The valves were also incorporated in a lateral flow assay where the device was used to detect Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA sequences. With the ability to control the fluid flow in a paper-fluidic device, more complex and intricate assays can be developed, which not only can be applied in the biomedical, food and environmental fields, but also can be used in low resource settings for the detection of diseases.

  3. Automated micro fluidic system for PCR applications in the monitoring of drinking water quality; Aplicacion de sistemas bionaliticos integrados sobre plataformas de microfluidica en el control de la calidad microbiologica del agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria Soria, E.; Yanez Amoros, A.; Murtula Corbi, R.; Catalan Cuenca, V.; Martin-Cisneros, C. S.; Ymbern, O.; Alonso-Chamorro, J.

    2009-07-01

    Microbiological laboratories present a growing interest in automated, simple and user-friendly methodologies able to perform simultaneous analysis of a high amount of samples. Analytical tools based on micro-fluidic could play an important role in this field. In this work, the development of an automated micro fluidic system for PCR applications and aimed to monitoring of drinking water quality is presented. The device will be able to determine, simultaneously, fecal pollution indicators and water-transmitted pathogens. Further-more, complemented with DNA pre-concentration and extraction modules, the device would present a highly integrated solution for microbiological diagnostic laboratories. (Author) 13 refs.

  4. Tuning Fluidic Resistance via Liquid Crystal Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Sengupta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Flow of molecularly ordered fluids, like liquid crystals, is inherently coupled with the average local orientation of the molecules, or the director. The anisotropic coupling—typically absent in isotropic fluids—bestows unique functionalities to the flowing matrix. In this work, we harness this anisotropy to pattern different pathways to tunable fluidic resistance within microfluidic devices. We use a nematic liquid crystalline material flowing in microchannels to demonstrate passive and active modulation of the flow resistance. While appropriate surface anchoring conditions—which imprint distinct fluidic resistances within microchannels under similar hydrodynamic parameters—act as passive cues, an external field, e.g., temperature, is used to actively modulate the flow resistance in the microfluidic device. We apply this simple concept to fabricate basic fluidic circuits, which can be hierarchically extended to create complex resistance networks, without any additional design or morphological patterning of the microchannels.

  5. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, David James

    other smaller particulate debris into the system. After a channel blockage was confirmed, three actuation attempts successfully cleared the blockage. Further tests indicated that the device were biocompatible with HeLa cells at 3 kV. To our knowledge this is the first pairing of dielectric elastomers with microfluidics in a non-electroosmotic context. Applications may include adaptive microfilters, micro-peristaltic pumps, and reduced-complexity lab-on-a-chip devices. Dielectric elastomers can also be adapted to manipulate fluidic systems on a larger scale. The second part of the dissertation research reports a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ~3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ~0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2,000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control. The final part of the dissertation presents a novel dielectric elastomer band with

  6. Effects of Interfaces on Dynamics in Micro-Fluidic Devices: Slip-Boundaries’ Impact on Rotation Characteristics of Polar Liquid Film Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Su-Rong; Liu, Zhong-Qiang; Amos Yinnon, Tamar; Kong, Xiang-Mu

    2017-05-01

    A new approach for exploring effects of interfaces on polar liquids is presented. Their impact on the polar liquid film motor (PLFM) – a novel micro-fluidic device – is studied. We account for the interface’s impact by modeling slip boundary effects on the PLFM’s electro-hydro-dynamical rotations. Our analytical results show as k={l}s/R increases (with {l}s denoting the slip length resulting from the interface’s impact on the film’s properties, k > -1 and R denoting the film’s radius): (a) PLFMs subsequently exhibit rotation characteristics under “negative-”, “no-”, “partial-” and “perfect-” slip boundary conditions; (b) The maximum value of the linear velocity of the steady rotating film increases linearly and its location approaches the film’s border; (c) The decay of the angular velocities’ dependency on the distance from the center of the film slows down, resulting in a macroscopic flow near the boundary. With our calculated rotation speed distributions consistent with the existing experimental ones, research aiming at fitting computed to measured distributions promises identifying the factors affecting {l}s, e.g., solid-fluid potential interactions and surface roughness. The consistency also is advantageous for optimizing PLFM’s applications as micro-washers, centrifuges, mixers in the lab-on-a-chip. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11302118, 11275112, and Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province under Grant No. ZR2013AQ015

  7. Research on Coordinated Robotic Motion Control Based on Fuzzy Decoupling Method in Fluidic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The underwater recovery of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV is a process of 6-DOF motion control, which is related to characteristics with strong nonlinearity and coupling. In the recovery mission, the vehicle requires high level control accuracy. Considering an AUV called BSAV, this paper established a kinetic model to describe the motion of AUV in the horizontal plane, which consisted of nonlinear equations. On the basis of this model, the main coupling variables were analyzed during recovery. Aiming at the strong coupling problem between the heading control and sway motion, we designed a decoupling compensator based on the fuzzy theory and the decoupling theory. We analyzed to the rules of fuzzy compensation, the input and output membership functions of fuzzy compensator, through compose operation and clear operation of fuzzy reasoning, and obtained decoupling compensation quantity. Simulation results show that the fuzzy decoupling controller effectively reduces the overshoot of the system, and improves the control precision. Through the water tank experiments and analysis of experimental data, the effectiveness and feasibility of AUV recovery movement coordinated control based on fuzzy decoupling method are validated successful, and show that the fuzzy decoupling control method has a high practical value in the recovery mission.

  8. Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Reid H; Jain, Rahil; Browning, Yoni; Shah, Rachana; Kauffman, Peter; Dinh, Doan; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-08-16

    Fluid control remains a challenge in development of portable lab-on-a-chip devices. Here, we show that microfluidic networks driven by single-frequency audio tones create resonant oscillating flow that is predicted by equivalent electrical circuit models. We fabricated microfluidic devices with fluidic resistors (R), inductors (L), and capacitors (C) to create RLC networks with band-pass resonance in the audible frequency range available on portable audio devices. Microfluidic devices were fabricated from laser-cut adhesive plastic, and a "buzzer" was glued to a diaphragm (capacitor) to integrate the actuator on the device. The AC flowrate magnitude was measured by imaging oscillation of bead tracers to allow direct comparison to the RLC circuit model across the frequency range. We present a systematic build-up from single-channel systems to multi-channel (3-channel) networks, and show that RLC circuit models predict complex frequency-dependent interactions within multi-channel networks. Finally, we show that adding flow rectifying valves to the network creates pumps that can be driven by amplified and non-amplified audio tones from common audio devices (iPod and iPhone). This work shows that RLC circuit models predict resonant flow responses in multi-channel fluidic networks as a step towards microfluidic devices controlled by audio tones.

  9. An implantable fluidic vibrational energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S.; Takahashi, T.; Kumemura, M.; Fujita, H.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2016-11-01

    Targeting implantable medical devices such as respiratory pace-maker, we have developed a proof-of-concept level energy harvester device that could earn electric power of 44 μW/cm2 by the fluidic motion in a PDMS microchannel placed on a silicon substrate with built-in permanent electrical charges or so-called electrets. The motion of the working fluid will be operated by the heart beat or breathing as a final shape of the energy harvesting system.

  10. Fluidic interconnections for microfluidic systems: A new integrated fluidic interconnection allowing plug 'n' play functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Bundgaard, Frederik; Geschke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A crucial challenge in packaging of microsystems is microfluidic interconnections. These have to seal the ports of the system, and have to provide the appropriate interface to other devices or the external environment. Integrated fluidic interconnections appear to be a good solution for interconn...... external metal ferrules and the system. Theoretical calculations are made to dimension and model the integrated fluidic interconnection. Leakage tests are performed on the interconnections, in order to experimentally confirm the model, and detect its limits.......A crucial challenge in packaging of microsystems is microfluidic interconnections. These have to seal the ports of the system, and have to provide the appropriate interface to other devices or the external environment. Integrated fluidic interconnections appear to be a good solution...... for interconnecting polymer microsystems in terms of cost, space and performance. Following this path we propose a new reversible, integrated fluidic interconnection composed of custom-made cylindrical rings integrated in a polymer house next to the fluidic network. This allows plug 'n' play functionality between...

  11. Fluidic Elements based on Coanda Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin OLIVOTTO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains first some definitions and classifications regarding the fluidic elements. Thegeneral current status is presented, nominating the main specific elements based on the Coanda effect developedspecially in Romania. In particularly the development of an original bistable element using industrial compressedair at industrial pressure supply is presented. The function of this element is based on the controlled attachmentof the main jet at a curved wall through the Coanda effect. The methods used for particular calculation andexperiments are nominated. The main application of these elements was to develop a specific execution element:a fluidic step–by-step motor based on the Coanda effect.

  12. Stokes Trap: Multiplexed particle trapping and manipulation using fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Anish; Schroeder, Charles

    We report the development of the Stokes Trap, which is a multiplexed microfluidic trap for control over an arbitrary number of small particles in a microfluidic device. Our work involves the design and implementation of ``smart'' flow-based devices by coupling feedback control with microfluidics, thereby enabling new routes for the fluidic-directed assembly of particles. Here, we discuss the development of a new method to achieve multiplexed microfluidic trapping of an arbitrary number of particles using the sole action of fluid flow. In particular, we use a Hele-Shaw microfluidic cell to generate hydrodynamic forces on particles in a viscous-dominated flow defined by the microdevice geometry and imposed peripheral flow rates. This platform allows for a high degree of flow control over individual particles and can be used for manufacturing novel particles for fundamental studies, using fluidic-directed assembly. From a broader perspective, our work provides a solid framework for guiding the design of next-generation, automated on-chip assays.

  13. High-Rate Assembly of Nanomaterials on Insulating Surfaces Using Electro-Fluidic Directed Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Cihan; Sirman, Asli; Halder, Aditi; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2017-08-22

    Conductive or semiconducting nanomaterials-based applications such as electronics and sensors often require direct placement of such nanomaterials on insulating surfaces. Most fluidic-based directed assembly techniques on insulating surfaces utilize capillary force and evaporation but are diffusion limited and slow. Electrophoretic-based assembly, on the other hand, is fast but can only be utilized for assembly on a conductive surface. Here, we present a directed assembly technique that enables rapid assembly of nanomaterials on insulating surfaces. The approach leverages and combines fluidic and electrophoretic assembly by applying the electric field through an insulating surface via a conductive film underneath. The approach (called electro-fluidic) yields an assembly process that is 2 orders of magnitude faster compared to fluidic assembly. By understanding the forces on the assembly process, we have demonstrated the controlled assembly of various types of nanomaterials that are conducting, semiconducting, and insulating including nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes on insulating rigid and flexible substrates. The presented approach shows great promise for making practical devices in miniaturized sensors and flexible electronics.

  14. The recent development and applications of fluidic channels by 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-10-18

    The technology of "Lab-on-a-Chip" allows the synthesis and analysis of chemicals and biological substance within a portable or handheld device. The 3D printed structures enable precise control of various geometries. The combination of these two technologies in recent years makes a significant progress. The current approaches of 3D printing, such as stereolithography, polyjet, and fused deposition modeling, are introduced. Their manufacture specifications, such as surface roughness, resolution, replication fidelity, cost, and fabrication time, are compared with each other. Finally, novel application of 3D printed channel in biology are reviewed, including pathogenic bacteria detection using magnetic nanoparticle clusters in a helical microchannel, cell stimulation by 3D chemical gradients, perfused functional vascular channels, 3D tissue construct, organ-on-a-chip, and miniaturized fluidic "reactionware" devices for chemical syntheses. Overall, the 3D printed fluidic chip is becoming a powerful tool in the both medical and chemical industries.

  15. Quality Control Method for a Micro-Nano-Channel Microfabricated Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Xuewu

    2012-01-01

    A variety of silicon-fabricated devices is used in medical applications such as drug and cell delivery, and DNA and protein separation and analysis. When a fluidic device inlet is connected to a compressed gas reservoir, and the outlet is at a lower pressure, a gas flow occurs through the membrane toward the outside. The method relies on the measurement of the gas pressure over the elapsed time inside the upstream and downstream environments. By knowing the volume of the upstream reservoir, the gas flow rate through the membrane over the pressure drop can be calculated. This quality control method consists of measuring the gas flow through a device and comparing the results with a standard curve, which can be obtained by testing standard devices. Standard devices can be selected through a variety of techniques, both destructive and nondestructive, such as SEM, AFM, and standard particle filtration.

  16. Water based fluidic radio frequency metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaobing; Zhao, Shaolin; Hu, Mingjun; Xiao, Junfeng; Zhang, Naibo; Yang, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials offer great flexibility for wave manipulation and enable exceptional functionality design, ranging from negative refraction, anomalous reflection, super-resolution imaging, transformation optics to cloaking, etc. However, demonstration of metamaterials with unprecedented functionalities is still challenging and costly due to the structural complexity or special material properties. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the versatile fluidic radio frequency metamaterials with negative refraction using a water-embedded and metal-coated 3D architecture. Effective medium analysis confirms that metallic frames create an evanescent environment while simultaneously water cylinders produce negative permeability under Mie resonance. The water-metal coupled 3D architectures and the accessory devices for measurement are fabricated by 3D printing with post electroless deposition. Our study also reveals the great potential of fluidic metamaterials and versatility of the 3D printing process in rapid prototyping of customized metamaterials.

  17. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  18. DNA Assembly in 3D Printed Fluidics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Patrick

    Full Text Available The process of connecting genetic parts-DNA assembly-is a foundational technology for synthetic biology. Microfluidics present an attractive solution for minimizing use of costly reagents, enabling multiplexed reactions, and automating protocols by integrating multiple protocol steps. However, microfluidics fabrication and operation can be expensive and requires expertise, limiting access to the technology. With advances in commodity digital fabrication tools, it is now possible to directly print fluidic devices and supporting hardware. 3D printed micro- and millifluidic devices are inexpensive, easy to make and quick to produce. We demonstrate Golden Gate DNA assembly in 3D-printed fluidics with reaction volumes as small as 490 nL, channel widths as fine as 220 microns, and per unit part costs ranging from $0.61 to $5.71. A 3D-printed syringe pump with an accompanying programmable software interface was designed and fabricated to operate the devices. Quick turnaround and inexpensive materials allowed for rapid exploration of device parameters, demonstrating a manufacturing paradigm for designing and fabricating hardware for synthetic biology.

  19. Fluidic Injection for Jet Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Investigations into fluidic injection for jet noise reduction began over 50 years ago. Studies have included water and air injection for the reduction of noise in scale model jets and jet engines and water injection for the reduction of excess overpressures on the Space Shuttle at lift-off. Injection systems have included high pressure microjets as well as larger scale injectors operating at pressures that can be achieved in real jet engines. An historical perspective highlighting noise reduction potential is presented for injection concepts investigated over the last 50 years. Results from recent investigations conducted at NASA are presented for supersonic and subsonic dual-stream jets. The noise reduction benefits achieved through fluidic contouring using an azimuthally controlled nozzle will be discussed.

  20. Creation of a transient vapor nanogap between two fluidic reservoirs for single molecule manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Stanislav; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Ott, John A

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a new experimental technique for manipulating a segment of a charged macromolecule inside a transient nanogap between two fluidic reservoirs. This technique uses an FPGA-driven nanopositioner to control the coupling of a nanopipette with the liquid surface of a fluidic cell. We present results on creating a transient nanogap, triggered by a translocation of double-stranded DNA between a nanopipette and a fluidic cell, and measure the probability to find the molecule near the tip of the nanopipette after closing the gap. The developed platform will enable testing of our recent theoretical predictions for the behavior of charged macromolecule in a nanogap between two fluidic reservoirs.

  1. Creation of a transient vapor nanogap between two fluidic reservoirs for single molecule manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Stanislav; Balagurusamy, Venkat S. K.; Ott, John A.

    2014-08-01

    We introduce a new experimental technique for manipulating a segment of a charged macromolecule inside a transient nanogap between two fluidic reservoirs. This technique uses an FPGA-driven nanopositioner to control the coupling of a nanopipette with the liquid surface of a fluidic cell. We present results on creating a transient nanogap, triggered by a translocation of double-stranded DNA between a nanopipette and a fluidic cell, and measure the probability to find the molecule near the tip of the nanopipette after closing the gap. The developed platform will enable testing of our recent theoretical predictions for the behavior of charged macromolecule in a nanogap between two fluidic reservoirs.

  2. A review on optical microfibers in fluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shao-cheng; Xu, Fei

    2017-09-01

    Fiber-based opto-fluidics with the distinct benefit of alignment-free optics has been a new rising area by integrating optical fiber and microfluidics in recent years. Optical microfibers with large accessible evanescent field and great configurability have more advantages on the integration with microfluidics than traditional fibers. Based on the strong light-liquid interaction, the fluid has the ability to modulate optical microfiber devices by changing physical and chemical properties such as refractive index, temperature, flow rate, chemicals dissolved in the fluid, etc. The light in the microfiber can also be used to manipulate particles which can move in the fluidic channel. Here we review the broad opto-fluidic applications of optical microfibers such as measurement of liquid characteristics, nonlinear effects, laser generation and optical manipulations with miniaturization, low cost, and high sensitivity. The microfiber-based microfluidic platform may provide more strategies for physical and chemical sensing applications and in particular contactless optical diagnostics.

  3. Predistortion control device and method, assembly including a predistortion control device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, Andre B.J.

    2003-01-01

    A predistortion control device (1). The device has a first predistortion control input connectable to a power amplifier output (21); a second predistortion control input (11) connectable to a signal contact of a predistortion device; and a predistortion control output (12) connectable to a control

  4. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazal, I.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are

  5. Cursor Control Device Test Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina; Sandor, Aniko; Pace, John; Thompson, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    The test battery was developed to provide a standard procedure for cursor control device evaluation. The software was built in Visual Basic and consists of nine tasks and a main menu that integrates the set-up of the tasks. The tasks can be used individually, or in a series defined in the main menu. Task 1, the Unidirectional Pointing Task, tests the speed and accuracy of clicking on targets. Two rectangles with an adjustable width and adjustable center- to-center distance are presented. The task is to click back and forth between the two rectangles. Clicks outside of the rectangles are recorded as errors. Task 2, Multidirectional Pointing Task, measures speed and accuracy of clicking on targets approached from different angles. Twenty-five numbered squares of adjustable width are arranged around an adjustable diameter circle. The task is to point and click on the numbered squares (placed on opposite sides of the circle) in consecutive order. Clicks outside of the squares are recorded as errors. Task 3, Unidirectional (horizontal) Dragging Task, is similar to dragging a file into a folder on a computer desktop. Task 3 requires dragging a square of adjustable width from one rectangle and dropping it into another. The width of each rectangle is adjustable, as well as the distance between the two rectangles. Dropping the square outside of the rectangles is recorded as an error. Task 4, Unidirectional Path Following, is similar to Task 3. The task is to drag a square through a tunnel consisting of two lines. The size of the square and the width of the tunnel are adjustable. If the square touches any of the lines, it is counted as an error and the task is restarted. Task 5, Text Selection, involves clicking on a Start button, and then moving directly to the underlined portion of the displayed text and highlighting it. The pointing distance to the text is adjustable, as well as the to-be-selected font size and the underlined character length. If the selection does not

  6. Electronic control of magnonic and spintronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous, C.; Gieraltowski, J.

    2016-01-01

    Nanometric magnonic and spintronic devices need magnetic field control in addition to conventional electronic control. In this work we review ways to replace magnetic field control by an electronic one in order to circumvent appearance of stray magnetic fields or the difficulty of creating large magnetic fields over nanometric distances. Voltage control is compared to current control and corresponding devices are compared from their energetic efficiency point of view.

  7. Ultrathin Fluidic Laminates for Large-Area Façade Integration and Smart Windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiz, Benjamin P V; Pan, Zhiwen; Lautenschläger, Gerhard; Sirtl, Christin; Kraus, Matthias; Wondraczek, Lothar

    2017-03-01

    Buildings represent more than 40% of Europe's energy demands and about one third of its CO2 emissions. Energy efficient buildings and, in particular, building skins have therefore been among the key priorities of international research agendas. Here, glass-glass fluidic devices are presented for large-area integration with adaptive façades and smart windows. These devices enable harnessing and dedicated control of various liquids for added functionality in the building envelope. Combining a microstructured glass pane, a thin cover sheet with tailored mechanical performance, and a liquid for heat storage and transport, a flat-panel laminate is generated with thickness adapted to a single glass sheet in conventional windows. Such multimaterial devices can be integrated with state-of-the-art window glazings or façades to harvest and distribute thermal as well as solar energy by wrapping buildings into a fluidic layer. High visual transparency is achieved through adjusting the optical properties of the employed liquid. Also secondary functionality, such as chromatic windows, polychromatism, or adaptive energy uptake can be generated on part of the liquid.

  8. Sampling by Fluidics and Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tesař

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting one from several available fluid samples is a procedure often performed especially in chemical engineering. It is usually done by an array of valves sequentially opened and closed. Not generally known is an advantageous alternative: fluidic sampling units without moving parts. In the absence of complete pipe closure, cross-contamination between samples cannot be ruled out. This is eliminated by arranging for small protective flows that clear the cavities and remove any contaminated fluid. Although this complicates the overall circuit layout, fluidic sampling units with these "guard" flows were successfully built and tested. Recent interest in microchemistry leads to additional problems due very low operating Reynolds numbers. This necessitated the design of microfluidic sampling units based on new operating principles.

  9. Electrokinetics with "paper-and-pencil" devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pratiti; Dey, Ranabir; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-10-21

    We demonstrate the occurrence of electrokinetic phenomenon in paper substrates, by developing a simple "paper-and-pencil" device. The underlying electrokinetic phenomenon results in enhanced liquid transport through the paper-fibre matrix, which exhibits significant active electrical controllability and improved repeatability. These bear far-ranging consequences towards opening up a new paradigm of fluidics over small scales.

  10. Control method for physical systems and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckenheimer, John

    1997-01-01

    A control method for stabilizing systems or devices that are outside the control domain of a linear controller is provided. When applied to nonlinear systems, the effectiveness of this method depends upon the size of the domain of stability that is produced for the stabilized equilibrium. If this domain is small compared to the accuracy of measurements or the size of disturbances within the system, then the linear controller is likely to fail within a short period. Failure of the system or device can be catastrophic: the system or device can wander far from the desired equilibrium. The method of the invention presents a general procedure to recapture the stability of a linear controller, when the trajectory of a system or device leaves its region of stability. By using a hybrid strategy based upon discrete switching events within the state space of the system or device, the system or device will return from a much larger domain to the region of stability utilized by the linear controller. The control procedure is robust and remains effective under large classes of perturbations of a given underlying system or device.

  11. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  12. CFD Investigation of Fluidic Momentum Injection as Alternative to Mechanical High Lift Devices for Boundary Layer Control

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Syftet med detta projekt i aerodynamik ar att prova en metod för kontroll av gränsskiktets beteende med luftinsprutning. En modern vingprofil vid transsonisk hastighet används, som liknar de som finns på de festa kommersiella flygplan. Koordinater för en experimentell vingprofil som tidigare har använts i vindtunneltester används i denna analys. Vanlig branschprogramvara används, såsom Pointwise för mesh-generering och ANSYS Fluent för CFD-beräkningar. En fullständig svepning av anfallsvinkel...

  13. Robotics and teleoperator-controlled devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meieran, H B

    1988-08-01

    This paper presents a rationale for and a summary of tasks and missions to which mobile and stationary robots and other teleoperator-controlled devices could be assigned in response to the accidental release of radioactive and other hazardous/toxic materials to the environment. Many of these vehicles and devices currently support operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants and other nuclear industry facilities. This paper also discusses specific missions for these devices at the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant sites at the time of the accidents. Also discussed is the status of devices under development for future applications, as well as research on robotics.

  14. Traffic control device evaluation program : FY 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report presents findings on three different activities conducted in the Traffic Control Device Evaluation Program during the 2016 fiscal year. The first two activities are evaluations of full-matrix color light-emitting diode changeable message ...

  15. Volume control device for digital signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Daniel; van Tuijl, Adrianus Johannes Maria; Nuijten, Petrus A.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    A digital volume control device comprises a logic unit for volume control of digital input signals. Successively supplied m-bits words with maximally k bits active, derived from the output signals of or supplied by a volume control (4) with a quantizer (5) element the filtered m-bits workds are

  16. Infrared control coating of thin film devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne; Hollingsworth, Russell

    2017-02-28

    Systems and methods for creating an infrared-control coated thin film device with certain visible light transmittance and infrared reflectance properties are disclosed. The device may be made using various techniques including physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, sputter deposition, and sol-gel processes. In particular, a pulsed energy microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process may be used. Production of the device may occur at speeds greater than 50 Angstroms/second and temperatures lower than 200.degree. C.

  17. Practical design control implementation for medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Justiniano, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Bringing together the concepts of design control and reliability engineering, this book is a must for medical device manufacturers. It helps them meet the challenge of designing and developing products that meet or exceed customer expectations and also meet regulatory requirements. Part One covers motivation for design control and validation, design control requirements, process validation and design transfer, quality system for design control, and measuring design control program effectiveness. Part Two discusses risk analysis and FMEA, designing-in reliability, reliability and design verific

  18. The Capillary Fluidics of Espresso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Nathan; Wollman, Drew; Graf, John; Weislogel, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Espresso is enjoyed by tens of millions of people daily. The coffee is distinguished by a complex low density colloid of emulsified oils. Due to gravity, these oils rise to the surface forming a foam lid called the crema. In this work we present a variety of large length scale capillary fluidic effects for espresso in a gravity-free environment. Drop tower tests are performed to establish brief microgravity conditions under which spontaneous capillarity-driven behavior is observed. Because the variety of espresso drinks is extensive, specific property measurements are made to assess the effects of wetting and surface tension for `Italian' espresso, caffe latte, and caffe Americano. To some, the texture and aromatics of the crema play a critical role in the overall espresso experience. We show how in the low-g environment this may not be possible. We also suggest alternate methods for enjoying espresso aboard spacecraft. NASA NNX09AP66A, Glenn Research Center.

  19. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Henry W.; Dzenitis, John M.

    2016-06-21

    Provided herein are fluidics platforms and related methods for performing integrated sample collection and solid-phase extraction of a target component of the sample all in one tube. The fluidics platform comprises a pump, particles for solid-phase extraction and a particle-holding means. The method comprises contacting the sample with one or more reagents in a pump, coupling a particle-holding means to the pump and expelling the waste out of the pump while the particle-holding means retains the particles inside the pump. The fluidics platform and methods herein described allow solid-phase extraction without pipetting and centrifugation.

  20. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  1. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2017-05-09

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  2. Design controls for the medical device industry

    CERN Document Server

    Teixeira, Marie B

    2013-01-01

    The second edition of a bestseller, Design Controls for the Medical Device Industry provides a comprehensive review of the latest design control requirements, as well as proven tools and techniques to ensure your company's design control program evolves in accordance with current industry practice. The text assists in the development of an effective design control program that not only satisfies the US FDA Quality System Regulation (QSR) and ISO 9001 and 13485 standards, but also meets today's third-party auditor/investigator expectations and saves you valuable time and money.The author's cont

  3. Wind turbine remote control using Android devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the remote control of a wind turbine system over the internet using an Android device, namely a tablet or a smartphone. The wind turbine workstation contains a LabVIEW program which monitors the entire wind turbine energy conversion system (WECS). The Android device connects to the LabVIEW application, working as a remote interface to the wind turbine. The communication between the devices needs to be secured because it takes place over the internet. Hence, the data are encrypted before being sent through the network. The scope was the design of remote control software capable of visualizing real-time wind turbine data through a secure connection. Since the WECS is fully automated and no full-time human operator exists, unattended access to the turbine workstation is needed. Therefore the device must not require any confirmation or permission from the computer operator in order to control it. Another condition is that Android application does not have any root requirements.

  4. Bending fluidic actuator for smart structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che-Ming Chang, Benjamin; Berring, John; Venkataram, Manu; Menon, Carlo; Parameswaran, M.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel silicone-based, millimeter-scale, bending fluidic actuator (BFA). Its unique parallel micro-channel design enables, for the first time, operation at low working pressure while at the same time having a very limited thickness expansion during pressurization. It also enables the actuator to have the highest ratios of angular displacement over length and torque over volume among previously proposed BFAs. In this work, this parallel micro-channel design is implemented by embedding the BFA with an innovative single winding conduit, which yields a simple, single-component configuration suitable for low-cost production and reliable performance. The BFA design can be easily scaled down to smaller dimensions and can be adapted to applications in restricted space, particularly minimally invasive surgery. In this work, the actuator is manufactured in TC-silicone through poly(methyl methacrylate) molds obtained by using laser cutting technology. Repeated angular displacement measurements on multiple prototypes having different stiffness are carried out. The experimental results are compared with an analytical model, which accurately predicts the performance of the device.

  5. Characterisation of adaptive fluidic silicone membrane lenses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the auhtors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or they are shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross...

  6. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by an...

  7. Friction measuring device for control rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1994-03-18

    In the present invention, judgment for friction of control rods conducted upon periodical inspection of a BWR type power plant is conducted by automatic analysis and evaluation by digitalizing data of an operation pressure and an differential pressure of control rods. That is, a differential pressure detection means detects a pressure and a differential pressure of driving water of a control rod driving source. A data processing device conducts digital analysis and store data from the differential pressure detection means, as well as compares the data with set values to automatically judge the friction of the control rod to diagnose abnormality based on the changing trend of the analyzed data. According to the device of the present invention, data measured for the friction of a great number of control rods can be analyzed and judged automatically in a short period of time. Accordingly, evaluation can be conducted accurately even by less skilled operators. Further, when an abnormality is detected, the diagnosis thereof is conducted, so that the operation is simplified and an operator's burden upon inspection can be mitigated. (I.S.).

  8. Reflow Bonding of Burosilicate Glass Tubes of Silicon Substrates as Fluidic Interconnect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogulkoc, B.

    2010-01-01

    The subject of the thesis was the use of borosilicate glass (Duran®) tubes as an interface to wafer-level microfluidic devices. The tubes are compatible with the standard fluidic connectors and can be used as a package for the so-called MEMS-ona- tube assembly. The connection technology is based on

  9. Device Control Using Gestures Sensed from EMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present neuro-electric interfaces for virtual device control. The examples presented rely upon sampling Electromyogram data from a participants forearm. This data is then fed into pattern recognition software that has been trained to distinguish gestures from a given gesture set. The pattern recognition software consists of hidden Markov models which are used to recognize the gestures as they are being performed in real-time. Two experiments were conducted to examine the feasibility of this interface technology. The first replicated a virtual joystick interface, and the second replicated a keyboard.

  10. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices shall... maintaining concentrations of respirable dust, methane, and other harmful gases, in accordance with the levels...

  11. Solvent-free fluidic organic dye lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Young; Mager, Loic; Cham, Tran Thi; Dorkenoo, Kokou D; Fort, Alain; Wu, Jeong Weon; Barsella, Alberto; Ribierre, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-06

    We report on the demonstration of liquid organic dye lasers based on 9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz), so-called liquid carbazole, doped with green- and red-emitting laser dyes. Both waveguide and Fabry-Perot type microcavity fluidic organic dye lasers were prepared by capillary action under solvent-free conditions. Cascade Förster-type energy transfer processes from liquid carbazole to laser dyes were employed to achieve color-variable amplified spontaneous emission and lasing. Overall, this study provides the first step towards the development of solvent-free fluidic organic semiconducting lasers and demonstrates a new kind of optoelectronic applications for liquid organic semiconductors.

  12. 3D printed fluidics with embedded analytic functionality for automated reaction optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Capel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing or ‘3D printing’ is being developed as a novel manufacturing process for the production of bespoke micro- and milliscale fluidic devices. When coupled with online monitoring and optimisation software, this offers an advanced, customised method for performing automated chemical synthesis. This paper reports the use of two additive manufacturing processes, stereolithography and selective laser melting, to create multifunctional fluidic devices with embedded reaction monitoring capability. The selectively laser melted parts are the first published examples of multifunctional 3D printed metal fluidic devices. These devices allow high temperature and pressure chemistry to be performed in solvent systems destructive to the majority of devices manufactured via stereolithography, polymer jetting and fused deposition modelling processes previously utilised for this application. These devices were integrated with commercially available flow chemistry, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis equipment, allowing automated online and inline optimisation of the reaction medium. This set-up allowed the optimisation of two reactions, a ketone functional group interconversion and a fused polycyclic heterocycle formation, via spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis.

  13. 3D printed fluidics with embedded analytic functionality for automated reaction optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, Andrew J; Wright, Andrew; Harding, Matthew J; Weaver, George W; Li, Yuqi; Harris, Russell A; Edmondson, Steve; Goodridge, Ruth D; Christie, Steven D R

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing or '3D printing' is being developed as a novel manufacturing process for the production of bespoke micro- and milliscale fluidic devices. When coupled with online monitoring and optimisation software, this offers an advanced, customised method for performing automated chemical synthesis. This paper reports the use of two additive manufacturing processes, stereolithography and selective laser melting, to create multifunctional fluidic devices with embedded reaction monitoring capability. The selectively laser melted parts are the first published examples of multifunctional 3D printed metal fluidic devices. These devices allow high temperature and pressure chemistry to be performed in solvent systems destructive to the majority of devices manufactured via stereolithography, polymer jetting and fused deposition modelling processes previously utilised for this application. These devices were integrated with commercially available flow chemistry, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis equipment, allowing automated online and inline optimisation of the reaction medium. This set-up allowed the optimisation of two reactions, a ketone functional group interconversion and a fused polycyclic heterocycle formation, via spectroscopic and chromatographic analysis.

  14. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...

  15. Transport Phenomena of Water in Molecular Fluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, Bohung

    2016-09-01

    In molecular-level fluidic transport, where the discrete characteristics of a molecular system are not negligible (in contrast to a continuum description), the response of the molecular water system might still be similar to the continuum description if the time and ensemble averages satisfy the ergodic hypothesis and the scale of the average is enough to recover the classical thermodynamic properties. However, even in such cases, the continuum description breaks down on the material interfaces. In short, molecular-level liquid flows exhibit substantially different physics from classical fluid transport theories because of (i) the interface/surface force field, (ii) thermal/velocity slip, (iii) the discreteness of fluid molecules at the interface and (iv) local viscosity. Therefore, in this study, we present the result of our investigations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with continuum-based energy equations and check the validity and limitations of the continuum hypothesis. Our study shows that when the continuum description is subjected to the proper treatment of the interface effects via modified boundary conditions, the so-called continuum-based modified-analytical solutions, they can adequately predict nanoscale fluid transport phenomena. The findings in this work have broad effects in overcoming current limitations in modeling/predicting the fluid behaviors of molecular fluidic devices.

  16. Dielectric elastomer strain and pressure sensing enable reactive soft fluidic muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Sheng Q.

    2016-04-01

    Wearable assistive devices are the future of rehabilitation therapy and bionic limb technologies. Traditional electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators can provide the precise and powerful around-the-clock assistance that therapists cannot deliver. However, they do so in the confines of highly controlled factory environments, resulting in actuators too rigid, heavy, and immobile for wearable applications. In contrast, biological skeletal muscles have been designed and proven in the uncertainty of the real world. Bioinspired artificial muscle actuators aim to mimic the soft, slim, and self-sensing abilities of natural muscle that make them tough and intelligent. Fluidic artificial muscles are a promising wearable assistive actuation candidate, sharing the high-force, inherent compliance of their natural counterparts. Until now, they have not been able to self-sense their length, pressure, and force in an entirely soft and flexible system. Their use of rigid components has previously been a requirement for the generation of large forces, but reduces their reliability and compromises their ability to be comfortably worn. We present the unobtrusive integration of dielectric elastomer (DE) strain and pressure sensors into a soft Peano fluidic muscle, a planar alternative to the relatively bulky McKibben muscle. Characterization of these DE sensors shows they can measure the full operating range of the Peano muscle: strains of around 18% and pressures up to 400 kPa with changes in capacitance of 2.4 and 10.5 pF respectively. This is a step towards proprioceptive artificial muscles, paving the way for wearable actuation that can truly feel its environment.

  17. Fully integrated miniature device for automated gene expression DNA microarray processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robin Hui; Nguyen, Tai; Schwarzkopf, Kevin; Fuji, H Sho; Petrova, Alla; Siuda, Tony; Peyvan, Kia; Bizak, Michael; Danley, David; McShea, Andy

    2006-03-15

    A DNA microarray with 12,000 features was integrated with a microfluidic cartridge to automate the fluidic handling steps required to carry out a gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K562). The fully integrated microfluidic device consists of microfluidic pumps/mixers, fluid channels, reagent chambers, and a DNA microarray silicon chip. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated into the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. The device was completely self-contained: no external pressure sources, fluid storage, mechanical pumps, mixers, or valves were necessary for fluid manipulation, thus eliminating possible sample contamination and simplifying device operation. Fluidic experiments were performed to study the on-chip washing efficiency and uniformity. A single-color transcriptional analysis of K562 cells with a series of calibration controls (spiked-in controls) to characterize this new platform with regard to sensitivity, specificity, and dynamic range was performed. The device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Experiment also showed that the performance of the integrated microfluidic device is comparable with the conventional hybridization chambers with manual operations, indicating that the on-chip fluidic handling (washing and reaction) is highly efficient and can be automated with no loss of performance. The device provides a cost-effective solution to eliminate labor-intensive and time-consuming fluidic handling steps in genomic analysis.

  18. Development of an opto-fluidic micro-system dedicated to chemical analysis in a nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffray, F.; Canto, F.; Couston, L. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Processes Department, SERA/LAMM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Allenet, T.; Bucci, D.; Broquin, J.E. [IMEP-LaHC, Universite de Grenoble Alpes, UMR 5130 CNRS, Minatec-Grenoble-INP, CS 50257, 38016 Grenoble (France); Jardinier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, RadioChemistry and Processes Department, SERA/LAMM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); IMEP-LaHC, Universite de Grenoble Alpes, UMR 5130 CNRS, Minatec-Grenoble-INP, CS 50257, 38016 Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-01

    Micromachining techniques enable the fabrication of innovative lab-on-a-chip. Following the trend in chemical and biological analysis, the use of microsystems also appears compelling in the nuclear industry. The volume reduction of radioactive solutions is especially attractive in order to reduce the workers radiation exposition in the context of off-line analysis in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. We hence present the development of an opto-fluidic sensor combining micro-fluidic channels for fluid transportation and integrated optics for detection. With the aim of achieving automated microanalysis with reduced response time the sensor is made compatible with a commercial micro-fluidic holder. Therefore the chip is connected to computer controlled pumps and electro-valves thanks to capillary tubing. In this paper we emphasis on the fluid handling capacities of the opto-fluidic sensor. (authors)

  19. Brain-controlled body movement assistance devices and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuthardt, Eric C.; Love, Lonnie J.; Coker, Rob; Moran, Daniel W.

    2017-01-10

    Methods, devices, systems, and apparatus, including computer programs encoded on a computer storage medium, for brain-controlled body movement assistance devices. In one aspect, a device includes a brain-controlled body movement assistance device with a brain-computer interface (BCI) component adapted to be mounted to a user, a body movement assistance component operably connected to the BCI component and adapted to be worn by the user, and a feedback mechanism provided in connection with at least one of the BCI component and the body movement assistance component, the feedback mechanism being configured to output information relating to a usage session of the brain-controlled body movement assistance device.

  20. Assessment of telemetry and fluidic control system used in the Medstream programmable infusion system: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Toralf; Crivelli, Rocco; Tardy, Yanik; Burger, Juergen

    2014-10-01

    The MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump, an intrathecal pump indicated for the treatment of chronic intractable pain and severe spasticity (CE-mark) or severe spasticity (US), has a highly accurate medication delivery (within 10% of the programmed flow rate) and is certified for use in 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging systems (conditional). Performance of the telemetric link between external control-unit and implanted pump was assessed in sheep (in vivo) up to 26 weeks, resulting in 1040 communication sessions. The telemetric communication envelope (communication distance and maximum antenna tilt angles) and communication duration were characterized in an in vitro test. Capacitance measurements of the piezoelectric actuator of the valve, valve flow rates, and leak rates were measured in an in vitro cyclic accelerated aging test to assess reliability of the valve over 6,200 k cycles. The pump was well tolerated in vivo; all communication sessions between control-unit and pump were successful (P = 6.889 × 10(-14)). Mean communication distance between pump and control-unit was 3.8 cm, with the maximum antenna tilt angles being 40° (θy) and 50° (θx) for all test cases; the maximum communication duration was 5.5 s. Capacitance measurements, flow rates, and leak rates were within ±10 % range up to 6,200 k cycles corresponding to approximately 10 times the valve cycles over the specified service life of the pump (8 years), except for one flow-rate value, which can be explained by the measurement setup. These results demonstrate the reliability of the telemetry link and piezoelectric valve system of the MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump.

  1. Experimental investigation of the noise reduction of supersonic exhaust jets with fluidic inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Russell William Walter

    The noise produced by the supersonic, high temperature jets that exhaust from military aircraft is becoming a hazard to naval personnel and a disturbance to communities near military bases. Methods to reduce the noise produced from these jets in a practical full-scale environment are difficult. The development and analysis of distributed nozzle blowing for the reduction of radiated noise from supersonic jets is described. Model scale experiments of jets that simulate the exhaust jets from typical low-bypass ratio military jet aircraft engines during takeoff are performed. Fluidic inserts are created that use distributed blowing in the divergent section of the nozzle to simulate mechanical, hardwall corrugations, while having the advantage of being an active control method. This research focuses on model scale experiments to better understand the fluidic insert noise reduction method. Distributed blowing within the divergent section of the military-style convergent divergent nozzle alters the shock structure of the jet in addition to creating streamwise vorticity for the reduction of mixing noise. Enhancements to the fluidic insert design have been performed along with experiments over a large number of injection parameters and core jet conditions. Primarily military-style round nozzles have been used, with preliminary measurements of hardwall corrugations and fluidic inserts in rectangular nozzle geometries also performed. It has been shown that the noise reduction of the fluidic inserts is most heavily dependent upon the momentum flux ratio between the injector and core jet. Maximum reductions of approximately 5.5 dB OASPL have been observed with practical mass flow rates and injection pressures. The first measurements with fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream have been performed. Optimal noise reduction occurs at similar injector parameters in the presence of forward flight. Fluidic inserts in the presence of a forward flight stream were

  2. Investigation of the dye concentration influence on the lasing wavelength and threshold for a micro-fluidic dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kragh, Søren; Kjeldsen, B.G.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a micro-fluidic dye laser, which can be integrated with polymer-based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the lasing threshold. The laser device is characterised using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved...... in ethanol, and the influence of dye concentration on the lasing wavelength and threshold is investigated. The experiments confirm the predictions of the rate-equation model, that lasing can be achieved in the 10 mum long laser cavity with moderate concentrations of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol, starting from 5 x...... 10(-3) mol/I. We also find that the lasing wavelength can be tuned between 565 and 593 nm, controlled by the dye concentration. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  3. Fluidic system for long-term in vitro culturing and monitoring of organotypic brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmand, Tanya; Troels-Smith, Ane R.; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Brain slice preparations cultured in vitro have long been used as a simplified model for studying brain development, electrophysiology, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In this paper an open fluidic system developed for improved long term culturing of organotypic brain slices is presented....... The positive effect of continuous flow of growth medium, and thus stability of the glucose concentration and waste removal, is simulated and compared to the effect of stagnant medium that is most often used in tissue culturing. Furthermore, placement of the tissue slices in the developed device was studied...... by numerical simulations in order to optimize the nutrient distribution. The device was tested by culturing transverse hippocampal slices from 7 days old NMRI mice for a duration of 14 days. The slices were inspected visually and the slices cultured in the fluidic system appeared to have preserved...

  4. Disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for online parallelized cell adhesion kinetics analysis on quartz crystal resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cama, G.; Jacobs, T.; Dimaki, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new disposable micro-fluidic biosensor array for the online analysis of adherent Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells on quartz crystal resonators (QCRs). The device was conceived for the parallel cultivation of cells providing the same experimental conditions...

  5. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  6. Use of UPFC device controlled by fuzzy logic controllers for decoupled power flow control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivković Sanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the possibility of decoupled active and reactive power flow control in a power system using a UPFC device controlled by fuzzy logic controllers. A Brief theoretical review of the operation principles and applications of UPFC devices and design principles of the fuzzy logic controller used are given. A Matlab/Simulink model of the system with UPFC, the fuzzy controller setup, and graphs of the results are presented. Conclusions are drawn regarding the possibility of using this system for decoupled control of the power flow in power systems based on analysis of these graphs.

  7. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part I – Force Tracking Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This article presents prototypes of smart variable resistance exercise devices using magneto-rheological fluid dampers. An intelligent supervisory control for regulating the resistive force or torque of the device is developed, and is validated both numerically and experimentally. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for the human joints including knee, elbow, hip, and ankle. PMID:18504509

  8. Multi-Axis Fluidic Thrust Vectoring of a Supersonic Jet Using Counterflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Edward L.; Alvi, Farrukh; Krothapalli, Anjanevulu

    1997-01-01

    The most common techniques currently used to efficiently vector supersonic jets require external flaps and or pivoting devices. Fluidic thrust vectoring using counterflow eliminates the need for such complex hardware. Thus, the promise of decreases in both weight and drag as well as increased maneuverability makes this technique an attractive alternative. This technique has been successfully employed to achieve single axis fluidic thrust vectoring of a Mach 2 rectangular jet. To better compete with contemporary systems the current study extends this technique to multi-axis thrust vectoring of a Mach 2 diamond-shaped jet by applying counterflow to one of its four sides. To evaluate the performance of this technique the Planar Laser Scattering (PLS) technique is used to show the continuous vectoring of the diamond jet up to 20 degrees. Also, cross-stream PLS images are acquired to show the vectoring can be achieved off all four surfaces of the diamond jet.

  9. digital control of external devices through the parallel port

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... Abstract. In this paper we carry out the digital control of external devices using the parallel port of a computer. The PC parallel port adapter that is specifically designed to attach printers has been found to be useful as a general input/output port for any device or application that matches its input/output ...

  10. Wearable Device Control Platform Technology for Network Application Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heejung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Application development platform is the most important environment in IT industry. There are a variety of platforms. Although the native development enables application to optimize, various languages and software development kits need to be acquired according to the device. The coexistence of smart devices and platforms has rendered the native development approach time and cost consuming. Cross-platform development emerged as a response to these issues. These platforms generate applications for multiple devices based on web languages. Nevertheless, development requires additional implementation based on a native language because of the coverage and functions of supported application programming interfaces (APIs. Wearable devices have recently attracted considerable attention. These devices only support Bluetooth-based interdevice communication, thereby making communication and device control impossible beyond a certain range. We propose Network Application Agent (NetApp-Agent in order to overcome issues. NetApp-Agent based on the Cordova is a wearable device control platform for the development of network applications, controls input/output functions of smartphones and wearable/IoT through the Cordova and Native API, and enables device control and information exchange by external users by offering a self-defined API. We confirmed the efficiency of the proposed platform through experiments and a qualitative assessment of its implementation.

  11. Multi-chamber nucleic acid amplification and detection device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Lawrence

    2017-10-25

    A nucleic acid amplification and detection device includes an amplification cartridge with a plurality of reaction chambers for containing an amplification reagent and a visual detection reagent, and a plurality of optically transparent view ports for viewing inside the reaction chambers. The cartridge also includes a sample receiving port which is adapted to receive a fluid sample and fluidically connected to distribute the fluid sample to the reaction chamber, and in one embodiment, a plunger is carried by the cartridge for occluding fluidic communication to the reaction chambers. The device also includes a heating apparatus having a heating element which is activated by controller to generate heat when a trigger event is detected. The heating apparatus includes a cartridge-mounting section which positioned a cartridge in thermal communication with the heating element so that visual changes to the contents of the reaction chambers are viewable through the view ports.

  12. Broadband Wireless Data Acquisition and Control Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mobitrum is proposing to develop a broadband wireless device for real-time data acquisition and monitoring applicable to the field instrumentation and control...

  13. Evaluation of traffic control devices : fifth-year activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This project was established to provide a means of conducting limited scope evaluations of numerous traffic : control device issues. During the fifth, and final, year of the project, researchers conducted four activities: : improving the interface fo...

  14. Fluidic Energy Harvester Optimization in Grid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh-Yazdi, Amir; Elvin, Niell; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2017-11-01

    Even though it is omnipresent in nature, there has not been a great deal of research in the literature involving turbulence as an energy source for piezoelectric fluidic harvesters. In the present work, a grid-generated turbulence forcing function model which we derived previously is employed in the single degree-of-freedom electromechanical equations to find the power output and tip displacement of piezoelectric cantilever beams. Additionally, we utilize simplified, deterministic models of the turbulence forcing function to obtain closed-form expressions for the power output. These theoretical models are studied using experiments that involve separately placing a hot-wire anemometer probe and a short PVDF beam in flows where turbulence is generated by means of passive and semi-passive grids. From a parametric study on the deterministic models, we show that the white noise forcing function best mimics the experimental data. Furthermore, our parametric study of the response spectrum of a generic fluidic harvester in grid-generated turbulent flow shows that optimum power output is attained for beams placed closer to the grid with a low natural frequency and damping ratio and a large electromechanical coupling coefficient. NSF Grant No. CBET 1033117.

  15. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-01

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  16. New Multiphase Matrix Converter Based Device for Power Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Szczepanik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the concept of new matrix converter (MC based device working as a phase shifting control device in a power system. The multiphase MC is working under an innovative control algorithm specially dedicated to the proposed application. The work presents the results of the simulation of the MC work in this application as well as the analysis of the MC properties.

  17. Final Stormwater Control and Devices Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-18

    wood nettle (Laportea canadensis), stinging nettle ( Urtica dioica ), and beggar ticks (Bidens frondosa) (Grand Forks AFB, 2003). The slopes of the...the water quality of the receiving waters. The proposed flow control structures would effectively reduce the potential impact of discharges from the...Alternative 2, and the No Action Alternative. Feasible alternatives should be low cost so they can be built with available funding; effectively control

  18. Controllable proximity effect in superconducting hybrid devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakurskiy, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of controllable proximity effects in superconductors, both in terms of fundamental aspects and applications. As a part of this thesis theoretical description was suggested for a number of structures with superconducting electrodes and multiple interlayers. These

  19. The Physiologic Effects of Multiple Simultaneous Electronic Control Device Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Donald M.; Ho, Jeffrey D.; Reardon, Robert F.; Sweeney, James D.; Miner, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Law enforcement and military personnel use electronic control devices to control non-compliant and actively resistive subjects. The TASER® Shockwave is a new electronic control device designed specifically as an area denial device capable of delivering multiple simultaneous discharges. This is the first study to examine the effects of multiple simultaneous device discharges in humans. Methods: Volunteers were exposed to multiple (two to three), simultaneous 5-second discharges from the Shockwave device to the chest, back, chest to abdomen, or thighs. Blood was analyzed before and after discharge for pH, lactate, potassium, creatine kinase (CK), and troponin. Continuous spirometry was performed before, during, and after the discharge. In addition, electrocardiograms (ECGs) before and after discharge were recorded, and echocardiography was used to determine the rhythm during discharge. Results: Small elevations of lactate occurred. Moderate increases in CK at 24 hours occurred and appeared to be related to the number of simultaneous discharges. There was a trend to a decrease in minute ventilation in the volunteers exposed to two simultaneous discharges, but it did not reach statistical significance. ECG changes only reflected an increase in vagal tone, and there was no evidence of capture by echocardiography. Five-second, simultaneous, multiple exposures to the TASER Shockwave device were reasonably tolerated by our human volunteers. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this device may have a reasonable risk/benefit ratio when used to protect an area from a threat. PMID:20411076

  20. Virtual Machine Language Controls Remote Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center worked with Blue Sun Enterprises, based in Boulder, Colorado, to enhance the company's virtual machine language (VML) to control the instruments on the Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatiles Extraction mission. Now the NASA-improved VML is available for crewed and uncrewed spacecraft, and has potential applications on remote systems such as weather balloons, unmanned aerial vehicles, and submarines.

  1. Growth control of sessile microbubbles in PDMS devices

    CERN Document Server

    Volk, Andreas; Kähler, Christian J; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Marin, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    In a microfluidic environment, the presence of bubbles is often detrimental to the functionality of the device, leading to clogging or cavitation, but microbubbles can also be an indispensable asset in other applications such as microstreaming. In either case, it is crucial to understand and control the growth or shrinkage of these bodies of air, in particular in common soft-lithography devices based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is highly permeable to gases. In this work, we study the gas transport into and out of a bubble positioned in a microfluidic device, taking into account the direct gas exchange through PDMS as well as the transport of gas through the liquid in the device. Hydrostatic pressure regulation allows for the quantitative control of growth, shrinkage, or the attainment of a stable equilibrium bubble size. We find that the vapor pressure of the liquid plays an important role for the balance of gas transport, accounting for variability in experimental conditions and suggesting addition...

  2. New leak assembly based on fluidic nanochannels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Aiqing; Zhao, Yongheng; Wang, Xudi, E-mail: wxudi@hfut.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Automobile Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Yu; Wei, Wei; Qiu, Keqiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Dong, Dong [Shanghai Institute of Spacecraft Equipment, Shanghai 201100 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Fluidic nanochannels with a characteristic dimension of ∼280 nm were fabricated and designed as a leak assembly, where the nanochannels were formed on silicon wafers and enclosed with Pyrex{sup ®} glass. The geometric dimensions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and the gas flow conductance of He and other heavy gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and Ar) was measured, and its uncertainty estimated, by the difference method. The results indicated that the measured flow conductance values were 45% less than the calculated flow conductance values. For helium, molecular flow was shown to occur at pressures ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. As a consequence of the well-defined geometry, the prediction of flow conductance could be achieved for various gas species.

  3. Stability of flowing open fluidic channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Nee Tan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Open fluidic systems have a distinct advantage over enclosed channels in that the fluids exposed nature makes for easy external interaction, this finds uses in introduction of samples by adding liquid droplets or from the surrounding gaseous medium. This work investigates flowing open channels and films, which can potentially make use of the open section of the system as an external interface, before bringing the sample into an enclosed channel. Clearly, in this scenario a key factor is the stability of the flowing open fluid. The open channels investigated include a straight open channel defined by a narrow strip of solid surface, the edges of which allow large contact angle hysteresis, and a wider structure allowing for multiple inputs and outputs. A model is developed for fluid flow, and the findings used to describe the process of failure in both cases.

  4. A Recipe for Soft Fluidic Elastomer Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Andrew D.; Katzschmann, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This work provides approaches to designing and fabricating soft fluidic elastomer robots. That is, three viable actuator morphologies composed entirely from soft silicone rubber are explored, and these morphologies are differentiated by their internal channel structure, namely, ribbed, cylindrical, and pleated. Additionally, three distinct casting-based fabrication processes are explored: lamination-based casting, retractable-pin-based casting, and lost-wax-based casting. Furthermore, two ways of fabricating a multiple DOF robot are explored: casting the complete robot as a whole and casting single degree of freedom (DOF) segments with subsequent concatenation. We experimentally validate each soft actuator morphology and fabrication process by creating multiple physical soft robot prototypes. PMID:27625913

  5. Fluidic Active Transducer for Electricity Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youngjun; Park, Junwoo; Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Youn Sang

    2015-10-01

    Flows in small size channels have been studied for a long time over multidisciplinary field such as chemistry, biology and medical through the various topics. Recently, the attempts of electricity generation from the small flows as a new area for energy harvesting in microfluidics have been reported. Here, we propose for the first time a new fluidic electricity generator (FEG) by modulating the electric double layer (EDL) with two phase flows of water and air without external power sources. We find that an electric current flowed by the forming/deforming of the EDL with a simple separated phase flow of water and air at the surface of the FEG. Electric signals between two electrodes of the FEG are checked from various water/air passing conditions. Moreover, we verify the possibility of a self-powered air slug sensor by applying the FEG in the detection of an air slug.

  6. Experimental and simulated control of lift using trailing edge devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, A.; Blaylock, M.; van Dam, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Two active aerodynamic load control (AALC) devices coupled with a control algorithm are shown to decrease the change in lift force experienced by an airfoil during a change in freestream velocity. Microtabs are small (1% chord) surfaces deployed perpendicular to an airfoil, while microjets are pneumatic jets with flow perpendicular to the surface of the airfoil near the trailing edge. Both devices are capable of producing a rapid change in an airfoil's lift coefficient. A control algorithm for microtabs has been tested in a wind tunnel using a modified S819 airfoil, and a microjet control algorithm has been simulated for a NACA 0012 airfoil using OVERFLOW. In both cases, the AALC devices have shown the ability to mitigate the changes in lift during a gust.

  7. Prototyping of concurrent control systems implemented in FPGA devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wiśniewski, Remigiusz

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on prototyping aspects of concurrent control systems and their further implementation and partial reconfiguration in programmable devices. Further, it lays out a full prototyping flow for concurrent control systems. Based on a given primary specification, a system is described with an interpreted Petri net, which naturally reflects the concurrent and sequential relationships of the design. The book shows that, apart from the traditional option of static configuration of the entire system, the latest programmable devices (especially FPGAs) offer far more sophistication. Partial reconfiguration allows selected parts of the system to be replaced without having to reprogram the entire structure of the device. Approaches to dynamic and static partial reconfiguration of concurrent control systems are presented and described in detail.< The theoretical work is illustrated by examples drawn from various applications, with a milling machine and a traffic-light controller highlighted as representat...

  8. Chaos control and taming of turbulence in plasma devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinger, T.; Schröder, C.; Block, D.

    2001-01-01

    . Electric control fields are externally applied to the plasma device and the chaotic or turbulent state is stabilized by only weak perturbations of the plasma equilibrium. The success of this approach is demonstrated in both experiment and numerical simulation and the actual effect of the applied control......Chaos and turbulence are often considered as troublesome features of plasma devices. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems, a number of strategies have been developed to achieve active control over complex temporal or spatio-temporal behavior. Many of these techniques apply...

  9. Implementation of Adaptive Digital Controllers on Programmable Logic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David A.; King, Kenneth D.; Smith, Keary J.; Monenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much has been made of the capabilities of FPGA's (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the hardware implementation of fast digital signal processing. Such capability also makes an FPGA a suitable platform for the digital implementation of closed loop controllers. Other researchers have implemented a variety of closed-loop digital controllers on FPGA's. Some of these controllers include the widely used proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, state space controllers, neural network and fuzzy logic based controllers. There are myriad advantages to utilizing an FPGA for discrete-time control functions which include the capability for reconfiguration when SRAM-based FPGA's are employed, fast parallel implementation of multiple control loops and implementations that can meet space level radiation tolerance requirements in a compact form-factor. Generally, a software implementation on a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) or microcontroller is used to implement digital controllers. At Marshall Space Flight Center, the Control Electronics Group has been studying adaptive discrete-time control of motor driven actuator systems using digital signal processor (DSP) devices. While small form factor, commercial DSP devices are now available with event capture, data conversion, pulse width modulated (PWM) outputs and communication peripherals, these devices are not currently available in designs and packages which meet space level radiation requirements. In general, very few DSP devices are produced that are designed to meet any level of radiation tolerance or hardness. The goal of this effort is to create a fully digital, flight ready controller design that utilizes an FPGA for implementation of signal conditioning for control feedback signals, generation of commands to the controlled system, and hardware insertion of adaptive control algorithm approaches. An alternative is required for compact implementation of such functionality to withstand the harsh environment

  10. A spatial bending fluidic actuator: fabrication and quasi-static characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Benjamin; Chew, Allison; Naghshineh, Nastaran; Menon, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a novel silicone-based, millimeter-scale, fluidic actuator able to bend about two orthogonal axes. The implemented molding fabrication procedure is discussed and the quasi-static performance of the developed prototypes is experimentally investigated. The relationship between the pressurized working fluid and the position of the actuator tip is determined by using a stereovision measurement system. Such a relationship is mapped through a regression model, which is used to implement a minimalist position controller.

  11. Universal Cloud Controller (UCC), a Cloud-centred system using personal mobile devices to control public devices

    OpenAIRE

    Thanh Tam, Tran

    2016-01-01

    We engage different working environments on a daily basis, including private and public environments. When we move from one to another constantly, the data also need to be transferred, and while the private environment is convenient, working with public devices creates the irritation of authentication. This dissertation proposes Universal Cloud Controller (UCC), a multi-components system that improves user’s experience when exchange data from personal to public device. The main functions of t...

  12. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  13. Gas flow control device for internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matesic, A.; Castella, J.P.

    1996-08-29

    A gas flow control device for internal combustion engines, consisting of a single or double linearly movable member for controlling the flow rate of air in an intake duct, followed by a throttling mechanism for varying the cross-section of the duct. Both these devices may be common to all cylinders or provided plurally. Said including petrol engines or unsupercharged or turbocharged diesel engines, but is particularly suitable for four-stroke fuel ignition engines, i.e. those without a carburettor. (author)

  14. A Multiposture Locomotor Training Device with Force-Field Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Sui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a multiposture locomotor training device (MPLTD with a closed-loop control scheme based on joint angle feedback, which is able to overcome various difficulties resulting from mechanical vibration and the weight of trainer to achieve higher accuracy trajectory. By introducing the force-field control scheme used in the closed-loop control, the device can obtain the active-constrained mode including the passive one. The MPLTD is mainly composed of three systems: posture adjusting and weight support system, lower limb exoskeleton system, and control system, of which the lower limb exoskeleton system mainly includes the indifferent equilibrium mechanism with two degrees of freedom (DOF and the driving torque is calculated by the Lagrangian function. In addition, a series of experiments, the weight support and the trajectory accuracy experiment, demonstrate a good performance of mechanical structure and the closed-loop control.

  15. 78 FR 36132 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... and pop-ups as well as smart search options. The FHWA realizes more and more users are likely to use... from a number of electronic devices including computers, tablets, and smart phones. Enhancing search... electronic version. The commenters who preferred the electronic version cited the ability to search quickly...

  16. Channel Access and Power Control for Mobile Crowdsourcing in Device-to-Device Underlaid Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the access of a myriad of smart handheld devices in cellular networks, mobile crowdsourcing becomes increasingly popular, which can leverage omnipresent mobile devices to promote the complicated crowdsourcing tasks. Device-to-device (D2D communication is highly desired in mobile crowdsourcing when cellular communications are costly. The D2D cellular network is more preferable for mobile crowdsourcing than conventional cellular network. Therefore, this paper addresses the channel access and power control problem in the D2D underlaid cellular networks. We propose a novel semidistributed network-assisted power and a channel access control scheme for D2D user equipment (DUE pieces. It can control the interference from DUE pieces to the cellular user accurately and has low information feedback overhead. For the proposed scheme, the stochastic geometry tool is employed and analytic expressions are derived for the coverage probabilities of both the cellular link and D2D links. We analyze the impact of key system parameters on the proposed scheme. The Pareto optimal access threshold maximizing the total area spectral efficiency is obtained. Unlike the existing works, the performances of the cellular link and D2D links are both considered. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the total area spectral efficiency significantly compared to existing schemes.

  17. The Physiologic Effects of Multiple Simultaneous Electronic Control Device Discharges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawes, Donald M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Law enforcement and military personnel use electronic control devices to control non-compliant and actively resistive subjects. The TASER® Shockwave is a new electronic control device designed specifically as an area denial device capable of delivering multiple simultaneous discharges. This is the first study to examine the effects of multiple simultaneous device discharges in humans.Methods: Volunteers were exposed to multiple (two to three, simultaneous 5-second discharges from the Shockwave device to the chest, back, chest to abdomen, or thighs. Blood was analyzed before and after discharge for pH, lactate, potassium, creatine kinase (CK, and troponin. Continuous spirometry was performed before, during, and after the discharge. In addition, electrocardiograms (ECGs before and after discharge were recorded, and echocardiography was used to determine the rhythm during discharge.Results: Small elevations of lactate occurred. Moderate increases in CK at 24 hours occurred and appeared to be related to the number of simultaneous discharges. There was a trend to a decrease in minute ventilation in the volunteers exposed to two simultaneous discharges, but it did not reach statistical significance. ECG changes only reflected an increase in vagal tone, and there was no evidence of capture by echocardiography. Five-second, simultaneous, multiple exposures to the TASER Shockwave device were reasonably tolerated by our human volunteers.Conclusion: Our study suggests that this device may have a reasonable risk/benefit ratio when used to protect an area from a threat. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(1:49-56].

  18. Computer Controlled Switching Device for Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tauchmanová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has two goals. The practical part deals with the design of a computer controlled switching device for an external stimulator for deep brain stimulation. The switching device is used during investigations with functional magnetic resonance for controlling signals leading to the deep brain stimulation (DBS electrode in the patient's brain. The motivation for designing this device was improve measured data quality and to enable new types of experiments.The theoretical part reports on early attempts to approach the problem of modeling and localizing the neural response of the human brain as a system identification and estimation task. The parametric identification method and real fMRI data are used for modeling the hemodynamic response.The project is in cooperation with 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Na Homolce hospital in Prague.

  19. Multidisciplinary Analysis of a Microsystem Device for Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2002-07-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEMS) device is under development that uses the Stirling cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. This MEMS cooler can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temporal and spatial temperature control. Potential applications include cooling and thermal control of: microsystems, electronics, sensors, biomedical devices, and spacecraft components. A primary challenge for further development is the multidisciplinary analysis required to characterize and optimize its performance. This paper describes the first-order thermodynamic analysis performed on the MEMS cooler and the resulting ideal performance curves generated. The basis for additional coupled analyses such as fluid/gas dynamics, thermal, electrostatic, structural, dynamic, material, and processing is addressed. Scaling issues relevant to the device and the breakdown of continuum theory in the micro-domain is also examined.

  20. Control system devices : architectures and supply channels overview.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, Jason; Atkins, William Dee; Schwartz, Moses Daniel; Mulder, John C.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes a research project to examine the hardware used in automated control systems like those that control the electric grid. This report provides an overview of the vendors, architectures, and supply channels for a number of control system devices. The research itself represents an attempt to probe more deeply into the area of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) - the specialized digital computers that control individual processes within supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. The report (1) provides an overview of control system networks and PLC architecture, (2) furnishes profiles for the top eight vendors in the PLC industry, (3) discusses the communications protocols used in different industries, and (4) analyzes the hardware used in several PLC devices. As part of the project, several PLCs were disassembled to identify constituent components. That information will direct the next step of the research, which will greatly increase our understanding of PLC security in both the hardware and software areas. Such an understanding is vital for discerning the potential national security impact of security flaws in these devices, as well as for developing proactive countermeasures.

  1. On the feasibility of device fingerprinting in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.; Hadziosmanovic, D.; Zambon, Emmanuele; Kargl, Frank; Luiijf, Eric; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2013-01-01

    As Industrial Control Systems (ICS) and standard IT networks are becoming one heterogeneous entity, there has been an increasing effort in adjusting common security tools and methodologies to fit the industrial environment. Fingerprinting of industrial devices is still an unexplored research field.

  2. Advanced patient transfer assist device with intuitive interaction control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Heather C; Choi, Young Mi; Book, Wayne J

    2017-10-24

    This research aims to improve patient transfers by developing a new type of advanced robotic assist device. It has multiple actuated degrees of freedom and a powered steerable base to maximize maneuverability around obstacles. An intuitive interface and control strategy allows the caregiver to simply push on the machine in the direction of desired patient motion. The control integrates measurements of both force and proximity to mitigate any potential large collision forces and provides operators information about obstacles with a form of haptic feedback. Electro-hydraulic pump controlled actuation provides high force density for the actuation. Nineteen participants performed tests to compare transfer operations (transferring a 250-lb mannequin between a wheelchair, chair, bed, and floor) and interaction control of a prototype device with a commercially available patient lift. The testing included a time study of the transfer operations and subjective rating of device performance. The results show that operators perform transfer tasks significantly faster and rate performance higher using the prototype patient transfer assist device than with a current market patient lift. With further development, features of the new patient lift can help facilitate patient transfers that are safer, easier, and more efficient for caregivers.

  3. Biopolymers in controlled release devices for agricultural applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of biopolymers such as starch for agricultural applications including controlled release devices is growing due the environmental benefits. Recently, concerns have grown about the worldwide spread of parasitic mites (Varroa destructor) that infect colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). ...

  4. Leap Motion Device Used to Control a Real Anthropomorphic Gripper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Staretu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents for the first time the use of the Leap Motion device to control an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers. First, a description of the Leap Motion device is presented, highlighting its main functional characteristics, followed by testing of its use for capturing the movements of a human hand's fingers in different configurations. Next, the HandCommander soft module and the Interface Controller application are described. The HandCommander is a software module created to facilitate interaction between a human hand and the GraspIT virtual environment, and the Interface Controller application is required to send motion data to the virtual environment and to test the communication protocol. For the test, a prototype of an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers was made, including a proper hardware system of command and control, which is briefly presented in this paper. Following the creation of the prototype, the command system performance test was conducted under real conditions, evaluating the recognition efficiency of the objects to be gripped and the efficiency of the command and control strategies for the gripping process. The gripping test is exemplified by the gripping of an object, such as a screw spanner. It was found that the command system, both in terms of capturing human hand gestures with the Leap Motion device and effective object gripping, is operational. Suggestive figures are presented as examples.

  5. A Wii-controlled safety device for electric chainsaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gubiani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Forestry continues to represent one of the most hazardous economic sectors of human activity, and historically, the operation of chainsaws has mainly been restricted to professional lumberjacks. In recent years, because of low cost, chainsaws have become popular among unprofessionals, e.g. for cutting firewood and trimming trees. Serious or lethal lesions due to the use of chainsaws or electric chainsaws are often observed by traumatologists or forensic pathologists. Such serious accidents often occur during occupational activities and are essentially due to kickback or uncorrected use of the tool, or when the operator falls down losing the control of the implement. A new device in order to stop a cutting chain was developed and adapted to an electric chainsaw. The device is based on a Wiimote controller (Nintendo™, including two accelerometers and two gyroscopes for detecting rotation and inclination. A Bluetooth wireless technology is used to transfer data to a portable computer. The data collected about linear and angular acceleration are filtered by an algorithm, based on the Euclid norm, capable to distinguishing between normal movements and dangerous chainsaw movements. The result show a good answer to device and when happen a dangerous situation an alarm signal is sent back to the implement in order to stop the cutting chain. The device show a correct behavior in tested dangerous situations and is envisaged to extend to combustion engine chainsaws, as well as to other portable equipment used in agriculture and forestry operations and for this objectives were patented.

  6. Inspection operation aid device and method for control rod drives and hydraulic control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Shun-ichi; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Okuzumi, Naoaki; Ishisato, Shin-ichi

    1995-12-12

    The device of the present invention comprises an input/output device for inputting/outputting various data required for evaluation of integrity, a memorizing/storing device, an information processing device and a display device. Friction data as differential pressure signals of driving hydraulic pressures measured upon inspection/test operation of control rod drives and hydraulic pressure control system are taken into the input/output device. A result of processing for friction signal waveform pattern is calculated. The integrity and abnormality of the control rod drives and the hydraulic pressure system are evaluated using a causal relation between the result of the signal processing for obtained waveform patterns and the intelligence/knowledge of behaviors of the control rod devices and the hydraulic pressure control system thereby providing integrity data. Since the friction data can be calculated automatically by signal waveform pattern processing, there is no need to read the data manually by specialists who take part in the inspection and test. As a result, data on evaluation for integrity and abnormality of the control rod drives and the hydraulic pressure control system can be provided rapidly. (N.H.).

  7. Control device for controlling the fuel-air ratio of an internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, W.G.

    1982-04-08

    The invention deals with a control device for controlling the fuel-air ratio of a combustion engine. The oxygen content in the exhaust gas is measured in certain time intervals thereby determining whether a pre-determined number of measurements shows the result ''lean'' or ''rich'', the control device adjusts the mixture according to the measured results if necessary.

  8. Resealable, optically accessible, PDMS-free fluidic platform for ex vivo interrogation of pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenguito, Giovanni; Chaimov, Deborah; Weitz, Jonathan R; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Rawal, Siddarth A K; Tamayo-Garcia, Alejandro; Caicedo, Alejandro; Stabler, Cherie L; Buchwald, Peter; Agarwal, Ashutosh

    2017-02-28

    We report the design and fabrication of a robust fluidic platform built out of inert plastic materials and micromachined features that promote optimized convective fluid transport. The platform is tested for perfusion interrogation of rodent and human pancreatic islets, dynamic secretion of hormones, concomitant live-cell imaging, and optogenetic stimulation of genetically engineered islets. A coupled quantitative fluid dynamics computational model of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and fluid dynamics was first utilized to design device geometries that are optimal for complete perfusion of three-dimensional islets, effective collection of secreted insulin, and minimization of system volumes and associated delays. Fluidic devices were then fabricated through rapid prototyping techniques, such as micromilling and laser engraving, as two interlocking parts from materials that are non-absorbent and inert. Finally, the assembly was tested for performance using both rodent and human islets with multiple assays conducted in parallel, such as dynamic perfusion, staining and optogenetics on standard microscopes, as well as for integration with commercial perfusion machines. The optimized design of convective fluid flows, use of bio-inert and non-absorbent materials, reversible assembly, manual access for loading and unloading of islets, and straightforward integration with commercial imaging and fluid handling systems proved to be critical for perfusion assay, and particularly suited for time-resolved optogenetics studies.

  9. Respiratory protective device design using control system techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, W. A.; Yankovich, D.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a control system analysis approach to provide a design base for respiratory protective devices is considered. A system design approach requires that all functions and components of the system be mathematically identified in a model of the RPD. The mathematical notations describe the operation of the components as closely as possible. The individual component mathematical descriptions are then combined to describe the complete RPD. Finally, analysis of the mathematical notation by control system theory is used to derive compensating component values that force the system to operate in a stable and predictable manner.

  10. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  11. A device for automatic photoelectric control of the analytical gap for emission spectrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, John A.; Cooley, Elmo F.; Curry, Kenneth J.

    1977-01-01

    A photoelectric device has been built that automatically controls the analytical gap between electrodes during excitation period. The control device allows for precise control of the analytical gap during the arcing process of samples, resulting in better precision of analysis.

  12. Mechanism of controlled release kinetics from medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Raval

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of biodegradable polymers for controlled drug delivery has gained immense attention in the pharmaceutical and medical device industry to administer various drugs, proteins and other bio-molecules both systematically and locally to cure several diseases. The efficacy and toxicity of this local therapeutics depends upon drug release kinetics, which will further decide drug deposition, distribution, and retention at the target site. Drug Eluting Stent (DES presently possesses clinical importance as an alternative to Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting due to the ease of the procedure and comparable safety and efficacy. Many models have been developed to describe the drug delivery from polymeric carriers based on the different mechanisms which control the release phenomenon from DES. Advanced characterization techniques facilitate an understanding of the complexities behind design and related drug release behavior of drug eluting stents, which aids in the development of improved future drug eluting systems. This review discusses different drug release mechanisms, engineering principles, mathematical models and current trends that are proposed for drug-polymer coated medical devices such as cardiovascular stents and different analytical methods currently utilized to probe diverse characteristics of drug eluting devices.

  13. Model predictive control approach for a CPAP-device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheel Mathias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by a collapse of the upper respiratory tract, resulting in a reduction of the blood oxygen- and an increase of the carbon dioxide (CO2 - concentration, which causes repeated sleep disruptions. The gold standard to treat the OSAS is the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy. The continuous pressure keeps the upper airway open and prevents the collapse of the upper respiratory tract and the pharynx. Most of the available CPAP-devices cannot maintain the pressure reference [1]. In this work a model predictive control approach is provided. This control approach has the possibility to include the patient’s breathing effort into the calculation of the control variable. Therefore a patient-individualized control strategy can be developed.

  14. Researching on Control Device of Prestressing Wire Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jianhui; Guo, Yangbo; Liu, Maoshe

    2017-06-01

    This paper mainly introduces a device for controlling prestress and its related research methods, the advantage of this method is that the reinforcement process is easy to operate and control the prestress of wire rope accurately. The relationship between the stress and strain of the steel wire rope is monitored during the experiment, and the one - to - one relationship between the controllable position and the pretightening force of the steel wire rope is confirmed by the 5mm steel wire rope, and the results are analyzed theoretically by the measured elastic modulus. The results show that the method can effectively control the prestressing force, and the result provides a reference method for strengthening the concrete column with prestressed steel strand.

  15. Controlled closing on shunt reactor compensated transmission lines. Part 1: Closing control device development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, K.; Hoelzl, C.; Stanek, M. [Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Carvalho, A.C.; Hofbauer, W.; Hoegg, P.; Avent, B.L.; Peelo, D.F.; Sawada, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    A control device for point-on-wave closing or auto-reclosing of shunt reactor compensated transmission lines for reduction of closing overvoltages is presented. The device is the first of its kind. It was put into field service successfully more than a year ago. Development aspects and basic investigations on the relevant transient switching phenomena are presented. The algorithm employed works independently of the shape of the voltage signal to be synchronized on by means of pattern recognition. Peculiarities of the hardware are high redundancy and a system to bypass the controller at any malfunction of the electronic circuits. The efficiency of the controller was verified by a combination of transient network analyzer tests and EMTP simulations showing the ability of the device to suppress overvoltages. This procedure is generally recommended for future application of control devices as a type test procedure.

  16. Design control considerations for biologic-device combination products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dave; Liu, Roger; Anand Subramony, J; Cammack, Jon

    2017-03-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic medical products that combine drugs, devices, and/or biological products with one another. Historically, biologics development involved identifying efficacious doses administered to patients intravenously or perhaps by a syringe. Until fairly recently, there has been limited focus on developing an accompanying medical device, such as a prefilled syringe or auto-injector, to enable easy and more efficient delivery. For the last several years, and looking forward, where there may be little to distinguish biologics medicines with relatively similar efficacy profiles, the biotechnology market is beginning to differentiate products by patient-focused, biologic-device based combination products. As innovative as biologic-device combination products are, they can pose considerable development, regulatory, and commercialization challenges due to unique physicochemical properties and special clinical considerations (e.g., dosing volumes, frequency, co-medications, etc.) of the biologic medicine. A biologic-device combination product is a marriage between two partners with "cultural differences," so to speak. There are clear differences in the development, review, and commercialization processes of the biologic and the device. When these two cultures come together in a combination product, developers and reviewers must find ways to address the design controls and risk management processes of both the biologic and device, and knit them into a single entity with supporting product approval documentation. Moreover, digital medicine and connected health trends are pushing the boundaries of combination product development and regulations even further. Despite an admirable cooperation between industry and FDA in recent years, unique product configurations and design features have resulted in review challenges. These challenges have prompted agency reviewers to modernize consultation processes, while at the same time, promoting

  17. Closed Loop Control Compact Exercise Device for Use on MPCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Chris; Funk, Justin; Funk, Nathan; Kutnick, Gilead; Humphreys, Brad; Bruinsma, Douwe; Perusek, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Long duration space travel to Mars or to an asteroid will expose astronauts to extended periods of reduced gravity. To combat spaceflight physiological deconditioning, astronauts will use resistive and aerobic exercise regimens for the duration of the space flight to minimize the loss of bone density, muscle mass and aerobic capacity that occurs during exposure to a reduced gravity environment. Unlike the International Space Station (ISS), the mass and volume available for an exercise device in the next generation of spacecraft is limited. Therefore, compact exercise device prototypes are being developed for human in the loop evaluations. The NASA Human Research Program (HRP) is managing Advanced Exercise Concepts (AEC) requirements development and candidate technology maturation for all exploration mission profiles from Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) exploration missions (e.g., EM-2, up to 21 day) to Mars Transit (up to 1000 day) missions. Numerous technologies have been considered and evaluated against HRP-approved functional requirements and include flywheel, pneumatic and closed-loop microprocessor-controlled motor driven power plants. Motor driven technologies offer excellent torque density and load accuracy characteristics as well as the ability to create custom mechanical impedance (the dynamic relationship between force and velocity) and custom load versus position exercise algorithms. Further, closed-loop motor-driven technologies offer the ability to monitor exercise dose parameters and adapt to the needs of the crewmember for real time optimization of exercise prescriptions. A simple proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is demonstrated in a prototype motor driven exercise device with comparison to resistive static and dynamic load set points and aerobic work rate targets. The resistive load term in the algorithm includes a constant force component (Fcmg) as well as inertial component (Fima) and a discussion of system tuning is presented

  18. Fabrication of Hydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces for Microfluidic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Kyojiro; Tsukahara, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    In the field of micro- and nanofluidics, various kinds of novel devices have been developed. For such devices, not only fluidic control but also surface control of micro/nano channels is essential. Recently, fluidic control by hydrophobic nanostructured surfaces have attracted much attention. However, conventional fabrication methods of nanostructures require complicated steps, and integration of the nanostructures into micro/nano channels makes fabrication procedures even more difficult and complicated. In the present study, a simple and easy fabrication method of nanostructures integrated into microchannels was developed. Various sizes of nanostructures were successfully fabricated by changing the plasma etching time and etching with a basic solution. Furthermore, it proved possible to construct highly hydrophobic nanostructured surfaces that could effectively control the fluid in microchannels at designed pressures. We believe that the fabrication method developed here and the results obtained are valuable contributions towards further applications in the field of micro- and nanofluidics.

  19. Silicon micro-fluidic cooling for NA62 GTK pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Romagnoli, G; Brunel, B; Catinaccio, A; Degrange, J; Mapelli, A; Morel, M; Noel, J; Petagna, P

    2015-01-01

    Silicon micro-channel cooling is being studied for efficient thermal management in application fields such as high power computing and 3D electronic integration. This concept has been introduced in 2010 for the thermal management of silicon pixel detectors in high energy physics experiments. Combining the versatility of standard micro-fabrication processes with the high thermal efficiency typical of micro-fluidics, it is possible to produce effective thermal management devices that are well adapted to different detector configurations. The production of very thin cooling devices in silicon enables a minimization of material of the tracking sensors and eliminates mechanical stresses due to the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between detectors and cooling systems. The NA62 experiment at CERN will be the first high particle physics experiment that will install a micro-cooling system to perform the thermal management of the three detection planes of its Gigatracker pixel detector.

  20. Polymeric barrier membranes for device packaging, diffusive control and biocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasikiewicz, J.M.; Roohpour, N.; Paul, D. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Grahn, M. [Centre for Academic Surgery, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Ateh, D. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Barts and the London Queen Mary' s school of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom); Rehman, I. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Vadgama, P. [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.vadgama@qmul.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    Current state-of-the-art implantable micron feature electronic devices are capable of monitoring and stimulating functions in vivo. Within an EU Framework VI project a further step was taken in developing key microsystem technologies and communication methods that could bring intelligence directly to the human interface, in the form of reactive medical implants and ambulatory measurement systems. Information from these devices is planned to be transmitted out into the wider environment for remote processing. However, the packaging of such state-of-the-art devices to enhance tissue biocompatibility, and to protect conducting elements from in vivo corrosion during extended use, along with protecting the body from toxins leaching from implant components, remains a concern. Candidate polymeric barriers as hydration resistant and solute impermeable interfaces to mitigate such major problems of chronic implantation were investigated. Materials studied included silicone rubber, PVC, polyurethane, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). Polymer permeability to water solutes was marginally improved through incorporation of lipid into these structures. Surface biocompatibility was assessed on the basis of protein film deposition in vitro and by cell viability studies in tissue culture. Short-term toxicity was not observed for any of the tested materials, though there were substantial differences in hydration. Additionally, polypyrrole over active electrodes shows feasibility for controlled tissue interfacing whilst retaining electrical conductivity.

  1. Optimal control and quantum simulations in superconducting quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel J.

    2014-10-31

    Quantum optimal control theory is the science of steering quantum systems. In this thesis we show how to overcome the obstacles in implementing optimal control for superconducting quantum bits, a promising candidate for the creation of a quantum computer. Building such a device will require the tools of optimal control. We develop pulse shapes to solve a frequency crowding problem and create controlled-Z gates. A methodology is developed for the optimisation towards a target non-unitary process. We show how to tune-up control pulses for a generic quantum system in an automated way using a combination of open- and closed-loop optimal control. This will help scaling of quantum technologies since algorithms can calibrate control pulses far more efficiently than humans. Additionally we show how circuit QED can be brought to the novel regime of multi-mode ultrastrong coupling using a left-handed transmission line coupled to a right-handed one. We then propose to use this system as an analogue quantum simulator for the Spin-Boson model to show how dissipation arises in quantum systems.

  2. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  3. Advanced fluidic handling and use of two-phase flow for high throughput structural investigation of proteins on a microfluidic sample preparation platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Møller, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the structure of proteins can bring forth a wealth of information about biological function and can be used to better understand the processes in living cells. This paper reports a new microfluidic sample preparation system for the structural investigation of proteins by Small Angle X......-ray Scattering (SAXS). The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, synchrotron beamline control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. The precise fluidic handling capabilities are used to transport and precisely position samples as small as 500 n...

  4. Characterisation of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schneider, F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors compare the performance and optical quality of two types of adaptive fluidic silicone-membrane lenses. The membranes feature either a homogeneous thickness, or they are shaped resulting in an inhomogeneous cross-section. The lens systems...

  5. Fabrication of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Faheem; Schmid, Silvan; Davis, Zachary James

    2011-01-01

    Microfabricated cantilevers are proving their potential as excellent tools for analysis applications. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication and testing of resonant micro cantilevers with integrated transparent fluidic channels. The cantilevers have been devised to measure the density....... Such cantilevers can be used as density sensors, to monitor growth of biological cells, measure mass of particles, etc....

  6. Methodology for designing and manufacturing complex biologically inspired soft robotic fluidic actuators: prosthetic hand case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Bean, E; Das, R; McDaid, A

    2016-10-31

    We present a novel methodology for the design and manufacture of complex biologically inspired soft robotic fluidic actuators. The methodology is applied to the design and manufacture of a prosthetic for the hand. Real human hands are scanned to produce a 3D model of a finger, and pneumatic networks are implemented within it to produce a biomimetic bending motion. The finger is then partitioned into material sections, and a genetic algorithm based optimization, using finite element analysis, is employed to discover the optimal material for each section. This is based on two biomimetic performance criteria. Two sets of optimizations using two material sets are performed. Promising optimized material arrangements are fabricated using two techniques to validate the optimization routine, and the fabricated and simulated results are compared. We find that the optimization is successful in producing biomimetic soft robotic fingers and that fabrication of the fingers is possible. Limitations and paths for development are discussed. This methodology can be applied for other fluidic soft robotic devices.

  7. A microscope automated fluidic system to study bacterial processes in real time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Ducret

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Most time lapse microscopy experiments studying bacterial processes ie growth, progression through the cell cycle and motility have been performed on thin nutrient agar pads. An important limitation of this approach is that dynamic perturbations of the experimental conditions cannot be easily performed. In eukaryotic cell biology, fluidic approaches have been largely used to study the impact of rapid environmental perturbations on live cells and in real time. However, all these approaches are not easily applicable to bacterial cells because the substrata are in all cases specific and also because microfluidics nanotechnology requires a complex lithography for the study of micrometer sized bacterial cells. In fact, in many cases agar is the experimental solid substratum on which bacteria can move or even grow. For these reasons, we designed a novel hybrid micro fluidic device that combines a thin agar pad and a custom flow chamber. By studying several examples, we show that this system allows real time analysis of a broad array of biological processes such as growth, development and motility. Thus, the flow chamber system will be an essential tool to study any process that take place on an agar surface at the single cell level.

  8. Electrically tunable fluidic lens imaging system for laparoscopic fluorescence-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Davide; Tullis, Iain D C; Barber, Paul R; Augustyniak, Edyta M; Smart, Sean C; Vallis, Katherine A; Vojnovic, Borivoj

    2017-07-01

    The addition of fluorescence guidance in laparoscopic procedures has gained significant interest in recent years, particularly through the use of near infrared (NIR) markers. In this work we present a novel laparoscope camera coupler based on an electrically tunable fluidic lens that permits programmable focus control and has desirable achromatic performance from the visible to the NIR. Its use extends the lower working distance limit and improves detection sensitivity, important for work with molecularly targeted fluorescence markers. We demonstrate its superior optical performance in laparoscopic fluorescence-guided surgery. In vivo results using a tumor specific molecular probe and a nonspecific NIR dye are presented.

  9. A High-Strength, Absorbable, Antibacterial Knotless Tissue Control Device for Fascial Closure

    OpenAIRE

    Nawrocki, Jesse G.; Nonnenmann, Heather; Mooney, Mark; Sutton, Nadia; Schmitz, Niels-Derrek

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review provides an overview of the STRATAFIX? SYMMETRIC PDS? Plus Knotless Tissue Control Device design and performance characteristics and highlights the device?s relevance for use in gynecological procedures. Various device testing was conducted on tensile strength, fixation tab mass comparison to conventional suture knot tower, initiation stitch strength, and wound holding strength to highlight the STRATAFIX? SYMMETRIC PDS? Plus Device?s key product attributes that m...

  10. Equilibria near asteroids for solar sails with reflection control devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shengping; Li, Junfeng

    2015-02-01

    Solar sails are well-suited for long-term, multiple-asteroid missions. The dynamics of solar sails near an asteroid have not yet been studied in detail. In this paper, out-of-plane artificial equilibria in a Sun-asteroid rotating frame and hovering points in a body-fixed rotating frame are studied (using a solar sail equipped with reflection control devices). First, the dynamics and the stability of out-of-plane artificial equilibria are studied as an elliptical restricted three body problem. Next, the body-fixed hovering problem is discussed as a two-body problem. Hovering flight is only possible for certain values of the latitude of the asteroid's orbit. In addition, the feasible range of latitudes is determined for each landmark on the asteroid's surface. The influence of the sail lightness number on the feasible range is also illustrated. Several special families of hovering points are discussed. These points include points above the equator and poles and points with an altitude equal to the radius of the synchronous orbit. In both of these types of problems, the solar sail (equipped with reflection control devices) can equilibrate over a large range of locations.

  11. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  12. 1st International Conference on Intelligent Communication, Control and Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Sushabhan

    2017-01-01

    The book presents high-quality research papers presented at the first international conference, ICICCD 2016, organised by the Department of Electronics, Instrumentation and Control Engineering of University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun on 2nd and 3rd April, 2016. The book is broadly divided into three sections: Intelligent Communication, Intelligent Control and Intelligent Devices. The areas covered under these sections are wireless communication and radio technologies, optical communication, communication hardware evolution, machine-to-machine communication networks, routing techniques, network analytics, network applications and services, satellite and space communications, technologies for e-communication, wireless Ad-Hoc and sensor networks, communications and information security, signal processing for communications, communication software, microwave informatics, robotics and automation, optimization techniques and algorithms, intelligent transport, mechatronics system, guidance and navigat...

  13. Control and Data Analysis for Emittance Measuring Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, T

    2001-01-01

    Due to the wide range of heavy ion beam intensities and energies in the GSI linac and the associated transfer channel to the synchrotron, several different types of emittance measurement systems have been established. Many common devices such as slit/grid or dipole-sweep systems are integrated into the GSI control system. Other systems like the single shot pepper pot method using CCD-cameras or stand-alone slit/grid set-ups are connected to personal computers. An overview is given about the various systems and their software integration. Main interest is directed on the software development for emittance front-end control and data analysis such as evaluation algorithms or graphical presentation of the results. In addition, special features for improved usability of the software such as data export, project databases and automatic report generation will be presented. An outlook on a unified evaluation procedure for all different types of emittance measurement is given.

  14. Active Thermal Control by Controlled Shoot-through of Power Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Concari, Carlo; Barater, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Active Thermal Control (ATC) consists in driving power switches in a less efficient way when low load conditions are present. The resulting wasted power is used to self-heat the device, reducing amplitude and occurrence of thermal cycles and hence improving the reliability. This paper presents a ...... a novel way to control losses, and hence temperature, of both positive- and negative-current devices in half-bridge topologies at various load conditions. The goal is achieved by means of a controlled shoot-through of the half-bridge leg....

  15. Method and apparatus for actively controlling a micro-scale flexural plate wave device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2001-01-01

    An actively controlled flexural plate wave device provides a micro-scale pump. A method of actively controlling a flexural plate wave device produces traveling waves in the device by coordinating the interaction of a magnetic field with actively controlled currents. An actively-controlled flexural plate wave device can be placed in a fluid channel and adapted for use as a micro-scale fluid pump to cool or drive micro-scale systems, for example, micro-chips, micro-electrical-mechanical devices, micro-fluid circuits, or micro-scale chemical analysis devices.

  16. 77 FR 64827 - Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV); Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... COMMISSION Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV); Final... against infringing lighting control devices including dimmer switches and parts thereof, and cease and... States after importation of certain lighting control devices including dimmer switches and parts thereof...

  17. STcontrol and NEWPORT Motion Controller Model ESP 301 Device

    CERN Document Server

    Kapanadze, Giorgi

    2015-01-01

    Pixel detectors are used to detect particle tracks in LHC experiments. This kind of detectors are built with silicon semiconductor diodes. Ionizing particles create charge in the diode and the reverse bias voltage creates electric field in the diode which causes effective charge collection by the drift of electrons [1]. One of the main parameter of tracker detectors is efficiency. The efficiency as a function of position in the pixel matrix can be evaluated by scanning the matrix with red and infrared lasers. It is important to know what is happening between pixels in terms of efficiency. We perform these measurements to test new type of pixel detectors for the LHC future upgrade in 2023. New type of detectors are needed because the radiation level will be much higher [2]. For the measurements we need to control a stage motion controller (NEWPORT Motion Controller Model ESP 301) with the existing software STcontrol, which is used for readout data from pixel detectors and to control other devices like the lase...

  18. 75 FR 17093 - Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... comprehensive system for the regulation of medical devices intended for human use. Section 513 of the act (21 U... device regulations to establish special controls for these class II devices and to exempt some of these... Cosmetic Act (the act) (21 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the...

  19. Implementation of vortex wake control using SMA-actuated devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bilanin, Alan J.; Batcho, P. F.; McKillip, Robert M., Jr.; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1997-05-01

    Mitigation of the undesirable effects of trailing vortex wakes has been a long-standing priority for both reduction of submarine wake signature and alleviation of aircraft vortex wake hazard. A recent study established the feasibility of using relatively weak, secondary vortices with carefully selected unsteady amplitude and phasing to accelerate the breakup of the primary vortex system of a lifting surface, a technique denoted `vortex leveraging'. This paper will summarize progress on the development of SMA-actuated devices for implementing vortex leveraging for hydrodynamic applications. The methods being applied to the hydrodynamic design of these deformable Smart Vortex Leveraging Tabs (SVLTs) will be described, and the results of a preliminary assessment of SVLT performance in achieving wake breakup will be presented. Also, previous work on the design and testing of deformable control surfaces actuated via embedded SMA agonist wires will be reviewed and the design process being employed in the present applications will be discussed. Finally, the plans for near-term computational and experimental work to validate the use of SMA-driven devices for the wake mitigation task will be briefly outlined.

  20. Autonomous Soft Robotic Fish Capable of Escape Maneuvers Using Fluidic Elastomer Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Cagdas D.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this work we describe an autonomous soft-bodied robot that is both self-contained and capable of rapid, continuum-body motion. We detail the design, modeling, fabrication, and control of the soft fish, focusing on enabling the robot to perform rapid escape responses. The robot employs a compliant body with embedded actuators emulating the slender anatomical form of a fish. In addition, the robot has a novel fluidic actuation system that drives body motion and has all the subsystems of a traditional robot onboard: power, actuation, processing, and control. At the core of the fish's soft body is an array of fluidic elastomer actuators. We design the fish to emulate escape responses in addition to forward swimming because such maneuvers require rapid body accelerations and continuum-body motion. These maneuvers showcase the performance capabilities of this self-contained robot. The kinematics and controllability of the robot during simulated escape response maneuvers are analyzed and compared with studies on biological fish. We show that during escape responses, the soft-bodied robot has similar input–output relationships to those observed in biological fish. The major implication of this work is that we show soft robots can be both self-contained and capable of rapid body motion. PMID:27625912

  1. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  2. The smart Peano fluidic muscle: a low profile flexible orthosis actuator that feels pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan J.; Anderson, Iain A.; Xie, Shane Q.

    2015-03-01

    Robotic orthoses have the potential to provide effective rehabilitation while overcoming the availability and cost constraints of therapists. These orthoses must be characterized by the naturally safe, reliable, and controlled motion of a human therapist's muscles. Such characteristics are only possible in the natural kingdom through the pain sensing realized by the interaction of an intelligent nervous system and muscles' embedded sensing organs. McKibben fluidic muscles or pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs) are a popular orthosis actuator because of their inherent compliance, high force, and muscle-like load-displacement characteristics. However, the circular cross-section of PMA increases their profile. PMA are also notoriously unreliable and difficult to control, lacking the intelligent pain sensing systems of their biological muscle counterparts. Here the Peano fluidic muscle, a new low profile yet high-force soft actuator is introduced. This muscle is smart, featuring bioinspired embedded pressure and soft capacitive strain sensors. Given this pressure and strain feedback, experimental validation shows that a lumped parameter model based on the muscle geometry and material parameters can be used to predict its force for quasistatic motion with an average error of 10 - 15N. Combining this with a force threshold pain sensing algorithm sets a precedent for flexible orthosis actuation that uses embedded sensors to prevent damage to the actuator and its environment.

  3. Large-area fluidic assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes through dip-coating and directional evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilnam; Kang, Tae June

    2017-12-01

    We present a simple and scalable fluidic-assembly approach, in which bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are selectively aligned and deposited by directionally controlled dip-coating and solvent evaporation processes. The patterned surface with alternating regions of hydrophobic polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) (height 100 nm) strips and hydrophilic SiO2 substrate was withdrawn vertically at a constant speed ( 3 mm/min) from a solution bath containing SWCNTs ( 0.1 mg/ml), allowing for directional evaporation and subsequent selective deposition of nanotube bundles along the edges of horizontally aligned PDMS strips. In addition, the fluidic assembly was applied to fabricate a field effect transistor (FET) with highly oriented SWCNTs, which demonstrate significantly higher current density as well as high turn-off ratio (T/O ratio 100) as compared to that with randomly distributed carbon nanotube bundles (T/O ratio <10).

  4. pH-Sensitive Hydrogel for Micro-Fluidic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengzhi Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior of a pH-sensitive hydrogel micro-fluidic valve system is investigated using inhomogeneous gel deformation theory, in which the fluid-structure interaction (FSI of the gel solid and fluid flow in the pipe is considered. We use a finite element method with a well adopted hydrogel constitutive equation, which is coded in commercial software, ABAQUS, to simulate the hydrogel valve swelling deformation, while FLUENT is adopted to model the fluid flow in the pipe of the hydrogel valve system. The study demonstrates that FSI significantly affects the gel swelling deformed shapes, fluid flow pressure and velocity patterns. FSI has to be considered in the study on fluid flow regulated by hydrogel microfluidic valve. The study provides a more accurate and adoptable model for future design of new pH-sensitive hydrogel valves, and also gives a useful guideline for further studies on hydrogel fluidic applications.

  5. Device for passive flow control around vertical axis marine turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coşoiu, C. I.; Georgescu, A. M.; Degeratu, M.; Haşegan, L.; Hlevca, D.

    2012-11-01

    The power supplied by a turbine with the rotor placed in a free stream flow may be increased by augmenting the velocity in the rotor area. The energy of the free flow is dispersed and it may be concentrated by placing a profiled structure around the bare turbine in order to concentrate more energy in the rotor zone. At the Aerodynamic and Wind Engineering Laboratory (LAIV) of the Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest (UTCB) it was developed a concentrating housing to be used for hydro or aeolian horizontal axis wind turbines, in order to increase the available energy in the active section of turbine rotor. The shape of the concentrating housing results by superposing several aero/hydro dynamic effects, the most important being the one generated by the passive flow control devices that were included in the housing structure. Those concentrating housings may be also adapted for hydro or aeolian turbines with vertical axis. The present paper details the numerical research effectuated at the LAIV to determine the performances of a vertical axis marine turbine equipped with such a concentrating device, in order to increase the energy quantity extracted from the main flow. The turbine is a Darrieus type one with three vertical straight blades, symmetric with respect to the axis of rotation, generated using a NACA4518 airfoil. The global performances of the turbine equipped with the concentrating housing were compared to the same characteristics of the bare turbine. In order to validate the numerical approach used in this paper, test cases from the literature resulting from experimental and numerical simulations for similar situations, were used.

  6. Electrokinetics Models for Micro and Nano Fluidic Impedance Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    1 ELECTROKINETICS MODELS FOR MICRO AND NANO FLUIDIC IMPEDANCE SENSORS Yi Wang*, Hongjun Song, Ketan Bhatt, Kapil Pant CFD Research Corporation...design continues to be a challenge. This paper presents high-fidelity models to resolve the electrokinetic transport process at the micro- and...nano-scale and capture the critical effects of various design parameters on the electrokinetic transport and sensor performance such as medium

  7. Microvalve-based microfluidic device for C. elegans manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, S.; Nock, V.; Alkaisi, M. M.; Wang, W.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we report on the integration of a force measurement application capable of continuously measuring the forces generated by C. elegans in motion with a series of controllable microvalves which have an additional ability to increase control over worm selection and manipulation. The three-layer device consists of a pneumatic layer at the top, and a fluidic layer at the bottom with a thin PDMS membrane which functions as a microvalve sandwiched in between. The pneumatic layer functions as valves, whose operation is controlled pneumatically. The fluidic layer contains of PDMS micropillars for resolving the worm force from the deflection of the cantilever-like pillars. The measured force is horizontal and equivalent to a point force acting at half of the pillar height. By carefully controlling the incorporated microvalves, the proposed device is able to select and direct worm movement and at the same time increase the number of force measurement results collected. The integration of the microvalve with the PDMS micropillar-based on chip system can be easily combined with existing screening and imaging systems and also has the capability to facilitate high-throughput screening of force patterns in C. elegans locomotion behaviour.

  8. An Implement of FPGA Based PCI Controller Device and Improvement of DDA Arc Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to develop a new kind of PCI slave device serving as a motion controller for a biaxial motion control system. This kind of controller device is a new realization scheme of PCI devices, which is embedded with a deeply customized PCI interface block instead of traditional PCI interface chips, which will greatly promote the comprehensive performance of the device. Besides, we improved the popular and widely used DDA arc interpolation algorithm, promoting its performance in both accuracy and stability, and integrated it into our device, allowing the ability of the moving parts to move along nonlinear curve paths. Currently, this kind of controller device has been successfully applied on a surface mount machine which is also developed by our lab. As a result, the controller device performs well and is able to satisfy the requirement of accuracy and velocity of the surface mount machine. And its reliability and stability are also remarkable.

  9. Fluidic Logic Used in a Systems Approach to Enable Integrated Single-cell Functional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Ramalingam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of single cells has evolved over the past several years to include expression and genomic analysis of an increasing number of single cells. Several studies have demonstrated wide-spread variation and heterogeneity within cell populations of similar phenotype. While the characterization of these populations will likely set the foundation for our understanding of genomic- and expression-based diversity, it will not be able to link the functional differences of a single cell to its underlying genomic structure and activity. Currently, it is difficult to perturb single cells in a controlled environment, monitor and measure the response due to perturbation, and link these response measurements to downstream genomic and transcriptomic analysis. In order to address this challenge, we developed a platform to integrate and miniaturize many of the experimental steps required to study single-cell function. The heart of this platform is an elastomer-based Integrated Fluidic Circuit (IFC that uses fluidic logic to select and sequester specific single cells based on a phenotypic trait for downstream experimentation. Experiments with sequestered cells that have been performed include on-chip culture, exposure to a variety of stimulants, and post-exposure image-based response analysis, followed by preparation of the mRNA transcriptome for massively parallel sequencing analysis. The flexible system embodies experimental design and execution that enable routine functional studies of single cells.

  10. Primary Control by ON/OFF Demand-Side Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Andersen, Palle

    2013-01-01

    manage the portfolio of devices to collectively provide a primary reserve delivery in an unbundled liberalized electricity market setting under current regulations. Furthermore, we formulate a binary linear optimization problem that minimizes the aggregator’s cost of providing a primary reserve delivery......We consider an aggregator managing a portfolio of ON/OFF demand-side devices. The devices are able to shift con- sumption in time within certain energy limitations; moreover, the devices are able to measure the system frequency and switch ON and OFF accordingly. We show how the aggregator can...

  11. Porous Microfluidic Devices - Fabrication adn Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.; Geerken, M.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Wessling, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The major part of microfluidic devices nowadays consists of a dense material that defines the fluidic structure. A generic fabrication method enabling the production of completely porous micro devices with user-defined channel networks is developed. The channel walls can be used as a (selective)

  12. Seismic Proofing Capability of the Accumulated Semiactive Hydraulic Damper as an Active Interaction Control Device with Predictive Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Sung, Wen-Pei

    2016-01-01

    .... To improve the seismic proofing capability of Accumulated Semiactive Hydraulic Damper, it is converted to an Active Interaction Control device and synchronous control and predictive control methods are proposed...

  13. System Control Applications of Low-Power Radio Frequency Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Roger

    2017-09-01

    This paper conceptualizes a low-power wireless sensor network design for application employment to reduce theft of portable computer devices used in educational institutions today. The aim of this study is to design and develop a reliable and robust wireless network that can eradicate accessibility of a device’s human interface. An embedded system supplied by an energy harvesting source, installed on the portable computer device, may represent one of multiple slave nodes which request regular updates from a standalone master station. A portable computer device which is operated in an undesignated area or in a field perimeter where master to slave communication is restricted, indicating a possible theft scenario, will initiate a shutdown of its operating system and render the device unusable. Consequently, an algorithm in the device firmware may ensure the necessary steps are executed to track the device, irrespective whether the device is enabled. Design outcomes thus far indicate that a wireless network using low-power embedded hardware, is feasible for anti-theft applications. By incorporating one of the latest Bluetooth low-energy, ANT+, ZigBee or Thread wireless technologies, an anti-theft system may be implemented that has the potential to reduce major portable computer device theft in institutions of digitized learning.

  14. 67 FR 78563 - Guidance on Traffic Control Devices at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-24

    ...This notice announces that the FHWA has issued guidance to assist engineers in selection of traffic control devices or other measures at highway-rail crossings. The report, ``Guidance on Traffic Control Devices at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings'' is available at the following URL: http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/media/twgreport.htm. This guidance is designed to assist in decisions to install traffic control devices or otherwise improve highway-rail grade crossings.

  15. 76 FR 17444 - In the Matter of Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... certain vaginal ring birth control devices by reason of infringement of claim 1 of U.S. Patent No. 6,086... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain vaginal ring birth control...

  16. A Pressure Controlled Pinched Flow Fractionation Device for Continuous Particle Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Trosborg, Jacqueline; Tanzi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    the device tunable using a simple pressure control. Through analytical calculations and FEM simulations in COMSOL, the required dimensions and operating pressures of the device was determined. The device was subsequently fabricated by injection molding of a COC TOPAS grade 5013 polymer (TOPAS Advanced...

  17. Rapid, low-cost prototyping of centrifugal microfluidic devices for effective implementation of various microfluidic operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available particularly attractive solution for implementing microfluidic operations, as pumps, valves and other fluidic operations can be achieved primarily using centrifugal forces, with only a small motor required to power the system. Numerous devices can...

  18. Comparison and Research of the Mechanical Items of Standards for Controlled Door Closing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X.; Wang, M.; Li, Z. K.; Ou, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper analyzes the standards of controlled door closing devices at home and abroad, compares the standards from test devices and items, and illustrates the backcheck function, delayed action and dead stop degree test in detail. In addition, experiments have been done to verify the influence of different door weights on closing time, opening and closing moment and efficiency. The results show that the door weight has significant influence on mechanical performance of controlled door closing devices.

  19. 76 FR 35015 - Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV); Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV); Notice of... sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain lighting... after importation of certain lighting control devices including dimmer switches and parts thereof that...

  20. 77 FR 43612 - Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV); Decision To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Lighting Control Devices Including Dimmer Switches and Parts Thereof (IV); Decision To... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain lighting control devices... Lighting of Los Angeles, California. On September 9, 2011, the Commission issued notice of its...

  1. 77 FR 8900 - Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on Withdrawal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Vaginal Ring Birth Control Devices; Termination of the Investigation Based on Withdrawal... within the United States after importation of certain vaginal birth control devices by reason of...

  2. Creating a systems engineering approach for the manual on uniform traffic control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) provides basic principles for use of traffic : control devices (TCD). However, most TCDs are not explicitly required, and the decision to use a given : TCD in a given situation is typically made b...

  3. Understanding and controlling chromaticity shift in LED devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Lynn; Mills, Karmann; Lamvik, Michael; Perkins, Curtis; Bobashev, Georgiy; Young, Joseph; Yaga, Robert; Johnson, Cortina

    2017-05-30

    Chromaticity shift in light-emitting diode (LED) devices arises from multiple mechanisms, and at least five different chromaticity shift modes (CSMs) have been identified to date. This paper focuses on the impacts of irreversible phosphor degradation as a cause of chromaticity shifts in LED devices. The nitride phosphors used to produce warm white LEDs are especially vulnerable to degradation due to thermal and chemical effects such as reactions with oxygen and water. As a result, LED devices utilizing these phosphors were found to undergo either a green shift or, less commonly, a red shift depending on the phosphor mix in the LED devices. These types of chromaticity shifts are classified as CSM-2 (green shift) and CSM-5 (red shift). This paper provides an overview of the kinetic processes responsible for green and red chromaticity shifts along with examples from accelerated stress testing of 6” downlights. Both CSMs appear to proceed through analogous mechanisms that are initiated at the surface of the phosphor. A green shift is produced by the surface oxidation of the nitride phosphor that changes the emission profile to lower wavelengths. As the surface oxidation reaction proceeds, reactant limitations slow the rate and bulk oxidation processes become more prevalent. We found that a red chromaticity shift arises from quenching of the green phosphor, also possibly due to surface reactions of oxygen, which shift the emission chromaticity in the red direction. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of these findings on projecting chromaticity.

  4. State-of-the-art robotic devices for ankle rehabilitation: Mechanism and control review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid; Jamwal, Prashant K; Ghayesh, Mergen H

    2017-12-01

    There is an increasing research interest in exploring use of robotic devices for the physical therapy of patients suffering from stroke and spinal cord injuries. Rehabilitation of patients suffering from ankle joint dysfunctions such as drop foot is vital and therefore has called for the development of newer robotic devices. Several robotic orthoses and parallel ankle robots have been developed during the last two decades to augment the conventional ankle physical therapy of patients. A comprehensive review of these robotic ankle rehabilitation devices is presented in this article. Recent developments in the mechanism design, actuation and control are discussed. The study encompasses robotic devices for treadmill and over-ground training as well as platform-based parallel ankle robots. Control strategies for these robotic devices are deliberated in detail with an emphasis on the assist-as-needed training strategies. Experimental evaluations of the mechanism designs and various control strategies of these robotic ankle rehabilitation devices are also presented.

  5. Autonomous undulatory serpentine locomotion utilizing body dynamics of a fluidic soft robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onal, Cagdas D; Rus, Daniela

    2013-06-01

    Soft robotics offers the unique promise of creating inherently safe and adaptive systems. These systems bring man-made machines closer to the natural capabilities of biological systems. An important requirement to enable self-contained soft mobile robots is an on-board power source. In this paper, we present an approach to create a bio-inspired soft robotic snake that can undulate in a similar way to its biological counterpart using pressure for actuation power, without human intervention. With this approach, we develop an autonomous soft snake robot with on-board actuation, power, computation and control capabilities. The robot consists of four bidirectional fluidic elastomer actuators in series to create a traveling curvature wave from head to tail along its body. Passive wheels between segments generate the necessary frictional anisotropy for forward locomotion. It takes 14 h to build the soft robotic snake, which can attain an average locomotion speed of 19 mm s(-1).

  6. Randomized controlled crossover trial of a new oscillatory device as add-on therapy for COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlender, Zvi G; Arish, Nissim; Laxer, Uri; Berkman, Neville; Leibovitz, Allon; Fink, Gershon; Breuer, Raphael

    2012-12-01

    A new oscillatory device administers predetermined pressure oscillation sequences into the chest cavity over inhaled/exhaled air streams at low positive pressure. We assessed device safety and effect on 6MW performance, pulmonary function, and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) in moderate-to-very severe COPD in a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover study. Outcomes with an oscillatory device (Pulsehaler(TM), Respinova Ltd, Herzliya, Israel) and a "muted" sham device (control) of identical appearance that delivered continuous positive air pressure were compared in two groups receiving opposite treatment sequences: 2-week oscillatory device/control, 2-week washout, 2-week control/oscillatory device, 2-week washout. The clinical trial was registered ( www.clinicaltrials.gov , NCT00821418) and approved by the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center Institutional Review Board (08-608). All participants signed informed consent; 22 patients completed the study with no marked differences in COPD exacerbations or side effects. A total of 91% of patients treated with the oscillatory device had a clinically significant improvement (increase >40 m) in 6MW performance. The 6MW distance with the oscillatory device increased significantly after 1 week of treatment (51.6 ± 7.6 m, +13.5 ± 2.3%, p device was significantly greater (p device but not with control. HRQL improved markedly (≥1 point) for dyspnea and mastery with the oscillatory device (p = 0.02) but not control. Treatment with a new oscillatory device appears to be safe, and to improve 6MW performance, pulmonary function, and HRQL in COPD. Further evaluation is warranted.

  7. Development of Two Color Fluorescent Imager and Integrated Fluidic System for Nanosatellite Biology Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Diana Terri; Ricco, Antonio Joseph; Lera, Matthew P.; Timucin, Linda R.; Parra, Macarena P.

    2012-01-01

    Nanosatellites offer frequent, low-cost space access as secondary payloads on launches of larger conventional satellites. We summarize the payload science and technology of the Microsatellite in-situ Space Technologies (MisST) nanosatellite for conducting automated biological experiments. The payload (two fused 10-cm cubes) includes 1) an integrated fluidics system that maintains organism viability and supports growth and 2) a fixed-focus imager with fluorescence and scattered-light imaging capabilities. The payload monitors temperature, pressure and relative humidity, and actively controls temperature. C. elegans (nematode, 50 m diameter x 1 mm long) was selected as a model organism due to previous space science experience, its completely sequenced genome, size, hardiness, and the variety of strains available. Three strains were chosen: two green GFP-tagged strains and one red tdTomato-tagged strain that label intestinal, nerve, and pharyngeal cells, respectively. The integrated fluidics system includes bioanalytical and reservoir modules. The former consists of four 150 L culture wells and a 4x5 mm imaging zone the latter includes two 8 mL fluid reservoirs for reagent and waste storage. The fluidic system is fabricated using multilayer polymer rapid prototyping: laser cutting, precision machining, die cutting, and pressure-sensitive adhesives it also includes eight solenoid-operated valves and one mini peristaltic pump. Young larval-state (L2) nematodes are loaded in C. elegans Maintenance Media (CeMM) in the bioanalytical module during pre-launch assembly. By the time orbit is established, the worms have grown to sufficient density to be imaged and are fed fresh CeMM. The strains are pumped sequentially into the imaging area, imaged, then pumped into waste. Reagent storage utilizes polymer bags under slight pressure to prevent bubble formation in wells or channels. The optical system images green and red fluorescence bands by excitation with blue (473 nm peak

  8. Fluidic Sampler. Tanks Focus Area. OST Reference No. 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Problem Definition; Millions of gallons of radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored in underground tanks across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To manage this waste, tank operators need safe, cost-effective methods for mixing tank material, transferring tank waste between tanks, and collecting samples. Samples must be collected at different depths within storage tanks containing various kinds of waste including salt, sludge, and supernatant. With current or baseline methods, a grab sampler or a core sampler is inserted into the tank, waste is maneuvered into the sample chamber, and the sample is withdrawn from the tank. The mixing pumps in the tank, which are required to keep the contents homogeneous, must be shut down before and during sampling to prevent airborne releases. These methods are expensive, require substantial hands-on labor, increase the risk of worker exposure to radiation, and often produce nonrepresentative and unreproducible samples. How It Works: The Fluidic Sampler manufactured by AEA Technology Engineering Services, Inc., enables tank sampling to be done remotely with the mixing pumps in operation. Remote operation minimizes the risk of exposure to personnel and the possibility of spills, reducing associated costs. Sampling while the tank contents are being agitated yields consistently homogeneous, representative samples and facilitates more efficient feed preparation and evaluation of the tank contents. The above-tank portion of the Fluidic Sampler and the replacement plug and pipework that insert through the tank top are shown.

  9. Electrode-Geometry Control of the Formation of a Conductive Bridge in Oxide Resistance Switching Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kohei; Yajima, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Rozenberg, Marcelo J.; Takagi, Hidenori

    2009-08-01

    Control of the formation of conductive bridge between the metal electrodes in planar-type resistance switching device was attempted. We demonstrated in Pt/CuO/Pt devices that, using a triangular seed electrode for soft breakdown, the position and the size of the bridge can be controlled. The decrease in the size resulted in the drastic reduction of operation voltage and current to the same level as in capacitor-type stacked device. We argue that the planar-type device might have a certain advantage for future non-volatile memory application.

  10. Description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, C. T.; Groom, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description of a digital computer simulation of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory model is presented. The AMCD is a momentum exchange device which is under development as an advanced control effector for spacecraft attitude control systems. The digital computer simulation of this device incorporates the following models: six degree of freedom rigid body dynamics; rim warp; controller dynamics; nonlinear distributed element axial bearings; as well as power driver and power supply current limits. An annotated FORTRAN IV source code listing of the computer program is included.

  11. Integrated elastomeric components for autonomous regulation of sequential and oscillatory flow switching in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Tung, Yi-Chung; Torisawa, Yu-Suke; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Tavana, Hossein; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-06-01

    A critical need for enhancing the usability and capabilities of microfluidic technologies is the development of standardized, scalable and versatile control systems. Electronically controlled valves and pumps typically used for dynamic flow regulation, although useful, can limit convenience, scalability and robustness. This shortcoming has motivated the development of device-embedded non-electrical flow-control systems. Existing approaches to regulate operation timing on-chip, however, still require external signals such as timed generation of fluid flow, bubbles, liquid plugs or droplets or an alteration of chemical compositions or temperature. Here, we describe a strategy to provide device-embedded flow switching and clocking functions. Physical gaps and cavities interconnected by holes are fabricated into a three-layer elastomer structure to form networks of fluidic gates that can spontaneously generate cascading and oscillatory flow output using only a constant flow of Newtonian fluids as the device input. The resulting microfluidic substrate architecture is simple, scalable and should be applicable to various materials. This flow-powered fluidic gating scheme brings the autonomous signal processing ability of microelectronic circuits to microfluidics where there is the added diversity in current information of having distinct chemical or particulate species and richness in current operation of having chemical reactions and physical interactions.

  12. Advanced methods for controlling untethered magnetic devices using rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Arthur W., Jr.

    This dissertation presents results documenting advancements on the control of untethered magnetic devices, such as magnetic "microrobots" and magnetically actuated capsule endoscopes, motivated by problems in minimally invasive medicine. This dissertation focuses on applying rotating magnetic fields for magnetic manipulation. The contributions include advancements in the way that helical microswimmers (devices that mimic the propulsion of bacterial flagella) are controlled in the presence of gravitational forces, advancements in ways that groups of untethered magnetic devices can be differentiated and semi-independently controlled, advancements in the way that untethered magnetic device can be controlled with a single rotating permanent magnet, and an improved understanding in the nature of the magnetic force applied to an untethered device by a rotating magnet.

  13. Atmospheric Simulation Using a Liquid Crystal Wavefront Controlling Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-23

    statistics to validated models. 1.4 Methodology In the atmosphere, laser device effectiveness degrades due to beam spread and dis- tortion caused by...the source. Passing the HeNe beam through a spatial filter approximates a point source which is collimated us- ing a doublet lens. Collimating the...ordered layers. This common orientation is due to the cigar -like shape of the NLC molecules [7]. The dielectric anisotropic property of the NLC

  14. Inhaled corticosteroids for asthma: impact of practice level device switching on asthma control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As more inhaled corticosteroid (ICS devices become available, there may be pressure for health-care providers to switch patients with asthma to cheaper inhaler devices. Our objective was to evaluate impact on asthma control of inhaler device switching without an accompanying consultation in general practice. Methods This 2-year retrospective matched cohort study used the UK General Practice Research Database to identify practices where ICS devices were changed without a consultation for ≥5 patients within 3 months. Patients 6–65 years of age from these practices whose ICS device was switched were individually matched with patients using the same ICS device who were not switched. Asthma control over 12 months after the switch was assessed using a composite measure including short-acting β-agonist and oral corticosteroid use, hospitalizations, and subsequent changes to therapy. Results A total of 824 patients from 55 practices had a device switch and could be matched. Over half (53% of device switches were from dry powder to metered-dose inhalers. Fewer patients in switched than matched cohort experienced successful treatment based on the composite measure (20% vs. 34% and more experienced unsuccessful treatment (51% vs. 38%. After adjusting for possible baseline confounding factors, the odds ratio for treatment success in the switched cohort compared with controls was 0.29 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.19 to 0.44; p Conclusion Switching ICS devices without a consultation was associated with worsened asthma control and is therefore inadvisable.

  15. 77 FR 28455 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... environmental risk to health or safety that might disproportionately affect children. Executive Order 12630... all streets, highways, bikeways, and private roads open to public travel. The purpose of this final... devices on all roads open to public travel pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 109(d), 114(a), 217, 315, and 402(a). In...

  16. Three-Axis Attitude Control of Solar Sails Utilising Reflectivity Control Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Theodoros

    Solar sails are spacecraft that utilise the Solar Radiation Pressure, the force generated by impinging photons, to propel themselves. Conventional actuators are not suitable for controlling the attitude of solar sails therefore specific attitude control methods have been devised to tackle this. One of these methods is to change the centre of pressure with respect to the center of mass thus creating a torque. Reflectivity Control Devices (RCDs) have been proposed and successfully used to change the centre of pressure. Current methods that utilise RCDs have control authority over two axis only with no ability to control the torque about the normal of the sail surface. This thesis extends the state of the art and demonstrates 3-axis control by generating arbitrary torque vectors within a convex polyhedron. Two different RCD materials are considered, transmission and diffusion technologies both compatible with the proposed concept. A number of metrics have been developed which facilitate the comparison of different sail configurations. One of these metics is the sun map which is a graphic representation of the sun angles for which control authority is maintained. An iterative design process is presented which makes use of the metrics developed and aids in the design of a sail which meets the mission requirements and constraints. Moreover, the effects of different parameters on the performance of the proposed control concept are discussed. For example it is shown that by alternating the angle between the edge and middle RCDs the control authority increases. The concept's scalability has been investigated and a hybrid control scheme has been devised which makes use of both RCDs and reaction wheels. The RCDs are complemented by the reaction wheels to achieve higher slew rates while in turn the RCDs desaturate the reaction wheels. Finally, a number of simulations are conducted to verify the validity of the proposed concept.

  17. Ultrasonically Activated Diffusion Bonding for Fluidic Control Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-01

    were made manually with a standard micrometer (0.0001 inch vernier ) to provide guidance in defining "excessive deformation." Conventional ultrasonic...16 NF 1500 pounds/inch 3000 pounds + 2 pounds Micrometer type dial (100 divisions) and scale (1/64-inch divisions) TEMPERATURE MONITORING

  18. Development of Hand Grip Assistive Device Control System for Old People through Electromyography (EMG Signal Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamis Herman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hand grip assistive device is a glove to assist old people who suffer from hand weakness in their daily life activities. The device earlier control system only use simple on and off switch. This required old people to use both hand to activate the device. The new control system of the hand grip assistive device was developed to allow single hand operation for old people. New control system take advantages of electromyography (EMG and flex sensor which was implemented to the device. It was programmed into active and semi-active mode operation. EMG sensors were placed on the forearm to capture EMG signal of Flexor Digitorum Profundus muscle to activate the device. Flex sensor was used to indicate the finger position and placed on top of the finger. The signal from both sensors then used to control the device. The new control system allowed single hand operation and designed to prevent user from over depended on the device by activating it through moving their fingers.

  19. Algorithm for Public Electric Transport Schedule Control for Intelligent Embedded Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alps, Ivars; Potapov, Andrey; Gorobetz, Mikhail; Levchenkov, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In this paper authors present heuristics algorithm for precise schedule fulfilment in city traffic conditions taking in account traffic lights. The algorithm is proposed for programmable controller. PLC is proposed to be installed in electric vehicle to control its motion speed and signals of traffic lights. Algorithm is tested using real controller connected to virtual devices and real functional models of real tram devices. Results of experiments show high precision of public transport schedule fulfilment using proposed algorithm.

  20. Rotor position and vibration control for aerospace flywheel energy storage devices and other vibration based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, B. X. S.

    Flywheel energy storage has distinct advantages over conventional energy storage methods such as electrochemical batteries. Because the energy density of a flywheel rotor increases quadratically with its speed, the foremost goal in flywheel design is to achieve sustainable high speeds of the rotor. Many issues exist with the flywheel rotor operation at high and varying speeds. A prominent problem is synchronous rotor vibration, which can drastically limit the sustainable rotor speed. In a set of projects, the novel Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) is applied to various problems of flywheel rotor operation. These applications include rotor levitation, steady state rotation at high speeds and accelerating operation. Several models such as the lumped mass model and distributed three-mass models have been analyzed. In each of these applications, the ADRC has been extended to cope with disturbance, noise, and control effort optimization; it also has been compared to various industry-standard controllers such as PID and PD/observer, and is proven to be superior. The control performance of the PID controller and the PD/observer currently used at NASA Glenn has been improved by as much as an order of magnitude. Due to the universality of the second order system, the results obtained in the rotor vibration problem can be straightforwardly extended to other vibrational systems, particularly, the MEMS gyroscope. Potential uses of a new nonlinear controller, which inherits the ease of use of the traditional PID, are also discussed.

  1. Fast, cheap and in control: spectral imaging with handheld devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Edward A.; Deutsch, Erik R.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2017-05-01

    Remote sensing has moved out of the laboratory and into the real world. Instruments using reflection or Raman imaging modalities become faster, cheaper and more powerful annually. Enabling technologies include virtual slit spectrometer design, high power multimode diode lasers, fast open-loop scanning systems, low-noise IR-sensitive array detectors and low-cost computers with touchscreen interfaces. High-volume manufacturing assembles these components into inexpensive portable or handheld devices that make possible sophisticated decision-making based on robust data analytics. Examples include threat, hazmat and narcotics detection; remote gas sensing; biophotonic screening; environmental remediation and a host of other applications.

  2. Speed control device for internal combustion engines. Drehzahlregelanordnung fuer Brennkraftmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bihan, B.

    1991-05-16

    In order to keep the speed constant, or even to increase it at high torque, a further controller is provided apart from the existing centrifugal force controller in a first example of the invention, which replaces the conventional adjustment screw for the basic speed setting, and permanently changes the basic speed setting on load change. According to a second example, an electronic speed control is provided, which has a setting member, which is operated electrically, hydraulically or pneumatically and which acts directly on the carburettor. The control of the setting member is done via a controller which sets the carburettor based on a manual speed signal and the actual speed.

  3. Virtual planning for vertical control using temporary anchorage devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Accorsi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The new and innovative technologies are unprecedentedly improving the level of proficiency in orthodontics in the recent history of this area of expertise. The proliferation of advances, such as self-ligating systems, temporary anchorage devices, shape-memory wires, robotically wire bending, intraoral scanners, cone-beam computed tomography, bring the virtual planning, and confection of dental devices through CAD/CAM systems to the real world. In order to get efficiency and efficacy in orthodontics with these new technologies, we must understand the importance of systemically managed clinical information, medical, and dentistry history of the patients, including the images resources, which ensures the use of a communication that is assisted by the technology, with an interdisciplinary team so that the database is able to help and support the process of therapeutic decision-making. This paper presents the clinical case of a borderline patient for orthognathic surgery who had his final treatment planning supported by these new tools for three-dimensional diagnosis and virtual planning.

  4. 75 FR 74128 - Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Compliance Dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Federal Highway Administration Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Compliance Dates AGENCY... requests comments on compliance dates for highway agencies to upgrade their existing non-compliant traffic... Devices (MUTCD). This notice asks for responses to a series of questions about compliance dates, their...

  5. Digital Control of External Devices through the Parallel Port of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we carry out the digital control of external devices using the parallel port of a computer. The PC parallel port adapter that is specically designed to attach printers has been found to be useful as a general input/output port for any device or application that matches its input/output capabilities. This paper gives ...

  6. Non-invasive control interfaces for intention detection in active movement-assistive devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo-Prat, J.; Kooren, P.N.; Stienen, A.H.A.; Herder, J.L.; Koopman, B.F.J.M.; Veltink, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    Active movement-assistive devices aim to increase the quality of life for patients with neuromusculoskeletal disorders. This technology requires interaction between the user and the device through a control interface that detects the user’s movement intention. Researchers have explored a wide

  7. A biodegradable device for the controlled release of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae) standardized extract to control Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custódio, Kauê Muller; Oliveira, Joice Guilherme de; Moterle, Diego; Zepon, Karine Modolon; Prophiro, Josiane Somariva; Kanis, Luiz Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase in dengue, Zika, and chikungunya and the resistance of the Aedes aegypti mosquito to major insecticides emphasize the importance of studying alternatives to control this vector. The aim of this study was to develop a controlled-release device containing Piper nigrum extract and to study its larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti. Piper nigrum extract was produced by maceration, standardized in piperine, and incorporated into cotton threads, which were inserted into hydrogel cylinders manufactured by the extrusion of carrageenan and carob. The piperine content of the extract and thread reservoirs was quantified by chromatography. The release profile from the device was assessed in aqueous medium and the larvicidal and residual activities of the standardized extract as well as of the controlled-release device were examined in Aedes aegypti larvae. The standardized extract contained 580mg/g of piperine and an LC50 value of 5.35ppm (24h) and the 3 cm thread reservoirs contained 13.83 ± 1.81mg of piperine. The device showed zero-order release of piperine for 16 days. The P. nigrum extract (25ppm) showed maximum residual larvicidal activity for 10 days, decreasing progressively thereafter. The device had a residual larvicidal activity for up to 37 days. The device provided controlled release of Piper nigrum extract with residual activity for 37 days. The device is easy to manufacture and may represent an effective alternative for the control of Aedes aegypti larvae in small water containers.

  8. Fluidic Manufacture of Star-Shaped Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Lay, Luigi; Psaro, Rinaldo; Polito, Laura; Evangelisti, Claudio

    2017-07-21

    Star-shaped gold nanoparticles (StarAuNPs) are extremely attractive nanomaterials, characterized by localized surface plasmon resonance which could be potentially employed in a large number of applications. However, the lack of a reliable and reproducible synthetic protocols for the production of StarAuNPs is the major limitation to their spreading. For the first time, here we present a robust protocol to manufacture reproducible StarAuNPs by exploiting a fluidic approach. Star-shaped AuNPs have been synthesized by means of a seed-less protocol, employing ascorbic acid as reducing agent at room temperature. Moreover, the versatility of the bench-top microfluidic protocol has been exploited to afford hydrophilic, hydrophobic and solid-supported engineered StarAuNPs, by avoiding intermediate NP purifications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Sub-micrometer fluidic channel for measuring photon emitting entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M; Edel, Joshua B; Samiee, Kevan T; Craighead, Harold G

    2014-11-18

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  10. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  11. Integrated freespace optical fluorescence detector for micro fluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, Martin; Stoebenau, Sebastian; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Fluorescence detectors are applied for various applications in biomedical research, e.g. for pH-sensoring or single-cell detection. Free space optical systems offer the advantage of compact and efficiently integrated systems with benefits in the terms of systems alignment and optical functionality. On the other hand, due to the lab-on-a-chip character many fluidic systems, such as segmented flow systems, are very compact and thus compatible with integrated optical systems. We discuss the potential of the integration of the segmented flow approach in complex free space optical microsystems. The design and realization of a highly integrated fluorescence detector is demonstrated. The system is fabricated by ultra precision micromilling which allows one to monolithically integrate freeform optical elements for optimized optical performance.

  12. Analysis of cantilever NEMS in centrifugal-fluidic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen-Nia, Mohsen; Abadian, Fateme; Abadian, Naeime; Dehkordi, Keivan Mosaiebi; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-07-01

    Electromechanical nanocantilevers are promising for using as sensors/detectors in centrifugal-fluidic systems. For this application, the presence of angular speed and electrolyte environment should be considered in the theoretical analysis. Herein, the pull-in instability of the nanocantilever incorporating the effects of angular velocity and liquid media is investigated using a size-dependent continuum theory. Using d’Alembert principle, the angular speed is transformed into an equivalent centrifugal force. The electrochemical and dispersion forces are incorporated considering the corrections due to the presence of electrolyte media. Two different approaches, i.e., the Rayleigh-Ritz method (RRM) and proposing a lumped parameter model (LPM), were applied to analyze the system. The models are validated with the results presented in literature. Impacts of the angular velocity, electrolyte media, dispersion forces, and size effect on the instability characteristics of the nanocantilever are discussed.

  13. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Songky; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of $0.41\\dot{6}\\eta^2$ for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of $\\eta$ much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained...

  14. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M [Ithaca, NY; Edel, Joshua B [Brookline, MA; Samiee, Kevan T [Ithaca, NY; Craighead, Harold G [Ithaca, NY

    2008-07-29

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  15. Consumer-grade EEG devices: are they usable for control tasks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Martisius, Ignas; Vasiljevas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    We present the evaluation of two well-known, low-cost consumer-grade EEG devices: the Emotiv EPOC and the Neurosky MindWave. Problems with using the consumer-grade EEG devices (BCI illiteracy, poor technical characteristics, and adverse EEG artefacts) are discussed. The experimental evaluation of the devices, performed with 10 subjects asked to perform concentration/relaxation and blinking recognition tasks, is given. The results of statistical analysis show that both devices exhibit high variability and non-normality of attention and meditation data, which makes each of them difficult to use as an input to control tasks. BCI illiteracy may be a significant problem, as well as setting up of the proper environment of the experiment. The results of blinking recognition show that using the Neurosky device means recognition accuracy is less than 50%, while the Emotiv device has achieved a recognition accuracy of more than 75%; for tasks that require concentration and relaxation of subjects, the Emotiv EPOC device has performed better (as measured by the recognition accuracy) by ∼9%. Therefore, the Emotiv EPOC device may be more suitable for control tasks using the attention/meditation level or eye blinking than the Neurosky MindWave device. PMID:27014511

  16. Consumer-grade EEG devices: are they usable for control tasks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rytis Maskeliunas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the evaluation of two well-known, low-cost consumer-grade EEG devices: the Emotiv EPOC and the Neurosky MindWave. Problems with using the consumer-grade EEG devices (BCI illiteracy, poor technical characteristics, and adverse EEG artefacts are discussed. The experimental evaluation of the devices, performed with 10 subjects asked to perform concentration/relaxation and blinking recognition tasks, is given. The results of statistical analysis show that both devices exhibit high variability and non-normality of attention and meditation data, which makes each of them difficult to use as an input to control tasks. BCI illiteracy may be a significant problem, as well as setting up of the proper environment of the experiment. The results of blinking recognition show that using the Neurosky device means recognition accuracy is less than 50%, while the Emotiv device has achieved a recognition accuracy of more than 75%; for tasks that require concentration and relaxation of subjects, the Emotiv EPOC device has performed better (as measured by the recognition accuracy by ∼9%. Therefore, the Emotiv EPOC device may be more suitable for control tasks using the attention/meditation level or eye blinking than the Neurosky MindWave device.

  17. Consumer-grade EEG devices: are they usable for control tasks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskeliunas, Rytis; Damasevicius, Robertas; Martisius, Ignas; Vasiljevas, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    We present the evaluation of two well-known, low-cost consumer-grade EEG devices: the Emotiv EPOC and the Neurosky MindWave. Problems with using the consumer-grade EEG devices (BCI illiteracy, poor technical characteristics, and adverse EEG artefacts) are discussed. The experimental evaluation of the devices, performed with 10 subjects asked to perform concentration/relaxation and blinking recognition tasks, is given. The results of statistical analysis show that both devices exhibit high variability and non-normality of attention and meditation data, which makes each of them difficult to use as an input to control tasks. BCI illiteracy may be a significant problem, as well as setting up of the proper environment of the experiment. The results of blinking recognition show that using the Neurosky device means recognition accuracy is less than 50%, while the Emotiv device has achieved a recognition accuracy of more than 75%; for tasks that require concentration and relaxation of subjects, the Emotiv EPOC device has performed better (as measured by the recognition accuracy) by ∼9%. Therefore, the Emotiv EPOC device may be more suitable for control tasks using the attention/meditation level or eye blinking than the Neurosky MindWave device.

  18. Advanced Controls for the Multi-pod Centipod WEC device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, Alan [Dehlsen Associates, LLC, Santa Barabara, CA (United States); Fleming, Alex [Dehlsen Associates, LLC, Santa Barabara, CA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) has developed a Wave Energy Converter (WEC), Centipod, which is a multiple point absorber, extracting wave energy primarily in the heave direction through a plurality of point absorber floats sharing a common stable reference structure. The objective of this project was to develop advanced control algorithms that will be used to reduce Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). This project investigated the use of Model Predictive Control (MPC) to improve the power capture of the WEC. The MPC controller developed in this work is a state-space, “look ahead” controller approach using knowledge of past and current states to predict future states to take action with the PTO to maximize power capture while still respecting system constraints. In order to maximize power, which is the product of force and velocity, the controller must aim to create phase alignment between excitation force and velocity. This project showed a 161% improvement in the Annual Energy Production (AEP) for the Centipod WEC when utilizing MPC, compared to a baseline, fixed passive damping control strategy. This improvement in AEP was shown to provide a substantial benefit to the WEC’s overall Cost of Energy, reducing LCOE by 50% from baseline. The results of this work proved great potential for the adoption of Model Predictive Controls in Wave Energy Converters.

  19. Interspinous process device versus standard conventional surgical decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Moojen (Wouter); M.P. Arts (Mark); W.C.H. Jacobs (WIlco); E.W. van Zwet (Erik); E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske); B.W. Koes (Bart); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objective To assess whether interspinous process device implantation is more effective in the short term than conventional surgical decompression for patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Design Randomized controlled

  20. Lightweight and Compace Multifunction Computer-Controlled Strength and Aerobic Training Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research proposes to develop a computer-controlled lightweight and compact device for aerobic and resistive training (DART) to counteract muscular atrophy and...

  1. Guest Editorial Advanced Distributed Control of Energy Conversion Devices and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoudi, Ali; Guerrero, Josep M.; Lewis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this special issue on advanced distributed control of energy conversion devices and systems are loosely grouped into three categories: 1) ac energy conversion systems; 2) dc energy conversion systems; and 3) optimization and standards....

  2. 40 CFR 63.693 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Whenever gases or vapors containing HAP are vented through a closed-vent system connected to a control... of such devices include, but are not limited to, a car-seal or a lock-and-key configuration valve. (d...

  3. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Electrostatic Precipitator Control Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  4. Compliance Assurance Monitoring Technical Guidance Document Appendix A: Wet Electrostatic Precipitator Control Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compliance assurance monitoring is intended to provide a reasonable assurance of compliance with applicable requirements under the Clean Air Act for large emission units that rely on pollution control device equipment to achieve compliance.

  5. Development of a blocking logic checking apparatus for substation measurement and control devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After transforming substation measurement and control devices, the traditional method of blocking logic check needs to go back and forth among the measurement and control devices, and repeatedly connect a large number of wires, which lead to tedious operation and low efficiency. This paper developed a logic verification device based on 4G wireless communication, which used the Modbus/TCP transport protocol to access Ethernet, to complete the real-time data communication with the mobile control terminal. And this paper made a request to the logic controller according to practicality and cost. And the terminal software interface was designed by the orthogonal experimental design idea. The development of this device provided a new and efficient method for logic verification.

  6. Topology optimisation of micro fluidic mixers considering fluid-structure interactions with a coupled Lattice Boltzmann algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, David J.; Kipouros, Timoleon; Vio, Gareth A.; Steven, Grant P.; Parks, Geoffrey T.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, the study of micro fluidic devices has gained much interest in various fields from biology to engineering. In the constant development cycle, the need to optimise the topology of the interior of these devices, where there are two or more optimality criteria, is always present. In this work, twin physical situations, whereby optimal fluid mixing in the form of vorticity maximisation is accompanied by the requirement that the casing in which the mixing takes place has the best structural performance in terms of the greatest specific stiffness, are considered. In the steady state of mixing this also means that the stresses in the casing are as uniform as possible, thus giving a desired operating life with minimum weight. The ultimate aim of this research is to couple two key disciplines, fluids and structures, into a topology optimisation framework, which shows fast convergence for multidisciplinary optimisation problems. This is achieved by developing a bi-directional evolutionary structural optimisation algorithm that is directly coupled to the Lattice Boltzmann method, used for simulating the flow in the micro fluidic device, for the objectives of minimum compliance and maximum vorticity. The needs for the exploration of larger design spaces and to produce innovative designs make meta-heuristic algorithms, such as genetic algorithms, particle swarms and Tabu Searches, less efficient for this task. The multidisciplinary topology optimisation framework presented in this article is shown to increase the stiffness of the structure from the datum case and produce physically acceptable designs. Furthermore, the topology optimisation method outperforms a Tabu Search algorithm in designing the baffle to maximise the mixing of the two fluids.

  7. MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE POSSESSING STRUCTURES ENABLING DIFFERENTIAL ANALYSIS OF A SINGLE CELL'S CONSTITUENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A method and a micro fluidic device comprising at least one micro fluidic structure for differential extraction of nuclear and extra-nuclear constituents of a single cell, said micro fluidic structure comprising a feeding channel for receiving a volume of a sample containing at least one cell......, at least one trapping structure for capturing a single cell, and at least one output channel in fluid connection with the at least one trapping structure, wherein the at least one trapping structure extends from one side of the feeding channel substantially perpendicular to longitudinal axis of the feeding...

  8. A Model for Service Life Control of Selected Device Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieja Mariusz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a way of determining distribution of limit state exceedence time by a diagnostic parameter which determines accuracy of maintaining zero state. For calculations it was assumed that the diagnostic parameter is deviation from nominal value (zero state. Change of deviation value occurs as a result of destructive processes which occur during service. For estimation of deviation increasing rate in probabilistic sense, was used a difference equation from which, after transformation, Fokker-Planck differential equation was obtained [4, 11]. A particular solution of the equation is deviation increasing rate density function which was used for determining exceedance probability of limit state. The so-determined probability was then used to determine density function of limit state exceedance time, by increasing deviation. Having at disposal the density function of limit state exceedance time one determined service life of a system of maladjustment. In the end, a numerical example based on operational data of selected aircraft [weapon] sights was presented. The elaborated method can be also applied to determining residual life of shipboard devices whose technical state is determined on the basis of analysis of values of diagnostic parameters.

  9. Analysis of Performance Resulting from the Design of Selected Hand-Held Input Control Devices and Visual Displays

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, Ronald Allen

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of graphical user interfaces (GUI), input control devices have become an integral part of desktop computing. When interfacing with GUIs, these input control devices have become the human's primary means of communicating with the computer. Although there have been a number of experiments conducted on pointing devices for desktop machine, there is little research on pointing devices for wearable computer technology. This is surprising because pointing devices are a maj...

  10. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.V.; Poulsen, L.; Birgens, H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new and flexible micro fluidic based method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs). The method relies on size separation of selectively hybridized polystyrene microspheres in a micro fluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) device. The micro fluidic PFF devices...... and 5.6 mu m were functionalized with biotin-labeled oligonucleotides for the detection of a mutant (Mt) or wild-type (Wt) DNA sequence in the HBB gene, respectively. Hybridization to functionalized beads was performed with fluorescent targets comprising synthetic DNA oligonucleotides or amplified RNA......, synthesized using human DNA samples from individuals with point mutations in the HBB gene. Following a stringent wash, the beads were separated in a PFF device and the fluorescent signal from the beads was analyzed. Patients being wildtypes, heterozygotes or mutated respectively for the investigated mutation...

  11. Device for dynamic switching of robot control points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention comprises a system for switching between control points of a robotic system involving an industrial robot including a robot arm with a number of joints and provided with a tool interest point movable in a plurality of degrees of freedom.......The invention comprises a system for switching between control points of a robotic system involving an industrial robot including a robot arm with a number of joints and provided with a tool interest point movable in a plurality of degrees of freedom....

  12. Automatic Control System for Dispensing Precise Amounts of FInely Divided Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, J. M.; McGraw, H. R.; Draut, C. F.

    1973-06-01

    A device for automatic dispensing of precise amounts of finely divided solids has been developed. Precision is a function of dispensing time. Smaller than gram quantities may be dispensed at a rate of about 1/3 g/min with a precision corresponding to a weight range of about 0.001 g for a series. The process consists in moving the material with the effect of the vibratory motion of a miniature air-powered vibrator. Operation is automatically controlled by the electronic system of the weighing unit interfaced to the pneumatic dispensing device via a combination fluidic and pneumatic control system.

  13. 40 CFR 424.10 - Applicability; description of the open electric furnaces with wet air pollution control devices...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electric furnaces with wet air pollution control devices subcategory. 424.10 Section 424.10 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Open Electric Furnaces With Wet Air Pollution Control Devices Subcategory § 424.10 Applicability; description of the open electric furnaces with wet air pollution control devices...

  14. Linear motion device and method for inserting and withdrawing control rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.

    Disclosed is a linear motion device and more specifically a control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) for inserting and withdrawing control rods into a reactor core. The CRDM and method disclosed is capable of independently and sequentially positioning two sets of control rods with a single motor stator and rotor. The CRDM disclosed can control more than one control rod lead screw without incurring a substantial increase in the size of the mechanism.

  15. Synthetic feedback control using an RNAi-based gene-regulatory device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Ryan J; Winkler, Sally M; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis within mammalian cells is achieved through complex molecular networks that can respond to changes within the cell or the environment and regulate the expression of the appropriate genes in response. The development of biological components that can respond to changes in the cellular environment and interface with endogenous molecules would enable more sophisticated genetic circuits and greatly advance our cellular engineering capabilities. Here we describe a platform that combines a ligand-responsive ribozyme switch and synthetic miRNA regulators to create an OFF genetic control device based on RNA interference (RNAi). We developed a mathematical model to highlight important design parameters in programming the quantitative performance of RNAi-based OFF control devices. By modifying the ribozyme switch integrated into the system, we demonstrated RNAi-based OFF control devices that respond to small molecule and protein ligands, including the oncogenic protein E2F1. We utilized the OFF control device platform to build a negative feedback control system that acts as a proportional controller and maintains target intracellular protein levels in response to increases in transcription rate. Our work describes a novel genetic device that increases the level of silencing from a miRNA in the presence of a ligand of interest, effectively creating an RNAi-based OFF control device. The OFF switch platform has the flexibility to be used to respond to both small molecule and protein ligands. Finally, the RNAi-based OFF switch can be used to implement a negative feedback control system, which maintains target protein levels around a set point level. The described RNAi-based OFF control device presents a powerful tool that will enable researchers to engineer homeostasis in mammalian cells.

  16. Control Board Digital Interface Input Devices – Touchscreen, Trackpad, or Mouse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Ronald L. Boring; Roger Lew

    2015-08-01

    The authors collaborated with a power utility to evaluate input devices for use in the human system interface (HSI) for a new digital Turbine Control System (TCS) at a nuclear power plant (NPP) undergoing a TCS upgrade. A standalone dynamic software simulation of the new digital TCS and a mobile kiosk were developed to conduct an input device study to evaluate operator preference and input device effectiveness. The TCS software presented the anticipated HSI for the TCS and mimicked (i.e., simulated) the turbine systems’ responses to operator commands. Twenty-four licensed operators from the two nuclear power units participated in the study. Three input devices were tested: a trackpad, mouse, and touchscreen. The subjective feedback from the survey indicates the operators preferred the touchscreen interface. The operators subjectively rated the touchscreen as the fastest and most comfortable input device given the range of tasks they performed during the study, but also noted a lack of accuracy for selecting small targets. The empirical data suggest the mouse input device provides the most consistent performance for screen navigation and manipulating on screen controls. The trackpad input device was both empirically and subjectively found to be the least effective and least desired input device.

  17. Hybrid Macro-Micro Fluidics System for a Chip-Based Biosensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamanaha, C. R; Whitman, L. J; Colton, R.J

    2002-01-01

    We describe the engineering of a hybrid fluidics platform for a chip-based biosensor system that combines high-performance microfluidics components with powerful, yet compact, millimeter-scale pump and valve actuators...

  18. Design and fabrication of a micro fluidic circuit for the separation of micron sized particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khumalo, F

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a micro fluidic circuit for the separation of micro particles is being investigated. There are a wide range of available separation techniques such as acoustic, laminar flow, split flow, optical trapping and centrifugal forces...

  19. Flight Investigation of the Effectiveness of an Automatic Aileron Trim Control Device for Personal Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, William H; Kuehnel, Helmut A; Whitten, James B

    1957-01-01

    A flight investigation to determine the effectiveness of an automatic aileron trim control device installed in a personal airplane to augment the apparent spiral stability has been conducted. The device utilizes a rate-gyro sensing element in order to switch an on-off type of control that operates the ailerons at a fixed rate through control centering springs. An analytical study using phase-plane and analog-computer methods has been carried out to determine a desirable method of operation for the automatic trim control.

  20. Development and control of a magnetorheological haptic device for robot assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, Elnaz; Goldenberg, Andrew A; Drake, James M; Eastwood, Kyle W; Kang, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    A prototype magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based actuator has been designed for tele-robotic surgical applications. This device is capable of generating forces up to 47 N, with input currents ranging from 0 to 1.5 A. We begin by outlining the physical design of the device, and then discuss a novel nonlinear model of the device's behavior. The model was developed using the Hammerstein-Wiener (H-W) nonlinear black-box technique and is intended to accurately capture the hysteresis behavior of the MR-fluid. Several experiments were conducted on the device to collect estimation and validation datasets to construct the model and assess its performance. Different estimating functions were used to construct the model, and their effectiveness is assessed based on goodness-of-fit and final-prediction-error measurements. A sigmoid network was found to have a goodness-of-fit of 95%. The model estimate was then used to tune a PID controller. Two control schemes were proposed to eliminate the hysteresis behavior present in the MR fluid device. One method uses a traditional force feedback control loop and the other is based on measuring the magnetic field using a Hall-effect sensor embedded within the device. The Hall-effect sensor scheme was found to be superior in terms of cost, simplicity and real-time control performance compared to the force control strategy.

  1. Autotuning of PID controller by means of human machine interface device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Awtoniuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available More and more control systems are based on industry microprocessors like PLC controllers (Programmable Logic Controller. The most commonly used control algorithm is PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative algorithm. Autotuning procedure is not available in every PLC. These controllers are typically used in cooperation with HMI (Human Machine Interface devices. In the study two procedures of autotuning of the PID controller were implemented in the HMI device: step method and relay method. Six tuning rules for step methods and one for relay method were chosen. The autotuning procedures on simulated controlled object and PLC controller without build-in autotuning were tested. The object of control was first order system plus time delay.

  2. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hu; Hwang, Suk-Won; Marelli, Benedetto; An, Bo; Moreau, Jodie E; Yang, Miaomiao; Brenckle, Mark A; Kim, Stanley; Kaplan, David L; Rogers, John A; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2014-12-09

    A paradigm shift for implantable medical devices lies at the confluence between regenerative medicine, where materials remodel and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms based on biomaterials and bioresorbable technologies such as optics and electronics. The union of materials and technology in this context enables a class of biomedical devices that can be optically or electronically functional and yet harmlessly degrade once their use is complete. We present here a fully degradable, remotely controlled, implantable therapeutic device operating in vivo to counter a Staphylococcus aureus infection that disappears once its function is complete. This class of device provides fully resorbable packaging and electronics that can be turned on remotely, after implantation, to provide the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally controllable, resorbable devices not only obviate the need for secondary surgeries and retrieval, but also have extended utility as therapeutic devices that can be left behind at a surgical or suturing site, following intervention, and can be externally controlled to allow for infection management by either thermal treatment or by remote triggering of drug release when there is retardation of antibiotic diffusion, deep infections are present, or when systemic antibiotic treatment alone is insufficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. After completion of function, the device is safely resorbed into the body, within a programmable period.

  3. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  4. Modelling and Control of Robotic Leg as Assistive Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingye, Yee; Zain, Badrul Aisham bin Md

    2017-10-01

    The ageing population (people older than 60 years old) is expected to constitute 21.8% of global population by year 2050. When human ages, bodily function including locomotors will deteriorate. Besides, there are hundreds of thousands of victims who suffer from multiple health conditions worldwide that leads to gait impairment. A promising solution will be the lower limb powered-exoskeleton. This study is to be a start-up platform to design a lower limb powered-exoskeleton for a normal Malaysian male, by designing and simulating the dynamic model of a 2-link robotic leg to observe its behaviour under different input conditions with and without a PID controller. Simulink in MATLAB software is used as the dynamic modelling and simulation software for this study. It is observed that the 2-links robotic leg behaved differently under different input conditions, and perform the best when it is constrained and controlled by PID controller. Simulink model is formed as a foundation for the upcoming researches and can be modified and utilised by the future researchers.

  5. Fuzzy maintenance costs of a wind turbine pitch control device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Carvalho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of estimation maintenance costs for the case of the pitch controls system of wind farms turbines. Previous investigations have estimated these costs as (traditional “crisp” values, simply ignoring the uncertainty nature of data and information available. This paper purposes an extended version of the estimation model by making use of the Fuzzy Set Theory. The results alert decision-makers to consequent uncertainty of the estimations along with their overall level, thus improving the information given to the mainte-nance support system.

  6. Real-Time Occupant Based Plug-in Device Control Using ICT in Office Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Bin Bae

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to reduce the unnecessary plug loads used by computers, monitors, and computer peripheral devices, all of which account for more than 95% of the entire plug loads of an office building. To this end, an occupant-based plug-in device control (OBC-P software was developed. The OBC-P software collects real-time information about the presence or absence of occupants who are connected to the access point through the Wifi and controls the power of monitors or computers, while a standby power off device controls computer peripheral devices. To measure the plug load saving of the occupant-based plug-in device control, an experiment was conducted, targeting 10 occupants of three research labs of the graduate school, for two weeks. The experiment results showed that it could save the plug loads of monitors and computer peripheral devices by 15% in the Awake mode, and by 26% in the Sleep mode.

  7. On Emulation of Flueric Devices in Excitable Chemical Medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Adamatzky

    Full Text Available Flueric devices are fluidic devices without moving parts. Fluidic devices use fluid as a medium for information transfer and computation. A Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ medium is a thin-layer spatially extended excitable chemical medium which exhibits travelling excitation wave-fronts. The excitation wave-fronts transfer information. Flueric devices compute via jets interaction. BZ devices compute via excitation wave-fronts interaction. In numerical model of BZ medium we show that functions of key flueric devices are implemented in the excitable chemical system: signal generator, and, xor, not and nor Boolean gates, delay elements, diodes and sensors. Flueric devices have been widely used in industry since late 1960s and are still employed in automotive and aircraft technologies. Implementation of analog of the flueric devices in the excitable chemical systems opens doors to further applications of excitation wave-based unconventional computing in soft robotics, embedded organic electronics and living technologies.

  8. Distributed smart device for monitoring, control and management of electric loads in domotic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Ricardo; Badesa, Francisco J; García-Aracil, Nicolas; Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Sabater, Jose María

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket) has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron) used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753) to measure the consumption of electrical energy and then to transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600) has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user's program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  9. Distributed Smart Device for Monitoring, Control and Management of Electric Loads in Domotic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Perez-Vidal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a microdevice for monitoring, control and management of electric loads at home. The key idea is to compact the electronic design as much as possible in order to install it inside a Schuko socket. Moreover, the electronic Schuko socket (electronic microdevice + Schuko socket has the feature of communicating with a central unit and with other microdevices over the existing powerlines. Using the existing power lines, the proposed device can be installed in new buildings or in old ones. The main use of this device is to monitor, control and manage electric loads to save energy and prevent accidents produced by different kind of devices (e.g., iron used in domestic tasks. The developed smart device is based on a single phase multifunction energy meter manufactured by Analog Devices (ADE7753 to measure the consumption of electrical energy and thento transmit it using a serial interface. To provide current measurement information to the ADE7753, an ultra flat SMD open loop integrated circuit current transducer based on the Hall effect principle manufactured by Lem (FHS-40P/SP600 has been used. Moreover, each smart device has a PL-3120 smart transceiver manufactured by LonWorks to execute the user’s program, to communicate with the ADE7753 via serial interface and to transmit information to the central unit via powerline communication. Experimental results show the exactitude of the measurements made using the developed smart device.

  10. Investigations of the Impact of Biodiesel Metal Contaminants on Emissions Control Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookshear, Daniel W [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Mccormick, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Toops, Todd J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel with the potential to displace a portion of petroleum use. However, as with any alternative fuel, in order to be a viable choice it must be compatible with the emissions control devices. The finished biodiesel product can contain up to 5 ppm Na + K and 5 ppm Ca + Mg, and these metal impurities can lead to durability issues with the devices used to control emissions in diesel vehicles. Significant work has been performed to understand how the presence of these metals impacts each individual component of diesel emissions control systems, and this chapter summarizes the findings of these research efforts.

  11. Investigations of the Impact of Biodiesel Metal Contaminants on Emissions Control Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookshear, D. W.; Lance, M. J.; McCormick, Robert L.; Toops, T. J.

    2017-02-27

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel with the potential to displace a portion of petroleum use. However, as with any alternative fuel, in order to be a viable choice it must be compatible with the emissions control devices. The finished biodiesel product can contain up to 5 ppm Na+K and 5 ppm Ca+Mg, and these metal impurities can lead to durability issues with the devices used to control emissions in diesel vehicles. Significant work has been performed to understand how the presence of these metals impacts each individual component of diesel emissions control systems, and this chapter summarizes the findings of these research efforts.

  12. COMPUTER CONTROLLED EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATIONS OF TRIBOLOGICAL INFLUENCES IN SHEET METAL FORMING

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Djordjevic; Srbislav Aleksandrović; Tomislav Vujinović; Milentije Stefanović; Vukić Lazić; Ružica Nikolić

    2012-01-01

    Sheet metal forming, especially deep drawing process, is influenced by many factors. Blank holding force and drawbead displacement are two of them that can be controlled during the forming process. For this purpose, electro-hydraulic computerized sheet-metal strip sliding device has been constructed. Basic characteristic of this device is realization of variable contact pressure and drawbead height as functions of time or stripe displacement. There are both, pressure and drawbead, ten linear ...

  13. The new realized mobile device for extremal control research and presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej URBANSKÝ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At our department we deal with torsional oscillating mechanical systems (TOMS continuous tuning during its operation in terms of torsional oscillation size. Therefore was build the new mobile device for research and presentation purposes of the TOMS continuous tuning using extremal control method. This paper deals mainly with design of the mobile device and its special compressed air distribution system, which is necessary for its regular function.

  14. Control of Fuel Microorganisms with Magnetic Devices: Laboratory Investigation with Hormoconis Resinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Aircraft Materials Technical Memorandum 408 CONTROL OF FUEL MICROORGANISMS WITH MAGNETIC DEVICES: LABORATORY INN, ESTIGATION WITH HORMOCONIS RESINAE ... RESINAE by G.G. McVEA R.K. SOLLY SUMMARY Automotive diesel fuel inoculated with the fungus, Hornoconis resinae , wascirculated through a magnetic device...HORMOCONIS resinae (often known by its previous name of Cladosporium resinae ) forms mats of slimy mycelia matter, which has a very high propensity to

  15. 76 FR 78 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Engine Control Module Speed Limiter Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... posted speed limit of 55 mph that was in effect in 1991. \\2\\ Comercial Motor Vehicle Speed Control... improved truck designs. \\3\\ Comercial Motor Vehicle Speed Control Devices (1991), DOT HS 807 725. TCA... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard...

  16. Quality Control Assessment of Radiology Devices in Kerman Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jomehzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Application of quality control (QC programs at diagnostic radiology departments is of great significance for optimization of image quality and reduction of patient dose. The main objective of this study was to perform QC tests on stationary radiographic X-ray machines, installed in 14 hospitals of Kerman province, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, QC tests were performed on 28 conventional radiographic X-ray units in Kerman governmental hospitals, based on the protocols and criteria recommended by the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI, using a calibrated Gammex QC kit. Each section of the QC kit incorporated different models. Results Based on the findings, kVp accuracy, kVp reproducibility, timer accuracy, timer reproducibility, exposure reproducibility, mA/timer linearity, and half-value layer were not within the acceptable limits in 25%, 4%, 29%, 18%, 11%, 12%, and 7% of the evaluated units (n=28, respectively. Conclusion As radiographic X-ray equipments in Kerman province are relatively old with a high workload, it is recommended that AEOI modify the current policies by changing the frequency of QC test implementation to at least once a year.

  17. Surface Tension Directed Fluidic Self-Assembly of Semiconductor Chips across Length Scales and Material Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantonu Biswas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This publication provides an overview and discusses some challenges of surface tension directed fluidic self-assembly of semiconductor chips which are transported in a liquid medium. The discussion is limited to surface tension directed self-assembly where the capture, alignment, and electrical connection process is driven by the surface free energy of molten solder bumps where the authors have made a contribution. The general context is to develop a massively parallel and scalable assembly process to overcome some of the limitations of current robotic pick and place and serial wire bonding concepts. The following parts will be discussed: (2 Single-step assembly of LED arrays containing a repetition of a single component type; (3 Multi-step assembly of more than one component type adding a sequence and geometrical shape confinement to the basic concept to build more complex structures; demonstrators contain (3.1 self-packaging surface mount devices, and (3.2 multi-chip assemblies with unique angular orientation. Subsequently, measures are discussed (4 to enable the assembly of microscopic chips (10 μm–1 mm; a different transport method is introduced; demonstrators include the assembly of photovoltaic modules containing microscopic silicon tiles. Finally, (5 the extension to enable large area assembly is presented; a first reel-to-reel assembly machine is realized; the machine is applied to the field of solid state lighting and the emerging field of stretchable electronics which requires the assembly and electrical connection of semiconductor devices over exceedingly large area substrates.

  18. A biodegradable device for the controlled release of Piper nigrum (Piperaceae standardized extract to control Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauê Muller Custódio

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: The significant increase in dengue, Zika, and chikungunya and the resistance of the Aedes aegypti mosquito to major insecticides emphasize the importance of studying alternatives to control this vector. The aim of this study was to develop a controlled-release device containing Piper nigrum extract and to study its larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti. METHODS: Piper nigrum extract was produced by maceration, standardized in piperine, and incorporated into cotton threads, which were inserted into hydrogel cylinders manufactured by the extrusion of carrageenan and carob. The piperine content of the extract and thread reservoirs was quantified by chromatography. The release profile from the device was assessed in aqueous medium and the larvicidal and residual activities of the standardized extract as well as of the controlled-release device were examined in Aedes aegypti larvae. RESULTS The standardized extract contained 580mg/g of piperine and an LC50 value of 5.35ppm (24h and the 3 cm thread reservoirs contained 13.83 ± 1.81mg of piperine. The device showed zero-order release of piperine for 16 days. The P. nigrum extract (25ppm showed maximum residual larvicidal activity for 10 days, decreasing progressively thereafter. The device had a residual larvicidal activity for up to 37 days. CONCLUSIONS: The device provided controlled release of Piper nigrum extract with residual activity for 37 days. The device is easy to manufacture and may represent an effective alternative for the control of Aedes aegypti larvae in small water containers.

  19. Second generation OLED devices and systems: inline evaporation, highly efficient OLED devices, and novel driver/controller ASICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelung, Joerg; Toerker, Michael; Luber, Claus; Eritt, Michael; Tomita, Yuto; Cholewa, Harald; Hermann, Ruediger; Loeffler, Frank; May, Christian; Vogel, Uwe; Bunk, Gerd; Heinig, Andreas; Jeroch, Werner; Holland, Hans-Jürgen; Leo, Karl

    2005-07-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) have to be improved to achieve new market segments in displays and lighting applications. We present important steps towards achieving this goal in a combination of highly efficient devices, manufacturing and new driving aspects. It is generally expected that the manufacturing methods have to be made more efficient to achieve large market penetration. We firstly present results on a highly efficient RGB-OLED-system with doped transport layer, manufactured in the worldwide first vertical In-Line set-up. Additionally a second-generation passive matrix OLED controller/driver IC was developed. Though the design was application-specifically directed for the onto integration into an OLED minidisplay panel module (e.g., by pad layout design being closely related to display connection schemes), versatile service in various applications was focused on. Therefore, in general they may also act as application-specific standard products (ASSP), if their built-in functions provide compatibility to a wide range of passive-matrix OLED panels. Additionally, the second generation supports various PMOLED display resolutions, area or full-color (RGB) operating modes and circuit techniques for OLED devices lifetime improvement.

  20. Study of drilling muds on the anti-erosion property of a fluidic amplifier in directional drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang-fu He; Peng-yu Zhang; Qi-lei Yin; Kun Yin; Hou-ping Liu

    2015-01-01

    Due to some drawbacks of conventional drilling methods and drilling tools, the application of hydraulic hammers with a fluidic amplifier have been extensively popularized since its emergence in recent years. However, the performance life of a fluidic amplifier is still unsatisfactory in oil and gas wells drilling, especially the heavy wear or erosion of the fluidic amplifier leads to the reduction of service life time of hydraulic hammers, which is derived from the incision of drilling muds w...

  1. Open-loop versus closed-loop control of MEMS devices: choices and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovic, B.; Liu, A. Q.; Popa, D.; Cai, H.; Lewis, F. L.

    2005-10-01

    From a controls point of view, micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) can be driven in an open-loop and closed-loop fashion. Commonly, these devices are driven open-loop by applying simple input signals. If these input signals become more complex by being derived from the system dynamics, we call such control techniques pre-shaped open-loop driving. The ultimate step for improving precision and speed of response is the introduction of feedback, e.g. closed-loop control. Unlike macro mechanical systems, where the implementation of the feedback is relatively simple, in the MEMS case the feedback design is quite problematic, due to the limited availability of sensor data, the presence of sensor dynamics and noise, and the typically fast actuator dynamics. Furthermore, a performance comparison between open-loop and closed-loop control strategies has not been properly explored for MEMS devices. The purpose of this paper is to present experimental results obtained using both open- and closed-loop strategies and to address the comparative issues of driving and control for MEMS devices. An optical MEMS switching device is used for this study. Based on these experimental results, as well as computer simulations, we point out advantages and disadvantages of the different control strategies, address the problems that distinguish MEMS driving systems from their macro counterparts, and discuss criteria to choose a suitable control driving strategy.

  2. Rankine cycle condenser pressure control using an energy conversion device bypass valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Timothy C; Nelson, Christopher R; Zigan, James A

    2014-04-01

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system and method in which pressure in a Rankine cycle (RC) system of the WHR system is regulated by diverting working fluid from entering an inlet of an energy conversion device of the RC system. In the system, an inlet of a controllable bypass valve is fluidly coupled to a working fluid path upstream of an energy conversion device of the RC system, and an outlet of the bypass valve is fluidly coupled to the working fluid path upstream of the condenser of the RC system such that working fluid passing through the bypass valve bypasses the energy conversion device and increases the pressure in a condenser. A controller determines the temperature and pressure of the working fluid and controls the bypass valve to regulate pressure in the condenser.

  3. Cost-benefit analysis of installing dust control devices in the agate industry, Khambhat (Gujarat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagia, Lakho J; Sadhu, H G

    2008-12-01

    It is well known that an exposure to crystalline silica gives rise to silicosis and silico-tuberculosis (TB). In the agate industry of Khambhat (Gujarat) not only workers but also people staying in the vicinity of the agate-grinding facilities are exposed to crystalline silica. To reduce their dust exposure, dust control devices were developed. There are approximately 500 grinding machines located in Khambhat. A cost-benefit analysis of installing dust control devices on all agate-grinding machines was carried out by adding all positive factors and benefits and subtracting the negatives and costs. It was concluded that by installing dust control devices not only could the prevalence of silicosis and TB be reduced but also, in the long run, there could be financial benefits.

  4. Hemostasis pad combined with compression device after transradial coronary procedures: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Hyuck; Han, Donghoon; Kim, Sehun; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Park, Jin-Joo; Suh, Jung-Won; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Arterial access and hemostasis are important processes during percutaneous coronary procedures. In this study, we tested if the use of chitosan-based pads on top of compression devices could improve hemostasis efficacy compared with compression devices alone after transradial coronary angiography or interventions. This study was a single-center open-label randomized controlled trial. Patients who underwent coronary angiography or intervention with the transradial approach were randomly assigned to the study (compression device and a chitosan-based pad) or control (compression devices alone) group in a 2:1 fashion. The primary endpoint was time to hemostasis, categorized into ≤5, 6-10, 11-20, and >20 minutes. Between April and July 2016, 95 patients were enrolled (59 were assigned to the study arm and 36 to the control arm). Time to hemostasis, the primary endpoint, was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (phemostasis pad in combination with rotatory compression devices is a safe and effective hemostasis strategy after radial artery access. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02954029.

  5. Hemostasis pad combined with compression device after transradial coronary procedures: A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Hyuck Kang

    Full Text Available Arterial access and hemostasis are important processes during percutaneous coronary procedures. In this study, we tested if the use of chitosan-based pads on top of compression devices could improve hemostasis efficacy compared with compression devices alone after transradial coronary angiography or interventions.This study was a single-center open-label randomized controlled trial. Patients who underwent coronary angiography or intervention with the transradial approach were randomly assigned to the study (compression device and a chitosan-based pad or control (compression devices alone group in a 2:1 fashion. The primary endpoint was time to hemostasis, categorized into ≤5, 6-10, 11-20, and >20 minutes.Between April and July 2016, 95 patients were enrolled (59 were assigned to the study arm and 36 to the control arm. Time to hemostasis, the primary endpoint, was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (p<0.001. Both groups showed low rates of vascular complications.This study suggests that the use of a hemostasis pad in combination with rotatory compression devices is a safe and effective hemostasis strategy after radial artery access.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02954029.

  6. Study of drilling muds on the anti-erosion property of a fluidic amplifier in directional drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-fu He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to some drawbacks of conventional drilling methods and drilling tools, the application of hydraulic hammers with a fluidic amplifier have been extensively popularized since its emergence in recent years. However, the performance life of a fluidic amplifier is still unsatisfactory in oil and gas wells drilling, especially the heavy wear or erosion of the fluidic amplifier leads to the reduction of service life time of hydraulic hammers, which is derived from the incision of drilling muds with high speed and pressure. In order to investigate the influence of drilling muds, such as particle size, solid content and jet velocity, on the antierosion property of a fluidic amplifier, several groups of drilling muds with different performance parameters have been utilized to numerical simulation on basis of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Simulation results have shown that the jet nozzle of fluidic amplifiers is primarily abraded, afterwards are the lateral plates and the wedge of the fluidic amplifier, which shows extraordinary agreement with the actual cases of fluidic amplifier in drilling process. It can be concluded that particle size, solid content and jet velocity have a great influence on the anti-erosion property of a fluidic amplifier, and the erosion rate linearly varies with the particle size of drilling muds, nevertheless exponentially varies with solid content and jet velocity of drilling muds. As to improve the service life time of a fluidic amplifier, the mud purification system or low solid clay-free mud system is suggested in the operation of directional well drilling

  7. Surface patterning by ripples using femtosecond laser for sensing and opto-fluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buividas, Ričardas; Day, Daniel J.; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2012-10-01

    Ripples on silicon have been fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation to minimize Si removal and to achieve a flat (not a groove-like) coverage of extended millimeter size areas for nano-/micro-fluidic applications. Such flat ripple-covered regions were found to control flow and wetting properties of water. Depending on orientation of ripples the flow speed of a 1 µl water droplet can be changed from 1.6 to 9.1 mm/s. Gold-coated ripples on sapphire are demonstrated as an excellent SERS substrate with more than one order-of-magnitude larger sensitivity and superior reproducibility a,.., compared to the commercial SER.S substrates; SERS signal on the ripples was more than 15 times higher and more than 2 times more uniform as compared to Klarite substrate at 633 mn excitation wavelength. It was shown that ripples can also be fabricated on thin transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) coatings of 45 mn thickness. The electrical resistance can be controlled by orientation and area fraction of ripples. Applications on miniaturized heaters for incubation and micro-chemistry chambers on lab-on-chip and electrowetting are discussed along with potential applications in orientational flows, self-assembly of micro-chips, and sensing.

  8. Transient dynamics of the flow around a NACA 0015 airfoil using fluidic vortex generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siauw, W.L. [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, ENSMA - Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, F-86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Bonnet, J.-P., E-mail: Jean-Paul.Bonnet@univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, CEAT, 43 rue de l' Aerodrome, F-86036 Poitiers Cedex (France); Tensi, J., E-mail: Jean.Tensi@lea.univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, ENSMA - Teleport 2, 1 Avenue Clement Ader, BP 40109, F-86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Cordier, L., E-mail: Laurent.Cordier@univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, CEAT, 43 rue de l' Aerodrome, F-86036 Poitiers Cedex (France); Noack, B.R., E-mail: Bernd.Noack@univ-poitiers.f [Institut Pprime, CNRS - Universite de Poitiers - ENSMA, UPR 3346, Departement Fluides, Thermique, Combustion, CEAT, 43 rue de l' Aerodrome, F-86036 Poitiers Cedex (France); Cattafesta, L., E-mail: cattafes@ufl.ed [Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion (FCAAP), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, 231 MAE-A, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The unsteady activation or deactivation of fluidic vortex generators on a NACA 0015 airfoil is studied to understand the transient dynamics of flow separation control. The Reynolds number is high enough and the boundary layer is tripped, so the boundary layer is fully turbulent prior to separation. Conditional PIV of the airfoil wake is obtained phase-locked to the actuator trigger signal, allowing reconstruction of the transient processes. When the actuators are impulsively turned on, the velocity field in the near wake exhibit a complex transient behavior associated with the formation and shedding of a starting vortex. When actuation is stopped, a more gradual process of the separation dynamics is found. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature in comparable configurations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition of phase-locked velocity fields reveals low-dimensional transient dynamics for the attachment and separation processes, with 98% of the fluctuation energy captured by the first four modes. The behavior is quantitatively well captured by a four-dimensional dynamical system with the corresponding mode amplitudes. Analysis of the first temporal POD modes accurately determines typical time scales for attachment and separation processes to be respectively t{sup +}=10 and 20 in conventional non-dimensional values. This study adds to experimental investigations of this scale with essential insight for the targeted closed-loop control.

  9. New implantable therapeutic device for the control of an atrial fibrillation attack using the Peltier element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yambe, Tomoyuki; Sumiyoshi, Taketada; Koga, Chihiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Miura, Hidekazu; Sugita, Norihiro; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    For the development of the new therapeutic device for the atrial fibrillation, implantable cooling device using Peltier element was developed in this study. An implantable cooling device had been consisted from Peltier element with transcutaneous energy transmission system (TETS). 1st coil can be contacted from outside of the body, when the patients will feel palpitation. Electrical current will be induced to the implanted 2nd coil. Peltier element will able to cool the surface of the atrium. For the confirmation of the effect of the cooling device, trial manufacture model was developed. Animal experiments using six healthy adult goats after animal ethical committee allowance was carried out. Fourth intercostals space had been opened after anesthesia inhalation, and various sensors had been inserted. AF was induced by the electrical current with battery. As the results, AF had been recovered to the normal sinus rhythm after cooling in all six goats. So, this cooling system for the control of AF showed evident effect in these experiments. Smaller size cooling device has been under development aiming at totally implantable type. Catheter type cooling device for the insertion by the use of fiber-scope type is now under planning for the clinical application. This new type device may be able to become good news for the patients with uncontrollable AF.

  10. 40 CFR 63.3966 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3966 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction... add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency as part of the performance test...

  11. Remote device control and monitor system for the LHD deuterium experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hideya, E-mail: nakanisi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ohsuna, Masaki; Ito, Tatsuki; Nonomura, Miki; Imazu, Setsuo; Emoto, Masahiko; Iwata, Chie; Yoshida, Masanobu; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Maeno, Hiroya; Aoyagi, Miwa; Ogawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Osamu; Morita, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Kiyomasa [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ida, Katsumi; Ishiguro, Seiji; Kaneko, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Dept. Fusion Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Device remote control will be significant for the LHD deuterium experiments. • A central management GUI to control the power distribution for devices. • For safety, power management is separated from operational commanding. • Wi-Fi was tested and found to be not reliable with fusion plasmas. - Abstract: Upon beginning the LHD deuterium experiment, the opportunity for maintenance work in the torus hall will be conspicuously reduced such that all instruments must be controlled remotely. The LHD data acquisition (DAQ) and archiving system have been using about 110 DAQ front-end, and the DAQ central control and monitor system has been implemented for their remote management. This system is based on the “multi-agent” model whose communication protocol has been unified. Since DAQ front-end electronics would suffer from the “single-event effect” (SEE) of D-D neutrons, software-based remote operation might become ineffective, and then securely intercepting or recycling the electrical power of the device would be indispensable for recovering from a non-responding fault condition. In this study, a centralized control and monitor system has been developed for a number of power distribution units (PDUs). This system adopts the plug-in structure in which the plug-in modules can absorb the differences among the commercial products of numerous vendors. The combination of the above-mentioned functionalities has led to realizing the flexible and highly reliable remote control infrastructure for the plasma diagnostics and the device management in LHD.

  12. A Numerical Analysis of Phononic-Assisted Control of Ultrasound Waves in Acoustofluidic Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    diffractors, which can be introduced in acoustofluidic structures. These diffractors can be applied in the design of efficient resonant cavities, directional sound waves for new types of particle sorting methods, or acoustically controlled deterministic lateral displacement. The PnC-diffractor-based devices...... and streaming has received much attention, since it relies solely on mechanical properties such as particle size and contrast in density and compressibility. We present a theoretical study of phononic-assisted control of ultrasound waves in acoustofluidic devices. We propose the use of phononic crystal...

  13. Micromechanical Devices for Control of Cell-Cell Interaction, and Methods of Use Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sangeeta N. (Inventor); Hui, Elliot (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The development and function of living tissues depends largely on interactions between cells that can vary in both time and space; however, temporal control of cell-cell interaction is experimentally challenging. By employing a micromachined silicon substrate with moving parts, herein is disclosed the dynamic regulation of cell-cell interactions via direct manipulation of adherent cells with micron-scale precision. The inventive devices and methods allow mechanical control of both tissue composition and spatial organization. The inventive device and methods enable the investigation of dynamic cell-cell interaction in a multitude of applications, such as intercellular communication, spanning embryogenesis, homeostasis, and pathogenic processes.

  14. Instrumentation and control of harmonic oscillators via a single-board microprocessor-FPGA device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Rico A R; Davis, Solomon; Devine, Cameron; Garbini, Joseph L; Sidles, John A

    2017-04-01

    We report the development of an instrumentation and control system instantiated on a microprocessor-field programmable gate array (FPGA) device for a harmonic oscillator comprising a portion of a magnetic resonance force microscope. The specific advantages of the system are that it minimizes computation, increases maintainability, and reduces the technical barrier required to enter the experimental field of magnetic resonance force microscopy. Heterodyne digital control and measurement yields computational advantages. A single microprocessor-FPGA device improves system maintainability by using a single programming language. The system presented requires significantly less technical expertise to instantiate than the instrumentation of previous systems, yet integrity of performance is retained and demonstrated with experimental data.

  15. Instrumentation and control of harmonic oscillators via a single-board microprocessor-FPGA device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, Rico A. R.; Davis, Solomon; Devine, Cameron; Garbini, Joseph L.; Sidles, John A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the development of an instrumentation and control system instantiated on a microprocessor-field programmable gate array (FPGA) device for a harmonic oscillator comprising a portion of a magnetic resonance force microscope. The specific advantages of the system are that it minimizes computation, increases maintainability, and reduces the technical barrier required to enter the experimental field of magnetic resonance force microscopy. Heterodyne digital control and measurement yields computational advantages. A single microprocessor-FPGA device improves system maintainability by using a single programming language. The system presented requires significantly less technical expertise to instantiate than the instrumentation of previous systems, yet integrity of performance is retained and demonstrated with experimental data.

  16. Radiological assessment of placement of the hysteroscopically inserted Essure permanent birth control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente Ramos, R M; Azpeitia Armán, J; Aparicio Rodríguez-Miñón, P; Salazar Arquero, F J; Albillos Merino, J C

    2015-01-01

    Essure is a permanent birth control device that is inserted through the cervix by hysteroscopy. The device is placed in the fallopian tubes, where it causes occlusion by stimulating fibrosis. Patients can be followed up with plain-film X-rays, hysterosalpingography, and ultrasonography, although the devices can also be identified incidentally on CT and MRI. The follow-up of Essure is based on checking the criteria for appropriate positioning and correct functioning (tubal occlusion) and on diagnosing complications. The most common complications are perforation, migration (toward the uterine or peritoneal cavity), and occlusion failure. In hysterosalpingography, vascular intravasation is the most common cause of diagnostic error. Radiologists need to know how to recognize the device on different imaging techniques, how to check that it is correctly placed and functioning, and how to diagnose complications. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Naproxen Sodium for Pain Control With Intrauterine Device Insertion: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Lynn L; Braaten, Kari P; Eichen, Eva; Fortin, Jennifer; Maurer, Rie; Goldberg, Alisa B

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate whether 550 mg oral naproxen sodium given 1 hour before intrauterine device (IUD) insertion is effective for pain relief as compared with placebo. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The primary outcome was pain with IUD insertion measured on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Our sample size was calculated to detect a 15-mm difference in VAS scores with 80% power (α=0.05). Secondary outcomes included pain with tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and 5 and 15 minutes postinsertion. A total of 118 women were enrolled and analyzed (58 in the naproxen sodium arm, 60 in the placebo arm, 97% nulliparous) between May 11, 2015, and March 25, 2016. There were no differences in baseline demographics or reproductive characteristics between arms. There were no differences in median VAS pain scores for the primary outcome of pain with IUD insertion between the naproxen sodium arm compared with the placebo arm (69 compared with 66 mm, P=.89). There were no differences in the secondary outcomes of median VAS pain scores with tenaculum placement (37 compared with 32 mm, P=.97) or uterine sounding (60 compared with 58 mm, P=.66). However, median pain scores postprocedure were lower in the naproxen arm as compared with the placebo arm: 17 compared with 26 mm (P=.01) at 5 minutes and 13 compared with 24 mm (P=.01) at 15 minutes postinsertion. Oral naproxen sodium does not reduce pain with IUD insertion but does reduce pain after insertion and should be considered as a premedication. ClinicalTrials.gov, http://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02388191.

  18. PANATIKI: a network access control implementation based on PANA for IoT devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Sanchez, Pedro; Marin Lopez, Rafa; Gomez Skarmeta, Antonio F

    2013-11-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) networks are the pillar of recent novel scenarios, such as smart cities or e-healthcare applications. Among other challenges, these networks cover the deployment and interaction of small devices with constrained capabilities and Internet protocol (IP)-based networking connectivity. These constrained devices usually require connection to the Internet to exchange information (e.g., management or sensing data) or access network services. However, only authenticated and authorized devices can, in general, establish this connection. The so-called authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) services are in charge of performing these tasks on the Internet. Thus, it is necessary to deploy protocols that allow constrained devices to verify their credentials against AAA infrastructures. The Protocol for Carrying Authentication for Network Access (PANA) has been standardized by the Internet engineering task force (IETF) to carry the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP), which provides flexible authentication upon the presence of AAA. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first deep study of the feasibility of EAP/PANA for network access control in constrained devices. We provide light-weight versions and implementations of these protocols to fit them into constrained devices. These versions have been designed to reduce the impact in standard specifications. The goal of this work is two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the feasibility of EAP/PANA in IoT devices; (2) to provide the scientific community with the first light-weight interoperable implementation of EAP/PANA for constrained devices in the Contiki operating system (Contiki OS), called PANATIKI. The paper also shows a testbed, simulations and experimental results obtained from real and simulated constrained devices.

  19. PANATIKI: A Network Access Control Implementation Based on PANA for IoT Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio F. Gomez Skarmeta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Internet of Things (IoT networks are the pillar of recent novel scenarios, such as smart cities or e-healthcare applications. Among other challenges, these networks cover the deployment and interaction of small devices with constrained capabilities and Internet protocol (IP-based networking connectivity. These constrained devices usually require connection to the Internet to exchange information (e.g., management or sensing data or access network services. However, only authenticated and authorized devices can, in general, establish this connection. The so-called authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA services are in charge of performing these tasks on the Internet. Thus, it is necessary to deploy protocols that allow constrained devices to verify their credentials against AAA infrastructures. The Protocol for Carrying Authentication for Network Access (PANA has been standardized by the Internet engineering task force (IETF to carry the Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP, which provides flexible authentication upon the presence of AAA. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first deep study of the feasibility of EAP/PANA for network access control in constrained devices. We provide light-weight versions and implementations of these protocols to fit them into constrained devices. These versions have been designed to reduce the impact in standard specifications. The goal of this work is two-fold: (1 to demonstrate the feasibility of EAP/PANA in IoT devices; (2 to provide the scientific community with the first light-weight interoperable implementation of EAP/PANA for constrained devices in the Contiki operating system (Contiki OS, called PANATIKI. The paper also shows a testbed, simulations and experimental results obtained from real and simulated constrained devices.

  20. Nanoscale architectural tuning of parylene patch devices to control therapeutic release rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierstorff, Erik; Lam, Robert; Ho, Dean

    2008-11-01

    The advent of therapeutic functionalized implant coatings has significantly impacted the medical device field by enabling prolonged device functionality for enhanced patient treatment. Incorporation of drug release from a stable, biocompatible surface is instrumental in decreasing systemic application of toxic therapeutics and increasing the lifespan of implants by the incorporation of antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. In this study, we have developed a parylene C-based device for controlled release of Doxorubicin, an anti-cancer chemotherapy and definitive read-out for preserved drug functionality, and further characterized the parylene deposition condition-dependent tunability of drug release. Drug release is controlled by the deposition of a layer of 20-200 nm thick parylene over the drug layer. This places a porous layer above the Doxorubicin, limiting drug elution based on drug accessibility to solvent and the solvent used. An increase in the thickness of the porous top layer prolongs the elution of active drug from the device from, in the conditions tested, the order of 10 min to the order of 2 d in water and from the order of 10 min to no elution in PBS. Thus, the controlled release of an anti-cancer therapeutic has been achieved via scalably fabricated, parylene C-encapsulated drug delivery devices.

  1. Brain Computer Interface-Controlling Devices Utilizing The Alpha Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Hundia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes the development and testing of an interface system whereby one can control external devices by voluntarily controlling alpha waves that is through eye movement. Such a system may be used for the control of prosthetics robotic arms and external devices like wheelchairs using the alpha brain waves and the Mu rhythm. The response generated through the movement of the eye detecting and controlling the amplitude of the alpha brain waves is interfaced and processed to control Robotic systems and smart home control. In order to measure the response of alpha waves over different lobes of the brain initially I measured these signals over 32 regions using silver chloride plated electrodes. By the opening and the closure of the eyes and the movement in the up-down left-right directions and processing these movements measuring them over the occipital region I was able to differentiate the amplitude of the alpha waves generated due to these several movements. In the First session testing period subjects were asked to close and open their eyes and they were able to control limited movements of a Robot and a prosthetic arm. In the Second 2session the movement of the eyes was also considered left-right up-down along with the opening and closure during this time span they were able to control more dimensions of the robot several devices at the same time using different eye movements.

  2. An optimal controller for an electric ventricular-assist device: theory, implementation, and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klute, G. K.; Tasch, U.; Geselowitz, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the development and testing of an optimal position feedback controller for the Penn State electric ventricular-assist device (EVAD). The control law is designed to minimize the expected value of the EVAD's power consumption for a targeted patient population. The closed-loop control law is implemented on an Intel 8096 microprocessor and in vitro test runs show that this controller improves the EVAD's efficiency by 15-21%, when compared with the performance of the currently used feedforward control scheme.

  3. A prototype rehabilitation device with variable resistance and joint motion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J.Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This paper presents the design of a versatile rehabilitation device in the form of a rotating joint arm mounted on the adjustable seat that provides passive resistance during strength training for muscles. The resistance is supplied by a magnetorheological damper. Intelligent controls are developed to produce resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Special consideration has been given to the human–machine interaction in the adaptive control algorithms that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue. PMID:16112598

  4. TASER® Electronic Control Device-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Renal Failure: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Many law enforcement agencies around the United States are employing the use of TASER® electronic control devices (TASER® International Inc.) to subdue combative suspects. Since its inception the TASER® has had a temporal association with reports of rhabdomyolysis. Case reports have reported TASER® induced rhabdomyolysis as mild but serious cases have also been reported. Herein we present the case of a single patient who was admitted to our health network with severe rhabdomyolysis after receiving TASER® shocks and review the pertinent literature. No direct link has been established between clinically significant rhabdomyolysis and TASER® device application but this case serves as an example of a sparsely documented but serious complication that may occur in patients who are at risk for restraint by an electronic control device. PMID:26557540

  5. TASER(®) Electronic Control Device-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Renal Failure: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, James Benjamin; Ahmad, Ibrahim

    2015-10-01

    Many law enforcement agencies around the United States are employing the use of TASER(®) electronic control devices (TASER(®) International Inc.) to subdue combative suspects. Since its inception the TASER(®) has had a temporal association with reports of rhabdomyolysis. Case reports have reported TASER(®) induced rhabdomyolysis as mild but serious cases have also been reported. Herein we present the case of a single patient who was admitted to our health network with severe rhabdomyolysis after receiving TASER(®) shocks and review the pertinent literature. No direct link has been established between clinically significant rhabdomyolysis and TASER(®) device application but this case serves as an example of a sparsely documented but serious complication that may occur in patients who are at risk for restraint by an electronic control device.

  6. Improvement on Main/backup Controller Switching Device of the Nozzle Throat Area Control System for a Turbofan Aero Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Duan, Minghu; Yan, Maode; Li, Gang; Li, Xiaohui

    2014-06-01

    A full authority digital electronic controller (FADEC) equipped with a full authority hydro-mechanical backup controller (FAHMBC) is adopted as the nozzle throat area control system (NTACS) of a turbofan aero engine. In order to ensure the switching reliability of the main/backup controller, the nozzle throat area control switching valve was improved from three-way convex desktop slide valve to six-way convex desktop slide valve. Simulation results show that, if malfunctions of FAEDC occur and abnormal signals are outputted from FADEC, NTACS will be seriously influenced by the main/backup controller switching in several working states, while NTACS will not be influenced by using the improved nozzle throat area control switching valve, thus the controller switching process will become safer and smoother and the working reliability of this turbofan aero engine is improved by the controller switching device improvement.

  7. A perineal protection device designed to protect the perineum during labor: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavesson, Tony; Griph, Inger D; Skärvad, Anna; Karlsson, Ann-Sofi; Nilsson, Helen B; Steinvall, Margareta; Haadem, Knut

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of a new device for reducing perineal tears during vaginal childbirth. A multicenter open randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed in Helsingborg, Lund and Malmö, Sweden consisting of 1148 women. Women anticipating a vaginal delivery were either randomized to the intervention group (n=574 in which the perineal protection device was used, or a control group (n=574), in which the perineal protection device was not used. The main outcome measurements were incidence of vaginal and perineal tears (1st to 4th degree tears) and adverse effects on the parturient and newborn. The incidences of first- and second-degree tears of the vagina (p=0.018) and perineum (p=0.005) were significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with the controls. In the intervention- and control group, 184 women (34.9%) and 142 (26.6%) showed no perineal tearing, respectively (p=0.034). Numbers needed to treat to avoid any perianal tearing was 12. The incidence of anal sphincter rupture (ASR) was the same in both groups (n=19; 3.4%). No negative effects on mother or child from using the device were observed. The perineal protective device significantly reduced the incidence of first- and second-degree tears in the vagina and perineum during vaginal birth and also significantly increased the number of parturients with a fully intact posterior commissure. No significant reduction of ASR and no negative effects of the device were observed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. A New Drop Fluidics Enabled by Magnetic Field Mediated Elasto-Capillary Transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Saheli; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2016-01-01

    This research introduces a new drop fluidics, which uses a deformable and stretchable elastomeric film as the platform, instead of the commonly used rigid supports. Such a soft film impregnated with magnetic particles can be modulated with an external electromagnetic field that produces a vast array of topographical landscapes with varying surface curvature, which, in conjunction with capillarity, can direct and control motion of water droplets efficiently and accurately. When a thin layer of oil is present on this film that is deformed locally, a centrosymmetric wedge is formed. A water droplet placed on this oil laden film becomes asymmetrically deformed thus producing a gradient of Laplace pressure within the droplet setting it to motion. A simple theory is presented that accounts for the droplet speed in terms of such geometric variables as the volume of the droplet and the thickness of the oil film covering the soft elastomeric film, as well as such material variables as the viscosity of the oil and inte...

  9. Open Fluidics: A Cell Culture Flow System Developed Over Wettability Contrast-Based Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2017-10-16

    Biological tissues are recurrently exposed to several dynamic mechanical forces that influence cell behavior. On this work, the focus is on the shear stress forces induced by fluid flow. The study of flow-induced effects on cells leads to important advances in cardiovascular, cancer, stem cell, and bone biology understanding. These studies are performed using cell culture flow (CCF) systems, mainly parallel plate flow chambers (PPFC), and microfluidic systems. Here, it is proposed an original CCF system based on the open fluidics concept. The system is developed using a planar superhydrophobic platform with hydrophilic paths. The paths work as channels to drive cell culture medium flows without using walls for liquid confinement. The liquid streams are controlled just based on the wettability contrast. To validate the concept, the effect of the shear stress stimulus in the osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells is studied. Combining bone morphogenic protein (specifically BMP-2) stimulation with this mechanical stimulus, a synergistic effect is found on osteoblast differentiation. This effect is confirmed by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase activity, a well-known early marker of osteogenic differentiation. The suggested CCF system combines characteristics and advantages of both the PPFC and microfluidic systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Hands-free device control using sound picked up in the ear canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatpar, Siddharth R.; Ngia, Lester; Vlach, Chris; Lin, Dong; Birkhimer, Craig; Juneja, Amit; Pruthi, Tarun; Hoffman, Orin; Lewis, Tristan

    2008-04-01

    Hands-free control of unmanned ground vehicles is essential for soldiers, bomb disposal squads, and first responders. Having their hands free for other equipment and tasks allows them to be safer and more mobile. Currently, the most successful hands-free control devices are speech-command based. However, these devices use external microphones, and in field environments, e.g., war zones and fire sites, their performance suffers because of loud ambient noise: typically above 90dBA. This paper describes the development of technology using the ear as an output source that can provide excellent command recognition accuracy even in noisy environments. Instead of picking up speech radiating from the mouth, this technology detects speech transmitted internally through the ear canal. Discreet tongue movements also create air pressure changes within the ear canal, and can be used for stealth control. A patented earpiece was developed with a microphone pointed into the ear canal that captures these signals generated by tongue movements and speech. The signals are transmitted from the earpiece to an Ultra-Mobile Personal Computer (UMPC) through a wired connection. The UMPC processes the signals and utilizes them for device control. The processing can include command recognition, ambient noise cancellation, acoustic echo cancellation, and speech equalization. Successful control of an iRobot PackBot has been demonstrated with both speech (13 discrete commands) and tongue (5 discrete commands) signals. In preliminary tests, command recognition accuracy was 95% with speech control and 85% with tongue control.

  11. O dispositivo de gozo na sociedade do controle The device of enjoyment in the society of control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo José Barreira Danziato

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir das proposições de Foucault sobre uma mudança de dispositivos na modernidade, saindo de um "dispositivo de aliança" para um "dispositivo da sexualidade", e levando em conta, ainda, as considerações de Deleuze sobre a contemporânea "sociedade do controle", o autor realiza uma leitura psicanalítica dessas transformações nos processos de subjetivação modernos e contemporâneos, propondo a regência de um novo dispositivo na atualidade, que denomina de "dispositivo de gozo". Argumenta em favor das suas leituras a capitalização do "mais-de-gozar" sugerida por Lacan, e os imperativos de gozo próprios dos nossos tempos.From the propositions of Foucault on a change of devices in modernity, leaving a "alliance device" to a "sexual device", and also taking into account the considerations of Deleuze on the contemporary "society of control," the author presents a psychoanalytic reading of these changes in the processes of modern and contemporary subjectivation, proposing the regency of a new device today, which he called "enjoyment device." He argues in favor of his readings the capitalization of the plus de goce suggested by Lacan, and the imperatives of enjoyment of our own times.

  12. Characterization and Erosion Modeling of a Nozzle-Based Inflow-Control Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Juul; Hemmingsen, Casper Schytte; Bergmann, Line

    2017-01-01

    In the petroleum industry, water-and-gas breakthrough in hydrocarbon reservoirs is a common issue that eventually leads to uneconomic production. To extend the economic production lifetime, inflow-control devices (ICDs) are designed to delay the water-and-gas breakthrough. Because the lifetime of...

  13. Temperature influence on electrically controlled liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the temperature influence on electrically controlled liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fiber device. The phase shift in the wavelength range 1520nm-1600nm for realizing quarter and half wave plates at different temperatures by applying a certain voltage...

  14. Photolithography of thick photoresist coating for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Lei; Khomtchenko, Elena; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2009-01-01

    Thick photoresist coating for electrode patterning in an anisotropically etched V-groove is investigated for electrically controlled liquid crystal photonic bandgap fibre devices. The photoresist step coverage at the convex corners is compared with and without soft baking after photoresist spin...

  15. Load power device, system and method of load control and management employing load identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yi; Luebke, Charles John; Schoepf, Thomas J.

    2018-01-09

    A load power device includes a power input, at least one power output for at least one load, a plurality of sensors structured to sense voltage and current at the at least one power output, and a processor. The processor provides: (a) load identification based upon the sensed voltage and current, and (b) load control and management based upon the load identification.

  16. Research of energy efficiency evaluation parameters for power quality control device based on IGBT module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jieyan; Liu, Yang; Mao, Yongqiu; Chen, Zheng; Jia, Rongda; Zhao, Caiyi; Yang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the energy efficiency evaluation parameters for power quality control device based on IGBT modules have been discussed. First of all, energy consumption of the typical power quality control equipment, such as SVG, APF and MEC, under the rated conditions, have been analyzed to identify the main energy-consuming parts. Then, energy loss mechanism and energy saving path of IGBT module have been discussed. And the energy saving improvement direction of the power quality control equipment based on IGBT module is identified at the same time. At last, the applicable energy efficiency evaluation parameters for power quality control device have been selected, based on the research of the product performances for energy efficiency of power grid.

  17. Physical assistance devices in complex motor skill learning: benefits of a self-controlled practice schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, G; Toole, T

    1999-09-01

    This study examines the effects of a self-controlled use of physical assistance devices on learning a complex motor skill (i.e., producing slalom-type movements on a ski simulator). Physical assistance was provided by ski poles. One group of learners (self-control) was provided with the poles whenever they requested them, whereas another (yoked) group had no influence on the pole/no-pole schedule. While there were no group differences during the practice phase (Days 1 and 2), clear group differences emerged in the retention test without poles (Day 3). The self-control group produced significantly larger amplitudes than the yoked group. These results extend previous findings by showing learning advantages of the self-controlled use of physical assistance devices in complex motor skill learning.

  18. Quantifying opportunities for hospital cost control: medical device purchasing and patient discharge planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C; Brown, Timothy T

    2014-09-01

    To quantify the potential reduction in hospital costs from adoption of best local practices in supply chain management and discharge planning. We performed multivariate statistical analyses of the association between total variable cost per procedure and medical device price and length of stay, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Ten hospitals in 1 major metropolitan area supplied patient-level administrative data on 9778 patients undergoing joint replacement, spine fusion, or cardiac rhythm management (CRM) procedures in 2008 and 2010. The impact on each hospital of matching lowest local market device prices and lowest patient length of stay (LOS) was calculated using multivariate regression analysis controlling for patient demographics, diagnoses, comorbidities, and implications. Average variable costs ranged from $11,315 for joint replacement to $16,087 for CRM and $18,413 for spine fusion. Implantable medical devices accounted for a large share of each procedure's variable costs: 44% for joint replacement, 39% for spine fusion, and 59% for CRM. Device prices and patient length-of-stay exhibited wide variation across hospitals. Total potential hospital cost savings from achieving best local practices in device prices and patient length of stay are 14.5% for joint replacement, 18.8% for spine fusion;,and 29.1% for CRM. Hospitals have opportunities for cost reduction from adoption of best local practices in supply chain management and discharge planning.

  19. 40 CFR 63.3166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Limitations § 63.3166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the procedures and test methods in this section to determine the add-on control device...

  20. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I determine the add-on control... determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the procedures and test methods in this section to determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  1. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the procedures and test methods in this section to determine the add-on control device...

  2. Secure Reprogramming of a Network Connected Device : Securing programmable logic controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Tesfaye, Mussie

    2012-01-01

    This is a master’s thesis project entitled “Secure reprogramming of network connected devices”. The thesis begins by providing some background information to enable the reader to understand the current vulnerabilities of network-connected devices, specifically with regard to cyber security and data integrity. Today supervisory control and data acquisition systems utilizing network connected programmable logic controllers are widely used in many industries and critical infrastructures. These n...

  3. Bismuth, antimony and tellurium alloy nanoparticles with controllable shape and composition for efficient thermoelectric devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, Derrick; Mai, Nguyen T.; Thuy, Nguyen T.B.; Maeda, Youjiro; Linh, Tran P.T.; Koyano, Mikio; Maenosono, Shinya [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    The wet chemical synthesis of organic molecule encapsulated Bi{sub x}Sb{sub y}Te{sub 100-x-y} nanoparticles (NPs) has been demonstrated to be shape and composition controllable as a function of the organic capping species used, the particles serve as intriguing materials towards thermoelectric (TE) devices with enhanced and controllable activity. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. METHODS AND DEVICES FOR CONTROL OF OPEN MICROSCOPIC POROSITY OF PORCELAIN INSULATORS

    OpenAIRE

    Galagan, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Examined the methods and devices of control of porcelain insulators for presence of defects such as open microscopic porosity. It is shown that open microscopic porosity is the most dangerous defect production origin and is responsible for over 80% of failures of porcelain support insulators. Considered methods of control are divided into two groups: destructive and non-destructive. For each method are highlighted their advantages and disadvantages. The analysis showed that most of the existi...

  5. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  6. Micro fluidic System for Culturing and Monitoring of Neuronal Cells and Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmand, Tanya; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    The aim of this Ph.D. project was to combine experience within cell and tissue culturing, electrochemistry and microfabrication in order to develop an in vivo-like fluidic culturing platform, challenging the traditional culturing methods. The first goal was to develope a fluidic system...... for culturing of brain tissue. The second goal was to develop a sensor system with the potential for incorporation into both conventional culture systems and fluidic culturing systems. The third and final goal of this project was to develop a system for culturing of neuronal cells with the possibility...... neuronal cells on a Peptide Nano Wires (PNW) modified substrate aiming to bring conventional neuronal cultures closer to mimic the in vivo situation. The work describes both the fabrication of the culture substrates and results comparing the performance of PNWcultured neurons and conventional cultures...

  7. Preparation and investigation of controlled-release glipizide novel oral device with three-dimensional printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qijun; Wen, Haoyang; Jia, Danyang; Guan, Xiaoying; Pan, Hao; Yang, Yue; Yu, Shihui; Zhu, Zhihong; Xiang, Rongwu; Pan, Weisan

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of combining fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing technology with hot melt extrusion (HME) to fabricate a novel controlled-release drug delivery device. Glipizide used in the treatment of diabetes was selected as model drug, and was successfully loaded into commercial polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) filaments by HME method. The drug-loaded filaments were printed through a dual-nozzle 3D printer, and finally formed a double-chamber device composed by a tablet embedded within a larger tablet (DuoTablet), each chamber contains different contents of glipizide. The drug-loaded 3D printed device was evaluated for drug release under in vitro dissolution condition, and we found the release profile fit Korsmeyer-Peppas release kinetics. With the double-chamber design, it is feasible to design either controlled drug release or delayed drug release behavior by reasonably arranging the concentration distribution of the drug in the device. The characteristics of the external layer performed main influence on the release profile of the internal compartment such as lag-time or rate of release. The results of this study suggest the potential of 3D printing to fabricate controlled-release drug delivery system containing multiple drug concentration distributions via hot melt extrusion method and specialized design configurations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Active Thermal Control for Reliability Improvement of MOS-gated Power Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Concari, Carlo; Dossena, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) method for MOS-gated power switches aimed at reducing temperature swing amplitude during operation. It leverages on the fact that thermal cycle amplitude of many actuation system components (such as power devices) has a large impact on the system...... reliability and lifetime. These figures can then be improved, which eases the adoption of electrification in markets, such as transportation, where they are still below target values. The proposed ATC method leaves electric load parameters untouched, while acting dynamically on gate parameters, namely voltage...... and resistance. A model-predictive control (MPC) strategy is used to determine the most suitable parameters to use. Simulations of the control scheme are presented first, to predict the potential benefits on temperature swing amplitude, and the consequent improvements in terms of device lifetime are inferred...

  9. Hierarchical Brokering with Feedback Control Framework in Mobile Device-Centric Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Lieh Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hierarchical brokering architecture (HiBA and Mobile Multicloud Networking (MMCN feedback control framework for mobile device-centric cloud (MDC2 computing. Exploiting the MMCN framework and RESTful web-based interconnection, each tier broker probes resource state of its federation for control and management. Real-time and seamless services were developed. Case studies including intrafederation energy-aware balancing based on fuzzy feedback control and higher tier load balancing are further demonstrated to show how HiBA with MMCN relieves the embedding of algorithms when developing services. Theoretical performance model and real-world experiments both show that an MDC2 based on HiBA features better quality in terms of resource availability and network latency if it federates devices with enough resources distributed in lower tier hierarchy. The proposed HiBA realizes a development platform for MDC2 computing which is a feasible solution to User-Centric Networks (UCNs.

  10. COMPUTER CONTROLLED EXPERIMENTAL DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATIONS OF TRIBOLOGICAL INFLUENCES IN SHEET METAL FORMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Vujinović

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheet metal forming, especially deep drawing process is influenced by many factors. Blank holding force and drawbead displacement are two of them that can be controlled during the forming process.For this purpose, an electro-hydraulic computerized sheet-metal strip sliding device has been constructed. The basic characteristic of this device is realization of variable contact pressure and drawbead height as functions of time or stripe displacement. There are both, pressure and drawbead, ten linear and nonlinear functions. Additional features consist of the ability to measure drawing force, contact pressure, drawbead displacement etc.The device overview and first results of steel sheet stripe sliding over rounded drawbead are presented in the paper.

  11. Computer controlled experimental device for investigations of tribological influences in sheet metal forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Djordjevic

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheet metal forming, especially deep drawing process, is influenced by many factors. Blank holding force and drawbead displacement are two of them that can be controlled during the forming process. For this purpose, electro-hydraulic computerized sheet-metal strip sliding device has been constructed. Basic characteristic of this device is realization of variable contact pressure and drawbead height as functions of time or stripe displacement. There are both, pressure and drawbead, ten linear and nonlinear functions. Additional features consist of the ability to measure drawing force, contact pressure, drawbead displacement etc. Presented in the paper are the device overview and the first results of steel sheet stripe sliding over rounded  drawbead.

  12. Influences of Removable Devices on the Anti-Threat Model: Dynamic Analysis and Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of M2M wireless network, damages caused by malicious worms are getting more and more serious. The main goal of this paper is to explore the influences of removable devices on the interaction dynamics between malicious worms and benign worms by using a mathematical model. The model takes two important network environment factors into consideration: benign worms and the influences of removable devices. Besides, the model’s basic reproduction number is obtained, along with the correct control conditions of the local and global asymptotical stability of the worm-free equilibrium. Simulation results show that the effectiveness of our proposed model in terms of reflecting the influences of removable devices on the interaction dynamics of an anti-treat model. Based on numerical analyses and simulations, effective methods are proposed to contain the propagation of malicious worms by using anti-worms.

  13. Method of controlling illumination device based on current-voltage model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    across and current through the LED and the means for generating the activation signal is adapted to generate the activating signal based on the voltage, the current and a current- voltage model related to LED. The current-voltage model defines a relationship between the current, the voltage......The present invention relates to an illumination device comprising a number of LEDs, means for receiving an input signal, means for generating an activation signal for at least one of the LEDs based on the input signal. The illumination device comprises further means for obtaining the voltage...... and the colorimetric properties of said light emitted by LED. The present invention relates also to a method of controlling and a meted of calibrating such illumination device....

  14. Controlling light with light using coherent meta-devices: all-optical transistor, summator and invertor

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Xu; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2014-01-01

    Vast amounts of information are conveyed by photons in optical fibres, but most data processing is performed electronically, creating the infamous 'information bottleneck' and consuming energy at an increasingly unsustainable rate. The potential for photonic devices to manipulate light themselves remains unfulfilled, largely due to the absence of materials with strong, fast optical nonlinearities. Here we show that small-signal amplifier, summator and invertor functions for optical signals may all be realized with a 4-port device exploiting the coherent interaction of beams on a planar plasmonic metamaterial, assuming no intrinsic nonlinearity. We show that coherently controlled redistribution of energy among ports can deliver various forms of optical switching. Such devices can operate even at the single photon level, with THz bandwidth, and without introducing signal distortion, presenting powerful opportunities for novel optical data processing architectures, complexity oracles and the locally coherent net...

  15. PREFACE: Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization Atomically controlled fabrication technology: new physics and functional device realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Kasai, Hideaki

    2011-10-01

    To realize next generation functional devices, atomic level controllability of the application and fabrication techniques is necessary. The conventional route to advance solid state devices, which involves improvement of 'instrumental accuracy', is now facing a major paradigm shift towards 'phenomenal accuracy'. Therefore, to keep up with this critical turn in the development of devices, pioneering research (both theoretical and experimental) on relevant materials, focusing on new physics at the atomic scale, is inevitable. This special section contains articles on the advancements in fabrication of functional devices with an emphasis on the exploration, clarification and understanding of atomistic phenomena. Research articles reporting theoretical and experimental findings on various materials such as semiconductors, metals, magnetic and organic systems, collectively present and 'capture' the appropriate processes and mechanisms of this rapidly developing field. The theoretical investigations employ first-principles quantum-mechanical simulations to clarify and bring about design principles and guidelines, or to develop more reliable computational methods. Experimental studies, on the other hand, introduce novel capabilities to build, view and manipulate materials at the atomic scale by employing pioneering techniques. Thus, the section pays significant attention to novel structures and properties and the accompanying fabrication techniques and design arising from the understanding of properties and structures at the atomic scale. We hope that researchers in the area of physics, materials science and engineering, interested in the development of functional devices via atomic level control, will find valuable information in this collaborative work. We are grateful to all of the authors for their contributions. Atomically controlled fabrication contents On the mechanism of carbon nanotube formation: the role of the catalyst G N Ayre, T Uchino, B Mazumder, A L Hector

  16. Monolithically integrated Si gate-controlled light-emitting device: science and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaikai

    2018-02-01

    The motivation of this study is to develop a p–n junction based light emitting device, in which the light emission is conventionally realized using reverse current driving, by voltage driving. By introducing an additional terminal of insulated gate for voltage driving, a novel three-terminal Si light emitting device is described where both the light intensity and spatial light pattern of the device are controlled by the gate voltage. The proposed light emitting device employs injection-enhanced Si in avalanche mode where electric field confinement occurs in the corner of a reverse-biased p+n junction. It is found that, depending on the bias conditions, the light intensity is either a linear or a quadratic function of the applied gate voltage or the reverse-bias. Since the light emission is based on the avalanching mode, the Si light emitting device offers the potential for very large scale integration-compatible light emitters for inter- or intra-chip signal transmission and contactless functional testing of wafers.

  17. Controlled Fabrication and High-Resolution Imaging of Molecular-Scale Three-Terminal Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Douglas R.; Johnston, Danvers E.; Guiton, Beth S.; Park, T.-H.; Therien, M. J.; Davies, Peter K.; Bonnell, Dawn A.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2007-03-01

    One of the biggest challenges to developing molecular-scale three terminal devices is to precisely fabricate and monitor the formation of the nanometer-scale electrodes (nanogaps). Recently, electromigrated nanogaps have been developed which provide sufficient gate-coupling to produce such devices. We have developed a technique for forming electromigrated nanogaps in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in order to monitor their formation with high-resolution imaging in real time. The technique relies on computer-controlled electromigration using feedback to produce the nanogaps at room temperature. This TEM imaging allows us to monitor the dynamics of the device evolution, where the gaps remain ordered and clear of residue during the process. Using this technique, we find clear visual evidence for the importance of joule heating in the formation of electromigrated nanogaps. These electrodes can also be directly used in the construction of three terminal nanometer-scale devices. Our results have implications on the development of a wide range of novel molecular-scale devices. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NIRT Grant No. 0304531 and MRSEC award DMR05-20020).

  18. Design of a novel mobility device controlled by the feet motion of a standing child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepflin, Zachary R; Chen, Xi; Ragonesi, Christina B; Galloway, James C; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2011-01-01

    Self-generated mobility is a major contributor to the physical, emotional, cognitive, and social development of infants and toddlers. When young children have disorders that hinder self locomotion, their development is at risk for delay. Independent mobility via traditional power mobility devices may prevent this delay, but do little to encourage the child's development of gross motor skills. This research aims to develop a bio-driven mobile-assistive device that is controlled and driven by moving the feet, which may encourage the development of gross motor skills. In this study, system feasibility is shown by experiments on five typically developing toddlers and one special needs toddler with spastic cerebral palsy. Children were placed in the bio-driven device and instructed to navigate through a maze. All subjects were able to successfully complete the maze in multiple trials. Additionally, two toddlers showed evidence of improved driving skill by completing the maze in shorter times in successive trials on a given testing day. The results suggest that such a device is feasible for purposeful driving. Recommendations are given for the device and protocol redesign for related future testing. © 2011 IEEE

  19. Controlled delivery of antiangiogenic drug to human eye tissue using a MEMS device

    KAUST Repository

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an implantable MEMS drug delivery device to conduct controlled and on-demand, ex vivo drug transport to human eye tissue. Remotely operated drug delivery to human post-mortem eyes was performed via a MEMS device. The developed curved packaging cover conforms to the eyeball thereby preventing the eye tissue from contacting the actuating membrane. By pulsed operation of the device, using an externally applied magnetic field, the drug released from the device accumulates in a cavity adjacent to the tissue. As such, docetaxel (DTX), an antiangiogenic drug, diffuses through the eye tissue, from sclera and choroid to retina. DTX uptake by sclera and choroid were measured to be 1.93±0.66 and 7.24±0.37 μg/g tissue, respectively, after two hours in pulsed operation mode (10s on/off cycles) at 23°C. During this period, a total amount of 192 ng DTX diffused into the exposed tissue. This MEMS device shows great potential for the treatment of ocular posterior segment diseases such as diabetic retinopathy by introducing a novel way of drug administration to the eye. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. A mathematical model for surface roughness of fluidic channels produced by grinding aided electrochemical discharge machining (G-ECDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeesh V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Grinding aided electrochemical discharge machining is a hybrid technique, which combines the grinding action of an abrasive tool and thermal effects of electrochemical discharges to remove material from the workpiece for producing complex contours. The present study focuses on developing fluidic channels on borosilicate glass using G-ECDM and attempts to develop a mathematical model for surface roughness of the machined channel. Preliminary experiments are conducted to study the effect of machining parameters on surface roughness. Voltage, duty factor, frequency and tool feed rate are identified as the significant factors for controlling surface roughness of the channels produced by G-ECDM. A mathematical model was developed for surface roughness by considering the grinding action and thermal effects of electrochemical discharges in material removal. Experiments are conducted to validate the model and the results obtained are in good agreement with that predicted by the model.

  1. Local Chemical Stimulation of Neurons with the Fluidic Force Microscope (FluidFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebersold, Mathias J; Dermutz, Harald; Demkó, László; Cogollo, José F Saenz; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Burchert, Conrad; Schneider, Moritz; Ling, Doris; Forró, Csaba; Han, Hana; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vörös, János

    2017-10-10

    Physiological communication between neurons is dependent on the exchange of neurotransmitters at the synapses. Although this chemical signal transmission targets specific receptors and allows for subtle adaptation of the action potential, in vitro neuroscience typically relies on electrical currents and potentials to stimulate neurons. The electric stimulus is unspecific and the confinement of the stimuli within the media is technically difficult to control and introduces large artifacts in electric recordings of the activity. Here, we present a local chemical stimulation platform that resembles in vivo physiological conditions and can be used to target specific receptors of synapses. Neurotransmitters were dispensed using the force-controlled fluidic force microscope (FluidFM) nanopipette, which provides exact positioning and precise liquid delivery. We show that controlled release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate induces spiking activity in primary rat hippocampal neurons, as measured by concurrent electrical and optical recordings using a microelectrode array and a calcium-sensitive dye, respectively. Furthermore, we characterized the glutamate dose response of neurons by applying stimulation pulses of glutamate with concentrations from 0 to 0.5 mm. This new stimulation approach, which combines FluidFM for gentle and precise positioning with a microelectrode array read-out, makes it possible to modulate the activity of individual neurons chemically and simultaneously record their induced activity across the entire neuronal network. The presented platform not only offers a more physiological alternative compared with electrical stimulation, but also provides the possibility to study the effects of the local application of neuromodulators and other drugs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Development of regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces for motor control of neuroprosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Stephen W. P.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Cederna, Paul S.

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries suffered during amputation commonly results in debilitating neuropathic pain in the affected limb. Modern prosthetic technologies allow for intuitive, simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom. However, these state-of-the-art devices require separate, independent control signals for each degree of freedom, which is currently not possible. As a result, amputees reject up to 75% of myoelectric devices preferring instead to use body-powered artificial limbs which offer subtle sensory feedback. Without meaningful and intuitive sensory feedback, even the most advanced myoelectric prostheses remain insensate, burdensome, and are associated with enormous cognitive demand and mental fatigue. The ideal prosthetic device is one which is capable of providing intuitive somatosensory feedback essential for interaction with the environment. Critical to the design of such a bioprosthetic device is the development of a reliable biologic interface between human and machine. This ideal patient-prosthetic interface allows for transmission of both afferent somatosensory information and efferent motor signals for a closed-loop feedback system of neural control. Our lab has developed the Regenerative Peripheral Nerve Interface (RPNI) as a biologic nerve interface designed for stable integration of a prosthetic device with transected peripheral nerves in a residual limb. The RPNI is constructed by surgically implanting the distal end of a transected peripheral nerve into an autogenous muscle graft. Animal experiments in our lab have shown recording of motor signals from RPNI's implanted into both rodents and monkeys. Here, we achieve high amplitude EMG signals with a high signal to noise (SNR) ratio.

  3. Energy-Efficient Scheduling for Hybrid Tasks in Control Devices for the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Dai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In control devices for the Internet of Things (IoT, energy is one of the critical restriction factors. Dynamic voltage scaling (DVS has been proved to be an effective method for reducing the energy consumption of processors. This paper proposes an energy-efficient scheduling algorithm for IoT control devices with hard real-time control tasks (HRCTs and soft real-time tasks (SRTs. The main contribution of this paper includes two parts. First, it builds the Hybrid tasks with multi-subtasks of different function Weight (HoW task model for IoT control devices. HoW describes the structure of HRCTs and SRTs, and their properties, e.g., deadlines, execution time, preemption properties, and energy-saving goals, etc. Second, it presents the Hybrid Tasks’ Dynamic Voltage Scaling (HTDVS algorithm. HTDVS first sets the slowdown factors of subtasks while meeting the different real-time requirements of HRCTs and SRTs, and then dynamically reclaims, reserves, and reuses the slack time of the subtasks to meet their ideal energy-saving goals. Experimental results show HTDVS can reduce energy consumption about 10%–80% while meeting the real-time requirements of HRCTs, HRCTs help to reduce the deadline miss ratio (DMR of systems, and HTDVS has comparable performance with the greedy algorithm and is more favorable to keep the subtasks’ ideal speeds.

  4. Geometrical and fluidic tuning of periodically modulated thin metal films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Xiao, Sanshui; Beccherelli, Romeo

    2012-01-01

    We numerically demonstrate near-zero transmission of light through two-dimensional arrays of isolated gold rings. The analysis of the device as an optofluidic sensor is presented to demonstrate the tuning of the device in relation to variations of volume and refractive index of an isotropic fluid...

  5. ER fluid applications to vibration control devices and an adaptive neural-net controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shin; Ura, Tamaki

    1993-07-01

    Four applications of electrorheological (ER) fluid to vibration control actuators and an adaptive neural-net control system suitable for the controller of ER actuators are described: a shock absorber system for automobiles, a squeeze film damper bearing for rotational machines, a dynamic damper for multidegree-of-freedom structures, and a vibration isolator. An adaptive neural-net control system composed of a forward model network for structural identification and a controller network is introduced for the control system of these ER actuators. As an example study of intelligent vibration control systems, an experiment was performed in which the ER dynamic damper was attached to a beam structure and controlled by the present neural-net controller so that the vibration in several modes of the beam was reduced with a single dynamic damper.

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System If you are required to comply with operating limits by... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System 1 Table 1 to Subpart SSSS of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OOOO of Part 63—Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System If you are required... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System 2 Table 2 to Subpart OOOO of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System If you are required to comply with operating... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Electrowetting-controlled droplet generation in a microfluidic flow-focusing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloggi, Florent; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Gu, Hao; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2007-11-01

    We studied the generation of aqueous microdrops in an oil-water flow-focusing device with integrated insulator-covered electrodes that allow for continuous tuning of the water wettability by means of electrowetting. Depending on the oil and water inlet pressures three different operating conditions were identified that shift upon applying a voltage: stable oil-water interface, drop generation, and laminar water jet formation. Full control over the drop generation is achieved within a well-defined range of inlet pressures, in quantitative agreement with a model based on the additive contributions from electrowetting and the local hydrostatic pressure at the junction. The tuning power of electrowetting is shown to increase upon device miniaturization, which makes this approach particularly attractive for flow control on the sub-micrometer scale.

  10. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  11. Microfluidic Device for Controllable Chemical Release via Field-Actuated Membrane Incorporating Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We report a robust magnetic-membrane-based microfluidic platform for controllable chemical release. The magnetic membrane was prepared by mixing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and carbonyl-iron nanoparticles together to obtain a flexible thin film. With combined, simultaneous regulation of magnetic stimulus and mechanical pumping, the desired chemical release rate can easily be realized. For example, the dose release experimental data was well fitted by a mathematical sigmoidal model, exhibiting a typical dose-response relationship, which shows promise in providing significant guidance for on-demand drug delivery. To test the platform’s feasibility, our microfluidic device was employed in an experiment involving Escherichia coli culture under controlled antibiotic ciprofloxacin exposure, and the expected outcomes were successfully obtained. Our experimental results indicate that such a microfluidic device, with high accuracy and easy manipulation properties, can legitimately be characterized as active chemical release system.

  12. Technological Breakthroughs in Growth Control of Silicon Carbide for High Power Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, Hiroyuki

    2004-10-01

    Technological breakthroughs in growth control of SiC are reviewed. Step-controlled epitaxy by using off-axis SiC {0001} substrates to grow high-quality epitaxial layer is explained in detail. The introduction of substrate off-angles brings step-flow growth, which easily makes polytype replication of SiC at rather low temperatures. Off-angle dependence, rate-determining processes, and temperature dependence of growth rate are discussed. Prediction, whether step-flow growth or two-dimensional nucleation does occur, is given as a function of off-angle, growth temperature, and growth rate. Optical and electrical properties of undoped epitaxial layers are characterized. Impurity doping during the growth is explained. Recent progresses in peripheral technologies for realization of power electronic devices, such as bulk growth, epitaxial growth, ion implantation, MOS interface, ohmic contacts, are introduced. Finally application to high-power electronic devices is briefly described.

  13. A New Pricing Scheme for Controlling Energy Storage Devices in Future Smart Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the overall efficiency of energy infrastructure is one of the main anticipated benefits of the deployment of smart grid technology. Advancement in energy storage technology and two-way communication in the electric network are indispensable components to achieve such a vision, while efficient pricing schemes and appropriate storage management are also essential. In this paper, we propose a universal pricing scheme which permits one to indirectly control the energy storage devices in the grid to achieve a more desirable aggregate demand profile that meets a particular target of the grid operator such as energy generation cost minimization and carbon emission reduction. Such a pricing scheme can potentially be applied to control the behavior of energy storage devices installed for integration of intermittent renewable energy sources that have permission to grid connection and will have broader applications as an increasing number of novel and low-cost energy storage technologies emerge.

  14. Ocular perfusion pressure control during pars plana vitrectomy: testing a novel device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Tommaso; Querzoli, Giorgio; Gelso, Aldo; Angelini, Giampiero; Rossi, Alessandro; Corazza, Paolo; Landi, Laura; Telani, Serena; Ripandelli, Guido

    2017-09-08

    To study the efficacy of a novel device intended to control infusion pressure based on mean ocular perfusion pressure (MOPP) during pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). An arm blood pressure cuff connected to a vitrectomy machine calculated mean arterial pressure (MAP), while a pressure sensor close to the infusion trocar measured intraocular pressure (IOP). MOPP was calculated in real time in 36 consecutive patients undergoing PPV, who were divided into two groups. The device lowered IOP every time that calculated MOPP fell below 30 mmHg in the Control ON group (18 patients), while no action was taken in the Control OFF group (18 patients). Baseline IOP and blood pressure were similar between groups. The Control ON group had significantly lower average intraoperative IOP (30.5 ± 2.1 vs. 35.9 ± 6.9 mmHg; p = 0.002) and higher MOPP (56.4 ± 5.9 vs. 49.7 ± 6.1 mmHg) than the Control OFF group. The Control ON group also spent less time at MOPP < 10 mmHg and < 30 mmHg: 0 vs. 3.40 ± 2.38 min (p < 0.001) and 9.91 ± 7.15 vs. 16.13 ± 8.12 min (p = 0.02), respectively. The MOPP control device effectively maintained lower IOP and higher MOPP throughout surgery. It also helped avoid dangerous IOP peaks and MOPP dips, allowing patients to spend less time at MOPP of < 10 and < 30 mmHg.

  15. Training approaches for the deployment of a mechanical chest compression device: a randomised controlled manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Velho, Rochelle M; Quinn, Tom; Devrell, Anne; Lall, Ranjit; Orriss, Barry; Yeung, Joyce; Perkins, Gavin D

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of training strategy on team deployment of a mechanical chest compression device. Randomised controlled manikin trial. Large teaching hospital in the UK. Twenty teams, each comprising three clinicians. Participating individuals were health professionals with intermediate or advanced resuscitation training. Teams were randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either standard mechanical chest compression device training or pit-crew device training. Training interventions lasted up to 1 h. Performance was measured immediately after training in a standardised simulated cardiac arrest scenario in which teams were required to deploy a mechanical chest compression device. Primary outcome was chest compression flow fraction in the minute preceding the first mechanical chest compression. Secondary outcomes included cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and mechanical device deployment metrics, and non-technical skill performance. Outcomes were assessed using video recordings of the test scenario. In relation to the primary outcome of chest compression flow fraction in the minute preceding the first mechanical chest compression, we found that pit-crew training was not superior to standard training (0.76 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.79) vs 0.77 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.82), mean difference -0.01 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.03), P=0.572). There was also no difference between groups in performance in relation to any secondary outcome. Pit-crew training, compared with standard training, did not improve team deployment of a mechanical chest device in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. ISRCTN43049287; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Controllable design of solid-state perovskite solar cells by SCAPS device simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai; Lin, Peng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Yan; Xu, Zongchang; Lin, Yixin

    2016-12-01

    The highest power conversion efficiency (PCE) of solid-state perovskite solar cells (ssPSCs) has achieved 20.1% recently. There is reason to believe that ssPSCs is a strong competitor with silicon and CIGS solar cells in photovoltaic field. The deep understanding of operation mechanism of ssPSCs is essential and required to furtherly improve device performance. The configuration and excition type are similar to inorganic semiconductor solar cells. Therefore, Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator (SCAPS), a device simulator widely using in inorganic solar cells, was employed to controllably design ssPSCs. The validity of device simulation was verified by comparing with real devices from reported literatures. The influence of absorber thickness on device property was discussed, which indicate that it exists an optimal thickness range. Two hypothetical interface layers, TiO2/perovskite layer and perovskite/HTM layer, were introduced into the construction model to consider the effects of interfaces defect density on device performance. It revealed TiO2/perovskite has stronger impact than perovskite/HTM, because higher excess carrier density existing at TiO2/perovskite will cause more recombination rate. In addition, hole transport materials (HTM) parameters, hole mobility and acceptor density, were chosen to study the impact of HTM characteristics on PCE. The analysis illuminate that the design of HTM layer should balance hole mobility and acceptor density. Meanwhile, different HTM candidates were selected and replaced typical HTM layer. The discussion about the function of candidates on solar cells performance demonstrated that a thiophene group hole-transporting polymer (PTAA) and a copper-based conductor (CuI) both have relatively high PCE, which is due to their wide bandgap, high conductivity, and better chemical interaction with perovskite absorber.

  17. Generation of Controlled Analog Emissions from Embedded Devices using Software Stress Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Generation of Controlled Analog Emissions from Embedded Devices using Software Stress Methods Oren Sternberg, Jonathan H. Nelson, Israel Perez...as dynamic memory allocation, hard disk writing and computations. Each stressing operation creates a pulse in an amplitude shift keying scheme...software stress testing and diagnostic and security applications including StressLinux (Linux) [17], KALI (Linux) [18] and a multitude of tools in

  18. The Encephalophone: A Novel Musical Biofeedback Device using Conscious Control of Electroencephalogram (EEG)

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas A. Deuel; Pampin, Juan; Sundstrom, Jacob; Darvas, Felix

    2017-01-01

    A novel musical instrument and biofeedback device was created using electroencephalogram (EEG) posterior dominant rhythm (PDR) or mu rhythm to control a synthesized piano, which we call the Encephalophone. Alpha-frequency (8–12 Hz) signal power from PDR in the visual cortex or from mu rhythm in the motor cortex was used to create a power scale which was then converted into a musical scale, which could be manipulated by the individual in real time. Subjects could then generate different notes ...

  19. Active DC Bus Signaling Control Method for Coordinating Multiple Energy Storage Devices in DC Microgrid

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fulong; Lin, Zhengyu; Qian, Zhongnan; Wu, Jiande

    2017-01-01

    This paper will be presented in 2017 Second IEEE International Conference on DC Microgrids (ICDCM) on 28th June 2017. Abstract: Management of multiple energy storage devices in a DC microgrid is a challenge. Conventional method, such as droop control, cannot ensure accurate current sharing in coordinating multiple battery banks, which limits the DC microgrid system performance. This paper proposed an active DC bus signaling (ADBS) method to coordinate multiple battery banks in a DC microg...

  20. TASER® Electronic Control Device-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Renal Failure: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Gleason, James Benjamin; Ahmad, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Many law enforcement agencies around the United States are employing the use of TASER® electronic control devices (TASER® International Inc.) to subdue combative suspects. Since its inception the TASER® has had a temporal association with reports of rhabdomyolysis. Case reports have reported TASER® induced rhabdomyolysis as mild but serious cases have also been reported. Herein we present the case of a single patient who was admitted to our health network with severe rhabdomyolysis after rece...

  1. A New Vibration Measurement Procedure for On-Line Quality Control of Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Marco Revel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of experimentally testing the mechanical reliability of electronic components for quality control is approached. In general, many tests are performed on electronic devices (personal computers, power supply units, lamps, etc., according to the relevant international standards (IEC, in order to verify their resistance to shock and vibrations, but these are mainly “go no-go” experiments, performed on few samples taken from the production batches.

  2. Randomized controlled trials in central vascular access devices: A scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Samantha; Rickard, Claire M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for central venous access devices, however, high complication rates remain. Scoping reviews map the available evidence and demonstrate evidence deficiencies to focus ongoing research priorities. Method A scoping review (January 2006–December 2015) of randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of interventions to improve central venous access device outcomes; including peripherally inserted central catheters, non-tunneled, tunneled and totally implanted venous access catheters. MeSH terms were used to undertake a systematic search with data extracted by two independent researchers, using a standardized data extraction form. Results In total, 178 trials were included (78 non-tunneled [44%]; 40 peripherally inserted central catheters [22%]; 20 totally implanted [11%]; 12 tunneled [6%]; 6 non-specified [3%]; and 22 combined device trials [12%]). There were 119 trials (68%) involving adult participants only, with 18 (9%) pediatric and 20 (11%) neonatal trials. Insertion-related themes existed in 38% of trials (67 RCTs), 35 RCTs (20%) related to post-insertion patency, with fewer trials on infection prevention (15 RCTs, 8%), education (14RCTs, 8%), and dressing and securement (12 RCTs, 7%). There were 46 different study outcomes reported, with the most common being infection outcomes (161 outcomes; 37%), with divergent definitions used for catheter-related bloodstream and other infections. Conclusion More high quality randomized trials across central venous access device management are necessary, especially in dressing and securement and patency. These can be encouraged by having more studies with multidisciplinary team involvement and consumer engagement. Additionally, there were extensive gaps within population sub-groups, particularly in tunneled devices, and in pediatrics and neonates. Finally, outcome definitions need to be unified for results to be meaningful and

  3. Characterization of controlled cortical impact devices by high-speed image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonho; Fu, Amanda H; Tucker, Laura B; Liu, Jiong; McCabe, Joseph T

    2017-07-04

    As a consequence of their commercial availability, ease of use, and reproducibility, controlled cortical impact (CCI) devices have attained significant prevalence in preclinical traumatic brain injury research. With a CCI, the severity of injury is controlled by varying the impact depth, velocity, and duration, but the actual performance of the device is not well appreciated, partly because of the velocity and short travel distance to impact. This study used a high-speed video digital camera to investigate the performance of five electromagnetically driven CCI devices of the same model. Videography indicated that the impactor tip made a series of distinctive vertical advances and retractions before it attained the desired preset depth; this was also observed in male mouse CCI tests. The impactor tip was also observed to move in the horizontal direction by .8-1.6 mm. On the first advance, the tip extended a distance that was shorter than the preset depth and the velocity of impactor tip was slightly faster than the preset values for three of the five machines. One of the devices was evaluated on four separate occasions over a 14-month period and was found to operate consistently over time. Overall, differences in impact depth and velocity between the devices were modest, suggesting that comparisons of experimental results from different laboratories will generally be informative, particularly if reports provide relevant descriptions of neuropathology. However, the repetitive extension and retraction and horizontal movement of the tip suggests caution in modeling CCI as a single injurious event. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. Quality Control of Conventional Radiology Devices in Selected Hospitals of Khuzestan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Rasuli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Quality control techniques used to test the components of the radiological system and verify that the equipment is operating satisfactorily. In this study, quality control (QC assessment of conventional radiology devices was performed in frequently visited radiology centers of Khuzestan province, Iran. Materials and Methods Fifteen conventional radiology devices were examined, based on the protocol proposed in Report No. 77 by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM. Ten standard QC tests, including voltage accuracy and reproducibility, exposure time accuracy and reproducibility, tube output linearity (time and milliampere, filtration (half-value layer, tube output (70 kV at FSD =100 cm, tube output reproducibility and beam alignment were performed and assessed. All measurements were performed, using Barracuda multi-purpose detector. Results The reproducibility of voltage, exposure time and dose output, as well as output linearity, met the standard criteria in all devices. However, in 60% of the units, the results of the beam alignment test were poor. We also found that 66.7% of the studied units offer services to more than 18,000 patients annually or 50 patients per day. Conclusion Despite the fact that radiological devices in Khuzestan province are relatively old with high workload, the obtained results showed that these devices met the standard criteria. This may be mainly related to proper after-sale services, provided by the companies. Although these services may be expensive for radiology centers, the costs may be significantly reduced if QC is defined as a routine procedure performed by qualified medical physicists or radiation safety officers.

  5. Quality Control of Conventional Radiology Devices in Selected Hospitals of Khuzestan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Rasuli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Quality control techniques used to test the components of the radiological system and verify that the equipment is operating satisfactorily. In this study, quality control (QC assessment of conventional radiology devices was performed in frequently visited radiology centers of Khuzestan province, Iran. Materials and Methods Fifteen conventional radiology devices were examined, based on the protocol proposed in Report No. 77 by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM. Ten standard QC tests, including voltage accuracy and reproducibility, exposure time accuracy and reproducibility, tube output linearity (time and milliampere, filtration (half-value layer, tube output (70 kV at FSD =100 cm, tube output reproducibility and beam alignment were performed and assessed. All measurements were performed, using Barracuda multi-purpose detector. Results Thereproducibility of voltage, exposure time and dose output, as well as output linearity, met the standard criteria in all devices. However, in 60% of the units, the results of the beam alignment test were poor. We also found that 66.7% of the studied units offer services to more than 18,000 patients annually or 50 patients per day. Conclusion Despite the fact that radiological devices in Khuzestan province are relatively old with high workload, the obtained results showed that these devices met the standard criteria. This may be mainly related to proper after-sale services, provided by the companies. Although these services may be expensive for radiology centers, the costs may be significantly reduced if QC is defined as a routine procedure performed by qualified medical physicists or radiation safety officers.

  6. Optimizing the construction of devices to control inaccesible surfaces - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niţu, E. L.; Costea, A.; Iordache, M. D.; Rizea, A. D.; Babă, Al

    2017-10-01

    The modern concept for the evolution of manufacturing systems requires multi-criteria optimization of technological processes and equipments, prioritizing associated criteria according to their importance. Technological preparation of the manufacturing can be developed, depending on the volume of production, to the limit of favourable economical effects related to the recovery of the costs for the design and execution of the technological equipment. Devices, as subsystems of the technological system, in the general context of modernization and diversification of machines, tools, semi-finished products and drives, are made in a multitude of constructive variants, which in many cases do not allow their identification, study and improvement. This paper presents a case study in which the multi-criteria analysis of some structures, based on a general optimization method, of novelty character, is used in order to determine the optimal construction variant of a control device. The rational construction of the control device confirms that the optimization method and the proposed calculation methods are correct and determine a different system configuration, new features and functions, and a specific method of working to control inaccessible surfaces.

  7. Electrowetting-induced drop generation and control in a microfluidic flow-focusing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloggi, Florent; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Gu, Hao; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2007-11-01

    Recent upsurge in droplet-based microfluidic research is fueled by the potential application of drops as well-controlled environments for biochemical reactions, single cell analysis and fluid logical devices. Commonly pressure driven flows are used to create droplets continuously either in a flow-focusing or in T-junction geometry. While this approach provides high throughput capability, it is neither amenable to detailed on-demand generation of individual drops nor to dynamic control of surface wettability, which can dramatically affect the dynamics of two-phase microflows. Alternatively, electrowetting (EW)-on-dielectric is used to digitally manipulate drops. The EW provides exquisite control over individual drops and surface wettability. However, current implementations have low throughput and cannot readily be integrated with existing channel-based technologies. Here, we adopt a unified approach to create a soft microfluidic platform that harvests the power of both methods and offers the capability to address their limitations. We achieve this integration by incorporating EW into a flow-focusing device and demonstrate EW-controlled drop formation. We identify experimentally the range of voltages and driving pressures that yields EW-induced droplet generation. A theoretical description based on the balance of external pressures and voltage-controlled capillary pressures quantitatively accounts for the observations. Moreover we show that the smaller the geometric scales the more efficient the electrowetting control of drop generation.

  8. Seismic Proofing Capability of the Accumulated Semiactive Hydraulic Damper as an Active Interaction Control Device with Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of natural disasters has increased recently, causing buildings’ damages which need to be reinforced to prevent their destruction. To improve the seismic proofing capability of Accumulated Semiactive Hydraulic Damper, it is converted to an Active Interaction Control device and synchronous control and predictive control methods are proposed. The full-scale shaking table test is used to test and verify the seismic proofing capability of the proposed AIC with these control methods. This study examines the shock absorption of test structure under excitation by external forces, influences of prediction time, stiffness of the auxiliary structure, synchronous switching, and asynchronous switching on the control effects, and the influence of control locations of test structure on the control effects of the proposed AIC. Test results show that, for the proposed AIC with synchronous control and predictive control of 0.10~0.13 seconds, the displacement reduction ratios are greater than 71%, the average acceleration reduction ratios are, respectively, 36.2% and 36.9%, at the 1st and 2nd floors, and the average base shear reduction ratio is 29.6%. The proposed AIC with suitable stiffeners for the auxiliary structure at each floor with synchronous control and predictive control provide high reliability and practicability for seismic proofing of buildings.

  9. A capability study of micro moulding for nano fluidic system manufacture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido

    2013-01-01

    With the present paper the authors analysed process capability of ultra-precision moulding used for producing nano crosses with the same critical channels dimensions of a nano fluidic system for optical mapping of genomic length DNA. The process variation focused on product tolerances is quantifi...

  10. Highly sensitive miniature fluidic flowmeter based on an FBG heated by Co2+-doped fiber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Z.; Htein, L.; Cheng, L.K.; Martina, Q.; Jansen, R.; Tam, H.Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a miniature fluidic flow sensor based on a short fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a single mode fiber and heated by Co2+-doped multimode fibers. The proposed flow sensor was employed to measure the flow rates of oil and water, showing good sensitivity of 0.339 nm/(m/s) and

  11. Picosecond Laser Machining of Metallic and Polymer Substrates for Fluidic Driven Self-Alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, G.R.B.E.; Cerro, D.A.D.; Pohl, R.; Chang, B.; Liimatainen, V.; Zhou, Q.; Veld, A.J.H.I.

    2012-01-01

    Fluidic self-alignment of micro-components relies on creating a receptor site that is able to confine a liquid droplet. When a micro-component is brought in contact with the droplet, capillary forces move the component to its final position. A method to stop the advancing of a liquid from a receptor

  12. The recent development and applications of fluidic channels by 3D printing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yufeng Zhou

    2017-01-01

    .... [...]the trend of 3D printing and fluidic channel in the lab-on-a-chip is discussed, and the improvement on the current limitations is necessary for the fast commercialization and wide acceptance of “killer-applications”. [...]derived polymer (e.g...

  13. The Encephalophone: A Novel Musical Biofeedback Device using Conscious Control of Electroencephalogram (EEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuel, Thomas A; Pampin, Juan; Sundstrom, Jacob; Darvas, Felix

    2017-01-01

    A novel musical instrument and biofeedback device was created using electroencephalogram (EEG) posterior dominant rhythm (PDR) or mu rhythm to control a synthesized piano, which we call the Encephalophone. Alpha-frequency (8-12 Hz) signal power from PDR in the visual cortex or from mu rhythm in the motor cortex was used to create a power scale which was then converted into a musical scale, which could be manipulated by the individual in real time. Subjects could then generate different notes of the scale by activation (event-related synchronization) or de-activation (event-related desynchronization) of the PDR or mu rhythms in visual or motor cortex, respectively. Fifteen novice normal subjects were tested in their ability to hit target notes presented within a 5-min trial period. All 15 subjects were able to perform more accurately (average of 27.4 hits, 67.1% accuracy for visual cortex/PDR signaling; average of 20.6 hits, 57.1% accuracy for mu signaling) than a random note generation (19.03% accuracy). Moreover, PDR control was significantly more accurate than mu control. This shows that novice healthy individuals can control music with better accuracy than random, with no prior training on the device, and that PDR control is more accurate than mu control for these novices. Individuals with more years of musical training showed a moderate positive correlation with more PDR accuracy, but not mu accuracy. The Encephalophone may have potential applications both as a novel musical instrument without requiring movement, as well as a potential therapeutic biofeedback device for patients suffering from motor deficits (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), brainstem stroke, traumatic amputation).

  14. The Encephalophone: A Novel Musical Biofeedback Device using Conscious Control of Electroencephalogram (EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Deuel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel musical instrument and biofeedback device was created using electroencephalogram (EEG posterior dominant rhythm (PDR or mu rhythm to control a synthesized piano, which we call the Encephalophone. Alpha-frequency (8–12 Hz signal power from PDR in the visual cortex or from mu rhythm in the motor cortex was used to create a power scale which was then converted into a musical scale, which could be manipulated by the individual in real time. Subjects could then generate different notes of the scale by activation (event-related synchronization or de-activation (event-related desynchronization of the PDR or mu rhythms in visual or motor cortex, respectively. Fifteen novice normal subjects were tested in their ability to hit target notes presented within a 5-min trial period. All 15 subjects were able to perform more accurately (average of 27.4 hits, 67.1% accuracy for visual cortex/PDR signaling; average of 20.6 hits, 57.1% accuracy for mu signaling than a random note generation (19.03% accuracy. Moreover, PDR control was significantly more accurate than mu control. This shows that novice healthy individuals can control music with better accuracy than random, with no prior training on the device, and that PDR control is more accurate than mu control for these novices. Individuals with more years of musical training showed a moderate positive correlation with more PDR accuracy, but not mu accuracy. The Encephalophone may have potential applications both as a novel musical instrument without requiring movement, as well as a potential therapeutic biofeedback device for patients suffering from motor deficits (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, brainstem stroke, traumatic amputation.

  15. Development of a novel concept for performing multiple assays on clinical samples using fluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen

    MikroRNA (miRNA) er små ikke kodende RNA stykker, der er involveret i post-transkriptionel regulering af gen-ekspression. Ekspressionen af specifikke miRNAer er reguleret i forskellige kræftformer og kan derfor betragtes som nye biomarkører, der kan bruges til klassifikation og mulig diagnostik. ...

  16. Improvement of Modeling Scheme of the Safety Injection Tank with Fluidic Device for Realistic LBLOCA Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Young Seok; Cheong, Aeju; Woo, Sweng Woong [Korea Institute of Nuclear safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Confirmation of the performance of the SIT with FD should be based on thermal-hydraulic analysis of LBLOCA and an adequate and physical model simulating the SIT/FD should be used in the LBLOCA calculation. To develop such a physical model on SIT/FD, simulation of the major phenomena including flow distribution of by standpipe and FD should be justified by full scale experiment and/or plant preoperational testing. Author's previous study indicated that an approximation of SIT/FD phenomena could be obtained by a typical system transient code, MARS-KS, and using 'accumulator' component model, however, that additional improvement on modeling scheme of the FD and standpipe flow paths was needed for a reasonable prediction. One problem was a depressurizing behavior after switchover to low flow injection phase. Also a potential to release of nitrogen gas from the SIT to the downstream pipe and then reactor core through flow paths of FD and standpipe has been concerned. The intrusion of noncondensible gas may have an effect on LBLOCA thermal response. Therefore, a more reliable model on SIT/FD has been requested to get a more accurate prediction and a confidence of the evaluation of LBLOCA. The present paper is to discuss an improvement of modeling scheme from the previous study. Compared to the existing modeling, effect of the present modeling scheme on LBLOCA cladding thermal response is discussed. The present study discussed the modeling scheme of SIT with FD for a realistic simulation of LBLOCA of APR1400. Currently, the SIT blowdown test can be best simulated by the modeling scheme using 'pipe' component with dynamic area reduction. The LBLOCA analysis adopting the modeling scheme showed the PCT increase of 23K when compared to the case of 'accumulator' component model, which was due to the flow rate decrease at transition phase low flow injection and intrusion of nitrogen gas to the core. Accordingly, the effect of SIT/FD modeling scheme should be considered for realistic LBLOCA analysis.

  17. Immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion and breast-feeding outcomes: a noninferiority randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turok, David K; Leeman, Lawrence; Sanders, Jessica N; Thaxton, Lauren; Eggebroten, Jennifer L; Yonke, Nicole; Bullock, Holly; Singh, Rameet; Gawron, Lori M; Espey, Eve

    2017-12-01

    Immediate postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion is increasing in frequency in the United States, but few studies have investigated the effect of early placement on breast-feeding outcomes. This study examined the effect of immediate vs delayed postpartum levonorgestrel intrauterine device insertion on breast-feeding outcomes. We conducted this noninferiority randomized controlled trial at the University of Utah and the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Centers from February 2014 through March 2016. Eligible women were pregnant and planned to breast-feed, spoke English or Spanish, were aged 18-40 years, and desired a levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Enrolled women were randomized 1:1 to immediate postpartum insertion or delayed insertion at 4-12 weeks' postpartum. Prespecified exclusion criteria included delivery lactogenesis, used a validated measure, and was analyzed by survival analysis and log rank test. We followed up participants for ongoing data collection for 6 months. Only the data analysis team was blinded to the intervention. We met the enrollment target with 319 participants, but lost 34 prior to randomization and excluded an additional 26 for medical complications prior to delivery. The final analytic sample included 132 in the immediate group and 127 in the delayed group. Report of any breast-feeding at 8 weeks in the immediate group (79%; 95% confidence interval, 70-86%) was noninferior to that of the delayed group (84%; 95% confidence interval, 76-91%). The 5% difference in breast-feeding continuation at 8 weeks between the groups fell within the noninferiority margin (95% confidence interval, -5.6 to 15%). Time to lactogenesis (mean ± SD) in the immediate group, 65.3 ± 25.7 hours, was noninferior to that of the delayed group, 63.6 ± 21.6 hours. The mean difference between groups was 1.7 hours (95% confidence interval, -4.8 to 8.2 hours), noninferior by log-rank test. A total of 24 intrauterine device expulsions

  18. Blood factors of Sus scrofa following a series of three TASER electronic control device exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauchem, James R; Cook, Michael C; Beason, Charles W

    2008-03-05

    In a previous study, 18 repeated exposures of anaesthetized swine to an electro-muscular incapacitating device (TASER International's ADVANCED TASER X26 electronic control device) resulted in acidosis and increases in blood electrolytes. In the current study, experiments were performed to investigate effects of a more typical scenario of repeated exposures of the device on muscle contraction and changes in blood factors. Ten swine were exposed for 5s, followed by a 5-s period of no exposure, three times. Selected blood factors were monitored for 3h following exposure. Transient increases in blood glucose, lactate, sodium, potassium, calcium, and pCO(2) were consistent with previous reports in the literature dealing with studies of muscle stimulation or exercise. Blood pH was decreased immediately following exposure, but subsequently returned toward a normal level. Oxygen saturation (measured by pulse oximetry) was not changed significantly. In conclusion, three repeated TASER device exposures had only transient effects on blood factors, which all returned to pre-exposure levels, with the exception of hematocrit (which remained elevated after 3h). Since the increase in this factor was less than that which may occur after short periods of exercise, it is unlikely that this would be an indicator of any serious harm.

  19. Opto-fluidics based microscopy and flow cytometry on a cell phone for blood analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    Blood analysis is one of the most important clinical tests for medical diagnosis. Flow cytometry and optical microscopy are widely used techniques to perform blood analysis and therefore cost-effective translation of these technologies to resource limited settings is critical for various global health as well as telemedicine applications. In this chapter, we review our recent progress on the integration of imaging flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using compact, light-weight and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments integrated onto the camera module of a smartphone. In our cell-phone based opto-fluidic imaging cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are delivered into the imaging area using a disposable micro-fluidic chip that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the sides of this micro-fluidic chip without any lenses, which effectively acts as a multimode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to excite the fluorescent targets within the micro-fluidic chip. Since the excitation light propagates perpendicular to the detection path, an inexpensive plastic absorption filter is able to reject most of the scattered light and create a decent dark-field background for fluorescent imaging. With this excitation geometry, the cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the particles/cells as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the solution under test. With a similar opto-fluidic design, we have recently demonstrated imaging and automated counting of stationary blood cells (e.g., labeled white blood cells or unlabeled red blood cells) loaded within a disposable cell counting chamber. We tested the performance of this cell-phone based imaging cytometry and blood analysis platform

  20. Impact of Thyristors Controlled Series Capacitor Devices and Optimal Power Flow on Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatiha LAKDJA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm, for solving the Optimal Power Flow problem with flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS. The type of FACTS devices is used: thyristor-controlled series capacitor (TCSC. A method to determine the optimal location of thyristor controlled series compensators has been suggested. The proposed approaches have been implemented on an adapted IEEE 26 bus system. The simulation results are discussed to show the performance of the proposed algorithm and our “FACTS programmer “simulator technique, which are compared with TCSC and without TCSC.

  1. Method for reading sensors and controlling actuators using audio interfaces of mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Rafael V; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F; Gonçalves, Luiz M G

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks.

  2. Open loop control of filament heating power supply for large volume plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugandhi, R., E-mail: ritesh@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Srivastava, P.K.; Sanyasi, A.K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Srivastav, Prabhakar [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Awasthi, L.M., E-mail: kushagra.lalit@gmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India); Mattoo, S.K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-02-15

    A power supply (20 V, 10 kA) for powering the filamentary cathode has been procured, interfaced and integrated with the centralized control system of Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD). Software interface has been developed on the standard Modbus RTU communication protocol. It facilitates the dashboard for configuration, on line status monitoring, alarm management, data acquisition, synchronization and controls. It has been tested for stable operation of the power supply for the operational capabilities. The paper highlights the motivation, interface description, implementation and results obtained.

  3. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  4. The inherent weaknesses in industrial control systems devices; hacking and defending SCADA systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Louis J.

    The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) is about to enforce their NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Version Five and Six requirements on July 1st 2016. The NERC CIP requirements are a set of cyber security standards designed to protect cyber assets essential the reliable operation of the electric grid. The new Version Five and Six requirements are a major revision to the Version Three (currently enforced) requirements. The new requirements also bring substations into scope alongside Energy Control Centers. When the Version Five requirements were originally drafted they were vague, causing in depth discussions throughout the industry. The ramifications of these requirements has made owners look at their systems in depth, questioning how much money it will take to meet these requirements. Some owners saw backing down from routable networks to non-routable as a means to save money as they would be held to less requirements within the standards. Some owners saw removing routable connections as a proper security move. The purpose of this research was to uncover the inherent weaknesses in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) devices; to show how ICS devices can be hacked and figure out potential protections for these Critical Infrastructure devices. In addition, this research also aimed to validate the decision to move from External Routable connectivity to Non-Routable connectivity, as a security measure and not as a means of savings. The results reveal in order to ultimately protect Industrial Control Systems they must be removed from the Internet and all bi-directional external routable connections must be removed. Furthermore; non-routable serial connections should be utilized, and these non-routable serial connections should be encrypted on different layers of the OSI model. The research concluded that most weaknesses in SCADA systems are due to the inherent weaknesses in ICS devices and because of these weaknesses, human intervention is

  5. Flow Control Device Evaluation for an Internal Flow with an Adverse Pressure Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Gorton, Susan Althoff; Anders, Scott G.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of several active and passive devices to control flow in an adverse pressure gradient with secondary flows present was evaluated in the 15 Inch Low Speed Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. In this study, passive micro vortex generators, micro bumps, and piezoelectric synthetic jets were evaluated for their flow control characteristics using surface static pressures, flow visualization, and 3D Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry. Data also were acquired for synthetic jet actuators in a zero flow environment. It was found that the micro vortex generator is very effective in controlling the flow environment for an adverse pressure gradient, even in the presence of secondary vortical flow. The mechanism by which the control is effected is a re-energization of the boundary layer through flow mixing. The piezoelectric synthetic jet actuators must have sufficient velocity output to produce strong longitudinal vortices if they are to be effective for flow control. The output of these devices in a laboratory or zero flow environment will be different than the output in a flow environment. In this investigation, the output was higher in the flow environment, but the stroke cycle in the flow did not indicate a positive inflow into the synthetic jet.

  6. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight fan noise in an anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis Anechoic Chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results showed about a 5 dB reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  7. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight noise fan in an anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis anechoic chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results show about a 5 db reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device, the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  8. Wireless, Web-Based Interactive Control of Optical Coherence Tomography with Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajvi; Nankivil, Derek; Zielinski, David J; Waterman, Gar; Keller, Brenton; Limkakeng, Alexander T; Kopper, Regis; Izatt, Joseph A; Kuo, Anthony N

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is widely used in ophthalmology clinics and has potential for more general medical settings and remote diagnostics. In anticipation of remote applications, we developed wireless interactive control of an OCT system using mobile devices. A web-based user interface (WebUI) was developed to interact with a handheld OCT system. The WebUI consisted of key OCT displays and controls ported to a webpage using HTML and JavaScript. Client-server relationships were created between the WebUI and the OCT system computer. The WebUI was accessed on a cellular phone mounted to the handheld OCT probe to wirelessly control the OCT system. Twenty subjects were imaged using the WebUI to assess the system. System latency was measured using different connection types (wireless 802.11n only, wireless to remote virtual private network [VPN], and cellular). Using a cellular phone, the WebUI was successfully used to capture posterior eye OCT images in all subjects. Simultaneous interactivity by a remote user on a laptop was also demonstrated. On average, use of the WebUI added only 58, 95, and 170 ms to the system latency using wireless only, wireless to VPN, and cellular connections, respectively. Qualitatively, operator usage was not affected. Using a WebUI, we demonstrated wireless and remote control of an OCT system with mobile devices. The web and open source software tools used in this project make it possible for any mobile device to potentially control an OCT system through a WebUI. This platform can be a basis for remote, teleophthalmology applications using OCT.

  9. A control system for ultrasound devices utilized for inactivating E. coli in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrdes, H; Ille, I; Twiefel, J; Wallaschek, J; Nogueira, R; Rosenwinkel, K-H

    2018-01-01

    Sonochemical processes applied to wastewater treatment have an influence on the behavior of ultrasonic systems. This is especially due to the load characteristic of the sonochemical process itself and the temperature increase caused by internal damping within the converter. Hence, a controlling device is needed to guarantee the operation in resonance and to keep the vibration amplitude constant. This paper presents a digital control system for the operation of weak to strong damped ultrasonic devices and its application for inactivating Escherichia coli in wastewater. In an experimental investigation, the electric data during a sonochemical process to inactivate E. coli in wastewater is taken into account to analyze the efficacy of the treatment process and the reaction of the vibration system to the process. Frequency response measurements depict that the resonance frequency changes with the sonicated medium and the vibration amplitude decreases with driving current. In addition to a common continuous operation of the system, different pulsed modes are investigated. The experiments prove the common dependencies between inactivation and power level or treatment time. Additionally, it is pointed out that the control of the sonochemical device is of utmost importance to guarantee an efficient treatment of water, because fast process changes, especially in pulsed operation modes, need to be controlled to a steady state as fast as possible. Although a water treatment efficiency increase using pulsed modes was not proved, it is shown, that the performance of the control unit is capable of using different driving modes in water treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  11. Distributed processing and network of data acquisition and diagnostics control for Large Helical Device (LHD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, H.; Kojima, M.; Hidekuma, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The LHD (Large Helical Device) data processing system has been designed in order to deal with the huge amount of diagnostics data of 600-900 MB per 10-second short-pulse experiment. It prepares the first plasma experiment in March 1998. The recent increase of the data volume obliged to adopt the fully distributed system structure which uses multiple data transfer paths in parallel and separates all of the computer functions into clients and servers. The fundamental element installed for every diagnostic device consists of two kinds of server computers; the data acquisition PC/Windows NT and the real-time diagnostics control VME/VxWorks. To cope with diversified kinds of both device control channels and diagnostics data, the object-oriented method are utilized wholly for the development of this system. It not only reduces the development burden, but also widen the software portability and flexibility. 100Mbps EDDI-based fast networks will re-integrate the distributed server computers so that they can behave as one virtual macro-machine for users. Network methods applied for the LHD data processing system are completely based on the TCP/IP internet technology, and it provides the same accessibility to the remote collaborators as local participants can operate. (author)

  12. A rotational traveling wave based levitation device - Modeling, design, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Gabai, Ran; Shaham, Ran; Cohen, Nadav; Bucher, Izhak

    2016-01-01

    Described is a device acting on an acoustically levitated object by manipulating the pressure and flow of a thin layer of air such that its rotation can be precisely controlled without mechanical contact. Virtual work analysis assists in simplifying the multi-actuator control problem into a problem governed by a controllable parameter. Actuation is done with a vibrating ring capable of producing ultrasonic standing and traveling waves, creating the acoustic excitation that affects the pressure in a thin, intermediate layer of gas. A distinctive vibration pattern is required to generate the temporal and spatial pressure field of the squeezed air layer that gives rise to both acoustic levitation force and rotational torque. Described are the physical and design development stages leading to an optimized structure, all followed by verifying and dynamics-calibration experiments. Moreover, by precisely controlling the ratio of standing and traveling waves in a closed-loop, one can affect the shear forces applied b...

  13. Experimental investigation of aerodynamic devices for wind turbine rotational speed control. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.S. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    1995-02-01

    An investigation was undertaken to identify the aerodynamic performance of five separate trailing-edge control devices, and to evaluate their potential for wind turbine overspeed and power modulation applications. A modular two-dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and evaluated during extensive wind tunnel testing. Aerodynamic lift, drag, suction, and pressure coefficient data were acquired and analyzed for various control configurations and angles of attack. To further interpret their potential performance, the controls were evaluated numerically using a generic wind turbine geometry and a performance analysis computer program. Results indicated that the Spoiler-Flap control configuration was best softed for turbine braking applications. It exhibited a large negative suction coefficient over a broad angle-of-attack range, and good turbine braking capabilities, especially at low tip-speed ratio.

  14. Well controlled multiple resistive switching states in the Al local doped HfO2 resistive random access memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. S.; Chen, B.; Gao, B.; Liu, L. F.; Liu, X. Y.; Kang, J. F.

    2013-04-01

    The resistive switching behaviors in the sandwiched Ti/HfO2/Pt devices with different doping condition were systematically investigated. We show that, comparing with the undoped and the Al layer doped HfO2 devices, significant improvement of switching characteristics is achieved in the Al local doped HfO2 device, including uniformity, reliability, and operation current. As a result, well controlled multiple switching states are obtained in the local doping device by modulating the set current compliance or the maximal reset voltage, respectively. Our results suggest that the switching characteristics of HfO2 device are very closely related to the inducement and controlling of conductive filaments' growth in the dielectric layer, which can be considered in the optimization of resistive random access memory device design.

  15. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: East African species Glossina swynnertoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furaha Mramba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Here we set out to standardize long-lasting, visually-attractive devices for Glossina swynnertoni, a vector of both human and animal trypanosomiasis in open savannah in Tanzania and Kenya, and in neighbouring conservation areas used by pastoralists. The goal was to determine the most practical device/material that would induce the strongest landing response in G. swynnertoni for use in area-wide population suppression of this fly with insecticide-impregnated devices. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Serengeti and Maasai Mara to measure the performance of traps and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a simple enumerator at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies of devices. Independent of season or presence of chemical baits, targets in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue cloth with adhesive film were the best devices for capturing G. swynnertoni in all situations, catching up to 19 times more flies than pyramidal traps. Baiting with chemicals did not affect the relative performance of devices. Fly landings were two times higher on 1 m(2 blue-black targets as on pyramidal traps when equivalent areas of both were covered with adhesive film. Landings on 1 m(2 blue-black targets were compared to those on smaller phthalogen blue 0.5 m(2 all-blue or blue-black-blue cloth targets, and to landings on all-blue plastic 0.32-0.47 m(2 leg panels painted in phthalogen blue. These smaller targets and leg panels captured equivalent numbers of G. swynnertoni per unit area as bigger targets. CONCLUSIONS: Leg panels and 0.5 m(2 cloth targets show promise as cost effective devices for management of G. swynnertoni as they can be used for both control (insecticide-impregnated cloth and for sampling (rigid plastic with insect glue or adhesive film of

  16. Features of control systems analysis with discrete control devices using mathematical packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, E. M.; Faerman, V. A.

    2017-02-01

    The article contains presentation of basic provisions of the theory of automatic pulse control systems as well as methods of analysis of such systems using the mathematical software widespread in the academic environment. The pulse systems under research are considered as analogues systems interacting among themselves, including sensors, amplifiers, controlled objects, and discrete parts. To describe such systems, one uses a mathematical apparatus of difference equations as well as discrete transfer functions. To obtain a transfer function of the open-loop system, being important from the point of view of the analysis of control systems, one uses mathematical packages Mathcad and Matlab. Despite identity of the obtained result, the way of its achievement from the point of view of user’s action is various for the specified means. In particular, Matlab uses a structural model of the control system while Mathcad allows only execution of a chain of operator transforms. It is worth noting that distinctions taking place allow considering transformation of signals during interaction of the linear and continuous parts of the control system from different sides. The latter can be used in an educational process for the best assimilation of the course of the control system theory by students.

  17. Measuring device for purging water flow rate in control rod drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hiroshi.

    1993-11-12

    The device of the present invention enables highly accurate measurement for an amount of purging water supplied to control rod drives of a BWR type reactor. That is, purging water is supplied from an inlet of a scram line of the control rod drives. A temperature measuring portion is disposed, for measuring temperature fluctuation of purging water, to a hydropressure control unit for providing pressure and flow rate of water required for supplying the purging water and scram operation. An instrumentation section is disposed for calculating the flow rate of purging water based on the measured data obtained in the section. An output device is disposed for outputting a flow rate value of the purging water based on the result of the calculation obtained therein. With such a constitution, flow rate of the purging water can be measured quantitatively at the hydropressure control unit. Accordingly, influences, such as fluctuation of reactor core temperature are reduced, and accuracy for the measurement of the purging water flow rate is improved. As a result, reactor safety and maintainability can be improved. (I.S.).

  18. Precision manufacturing of polymer micro-nano fluidic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnæs, Jørgen; Calaon, Matteo; Tosello, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) technologies require the possibility of fabricating devices which include micro down to sub-micrometre features with high production rate and low cost. In the present study precision injection moulding is performed using a COC Topas 5013 L10 polymer to produce LoC devices...... for DNA barcoding with functional features in the 100 nm to 10 μm range. Replication quality of produced features (from nickel to polymer) was assessed by calibrated atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements performed on multiple nanochannels test structures arrays placed at different positions...

  19. Novel MOSFET-based fluidic sensors and simulations of thermal bubble nucleation in nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Manoj

    Traditional particle sensing schemes are based on the resistive-pulse sensing technique. A non-conducting particle displaces a volume of electrolyte, equal to its own volume, from a sensing channel when it flows through. Correspondingly, the resistance of the sensing channel increases and this resistance modulation is measured directly by the resultant ionic current or electrical potential modulation across the sensing channel. The novel MOSFET-based sensing scheme integrates a MOSFET with the fluidic circuit and detects particles by monitoring the MOSFET drain current modulation instead of the direct ionic current modulation. Using this new sensing scheme, we are able to detect a minimum volume ratio of the particle to the sensing channel of 0.006%, which is about ten times lower than the lowest detected volume ratio previously reported in the literature. The new sensing scheme is first tested at the microscale and then extended down to the nanoscale. The fundamental limitation of particle sensors is the amplitude of noise observed with respect to the baseline current measured. It was recently suggested that nanobubble nucleation and transport inside nanopore-based devices could be a source of noise in nanofluidic experiments. This source of noise has not been investigated thoroughly. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of thermal bubble nucleation to investigate whether nanobubbles can indeed form in nanochannels and thus, be a plausible source of noise in nanofluidic experiments. We investigated thermal bubble nucleation in nano-confined NPT systems of argon and water and found that bubbles did not form for temperatures up to the superheat limit of the fluids when the external pressure on the system ranged from 0.01 to 0.1 MPa. We propose a pressure wave hypothesis to explain our simulation results and show that our results are consistent with this hypothesis. Our initial investigations suggest that it might be difficult to form thermal bubbles in nano

  20. Rapid and inexpensive fabrication of polymeric microfluidic devices via toner transfer masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Christopher J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.; Shaver, Jesse H.; Head, W. Steven; Piston, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary An alternative fabrication method is presented for production of masters for single- or multilayer polymeric microfluidic devices in a standard laboratory environment, precluding the need for a cleanroom. This toner transfer masking (TTM) method utilizes an office laser printer to generate a toner pattern which is thermally transferred to a metal master to serve as a mask for etching. With master fabrication times as little as one hour (depending on channel depth) using commercially-available equipment and supplies, this approach should make microfluidic technology more widely accessible to the non-expert—even the non-scientist. The cost of fabrication consumables was estimated to be < $1 per master, over an order of magnitude decrease in consumable costs compared to standard photolithography. In addition, the use of chemical etching allows accurate control over the height of raised features (i.e., channel depths), allowing the flexibility to fabricate multiple depths on a single master with little added time. Resultant devices are shown capable of pneumatic valving, three-dimensional channel formation (using layer-connecting vias), droplet fluidics, and cell imaging and staining. The multiple-depth capabilities of the method are proven useful for cellular analysis by fabrication of handheld, disposable devices used for trapping and imaging of live murine pancreatic islets. The precise fluidic control provided by the microfluidic platform allows subsequent fixing and staining of these cells without significant movement, thus spatial correlation of imaging and staining is attainable—even with rare alpha cells that constitute only ∼10% of the islet cells. PMID:19350094

  1. Hierarchical and hybrid energy storage devices in data centers: Architecture, control and provisioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuankun; Bogdan, Paul; Tang, Jian; Wang, Yanzhi; Lin, Xue

    2018-01-01

    Recently, a new approach has been introduced that leverages and over-provisions energy storage devices (ESDs) in data centers for performing power capping and facilitating capex/opex reductions, without performance overhead. To fully realize the potential benefits of the hierarchical ESD structure, we propose a comprehensive design, control, and provisioning framework including (i) designing power delivery architecture supporting hierarchical ESD structure and hybrid ESDs for some levels, as well as (ii) control and provisioning of the hierarchical ESD structure including run-time ESD charging/discharging control and design-time determination of ESD types, homogeneous/hybrid options, ESD provisioning at each level. Experiments have been conducted using real Google data center workloads based on realistic data center specifications. PMID:29351553

  2. Hierarchical and hybrid energy storage devices in data centers: Architecture, control and provisioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengshu; Xue, Yuankun; Bogdan, Paul; Tang, Jian; Wang, Yanzhi; Lin, Xue

    2018-01-01

    Recently, a new approach has been introduced that leverages and over-provisions energy storage devices (ESDs) in data centers for performing power capping and facilitating capex/opex reductions, without performance overhead. To fully realize the potential benefits of the hierarchical ESD structure, we propose a comprehensive design, control, and provisioning framework including (i) designing power delivery architecture supporting hierarchical ESD structure and hybrid ESDs for some levels, as well as (ii) control and provisioning of the hierarchical ESD structure including run-time ESD charging/discharging control and design-time determination of ESD types, homogeneous/hybrid options, ESD provisioning at each level. Experiments have been conducted using real Google data center workloads based on realistic data center specifications.

  3. Unified control of DC-DC buck converter using dynamic adaptive controller for battery operated devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanimozhi Kannabiran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigación es mejorar la respuesta dinámica del sistema de convertidor DC-DC con incertidumbres en los parámetros internos. La metodología de control por modo deslizante en las obras existentes se basa en un sistema de control proporcional-integral-derivativo (PID. El presente trabajo aborda diversas cuestiones en un enfoque unificado para el diseño y la aplicación de la modulación de ancho de pulso (PWM basado en control digital por modos deslizantes adaptativos (CMD, técnica de control para el controlador buck para los teléfonos móviles que funcionan en modo continuo de conducción (MCC y el modo de conducción discontinua (MCD. El controlador está programado para controlar la ganancia de la condición de carga de salida y cambiar adaptativamente los parámetros de control para dar un rendimiento dinámico óptimo correspondiente a las variaciones de carga. Además, la estabilidad se verifica analíticamente utilizando el criterio de estabilidad de Lyapunov y se prueba que el sistema es global y asintóticamente estable. Finalmente, la eficacia del método propuesto se verifica mediante la simulación y experimentación. Se obtiene una respuesta estable en estado estacionario con ondulación reducida.

  4. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Duane E.

    2003-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) using a Stirling thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode or can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly employ techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces, limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration. The MEMS cooler has potential applications across a broad range of industries such as the biomedical, computer, automotive, and aerospace industries. The basic capabilities it provides can be categorized into four key areas: 1) Extended environmental temperature range in harsh environments; 2) Lower operating temperatures for electronics and other components; 3) Precision spatial and temporal thermal control for temperature-sensitive devices; and 4) The enabling of microsystem devices that require active cooling and/or temperature control. The rapidly expanding capabilities of semiconductor processing in general, and microsystems packaging in particular, present a new opportunity to extend Stirling-cycle cooling to the MEMS domain. The comparatively high capacity and efficiency possible with a MEMS Stirling cooler provides a level of active cooling that is impossible at the microscale with current state-of-the-art techniques. The MEMS cooler technology builds on decades of research at Glenn on Stirling-cycle machines, and capitalizes on Glenn s emerging microsystems capabilities.

  5. Development of a standard test procedure for devices on thermal weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschwele, Arnd

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the standard evaluation of the efficacy of pesticides and the testing of spraying equipment there are no comparable testing procedure for equipment of thermal weed control. It is the aim of the investigations described here to develop a standard procedure for assessing temperature distribution and biological efficacy. This will be the basis for quality testing which can be directly used by practical users. Also it can help engineers to improve devices if constructive gaps will be identified by these tests. The results from testing a flaming device (Green-Flame 850 E demonstrated such a potential for technical improvement: The temperature decreased from 159 °C to 89 °C by increasing driving speed from 0.35 m/s to 0.81 m/s. The variation of the temperature related to the working width was extremely high: The range was 60 °C at highest speed and 79 °C at lowest speed, respectively. The biological efficacy against the test plant species Sinapis arvensis was also affected by the driving speed and the corresponding temperature. A driving speed not higher than 0.53 m/s resulted in efficacy rates of almost 95%. However, the efficacy was only 66% at the highest tested speed of 0.81 m/s. Thus, the needed effective temperature is between 89 °C und 106 °C. In contrast, Lolium perenne was controlled by only 72% under the tested conditions. Here a dose-response relationship was not observed. The variation of the temperature, as well as the biological efficacy, was extremely heterogeneous and not satisfying in terms of an economic and safe use. Similar results were found for other devices on thermal weed control.

  6. An SSVEP based BCI to control a humanoid robot by using portable EEG device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güneysu, Arzu; Akin, H Levent

    2013-01-01

    Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) are systems that allow human subjects to interact with the environment by interpreting brain signals into machine commands. This work provides a design for a BCI to control a humanoid robot by using signals obtained from the Emotiv EPOC, a portable electroencephalogram (EEG) device with 14 electrodes and sampling rate of 128 Hz. The main objective is to process the neuroelectric responses to an externally driven stimulus and generate control signals for the humanoid robot Nao accordingly. We analyze steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) induced by one of four groups of light emitting diodes (LED) by using two distinct signals obtained from the two channels of the EEG device which reside on top of the occipital lobe. An embedded system is designed for generating pulse width modulated square wave signals in order to flicker each group of LEDs with different frequencies. The subject chooses the direction by looking at one of these groups of LEDs that represent four directions. Fast Fourier Transform and a Gaussian model are used to detect the dominant frequency component by utilizing harmonics and neighbor frequencies. Then, a control signal is sent to the robot in order to draw a fixed sized line in that selected direction by BCI. Experimental results display satisfactory performance where the correct target is detected 75% of the time on the average across all test subjects without any training.

  7. Electrical control simulation of near infrared emission in SOI-MOSFET quantum well devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendayan, Michael; Sabo, Roi; Zolberg, Roee; Mandelbaum, Yaakov; Chelly, Avraham; Karsenty, Avi

    2017-07-01

    In the race to realize ultrahigh-speed processors, silicon photonics research is part of the efforts. Overcoming the silicon indirect bandgap with special geometry, we developed a concept of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, based on a silicon quantum well structure that enables control of light emission. This quantum well consists of a recessed ultrathin silicon layer, obtained by a gate-recessed channel and limited between two oxide layers. The device's coupled optical and electrical properties have been simulated for channel thicknesses, varying from 2 to 9 nm. The results show that this device can emit near infrared radiation in the 1 to 2 μm range, compatible with the optical networking spectrum. The emitted light intensity can be electrically controlled by the drain voltage Vds while the peak emission wavelength depends on the channel thickness and slightly on Vds. Moreover, the location of the radiative recombination source inside the channel, responsible for the light emission, is also controllable through the applied voltages.

  8. Atomic switch: atom/ion movement controlled devices for beyond von-neumann computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-01-10

    An atomic switch is a nanoionic device that controls the diffusion of metal ions/atoms and their reduction/oxidation processes in the switching operation to form/annihilate a conductive path. Since metal atoms can provide a highly conductive channel even if their cluster size is in the nanometer scale, atomic switches may enable downscaling to smaller than the 11 nm technology node, which is a great challenge for semiconductor devices. Atomic switches also possess novel characteristics, such as high on/off ratios, very low power consumption and non-volatility. The unique operating mechanisms of these devices have enabled the development of various types of atomic switch, such as gap-type and gapless-type two-terminal atomic switches and three-terminal atomic switches. Novel functions, such as selective volatile/nonvolatile, synaptic, memristive, and photo-assisted operations have been demonstrated. Such atomic switch characteristics can not only improve the performance of present-day electronic systems, but also enable development of new types of electronic systems, such as beyond von- Neumann computers. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparative analysis of selected exhaled breath biomarkers obtained with two different temperature-controlled devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brüning Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC is a suitable and non-invasive method for evaluation of airway inflammation. Several studies indicate that the composition of the condensate and the recovery of biomarkers are affected by physical characteristics of the condensing device and collecting circumstances. Additionally, there is an apparent influence of the condensing temperature, and often the level of detection of the assay is a limiting factor. The ECoScreen2 device is a new, partly single-use disposable system designed for studying different lung compartments. Methods EBC samples were collected from 16 healthy non-smokers by using the two commercially available devices ECoScreen2 and ECoScreen at a controlled temperature of -20°C. EBC volume, pH, NOx, LTB4, PGE2, 8-isoprostane and cys-LTs were determined. Results EBC collected with ECoScreen2 was less acidic compared to ECoScreen. ECoScreen2 was superior concerning condensate volume and detection of biomarkers, as more samples were above the detection limit (LTB4 and PGE2 or showed higher concentrations (8-isoprostane. However, NOx was detected only in EBC sampled by ECoScreen. Conclusion ECoScreen2 in combination with mediator specific enzyme immunoassays may be suitable for measurement of different biomarkers. Using this equipment, patterns of markers can be assessed that are likely to reflect the complex pathophysiological processes in inflammatory respiratory disease.

  10. An efficient contents-adaptive backlight control method for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiao Song; Yan, Ya Xing; Zhang, Xiao Mou; Cai, Hua; Deng, Xin; Wang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    For most of mobile devices with a large screen, image quality and power consumption are both of the major factors affecting the consumers' preference. Contents-adaptive backlight control (CABC) method can be utilized to adjust the backlight and promote the performance of mobile devices. Unlike the previous works mostly focusing on the reduction of power consumption, both of image quality and power consumption are taken into account in the proposed method. Firstly, region of interest (ROI) is detected to divide image into two parts: ROI and non-ROI. Then, three attributes including entropy, luminance, and saturation information in ROI are calculated. To achieve high perceived image quality in mobile devices, optimal value of backlight can be calculated by a linear combination of the aforementioned attributes. Coefficients of the linear combination are determined by applying the linear regression to the subjective scores of human visual experiments and objective values of the attributes. Based on the optimal value of backlight, displayed image data are processed brightly and backlight is darkened to reduce the power consumption of backlight later. Here, the ratios of increasing image data and decreasing backlight functionally depend on the luminance information of displayed image. Also, the proposed method is hardware implemented. Experimental results indicate that the proposed technique exhibits better performance compared to the conventional methods.

  11. Increasing operational command and control security by the implementation of device independent quantum key distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, Fabio Antonio; Messina, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    In a very simplistic way, the Command and Control functions can be summarized as the need to provide the decision makers with an exhaustive, real-time, situation picture and the capability to convey their decisions down to the operational forces. This two-ways data and information flow is vital to the execution of current operations and goes far beyond the border of military operations stretching to Police and disaster recovery as well. The availability of off-the shelf technology has enabled hostile elements to endanger the security of the communication networks by violating the traditional security protocols and devices and hacking sensitive databases. In this paper an innovative approach based to implementing Device Independent Quantum Key Distribution system is presented. The use of this technology would prevent security breaches due to a stolen crypto device placed in an end-to-end communication chain. The system, operating with attenuated laser, is practical and provides the increasing of the distance between the legitimate users.

  12. Embedded Control in Wearable Medical Devices: Application to the Artificial Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatina Zavitsanou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Significant increases in processing power, coupled with the miniaturization of processing units operating at low power levels, has motivated the embedding of modern control systems into medical devices. The design of such embedded decision-making strategies for medical applications is driven by multiple crucial factors, such as: (i guaranteed safety in the presence of exogenous disturbances and unexpected system failures; (ii constraints on computing resources; (iii portability and longevity in terms of size and power consumption; and (iv constraints on manufacturing and maintenance costs. Embedded control systems are especially compelling in the context of modern artificial pancreas systems (AP used in glucose regulation for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Herein, a review of potential embedded control strategies that can be leveraged in a fully-automated and portable AP is presented. Amongst competing controllers, emphasis is provided on model predictive control (MPC, since it has been established as a very promising control strategy for glucose regulation using the AP. Challenges involved in the design, implementation and validation of safety-critical embedded model predictive controllers for the AP application are discussed in detail. Additionally, the computational expenditure inherent to MPC strategies is investigated, and a comparative study of runtime performances and storage requirements among modern quadratic programming solvers is reported for a desktop environment and a prototype hardware platform.

  13. A portable hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) device for automotive diagnostic control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, A; Fiengo, G; Lanzo, D

    2012-01-01

    In-vehicle driving tests for evaluating the performance and diagnostic functionalities of engine control systems are often time consuming, expensive, and not reproducible. Using a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation approach, new control strategies and diagnostic functions on a controller area network (CAN) line can be easily tested in real time, in order to reduce the effort and the cost of the testing phase. Nowadays, spark ignition engines are controlled by an electronic control unit (ECU) with a large number of embedded sensors and actuators. In order to meet the rising demand of lower emissions and fuel consumption, an increasing number of control functions are added into such a unit. This work aims at presenting a portable electronic environment system, suited for HIL simulations, in order to test the engine control software and the diagnostic functionality on a CAN line, respectively, through non-regression and diagnostic tests. The performances of the proposed electronic device, called a micro hardware-in-the-loop system, are presented through the testing of the engine management system software of a 1.6 l Fiat gasoline engine with variable valve actuation for the ECU development version. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. From nanofabrication to self-fabrication--tailored chemistry for control of single molecule electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule electronics is a field of research focused on the use of single molecules as electronics components. During the past 15 years the field has concentrated on development of test beds for measurements on single molecules. Bottom-up approaches to single molecule devices are emerging...... the electronic properties of a single molecule by chemical design....... as alternatives to the dominant top-down nanofabrication techniques. One example is solution-based self-assembly of a molecule enclosed by two gold nanorod electrodes. This article will discuss recent attempts to control the self-assembly process by the use of supramolecular chemistry and how to tailor...

  15. Amplitude Test for Input Devices for System Control in Immersive Virtual Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Thornemann Hansen, Nina; Hald, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the amplitudes best suited to compare four input devices are examined in the context of a pointer-based system control interface for immersive virtual environments. The interfaces are based on a pen and tablet, a touch tablet, hand-tracking using Kinect and a Wii Nunchuk analog stick...... menu using each combination of amplitude and interface. The amplitudes to be used for future experiments were found. Also, the movement times for the interfaces do not fit the predictions of Fitts' law....

  16. Modeling and control of a brushless DC axial flow ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Skliar, Mikhail; Olsen, Donald B; Pantalos, George M

    2002-01-01

    This article presents an integrated model of the human circulatory system that incorporates circulatory support by a brushless DC axial flow ventricular assist device (VAD), and a feedback VAD controller designed to maintain physiologically sufficient perfusion. The developed integrated model combines a network type model of the circulatory system with a nonlinear dynamic model of the brushless DC pump We show that maintaining a reference differential pressure between the left ventricle and aorta leads to adequate perfusion for different pathologic cases, ranging from normal heart to left heart asystole, and widely varying physical activity scenarios from rest to exercise.

  17. Integrated Channel Selector for Directing Fluid Flow Using Thermoreversible Gelation Controlled by a Digital Mirror Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Shirasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated channel selector system employing thermoreversible gelation of a polymer was developed. Here, we show a system with 3×3 arrayed microchannels having nine crossing points. Infrared laser irradiation was used to form gel areas at several crossing points in arranging a flow path from the inlet to one of the nine outlets passing through certain junctions and channels. The multipoint irradiation by the infrared laser was realized using a personal-computer-controlled digital mirror device. The system was demonstrated to be able to direct flow to all nine outlets. Finally, we achieved to produce flexible paths for flowing particles including side trips.

  18. Integrated Lateral Flow Device for Flow Control with Blood Separation and Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Betancur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lateral flow devices are versatile and serve a wide variety of purposes, including medical, agricultural, environmental, and military applications. Yet, the most promising opportunities of these devices for diagnosis might reside in point-of-care (POC applications. Disposable paper-based lateral flow strips have been of particular interest, because they utilize low-cost materials and do not require expensive fabrication instruments. However, there are constraints on tuning flow rates and immunoassays functionalization in papers, as well as technical challenges in sensors’ integration and concentration units for low-abundant molecular detection. In the present work, we demonstrated an integrated lateral flow device that applied the capillary forces with functionalized polymer-based microfluidics as a strategy to realize a portable, simplified, and self-powered lateral flow device (LFD. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS surface was rendered hydrophilic via functionalization with different concentrations of Pluronic F127. Controlled flow is a key variable for immunoassay-based applications for providing enough time for protein binding to antibodies. The flow rate of the integrated LFD was regulated by the combination of multiple factors, including Pluronic F127 functionalized surface properties and surface treatments of microchannels, resistance of the integrated flow resistor, the dimensions of the microstructures and the spacing between them in the capillary pump, the contact angles, and viscosity of the fluids. Various plasma flow rates were regulated and achieved in the whole device. The LFD combined the ability to separate high quality plasma from human whole blood by using a highly asymmetric plasma separation membrane, and created controlled and steady fluid flow using capillary forces produced by the interfacial tensions. Biomarker immunoglobulin G (IgG detection from plasma was demonstrated with a graphene nanoelectronic sensor integrated

  19. Study of thermo-fluidic behavior of micro-droplet in inkjet-based micro manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Raju; Mahapatra, Abhijit; Ball, Amit Kumar; Roy, Shibendu Shekhar; Murmu, Naresh Chandra

    2017-06-01

    Inkjet printing technology, a maskless, non-contact patterning operation, which has been a revelation in the field of micro and nano manufacturing for its use in the selective deposition of desired materials. It is becoming an exciting alternative technology such as lithography to print functional material on to a substrate. Selective deposition of functional materials on desired substrates is a basic requirement in many of the printing based micro and nano manufacturing operations like the fabrication of microelectronic devices, solar cell, Light-emitting Diode (LED) research fields like pharmaceutical industries for drug discovery purposes and in biotechnology to make DNA microarrays. In this paper, an attempt has been made to design and develop an indigenous Electrohydrodynamic Inkjet printing system for micro fabrication and to study the interrelationships between various thermos-fluidic parameters of the ink material in the printing process. The effect of printing process parameters on printing performance characteristics has also been studied. And the applicability of the process has also been experimentally demonstrated. The experimentally found results were quite satisfactory and accordance to its applicability.

  20. Standardising visual control devices for tsetse flies: Central and West African species Glossina palpalis palpalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Dramane; Zacarie, Tusevo; M'pondi, Alexis Makumyaviri; Njiokou, Flobert; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Kröber, Thomas; McMullin, Andrew; Mihok, Steve; Guerin, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Glossina palpalis palpalis (G. p. palpalis) is one of the principal vectors of sleeping sickness and nagana in Africa with a geographical range stretching from Liberia in West Africa to Angola in Central Africa. It inhabits tropical rain forest but has also adapted to urban settlements. We set out to standardize a long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that would induce the strongest landing response by G. p. palpalis for future use as an insecticide-impregnated tool in area-wide population suppression of this fly across its range. Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola to measure the performance of traps (biconical, monoconical and pyramidal) and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a practical enumerator at these remote locations to compare landing efficiencies of devices. Independent of season and country, both phthalogen blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m(2) targets covered with adhesive film proved to be as good as traps in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue for capturing G. p. palpalis. Trap efficiency varied (8-51%). There was no difference between the performance of blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m(2) targets. Baiting with chemicals augmented the overall performance of targets relative to traps. Landings on smaller phthalogen blue-black 0.25 m(2) square targets were not significantly different from either 1 m(2) blue-black-blue or blue-black square targets. Three times more flies were captured per unit area on the smaller device. Blue-black 0.25 m(2) cloth targets show promise as simple cost effective devices for management of G. p. palpalis as they can be used for both control when impregnated with insecticide and for population sampling when covered with adhesive film.

  1. Survey of Emissions Associated with Enclosed Combustor Emission Control Devices in the Denver-Julesburg Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, W. B.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Wormhoult, J.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Brooks, B.; Roscioli, J. R.; Bon, D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in local and regional air quality. A large source of VOCs comes from the oil and gas industry and the Denver-Julesburg Basin (D-J Basin) has seen a sharp increase in production in recent years primarily due to advances in horizontal drilling techniques. To help curb emissions with extraction and production of natural gas and its associated oil, emission control devices are required for facilities emitting over 6 tons of hydrocarbons per year. Within the ozone non-attainment area, which encompasses Denver and much of the front range, enclosed combustion devices (enclosed flares) are required to reduce hydrocarbon emissions by at least 95%. While certification tests indicate that these enclosed combustor devices provide high destruction removal efficiencies, there is considerable interest in knowing how well they perform in the field. As part of Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) project conducted during the Summer of 2014, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) surveyed oil and gas operations within the Wattenberg gas field and the surrounding D-J Basin. The AML deployed a full suite of gas and particle phase instrumentation providing a comprehensive set of on-line, real-time measurements for the major natural gas components (methane and ethane) and their combustion products (CO2, CO, NOx) using a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Additional gas phase organic gas emissions were made using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Particle number and composition were determined using a condensation particle counter and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). A summary of the number of enclosed combustor devices measured and their observed combustion efficiencies will be presented.

  2. Stability effects of singularities in force-controlled robotic assist devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Greg R.

    2002-02-01

    Force feedback is being used as an interface between humans and material handling equipment to provide an intuitive method to control large and bulky payloads. Powered actuation in the lift assist device compensates for the inertial characteristics of the manipulator and the payload to provide effortless control and handling of manufacturing parts, components, and assemblies. The use of these Intelligent Assist Devices (IAD) is being explored to prevent worker injury, enhance material handling performance, and increase productivity in the workplace. The IAD also provides the capability to shape and control motion in the workspace during routine operations. Virtual barriers can be developed to protect fixed objects in the workspace, and regions can be programmed that attract the work piece to a certain position and orientation. However, the robot is still under complete control of the human operator, with the trajectory being determined and commanded using the judgment of the operator to complete a given task. In many cases, the IAD is built in a configuration that may have singular points inside the workspace. These singularities can cause problems when the unstructured trajectory commands from the human cause interaction between the IAD and the virtual walls and fixtures at positions close to these singularities. The research presented here explores the stability effects of the interactions between the powered manipulator and the virtual surfaces when controlled by the operator. Because of the flexible nature of the human decisions determining the real time work piece paths, manipulator singularities that occur in conjunction with the virtual surfaces raise stability issues in the performance around these singularities. We examine these stability issues in the context of a particular IAD configuration, and present analytic results for the performance and stability of these systems in response to the real-time trajectory modification of the human operator.

  3. Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (SSDBD) Device for Turbulent Skin Friction Drag Reduction and Flow Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed research effort explores the use of a nanosecond pulse driven offset semiconducting surface dielectric barrier discharge (SSDBD) device for the control...

  4. High-performance computing-based exploration of flow control with micro devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kozo

    2014-08-13

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator that controls flow separation is one of the promising technologies to realize energy savings and noise reduction of fluid dynamic systems. However, the mechanism for controlling flow separation is not clearly defined, and this lack of knowledge prevents practical use of this technology. Therefore, large-scale computations for the study of the DBD plasma actuator have been conducted using the Japanese Petaflops supercomputer 'K' for three different Reynolds numbers. Numbers of new findings on the control of flow separation by the DBD plasma actuator have been obtained from the simulations, and some of them are presented in this study. Knowledge of suitable device parameters is also obtained. The DBD plasma actuator is clearly shown to be very effective for controlling flow separation at a Reynolds number of around 10(5), and several times larger lift-to-drag ratio can be achieved at higher angles of attack after stall. For higher Reynolds numbers, separated flow is partially controlled. Flow analysis shows key features towards better control. DBD plasma actuators are a promising technology, which could reduce fuel consumption and contribute to a green environment by achieving high aerodynamic performance. The knowledge described above can be obtained only with high-end computers such as the supercomputer 'K'. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: east African Species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloo, Francis; Sciarretta, Andrea; Mohamed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Kröber, Thomas; McMullin, Andrew; Mihok, Steve; Guerin, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Riverine species of tsetse are responsible for most human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) transmission and are also important vectors of animal trypanosomiasis. This study concerns the development of visual control devices for two such species, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides, at the eastern limits of their continental range. The goal was to determine the most long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that induces the strongest landing responses in these species for use as insecticide-impregnated tools in vector population suppression. Field trials were conducted in different seasons on G. f. fuscipes in Kenya, Ethiopia and the Sudan and on G. tachinoides in Ethiopia to measure the performance of traps and 2D targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used to enumerate flies at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies. The findings show that targets made from black and blue fabrics (either phthalogen or turquoise) covered with adhesive film render them equal to or more efficient than traps at capturing G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides. Biconical trap efficiency varied between 25% and 33% for the two species. Smaller 0.25 m×0.25 m phthalogen blue-black targets proved more efficient than the regular 1 m2 target for both species, by over six times for Glossina f. fuscipes and two times for G. tachinoides based on catches per m2. Overall, targets with a higher edge/surface area ratio were more efficient at capturing flies. Taking into account practical considerations and fly preferences for edges and colours, we propose a 0.5×0.75 m blue-black target as a simple cost-effective device for management of G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides, impregnated with insecticide for control and covered with adhesive film for population sampling.

  6. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: east African Species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Oloo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Riverine species of tsetse are responsible for most human African trypanosomiasis (HAT transmission and are also important vectors of animal trypanosomiasis. This study concerns the development of visual control devices for two such species, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides, at the eastern limits of their continental range. The goal was to determine the most long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that induces the strongest landing responses in these species for use as insecticide-impregnated tools in vector population suppression.Field trials were conducted in different seasons on G. f. fuscipes in Kenya, Ethiopia and the Sudan and on G. tachinoides in Ethiopia to measure the performance of traps and 2D targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used to enumerate flies at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies. The findings show that targets made from black and blue fabrics (either phthalogen or turquoise covered with adhesive film render them equal to or more efficient than traps at capturing G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides. Biconical trap efficiency varied between 25% and 33% for the two species. Smaller 0.25 m×0.25 m phthalogen blue-black targets proved more efficient than the regular 1 m2 target for both species, by over six times for Glossina f. fuscipes and two times for G. tachinoides based on catches per m2. Overall, targets with a higher edge/surface area ratio were more efficient at capturing flies.Taking into account practical considerations and fly preferences for edges and colours, we propose a 0.5×0.75 m blue-black target as a simple cost-effective device for management of G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides, impregnated with insecticide for control and covered with adhesive film for population sampling.

  7. WaveSAX device: design optimization through scale modelling and a PTO strategical control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, Maximo; Danelli, Andrea; Dadone, Gianluca; Dalmasso, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    WaveSAX is an innovative OWC (Oscillating Water Column) device for the generation of electricity from wave power, conceived to be installed in coastal marine structures, such as ports and harbours. The device - especially designed for the typical wave climate of Mediterranean Sea - is characterized by two important aspects: flexibility to fit in different structural configurations and replication in a large number of units. A model of the WaveSAX device on a scale 1:5 has been built and tested in the ocean tank at Ecole Centrale de Nantes (France). The study aimed to analyse the behaviour of the device, including two Wells turbine configurations (with three and four blades), with regular and irregular wave conditions in the ocean wave tank. The model and the wave basin were equipped with a series of sensors which allowed to measure the following parameters during the tests: pressure in different points inside the device, the free water surface displacement inside and outside the device, the rotational velocity and the torque at the top of the axis. The tests had the objective to optimize the device design, especially as far as the characteristics of the rotor of the turbine is concern. Although the performance of the WaveSAX has been satisfactory for regular wave conditions, the behaviour of the Wells turbines for irregular wave climate has shown limitations in terms of maintaining the capacity to transform hydraulics energy into mechanical power. To optimize the efficiency of the turbine, an electronical system has been built on the basis of the ocean tank tests. It allows to continuously monitor and command the rotational speed and the torque of the rotor connected with the turbine, and to control in real time the electrical flow of a motor-generator, either absorbing energy as a generator, or providing power to the turbine working as an engine. Two strategies - based on the velocity and the torque control - have been investigate in the electronic test bench

  8. Modular microfluidic systems using reversibly attached PDMS fluid control modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Sip, Christopher G.; Folch, Albert; Dufva, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The use of soft lithography-based poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) valve systems is the dominating approach for high-density microscale fluidic control. Integrated systems enable complex flow control and large-scale integration, but lack modularity. In contrast, modular systems are attractive alternatives to integration because they can be tailored for different applications piecewise and without redesigning every element of the system. We present a method for reversibly coupling hard materials to soft lithography defined systems through self-aligning O-ring features thereby enabling easy interfacing of complex-valve-based systems with simpler detachable units. Using this scheme, we demonstrate the seamless interfacing of a PDMS-based fluid control module with hard polymer chips. In our system, 32 self-aligning O-ring features protruding from the PDMS fluid control module form chip-to-control module interconnections which are sealed by tightening four screws. The interconnection method is robust and supports complex fluidic operations in the reversibly attached passive chip. In addition, we developed a double-sided molding method for fabricating PDMS devices with integrated through-holes. The versatile system facilitates a wide range of applications due to the modular approach, where application specific passive chips can be readily attached to the flow control module.

  9. Precision Control of Thermal Transport in Cryogenic Single-Crystal Silicon Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostem, K.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Crowe, E. J.; Denis, K. L.; Lourie, N. P.; Moseley, S. H.; Stevenson, T. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the diffusive-ballistic thermal conductance of multi-moded single-crystal silicon beams measured below 1 K. It is shown that the phonon mean-free-path is a strong function of the surface roughness characteristics of the beams. This effect is enhanced in diffuse beams with lengths much larger than, even when the surface is fairly smooth, 510 nm rms, and the peak thermal wavelength is 0.6 microns. Resonant phonon scattering has been observed in beams with a pitted surface morphology and characteristic pit depth of 30 nm. Hence, if the surface roughness is not adequately controlled, the thermal conductance can vary significantly for diffuse beams fabricated across a wafer. In contrast, when the beam length is of order, the conductance is dominated by ballistic transport and is effectively set by the beam cross-sectional area. We have demonstrated a uniformity of +/-8% in fractional deviation for ballistic beams, and this deviation is largely set by the thermal conductance of diffuse beams that support the micro-electro-mechanical device and electrical leads. In addition, we have found no evidence for excess specific heat in single-crystal silicon membranes. This allows for the precise control of the device heat capacity with normal metal films. We discuss the results in the context of the design and fabrication of large-format arrays of far-infrared and millimeter wavelength cryogenic detectors.

  10. Control of a powered prosthetic device via a pinch gesture interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Oguz; Wallace, Kristi; Sanford, Joseph D.; Popa, Dan O.

    2015-06-01

    A novel system is presented to control a powered prosthetic device using a gesture tracking system worn on a user's sound hand in order to detect different grasp patterns. Experiments are presented with two different gesture tracking systems: one comprised of Conductive Thimbles worn on each finger (Conductive Thimble system), and another comprised of a glove which leaves the fingers free (Conductive Glove system). Timing tests were performed on the selection and execution of two grasp patterns using the Conductive Thimble system and the iPhone app provided by the manufacturer. A modified Box and Blocks test was performed using Conductive Glove system and the iPhone app provided by Touch Bionics. The best prosthetic device performance is reported with the developed Conductive Glove system in this test. Results show that these low encumbrance gesture-based wearable systems for selecting grasp patterns may provide a viable alternative to EMG and other prosthetic control modalities, especially for new prosthetic users who are not trained in using EMG signals.

  11. Stabilization and control of quad-rotor helicopter using a smartphone device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Alok; Lee, Dah-Jye; Moore, Jason; Chang, Yung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, autonomous, micro-unmanned aerial vehicles (micro-UAVs), or more specifically hovering micro- UAVs, have proven suitable for many promising applications such as unknown environment exploration and search and rescue operations. The early versions of UAVs had no on-board control capabilities, and were difficult for manual control from a ground station. Many UAVs now are equipped with on-board control systems that reduce the amount of control required from the ground-station operator. However, the limitations on payload, power consumption and control without human interference remain the biggest challenges. This paper proposes to use a smartphone as the sole computational device to stabilize and control a quad-rotor. The goal is to use the readily available sensors in a smartphone such as the GPS, the accelerometer, the rate-gyros, and the camera to support vision-related tasks such as flight stabilization, estimation of the height above ground, target tracking, obstacle detection, and surveillance. We use a quad-rotor platform that has been built in the Robotic Vision Lab at Brigham Young University for our development and experiments. An Android smartphone is connected through the USB port to an external hardware that has a microprocessor and circuitries to generate pulse-width modulation signals to control the brushless servomotors on the quad-rotor. The high-resolution camera on the smartphone is used to detect and track features to maintain a desired altitude level. The vision algorithms implemented include template matching, Harris feature detector, RANSAC similarity-constrained homography, and color segmentation. Other sensors are used to control yaw, pitch, and roll of the quad-rotor. This smartphone-based system is able to stabilize and control micro-UAVs and is ideal for micro-UAVs that have size, weight, and power limitations.

  12. Photoluminescence-based quality control for thin film absorber layers of photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repins, Ingrid L.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-07

    A time-resolved photoluminescence-based system providing quality control during manufacture of thin film absorber layers for photovoltaic devices. The system includes a laser generating excitation beams and an optical fiber with an end used both for directing each excitation beam onto a thin film absorber layer and for collecting photoluminescence from the absorber layer. The system includes a processor determining a quality control parameter such as minority carrier lifetime of the thin film absorber layer based on the collected photoluminescence. In some implementations, the laser is a low power, pulsed diode laser having photon energy at least great enough to excite electron hole pairs in the thin film absorber layer. The scattered light may be filterable from the collected photoluminescence, and the system may include a dichroic beam splitter and a filter that transmit the photoluminescence and remove scattered laser light prior to delivery to a photodetector and a digital oscilloscope.

  13. Method of Optimizing the Construction of Machining, Assembly and Control Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, D. M.; Costea, A.; Niţu, E. L.; Rizea, A. D.; Babă, A.

    2017-10-01

    Industry dynamics, driven by economic and social requirements, must generate more interest in technological optimization, capable of ensuring a steady development of advanced technical means to equip machining processes. For these reasons, the development of tools, devices, work equipment and control, as well as the modernization of machine tools, is the certain solution to modernize production systems that require considerable time and effort. This type of approach is also related to our theoretical, experimental and industrial applications of recent years, presented in this paper, which have as main objectives the elaboration and use of mathematical models, new calculation methods, optimization algorithms, new processing and control methods, as well as some structures for the construction and configuration of technological equipment with a high level of performance and substantially reduced costs..

  14. 40 CFR 63.496 - Back-end process provisions-procedures to determine compliance using control or recovery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process vent streams are combined prior to being routed to control or recovery devices, the inlet sampling... boiler or process heater. (iii) The control efficiency of the boiler or process heater shall be calculated using Equation 29. ER05SE96.027 where: R=Control efficiency of boiler or process heater, percent...

  15. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Metal Furniture Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must...

  16. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4566 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  17. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Large Appliances Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? (a) For...

  18. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Metal Cans Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3545 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use...

  19. 40 CFR 63.4766 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the add-on control... Coating of Wood Building Products Compliance Requirements for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4766 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency...

  20. A One-Dimensional Fluidic Nanogenerator with a High Power Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yifan; Chen, Peining; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Songlin; Wan, Fang; Deng, Jue; Cheng, Xunliang; Hu, Yajie; Liao, Meng; Wang, Bingjie; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-09

    Electricity generation from flowing water has been developed for over a century and plays a critical role in our lives. Generally, heavy and complex facilities are required for electricity generation, while using these technologies for applications that require a small size and high flexibility is difficult. Here, we developed a fluidic nanogenerator fiber from an aligned carbon nanotube sheet to generate electricity from any flowing water source in the environment as well as in the human body. The power conversion efficiency reached 23.3 %. The fluidic nanogenerator fiber was flexible and stretchable, and the high performance was well-maintained after deformation over 1 000 000 cycles. The fiber also offered unique and promising advantages, such as the ability to be woven into fabrics for large-scale applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Induced fluid rotation and bistable fluidic turn-down valves (a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesař Václav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper surveys engineering applications of an unusual fluidic principle — momentum transfer through a relatively small communicating window into a vortex chamber, where the initially stationary fluid is put into rotation. The transfer is often by shear stress acting in the window plane, but may be enhanced and perhaps even dominated by fluid flow crossing the boundary. The case of zero-time-mean fluid transport through the window has found use in experimental fluid mechanics: non-invasive measurement of wall shear stress on objects by evaluating the induced rotation in the vortex chamber. The case with the non-zero flow through the interface became the starting point in development of fluidic valves combining two otherwise mutually incompatible properties: bistability and flow turning down.

  2. The Use of a Brain Computer Interface Remote Control to Navigate a Recreational Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Chung Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available People suffering from paralysis caused by serious neural disorder or spinal cord injury also need to be given a means of recreation other than general living aids. Although there have been a proliferation of brain computer interface (BCI applications, developments for recreational activities are scarcely seen. The objective of this study is to develop a BCI-based remote control integrated with commercial devices such as the remote controlled Air Swimmer. The brain is visually stimulated using boxes flickering at preprogrammed frequencies to activate a brain response. After acquiring and processing these brain signals, the frequency of the resulting peak, which corresponds to the user’s selection, is determined by a decision model. Consequently, a command signal is sent from the computer to the wireless remote controller via a data acquisition (DAQ module. A command selection training (CST and simulated path test (SPT were conducted by 12 subjects using the BCI control system and the experimental results showed a recognition accuracy rate of 89.51% and 92.31% for the CST and SPT, respectively. The fastest information transfer rate demonstrated a response of 105 bits/min and 41.79 bits/min for the CST and SPT, respectively. The BCI system was proven to be able to provide a fast and accurate response for a remote controller application.

  3. A cerebellar model for predictive motor control tested in a brain-based device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L; Edelman, Gerald M; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2006-02-28

    The cerebellum is known to be critical for accurate adaptive control and motor learning. We propose here a mechanism by which the cerebellum may replace reflex control with predictive control. This mechanism is embedded in a learning rule (the delayed eligibility trace rule) in which synapses onto a Purkinje cell or onto a cell in the deep cerebellar nuclei become eligible for plasticity only after a fixed delay from the onset of suprathreshold presynaptic activity. To investigate the proposal that the cerebellum is a general-purpose predictive controller guided by a delayed eligibility trace rule, a computer model based on the anatomy and dynamics of the cerebellum was constructed. It contained components simulating cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei, and it received input from a middle temporal visual area and the inferior olive. The model was incorporated in a real-world brain-based device (BBD) built on a Segway robotic platform that learned to traverse curved paths. The BBD learned which visual motion cues predicted impending collisions and used this experience to avoid path boundaries. During learning, the BBD adapted its velocity and turning rate to successfully traverse various curved paths. By examining neuronal activity and synaptic changes during this behavior, we found that the cerebellar circuit selectively responded to motion cues in specific receptive fields of simulated middle temporal visual areas. The system described here prompts several hypotheses about the relationship between perception and motor control and may be useful in the development of general-purpose motor learning systems for machines.

  4. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3546 Section 63.3546... device or system of multiple capture devices. The average duct static pressure is the maximum operating... Add-on Controls Option § 63.3546 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control...

  5. Continuously tunable devices based on electrical control of dual-frequency liquid crystal filled photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Riishede, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We present an electrically controlled photonic bandgap fiber device obtained by infiltrating the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a dual-frequency liquid crystal (LC) with pre-tilted molecules. Compared to previously demonstrated devices of this kind, the main new feature...... of this one is its continuous tunability due to the fact that the used LC does not exhibit reverse tilt domain defects and threshold effects. Furthermore, the dual-frequency features of the LC enables electrical control of the spectral position of the bandgaps towards both shorter and longer wavelengths...... in the same device. We investigate the dynamics of this device and demonstrate a birefringence controller based on this principle....

  6. Micro Machining of Injection Mold Inserts for Fluidic Channel of Polymeric Biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Chul; Heo, Young-Moo; Yoon, Gil-Sang; Shin, Kwang-Ho; Chang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Gun-Hee; Cho, Myeong-Woo

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the polymeric micro-fluidic biochip, often called LOC (lab-on-a-chip), has been focused as a cheap, rapid and simplified method to replace the existing biochemical laboratory works. It becomes possible to form miniaturized lab functionalities on a chip with the development of MEMS technologies. The micro-fluidic chips contain many micro-channels for the flow of sample and reagents, mixing, and detection tasks. Typical substrate materials for the chip are glass and polymers. Typical techniques for microfluidic chip fabrication are utilizing various micro pattern forming methods, such as wet-etching, micro-contact printing, and hot-embossing, micro injection molding, LIGA, and micro powder blasting processes, etc. In this study, to establish the basis of the micro pattern fabrication and mass production of polymeric micro-fluidic chips using injection molding process, micro machining method was applied to form micro-channels on the LOC molds. In the research, a series of machining experiments using micro end-mills were performed to determine optimum machining conditions to improve surface roughness and shape accuracy of designed simplified micro-channels. Obtained conditions were used to machine required mold inserts for micro-channels using micro end-mills. Test injection processes using machined molds and COC polymer were performed, and then the results were investigated.

  7. Physics of semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prew, B.A.

    1975-09-01

    The properties of semiconductors which make them important in the electronic devices industry, and how these properties are controlled by doping, are described. The physics and applications of p-n and other junction devices, and of bulk effect devices are discussed. Avalanche devices, optical devices, solar cells, Schottky barriers, MOS devices, heterojunctions, photoconductors, and transferred electron devices are considered.

  8. Micromixing within microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capretto, Lorenzo; Cheng, Wei; Hill, Martyn; Zhang, Xunli

    2011-01-01

    Micromixing is a crucial process within microfluidic systems such as micro total analysis systems (μTAS). A state-of-art review on microstructured mixing devices and their mixing phenomena is given. The review first presents an overview of the characteristics of fluidic behavior at the microscale and their implications in microfluidic mixing processes. According to the two basic principles exploited to induce mixing at the microscale, micromixers are generally classified as being passive or active. Passive mixers solely rely on pumping energy, whereas active mixers rely on an external energy source to achieve mixing. Typical types of passive micromixers are discussed, including T- or Y-shaped, parallel lamination, sequential, focusing enhanced mixers, and droplet micromixers. Examples of active mixers using external forces such as pressure field, electrokinetic, dielectrophoretic, electrowetting, magneto-hydrodynamic, and ultrasound to assist mixing are presented. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of mixing in a microfluidic environment are discussed.

  9. The use of an electronic portal imaging device for exit dosimetry and quality control measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, M C; Williams, P C

    1995-02-01

    To determine ways in which electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) could be used to (a) measure exit doses for external beam radiotherapy and (b) perform quality control checks on linear accelerators. When imaging, our fluoroscopic EPID adjusts the gain, offset, and frame acquisition time of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera automatically, to allow for the range of photon transmissions through the patient, and to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio. However, our EPID can be programmed to act as an integrating dosemeter. EPID dosemeter measurements were made for 20 MV photons, for different field sizes and thicknesses of unit density phantom material placed at varying exit surface to detector distances. These were compared with simultaneous Silicon diode exit dose measurements. Our exit dosimetry technique was verified using an anthropomorphic type phantom, and some initial measurements have been made for patients treated with irregularly shaped 20 MV x-ray fields. In this dosimetry mode, our EPID was also used to measure certain quality control parameters, x-ray field flatness, and the verification of segmented intensity modulated field prescriptions. Configured for dosimetry, our EPID exhibited a highly linear response, capable of resolving individual monitor units. Exit doses could be measured to within about 3% of that measured using Silicon diodes. Field flatness was determined to within 1.5% of Farmer dosemeter measurements. Segmented intensity modulated fields can be easily verified. Our EPID has the versatility to assess a range of parameters pertinent to the delivery of high quality, high precision radiotherapy. When configured appropriately, it can measure exit doses in vivo, with reasonable accuracy, perform certain quick quality control checks, and analyze segmented intensity modulated treatment fields.

  10. Controlled power delivery for super-resolution imaging of biological samples using digital micromirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Peedikakkal, Liyana; Cadby, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    Localization based super resolution images of a biological sample is generally achieved by using high power laser illumination with long exposure time which unfortunately increases photo-toxicity of a sample, making super resolution microscopy, in general, incompatible with live cell imaging. Furthermore, the limitation of photobleaching reduces the ability to acquire time lapse images of live biological cells using fluorescence microscopy. Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology can deliver light at grey scale levels by flickering digital micromirrors at around 290 Hz enabling highly controlled power delivery to samples. In this work, Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) is implemented in an inverse Schiefspiegler telescope setup to control the power and pattern of illumination for super resolution microscopy. We can achieve spatial and temporal patterning of illumination by controlling the DMD pixel by pixel. The DMD allows us to control the power and spatial extent of the laser illumination. We have used this to show that we can reduce the power delivered to the sample to allow for longer time imaging in one area while achieving sub-diffraction STORM imaging in another using higher power densities.

  11. Automatic Life Saving Device in Commercial Aircrafts using Feedback Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennyson Samuel John

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Several safety devices have filled in the vacuous spaces in commercial airplanes which once did not possess such sophisticated mechanisms. Commercial airplanes have copious amount of instruments and electrical circuits to provide a proper control system inside the plane. A noteworthy invention in the early 80’s is the oxygen masks provided for every passenger during a plane crash or if the airplane is subjected to climatic disturbances while travelling a passenger manually uses the oxygen masks. The oxygen control system in the airplanes has proved very effective in providing an overall safety to the passengers. But the technique given below is far more advanced than the present scenario. A person suffering from a breathing ailment is succumbed to variations in the carbon dioxide levels. Thereby this CO2 is measured and using a feedback control loop, quick actions can be taken in order to provide quick aid to the ailing patient. These are completely automatic and hence it is advanced than the manual oxygen control system presently used in all commercial aircrafts. At the end of the day saving a life is what a humanistic approach is all about.

  12. Sensitive biomolecule detection in lateral flow assay with a portable temperature-humidity control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have currently attracted broad interest for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, but their application has been restricted by poor quantification and limited sensitivity. While the former has been currently solved to some extent by the development of handheld or smartphone-based readers, the latter has not been addressed fully, particularly the potential influences of environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative humidity (RH)), which have not yet received serious attention. The present study reports the use of a portable temperature-humidity control device to provide an optimum environmental requirement for sensitivity improvement in LFAs, followed by quantification by using a smartphone. We found that a RH beyond 60% with temperatures of 55-60°C and 37-40°C produced optimum nucleic acid hybridization and antigen-antibody interaction in LFAs, respectively representing a 10-fold and 3-fold signal enhancement over ambient conditions (25°C, 60% RH). We envision that in the future the portable device could be coupled with a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for sensitive detection of various target analytes in POC settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microfluidic biosensing device for controlled trapping and detection of magnetic microparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2013-05-01

    A magnetic microfluidic device is proposed to transport and trap magnetic microparticles (MPs) to a sensing area. Once the MPs are concentrated in the vicinity of the sensing area, a spin valve type giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensor is used to detect their presence. The device is used for the detection of biological targets once they are labeled with functionalized MPs. Manipulation of the MPs is achieved by employing a microstructure which consists of planar ringshaped conducting microloops. These microloops are designed to produce high magnetic field gradients which are directly proportional to the force applied to manipulate the MPs. Upon sequential application of current, starting from the outermost loop, MPs are directed to move from the outermost to the innermost loop. The speed with which the MPs move towards the sensing area is controlled by the speed with which current is switched between the loops. On top of the microstructure, a microfluidic channel is fabricated using a standard photolithography technique and a dry film resist layer (Ordyl SY355). Experimental results showed that MPs of different diameters were successfully trapped at the sensing area and detected by the GMR sensor located directly under the innermost square loop. © 2013 IEEE.

  14. Respiratory and Cardiovascular Response during Electronic Control Device Exposure in Law Enforcement Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Lavietes, Marc H.; Cherniack, Neil S.; Bergen, Michael T.; Teichman, Ronald; Servatius, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Law enforcement represents a large population of workers who may be exposed to electronic control devices (ECDs). Little is known about the potential effect of exposure to these devices on respiration or cardiovascular response during current discharge. Methods: Participants (N = 23) were trainees exposed to 5 s of an ECD (Taser X26®) as a component of training. Trainees were asked to volitionally inhale during exposure. Respiratory recordings involved a continuous waveform recorded throughout the session including during the exposure period. Heart rate was calculated from a continuous pulse oximetry recording. Results: The exposure period resulted in the cessation of normal breathing patterns in all participants and in particular a decrease in inspiratory activity. No significant changes in heart rate during ECD exposure were found. Conclusion: This is the first study to examine breathing patterns during ECD exposure with the resolution to detect changes over this discrete period of time. In contrast to reports suggesting respiration is unaffected by ECDs, present evidence suggests that voluntary inspiration is severely compromised. There is no evidence of cardiac disruption during ECD exposure. PMID:23616772

  15. Respiratory and cardiovascular response during electronic control device (ECD exposure in law enforcement trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten M. VanMeenen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Law enforcement represents a large population of workers who may be exposed to electronic control devices (ECDs. Little is known about the potential effect of exposure to these devices on respiration or cardiovascular response during current discharge. Methods: Participants (N=23 were trainees exposed to 5 seconds of an ECD (Taser X26® as a component of training. Trainees were asked to volitionally inhale during exposure. Respiratory recordings involved a continuous waveform recorded throughout the session including during the exposure period. Heart rate was calculated from a continuous pulse oximetry recording. Results: The exposure period resulted in the cessation of normal breathing patterns in all participants and in particular a decrease in inspiratory activity. No significant changes in heart rate during ECD exposure were found. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine breathing patterns during ECD exposure with the resolution to detect changes over this discrete period of time. In contrast to reports suggesting respiration is unaffected by ECDs, present evidence suggests that voluntary inspiration is severely compromised. There is no evidence of cardiac disruption during ECD exposure.

  16. Improvement in Device Performance and Reliability of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes through Deposition Rate Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Wei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a fabrication technique to reduce the driving voltage, increase the current efficiency, and extend the operating lifetime of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED by simply controlling the deposition rate of bis(10-hydroxybenzo[h]qinolinato beryllium (Bebq2 used as the emitting layer and the electron-transport layer. In our optimized device, 55 nm of Bebq2 was first deposited at a faster deposition rate of 1.3 nm/s, followed by the deposition of a thin Bebq2 (5 nm layer at a slower rate of 0.03 nm/s. The Bebq2 layer with the faster deposition rate exhibited higher photoluminescence efficiency and was suitable for use in light emission. The thin Bebq2 layer with the slower deposition rate was used to modify the interface between the Bebq2 and cathode and hence improve the injection efficiency and lower the driving voltage. The operating lifetime of such a two-step deposition OLED was 1.92 and 4.6 times longer than that of devices with a single deposition rate, that is, 1.3 and 0.03 nm/s cases, respectively.

  17. Standardising visual control devices for tsetse flies: Central and West African species Glossina palpalis palpalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dramane Kaba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glossina palpalis palpalis (G. p. palpalis is one of the principal vectors of sleeping sickness and nagana in Africa with a geographical range stretching from Liberia in West Africa to Angola in Central Africa. It inhabits tropical rain forest but has also adapted to urban settlements. We set out to standardize a long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that would induce the strongest landing response by G. p. palpalis for future use as an insecticide-impregnated tool in area-wide population suppression of this fly across its range. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Ivory Coast, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola to measure the performance of traps (biconical, monoconical and pyramidal and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a practical enumerator at these remote locations to compare landing efficiencies of devices. Independent of season and country, both phthalogen blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m(2 targets covered with adhesive film proved to be as good as traps in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue for capturing G. p. palpalis. Trap efficiency varied (8-51%. There was no difference between the performance of blue-black and blue-black-blue 1 m(2 targets. Baiting with chemicals augmented the overall performance of targets relative to traps. Landings on smaller phthalogen blue-black 0.25 m(2 square targets were not significantly different from either 1 m(2 blue-black-blue or blue-black square targets. Three times more flies were captured per unit area on the smaller device. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Blue-black 0.25 m(2 cloth targets show promise as simple cost effective devices for management of G. p. palpalis as they can be used for both control when impregnated with insecticide and for

  18. A test pattern for quality control of laser scanner and charge-coupled device film digitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, E J

    1995-02-01

    Although clinical images provide the ultimate test of diagnostic performance for a film digitizer, such images are not generally suitable for daily quality control (QC) purposes. However, a well-designed test pattern will provide a rapid, comprehensive, objective and reproducible assessment of image quality. This pattern should evaluate various parameters of image quality, including high contrast resolution, low contrast discrimination, linearity of gray scale, geometric distortion, and noise. Furthermore, the pattern should detect light leak and film slippage, two problems commonly associated with film digitizers. The test pattern described in this manuscript was designed to provide quantitative measures of performance for a film digitizer. As part of a regular QC routine for a laser scanner or charge-coupled device digitizer, this pattern provides a simple method to identify and quantify changes in digital image quality.

  19. Electro-Active Device Using Radial Electric Field Piezo-Diaphragm for Control of Fluid Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fluid-control electro-active device includes a piezo-diaphragm made from a ferroelectric material sandwiched by first and second electrode patterns configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when voltage is applied thereto. The electric field originates at a region of the ferroelectric material between the first and second electrode patterns, and extends radially outward from this region of the ferroelectric material and substantially parallel to the plane of the ferroelectric material. The piezo-diaphragm deflects symmetrically about this region in a direction substantially perpendicular to the electric field. An annular region coupled to and extending radially outward from the piezo-diaphragm perimetrically borders the piezo-diaphragm, A housing is connected to the region and at least one fluid flow path with piezo-diaphragm disposed therein.

  20. Sudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipes, Douglas P

    2012-05-22

    The safety of electronic control devices (ECDs) has been questioned. The goal of this study was to analyze in detail cases of loss of consciousness associated with ECD deployment. Eight cases of TASER X26 ECD-induced loss of consciousness were studied. In each instance, when available, police, medical, and emergency response records, ECD dataport interrogation, automated external defibrillator information, ECG strips, depositions, and autopsy results were analyzed. First recorded rhythms were ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation in 6 cases and asystole (after ≈ 30 minutes of nonresponsiveness) in 1 case. An external defibrillator reported a shockable rhythm in 1 case, but no recording was made. This report offers evidence detailing the mechanism by which an ECD can produce transthoracic stimulation resulting in cardiac electrical capture and ventricular arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. ECD stimulation can cause cardiac electrical capture and provoke cardiac arrest resulting from ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. After prolonged ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation without resuscitation, asystole develops.

  1. Performance Analysis of a Fluidic Axial Oscillation Tool for Friction Reduction with the Absence of a Throttling Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An axial oscillation tool is proved to be effective in solving problems associated with high friction and torque in the sliding drilling of a complex well. The fluidic axial oscillation tool, based on an output-fed bistable fluidic oscillator, is a type of axial oscillation tool which has become increasingly popular in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyze the dynamic flow behavior of a fluidic axial oscillation tool with the absence of a throttling plate in order to evaluate its overall performance. In particular, the differences between the original design with a throttling plate and the current default design are profoundly analyzed, and an improvement is expected to be recorded for the latter. A commercial computational fluid dynamics code, Fluent, was used to predict the pressure drop and oscillation frequency of a fluidic axial oscillation tool. The results of the numerical simulations agree well with corresponding experimental results. A sufficient pressure pulse amplitude with a low pressure drop is desired in this study. Therefore, a relative pulse amplitude of pressure drop and displacement are introduced in our study. A comparison analysis between the two designs with and without a throttling plate indicates that when the supply flow rate is relatively low or higher than a certain value, the fluidic axial oscillation tool with a throttling plate exhibits a better performance; otherwise, the fluidic axial oscillation tool without a throttling plate seems to be a preferred alternative. In most of the operating circumstances in terms of the supply flow rate and pressure drop, the fluidic axial oscillation tool performs better than the original design.

  2. High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Devices using Trap-Controlled Quantum-Dot Ink prepared via Phase-Transfer Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqoma, Havid; Al Mubarok, Muhibullah; Hadmojo, Wisnu Tantyo; Lee, Eun-Hye; Kim, Tae-Wook; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Oh, Seung-Hwan; Jang, Sung-Yeon

    2017-05-01

    Colloidal-quantum-dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices are promising candidates for low-cost power sources owing to their low-temperature solution processability and bandgap tunability. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of >10% is achieved for these devices; however, there are several remaining obstacles to their commercialization, including their high energy loss due to surface trap states and the complexity of the multiple-step CQD-layer-deposition process. Herein, high-efficiency photovoltaic devices prepared with CQD-ink using a phase-transfer-exchange (PTE) method are reported. Using CQD-ink, the fabrication of active layers by single-step coating and the suppression of surface trap states are achieved simultaneously. The CQD-ink photovoltaic devices achieve much higher PCEs (10.15% with a certified PCE of 9.61%) than the control devices (7.85%) owing to improved charge drift and diffusion. Notably, the CQD-ink devices show much lower energy loss than other reported high-efficiency CQD devices. This result reveals that the PTE method is an effective strategy for controlling trap states in CQDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Squeeze-chip: a finger-controlled microfluidic flow network device and its application to biochemical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentao; Chen, Tao; Chen, Zitian; Fei, Peng; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-05-07

    We designed and fabricated a novel microfluidic device that can be operated through simple finger squeezing. On-chip microfluidic flow control is enabled through an optimized network of check-valves and squeeze-pumps. The sophisticated flow system can be easily constructed by combining a few key elements. We implemented this device to perform quantitative biochemical assays with no requirement for precision instruments.

  4. A Control Scheme to Improve the Power Quality with the Absence of Dedicated Compensation Devices in Microgrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderipour, A.; Mohd Zin, A. A.; Habibuddin, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    devices, such as Active Power Filters (APFs). The proposed control method is composed of the Adjustable Synchronous Reference Frame (ASRF) and the Synchronous Reference Frame (SRF) methods. The ASRF and SRF are proposed to control the power injection and harmonic current compensation, respectively...

  5. 40 CFR 63.497 - Back-end process provisions-monitoring provisions for control and recovery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Polymers and Resins § 63.497 Back-end process provisions—monitoring provisions for control and recovery... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Back-end process provisions-monitoring provisions for control and recovery devices. 63.497 Section 63.497 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  6. Using a source-receptor approach to characterize the volatile organic compounds from control device exhaust in a science park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Fan; Liang, Jeng-Jong

    2013-03-01

    The science parks have helped shape Taiwan as a high-tech island with a good reputation worldwide. But some complaints on air pollution from the science parks have recently risen. To better understand the environmental effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from various high-tech factories in a science park, this study uses a source-receptor approach to characterize the environmental effects of VOCs from control device exhaust in Taichung Science Park. The chemical mass balance model (CMB8.2) of field measurements of 30 stacks and ambient air at nine sites was used to identify the source and relative contribution of ambient VOCs. The exhaust gas of various pollution control devices was also sampled by drawing a stream of the gases from the exhaust duct at its sampling port. The VOC source profile of each control device exhaust was determined using a database of noncharacteristic compounds. Monthly ambient concentrations of 167 VOCs were divided into monsoon datasets to investigate the effect of monsoon conditions on the emission of VOCs in the science park. This study also suggests a method for determining the optimum source profile in source-receptor modeling, and identifies and analyzes the sources of ambient VOCs at nine sites during southwest and northeast monsoons. Results show a direct relationship between the relative contribution of each source and its control device efficiency. The proposed source-receptor approach can characterize the environmental effect of air pollutants from various factories and successfully assess the efficiency of various control devices.

  7. Development of a portable quality control application using a tablet-type electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Akimoto, Mami; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2018-02-02

    Our aim was to develop a portable quality control (QC) application using a thermometer, a barometer, an angle gauge, and a range finder implemented in a tablet-type consumer electronic device (CED) and to assess the accuracies of the measurements made. The QC application was programmed using Java and OpenCV libraries. First, temperature and atmospheric pressure were measured over 30 days using the temperature and pressure sensors of the CED and compared with those measured by a double-tube thermometer and a digital barometer. Second, the angle gauge was developed using the accelerometer of the CED. The roll and pitch angles of the CED were measured from 0 to 90° at intervals of 10° in the clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) directions. The values were compared with those measured by a digital angle gauge. Third, a range finder was developed using the tablet's built-in camera and image-processing capacities. Surrogate markers were detected by the camera and their positions converted to actual positions using a homographic transformation method. Fiducial markers were placed on a treatment couch and moved 100 mm in 10-mm steps in both the lateral and longitudinal directions. The values were compared with those measured by the digital output of the treatment couch. The differences between CED values and those of other devices were compared by calculating means ± standard deviations (SDs). The means ± SDs of differences in temperature and atmospheric pressure were -0.07 ± 0.25°C and 0.05 ± 0.10 hPa, respectively. The means ± SDs of the difference in angle was -0.17 ± 0.87° (0.15 ± 0.23° degrees excluding the 90° angle). The means ± SDs of distances were 0.01 ± 0.07 mm in both the lateral and longitudinal directions. Our portable QC application was accurate and may be used instead of standard measuring devices. Our portable CED is efficient and simple when used in the field of medical physics. © 2018 American Association of

  8. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  9. NOTE: A method for controlling image acquisition in electronic portal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, A. G.; Hunt, S. G.; Bonnett, D. E.

    2001-02-01

    Certain types of camera-based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) which initiate image acquisition based on sensing a change in video level have been observed to trigger unreliably at the beginning of dynamic multileaf collimation sequences. A simple, novel means of controlling image acquisition with an Elekta linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) is proposed which is based on illumination of a photodetector (ORP-12, Silonex Inc., Plattsburgh, NY, USA) by the electron gun of the accelerator. By incorporating a simple trigger circuit it is possible to derive a beam on/off status signal which changes at least 100 ms before any dose is measured by the accelerator. The status signal does not return to the beam-off state until all dose has been delivered and is suitable for accelerator pulse repetition frequencies of 50-400 Hz. The status signal is thus a reliable means of indicating the initiation and termination of radiation exposure, and thus controlling image acquisition of such EPIDs for this application.

  10. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-04-26

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  11. Neuronal ensemble control of prosthetic devices by a human with tetraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Serruya, Mijail D.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Mukand, Jon A.; Saleh, Maryam; Caplan, Abraham H.; Branner, Almut; Chen, David; Penn, Richard D.; Donoghue, John P.

    2006-07-01

    Neuromotor prostheses (NMPs) aim to replace or restore lost motor functions in paralysed humans by routeing movement-related signals from the brain, around damaged parts of the nervous system, to external effectors. To translate preclinical results from intact animals to a clinically useful NMP, movement signals must persist in cortex after spinal cord injury and be engaged by movement intent when sensory inputs and limb movement are long absent. Furthermore, NMPs would require that intention-driven neuronal activity be converted into a control signal that enables useful tasks. Here we show initial results for a tetraplegic human (MN) using a pilot NMP. Neuronal ensemble activity recorded through a 96-microelectrode array implanted in primary motor cortex demonstrated that intended hand motion modulates cortical spiking patterns three years after spinal cord injury. Decoders were created, providing a `neural cursor' with which MN opened simulated e-mail and operated devices such as a television, even while conversing. Furthermore, MN used neural control to open and close a prosthetic hand, and perform rudimentary actions with a multi-jointed robotic arm. These early results suggest that NMPs based upon intracortical neuronal ensemble spiking activity could provide a valuable new neurotechnology to restore independence for humans with paralysis.

  12. Scattering Fields Control by Metamaterial Device Based on Ultra-Broadband Polarization Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Jia Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel ultra-broadband meta¬material screen with controlling the electromagnetic scat¬tering fields based on the three layers wideband polariza¬tion converter (TLW-PC. The unit cell of TLW-PC was composed of a three layers substrate loaded with double metallic split-rings structure and a metal ground plane. We observed that the polarization converter primarily per¬formed ultra-broadband cross polarization conversion from 5.71 GHz to 14.91 GHz. Furthermore, a metamaterial screen, which contributed to the low scattering charac¬teristics, had been exploited with the orthogonal array based on TLW-PC. The near scattering electronic fields are controlled due to the change of phase and amplitude for incident wave. The metamaterial screen significantly exhibited low scattering characteristics from 5.81 GHz to 15.06 GHz. To demonstrate design, a metamaterial device easily implemented by the common printed circuit board method has been fabricated and measured. Experimental results agreed well with the simulated results.

  13. Intraocular pressure control of a novel glaucoma drainage device - in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li-Jun; Li, Di-Chen; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Xing, Yao

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the intraocular pressure (IOP) control of an artificial trabeculum drainage system (ATDS), a newly designed glaucoma drainage device, and postoperative complications in normal rabbit eyes. Pressure drops in air and fluid of 30 ATDS were measured after being connected to a closed manometric system. Twenty of them were then chosen and implanted randomly into the eyes of 20 rabbits. Postoperative slit-lamp, gonioscopic examination and IOP measurements were recorded periodically. Ultrasound biomicroscopy and B-scan ultrasonography were also used to observe the complications. Eyes were enucleated on day 60. Pressure drops of 4.6-9.4 mm Hg were obtained at physiological aqueous flow rates in the tests in vitro. The average postoperative IOP of the experimental eyes (11.6-12.8 mm Hg) was lower than the controls significantly (Pdevices were devoid of obstructions in all specimens examined and a thin fibrous capsule was found around the endplate. ATDS reduce IOP effectively. However, further studies on the structure are needed to reduce complications.

  14. A synthetic multifunctional mammalian pH sensor and CO2 transgene-control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausländer, David; Ausländer, Simon; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Sedlmayer, Ferdinand; Müller, Marius; Frey, Olivier; Hierlemann, Andreas; Stelling, Jörg; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-07

    All metabolic activities operate within a narrow pH range that is controlled by the CO2-bicarbonate buffering system. We hypothesized that pH could serve as surrogate signal to monitor and respond to the physiological state. By functionally rewiring the human proton-activated cell-surface receptor TDAG8 to chimeric promoters, we created a synthetic signaling cascade that precisely monitors extracellular pH within the physiological range. The synthetic pH sensor could be adjusted by organic acids as well as gaseous CO2 that shifts the CO2-bicarbonate balance toward hydrogen ions. This enabled the design of gas-programmable logic gates, provided remote control of cellular behavior inside microfluidic devices, and allowed for CO2-triggered production of biopharmaceuticals in standard bioreactors. When implanting cells containing the synthetic pH sensor linked to production of insulin into type 1 diabetic mice developing diabetic ketoacidosis, the prosthetic network automatically scored acidic pH and coordinated an insulin expression response that corrected ketoacidosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Graphene-coated meshes for electroactive flow control devices utilizing two antagonistic functions of repellency and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassian, Rassoul; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyeun; Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Seung-Min; Koratkar, Nikhil; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    The wettability of graphene on various substrates has been intensively investigated for practical applications including surgical and medical tools, textiles, water harvesting, self-cleaning, oil spill removal and microfluidic devices. However, most previous studies have been limited to investigating the intrinsic and passive wettability of graphene and graphene hybrid composites. Here, we report the electrowetting of graphene-coated metal meshes for use as electroactive flow control devices, utilizing two antagonistic functions, hydrophobic repellency versus liquid permeability. Graphene coating was able to prevent the thermal oxidation and corrosion problems that plague unprotected metal meshes, while also maintaining its hydrophobicity. The shapes of liquid droplets and the degree of water penetration through the graphene-coated meshes were controlled by electrical stimuli based on the functional control of hydrophobic repellency and liquid permeability. Furthermore, using the graphene-coated metal meshes, we developed two active flow devices demonstrating the dynamic locomotion of water droplets and electroactive flow switching.

  16. 3D Printed Fluidic Hardware for DNA Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-10

    initiatives such as the FabLab Foundation10. Access to digital fabrication tools and open electronics, such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi, enables access to...mill (Roland DG Corporation, Hamamatsu, Japan) running Arduino firmware. A user interface (Supplementary Figure 9) enabled the user to control the...A3909 stepper motor driver, were soldered onto the milled circuit board (Supplementary Figure 8). Custom Arduino -based firmware was written to take

  17. A Review on Natural Ventilation-enabling Façade Noise Control Devices for Congested High-Rise Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Keung Tang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current status of the research and development of natural ventilation-enabling noise control devices for use on the façades of high-rise residential buildings in congested cities. These devices are important for a sustainable urbanized city, as they are supposed to offer good acoustical protection to citizens, allowing for an acceptable level of natural ventilation inside residential units; energy for mechanical ventilation can then be saved. From the information presented in the existing literature, it is concluded that protrusive devices, such as lintels and balconies, are not effective noise screening devices, even if they are installed with sound absorbers and/or reflectors, under the effect of city reverberation. On the contrary, plenum windows and similar structures, which are plenum structures with a staggered air inlet and outlet, are interesting alternatives that are worth rigorous considerations.

  18. Impact of fluidic agitation on human pluripotent stem cells in stirred suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampe, Daniel; Joshi, Ronak; Keller, Kevin; Zur Nieden, Nicole I; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2017-09-01

    The success of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) as a source of future cell therapies hinges, in part, on the availability of a robust and scalable culture system that can readily produce a clinically relevant number of cells and their derivatives. Stirred suspension culture has been identified as one such promising platform due to its ease of use, scalability, and widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry (e.g., CHO cell-based production of therapeutic proteins) among others. However, culture of undifferentiated hPSCs in stirred suspension is a relatively new development within the past several years, and little is known beyond empirically optimized culture parameters. In particular, detailed characterizations of different agitation rates and their influence on the propagation of hPSCs are often not reported in the literature. In the current study, we systematically investigated various agitation rates to characterize their impact on cell yield, viability, and the maintenance of pluripotency. Additionally, we closely examined the distribution of cell aggregates and how the observed culture outcomes are attributed to their size distribution. Overall, our results showed that moderate agitation maximized the propagation of hPSCs to approximately 38-fold over 7 days by keeping the cell aggregates below the critical size, beyond which the cells are impacted by the diffusion limit, while limiting cell death caused by excessive fluidic forces. Furthermore, we observed that fluidic agitation could regulate not only cell aggregation, but also expression of some key signaling proteins in hPSCs. This indicates a new possibility to guide stem cell fate determination by fluidic agitation in stirred suspension cultures. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2109-2120. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Impact of the Shodan Computer Search Engine on Internet-facing Industrial Control System Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Table 2.1) [43]. In addition to an Internet-facing device 19 index, Shodan offers an exploit database, a raw nmap data output visualization tool, and...Automation 1769-L23E-QB1 PLC based on NMAP’s device fingerprinting service. Note the scan for all four honeypots yielded the same results. NMAP device... fingerprinting is based on a comparison of device responses to specific TCP/IP probes and open TCP or UDP ports. An investigation into the NMAP

  20. Metal nanoparticle mediated space charge and its optical control in an organic hole-only device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligorio, G.; Nardi, M. V. [Institut für Physik & IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Steyrleuthner, R.; Neher, D. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht Str. 24, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ihiawakrim, D. [Institut de Physique et de Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7504, 23 rue du Loess, BP 43, 67034 Strasbourg, Cedex2 (France); Crespo-Monteiro, N.; Brinkmann, M. [Institut Charles Sadron CNRS, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Koch, N., E-mail: norbert.koch@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Physik & IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Erneuerbare Energien, Albert-Einstein Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    We reveal the role of localized space charges in hole-only devices based on an organic semiconductor with embedded metal nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs act as deep traps for holes and reduce the current density compared to a device without MNPs by a factor of 10{sup 4} due to the build-up of localized space charge. Dynamic MNPs charged neutrality can be realized during operation by electron transfer from excitons created in the organic matrix, enabling light sensing independent of device bias. In contrast to the previous speculations, electrical bistability in such devices was not observed.