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Sample records for controlled trials experiences

  1. How do parents experience being asked to enter a child in a randomised controlled trial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bridget

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enrol their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words. Discussion Parents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to care for and protect them yet the complexities of the medical and research context can challenge their fulfilment of this role. Parents are simultaneously responsible for their child and cherish this role yet they are dependent on others when their child becomes sick. They are keen to exercise responsibility for deciding to enter a child in a trial yet can be fearful of making the 'wrong' decision. They make judgements about the threat of the child's condition as well as the risks of the trial yet their interpretations often differ from those of medical and research experts. Individual pants will experience these and other complexities to a greater or lesser degree depending on their personal experiences and values, the medical situation of their child and the nature of the trial. Interactions at the time of trial recruitment offer scope for negotiating these complexities if practitioners have the flexibility to tailor discussions to the needs and situation of individual parents. In this way, parents may be helped to retain a sense that they have acted as good parents to their child whatever decision they make. Summary Discussing randomised controlled trials and gaining and providing informed consent is challenging. The unique position of parents in giving proxy consent for their child adds to this challenge. Recognition of the complexities parents face in making decisions about trials suggests lines for future

  2. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  3. Ethical challenges in cluster randomized controlled trials: experiences from public health interventions in Africa and Asia.

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    Osrin, David; Azad, Kishwar; Fernandez, Armida; Manandhar, Dharma S; Mwansambo, Charles W; Tripathy, Prasanta; Costello, Anthony M

    2009-10-01

    Public health interventions usually operate at the level of groups rather than individuals, and cluster randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are one means of evaluating their effectiveness. Using examples from six such trials in Bangladesh, India, Malawi and Nepal, we discuss our experience of the ethical issues that arise in their conduct. We set cluster RCTs in the broader context of public health research, highlighting debates about the need to reconcile individual autonomy with the common good and about the ethics of public health research in low-income settings in general. After a brief introduction to cluster RCTs, we discuss particular challenges we have faced. These include the nature of - and responsibility for - group consent, and the need for consent by individuals within groups to intervention and data collection. We discuss the timing of consent in relation to the implementation of public health strategies, and the problem of securing ethical review and approval in a complex domain. Finally, we consider the debate about benefits to control groups and the standard of care that they should receive, and the issue of post-trial adoption of the intervention under test.

  4. Genetic differential susceptibility on trial: meta-analytic support from randomized controlled experiments.

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    van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2015-02-01

    The most stringent test of differential susceptibility theory is provided by randomized control trials examining the moderating role of genetic markers of differential susceptibility in experimental manipulations of the environment (Gene × Experimental Environment interactions), being at least 10 times more powerful than correlational Gene × Environment interaction studies. We identified 22 experiments involving 3,257 participants with various developmental outcomes (e.g., externalizing problems, internalizing behaviors, and cognitive development). Effect sizes contrasting experimental versus control group were computed both for subjects with the polymorphism considered indicative of heightened susceptibility (e.g., the dopamine receptor D4 gene seven-repeat allele and the serotonin transporter polymorphic region short allele) and others expected to be low in susceptibility (e.g., the dopamine receptor D4 gene four-repeat allele and the serotonin transporter polymorphic region short allele). Clear-cut experimental support for genetic differential susceptibility emerged: the combined effect size of the interventions for the susceptible genotypes amounted to r = .33 (95% confidence interval = 0.23, 0.42; p differential susceptibility than microtrials, and differential susceptibility was more clearly observed in trials with externalizing and cognitive outcomes than with internalizing problems. This meta-analysis shows proof of principle for genetic differential susceptibility and indicates that it is time to explore its mechanisms and limits. The concept of differential susceptibility alters the idea of constitutional "risk" factors (reactive temperament and risk genotypes), and points to intervention efficacy hidden in Gene × Environment interactions.

  5. Experience sampling-based personalized feedback and positive affect: a randomized controlled trial in depressed patients.

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    Jessica A Hartmann

    Full Text Available Positive affect (PA plays a crucial role in the development, course, and recovery of depression. Recently, we showed that a therapeutic application of the experience sampling method (ESM, consisting of feedback focusing on PA in daily life, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. The present study investigated whether the experience of PA increased during the course of this intervention.Multicentre parallel randomized controlled trial. An electronic random sequence generator was used to allocate treatments.University, two local mental health care institutions, one local hospital.102 pharmacologically treated outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder, randomized over three treatment arms.Six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with weekly PA-focused feedback sessions (experimental group; six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with six weekly sessions without feedback (pseudo-experimental group; or treatment as usual (control group.The interaction between treatment allocation and time in predicting positive and negative affect (NA was investigated in multilevel regression models.102 patients were randomized (mean age 48.0, SD 10.2 of which 81 finished the entire study protocol. All 102 patients were included in the analyses. The experimental group did not show a significant larger increase in momentary PA during or shortly after the intervention compared to the pseudo-experimental or control groups (χ2(2 = 0.33, p = .846. The pseudo-experimental group showed a larger decrease in NA compared to the control group (χ2(1 = 6.29, p =.012.PA-focused feedback did not significantly impact daily life PA during or shortly after the intervention. As the previously reported reduction in depressive symptoms associated with the feedback unveiled itself only after weeks, it is conceivable that the effects on daily life PA also evolve slowly and therefore were not captured by the experience sampling procedure

  6. Whole Animal Experiments Should Be More Like Human Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The quality of reporting of animal studies lags behind that of human randomized controlled trials but a series of additions to the ARRIVE guidelines will help ensure that the standards are comparable.

  7. Experience Sampling-Based Personalized Feedback and Positive Affect: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Depressed Patients

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    Hartmann, Jessica A.; Wichers, Marieke; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Kramer, Ingrid; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Peeters, Frenk; Schruers, Koen R. J.; van Bemmel, Alex L.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; van Os, Jim; Simons, Claudia J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Positive affect (PA) plays a crucial role in the development, course, and recovery of depression. Recently, we showed that a therapeutic application of the experience sampling method (ESM), consisting of feedback focusing on PA in daily life, was associated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. The present study investigated whether the experience of PA increased during the course of this intervention. Design Multicentre parallel randomized controlled trial. An electronic random sequence generator was used to allocate treatments. Settings University, two local mental health care institutions, one local hospital. Participants 102 pharmacologically treated outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder, randomized over three treatment arms. Intervention Six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with weekly PA-focused feedback sessions (experimental group); six weeks of ESM self-monitoring combined with six weekly sessions without feedback (pseudo-experimental group); or treatment as usual (control group). Main outcome The interaction between treatment allocation and time in predicting positive and negative affect (NA) was investigated in multilevel regression models. Results 102 patients were randomized (mean age 48.0, SD 10.2) of which 81 finished the entire study protocol. All 102 patients were included in the analyses. The experimental group did not show a significant larger increase in momentary PA during or shortly after the intervention compared to the pseudo-experimental or control groups (χ2 (2) =0.33, p=.846). The pseudo-experimental group showed a larger decrease in NA compared to the control group (χ2 (1) =6.29, p=.012). Conclusion PA-focused feedback did not significantly impact daily life PA during or shortly after the intervention. As the previously reported reduction in depressive symptoms associated with the feedback unveiled itself only after weeks, it is conceivable that the effects on daily life PA also evolve

  8. Experiences of a long-term randomized controlled prevention trial in a maiden environment: Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial

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    Rahu Mati

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventive drugs require long-term trials to show their effectiveness or harms and often a lot of changes occur during post-marketing studies. The purpose of this article is to describe the research process in a long-term randomized controlled trial and discuss the impact and consequences of changes in the research environment. Methods The Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial (EPHT, originally planned to continue for five years, was planned in co-operation with the Women's International Study of Long-Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM in the UK. In addition to health outcomes, EPHT was specifically designed to study the impact of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT on health services utilization. Results After EPHT recruited in 1999–2001 the Women's Health Initiative (WHI in the USA decided to stop the estrogen-progestin trial after a mean of 5.2 years in July 2002 because of increased risk of breast cancer and later in 2004 the estrogen-only trial because HT increased the risk of stroke, decreased the risk of hip fracture, and did not affect coronary heart disease incidence. WISDOM was halted in autumn 2002. These decisions had a major influence on EPHT. Conclusion Changes in Estonian society challenged EPHT to find a balance between the needs of achieving responses to the trial aims with a limited budget and simultaneously maintaining the safety of trial participants. Flexibility was the main key for success. Rapid changes are not limited only to transiting societies but are true also in developed countries and the risk must be included in planning all long-term trials. The role of ethical and data monitoring committees in situations with emerging new data from other studies needs specification. Longer funding for preventive trials and more flexibility in budgeting are mandatory. Who should prove the effectiveness of an (old drug for a new preventive indication? In preventive drug trials companies may

  9. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in inflammatory myopathies: experience based on controlled clinical trials.

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    Dalakas, M C

    2003-10-01

    Controlled clinical trials with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) have been conducted in patients with DM and IBM, but not PM. A double-blind placebo-controlled study in DM patients, resistant or partially responsive to conventional therapies, showed that IVIg is very effective in improving both the muscle strength and the skin rash. The clinical benefit, which was impressive in patients with early disease, was associated with improvement in the muscle cytoarchitecture. Quantitative histological studies in repeated muscle biopsies showed a statistically significant increased in the size of muscle fibers and the number of capillaries with normalization of the capillary diameter. Resolution of the aberrant immunopathological parameters including interception of complement activation products and downregulation of T cells, ICAM-I, VCAM, TGF-beta and MHC-I molecules was also noted. In IBM, IVIg showed marginal, and non statistically significant, improvements in muscle strength. Up to 20% of patients however, demonstrated clinical improvement with increased activities of daily living while certain muscle groups, such as the muscles of swallowing, showed significant improvements compared to placebo implying mild regional benefits. In PM, small uncontrolled series have shown improvements in muscle strength in up to 70% of the IVIg-treated patients. Because PM, as a stand-alone clinical entity, is a very rare disease, completion of controlled trials will be very difficult.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

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    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

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    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  12. Understanding involvement in surgical orthopaedic randomized controlled trials: A qualitative study of patient and health professional views and experiences

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    Horwood, Jeremy; Johnson, Emma; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Background Factors influencing patients' motivations for enrolling in, and their experiences of, orthopaedic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are not fully understood. Less is known about healthcare professionals' (HCP) experiences of RCT involvement. Aim This study investigates patients' and HCPs' views and experiences of RCT participation and delivery to inform the planning of future RCTs. Methods Total hip or knee replacement patients (n = 24) participating in the single-center double-blind APEX RCTs of an intra-operative anesthetic intervention and HCPs (n = 15) involved in trial delivery were interviewed. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed, anonymized and thematically analyzed. Results Although altruistic reasons for RCT participation were common, patients also weighed up demands of the RCT with the potential benefits of taking part, demonstrating the complex and conditional nature of trial participation. HCPs were interested in RCT involvement as a means of contributing towards advances in medical knowledge and also considered the costs and benefits of RCT involvement. Conclusion Patients and HCPs value involvement in RCTs that they see as relevant and of value, while imposing minimum burden. These findings have important implications for the design of methods to recruit patients to RCTs and for planning how an RCT might best interface with HCP clinical commitments. PMID:26772763

  13. Reconciling research and implementation in micro health insurance experiments in India: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Doyle Conor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microinsurance or Community-Based Health Insurance is a promising healthcare financing mechanism, which is increasingly applied to aid rural poor persons in low-income countries. Robust empirical evidence on the causal relations between Community-Based Health Insurance and healthcare utilisation, financial protection and other areas is scarce and necessary. This paper contains a discussion of the research design of three Cluster Randomised Controlled Trials in India to measure the impact of Community-Based Health Insurance on several outcomes. Methods/Design Each trial sets up a Community-Based Health Insurance scheme among a group of micro-finance affiliate families. Villages are grouped into clusters which are congruous with pre-existing social groupings. These clusters are randomly assigned to one of three waves of implementation, ensuring the entire population is offered Community-Based Health Insurance by the end of the experiment. Each wave of treatment is preceded by a round of mixed methods evaluation, with quantitative, qualitative and spatial evidence on impact collected. Improving upon practices in published Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial literature, we detail how research design decisions have ensured that both the households offered insurance and the implementers of the Community-Based Health Insurance scheme operate in an environment replicating a non-experimental implementation. Discussion When a Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial involves randomizing within a community, generating adequate and valid conclusions requires that the research design must be made congruous with social structures within the target population, to ensure that such trials are conducted in an implementing environment which is a suitable analogue to that of a non-experimental implementing environment.

  14. Somatisation in primary care: experiences of primary care physicians involved in a training program and in a randomised controlled trial

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    Salazar Agustín

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new intervention aimed at managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS based on a specific set of communication techniques was developed, and tested in a cluster randomised clinical trial. Due to the modest results obtained and in order to improve our intervention we need to know the GPs' attitudes towards patients with MUS, their experience, expectations and the utility of the communication techniques we proposed and the feasibility of implementing them. Physicians who took part in 2 different training programs and in a randomised controlled trial (RCT for patients with MUS were questioned to ascertain the reasons for the doctors' participation in the trial and the attitudes, experiences and expectations of GPs about the intervention. Methods A qualitative study based on four focus groups with GPs who took part in a RCT. A content analysis was carried out. Results Following the RCT patients are perceived as true suffering persons, and the relationship with them has improved in GPs of both groups. GPs mostly valued the fact that it is highly structured, that it made possible a more comfortable relationship and that it could be applied to a broad spectrum of patients with psychosocial problems. Nevertheless, all participants consider that change in patients is necessary; GPs in the intervention group remarked that that is extremely difficult to achieve. Conclusion GPs positively evaluate the communication techniques and the interventions that help in understanding patient suffering, and express the enormous difficulties in handling change in patients. These findings provide information on the direction in which efforts for improving intervention should be directed. Trial registration US ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130988

  15. Therapist experience and knowledge acquisition in internet-delivered CBT for social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Gerhard Andersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT has been tested in several trials on social anxiety disorder (SAD with moderate to large effects. The aims of this study were threefold. First, to compare the effects of ICBT including online discussion forum with a moderated online discussion forum only. Second, to investigate if knowledge about SAD increased following treatment and third to compare the effects of inexperienced versus experienced therapists on patient outcomes. METHODS: A total of 204 participants with a primary diagnosis of SAD were included and randomized to either guided ICBT or the control condition. ICBT consisted of a 9-week treatment program which was guided by either psychology students at MSc level (n = 6 or by licensed psychologists with previous experience of ICBT (n = 7. A knowledge test dealing with social anxiety was administered before and after treatment. Measures of social anxiety and secondary outcomes dealing with general anxiety, depression, and quality of life were administered before and after treatment. In addition, a 1-year follow-up was conducted on the treated individuals. RESULTS: Immediately following treatment, the ICBT group showed superior outcome on the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale self-report version with a between group posttreatment Hedges g effect size of g = 0.75. In addition, significant differences on all the secondary outcomes were observed. Gains were well maintained one year later. Knowledge, as assessed by the knowledge test, increased following treatment with little gain in the control group. Therapist experience did not result in different outcomes, but experienced therapists logged in less frequently compared to the inexperienced therapists, suggesting that they needed less time to support patients. DISCUSSION: We conclude that guided ICBT reduce symptoms of SAD, increase knowledge about SAD and that therapist experience does not make a difference

  16. Can Facebook Be Used for Research? Experiences Using Facebook to Recruit Pregnant Women for a Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Adam, Laura M; Manca, Donna P

    2016-01-01

    Background Recruitment is often a difficult and costly part of any human research study. Social media and other emerging means of mass communication hold promise as means to complement traditional strategies used for recruiting participants because they can reach a large number of people in a short amount of time. With the ability to target a specified audience, paid Facebook advertisements have potential to reach future research participants of a specific demographic. This paper describes the experiences of a randomized controlled trial in Edmonton, Alberta, attempting to recruit healthy pregnant women between 8 and 20 weeks’ gestation for participation in a prenatal study. Various traditional recruitment approaches, in addition to paid Facebook advertisements were trialed. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of paid advertisements on Facebook as a platform for recruiting pregnant women to a randomized controlled trial in comparison with traditional recruitment approaches. Methods Recruitment using traditional approaches occurred for 7 months, whereas Facebook advertisements ran for a total of 26 days. Interested women were prompted to contact the study staff for a screening call to determine study eligibility. Costs associated with each recruitment approach were recorded and used to calculate the cost to recruit eligible participants. Performance of Facebook advertisements was monitored using Facebook Ads Manager. Results Of the 115 women included, 39.1% (n=45) of the women who contacted study staff heard about the study through Facebook, whereas 60.9% (n=70) of them heard about it through traditional recruitment approaches. During the 215 days (~7 months) that the traditional approaches were used, the average rate of interest was 0.3 (0.2) women/day, whereas the 26 days of Facebook advertisements resulted in an average rate of interest of 2.8 (1.7) women/day. Facebook advertisements cost Can $506.91 with a cost per eligible participant of Cad $20.28. In

  17. Facilitated patient experience feedback can improve nursing care: a pilot study for a phase III cluster randomised controlled trial

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    2013-01-01

    Background England’s extensive NHS patient survey programme has not fulfilled government promises of widespread improvements in patients’ experiences, and media reports of poor nursing care in NHS hospitals are increasingly common. Impediments to the surveys’ impact on the quality of nursing care may include: the fact that they are not ward-specific, so nurses claim “that doesn’t happen on my ward”; nurses’ scepticism about the relevance of patient feedback to their practice; and lack of prompt communication of results. The surveys’ impact could be increased by: conducting ward-specific surveys; returning results to ward staff more quickly; including patients’ written comments in reports; and offering nurses an opportunity to discuss the feedback. Very few randomised trials have been conducted to test the effectiveness of patient feedback on quality improvement and there have been few, if any, published trials of ward-specific patient surveys. Methods Over two years, postal surveys of recent inpatients were conducted at four-monthly intervals in 18 wards in two NHS Trusts in England. Wards were randomly allocated to Basic Feedback (ward-specific printed patient survey results including patients’ written comments sent to nurses by letter); Feedback Plus (in addition to printed results, ward meetings to discuss results and plan improvements) or Control (no active feedback of survey results). Patient survey responses to questions about nursing care were used to compute wards’ average Nursing Care Scores at each interval. Nurses’ reactions to the patient feedback were recorded. Results Conducting ward-level surveys and delivering ward-specific results was feasible. Ward meetings were effective for engaging nurses and challenging scepticism and patients’ written comments stimulated interest. 4,236 (47%) patients returned questionnaires. Nursing Care Scores improved more for Feedback Plus than Basic Feedback or Control (difference between

  18. Can Facebook Be Used for Research? Experiences Using Facebook to Recruit Pregnant Women for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Laura M; Manca, Donna P; Bell, Rhonda C

    2016-09-21

    Recruitment is often a difficult and costly part of any human research study. Social media and other emerging means of mass communication hold promise as means to complement traditional strategies used for recruiting participants because they can reach a large number of people in a short amount of time. With the ability to target a specified audience, paid Facebook advertisements have potential to reach future research participants of a specific demographic. This paper describes the experiences of a randomized controlled trial in Edmonton, Alberta, attempting to recruit healthy pregnant women between 8 and 20 weeks' gestation for participation in a prenatal study. Various traditional recruitment approaches, in addition to paid Facebook advertisements were trialed. To evaluate the effectiveness of paid advertisements on Facebook as a platform for recruiting pregnant women to a randomized controlled trial in comparison with traditional recruitment approaches. Recruitment using traditional approaches occurred for 7 months, whereas Facebook advertisements ran for a total of 26 days. Interested women were prompted to contact the study staff for a screening call to determine study eligibility. Costs associated with each recruitment approach were recorded and used to calculate the cost to recruit eligible participants. Performance of Facebook advertisements was monitored using Facebook Ads Manager. Of the 115 women included, 39.1% (n=45) of the women who contacted study staff heard about the study through Facebook, whereas 60.9% (n=70) of them heard about it through traditional recruitment approaches. During the 215 days (~7 months) that the traditional approaches were used, the average rate of interest was 0.3 (0.2) women/day, whereas the 26 days of Facebook advertisements resulted in an average rate of interest of 2.8 (1.7) women/day. Facebook advertisements cost Can $506.91 with a cost per eligible participant of Cad $20.28. In comparison, the traditional approaches

  19. A therapeutic application of the experience sampling method in the treatment of depression: a randomized controlled trial

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    Kramer, Ingrid; Simons, Claudia JP; Hartmann, Jessica A; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Peeters, Frenk; Schruers, Koen; Bemmel, Alex L; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Delespaul, Philippe; Os, Jim; Wichers, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    In depression, the ability to experience daily life positive affect predicts recovery and reduces relapse rates. Interventions based on the experience sampling method (ESM-I) are ideally suited to provide insight in personal, contextualized patterns of positive affect. The aim of this study was to examine whether add-on ESM-derived feedback on personalized patterns of positive affect is feasible and useful to patients, and results in a reduction of depressive symptomatology. Depressed outpatients (n=102) receiving pharmacological treatment participated in a randomized controlled trial with three arms: an experimental group receiving add-on ESM-derived feedback, a pseudo-experimental group participating in ESM but receiving no feedback, and a control group. The experimental group participated in an ESM procedure (three days per week over a 6-week period) using a palmtop. This group received weekly standardized feedback on personalized patterns of positive affect. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale – 17 (HDRS) and Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (IDS) scores were obtained before and after the intervention. During a 6-month follow-up period, five HDRS and IDS assessments were completed. Add-on ESM-derived feedback resulted in a significant and clinically relevant stronger decrease in HDRS score relative to the control group (p<0.01; −5.5 point reduction in HDRS at 6 months). Compared to the pseudo-experimental group, a clinically relevant decrease in HDRS score was apparent at 6 months (B=−3.6, p=0.053). Self-reported depressive complaints (IDS) yielded the same pattern over time. The use of ESM-I was deemed acceptable and the provided feedback easy to understand. Patients attempted to apply suggestions from ESM-derived feedback to daily life. These data suggest that the efficacy of traditional passive pharmacological approach to treatment of major depression can be enhanced by using person-tailored daily life information regarding positive affect. PMID:24497255

  20. The acceptability of acupuncture for low back pain: a qualitative study of patient's experiences nested within a randomised controlled trial.

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    Ann Hopton

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines recommend acupuncture as a clinically effective treatment for chronic back pain. However, there is insufficient knowledge of what factors contribute to patients' positive and negative experiences of acupuncture, and how those factors interact in terms of the acceptability of treatment. This study used patient interviews following acupuncture treatment for back pain to identify, understand and describe the elements that contribute or detract from acceptability of treatment. METHODS: The study used semi-structured interviews. Twelve patients were interviewed using an interview schedule as a sub-study nested within a randomised controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic back pain. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Three over-arching themes emerged from the analysis. The first entitled facilitators of acceptability contained five subthemes; experience of pain relief, improvements in physical activity, relaxation, psychological benefit, reduced reliance on medication. The second over-arching theme identified barriers to acceptability, which included needle-related discomfort and temporary worsening of symptoms, pressure to continue treatment and financial cost. The third over-arching theme comprised mediators of acceptability, which included pre-treatment mediators such as expectation and previous experience, and treatment-related mediators of time, therapeutic alliance, lifestyle advice and the patient's active involvement in recovery. These themes inform our understanding of the acceptability of acupuncture to patients with low back pain. CONCLUSION: The acceptability of acupuncture treatment for low back pain is complex and multifaceted. The therapeutic relationship between the practitioner and patient emerged as a strong driver for acceptability, and as a useful vehicle to develop the patients' self-efficacy in pain

  1. After the Gold Rush: Questioning the "Gold Standard" and Reappraising the Status of Experiment and Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

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    Thomas, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The past few years have seen a resurgence of faith in experimentation in education inquiry, and particularly in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Proponents of such research have succeeded in bringing into common parlance the term "gold standard," which suggests that research emerging from any other design frame fails to achieve the…

  2. Close look at the experiences of patients enrolled in a clinical trial of acupuncture treatment for atrial fibrillation in Korea: a qualitative study nested within a randomised controlled trial

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    Lee, Seung Min Kathy; Park, Jun Hyeong; Yoon, Kang Hyun; Woo, Jong Shin; Lee, Jung Myung; Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Weon; Lee, Sanghoon

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the experiences of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in the context of a prospective, two-parallel-armed, participant-blinded and assessor-blinded sham-controlled randomised trial. Design A nested qualitative study within an ongoing randomised controlled trial to explore acupuncture's antiarrhythmic effects on drug refractory acupuncture in persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) (ACU-AF trial). Participants Participants were recruited using purposeful sampling and a maximum variation strategy with regard to treatment allocation (treatment or control) and protocol completion (completion or non-completion). Setting This was a single-centre in-depth interview qualitative study conducted at a tertiary-level university hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Results Data saturation was reached after 8 participants. Thematic analysis identified that most patients were not aware of their condition until medical check-up; physician referral was the main reason for trial participation, and patients had high expectations regardless of previous acupuncture experiences. Patients tended to depend on their physicians' opinions because they felt helpless of their condition. No one questioned their assigned treatment groups and generally believed acupuncture treatment was different for cardiovascular diseases. A few patients expressed disappointment in the strict and rigid protocols, in which most practitioners refrained from explaining their acupuncture procedures. Conclusions For cardiovascular patients their physician's advice was one of the biggest reasons for enrolling in the acupuncture trial therefore relying on standard recruitment methods may not be effective. Fortunately both real and sham acupuncture groups in our sample were receiving treatment as intended, but in the future, designing a more pragmatic trial (better reflecting clinical settings, expanding the inclusion criteria and using more treatment points) will allow researchers to better

  3. Evaluation of the effects of a birth plan on Taiwanese women's childbirth experiences, control and expectations fulfilment: a randomised controlled trial.

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    Kuo, Su-Chen; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Hsu, Chi-Ho; Yang, Cherng-Chia; Chang, Min-Yu; Tsao, Chien-Ming; Lin, Lie-Chu

    2010-07-01

    In many western countries, pregnant women often prepare birth plans, outlining how they would like their childbirth experiences to proceed. However there have been no experimental studies to evaluate the effect of birth plans. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of birth plans on women's fulfilment of their childbirth expectations, their control over the birth process, and overall experiences. A randomised, single-blind controlled trial study design was used. This study involved seven hospitals and 10 obstetricians in Taiwan. Participants included primiparous women, each under the care of one of seven Taiwanese medical facilities, and who had been pregnant for at least 32 weeks. They were also at least 18 years old, and had no pregnancy complications. An exclusion criterion was elective caesarean as a mode of delivery. A total of 296 women in hospital clinics who met the study criteria were allocated by block randomisation to experimental (n=155) or control (n=141) groups. The women completed their basic personal information and a childbirth expectations questionnaire when they were recruited. One day after delivery, all the participants completed a questionnaire about the childbirth experience, control and fulfilment of their childbirth expectations. The experimental group had a statistically higher degree of positive childbirth experiences than that of the control group (t=2.48, p=0.01). The experimental group also showed a higher degree of childbirth control (t=9.60, pcontrol groups in prenatal birth expectations, but a significant difference (t=2.63, p=0.01) in the degree of fulfilment of their childbirth expectations after delivery. On a subscale measuring the fulfilment of childbirth expectations, there was a statistically higher degree of mastery and participation (t=3.74, pcontrol group. The results justify the clinical implementation of birth plans. Providing birth plans in medical facilities is an effective means of fulfilling

  4. Nonresponse bias in randomized controlled experiments in criminology: Putting the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET) under a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, Emma; Elffers, Henk; White, Gentry; Mazerolle, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine whether or not the results of the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET)-a randomized controlled trial that tested the impact of procedural justice policing on citizen attitudes toward police-were affected by different types of nonresponse bias. We use two methods (Cochrane and Elffers methods) to explore nonresponse bias: First, we assess the impact of the low response rate by examining the effects of nonresponse group differences between the experimental and control conditions and pooled variance under different scenarios. Second, we assess the degree to which item response rates are influenced by the control and experimental conditions. Our analysis of the QCET data suggests that our substantive findings are not influenced by the low response rate in the trial. The results are robust even under extreme conditions, and statistical significance of the results would only be compromised in cases where the pooled variance was much larger for the nonresponse group and the difference between experimental and control conditions was greatly diminished. We also find that there were no biases in the item response rates across the experimental and control conditions. RCTs that involve field survey responses-like QCET-are potentially compromised by low response rates and how item response rates might be influenced by the control or experimental conditions. Our results show that the QCET results were not sensitive to the overall low response rate across the experimental and control conditions and the item response rates were not significantly different across the experimental and control groups. Overall, our analysis suggests that the results of QCET are robust and any biases in the survey responses do not significantly influence the main experimental findings.

  5. Participant experiences from chronic administration of a multivitamin versus placebo on subjective health and wellbeing: a double-blind qualitative analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarris Jerome

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While many randomised controlled trials have been conducted on multivitamins, to our knowledge no qualitative research exploring the subjective experience of taking a multivitamin during a clinical trial has been reported. Methods Semi-structured and open-ended written questions were incorporated into a 16-week double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel groups trial of once-daily multivitamin administration. At the final study visit (week 16, three open-ended questions were posed to elucidate any positive, negative or unusual experiences from taking either the multivitamin or matched placebo. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken by researchers who were blind as to treatment condition of participants, and triangulation (independent analysis from three researchers was employed to ensure methodological rigour. Participant’s experiences were categorised as “positive” or “negative” and a Chi Square analysis was then applied to each of the experiential themes, to compare experiences between the multivitamin and placebo groups, (subdividing the groups by gender. Usual experiences were categorised and discussed separately. Results Of the 182 participants enrolled, 116 completed the study and qualitative data were available from 114 participants. Thematic analysis revealed significant effects in favour of the multivitamin over placebo for participants experiencing increased energy levels (p=.022 and enhanced mood (p=.027. The beneficial effect on energy levels was particularly evident among female participants. A trend was found for participants reporting better sleep in the multivitamin over placebo. The multivitamin and placebo groups did not significantly differ in perceived positive or negative effects in areas relating to other aspects of mental function or physical health. No significant negative effects were revealed, although there was a non-significant trend for more people in the multivitamin

  6. Maintaining Treatment Fidelity of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention Intervention for Alcohol Dependence: A Randomized Controlled Trial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra E. Zgierska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment fidelity is essential to methodological rigor of clinical trials evaluating behavioral interventions such as Mindfulness Meditation (MM. However, procedures for monitoring and maintenance of treatment fidelity are inconsistently applied, limiting the strength of such research. Objective. To describe the implementation and findings related to fidelity monitoring of the Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention for Alcohol Dependence (MBRP-A intervention in a 26-week randomized controlled trial. Methods. 123 alcohol dependent adults were randomly assigned to MM (MBRP-A and home practice, adjunctive to usual care; N=64 or control (usual care alone; N=59. Treatment fidelity assessment strategies recommended by the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change Consortium for study/intervention design, therapist training, intervention delivery, and treatment receipt and enactment were applied. Results. Ten 8-session interventions were delivered. Therapist adherence and competence, assessed using the modified MBRP Adherence and Competence Scale, were high. Among the MM group participants, 46 attended ≥4 sessions; over 90% reported at-home MM practice at 8 weeks and 72% at 26 weeks. They also reported satisfaction with and usefulness of MM for maintaining sobriety. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions. A systematic approach to assessment of treatment fidelity in behavioral clinical trials allows determination of the degree of consistency between intended and actual delivery and receipt of intervention.

  7. Understanding barriers to involving community midwives in identifying research participants; experience of the first steps randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jane; Barnes, Jacqueline; Spiby, Helen; Elbourne, Diana

    2015-08-01

    to explore barriers to the involvement of community midwives in identifying women in early pregnancy as potential participants in the first steps study, a randomised controlled trial of a new intervention to provide health and parenting support to potentially vulnerable women. descriptive qualitative investigation using semi-structured audio-recorded interviews. community midwifery offices. volunteer sample of 13 community midwives. themes derived from content analysis. understanding of their role in the research process was unclear to many midwives. Confusion arose about the difference between potential participant identification and trial recruitment. There were concerns about the eligibility criteria and it was suggested that there was insufficient time during booking appointments, and sometimes insufficient information, to determine potential eligibility. Midwives had concerns about some aspects of the intervention, which incorporated routine midwifery care, and had expectations that women may not like a group programme. This may have led some not to mention the trial. They were, however positive about the programme׳s potential for beneficial impacts on mothers and infants. dedicated research midwives may be the best option if research studies need to identify potential participants early in pregnancy, so that they can communicate with all their colleagues. if community midwives are asked to be involved in time-critical research they are likely to need additional local resources and support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring the experiences of substitute decision-makers with an exception to consent in a paediatric resuscitation randomised controlled trial: study protocol for a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melissa J; de Laat, Sonya; Schwartz, Lisa

    2016-09-13

    Prospective informed consent is required for most research involving human participants; however, this is impracticable under some circumstances. The Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS) outlines the requirements for research involving human participants in Canada. The need for an exception to consent (deferred consent) is recognised and endorsed in the TCPS for research in individual medical emergencies; however, little is known about substitute decision-maker (SDM) experiences. A paediatric resuscitation trial (SQUEEZE) (NCT01973907) using an exception to consent process began enrolling at McMaster Children's Hospital in January 2014. This qualitative research study aims to generate new knowledge on SDM experiences with the exception to consent process as implemented in a randomised controlled trial. The SDMs of children enrolled into the SQUEEZE pilot trial will be the sampling frame from which ethics study participants will be derived. Qualitative research study involving individual interviews and grounded theory methodology. SDMs for children enrolled into the SQUEEZE pilot trial. Up to 25 SDMs. Qualitative methodology: SDMs will be invited to participate in the qualitative ethics study. Interviews with consenting SDMs will be conducted in person or by telephone, taped and professionally transcribed. Participants will be encouraged to elaborate on their experience of being asked to consent after the fact and how this process occurred. Data gathering and analysis will be undertaken simultaneously. The investigators will collaborate in developing the coding scheme, and data will be coded using NVivo. Emerging themes will be identified. This research represents a rare opportunity to interview parents/guardians of critically ill children enrolled into a resuscitation trial without their knowledge or prior consent. Findings will inform implementation of the exception to consent process in the planned definitive SQUEEZE

  9. Study protocol: an early intervention program to improve motor outcome in preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial and a qualitative study of physiotherapy performance and parental experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øberg Gunn

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about early physiotherapy to preterm infants is sparse, given the risk of delayed motor development and cerebral palsy. Methods/Design A pragmatic randomized controlled study has been designed to assess the effect of a preventative physiotherapy program carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit. Moreover, a qualitative study is carried out to assess the physiotherapy performance and parents' experiences with the intervention. The aim of the physiotherapy program is to improve motor development i.e. postural control and selective movements in these infants. 150 infants will be included and randomized to either intervention or standard follow-up. The infants in the intervention group will be given specific stimulation to facilitate movements based on the individual infant's development, behavior and needs. The physiotherapist teaches the parents how to do the intervention and the parents receive a booklet with photos and descriptions of the intervention. Intervention is carried out twice a day for three weeks (week 34, 35, 36 postmenstrual age. Standardized tests are carried out at baseline, term age and at three, six, 12 and 24 months corrected age. In addition eight triads (infant, parent and physiotherapist are observed and videotaped in four clinical encounters each to assess the process of physiotherapy performance. The parents are also interviewed on their experiences with the intervention and how it influences on the parent-child relationship. Eight parents from the follow up group are interviewed about their experience. The interviews are performed according to the same schedule as the standardized measurements. Primary outcome is at two years corrected age. Discussion The paper presents the protocol for a randomized controlled trial designed to study the effect of physiotherapy to preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units. It also studies physiotherapy performance and the parent's experiences

  10. Effect of dignity therapy on distress and end-of-life experience in terminally ill patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochinov, Harvey Max; Kristjanson, Linda J; Breitbart, William; McClement, Susan; Hack, Thomas F; Hassard, Tom; Harlos, Mike

    2011-08-01

    Dignity therapy is a unique, individualised, short-term psychotherapy that was developed for patients (and their families) living with life-threatening or life-limiting illness. We investigated whether dignity therapy could mitigate distress or bolster the experience in patients nearing the end of their lives. Patients (aged ≥18 years) with a terminal prognosis (life expectancy ≤6 months) who were receiving palliative care in a hospital or community setting (hospice or home) in Canada, USA, and Australia were randomly assigned to dignity therapy, client-centred care, or standard palliative care in a 1:1:1 ratio. Randomisation was by use of a computer-generated table of random numbers in blocks of 30. Allocation concealment was by use of opaque sealed envelopes. The primary outcomes--reductions in various dimensions of distress before and after completion of the study--were measured with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Spiritual Well-Being Scale, Patient Dignity Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, items from the Structured Interview for Symptoms and Concerns, Quality of Life Scale, and modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. Secondary outcomes of self-reported end-of-life experiences were assessed in a survey that was undertaken after the completion of the study. Outcomes were assessed by research staff with whom the participant had no previous contact to avoid any possible response bias or contamination. Analyses were done on all patients with available data at baseline and at the end of the study intervention. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00133965. 165 of 441 patients were assigned to dignity therapy, 140 standard palliative care, and 136 client-centred care. 108, 111, and 107 patients, respectively, were analysed. No significant differences were noted in the distress levels before and after completion of the study in the three groups. For the secondary outcomes, patients reported that

  11. Advancing engagement methods for trials: the CORE study relational model of engagement for a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial of experience-based co-design for people living with severe mental illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Lauralie; Piper, Donella; Weavell, Wayne; Callander, Rosemary; Iedema, Rick; Furler, John; Pierce, David; Godbee, Kali; Gunn, Jane; Palmer, Victoria J

    2017-04-08

    Engagement is essential in trials research but is rarely embedded across all stages of the research continuum. The development, use, effectiveness and value of engagement in trials research is poorly researched and understood, and models of engagement are rarely informed by theory. This article describes an innovative methodological approach for the development and application of a relational model of engagement in a stepped wedge designed cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT), the CORE study. The purpose of the model is to embed engagement across the continuum of the trial which will test if an experience-based co-design intervention improves psychosocial recovery for people affected by severe mental illness. The model was developed in three stages and used a structured iterative approach. A context mapping assessment of trial sites was followed by a literature review on recruitment and retention of hard-to-reach groups in complex interventions and RCTs. Relevant theoretical and philosophical underpinnings were identified by an additional review of literature to inform model development and enactment of engagement activities. Policy, organisational and service user data combined with evidence from the literature on barriers to recruitment provided contextual information. Four perspectives support the theoretical framework of the relational model of engagement and this is organised around two facets: the relational and continuous. The relational facet is underpinned by relational ethical theories and participatory action research principles. The continuous facet is supported by systems thinking and translation theories. These combine to enact an ethics of engagement and evoke knowledge mobilisation to reach the higher order goals of the model. Engagement models are invaluable for trials research, but there are opportunities to advance their theoretical development and application, particularly within stepped wedge designed studies where there may be a

  12. Balancing Opposing Forces—A Nested Process Evaluation Study Protocol for a Stepped Wedge Designed Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of an Experience Based Codesign Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Jane Palmer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Process evaluations are essential to understand the contextual, relational, and organizational and system factors of complex interventions. The guidance for developing process evaluations for randomized controlled trials (RCTs has until recently however, been fairly limited. Method/Design: A nested process evaluation (NPE was designed and embedded across all stages of a stepped wedge cluster RCT called the CORE study. The aim of the CORE study is to test the effectiveness of an experience-based codesign methodology for improving psychosocial recovery outcomes for people living with severe mental illness (service users. Process evaluation data collection combines qualitative and quantitative methods with four aims: (1 to describe organizational characteristics, service models, policy contexts, and government reforms and examine the interaction of these with the intervention; (2 to understand how the codesign intervention works, the cluster variability in implementation, and if the intervention is or is not sustained in different settings; (3 to assist in the interpretation of the primary and secondary outcomes and determine if the causal assumptions underpinning the codesign interventions are accurate; and (4 to determine the impact of a purposefully designed engagement model on the broader study retention and knowledge transfer in the trial. Discussion: Process evaluations require prespecified study protocols but finding a balance between their iterative nature and the structure offered by protocol development is an important step forward. Taking this step will advance the role of qualitative research within trials research and enable more focused data collection to occur at strategic points within studies.

  13. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  14. Does oral polio vaccine have non-specific effects on all-cause mortality? Natural experiments within a randomised controlled trial of early measles vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaby, Peter; Andersen, Andreas; Martins, Cesário L; Fisker, Ane B; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Whittle, Hilton C; Benn, Christine S

    2016-01-01

    Background BCG and measles vaccine (MV) may have beneficial non-specific effects (NSEs). If an unplanned intervention with a vaccine (a natural experiment) modifies the estimated effect in a randomised controlled trial (RCT), this suggests NSEs. We used this approach to test NSEs of triple oral polio vaccine (OPV). Methods During an RCT of 2 doses of MV at 4.5 and 9 months versus 1 dose of MV at 9 months of age, we experienced 2 natural experiments with OPV. We assessed whether these OPV experiments modified the effect of 2-dose MV in the MV trial. Setting MV RCT conducted in urban Guinea-Bissau 2003–2009. Interventions Natural experiments with OPV due to missing vaccine and the implementation of OPV campaigns. Main outcome measure Changes in the mortality rate ratio (MRR) for 2-dose MV versus 1-dose MV. Results First, the MRR (2-dose/1-dose MV) overall was 0.70 (0.52 to 0.94), but the MRR was 1.04 (0.53 to 2.04) when OPV at birth (OPV0) was not given, suggesting that early priming with OPV was important for the effect of 2-dose MV. The effect of OPV0 depended on age of administration; the MRR (2-dose/1-dose MV) was 0.45 (0.29 to 0.71) for children receiving OPV0 in the first week of life, but 3.63 (0.87 to 15.2) for those receiving OPV0 after the first month of life (p=0.007, test of no interaction). Second, campaign-OPV may have reduced the difference between the randomisation groups since the MRR (2-dose/1-dose MV) was 0.60 (0.42 to 0.85) for children who had not received campaign-OPV before RCT-enrolment versus 0.72 (0.23 to 2.31) and 1.42 (0.70 to 2.90) for children who had received 1 or 2 doses of campaign-OPV-before-enrolment, respectively. Conclusions Bissau had no polio infection during this trial, so OPV0 and campaign-OPV may have NSEs since they modified the effect of 2-dose MV in an RCT. Different interventions may interact to a much larger effect than usually assumed. PMID:28011813

  15. Effects of natural childbirth preparation versus standard antenatal education on epidural rates, experience of childbirth and parental stress in mothers and fathers: a randomised controlled multicentre trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, M; Kieler, H; Waldenström, U

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with psychoprophylactic training versus standard antenatal education on the use of epidural analgesia, experience of childbirth and parental stress in first-time mothers and fathers. Design Randomised controlled multicentre trial. Setting Fifteen antenatal clinics in Sweden between January 2006 and May 2007. Sample A total of 1087 nulliparous women and 1064 of their partners. Methods Natural group: Antenatal education focussing on natural childbirth preparation with training in breathing and relaxation techniques (psychoprophylaxis). Standard care group: Standard antenatal education focussing on both childbirth and parenthood, without psychoprophylactic training. Both groups: Four 2-hour sessions in groups of 12 participants during third trimester of pregnancy and one follow-up after delivery. Main outcome measures Epidural analgesia during labour, experience of childbirth as measured by the Wijma Delivery Experience Questionnaire (B), and parental stress measured by the Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire. Results The epidural rate was 52% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences in the experience of childbirth or parental stress between the randomised groups, either in women or men. Seventy percent of the women in the Natural group reported having used psychoprophylaxis during labour. A minority in the Standard care group (37%) had also used this method, but subgroup analysis where these women were excluded did not change the principal findings. Conclusion Natural childbirth preparation including training in breathing and relaxation did not decrease the use of epidural analgesia during labour, nor did it improve the birth experience or affect parental stress in early parenthood in nulliparous women and men, compared with a standard form of antenatal education. PMID:19538406

  16. The effect of dignity therapy on distress and end-of-life experience in terminally ill patients: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochinov, Harvey Max; Kristjanson, Linda J.; Breitbart, William; McClement, Susan; Hack, Thomas F; Hassard, Tom; Harlos, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Dignity Therapy is a unique, individualized, brief psychotherapy, developed for patients (and their families) living with life threatening or life limiting illness. The purpose of this study was to determine if Dignity Therapy could mitigate distress and/or bolster end-of-life experience for patients nearing death. Trial Design Multi-site randomized controlled trial, with patients assigned to Dignity Therapy, Client Centred Care or Standard Palliative Care. Study arm assignment was based on a computer-generated table of random numbers. Blinding was achieved using opaque sealed envelopes, containing allocations that were only opened once consent had been obtained. Participants Patients receiving hospital or community (hospice or home) based palliative care, in Winnipeg, New York, or Perth, randomly assigned to, Dignity Therapy [n=108], Client Centered Care [n=107] and Standard Palliative Care (n=111). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome measures included the FACIT Spiritual Well-Being Scale, the Patient Dignity Inventory, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; items from the Structured Interview for Symptoms and Concerns, the Quality of Life Scale and a modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale. Mean changes between baseline and end of intervention ratings were determined. Secondary outcomes, examining self-report end-of-life experience, consisted of a post-study survey administered across all study arms. Intervention Dignity Therapy, a novel, brief psychotherapy, provides patients with life threatening and life limiting illnesses an opportunity to speak about things that matter most to them. These recorded conversations form the basis of a generativity document, which patients can bequeath to individuals of their choosing. Client Centred Care is a supportive psychotherapeutic approach, in which research nurse/therapists guide patients through discussions focusing on here and now issues. Findings No significant differences across study arms

  17. Supported employment: randomised controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M.; Heslin, Margaret; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Rice, Christopher; Jarrett, Manuela; Spokes, Terry; Huxley, Peter; Thornicroft, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence from North American trials that supported employment using the individual placement and support (IPS) model is effective in helping individuals with severe mental illness gain competitive employment. There have been few trials in other parts of the world. Aims To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of IPS in the UK. Method Individuals with severe mental illness in South London were randomised to IPS or local traditional vocational services (treatment as usual) (ISRCTN96677673). Results Two hundred and nineteen participants were randomised, and 90% assessed 1 year later. There were no significant differences between the treatment as usual and intervention groups in obtaining competitive employment (13% in the intervention group and 7% in controls; risk ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.95–1.93, P = 0.15), nor in secondary outcomes. Conclusions There was no evidence that IPS was of significant benefit in achieving competitive employment for individuals in South London at 1-year follow-up, which may reflect suboptimal implementation. Implementation of IPS can be challenging in the UK context where IPS is not structurally integrated with mental health services, and economic disincentives may lead to lower levels of motivation in individuals with severe mental illness and psychiatric professionals. PMID:20435968

  18. Efficacy of agomelatine and escitalopram on depression, subjective sleep and emotional experiences in patients with major depressive disorder: a 24-wk randomized, controlled, double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corruble, Emmanuelle; de Bodinat, Christian; Belaïdi, Carole; Goodwin, Guy M

    2013-11-01

    In the present randomized, controlled, double-blind trial (12 wk treatment plus double-blind extension for 12 wk), 25-50 mg/d agomelatine (n = 164) and 10-20 mg/d escitalopram (n = 160) were compared for short- and long-term efficacy, subjective sleep and tolerability. The effects of these drugs on emotional experiences were also compared in patients having completed the Oxford Questionnaire on the Emotional Side-Effects of Antidepressants (agomelatine: n = 25; escitalopram: n = 20). Agomelatine and escitalopram similarly improved depressive symptoms, with clinically relevant score changes over 12 and 24 wk and notable percentage of remitters (week 12: 60.9 and 54.4%; week 24: 69.6 and 63.1% respectively). Over the 12 and 24-wk treatment periods, the 'global satisfaction on sleep' scores increased in both treatment groups and did not differ between groups. Satisfaction with sleep-wake quality was high in both groups; the 'wellness feeling on waking' was more improved with agomelatine than with escitalopram (p = 0.02). In patients with pronounced sleep complaints, quality of sleep and feeling on waking were significantly more improved with agomelatine than with escitalopram (p = 0.016 and p = 0.009, respectively). Emotional blunting was less frequent on agomelatine than on escitalopram. Indeed, 28% of patients on agomelatine vs. 60% on escitalopram felt that their emotions lacked intensity and 16% of patients on agomelatine vs. 53% on escitalopram felt that things that they cared about before illness did not seem important any more (p = 0.024). The tolerability profile of agomelatine was found to be superior to that of escitalopram and the incidence of patients with at least one emergent adverse event leading to treatment discontinuation was lower in the agomelatine group than in the escitalopram group (5.5 vs. 10.6%). The findings suggest that agomelatine displays additional long-term clinical benefits on sleep-wake quality and emotional experiences over

  19. Clinical trial participants’ experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. Setting The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. Participants The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. Outcomes We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Results Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Conclusions Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in ‘missing’ or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an

  20. Bicycle Rider Control: Observations, Modeling & Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, J.D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Bicycle designers traditionally develop bicycles based on experience and trial and error. Adopting modern engineering tools to model bicycle and rider dynamics and control is another method for developing bicycles. This method has the potential to evaluate the complete design space, and thereby dev

  1. Clinical trial participants' experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-03-24

    To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in 'missing' or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an intervention is a subjective experience, it seems important to create a

  2. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in chronic neck pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. 77 with chronic neck pain who scored > 40 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) were randomized to a nine week Iyengar yoga program with weekly 90-minute classes or to a self-care/exercise program. The primary outcome measure was change of mean pain at rest (VAS) from baseline to week ten. Secondary outcomes included pain at motion, functional disabilit...

  3. Franklin, Lavoisier, and Mesmer: origin of the controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Harry W

    2005-01-01

    In 1784, a Royal Commission headed by Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier designed a series of ingenious experiments to debunk France's greatest medical rogue, Anton Mesmer, and his bizarre healing of illnesses based on his bogus theory of animal magnetism. Using intentional subject ignorance and sham interventions to investigate mesmerism, Franklin's commission provided a model for the controlled clinical trial.

  4. Razors versus clippers. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tracy; Tanner, Judith

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this randomised controlled trial was to determine if patients showed a preference for preoperative hair removal with razors or clippers and to identify if one method was associated with more trauma or postoperative infections. The trial took place in a day surgery unit with patients who were having a range of surgical procedures including hernias and varicose veins. This study was sponsored by an award from the NATN/3M Clinical Fellowship.

  5. Control groups in recent septic shock trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    , and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. RESULTS: A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58......PURPOSE: The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. METHODS: We searched for original articles presenting...... randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics...

  6. Continuity and change?: Exploring reactions to a guided self-management intervention in a randomised controlled trial for IBS with reference to prior experience of managing a long term condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Anne; Lee, Victoria; Kennedy, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Self-care interventions are promoted as effective strategies for improving the quality of life and health outcomes for individuals with long-term health conditions. Outcome measures used in evaluations using Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) are not designed to consider patients' prior management strategies and experience of illness. Yet the experience of illness literature suggests that adjusting to living with chronic illness, together with broader contextual influences, are likely to be relevant to understanding responses to self-management initiatives. Using group and individual interview data we attempt to illuminate the transposition of IBS from a condition unsatisfactorily managed by medicine to one successfully managed within the life worlds of individuals. If routine embedding of complex interventions depends on the accomplishment of integration and workability in patients' everyday lives then the design and evaluation of such interventions should view participation as part of a process of continuity as well as change. Responses to formal self-management can be extended beyond psychological and other quantitatively measured outcomes. A useful addendum to trial outcomes for self-management education is an understanding of change as being inextricably linked to people's previous attempts to, and experience of, managing long-term conditions. We suggest that the benefits of understanding the prior experience of managing illness and contact with health services include the acceptability and workability of complex interventions in patients' everyday lives. PMID:17316438

  7. Placebo-Controlled Trials, Ethics of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, R; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    There are often good scientific and ethical reasons for using placebo controls in clinical trials. At the same time placebo use is controversial, especially when an established effective treatment is being withheld from the control group. This article gives an overview of the key ethical positions

  8. Placebo-Controlled Trials, Ethics of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, R; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    There are often good scientific and ethical reasons for using placebo controls in clinical trials. At the same time placebo use is controversial, especially when an established effective treatment is being withheld from the control group. This article gives an overview of the key ethical positions i

  9. Control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Yunnan province, People's Republic of China: experiences and lessons from a 5-year multi-intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Peter; Yap, Peiling; Utzinger, Jürg; Du, Zun-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Yong; Chen, Ran; Wu, Fang-Wei; Chen, Jia-Xu; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-01-01

    The current global strategy for the control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis emphasises periodic administration of anthelminthic drugs to at-risk populations. However, this approach fails to address the root social and ecological causes of soil-transmitted helminthiasis. For sustainable control, it has been suggested that improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene behaviour are required. We designed a 5-year multi-intervention trial in Menghai county, Yunnan province, People's Republic of China. Three different interventions were implemented, each covering a village inhabited by 200-350 people. The interventions consisted of (i) initial health education at study inception and systematic treatment of all individuals aged ≥2 years once every year with a single dose of albendazole; (ii) initial health education and bi-annual albendazole administration; and (iii) bi-annual treatment coupled with latrine construction at family level and regular health education. Interventions were rigorously implemented for 3 years, whilst the follow-up, which included annual albendazole distribution, lasted for 2 more years. Before the third round of treatment, the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was reduced by only 2.8% in the annual treatment arm, whilst bi-annual deworming combined with latrine construction and health education resulted in a prevalence reduction of 53.3% (p<0.001). All three control approaches significantly reduced the prevalence of Trichuris trichiura and hookworm, with the highest reductions achieved when chemotherapy was combined with sanitation and health education. The prevalence of T. trichiura remained at 30% and above regardless of the intervention. Only bi-annual treatment combined with latrine construction and health education significantly impacted on the prevalence of Taenia spp., but none of the interventions significantly reduced the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis. Our findings support the notion that in high-endemicity areas

  10. Randomized controlled trials - a matter of design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial.

  11. Automating quantum experiment control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kelly E.; Amini, Jason M.; Doret, S. Charles; Mohler, Greg; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.

    2017-03-01

    The field of quantum information processing is rapidly advancing. As the control of quantum systems approaches the level needed for useful computation, the physical hardware underlying the quantum systems is becoming increasingly complex. It is already becoming impractical to manually code control for the larger hardware implementations. In this chapter, we will employ an approach to the problem of system control that parallels compiler design for a classical computer. We will start with a candidate quantum computing technology, the surface electrode ion trap, and build a system instruction language which can be generated from a simple machine-independent programming language via compilation. We incorporate compile time generation of ion routing that separates the algorithm description from the physical geometry of the hardware. Extending this approach to automatic routing at run time allows for automated initialization of qubit number and placement and additionally allows for automated recovery after catastrophic events such as qubit loss. To show that these systems can handle real hardware, we present a simple demonstration system that routes two ions around a multi-zone ion trap and handles ion loss and ion placement. While we will mainly use examples from transport-based ion trap quantum computing, many of the issues and solutions are applicable to other architectures.

  12. The Hawthorne Effect: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Haselen Robbert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Hawthorne Effect' may be an important factor affecting the generalisability of clinical research to routine practice, but has been little studied. Hawthorne Effects have been reported in previous clinical trials in dementia but to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to quantify them. Our aim was to compare minimal follow-up to intensive follow-up in participants in a placebo controlled trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia. Methods Participants in a dementia trial were randomised to intensive follow-up (with comprehensive assessment visits at baseline and two, four and six months post randomisation or minimal follow-up (with an abbreviated assessment at baseline and a full assessment at six months. Our primary outcomes were cognitive functioning (ADAS-Cog and participant and carer-rated quality of life (QOL-AD. Results We recruited 176 participants, mainly through general practices. The main analysis was based on Intention to treat (ITT, with available data. In the ANCOVA model with baseline score as a co-variate, follow-up group had a significant effect on outcome at six months on the ADAS-Cog score (n = 140; mean difference = -2.018; 95%CI -3.914, -0.121; p = 0.037 favouring the intensive follow-up group, and on participant-rated quality of life score (n = 142; mean difference = -1.382; 95%CI -2.642, -0.122; p = 0.032 favouring minimal follow-up group. There was no significant difference on carer quality of life. Conclusion We found that more intensive follow-up of individuals in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia resulted in a better outcome than minimal follow-up, as measured by their cognitive functioning. Trial registration Current controlled trials: ISRCTN45577048

  13. CLinical experience acquired with the efalizumab (Raptiva) (CLEAR) trial in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis: results from a phase III international randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubertret, L; Sterry, W; Bos, J D; Chimenti, S; Shumack, S; Larsen, C G; Shear, N H; Papp, K A

    2006-07-01

    Efalizumab (anti-CD11a), a humanized monoclonal antibody, blocks multiple T-cell-dependent functions implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, including T-cell activation, migration to the skin, reactivation in psoriatic skin and interactions with keratinocytes. This multinational, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of subcutaneous efalizumab 1.0 mg kg-1 once weekly for 12 weeks compared with placebo in a population that included high-need patients, defined as those for whom at least two systemic therapies were unsuitable because of lack of efficacy, intolerance or contraindication. Patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis [involvement of >or=10% of total body surface area and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI)>or=12.0 at screening] were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive efalizumab or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving >or=75% PASI improvement (PASI-75 response) at week 12 in the intention-to-treat population; secondary endpoints included changes in PASI, static Physician's Global Assessment, Physician's Global Assessment of change from baseline and percentage of body surface area affected. Results We enrolled 793 patients (529 received efalizumab and 264 placebo), including 526 high-need patients (342 received efalizumab and 184 placebo). Week 12 PASI-75 rates were 29.5% for efalizumab compared with 2.7% for placebo among high-need patients (Pgeneral moderate-to-severe psoriasis patient population. In view of its demonstrated efficacy and safety profile, efalizumab represents a valuable option for the treatment of adult patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, including high-need patients.

  14. Effects of Pre-Trial Response Requirements on Self-Control Choices by Rats and Pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Parallel experiments with rats and pigeons examined whether the size of a pre-trial ratio requirement would affect choices in a self-control situation. In different conditions, either 1 response or 40 responses were required before each trial. In the first half of each experiment, an adjusting-ratio schedule was used, in which subjects could…

  15. Clobazam: uncontrolled and standard controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, T A; Amin, M M

    1979-01-01

    1 In an uncontrolled clinical trial, carried out in 11 psychiatric patients with the clinical diagnoses of anxiety neurosis and depressive neurosis, clobazam, a new benzodiazepine preparation, in the dosage range 10-60 mg daily produced statistically significant improvement in the total and both factor scores of the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A). The lowest mean total HAM-A scores occurred with a mean clobazam dosage of 48 mg daily. 2 Results of the uncontrolled clinical trial were further substantiated in a standard-controlled clinical study in which no statistically significant difference between the therapeutic effectiveness of clobazam and diazepam could be revealed. The lowest mean total HAM-A scores occurred with a mean clobazam dosage of 49 mg daily. There was a lower incidence of adverse effects reported in patients receiving clobazam than in those taking the control drug (diazepam).

  16. From the Experience of Interactivity and Entertainment to Lower Intention to Smoke: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Path Analysis of a Web-Based Smoking Prevention Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Calabro, Karen Sue; Mitra, Natasha; Shegog, Ross

    2017-01-01

    Background Web-based programs for smoking prevention are being increasingly used with some success among adolescents. However, little is known about the mechanisms that link the experience of such programs to intended nicotine or tobacco control outcomes. Objective Based on the experiential learning theory and extended elaboration likelihood model, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a Web-based intervention, A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience (ASPIRE), on adolescents’ intention to smoke, while considering the experience of interactivity and entertainment as predictors of reduced intention to smoke, under a transitional user experience model. Methods A total of 101 adolescents were recruited from after-school programs, provided consent, screened, and randomized in a single-blinded format to 1 of 2 conditions: the full ASPIRE program as the experimental condition (n=50) or an online , text-based version of ASPIRE as the control condition (n=51). Data were collected at baseline and immediate follow-up. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models and path analyses were conducted. Results A total of 82 participants completed the study and were included in the analysis. Participants in the experimental condition were more likely to show a decrease in their intention to smoke than those in the control condition (beta=−0.18, P=.008). Perceived interactivity (beta=−0.27, P=.004) and entertainment (beta=−0.20, P=.04) were each associated with a decrease in intention to smoke independently. Results of path analyses indicated that perceived interactivity and perceived entertainment mediated the relationship between ASPIRE use and emotional involvement. Furthermore, perceived presence mediated the relationship between perceived interactivity and emotional involvement. There was a direct relationship between perceived entertainment and emotional involvement. Emotional involvement predicted a decrease in intention to smoke (beta=−0.16, P=.04). Conclusions

  17. Establishing the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and student experience of a Simulation-based education Training program On the Prevention of Falls (STOP-Falls) among hospitalised inpatients: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cylie; Bowles, Kelly-Ann; Kiegaldie, Debra; Maloney, Stephen; Nestel, Debra; Kaplonyi, Jessica; Haines, Terry

    2016-06-02

    Simulation-based education (SBE) is now commonly used across health professional disciplines to teach a range of skills. The evidence base supporting the effectiveness of this approach for improving patient health outcomes is relatively narrow, focused mainly on the development of procedural skills. However, there are other simulation approaches used to support non-procedure specific skills that are in need of further investigation. This cluster, cross-over randomised controlled trial with a concurrent economic evaluation (cost per fall prevented) trial will evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and student experience of health professional students undertaking simulation training for the prevention of falls among hospitalised inpatients. This research will target the students within the established undergraduate student placements of Monash University medicine, nursing and allied health across Peninsula Health acute and subacute inpatient wards. The intervention will train the students in how to provide the Safe Recovery program, the only single intervention approach demonstrated to reduce falls in hospitals. This will involve redevelopment of the Safe Recovery program into a one-to-many participant SBE program, so that groups of students learn the communication skills and falls prevention knowledge necessary for delivery of the program. The primary outcome of this research will be patient falls across participating inpatient wards, with secondary outcomes including student satisfaction with the SBE and knowledge gain, ward-level practice change and cost of acute/rehabilitation care for each patient measured using clinical costing data. The Human Research Ethics Committees of Peninsula Health (LRR/15/PH/11) and Monash University (CF15/3523-2015001384) have approved this research. The participant information and consent forms provide information on privacy, storage of results and dissemination. Registration of this trial has been completed with the

  18. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. Methods A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Results Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the...

  19. Dealing with daily challenges in dementia (deal-id study): effectiveness of the experience sampling method intervention 'Partner in Sight' for spousal caregivers of people with dementia: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Knippenberg, Rosalia J M; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Ponds, Rudolf W; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Verhey, Frans R J

    2016-05-11

    There is an urgent need for psychosocial interventions that effectively support dementia caregivers in daily life. The Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM) offers the possibility to provide a more dynamic view of caregiver functioning. ESM-derived feedback may help to redirect caregivers' behavior towards situations that elicit positive emotions and to increase their feelings of competence in the caretaking process. This paper presents the design of a study that evaluates the process characteristics and effects of the ESM-based intervention 'Partner in Sight'. A randomized controlled trial with 90 spousal caregivers of people with dementia will be conducted. Participants will be randomly assigned to the experimental (6-week ESM intervention including feedback), pseudo-experimental (6-week ESM intervention without feedback), or control group (care as usual). Assessments will be performed pre- and post-intervention and at 2-, and 6-month follow-up. Main outcomes will be sense of competence, perceived control, momentary positive affect, and psychological complaints (depressive symptoms, perceived stress, anxiety, momentary negative affect). In addition to the effect evaluation, a process and economic evaluation will be conducted to investigate the credibility and generalizability of the intervention, and its cost-effectiveness. The potential effects of the ESM intervention may help caregivers to endure their care responsibilities and prevent them from becoming overburdened. This is the first ESM intervention for caregivers of people with dementia. The results of this study, therefore, provide a valuable contribution to the growing knowledge on m-health interventions for dementia caregivers. Dutch Trial Register NTR4847 ; date registered Oct 9, 2014.

  20. Experiences of Parents with the Reading to Learn Approach: A Randomised Control Trial Initiative to Improve Literacy and Numeracy in Kenya and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuya, Benta A.; Oketch, Moses; Ngware, Moses W.; Mutisya, Maurice; Musyoka, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Parental involvement in their children's schooling is in recognition that establishing the context in which a child attends school is important. Reading to Learn (RtL)was implemented in two districts of Kwale and Kinango in Kenya and of Amolatar and Dokolo in Uganda. This paper looks at parental involvement and their experiences with RtL. Data are…

  1. Randomised controlled trials: important but overrated?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boylan, J F

    2012-02-01

    Practising physicians individualise treatments, hoping to achieve optimal outcomes by tackling relevant patient variables. The randomised controlled trial (RCT) is universally accepted as the best means of comparison. Yet doctors sometimes wonder if particular patients might benefit more from treatments that fared worse in the RCT comparisons. Such clinicians may even feel ostracised by their peers for stepping outside treatments based on RCTs and guidelines. Are RCTs the only acceptable evaluations of how patient care can be assessed and delivered? In this controversy we explore the interpretation of RCT data for practising clinicians facing individualised patient choices. First, critical care anaesthetists John Boylan and Brian Kavanagh emphasise the dangers of bias and show how Bayesian approaches utilise prior probabilities to improve posterior (combined) probability estimates. Secondly, Jane Armitage, of the Clinical Trial Service Unit in Oxford, argues why RCTs remain essential and explores how the quality of randomisation can be improved through systematic reviews and by avoiding selective reporting.

  2. Experiences and Perceptions of Problem Gamblers on Cognitive and Exposure Therapies When Taking Part in a Randomised Controlled Trial: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David; Pols, Rene; Lavis, Tiffany; Battersby, Malcolm; Harvey, Peter

    2016-12-01

    In South Australia (SA) problem gambling is mainly a result of the widespread availability of electronic gaming machines. A key treatment provider in SA offers free cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) to help-seeking problem gamblers. The CBT program focuses on the treatment of clients' urge to gamble using exposure therapy (ET) and cognitive therapy (CT) to restructure erroneous gambling beliefs. The aim of this study was to explore treatment specific and non-specific effects for CT alone and ET alone using qualitative interviews. Interviewees were a sub-sample of participants from a randomised trial that investigated the relative efficacy of CT versus ET. Findings revealed that all interviewees gained benefit from their respective therapies and their comments did not appear to favour one therapy over another. Both treatment specific and treatment non-specific effects were well supported as playing a therapeutic role to recovery. Participants' comments in both therapy groups suggested that symptom reduction was experienced on a gambling related urge-cognition continuum. In addition to symptom improvement from therapy-specific mechanisms, ET participants described a general acquisition of "rational thought" from their program of therapy and CT participants had "taken-over" their gambling urges. The findings also highlighted areas for further improvement including therapy drop-out.

  3. Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-F) will evaluate, for the first time in a space environment, the performance of a feedback-controlled variable conductance heat pipe and a heat pipe thermal diode. In addition, the temperature control aspects of a phase-change material (PCM) will be demonstrated. The methanol/stainless steel feedback-controlled heat pipe uses helium control gas that is stored in a wicked reservoir. This reservoir is electrically heated through a solid state controller that senses the temperature of the heat source directly. The ammonia/stainless steel diode heat pipe uses excess liquid to block heat transfer in the reverse direction. The PCM is octadecane. Design tradeoffs, fabrication problems, and performance during qualification and flight acceptance tests are discussed.

  4. Developing and evaluating interventions to reduce inappropriate prescribing by general practitioners of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections: A randomised controlled trial to compare paper-based and web-based modelling experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan Frank

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much implementation research is focused on full-scale trials with little evidence of preceding modelling work. The Medical Research Council Framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions has argued for more and better theoretical and exploratory work prior to a trial as a means of improving intervention development. Intervention modelling experiments (IMEs are a way of exploring and refining an intervention before moving to a full-scale trial. They do this by delivering key elements of the intervention in a simulation that approximates clinical practice by, for example, presenting general practitioners (GPs with a clinical scenario about making a treatment decision. Methods The current proposal will run a full, web-based IME involving 250 GPs that will advance the methodology of IMEs by directly comparing results with an earlier paper-based IME. Moreover, the web-based IME will evaluate an intervention that can be put into a full-scale trial that aims to reduce antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections in primary care. The study will also include a trial of email versus postal invitations to participate. Discussion More effective behaviour change interventions are needed and this study will develop one such intervention and a system to model and test future interventions. This system will be applicable to any situation in the National Health Service where behaviour needs to be modified, including interventions aimed directly at the public. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT01206738

  5. Diagnostic randomized controlled trials: the final frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Marc; Ramsay, Tim; Fergusson, Dean

    2012-08-16

    Clinicians, patients, governments, third-party payers, and the public take for granted that diagnostic tests are accurate, safe and effective. However, we may be seriously misled if we are relying on robust study design to ensure accurate, safe, and effective diagnostic tests. Properly conducted, randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for assessing the effectiveness and safety of interventions, yet are rarely conducted in the assessment of diagnostic tests. Instead, diagnostic cohort studies are commonly performed to assess the characteristics of a diagnostic test including sensitivity and specificity. While diagnostic cohort studies can inform us about the relative accuracy of an experimental diagnostic intervention compared to a reference standard, they do not inform us about whether the differences in accuracy are clinically important, or the degree of clinical importance (in other words, the impact on patient outcomes). In this commentary we provide the advantages of the diagnostic randomized controlled trial and suggest a greater awareness and uptake in their conduct. Doing so will better ensure that patients are offered diagnostic procedures that will make a clinical difference.

  6. Recent randomized controlled trials in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banglawala, Sarfaraz M; Lawrence, Lauren A; Franko-Tobin, Emily; Soler, Zachary M; Schlosser, Rodney J; Ioannidis, John

    2015-03-01

    To assess recent trends in the prevalence and quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in 4 otolaryngology journals. Methodology and reporting analysis. Randomized controlled trials in 4 otolaryngology journals. All RCTs published from 2011 to 2013 in 4 major otolaryngology journals were examined for characteristics of study design, quality of design and reporting, and funding. Of 5279 articles published in 4 leading otolaryngology journals from 2011 to 2013, 189 (3.3%) were RCTs. The majority of RCTs were clinical studies (86%), with the largest proportion consisting of sinonasal topics (31%). Most interventions were medical (46%), followed by surgical (38%) and mixed (16%). In terms of quality, randomization method was reported in 54% of RCTs, blinding in 33%, and adverse events in 65%. Intention-to-treat analysis was used in 32%; P values were reported in 87% and confidence intervals in 10%. Research funding was most often absent or not reported (55%), followed by not-for-profit (25%). Based on review of 4 otolaryngology journals, RCTs are still a small proportion of all published studies in the field of otolaryngology. There seem to be trends toward improvement in quality of design and reporting of RCTs, although many quality features remain suboptimal. Practitioners both designing and interpreting RCTs should critically evaluate RCTs for quality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  7. Impact of Length or Relevance of Questionnaires on Attrition in Online Trials: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; White, Ian R; Khadjesari, Zarnie; Murray, Elizabeth; Linke, Stuart; Thompson, Simon G; Godfrey, Christine; Wallace, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been limited study of factors influencing response rates and attrition in online research. Online experiments were nested within the pilot (study 1, n = 3780) and main trial (study 2, n = 2667) phases of an evaluation of a Web-based intervention for hazardous drinkers: the Down Your Drink randomized controlled trial (DYD-RCT). Objectives The objective was to determine whether differences in the length and relevance of questionnaires can impact upon loss to follow-up in online trials. Methods A randomized controlled trial design was used. All participants who consented to enter DYD-RCT and completed the primary outcome questionnaires were randomized to complete one of four secondary outcome questionnaires at baseline and at follow-up. These questionnaires varied in length (additional 23 or 34 versus 10 items) and relevance (alcohol problems versus mental health). The outcome measure was the proportion of participants who completed follow-up at each of two follow-up intervals: study 1 after 1 and 3 months and study 2 after 3 and 12 months. Results At all four follow-up intervals there were no significant effects of additional questionnaire length on follow-up. Randomization to the less relevant questionnaire resulted in significantly lower rates of follow-up in two of the four assessments made (absolute difference of 4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0%-8%, in both study 1 after 1 month and in study 2 after 12 months). A post hoc pooled analysis across all four follow-up intervals found this effect of marginal statistical significance (unadjusted difference, 3%, range 1%-5%, P = .01; difference adjusted for prespecified covariates, 3%, range 0%-5%, P = .05). Conclusions Apparently minor differences in study design decisions may have a measurable impact on attrition in trials. Further investigation is warranted of the impact of the relevance of outcome measures on follow-up rates and, more broadly, of the consequences of what we ask participants to

  8. Increasing recruitment to randomised trials: a review of randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgerson David J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor recruitment to randomised controlled trials (RCTs is a widespread and important problem. With poor recruitment being such an important issue with respect to the conduct of randomised trials, a systematic review of controlled trials on recruitment methods was undertaken in order to identify strategies that are effective. Methods We searched the register of trials in Cochrane library from 1996 to end of 2004. We also searched Web of Science for 2004. Additional trials were identified from personal knowledge. Included studies had to use random allocation and participants had to be allocated to different methods of recruitment to a 'real' randomised trial. Trials that randomised participants to 'mock' trials and trials of recruitment to non-randomised studies (e.g., case control studies were excluded. Information on the study design, intervention and control, and number of patients recruited was extracted by the 2 authors. Results We identified 14 papers describing 20 different interventions. Effective interventions included: telephone reminders; questionnaire inclusion; monetary incentives; using an 'open' rather than placebo design; and making trial materials culturally sensitive. Conclusion Few trials have been undertaken to test interventions to improve trial recruitment. There is an urgent need for more RCTs of recruitment strategies.

  9. Randomized controlled trials of COX-2 inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; De Bruin, Marie L; Knol, Mirjam J

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naproxen, ibuprofen and diclofenac are frequently used as comparators in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the safety and efficacy of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors. Different comparator doses may influence the results of RCTs. It has been hypothesized that RCTs of COX-2...... 1995 and 2009 in which celecoxib or rofecoxib were compared with naproxen, ibuprofen or diclofenac. All articles labelled as RCTs mentioning rofecoxib or celecoxib and one or more of the comparator drugs in the title and/or abstract were included. We extracted information on doses of both non...... dose trends in the case of rofecoxib. CONCLUSIONS: Although the dose trends over time differed for RCTs comparing rofecoxib and celecoxib with diclofenac, ibuprofen or naproxen, the results of our study do not support the hypothesis that dose trends influenced the decision to continue marketing...

  10. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, pUnilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing adoptive parenting: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Alan; Monck, Elizabeth; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Sharac, Jessica

    2010-10-01

    The aim was to conduct a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate two parenting programmes designed for adopters of children late placed from care. Adoptive parents, with children between 3 and 8 years who were screened to have serious behavioural problems early in the placement, participated in home-based, manualized, parenting programmes delivered by trained and supervised family social workers. The adopters who agreed to join the study were randomly allocated to one of two parenting interventions or to a "services as usual" group. Baseline, immediate post-intervention and six-month follow-ups were assessed using questionnaires and adopter interviews. No cases were lost to follow-up at any point and satisfaction was high with both parenting interventions. At the six-month follow-up, a significant difference (p parenting" in favour of the intervention group (Effect Size d = 0.7). Negative parenting approaches were reduced in the intervention group. However, no significant differences in child problems were found between the intervention groups and control group, adjusting for baseline scores. Costs analysis showed that a relatively modest investment in post-adoption support would be well spent in improving adopters' satisfaction with parenting in the intervention group compared to the routine service group.

  12. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  13. ORCHIDS: an Observational Randomized Controlled Trial on Childhood Differential Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhangur Rabia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes. However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-environment interactions to obtain more insight into a moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-environment interactions in an experimental design. Methods/Design The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training. In a screening, families with children aged 4–8 who show mild to (subclinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest, after 6 months (i.e., posttest, and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up. Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and

  14. A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy, Safety and Cost Effectiveness of ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Pharmacological control of pain is the mainstay of management of osteoarthritis.

  15. [Placebo control and clinical trial of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing

    2010-10-01

    World Health Organization aims to develop safe, effective and practical traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and other complementary and alternative medicine are being recognized in the whole world nowadays. However, the definite effect of Chinese medicine is still in need of scientific research proof. Placebo control is of equal importance to active control and blank control in clinical trial of TCM. This article briefly reviewed the importance of placebo control and commented on its present situation in clinical trial of TCM. This article also brought up the preliminary proposals of placebo application in TCM clinical trial. We should emphasize scientific placebo preparation and good design of placebo-controlled trial, which are directed by International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. A good clinical trial project will avoid unnecessary wastes and provide safe and effective treatment for people.

  16. Comparison communities in a cluster randomised trial innovate in response to 'being controlled'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawe, Penelope; Riley, Therese; Gartrell, Alexandra; Turner, Karen; Canales, Claudia; Omstead, Darlene

    2015-05-01

    We conducted qualitative interviews among primary health care teams and community agencies in eight communities in Victoria, Australia which had (1) agreed to be part of a universal primary care and community development intervention to reduce post natal depression and promote maternal health; and (2) were randomised to the comparison arm. The purpose was to document their experience with and interpretation of the trial. Although 'control' in a controlled trial refers to the control of confounding of the trial result by factors other than allocation to the intervention, participants interpreted 'control' to mean restrictions on what they were allowed to do during the trial period. They had agreed not to use the Edinburgh Post Natal Depression Scale or the SF 36 in clinical practice and not to implement any of the elements of the intervention. We found that no elements of the intervention were implemented. However, the extension of the trial from three to five years made the trial agreement a strain. The imposition of trial conditions also encouraged a degree of lateral thinking and innovation in service delivery (quality improvement). This may have potentially contributed to the null trial results. The observations invite interrogation of intervention theory and consequent rethinking of the way contamination in a cluster trial is defined.

  17. Pragmatic design in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgato, M; Barbui, C; Stroup, S; Adams, C

    2015-01-01

    At more than 10 years after the paper by Hotopf and colleagues regarding pragmatic trials in psychiatry, the field has evolved and is evolving further. There have been many developments in our understanding of what pragmatism really means, and excellent examples of truly pragmatic trials in psychiatry are currently available. Funders have helped encourage more emphasis on the need for such studies, but 'local' and trans-national regulations could help more. Consumers of the evidence should have a greater voice in generating the research agenda and, as this happens, the questions generated are more likely to be answered by a pragmatic approach to trials.

  18. Special features of health services and register based trialsexperiences from a randomized trial of childbirth classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevón Tiina

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluating complex interventions in health services faces various difficulties, such as making practice changes and costs. Ways to increase research capacity and decrease costs include making research an integral part of health services and using routine data to judge outcomes. The purpose of this article is to report the feasibility of a pilot trial relying solely on routinely collected register data and being based on ordinary health services. Methods The example intervention was education to public health nurses (PHN (childbirth classes to reduce caesarean section rates via pre-delivery considerations of pregnant women. 20 maternity health centers (MHC were paired and of each 10 pairs, one MHC was randomly allocated to an intervention group and the other to a control; 8 pairs with successful intervention were used in the analyses (1601 mothers. The women visiting to the study maternity centers were identified from the Customer Register of Helsinki City. A list of the study women was made using the mother's personal identification number, visit date, the maternity center code, birth date and gestation length. The mode of delivery and health outcomes were retrieved from the Finnish Medical Birth Register (MBR. Process data of the intervention are based on observations, written feedback and questionnaires from PHNs, and project correspondence. Results It took almost two years to establish how to obtain permissions and to actually obtain it for the trial. Obtaining permissions for the customer and outcome data and register linkages was unproblematic and the cluster randomization provided comparable groups. The intervention did not succeed well. Had the main aim of the trial been to cause a change in PHNs behavior, we would have very likely intensified the intervention during the trial. Conclusion Our experiences encourage the use of trials that obtain their outcomes from registers. Changing the behavior of ordinary health

  19. Challenges of randomized controlled trial design in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Aladdin H; Herrera, Fernando A; Hassanein, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials are the gold standard of evidence-based medicine. In the field of plastic surgery, designing these studies is much more challenging than in pharmaceutical medicine. Randomized trials in plastic surgery encompass several road blocks including problems shared with other surgical trials: equipoise, high cost, placebo issues and learning curves following the establishment of a novel approach. In addition, plastic surgery has more subjective outcomes, thus making study design even more difficult in assessing the end result.

  20. Analysis of scientific truth status in controlled rehabilitation trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Roger; Madouasse, Aurélien; Arthur, Antony; Mumford, Stephen D

    2013-08-01

    Systematic reviews, meta-analyses and clinical guidelines (reviews) are intended to inform clinical practice, and in this sense can be thought of as scientific truthmakers. High-quality controlled trials should align to this truth, and method quality markers should predict truth status. We sought to determine in what way controlled trial quality relates to scientific truth, and to determine predictive utility of trial quality and bibliographic markers. A sample of reviews in rehabilitation medicine was examined. Two scientific truth dimensions were established based on review outcomes. Quality and bibliographic markers were extracted from associated trials for use in a regression analysis of their predictive utility for trial truth status. Probability analysis was undertaken to examine judgments of future trial truth status. Of the 93 trials included in contemporaneous reviews, overall, n = 45 (48%) were true. Randomization was found more in true trials than false trials in one truth dimension (P = 0.03). Intention-to-treat analysis was close to significant in one truth dimension (P = 0.058), being more commonly used in false trials. There were no other significant differences in quality or bibliographic variables between true and false trials. Regression analysis revealed no significant predictors of trial truth status. Probability analysis reported that the reasonable chance of future trials being true was between 2 and 5%, based on a uniform prior. The findings are at odds with what is considered gold-standard research methods, but in line with previous reports. Further work should focus on scientific dynamics within healthcare research and evidence-based practice constructs. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Clinical Research Methodology 3: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Imrey, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Randomized assignment of treatment excludes reverse causation and selection bias and, in sufficiently large studies, effectively prevents confounding. Well-implemented blinding prevents measurement bias. Studies that include these protections are called randomized, blinded clinical trials and, when conducted with sufficient numbers of patients, provide the most valid results. Although conceptually straightforward, design of clinical trials requires thoughtful trade-offs among competing approaches-all of which influence the number of patients required, enrollment time, internal and external validity, ability to evaluate interactions among treatments, and cost.

  2. Design and Validity of Randomized Controlled Dental Restorative Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Göstemeyer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evidence stemming from trials on restorative materials is shaped not only by trial findings, but also trial design and validity. We aimed to evaluate both aspects in randomized controlled dental restorative trials published from 2005–2015. Methods: Using systematic review methodology, we retrieved trials comparing restorative or adhesive dental materials. Two authors independently assessed design, risk of bias, registration status, and findings of trials. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Results: 114 studies on 15,321 restorations placed mainly in permanent teeth of 5232 patients were included. Per trial, the median number of patients was 37 (25th/75th percentiles: 30/51. Follow-up was 24 (20/48 months. Seventeen percent of trials reported on sample size calculations, 2% had been registered. Most trials (90% used US Public Health Service (USPHS criteria, and had a high risk of bias. More recent trials were more likely to have been registered, to have reported on sample size calculations, to be of low risk of bias, and to use other than USPHS-criteria. Twenty-three percent of trials yielded significant differences between groups. The likelihood of such differences was significantly increased in older studies, studies with potential reporting bias, published in journals with high impact factor (>2, longer follow-up periods, and not using USPHS-criteria. Conclusions: The majority of dental restorative trials published from 2005–2015 had limited validity. Risk of bias decreased in more recent trials. Future trials should aim for high validity, be registered, and use defined and appropriate sample sizes, follow-up periods, and outcome measures.

  3. Subgroup analyses in randomised controlled trials: cohort study on trial protocols and journal publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; von Elm, Erik; You, John; Blümle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ebrahim, Shanil; Vandvik, Per O; Johnston, Bradley C; Walter, Martin A; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G; Bucher, Heiner C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Briel, Matthias

    2014-07-16

    To investigate the planning of subgroup analyses in protocols of randomised controlled trials and the agreement with corresponding full journal publications. Cohort of protocols of randomised controlled trial and subsequent full journal publications. Six research ethics committees in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. 894 protocols of randomised controlled trial involving patients approved by participating research ethics committees between 2000 and 2003 and 515 subsequent full journal publications. Of 894 protocols of randomised controlled trials, 252 (28.2%) included one or more planned subgroup analyses. Of those, 17 (6.7%) provided a clear hypothesis for at least one subgroup analysis, 10 (4.0%) anticipated the direction of a subgroup effect, and 87 (34.5%) planned a statistical test for interaction. Industry sponsored trials more often planned subgroup analyses compared with investigator sponsored trials (195/551 (35.4%) v 57/343 (16.6%), P<0.001). Of 515 identified journal publications, 246 (47.8%) reported at least one subgroup analysis. In 81 (32.9%) of the 246 publications reporting subgroup analyses, authors stated that subgroup analyses were prespecified, but this was not supported by 28 (34.6%) corresponding protocols. In 86 publications, authors claimed a subgroup effect, but only 36 (41.9%) corresponding protocols reported a planned subgroup analysis. Subgroup analyses are insufficiently described in the protocols of randomised controlled trials submitted to research ethics committees, and investigators rarely specify the anticipated direction of subgroup effects. More than one third of statements in publications of randomised controlled trials about subgroup prespecification had no documentation in the corresponding protocols. Definitive judgments regarding credibility of claimed subgroup effects are not possible without access to protocols and analysis plans of randomised controlled trials. © The DISCO study group 2014.

  4. Effect of diclofenac suppository on pain control during flexible cystoscopy-A randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Ather, M Hammad

    2016-01-01

    TRIAL DESIGN: To compare the difference in pain score during flexible cystoscopy between patients undergoing the procedure with plain lubricating gel only and plain gel with diclofenac suppository in a randomized control trial. METHODS...

  5. Acupucture as pain relief during delivery - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lissa; Wurlitzer, Winnie; Hedegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many women need some kind of analgesic treatment to relieve pain during childbirth. The objective of our study was to compare the effect of acupuncture with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and traditional analgesics for pain relief and relaxation during delivery...... with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain...... with the intention-to-treat principle. Results: Use of pharmacological and invasive methods was significantly lower in the acupuncture group (acupuncture vs traditional, p acupuncture vs TENS, p = 0.031). Pain scores were comparable. Acupuncture did not influence the duration of labor or the use of oxytocin...

  6. Acupuncture as pain relief during delivery: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lissa; Wurlitzer, Winnie; Hedegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many women need some kind of analgesic treatment to relieve pain during childbirth. The objective of our study was to compare the effect of acupuncture with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) and traditional analgesics for pain relief and relaxation during delivery...... with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain...... with the intention-to-treat principle. RESULTS: Use of pharmacological and invasive methods was significantly lower in the acupuncture group (acupuncture vs traditional, p acupuncture vs TENS, p = 0.031). Pain scores were comparable. Acupuncture did not influence the duration of labor or the use of oxytocin...

  7. Reported challenges in nurse-led randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang Vedelø, Tina; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    , nursing research, nursing, research, challenges, barriers, nurse's role, nurse attitude, attitude of health personnel. Findings: The literature on reported challenges and barriers between 1999 and 2009 showed that the most often experienced problems were (i) sufficient patient recruitment, (ii......Aims: The purpose of this integrative literature review was to explore and discuss the methodological challenges nurse researchers report after conducting nurse-led randomised controlled trials in clinical hospital settings. Our research questions were (i) what are the most commonly experienced...... and the clinical nursing staff. Two lessons learned from this integrative review can be highlighted. First, we recommend researchers openly to share their experiences of barriers and challenges. They should describe factors that may have inhibited the desired outcome. Second, efforts to improve the collaboration...

  8. Decreasing the Proportion of Self-Control Trials during the Acquisition Period Does Not Compromise the Learning Advantages in a Self-Controlled Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jae T.; Carter, Michael; Sanli, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment examined the learning effects of participants self-controlling their receipt of knowledge of results (KR) on all or half of their acquisition trials (50%). For participants who were provided 50% self-control, the first half of their acquisition period consisted of receiving KR on all trials, or according to a faded-KR…

  9. Real time digital control and controlled structures experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael J.; Knowles, Gareth J.; Rauch, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs covering the following topics are given: controlled structures technology at Grumman Corporate Research Center, active and passive control technology, experiment plans, and vacuum chamber test experiment objectives and setup.

  10. Sexual assault resistance education for university women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (SARE trial)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senn, Charlene Y; Eliasziw, Misha; Barata, Paula C; Thurston, Wilfreda E; Newby-Clark, Ian R; Radtke, H Lorraine; Hobden, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether a novel, small-group sexual assault resistance education program can reduce the incidence of sexual assault among university...

  11. Hallucination focused integrative treatment : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, JA; Nienhuis, FJ; Wiersma, D; van de Willige, G

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in psychopathology, subjective burden, and coping with voices after hallucination focused integrative treatment (HIT) were studied in chronic schizophrenic patients with persistent (> 10 years), drug-refractory auditory hallucinations. In a randomized controlled trial, routine care was

  12. The ethics of placebo-controlled trials: methodological justifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millum, Joseph; Grady, Christine

    2013-11-01

    The use of placebo controls in clinical trials remains controversial. Ethical analysis and international ethical guidance permit the use of placebo controls in randomized trials when scientifically indicated in four cases: (1) when there is no proven effective treatment for the condition under study; (2) when withholding treatment poses negligible risks to participants; (3) when there are compelling methodological reasons for using placebo, and withholding treatment does not pose a risk of serious harm to participants; and, more controversially, (4) when there are compelling methodological reasons for using placebo, and the research is intended to develop interventions that can be implemented in the population from which trial participants are drawn, and the trial does not require participants to forgo treatment they would otherwise receive. The concept of methodological reasons is essential to assessing the ethics of placebo controls in these controversial last two cases. This article sets out key considerations relevant to considering whether methodological reasons for a placebo control are compelling.

  13. Qigong and Fibromyalgia: Randomized Controlled Trials and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Jana Sawynok; Mary Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6–8 weeks) produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pai...

  14. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  15. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-a receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-a receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  16. Evaluating traditional Chinese medicine using modern clinical trial design and statistical methodology: application to a randomized controlled acupuncture trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Lixing; Huang, Yi; Feng, Chiguang; Berman, Brian M; Tan, Ming T

    2012-03-30

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), used in China and other Asian counties for thousands of years, is increasingly utilized in Western countries. However, due to inherent differences in how Western medicine and this ancient modality are practiced, employing the so-called Western medicine-based gold standard research methods to evaluate TCM is challenging. This paper is a discussion of the obstacles inherent in the design and statistical analysis of clinical trials of TCM. It is based on our experience in designing and conducting a randomized controlled clinical trial of acupuncture for post-operative dental pain control in which acupuncture was shown to be statistically and significantly better than placebo in lengthening the median survival time to rescue drug. We demonstrate here that PH assumptions in the common Cox model did not hold in that trial and that TCM trials warrant more thoughtful modeling and more sophisticated models of statistical analysis. TCM study design entails all the challenges encountered in trials of drugs, devices, and surgical procedures in the Western medicine. We present possible solutions to some but leave many issues unresolved.

  17. Impact of industry collaboration on randomised controlled trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Anne; Yang, Annie; Roper, Nitin; Whitaker, Evans; Korenstein, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    Industry funders can simply provide money or collaborate in trial design, analysis or reporting of clinical trials. Our aim was to assess the impact of industry collaboration on trial methodology and results of randomised controlled trials (RCT). We searched PubMed for oncology RCTs published May 2013 to December 2015 in peer-reviewed journals with impact factor > 5 requiring reporting of funder role. Two authors extracted methodologic (primary end-point; blinding of the patient, clinician and outcomes assessor; and analysis) and outcome data. We used descriptive statistics and two-sided Fisher exact tests to compare characteristics of trials with collaboration, with industry funding only, and without industry funding. We included 224 trials. Compared to those without industry funding, trials with collaboration used more placebo control (RR 3·59, 95% CI [1·88-6·83], p industry collaboration were more likely to use some high-quality methods than those without industry funding, with similar rates of positive results. Our findings suggest that collaboration is not associated with trial outcomes and that mandatory disclosure of funder roles may mitigate bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Goode, Jackie; Drabble, Sarah J; Thomas, Kate J; Rudolph, Anne; Hewison, Jenny

    2014-06-09

    Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the trial, explaining how it solved problems at the pretrial stage, explained findings, and helped to increase the utility of the evidence generated by the trial. From the interviews, we identified three models of relationship of the qualitative research to the trial. In 'the peripheral' model, the trial was an opportunity to undertake qualitative research, with no intention that it would add value to the trial. In 'the add-on' model, the qualitative researcher understood the potential value of the qualitative research but it was viewed as a separate and complementary endeavour by the trial lead investigator and wider team. Interviewees described how this could limit the value of the qualitative research to the trial. Finally 'the integral' model played out in two ways. In 'integral-in-theory' studies, the lead investigator viewed the qualitative research as essential to the trial. However, in practice the qualitative research was under-resourced relative to the trial, potentially limiting its ability to add value to the trial. In 'integral-in-practice' studies, interviewees described how the qualitative research was planned from the beginning of the study, senior qualitative expertise was on the team from beginning to end, and staff and time were dedicated to the qualitative research. In these studies interviewees described the qualitative research adding value to the trial although this value was not necessarily visible beyond the original research team due to the challenges of publishing this research

  19. Critical periods after stroke study: translating animal stroke recovery experiments into a clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromerick, Alexander W.; Edwardson, Matthew A.; Edwards, Dorothy F.; Giannetti, Margot L.; Barth, Jessica; Brady, Kathaleen P.; Chan, Evan; Tan, Ming T.; Tamboli, Irfan; Chia, Ruth; Orquiza, Michael; Padilla, Robert M.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Mapstone, Mark E.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Federoff, Howard J.; Newport, Elissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and neurotransmitter manipulation. However, most of these findings have not been tested or confirmed in the rehabilitation setting, in large part because of the challenges in translating a conceptually straightforward laboratory experiment into a meaningful and rigorous clinical trial in humans. Through presentation of methods for a Phase II trial, we discuss these issues and describe our approach. Methods: In rodents there is compelling evidence for timing effects in rehabilitation; motor training delivered at certain times after stroke may be more effective than the same training delivered earlier or later, suggesting that there is a critical or sensitive period for strongest rehabilitation training effects. If analogous critical/sensitive periods can be identified after human stroke, then existing clinical resources can be better utilized to promote recovery. The Critical Periods after Stroke Study (CPASS) is a phase II randomized, controlled trial designed to explore whether such a sensitive period exists. We will randomize 64 persons to receive an additional 20 h of upper extremity therapy either immediately upon rehab admission, 2–3 months after stroke onset, 6 months after onset, or to an observation-only control group. The primary outcome measure will be the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) at 1 year. Blood will be drawn at up to 3 time points for later biomarker studies. Conclusion: CPASS is an example of the translation of rodent motor recovery experiments into the clinical setting; data obtained from this single site randomized controlled trial will be used to finalize the design of a Phase III trial. PMID

  20. An integrated approach to consumer representation and involvement in a multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Anne L; McCallum, Marilyn; Campbell, Marion K; Robertson, Clare; Ralston, Stuart H

    2005-01-01

    Although, consumer involvement in individual studies is often limited, their involvement in guiding health research is generally considered to be beneficial. This paper outlines our experiences of an integrated relationship between the organisers of a clinical trial and a consumer organisation. The PRISM trial is a UK multicentre, randomized controlled trial comparing treatment strategies for Paget's disease of the bone. The National Association for the Relief of Paget's Disease (NARPD) is the only UK support group for sufferers of Paget's disease and has worked closely with the PRISM team from the outset. NARPD involvement is integral to the conduct of the trial and specific roles have included: peer-review; trial steering committee membership; provision of advice to participants, and promotion of the trial amongst Paget's disease patients. The integrated relationship has yielded benefits to both the trial and the consumer organisation. The benefits for the trial have included: recruitment of participants via NARPD contacts; well-informed participants; unsolicited patient advocacy of the trial; and interested and pro-active collaborators. For the NARPD and Paget's disease sufferers, benefits have included: increased awareness of Paget's disease; increased access to relevant health research; increased awareness of the NARPD services; and wider transfer of diagnosis and management knowledge to/from health care professionals. Our experience has shown that an integrated approach between a trial team and a consumer organisation is worthwhile. Adoption of such an approach in other trials may yield significant improvements in recruitment and quality of participant information flow. There are, however, resource implications for both parties.

  1. Field Experiments in Litter Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, William C.

    1973-01-01

    A series of urban and highway litter experiments in Richmond (Virginia), St. Louis, and Philadelphia indicated well-designed litter cans reduced littering about 15 percent along city streets and nearly 30 percent along highways. Also, the propensity to litter is critically affected by the characteristics of the individual and environmental…

  2. Control groups in recent septic shock trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M; Wilkman, Erika; Perner, Anders; Takala, Jukka

    2016-12-01

    The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. We searched for original articles presenting randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics, and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58 % the proportion of patients with elevated lactate values. Five studies (21 %) provided data to estimate the proportion of septic shock patients fulfilling the Sepsis-3 definition. The mean data completeness score was 19 out of 36 (range 8-32). Of 18 predefined control group characteristics, a mean of 8 (range 2-17) were reported. Only 2 (8 %) trials provided adequate data to confirm that their control group treatment represented usual care. Recent trials in septic shock provide inadequate data on the control group treatment and hemodynamic values. We propose a standardized trial dataset to be created and validated, comprising characteristics of patient population, interventions administered, hemodynamic values achieved, surrogate organ dysfunction, and mortality outcomes, to allow better analysis and interpretation of future trial results.

  3. Developing a survey of barriers and facilitators to recruitment in randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Geetinder

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruitment to randomized controlled trials is known to be challenging. It is important to understand and identify predictors of good or poor accrual to a clinical trial so that appropriate strategies can be put in place to overcome these problems and facilitate successful trial completion. We have developed a survey tool to establish the recruitment experience of clinical teams regarding facilitators and barriers to recruitment in a clinical trial and describe herein the method of developing the questionnaire. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify studies that have explored facilitators and barriers to recruitment, and a list of potential factors affecting recruitment to a clinical trial was generated. These factors were categorized in terms relating to the (i trial, (ii site, (iii patient, (iv clinical team, (v information and consent and (vi study team. A list was provided for responders to grade these factors as weak, intermediate or strong facilitators or barriers to recruitment. Results A web-based survey questionnaire was developed. This survey was designed to establish the recruitment experience of clinical teams with regard to the perceived facilitators and barriers to recruitment, to identify strategies applied to overcome these problems, and to obtain suggestions for change in the organization of future trials. The survey tool can be used to assess the recruitment experience of clinical teams in a single/multicenter trial in any clinical setting or speciality involving adults or children either in an ongoing trial or at trial completion. The questionnaire is short, easy to administer and to complete, with an estimated completion time of 11 minutes. Conclusions We have presented a robust methodology for developing this survey tool that provides an evidence-based list of potential factors that can affect recruitment to a clinical trial. We recommend that all clinical trialists should consider using

  4. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Forster Anne; Young John; Barber Sally; Clegg Andrew; Iliffe Steve

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE) trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) to a...

  5. Safety of placebo controls in pediatric hypertension trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P Brian; Li, Jennifer S; Murphy, M Dianne; Califf, Robert M; Benjamin, Daniel K

    2008-04-01

    Many clinical trials, including those in pediatric populations, use a placebo arm for medical conditions for which there are readily available therapeutic interventions. Several short-term efficacy trials of antihypertensive medications performed in response to Food and Drug Administration-issued written requests have used a placebo arm; whether the use of a placebo arm is safe in children with hypertension is unknown. We sought to define the rates of adverse events in 10 short-term antihypertensive trials to determine whether these trials resulted in increased risk to pediatric patients receiving placebo. We combined patient-level data from 10 antihypertensive efficacy trials performed in pediatric patients that were submitted to the Food and Drug Administration from 1998 to 2005. We determined the number and type of all of the adverse events reported during the placebo-controlled portion of the clinical trials and compared these numbers between the patients who received placebo and those who received active drug. Among the 1707 children in the 10 studies, we observed no differences in the rates of adverse events reported between the patients who received placebo and those who received active drug. Only 5 patients suffered a serious adverse event during the trials; none were thought by the investigators to be related to study drug, and only 1 occurred in a patient receiving placebo. Short-term exposure to placebo in pediatric trials of antihypertensive medications appears to be safe.

  6. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: from clinical trials to real-life experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Harari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled clinical trials are fundamental in medicine to develop new effective drugs and new therapeutic regimens and are the strength of evidence-based medicine. These studies allow us to avoid the repetition of misleading experiences that have been reported in the past, where drugs or associations were utilised without compelling evidence and ultimately proven to be ineffective. In recent years, randomised clinical trials have been conducted and concluded for many rare diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, clinical trials do not always reflect the real-life scenario. Patients selected for clinical trials present fewer comorbidities, they fall between certain age limits, and the severity of their disease is defined; therefore, they do not always reflect the whole of the population affected by a specific disease. These are the reasons why we also need data that mirror real-life experience. The limitations that these kind of studies present are always several and the studies should be interpreted with caution, although they can fill the important gap between efficacy and effectiveness. In this article, we will review the existing clinical data on real-life treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Drug interactions in controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, S

    1982-12-01

    As much information as possible should be obtained in clinical trials to assess possible interactions between test drugs and concomitant medications prescribed for other medical indications. Side effect profiles were compared in patients taking buspirone, mean = 20 mg/day; diazepam, 20 mg/day; clorazepate, 23 mg/day; and placebo, with or without concomitant medications. Approximately 1,000 anxious patients were included in the analysis; 700 received buspirone. The use of a variety of common medications did not affect the side effect profile in the buspirone, clorazepate, and placebo groups, but did increase the incidence of side effects in the diazepam group. The increased incidence of sedation noted with diazepam and clorazepate, however, was not due to concomitant medication.

  8. Impact of Attention Training on Academic Achievement, Executive Functioning, and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Hannah; Gray, Kylie; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience significant difficulties in attention, learning, executive functions, and behavioral regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that computerized cognitive training may remediate these impairments. In a double blind controlled trial, 76 children with IDD (4-11 years) were…

  9. Challenges and Innovations in a Community-Based Participatory Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Jessica R.; Amer, Suha; Christian, Charlisa; Hess, Julia Meredith; Bybee, Deborah; Isakson, Brian L.; Baca, Brandon; Ndayisenga, Martin; Greene, R. Neil; Shantzek, Cece

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are a long-standing and important design for conducting rigorous tests of the effectiveness of health interventions. However, many questions have been raised about the external validity of RCTs, their utility in explicating mechanisms of intervention and participants' intervention experiences, and their…

  10. Veterinary clinical research database for homeopathy: placebo-controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J; Albrecht, H; Mathie, R T

    2013-04-01

    Veterinary homeopathy has led a somewhat shadowy existence since its first introduction. Only in the last three decades has the number of clinical trials increased considerably. This literature is generally not well perceived, which may be partly a consequence of the diffuse and somewhat inaccessible nature of some of the relevant research publications. The Veterinary Clinical Research Database for Homeopathy (VetCR) was launched in 2006 to provide information on existing clinical research in veterinary homeopathy and to facilitate the preparation of systematic reviews. The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of this first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy, with a special focus on its content of placebo controlled clinical trials and summarising what is known about placebo effects in animals. In April 2012, the VetCR database contained 302 data records. Among these, 203 controlled trials were identified: 146 randomised and 57 non-randomised. In 97 of those 203 trials, the homeopathic medical intervention was compared to placebo. A program of formal systematic reviews of peer-reviewed randomised controlled trials in veterinary homeopathy is now underway; detailed findings from the program's data extraction and appraisal approach, including the assessment of trial quality (risk of bias), will be reported in due course. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Remote Control of Experiments via Matlab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Sedlak

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper demonstrates two possibilities of remote control of real experiments using Matlab software environment. We introduced basic approaches to Matlab remote access using Matlab Web Server, COM and Virtual Reality Toolbox. The proposed concepts were used and tested for control of magnetic levitation system. The gained experience was also discussed in the paper.

  12. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  13. From the Experience of Interactivity and Entertainment to Lower Intention to Smoke: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Path Analysis of a Web-Based Smoking Prevention Program for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Georges Elias; Wang, Hua; Calabro, Karen Sue; Mitra, Natasha; Shegog, Ross; Prokhorov, Alexander V

    2017-02-16

    Web-based programs for smoking prevention are being increasingly used with some success among adolescents. However, little is known about the mechanisms that link the experience of such programs to intended nicotine or tobacco control outcomes. Based on the experiential learning theory and extended elaboration likelihood model, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a Web-based intervention, A Smoking Prevention Interactive Experience (ASPIRE), on adolescents' intention to smoke, while considering the experience of interactivity and entertainment as predictors of reduced intention to smoke, under a transitional user experience model. A total of 101 adolescents were recruited from after-school programs, provided consent, screened, and randomized in a single-blinded format to 1 of 2 conditions: the full ASPIRE program as the experimental condition (n=50) or an online , text-based version of ASPIRE as the control condition (n=51). Data were collected at baseline and immediate follow-up. Repeated-measures mixed-effects models and path analyses were conducted. A total of 82 participants completed the study and were included in the analysis. Participants in the experimental condition were more likely to show a decrease in their intention to smoke than those in the control condition (beta=-0.18, P=.008). Perceived interactivity (beta=-0.27, P=.004) and entertainment (beta=-0.20, P=.04) were each associated with a decrease in intention to smoke independently. Results of path analyses indicated that perceived interactivity and perceived entertainment mediated the relationship between ASPIRE use and emotional involvement. Furthermore, perceived presence mediated the relationship between perceived interactivity and emotional involvement. There was a direct relationship between perceived entertainment and emotional involvement. Emotional involvement predicted a decrease in intention to smoke (beta=-0.16, P=.04). Adolescents' experience of interactivity and entertainment

  14. Drug versus placebo randomized controlled trials in neonates: A review of ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselas, Emilie; Pansieri, Claudia; Leroux, Stephanie; Bonati, Maurizio; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Despite specific initiatives and identified needs, most neonatal drugs are still used off-label, with variable dosage administrations and schedules. In high risk preterm and term neonates, drug evaluation is challenging and randomized controlled trials (RCT) are difficult to conduct and even more is the use of a placebo, required in the absence of a reference validated drug to be used as comparator. We analyzed the complete ClinicalTrials.gov registry 1) to describe neonatal RCT involving a placebo, 2) to report on the medical context and ethical aspects of placebo use. Placebo versus drug RCT (n = 146), either prevention trials (n = 57, 39%) or therapeutic interventions (n = 89, 61%), represent more than a third of neonatal trials registered in the National Institute of Health clinical trial database (USA) since 1999. They mainly concerned preterm infants, evaluating complications of prematurity. Most trials were conducted in the USA, were single centered, and funded by non-profit organizations. For the three top drug trials evaluating steroids (n = 13, 9.6%), erythropoietin (EPO, n = 10, 6.8%) and nitric oxide (NO, n = 9, 6.2%), the objectives of the trial and follow-up were analyzed in more details. Although a matter of debate, the use of placebo should be promoted in neonates to evaluate a potential new treatment, in the absence of reference drug. Analysis of the trials evaluating steroids showed that long-term follow-up of exposed patients, although required by international guidelines, is frequently missing and should be planned to collect additional information and optimize drug evaluation in these high-risk patients.

  15. Drug versus placebo randomized controlled trials in neonates: A review of ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselas, Emilie; Pansieri, Claudia; Leroux, Stephanie; Bonati, Maurizio; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite specific initiatives and identified needs, most neonatal drugs are still used off-label, with variable dosage administrations and schedules. In high risk preterm and term neonates, drug evaluation is challenging and randomized controlled trials (RCT) are difficult to conduct and even more is the use of a placebo, required in the absence of a reference validated drug to be used as comparator. Methods We analyzed the complete ClinicalTrials.gov registry 1) to describe neonatal RCT involving a placebo, 2) to report on the medical context and ethical aspects of placebo use. Results Placebo versus drug RCT (n = 146), either prevention trials (n = 57, 39%) or therapeutic interventions (n = 89, 61%), represent more than a third of neonatal trials registered in the National Institute of Health clinical trial database (USA) since 1999. They mainly concerned preterm infants, evaluating complications of prematurity. Most trials were conducted in the USA, were single centered, and funded by non-profit organizations. For the three top drug trials evaluating steroids (n = 13, 9.6%), erythropoietin (EPO, n = 10, 6.8%) and nitric oxide (NO, n = 9, 6.2%), the objectives of the trial and follow-up were analyzed in more details. Conclusion Although a matter of debate, the use of placebo should be promoted in neonates to evaluate a potential new treatment, in the absence of reference drug. Analysis of the trials evaluating steroids showed that long-term follow-up of exposed patients, although required by international guidelines, is frequently missing and should be planned to collect additional information and optimize drug evaluation in these high-risk patients. PMID:28192509

  16. Choosing a control intervention for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical trials are performed to resolve uncertainty concerning comparator interventions. Appropriate acknowledgment of uncertainty enables the concurrent achievement of two goals : the acquisition of valuable scientific knowledge and an optimum treatment choice for the patient-participant. The ethical recruitment of patients requires the presence of clinical equipoise. This involves the appropriate choice of a control intervention, particularly when unapproved drugs or innovative interventions are being evaluated. Discussion We argue that the choice of a control intervention should be supported by a systematic review of the relevant literature and, where necessary, solicitation of the informed beliefs of clinical experts through formal surveys and publication of the proposed trial's protocol. Summary When clinical equipoise is present, physicians may confidently propose trial enrollment to their eligible patients as an act of therapeutic beneficence.

  17. Exploring User Experience of a Telehealth System for the Danish TeleCare North Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilholt, Pernille Heyckendorff; Hæsum, Lisa Korsbakke Emtekær; Hejlesen, Ole Kristian

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to explore user experiences of using a telehealth system (Telekit) designed for the Danish TeleCare North trial. Telekit is designed for patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in order to manage the disease and support patient empowerment. This article sums up COPD-participants' user experiences in terms of increased sense of freedom, of security, of control, and greater awareness of COPD symptoms. A consecutive sample of sixty participants (27 women, 33 men) were recruited from the TeleCare North trial. At home the participants completed a non-standardised questionnaire while a researcher was present. The questionnaire identified their health status, their use of specific technologies, and their user experiences with the telehealth system. Results from the questionnaire indicate that the majority of participants (88%) considered the Telekit system as easy to use. 43 (72%) participants felt increased sense of security, and 37 (62%) participants felt increased sense of control by using the system. 30 (50%) participants felt greater awareness of their COPD symptoms, but only 16 (27%) participants felt increased freedom. The study has provided a general picture of COPD participants' user experiences which is important to emphasise as it has a bearing on whether a given implementation will be successful or not.

  18. Chemotherapeutic trial to control enterobiasis in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y S; Kim, S W; Jung, S H; Huh, S; Lee, J H

    1997-12-01

    To assess several chemotherapeutic schemes for control of enterobiasis, 738 children in five primary schools in Chunchon, Korea, were studied from May 1994 to June 1995. They were divided into 6 groups by the schemes: treatment of once or twice a year; treatment of positive cases or of whole class students; treatment with or without family members. The overall egg positive rate before intervention was 17.5% out of 789 children. Treating all individuals in a class together with family members of positive cases brought better control efficacy than other schemes (p = 0.000). However, when egg positive rate is less than 30%, treating only egg positive cases also can reduce egg positive rate. The confounding factors for the enterobiasis control in primary schoolchildren were new-comer to a class and familial infection.

  19. Steroids In caRdiac Surgery (SIRS) trial: acute kidney injury substudy protocol of an international randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garg, Amit X; Vincent, Jessica; Cuerden, Meaghan; Parikh, Chirag; Devereaux, P J; Teoh, Kevin; Yusuf, Salim; Hildebrand, Ainslie; Lamy, Andre; Zuo, Yunxia; Sessler, Daniel I; Shah, Pallav; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Quantz, Mackenzie; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Noiseux, Nicolas; Tagarakis, Georgios; Rochon, Antoine; Pogue, Janice; Walsh, Michael; Chan, Matthew T V; Lamontagne, Francois; Salehiomran, Abbas; Whitlock, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Steroids In caRdiac Surgery trial (SIRS) is a large international randomised controlled trial of methylprednisolone or placebo in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass pump...

  20. Controlled trials in children: quantity, methodological quality and descriptive characteristics of pediatric controlled trials published 1948-2006.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Thomson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to describe randomized controlled trials (RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs in child health published between 1948 and 2006, in terms of quantity, methodological quality, and publication and trial characteristics. We used the Trials Register of the Cochrane Child Health Field for overall trends and a sample from this to explore trial characteristics in more detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We extracted descriptive data on a random sample of 578 trials. Ninety-six percent of the trials were published in English; the percentage of child-only trials was 90.5%. The most frequent diagnostic categories were infectious diseases (13.2%, behavioural and psychiatric disorders (11.6%, neonatal critical care (11.4%, respiratory disorders (8.9%, non-critical neonatology (7.9%, and anaesthesia (6.5%. There were significantly fewer child-only studies (i.e., more mixed child and adult studies over time (P = 0.0460. The proportion of RCTs to CCTs increased significantly over time (P<0.0001, as did the proportion of multicentre trials (P = 0.002. Significant increases over time were found in methodological quality (Jadad score (P<0.0001, the proportion of double-blind studies (P<0.0001, and studies with adequate allocation concealment (P<0.0001. Additionally, we found an improvement in reporting over time: adequate description of withdrawals and losses to follow-up (P<0.0001, sample size calculations (P<0.0001, and intention-to-treat analysis (P<0.0001. However, many trials still do not describe their level of blinding, and allocation concealment was inadequately reported in the majority of studies across the entire time period. The proportion of studies with industry funding decreased slightly over time (P = 0.003, and these studies were more likely to report positive conclusions (P = 0.028. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The quantity and quality of pediatric controlled trials has increased over time; however

  1. Weed Control Trials in Cottonwood Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. M. Krinard

    1964-01-01

    Weed control in the first year is essential for establishing a cottonwood plantation, for the young trees can neither survive nor grow well if they must compete with other plants. Once the light and moisture conditions are established in its favor, cottonwood becomes the fastest growing tree in the South.

  2. Microcontroller-based Feedback Control Laboratory Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available this paper is a result of the implementation of the recommendations on enhancing hands-on experience of control engineering education using single chip, small scale computers such as microcontrollers. A set of microcontroller-based feedback control experiments was developed for the Electrical Engineering curriculum at the University of North Florida. These experiments provided hands-on techniques that students can utilize in the development of complete solutions for a number of servo control problems. Significant effort was devoted to software development of feedback controllers and the associated signal conditioning circuits interfacing between the microcontroller and the physical plant. These experiments have stimulated the interest of our students in control engineering.

  3. Prevention of abdominal wound infection (PROUD trial, DRKS00000390: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Ulrike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infection affects a considerable portion of patients after abdominal operations, increasing health care costs and postoperative morbidity and affecting quality of life. Antibacterial coating has been suggested as an effective measure to decrease postoperative wound infections after laparotomies. The INLINE metaanalysis has recently shown the superiority of a slowly absorbable continuous suture for abdominal closure; with PDS plus® such a suture has now been made available with triclosan antibacterial coating. Methods/Design The PROUD trial is designed as a randomised, controlled, observer, surgeon and patient blinded multicenter superiority trial with two parallel groups and a primary endpoint of wound infection during 30 days after surgery. The intervention group will receive triclosan coated polydioxanone sutures, whereas the control group will receive the standard polydioxanone sutures; abdominal closure will otherwise be standardized in both groups. Statistical analysis is based on intention-to-treat population via binary logistic regression analysis, the total sample size of n = 750 is sufficient to ensure alpha = 5% and power = 80%, an interim analysis will be carried out after data of 375 patients are available. Discussion The PROUD trial will yield robust data to determine the effectiveness of antibacterial coating in one of the standard sutures for abdominal closure and potentially lead to amendment of current guidelines. The exploration of clinically objective parameters as well as quality of life holds immediate relevance for clinical management and the pragmatic trial design ensures high external validity. Trial Registration The trial protocol has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000390.

  4. Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Prospective Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Dae Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were “acupuncture” and “PTSD.” No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  5. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and prospective clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Dae; Heo, In; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Crawford, Cindy; Kang, Hyung-Won; Lim, Jung-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were "acupuncture" and "PTSD." No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs) out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  6. Surgical trials in oncology. the importance of quality control in the TME trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Kranenbarg, E; van de Velde, C J H

    2002-05-01

    Results from randomised trials provide the best scientific evidence of efficacy or inefficacy of the therapy. The evaluation of surgical procedures involves problems in addition to those associated with medical experimentation. Surgery, unlike a pill, is not a standardised, reproducible entity, but a unique product whose details are defined by, for example, the skill of the surgeon. Quality assurance is important for treatment and also for data handling. The different treatments (surgery, pathology, radiotherapy, etc.) should be familiar to all participating physicians prior to the start of the trial. Instructions can be given by means of a well-written protocol, videotapes, workshops and instructors at the dissection table. The data collection and data check should be done by data managers and co-ordinators for the separate disciplines. Errors and missing data should be completed and feedback to the physician is essential. Close contact between an active co-ordinating data centre, including co-ordinators for the separate disciplines, and all participating physicians is essential to conduct a quality controlled multicentre, multidisciplinary trial. Continuous enthusiasm can be maintained by the organisation of regular workshops, distribution of newsletters and trial up-dates at scientific meetings. The efforts from all of the involved co-ordinators, data managers, instructors and physicians have resulted in a very successful trial with rapid accrual, good quality treatments and procedures, good quality data, and a high participation rate among hospitals and patients. Quality control is expensive and labour-intensive, but it is worthwhile.

  7. Randomized controlled trials – a matter of design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial. PMID:27354804

  8. Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

    2007-01-01

    Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

  9. Hierarchical Control of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barriuso-Poy, Alex; Llobet-Valero, E

    2007-01-01

    Control systems at High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are becoming increasingly complex mainly due to the size, complexity and data volume associated to the front-end instrumentation. In particular, this becomes visible for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC accelerator at CERN. ATLAS will be the largest particle detector ever built, result of an international collaboration of more than 150 institutes. The experiment is composed of 9 different specialized sub-detectors that perform different tasks and have different requirements for operation. The system in charge of the safe and coherent operation of the whole experiment is called Detector Control System (DCS). This thesis presents the integration of the ATLAS DCS into a global control tree following the natural segmentation of the experiment into sub-detectors and smaller sub-systems. The integration of the many different systems composing the DCS includes issues such as: back-end organization, process model identification, fault detection, synchronization ...

  10. Directional sensitivity of "first trial" reactions in human balance control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijhuis, L.B.; Allum, J.H.J.; Borm, G.F.; Honegger, F.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    Support-surface movements are commonly used to examine balance control. Subjects typically receive a series of identical or randomly interspersed multidirectional balance perturbations and the atypical "first trial reaction" (evoked by the first perturbation) is often excluded from further analysis.

  11. A controlled trial of ambroxol in chronic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, G H; Townsend, M; Kazim, F; Newhouse, M T

    1987-10-01

    Ambroxol is a mucolytic agent which is widely used in chronic bronchitis in Europe. We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial of ambroxol vs matched placebo in 90 patients with chronic bronchitis and difficulty clearing secretions. It was concluded that there was no advantage to taking ambroxol.

  12. Yoga in schizophrenia : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancampfort, D.; Vansteelandt, K.; Scheewe, T.; Probst, M.; Knapen, J.; De Herdt, A.; De Hert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Vancampfort D, Vansteelandt K, Scheewe T, Probst M, Knapen J, De Herdt A, De Hert M. Yoga in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary treatment on general psychopa

  13. Amalgam and ART restorations in children: a controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorim, R.G. de; Leal, S.C.; Mulder, J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to compare 2-year cumulative survival rates of amalgam and atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations in primary molars and to investigate the determinants of the survival rate of restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A controlled clinical trial using

  14. Yoga in schizophrenia : a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vancampfort, D.; Vansteelandt, K.; Scheewe, T.; Probst, M.; Knapen, J.; De Herdt, A.; De Hert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Vancampfort D, Vansteelandt K, Scheewe T, Probst M, Knapen J, De Herdt A, De Hert M. Yoga in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Objective: The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a complementary treatment on general psychopa

  15. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  16. The effect of orthodontic referral guidelines: A randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Conboy, Frances; O'Brien, K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate the effectiveness of referral guidelines for the referral of orthodontic patients to consultant and specialist practijioner orthodontists. Design Single centre randomised controlled trial with random allocation of referral guidelines for orthodontic treatment to general dental practitioners. Setting Hospital orthodontic departments and specialist orthodontic practices in Manchester and Stockport. Subjects General dental practitioners and the patients they ref...

  17. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  18. Chemical Control of Pennesetum Purpureum Laboratory Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N Tripathi

    1977-10-01

    Full Text Available Dichloral urea, diethyl chloracetamide, nitrourea, chloralhydrate, sodium trichloroacetate, sodium borate, ammonium thiocynate, sodium arsenite, arsenic oxide-sulphuric acid mixture, sodium chlorate, maleic hydrazide and the salts containing inorganic ions Cu/sup 2+/, Co/sup 2+/, MoO/sub 4//sup 2-/ and Zn/sup 2+/ were tested in experimental plots for their phytotoxic activity on a hybrid variety of Pennesetum purpureum. Sodium borate (2500 Kg/hectare, Sodium arsenite (250 Kg/hectare and sodium chlorate (1000 Kg/hectare through soil and ammonium thiocyanate (100 Kg/hectare through direct spray function as growth retardants. Arsenic oxide-sulphuric acid (100 : 300 Kg/hectare spray kills the existing leaves. Sodium chlorate (250 Kg/hectare spray exerts phytocidal action on young plants (3 weeks. Maleic hydrazide (50 Kg/hectare exerts permanent growth suppressant action on older plants (height >=1 m and kills the existing leaves of younger plants (height=<0.5 m. Copper sulphate (100 Kg/hectare induces partial drying of existing leaves and cobalt sulphate in the same dose induces yellowing of leaves extending the period of growth beyond the season of maximum growth of the control. Ammonium molybdate and Zinc acetate in the same dose do not exert any perceptible effect.

  19. Placebo-controlled trials and the Declaration of Helsinki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John A; Jonsson, Bertil; Kreutz, Gottfried; Sampaio, Cristina; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara

    2002-04-13

    A revised version of the Declaration of Helsinki, issued in October, 2000, remains a vital expression of medical ethics, and deserves unanimous support. A strict interpretation of the declaration seems to rule out clinical trials that use a placebo control group whenever licensed therapeutic methods already exist, preferring active controls. Although the efficacy of some new medicines can be satisfactorily established without the use of a placebo, for others the judicious use of placebo remains essential to establish their effectiveness.

  20. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  1. Calculating sample size in trials using historical controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Cao, Jing; Ahn, Chul

    2010-08-01

    Makuch and Simon [Sample size considerations for non-randomised comparative studies. J Chronic Dis 1980; 33: 175-81.] developed a sample size formula for historical control trials. When assessing power, they assumed the true control treatment effect to be equal to the observed effect from the historical control group. Many researchers have pointed out that the Makuch-Simon approach does not preserve the nominal power and type I error when considering the uncertainty in the true historical control treatment effect. To develop a sample size formula that properly accounts for the underlying randomness in the observations from the historical control group. We reveal the extremely skewed nature in the distributions of power and type I error, obtained over all the random realizations of the historical control data. The skewness motivates us to derive a sample size formula that controls the percentiles, instead of the means, of the power and type I error. A closed-form sample size formula is developed to control arbitrary percentiles of power and type I error for historical control trials. A simulation study further demonstrates that this approach preserves the operational characteristics in a more realistic scenario where the population variances are unknown and replaced by sample variances. The closed-form sample size formula is derived for continuous outcomes. The formula is more complicated for binary or survival time outcomes. We have derived a closed-form sample size formula that controls the percentiles instead of means of power and type I error in historical control trials, which have extremely skewed distributions over all the possible realizations of historical control data.

  2. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  3. The RESPITE trial: remifentanil intravenously administered patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus pethidine intramuscular injection for pain relief in labour: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Matthew; MacArthur, Christine; Gao Smith, Fang; Homer, Leanne; Handley, Kelly; Daniels, Jane

    2016-12-12

    The commonest opioid used for pain relief in labour is pethidine (meperidine); however, its effectiveness has long been challenged and the drug has known side effects including maternal sedation, nausea and potential transfer across the placenta to the foetus. Over a third of women receiving pethidine require an epidural due to inadequate pain relief. Epidural analgesia increases the risk of an instrumental vaginal delivery and its associated effects. Therefore, there is a clear need for a safe, effective, alternative analgesic to pethidine. Evidence suggests that remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) reduces epidural conversion rates compared to pethidine; however, no trial has yet investigated this as a primary endpoint. We are, therefore, comparing pethidine intramuscular injection to remifentanil PCA in a randomised controlled trial. Women in established labour, requesting systemic opioid pain relief, will be randomised to either intravenously administered remifentanil PCA (intervention) or pethidine intramuscular injection (control) in an unblinded, 1:1 individual randomised trial. Following informed consent, 400 women in established labour, who request systemic opioid pain relief, from NHS Trusts across England will undergo a minimised randomisation by a computer or automated telephone system to either pethidine or remifentanil. In order to balance the groups this minimisation is based on four parameters; parity (nulliparous versus multiparous), maternal age (relief provided by each technique will be recorded every 30 min after time zero, until epidural placement, delivery or transfer to theatre, quantified by Visual Analogue Scale. Incidence of maternal side effects including sedation, delivery mode, foetal distress requiring delivery, neonatal status at delivery and rate of initiation of breastfeeding within the first hour of birth will also be recorded. Maternal satisfaction with her childbirth experience will be determined by a postpartum

  4. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, Sven; Thomeer, Michiel; Heath, John; Vukicevic, Milan

    2016-07-06

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers' scientific epistemology of "falsificationism." Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation.

  5. The Sexunzipped trial: optimizing the design of online randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Julia V; Pavlou, Menelaos; Copas, Andrew; McCarthy, Ona; Carswell, Ken; Rait, Greta; Hart, Graham; Nazareth, Irwin; Free, Caroline; French, Rebecca; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-12-11

    Sexual health problems such as unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection are important public health concerns and there is huge potential for health promotion using digital interventions. Evaluations of digital interventions are increasingly conducted online. Trial administration and data collection online offers many advantages, but concerns remain over fraudulent registration to obtain compensation, the quality of self-reported data, and high attrition. This study addresses the feasibility of several dimensions of online trial design-recruitment, online consent, participant identity verification, randomization and concealment of allocation, online data collection, data quality, and retention at 3-month follow-up. Young people aged 16 to 20 years and resident in the United Kingdom were recruited to the "Sexunzipped" online trial between November 2010 and March 2011 (n=2036). Participants filled in baseline demographic and sexual health questionnaires online and were randomized to the Sexunzipped interactive intervention website or to an information-only control website. Participants were also randomly allocated to a postal request (or no request) for a urine sample for genital chlamydia testing and receipt of a lower (£10/US$16) or higher (£20/US$32) value shopping voucher compensation for 3-month outcome data. The majority of the 2006 valid participants (90.98%, 1825/2006) were aged between 18 and 20 years at enrolment, from all four countries in the United Kingdom. Most were white (89.98%, 1805/2006), most were in school or training (77.48%, 1545/1994), and 62.81% (1260/2006) of the sample were female. In total, 3.88% (79/2036) of registrations appeared to be invalid and another 4.00% (81/2006) of participants gave inconsistent responses within the questionnaire. The higher value compensation (£20/US$32) increased response rates by 6-10%, boosting retention at 3 months to 77.2% (166/215) for submission of online self-reported sexual health

  6. Trial-to-trial adaptation in control of arm reaching and standing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienciak-Siewert, Alison; Horan, Dylan P; Ahmed, Alaa A

    2016-12-01

    Classical theories of motor learning hypothesize that adaptation is driven by sensorimotor error; this is supported by studies of arm and eye movements that have shown that trial-to-trial adaptation increases with error. Studies of postural control have shown that anticipatory postural adjustments increase with the magnitude of a perturbation. However, differences in adaptation have been observed between the two modalities, possibly due to either the inherent instability or sensory uncertainty in standing posture. Therefore, we hypothesized that trial-to-trial adaptation in posture should be driven by error, similar to what is observed in arm reaching, but the nature of the relationship between error and adaptation may differ. Here we investigated trial-to-trial adaptation of arm reaching and postural control concurrently; subjects made reaching movements in a novel dynamic environment of varying strengths, while standing and holding the handle of a force-generating robotic arm. We found that error and adaptation increased with perturbation strength in both arm and posture. Furthermore, in both modalities, adaptation showed a significant correlation with error magnitude. Our results indicate that adaptation scales proportionally with error in the arm and near proportionally in posture. In posture only, adaptation was not sensitive to small error sizes, which were similar in size to errors experienced in unperturbed baseline movements due to inherent variability. This finding may be explained as an effect of uncertainty about the source of small errors. Our findings suggest that in rehabilitation, postural error size should be considered relative to the magnitude of inherent movement variability.

  7. Qigong and Fibromyalgia: Randomized Controlled Trials and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sawynok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6–8 weeks produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function that are maintained at 4–6 months compared to wait-list subjects or baselines. Comparisons with active controls show little difference, but compared to baseline there are significant and comparable effects in both groups. Open-label studies provide information that supports benefit but remain exploratory. An extension trial and case studies involving extended practice (daily, 6–12 months indicate marked benefits but are limited by the number of participants. Benefit appears to be related to amount of practice. Conclusions. There is considerable potential for qigong to be a useful complementary practice for the management of fibromyalgia. However, there are unique methodological challenges, and exploration of its clinical potential will need to focus on pragmatic issues and consider a spectrum of trial designs. Mechanistic considerations need to consider both system-wide and more specific effects.

  8. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  9. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-05-19

    Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors' efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups--plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen the course of psychosis. Better designed

  10. The Cessation in Pregnancy Incentives Trial (CPIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tappin David M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seventy percent of women in Scotland have at least one baby, making pregnancy an opportunity to help most young women quit smoking before their own health is irreparably compromised. By quitting during pregnancy their infants will be protected from miscarriage and still birth as well as low birth weight, asthma, attention deficit disorder and adult cardiovascular disease. In the UK, the NICE guidelines: ‘How to stop smoking in pregnancy and following childbirth’ (June 2010 highlighted that little evidence exists in the literature to confirm the efficacy of financial incentives to help pregnant smokers to quit. Its first research recommendation was to determine: Within a UK context, are incentives an acceptable, effective and cost-effective way to help pregnant women who smoke to quit? Design and methods This study is a phase II exploratory individually randomized controlled trial comparing standard care for pregnant smokers with standard care plus the additional offer of financial voucher incentives to engage with specialist cessation services and/or to quit smoking during pregnancy. Participants (n = 600 will be pregnant smokers identified at maternity booking who, when contacted by specialist cessation services, agree to having their details passed to the NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline to discuss the trial. The NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline will be responsible for telephone consent and follow-up in late pregnancy. The primary outcome will be self reported smoking in late pregnancy verified by cotinine measurement. An economic evaluation will refine cost data collection and assess potential cost-effectiveness while qualitative research interviews with clients and health professionals will assess the level of acceptance of this form of incentive payment. The research questions are: What is the likely therapeutic efficacy? Are incentives potentially cost-effective? Is individual randomization an

  11. Clinical trials of antihypertensives: Nature of control and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswat S Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the critical issues in the control and design of antihypertension (anti-HT clinical trials. The international guidelines and current clinical and biostatistical practices were reviewed for relevant clinical, design, end-point assessments and regulatory issues. The results are grouped mainly into ethical, protocol and assessment issues. Ethical issues arise as placebo-controlled trials (PCTs for HT-lowering agents in patients with moderate to severe HT are undertaken. Patients with organ damage due to HT should not be included in long-term PCT. Active-control trials, however, are suitable for all randomized subsets of patients, including men and women, and different ethnic and age groups. Severity subgroups must be studied separately with consideration to specific study design. Mortality and morbidity outcome studies are not required in anti-HT trials except when significant mortality and cardiovascular morbidity are suspected. Generally, changes in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP at the end of the dosing interval from the baseline are compared between the active and the control arms as the primary endpoint of anti-HT effect. Onset of the anti-HT effect can be studied as the secondary endpoint. For maintenance of efficacy, long-term studies of ≥6 months need to be undertaken. Error-free measurement of BP is a serious issue as spontaneous changes in BP are large and active drug effect on diastolic BP is often small. Placebo-controlled short-term studies (of ~12 weeks for dose-response and titration are very useful. Safety studies must be very vigilant on hypotension, orthostatic hypotension and effects on heart. In dose-response studies, at least three doses in addition to placebo should be used to well characterize the benefits and side-effects.

  12. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  13. The Detector Control of the PANDA Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbauer, F.

    2014-08-01

    The PANDA experiment will be built at the antiproton storage ring HESR, a part of the new accelerator facility FAIR in Darmstadt, Germany. PANDA aims amongst other topics for high precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy and search for exotic matter. To guarantee the high resolution of the different components a detector control system (DCS) monitoring temperatures, humidity, pressure, and controlling chillers and power supplies is needed. The DCS of PANDA is built using the open-source software package EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) with a PANDA specific version of Control-System Studio. In this document the general concepts of the PANDA DCS will be discussed.

  14. A pragmatic multi-centred randomised controlled trial of yoga for chronic low back pain: Trial protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Helen; Tilbrook, Helen; Aplin, John; Chuang, Ling-Hsiang; Hewitt, Catherine; Jayakody, Shalmini; Semlyen, Anna; Soares, Marta O; Torgerson, David; Trewhela, Alison; Watt, Ian; Worthy, Gill

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is...

  15. Is sham laser a valid control for acupuncture trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnich, Dominik; Salih, Norbert; Offenbächer, Martin; Fleckenstein, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point) and sham laser (red light) treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3) in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation). We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44%) healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years) identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41%) after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26). Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS) and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS). The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se.

  16. Is Sham Laser a Valid Control for Acupuncture Trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Irnich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methodological problems of acupuncture trials focus on adequate placebo controls. In this trial we evaluated the use of sham laser acupuncture as a control procedure. Thirty-four healthy volunteers received verum laser (invisible infrared laser emission and red light, 45 s and 1 J per point and sham laser (red light treatment at three acupuncture points (LI4, LU7 and LR3 in a randomized, double-blinded, cross-over design. The main outcome measure was the ratio of correct to incorrect ratings of treatment immediately after each session. The secondary outcome measure was the occurrence of deqi-like sensations at the acupuncture points and their intensity on a 10-fold visual analog scale (VAS; 10 being the strongest sensible sensation. We pooled the results of three former trials to evaluate the credibility of sham laser acupuncture when compared to needle acupuncture. Fifteen out of 34 (44% healthy volunteers (age: 28 ± 10.7 years identified the used laser device after the first session and 14 (41% after the second session. Hence, both treatments were undistinguishable (P = .26. Deqi-like sensations occurred in 46% of active laser (2.34 VAS and in 49.0% of sham laser beams (2.49 VAS. The credibility of sham laser was not different from needle acupuncture. Sham laser acupuncture can serve as a valid placebo control in laser acupuncture studies. Due to similar credibility and the lack of sensory input on the peripheral nervous system, sham laser acupuncture can also serve as a sham control for acupuncture trials, in order to evaluate needling effects per se.

  17. Probiotics in the prevention of eczema: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Stephen J; Jordan, Sue; Storey, Melanie; Catherine A Thornton; Gravenor, Michael B.; Garaiova, Iveta; Plummer, Susan F; Wang, Duolao; Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a multistrain, high-dose probiotic in the prevention of eczema. Design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial. Settings Antenatal clinics, research clinic, children at home. Patients Pregnant women and their infants. Interventions Women from 36 weeks gestation and their infants to age 6 months received daily either the probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarius CUL61, Lactobacillus paracasei CUL08, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis CUL34 a...

  18. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  19. Genetic susceptibility testing and readiness to control weight: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meisel, S.F.; Beeken, R.J.; Jaarsveld, C.H.M. van; Wardle, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that adding obesity gene feedback (FTO) to simple weight control advice at a life stage with raised risk of weight gain (university) increases readiness to control weight. METHODS: Individually randomized controlled trial comparing the effect of: (i) simple weight c

  20. GEECS (Generalized Equipment and Experiment Control System)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-12

    GEECS (Generalized Equipment and Experiment Control System) monitors and controls equipment distributed across a network, performs experiments by scanning input variables, and collects and stores various types of data synchronously from devices. Examples of devices include cameras, motors and pressure gauges. GEEKS is based upon LabView graphical object oriented programming (GOOP), allowing for a modular and scalable framework. Data is published for subscription of an arbitrary number of variables over TCP. A secondary framework allows easy development of graphical user interfaces for a combined control of any available devices on the control system without the need of programming knowledge. This allows for rapid integration of GEECS into a wide variety of systems. A database interface provides for devise and process configuration while allowing the user to save large quantities of data to local or network drives.

  1. The Effects of School Gardens on Children's Science Knowledge: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Income Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Nancy M.; Myers, Beth M.; Todd, Lauren E.; Barale, Karen; Gaolach, Brad; Ferenz, Gretchen; Aitken, Martha; Henderson, Charles R.; Tse, Caroline; Pattison, Karen Ostlie; Taylor, Cayla; Connerly, Laura; Carson, Janet B.; Gensemer, Alexandra Z.; Franz, Nancy K.; Falk, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial or "true experiment" examines the effects of a school garden intervention on the science knowledge of elementary school children. Schools were randomly assigned to a group that received the garden intervention (n?=?25) or to a waitlist control group that received the garden intervention at the end of the…

  2. Should desperate volunteers be included in randomised controlled trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmark, P; Mason, S

    2006-09-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) sometimes recruit participants who are desperate to receive the experimental treatment. This paper defends the practice against three arguments that suggest it is unethical first, desperate volunteers are not in equipoise. Second clinicians, entering patients onto trials are disavowing their therapeutic obligation to deliver the best treatment; they are following trial protocols rather than delivering individualised care. Research is not treatment; its ethical justification is different. Consent is crucial. Third, desperate volunteers do not give proper consent: effectively, they are coerced. This paper responds by advocating a notion of equipoise based on expert knowledge and widely shared values. Where such collective, expert equipoise exists there is a prima facie case for an RCT. Next the paper argues that trial entry does not involve clinicians disavowing their therapeutic obligation; individualised care based on insufficient evidence is not in patients best interest. Finally, it argues that where equipoise exists it is acceptable to limit access to experimental agents; desperate volunteers are not coerced because their desperation does not translate into a right to receive what they desire.

  3. Electrocardiogram ST Analysis During Labor : A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Schuit, Ewoud; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Xodo, Serena; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of cardiotocography plus ST analysis with cardiotocography alone during labor. DATA SOURCES: Randomized controlled trials were identified by searching electronic databases. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included all randomized controlled trials comparing intr

  4. Electrocardiogram ST Analysis During Labor : A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saccone, Gabriele; Schuit, Ewoud; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Xodo, Serena; Berghella, Vincenzo

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of cardiotocography plus ST analysis with cardiotocography alone during labor. DATA SOURCES: Randomized controlled trials were identified by searching electronic databases. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included all randomized controlled trials comparing

  5. Establishing a clinical trials network in nephrology: experience of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrish, Alicia T; Hawley, Carmel M; Johnson, David W; Badve, Sunil V; Perkovic, Vlado; Reidlinger, Donna M; Cass, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem globally. Despite this, there are fewer high-quality, high-impact clinical trials in nephrology than other internal medicine specialties, which has led to large gaps in evidence. To address this deficiency, the Australasian Kidney Trials Network, a Collaborative Research Group, was formed in 2005. Since then, the Network has provided infrastructure and expertise to conduct patient-focused high-quality, investigator-initiated clinical trials in nephrology. The Network has not only been successful in engaging the nephrology community in Australia and New Zealand but also in forming collaborations with leading researchers from other countries. This article describes the establishment, development, and functions of the Network. The article also discusses the current and future funding strategies to ensure uninterrupted conduct of much needed clinical trials in nephrology to improve the outcomes of patients affected by kidney diseases with cost-effective interventions.

  6. The Asthma Control Questionnaire as a clinical trial endpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, P J; Casale, T B; Dahl, Ronald;

    2014-01-01

    The goal of asthma treatment is to control the disease according to guidelines issued by bodies such as the Global Initiative for Asthma. Effective control is dependent upon evaluation of symptoms, initiation of appropriate treatment and minimization of the progressive adverse effects...... of the disease and its therapies. Although individual outcome measures have been shown to correlate with asthma control, composite endpoints are preferred to enable more accurate and robust monitoring of the health of the individual patient. A number of validated instruments are utilized to capture...... these component endpoints; however, there is no consensus on the optimal instrument for use in clinical trials. The Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) has been shown to be a valid, reliable instrument that allows accurate and reproducible assessment of asthma control that compares favourably with other commonly...

  7. The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty is common in older age, and is associated with important adverse health outcomes including increased risk of disability and admission to hospital or long-term care. Exercise interventions for frail older people have the potential to reduce the risk of these adverse outcomes by increasing muscle strength and improving mobility. Methods/Design The Home-Based Older People's Exercise (HOPE trial is a two arm, assessor blind pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT to assess the effectiveness of a 12 week exercise intervention (the HOPE programme designed to improve the mobility and functional abilities of frail older people living at home, compared with usual care. The primary outcome is the timed-up-and-go test (TUGT, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. Secondary outcomes include the Barthel Index of activities of daily living (ADL, EuroQol Group 5-Dimension Self-Report Questionnaire (EQ-5D quality of life measure and the geriatric depression scale (GDS, measured at baseline and 14 weeks post-randomisation. We will record baseline frailty using the Edmonton Frail Scale (EFS, record falls and document muscle/joint pain. We will test the feasibility of collection of data to identify therapy resources required for delivery of the intervention. Discussion The HOPE trial will explore and evaluate a home-based exercise intervention for frail older people. Although previous RCTs have used operationalised, non-validated methods of measuring frailty, the HOPE trial is, to our knowledge, the first RCT of an exercise intervention for frail older people that includes a validated method of frailty assessment at baseline. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN57066881

  8. Challenges in randomized controlled trials and emerging multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, DeRen

    2015-12-01

    The remarkable global development of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) specific for multiple sclerosis (MS) has significantly reduced the frequency of relapse, slowed the progression of disability, and improved the quality of life in patients with MS. With increasing numbers of approved DMTs, neurologists in North America and Europe are able to present multiple treatment options to their patients to achieve a better therapeutic outcome, and in many cases, no evidence of disease activity. MS patients have improved accessibility to various DMTs at no or minimal out-of-pocket cost. The ethical guidelines defined by the Edinburgh revision of the Declaration of Helsinki strongly discourage the use of placebo control groups in modern MS clinical trials. The use of an active comparator control group increases the number of participants in each group that is essential to achieve statistical significance, thus further increasing the difficulty of completing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the development of new MS therapies. There is evidence of a high prevalence of MS and a large number of patients in Asia. The belief of the existence of Asian types of MS that are distinct from Western types, and regulatory policies are among the reasons why DMTs are limited in most Asian countries. Lack of access to approved DMTs provides a good opportunity for clinical trials that are designed for the development of new MS therapies. Recently, data from RCTs have demonstrated excellent recruitment of participants and the completion of multi-nation and single-nation MS trials within this region. Recent studies using the McDonald MS diagnostic criteria carefully excluded patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and NMO spectrum disorder, and demonstrated that patients with MS in Asia have clinical characteristics and treatment responses similar to those in Western countries.

  9. Paramedic Initiated Lisinopril For Acute Stroke Treatment (PIL-FAST: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McColl Elaine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High blood pressure during acute stroke is associated with poorer stroke outcome. Previous trials have failed to show benefit from lowering blood pressure but treatment may have been commenced too late to be effective. The earliest that acute stroke treatments could be initiated is during contact with the emergency medical services (paramedics. However, experience of pre-hospital clinical trials is limited and logistical challenges are likely to be greater than for trials performed in other settings. We report the protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial of paramedic initiated blood pressure lowering treatment for hypertension in acute stroke. Methods Trial Design: Double blind parallel group external pilot randomised controlled trial. Setting: Participant recruitment and initial treatment by North East Ambulance Service research trained paramedics responding to the emergency call. Continued treatment in three study hospitals. Participants: Target is recruitment of 60 adults with acute arm weakness due to suspected stroke (within 3 hours of symptom onset and hypertension (systolic BP>160 mmHg. Intervention: Lisinopril 5-10 mg (intervention group, matched placebo (control group, daily for 7 days. Randomisation: Study medication contained within identical pre-randomised "trial packs" carried by research trained paramedics. Outcomes: Study feasibility (recruitment rate, compliance with data collection and clinical data to inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial (blood pressure monitoring, National Institute of Health Stroke Scale, Barthel ADL Index, Modified Rankin Scale, renal function. Discussion This pilot study is assessing the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of paramedic initiated lisinopril for hypertension early after the onset of acute stroke. The results will inform the design of a definitive RCT to evaluate the effects of very early blood pressure lowering in acute stroke

  10. Clinical Experience amongst Surgeons in the Asymptomatic Carotid Surgery Trial-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, Anne; de Waard, Djurre; Bulbulia, Richard; de Borst, Gert Jan; Halliday, Alison

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hospital volume may influence the outcomes of carotid revascularization, but in trials the effect of the clinical experience of individual surgeons on procedural outcome is less certain. We assessed perioperative event rates amongst centers with different trial entry volumes and also t

  11. Remote Experiments in Control Engineering Education Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica B Naumović

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Automatic Control Engineering Laboratory (ACEL - WebLab, an under-developed, internet-based remote laboratory for control engineering education at the Faculty of Electronic Engineering in Niš. Up to now, the remote laboratory integrates two physical systems (velocity servo system and magnetic levitation system and enables some levels of measurement and control. To perform experiments in ACEL-WebLab, the "LabVIEW Run Time Engine"and a standard web browser are needed.

  12. Controlled human malaria infection trials: How tandems of trust and control construct scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijker, Else M; Sauerwein, Robert W; Bijker, Wiebe E

    2016-02-01

    Controlled human malaria infections are clinical trials in which healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with malaria under controlled conditions. Controlled human malaria infections are complex clinical trials: many different groups and institutions are involved, and several complex technologies are required to function together. This functioning together of technologies, people, and institutions is under special pressure because of potential risks to the volunteers. In this article, the authors use controlled human malaria infections as a strategic research site to study the use of control, the role of trust, and the interactions between trust and control in the construction of scientific knowledge. The authors argue that tandems of trust and control play a central role in the successful execution of clinical trials and the construction of scientific knowledge. More specifically, two aspects of tandems of trust and control will be highlighted: tandems are sites where trust and control coproduce each other, and tandems link the personal, the technical, and the institutional domains. Understanding tandems of trust and control results in setting some agendas for both clinical trial research and science and technology studies.

  13. Decentralized control experiments on NASA's flexible grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, U.; Yurkowich, S.; Martin, J., III; Al-Abbass, F.

    1986-01-01

    Methods arising from the area of decentralized control are emerging for analysis and control synthesis for large flexible structures. In this paper the control strategy involves a decentralized model reference adaptive approach using a variable structure control. Local models are formulated based on desired damping and response time in a model-following scheme for various modal configurations. Variable structure controllers are then designed employing co-located angular rate and position feedback. In this scheme local control forces the system to move on a local sliding mode in some local error space. An important feature of this approach is that the local subsystem is made insensitive to dynamical interactions with other subsystems once the sliding surface is reached. Experiments based on the above have been performed for NASA's flexible grid experimental apparatus. The grid is designed to admit appreciable low-frequency structural dynamics, and allows for implementation of distributed computing components, inertial sensors, and actuation devices. A finite-element analysis of the grid provides the model for control system design and simulation; results of several simulations are reported on here, and a discussion of application experiments on the apparatus is presented.

  14. Difficulties in recruitment for a randomized controlled trial involving hysterosalpingography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmerhorst Frans M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The usefulness of hysterosalpingography (HSG as routine investigation in the fertility work-up prior to laparoscopy and dye had been assessed in a randomized controlled trial. Recruiting subjects to the study was more difficult than anticipated. The objective of this study was to explore possible reasons for non-participation in the trial. Methods All newly referred subfertile women admitted to the Reproductive Medicine Clinic of Leiden University Medical Centre between 1 April 1997 and 31 December 1999, were eligible for the study. The reasons for non-participation were evaluated by scrutinizing the medical records. Results Out of 759 women, a total of 127 (17% agreed to participate in the trial. The most important reason for non-participation was because of exclusion criteria (73%. Other reasons were inattentive clinicians (3% and patient-associated reasons (24%. Patient refusal and indecisiveness to enroll in the study were the most common patient-associated reasons. The most frequently stated reason for trial refusal was reluctance to undergo laparoscopy and dye mainly due to issues related to anesthesia and scheduling of procedure. Conclusion Almost three-quarters of recruitment difficulties in this study were due to unavoidable reasons. To overcome the remaining avoidable reasons for non-participation, attention should be paid to appropriate instruction of the study protocol to the participating doctors and to provide adequate information, in layman's terms, to the patients. Reminding patients by notes or telephone calls for attending the clinic are helpful. It may be contingent upon tracing the reasons of clinicians and patients for non-participation to improve enrollment during a trial.

  15. Sample size in orthodontic randomized controlled trials: are numbers justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi, Despina; Pandis, Nikolaos; Fleming, Padhraig S

    2014-02-01

    Sample size calculations are advocated by the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) group to justify sample sizes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to analyse the reporting of sample size calculations in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals. The performance of sample size calculations was assessed and calculations verified where possible. Related aspects, including number of authors; parallel, split-mouth, or other design; single- or multi-centre study; region of publication; type of data analysis (intention-to-treat or per-protocol basis); and number of participants recruited and lost to follow-up, were considered. Of 139 RCTs identified, complete sample size calculations were reported in 41 studies (29.5 per cent). Parallel designs were typically adopted (n = 113; 81 per cent), with 80 per cent (n = 111) involving two arms and 16 per cent having three arms. Data analysis was conducted on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis in a small minority of studies (n = 18; 13 per cent). According to the calculations presented, overall, a median of 46 participants were required to demonstrate sufficient power to highlight meaningful differences (typically at a power of 80 per cent). The median number of participants recruited was 60, with a median of 4 participants being lost to follow-up. Our finding indicates good agreement between projected numbers required and those verified (median discrepancy: 5.3 per cent), although only a minority of trials (29.5 per cent) could be examined. Although sample size calculations are often reported in trials published as RCTs in orthodontic speciality journals, presentation is suboptimal and in need of significant improvement.

  16. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of dichlorphenamide in periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Valeria A; Burge, James; McDermott, Michael P; Smith, Patty C; Herr, Barbara; Tawil, Rabi; Pandya, Shree; Kissel, John; Ciafaloni, Emma; Shieh, Perry; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Amato, Antony; Cannon, Steve C; Trivedi, Jaya; Barohn, Richard; Crum, Brian; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Pestronk, Alan; Meola, Giovanni; Conwit, Robin; Hanna, Michael G; Griggs, Robert C

    2016-04-12

    To determine the short-term and long-term effects of dichlorphenamide (DCP) on attack frequency and quality of life in hyperkalemic (HYP) and hypokalemic (HOP) periodic paralysis. Two multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasted 9 weeks (Class I evidence), followed by a 1-year extension phase in which all participants received DCP. Forty-four HOP and 21 HYP participants participated. The primary outcome variable was the average number of attacks per week over the final 8 weeks of the double-blind phase. The median attack rate was lower in HOP participants on DCP than in participants on placebo (0.3 vs 2.4, p = 0.02). The 9-week mean change in the Physical Component Summary score of the Short Form-36 was also better in HOP participants receiving DCP (treatment effect = 7.29 points, 95% confidence interval 2.26 to 12.32, p = 0.006). The median attack rate was also lower in HYP participants on DCP (0.9 vs 4.8) than in participants on placebo, but the difference in median attack rate was not significant (p = 0.10). There were no significant effects of DCP on muscle strength or muscle mass in either trial. The most common adverse events in both trials were paresthesia (47% DCP vs 14% placebo, both trials combined) and confusion (19% DCP vs 7% placebo, both trials combined). DCP is effective in reducing the attack frequency, is safe, and improves quality of life in HOP periodic paralysis. These studies provide Class I evidence that DCP significantly reduces attack frequency in HOP but lacked the precision to support either efficacy or lack of efficacy of DCP in HYP. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of dichlorphenamide in periodic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, James; McDermott, Michael P.; Smith, Patty C.; Herr, Barbara; Tawil, Rabi; Pandya, Shree; Kissel, John; Ciafaloni, Emma; Shieh, Perry; Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Amato, Antony; Cannon, Steve C.; Trivedi, Jaya; Barohn, Richard; Crum, Brian; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Pestronk, Alan; Meola, Giovanni; Conwit, Robin; Hanna, Michael G.; Griggs, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the short-term and long-term effects of dichlorphenamide (DCP) on attack frequency and quality of life in hyperkalemic (HYP) and hypokalemic (HOP) periodic paralysis. Methods: Two multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasted 9 weeks (Class I evidence), followed by a 1-year extension phase in which all participants received DCP. Forty-four HOP and 21 HYP participants participated. The primary outcome variable was the average number of attacks per week over the final 8 weeks of the double-blind phase. Results: The median attack rate was lower in HOP participants on DCP than in participants on placebo (0.3 vs 2.4, p = 0.02). The 9-week mean change in the Physical Component Summary score of the Short Form–36 was also better in HOP participants receiving DCP (treatment effect = 7.29 points, 95% confidence interval 2.26 to 12.32, p = 0.006). The median attack rate was also lower in HYP participants on DCP (0.9 vs 4.8) than in participants on placebo, but the difference in median attack rate was not significant (p = 0.10). There were no significant effects of DCP on muscle strength or muscle mass in either trial. The most common adverse events in both trials were paresthesia (47% DCP vs 14% placebo, both trials combined) and confusion (19% DCP vs 7% placebo, both trials combined). Conclusions: DCP is effective in reducing the attack frequency, is safe, and improves quality of life in HOP periodic paralysis. Classification of evidence: These studies provide Class I evidence that DCP significantly reduces attack frequency in HOP but lacked the precision to support either efficacy or lack of efficacy of DCP in HYP. PMID:26865514

  18. Progress on control experiments of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    Progress at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of control experiments for flexible structures is described. First the author presents the experimental results for a linear model which represents slewing maneuvers of a generic space station solar panel carried out to evaluate experimentally some control technologies. Then the status of the rotational/translational maneuvering experiment of a flexible steel panel carried by a translation cart is presented. Finally, experimental results of the NASA minimast testbed using velocity command stepper motors as reaction mass reactors are shown. All the test configurations are briefly described, including actuator and sensor, test setup, and test software. The status of some research activities oriented primarily to the experimental methods for control of flexible structures is presented.

  19. Directional sensitivity of "first trial" reactions in human balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Nijhuis, Lars B; Allum, John H J; Borm, George F; Honegger, Flurin; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2009-06-01

    Support-surface movements are commonly used to examine balance control. Subjects typically receive a series of identical or randomly interspersed multidirectional balance perturbations and the atypical "first trial reaction" (evoked by the first perturbation) is often excluded from further analysis. However, this procedure may obscure vital information about neurophysiological mechanisms associated with the first perturbation and, by analogy, fully unexpected falls. We studied first trial reactions, aiming to clarify their directional impact on postural control and to characterize the underlying neurophysiological substrate. We instructed 36 subjects to maintain balance following support-surface rotations in six different directions. Perturbations in each direction were delivered in blocks, consisting of 10 serial stimuli. Full body kinematics, surface reactive forces, and electromyographic (EMG) responses were recorded. Regardless of direction, for the very first rotation, displacement of the center of mass was 15% larger compared with the ensuing nine identical rotations (P postural instability, mainly due to increased response amplitudes. Although rapid habituation occurs following presentation of identical stimuli, subjects immediately become unstable again when the perturbation direction suddenly changes. Excessive responses due to a failure to combine proprioceptive and vestibular cues effectively may explain this instability seen with first trials, particularly when falling backward.

  20. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Kaisa Niemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants.

  1. Financial incentives for smoking cessation in pregnancy: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, David; Bauld, Linda; Purves, David; Boyd, Kathleen; Sinclair, Lesley; MacAskill, Susan; McKell, Jennifer; Friel, Brenda; McConnachie, Alex; de Caestecker, Linda; Tannahill, Carol; Radley, Andrew; Coleman, Tim

    2015-01-27

    To assess the efficacy of a financial incentive added to routine specialist pregnancy stop smoking services versus routine care to help pregnant smokers quit. Phase II therapeutic exploratory single centre, individually randomised controlled parallel group superiority trial. One large health board area with a materially deprived, inner city population in the west of Scotland, United Kingdom. 612 self reported pregnant smokers in NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde who were English speaking, at least 16 years of age, less than 24 weeks pregnant, and had an exhaled carbon monoxide breath test result of 7 ppm or more. 306 women were randomised to incentives and 306 to control. The control group received routine care, which was the offer of a face to face appointment to discuss smoking and cessation and, for those who attended and set a quit date, the offer of free nicotine replacement therapy for 10 weeks provided by pharmacy services, and four, weekly support phone calls. The intervention group received routine care plus the offer of up to £400 of shopping vouchers: £50 for attending a face to face appointment and setting a quit date; then another £50 if at four weeks' post-quit date exhaled carbon monoxide confirmed quitting; a further £100 was provided for continued validated abstinence of exhaled carbon monoxide after 12 weeks; a final £200 voucher was provided for validated abstinence of exhaled carbon monoxide at 34-38 weeks' gestation. The primary outcome was cotinine verified cessation at 34-38 weeks' gestation through saliva (incentives were documented. Significantly more smokers in the incentives group than control group stopped smoking: 69 (22.5%) versus 26 (8.6%). The relative risk of not smoking at the end of pregnancy was 2.63 (95% confidence interval 1.73 to 4.01) Pincentives need to be offered to achieve one extra quitter in late pregnancy) was 7.2 (95% confidence interval 5.1 to 12.2). The mean birth weight was 3140 g (SD 600 g) in the incentives group

  2. Randomized controlled trials – a matter of design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spieth PM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peter Markus Spieth,1,2 Anne Sophie Kubasch,3 Ana Isabel Penzlin,4 Ben Min-Woo Illigens,2,5 Kristian Barlinn,6 Timo Siepmann2,6,7 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, 2Center for Clinical Research and Management Education, Division of Health Care Sciences, Dresden International University, 3Pediatric Rheumatology and Immunology, Children’s Hospital, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, 4Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany; 5Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 6Department of Neurology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany; 7Radcliffe Department of Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK Abstract: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1 clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2 both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively

  3. The Declaration of Helsinki and clinical trials: a focus on placebo-controlled trials in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, William T; Appelbaum, Paul S; Levine, Robert J

    2003-02-01

    The authors' goal was to consider ethical approaches to placebo-controlled clinical trials in the light of the evolving Declaration of Helsinki, with special attention to applications to research on schizophrenia. They review the Helsinki position on placebos, including the 2002 Clarification, exploring the potential negative effects of banning placebos in studies involving conditions for which at least partially effective treatments exist. The Clarification is examined as an approach to this issue that, in contrast to earlier formulations, better acknowledges the complexity of clinical research and the need for protocol-specific determinations. Placebo controls in schizophrenia studies are used to illustrate issues relevant to all clinical research on therapeutic interventions. The Helsinki Clarification provides a basis for operationalizing criteria for review of placebo use in clinical trials. Six criteria are proposed for judging the ethical acceptability of placebo controls, including the likelihood that the intervention being tested will have clinically significant advantages over existing treatments, the presence of compelling reasons for placebo use, subject selection that minimizes the possibility of serious adverse consequences, and a risk-versus-benefit analysis that favors the advantages from placebo use over the risks to subjects. The Helsinki Clarification constitutes an important advance in international approaches to placebo use, requiring protocol-by-protocol judgments on complex issues of clinical research ethics. When operationalized, it provides review boards with a useful methodology for reaching determinations on the appropriateness of placebo controls in particular studies.

  4. WORKBENCH FOR CONTROL SYSTEMS TRIALS BASED ON VIPA 300 CONTROLLER AND ADVANTECH INPUT/OUTPUT CARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Levinskyi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic is about workbench creation for control systems trials based on VIPA 300 industrial PLC and model of control object which is implemented in MatLab Simulink program on PC. Connection between controller and the PC is provided by the Advantech PCI-1711 input/output card of discrete and analog signals. Object identification,control system synthesis, creation of control device structure and its parametrical identification, as a rule, is done on a PC in a modelling environment, e.g. in MatLab. But often, using this PC modelling, the hardware and software features of algorithms which were obtained during system synthesis are not considered in a specific industrial PLC.It is considered a good idea to use a composite version where obtained algorithms are tested in a real industrial PLC and control object is substituted by a model which is working on a PC in real time scale. In this case software realization of algorithms in a specific PLC are fully taken into account and substitution of real control object by itsmodel considerably reduces the costs for carrying out experiments and allows to study the system behavior when control object parameters and modes of operation vary greatly. The creation of workbench stipulates several stages: configuration and programming of industrial PLC VIPA 313 SC, installation and configuration of Advantech PCI- 1711 input/output card, tuning of Simulink modelling environment for working in real time scale using Real-Time Windows Target Library, testing of workbench by using constant and harmonic signals of different frequencies. Work results of virtual stabilization system are compared with combined version. In virtual stabilization system PID governor and control object are implemented in Simulink. In combined version control object is still implemented in Simulink and PID governor - in VIPA 313 SC controller (using functional block FB58 from Step7 standard library.

  5. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention.

  6. Radonexposure with the treatment of rheumatic diseases - randomized controlled trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenbach, A. [Krankenanstalt Gasteiner Heilstollen, Bad Gastein-Boeckstein (Austria)]|[Forschungsinstitut Gastein, Bad Gastein (Austria); Kovac, J.; Brandmaier, P. [Krankenanstalt Gasteiner Heilstollen, Bad Gastein-Boeckstein (Austria); Soto, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Univ. of Cantabria (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The objective was to investigate whether there is evidence for the effectiveness of radon therapy in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. Method: Medline and MedKur databases were searched for randomised controlled clinical trials. Radon therapy centres and experts in the field were contacted, proceedings were hand-searched and bibliographies were checked for references of potential impact. Four clinical trials evaluating the effect of radon in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases with no or only a small number of drop-outs met the inclusion criteria. In patients with degenerative disease of the spine and large joints, two trials [1,2] reported less pain on pressure of painful paraspinal muscle points after a series of radon baths at a concentration of 0.8 kBq/L and 3 kBq/L, respectively. The alleviation of pain was most pronounced in the weeks following the treatment period. [3]. At six months follow-up serial immersion in combined radon and CO{sub 2} baths reduced pain and functional restrictions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n=60) more effectively than bathing in CO{sub 2} only. [4] In 130 patients with ankylosing spondylitis a complex rehabilitation program at a health resort (group 1 and 2) showed greater and longer-lasting differences to a control group staying at home (group 3), if speleotherapeutic radon exposure (group 1) was added (as compared to an added sauna treatment, group 2). Conclusion: The four trials meeting the inclusion criteria showed beneficial effects of radon therapy compared to interventions without radon exposure. Up to nine months after the treatment period significantly better results were observed, if radon therapy is added. (orig.)

  7. Sham Acupressure Controls Used in Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review and Critique

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Yu Tan; Suen, Lorna K P; Tao Wang; Alexander Molassiotis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the commonly utilized sham acupressure procedures in existing acupressure trials, and to assess whether different types of sham interventions yield different therapeutic outcomes, and, as far as possible, to identify directions for the future development of an adequate sham acupressure method. Methods Randomized controlled trials comparing true acupressure with sham interventions were included. Thirteen electronic databases were adopted to locate relevant studies from in...

  8. Teenage pregnancy and social disadvantage: systematic review integrating controlled trials and qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Angela; Brunton, Ginny; Fletcher, Adam; Oakley, Ann

    2009-11-12

    To determine the impact on teenage pregnancy of interventions that address the social disadvantage associated with early parenthood and to assess the appropriateness of such interventions for young people in the United Kingdom. Systematic review, including a statistical meta-analysis of controlled trials on interventions for early parenthood and a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies that investigated the views on early parenthood of young people living in the UK. 12 electronic bibliographic databases, five key journals, reference lists of relevant studies, study authors, and experts in the field. Review methods Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of studies and abstracted data. Ten controlled trials and five qualitative studies were included. Controlled trials evaluated either early childhood interventions or youth development programmes. The overall pooled effect size showed that teenage pregnancy rates were 39% lower among individuals receiving an intervention than in those receiving standard practice or no intervention (relative risk 0.61; 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.77). Three main themes associated with early parenthood emerged from the qualitative studies: dislike of school; poor material circumstances and unhappy childhood; and low expectations for the future. Comparison of these factors related to teenage pregnancy with the content of the programmes used in the controlled trials indicated that both early childhood interventions and youth development programmes are appropriate strategies for reducing unintended teenage pregnancies. The programmes aim to promote engagement with school through learning support, ameliorate unhappy childhood through guidance and social support, and raise aspirations through career development and work experience. However, none of these approaches directly tackles all the societal, community, and family level factors that influence young people's routes to early parenthood. A small but

  9. The Women's international study of long-duration oestrogen after menopause (WISDOM: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meade Tom W

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the time of feasibility work and final design of the trial there was no randomised control trial evidence for the long-term risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy. Observational studies had suggested that long term use of estrogen was likely to be associated, amongst other things, with reduced risks of osteoporosis and ischaemic heart disease and increased risks of breast and endometrial cancer. Concomitant use of progestogens had been shown to protect against endometrial cancer, but there were few data showing how progestogen might affect estrogen actions on other conditions. Disease specific risks from observational studies suggested that, overall, long-term HRT was likely to be beneficial. Several studies showed that mortality from all causes was lower in HRT users than in non-users. Some secondary cardiovascular prevention trials were ongoing but evidence was also required for a range of outcomes in healthy women. The WISDOM trial was designed to compare combined estrogen and progestogen versus placebo, and estrogen alone versus combined estrogen and progestogen. During the development of WISDOM the Women's Health Initiative trial was designed, funded and started in the US. Design Randomised, placebo, controlled, trial. Methods The trial was set in general practices in the UK (384, Australia (94, and New Zealand (24. In these practices 284175 women aged 50–69 years were registered with 226282 potentially eligible. We sought to randomise 22300 postmenopausal women aged 50 – 69 and treat for ten years. The interventions were: conjugated equine estrogens, 0.625 mg orally daily; conjugated equine estrogens plus medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5/5.0 mg orally daily; matched placebo. Primary outcome measures were: major cardiovascular disease, osteoporotic fractures, breast cancer and dementia. Secondary outcomes were: other cancers, all cause death, venous thromboembolism and cerebro-vascular disease. Results

  10. Practices, patients and (imperfect data - feasibility of a randomised controlled clinical drug trial in German general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummers-Pradier Eva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical (drug trials supply high quality evidence for therapeutic strategies in primary care. Until now, experience with drug trials in German general practice has been sparse. In 2007/2008, the authors conducted an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (HWI-01 to assess the clinical equivalence of ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI. Here, we report the feasibility of this trial in German general practices and the implementation of Good Clinical Practice (GCP standards as defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH in mainly inexperienced general practices. Methods This report is based on the experience of the HWI-01 study conducted in 29 German general practices. Feasibility was defined by 1 successful practice recruitment, 2 sufficient patient recruitment, 3 complete and accurate data collection and 4 appropriate protection of patient safety. Results The final practice recruitment rate was 18%. In these practices, 79 of 195 screened UTI patients were enrolled. Recruitment differed strongly between practices (range 0-12, mean 2.8 patients per practice and was below the recruitment goal of approximately 100 patients. As anticipated, practice nurses became the key figures in the screening und recruitment of patients. Clinical trial demands, in particular for completing symptom questionnaires, documentation of source data and reporting of adverse events, did not agree well with GPs' documentation habits and required support from study nurses. In many cases, GPs and practice staff seemed to be overwhelmed by the amount of information and regulations. No sudden unexpected serious adverse reactions (SUSARs were observed during the trial. Conclusions To enable drug trials in general practice, it is necessary to adapt the setup of clinical research infrastructure to the needs of GPs and

  11. Individual nutrition therapy and exercise regime: A controlled trial of injured, vulnerable elderly (INTERACTIVE trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead Craig

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal femoral fractures are amongst the most devastating consequences of osteoporosis and injurious accidental falls with 25–35% of patients dying in the first year post-fracture. Effective rehabilitation strategies are evolving however, despite established associations between nutrition, mobility, strength and strength-related functional outcomes; there has been only one small study with older adults immediately following fragility fracture where a combination of both exercise and nutrition have been provided. The aim of the INTERACTIVE trial is to establish whether a six month, individualised exercise and nutrition program commencing within fourteen days of surgery for proximal femur fracture, results in clinically and statistically significant improvements in physical function, body composition and quality of life at an acceptable level of cost and resource use and without increasing the burden of caregivers. Methods and Design This randomised controlled trial will be performed across two sites, a 500 bed acute hospital in Adelaide, South Australia and a 250 bed acute hospital in Sydney, New South Wales. Four hundred and sixty community-dwelling older adults aged > 70 will be recruited after suffering a proximal femoral fracture and followed into the community over a 12-month period. Participants allocated to the intervention group will receive a six month individualised care plan combining resistance training and nutrition therapy commencing within 14 days post-surgery. Outcomes will be assessed by an individual masked to treatment allocation at six and 12 months. To determine differences between the groups at the primary end-point (six months, ANCOVA or logistic regression will be used with models adjusted according to potential confounders. Discussion The INTERACTIVE trial is among the first to combine nutrition and exercise therapy as an early intervention to address the serious consequence of rapid deconditioning

  12. What influences recruitment to randomised controlled trials? A review of trials funded by two UK funding agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis David

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A commonly reported problem with the conduct of multicentre randomised controlled trials (RCTs is that recruitment is often slower or more difficult than expected, with many trials failing to reach their planned sample size within the timescale and funding originally envisaged. The aim of this study was to explore factors that may have been associated with good and poor recruitment in a cohort of multicentre trials funded by two public bodies: the UK Medical Research Council (MRC and the Health Technology Assessment (HTA Programme. Methods The cohort of trials was identified from the administrative databases held by the two funding bodies. 114 trials that recruited participants between 1994 and 2002 met the inclusion criteria. The full scientific applications and subsequent trial reports submitted by the trial teams to the funders provided the principal data sources. Associations between trial characteristics and recruitment success were tested using the Chi-squared test, or Fisher's exact test where appropriate. Results Less than a third (31% of the trials achieved their original recruitment target and half (53% were awarded an extension. The proportion achieving targets did not appear to improve over time. The overall start to recruitment was delayed in 47 (41% trials and early recruitment problems were identified in 77 (63% trials. The inter-relationship between trial features and recruitment success was complex. A variety of strategies were employed to try to increase recruitment, but their success could not be assessed. Conclusion Recruitment problems are complex and challenging. Many of the trials in the cohort experienced recruitment difficulties. Trials often required extended recruitment periods (sometimes supported by additional funds. While this is of continuing concern, success in addressing the trial question may be more important than recruitment alone.

  13. Computer controls for the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tandecki, M; Van Gorp, S; Friedag, P; De Leebeeck, V; Beck, D; Brand, H; Weinheimer, C; Breitenfeldt, M; Traykov, E; Mader, J; Roccia, S; Severijns, N; Herlert, A; Wauters, F; Zakoucky, D; Kozlov, V; Soti, G

    2011-01-01

    The WITCH experiment is a medium-scale experimental set-up located at ISOLDE/CERN. It combines a double Penning trap system with,a retardation spectrometer for energy measurements of recoil ions from beta decay. For a correct operation of such a set-up a whole range of different devices is required. Along with the installation and optimization of the set-up a computer control system was developed to control these devices. The CS-Framework that is developed and maintained at GSI, was chosen as a basis for this control system as it is perfectly suited to handle the distributed nature of a control system.We report here on the required hardware for WITCH, along with the basis of this CS-Framework and the add-ons that were implemented for WITCH. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exercise and manual physiotherapy arthritis research trial (EMPART): a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    French, Helen P

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is a major cause of functional disability and reduced quality of life. Management options aim to reduce pain and improve or maintain physical functioning. Current evidence indicates that therapeutic exercise has a beneficial but short-term effect on pain and disability, with poor long-term benefit. The optimal content, duration and type of exercise are yet to be ascertained. There has been little scientific investigation into the effectiveness of manual therapy in hip OA. Only one randomized controlled trial (RCT) found greater improvements in patient-perceived improvement and physical function with manual therapy, compared to exercise therapy.

  15. Surgical trial in traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (STITCH(Trauma: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregson Barbara A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in over 60% of severe head injuries in one of three types: extradural (EDH; subdural (SDH; and intraparenchymal (TICH. Prompt surgical removal of significant SDH and EDH is established and widely accepted. However, TICH is more common and is found in more than 40% of severe head injuries. It is associated with a worse outcome but the role for surgical removal remains undefined. Surgical practice in the treatment of TICHs differs widely around the world. The aim of early surgery in TICH removal is to prevent secondary brain injury. There have been trials of surgery for spontaneous ICH (including the STICH II trial, but none so far of surgery for TICH. Methods/Design The UK National Institutes of Health Research has funded STITCH(Trauma to determine whether a policy of early surgery in patients with TICH improves outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It will include a health economics component and carry out a subgroup analysis of patients undergoing invasive monitoring. This is an international multicenter pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Patients are eligible if: they are within 48 h of injury; they have evidence of TICH on CT scan with a confluent volume of attenuation significantly raised above that of the background white and grey matter that has a total volume >10 mL; and their treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise. Patients will be ineligible if they have: a significant surface hematoma (EDH or SDH requiring surgery; a hemorrhage/contusion located in the cerebellum; three or more separate hematomas fulfilling inclusion criteria; or severe pre-existing physical or mental disability or severe co-morbidity which would lead to poor outcome even if the patient made a full recovery from the head injury. Patients will be randomized via an independent service. Patients randomized to surgery receive surgery within 12 h. Both groups will be monitored according to

  16. Alzheimer’s disease multiple intervention trial (ADMIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callahan Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the current lack of disease-modifying therapies, it is important to explore new models of longitudinal care for older adults with dementia that focus on improving quality of life and delaying functional decline. In a previous clinical trial, we demonstrated that collaborative care for Alzheimer’s disease reduces patients’ neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as caregiver stress. However, these improvements in quality of life were not associated with delays in subjects’ functional decline. Trial design Parallel randomized controlled clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Participants A total of 180 community-dwelling patients aged ≥45 years who are diagnosed with possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease; subjects must also have a caregiver willing to participate in the study and be willing to accept home visits. Subjects and their caregivers are enrolled from the primary care and geriatric medicine practices of an urban public health system serving Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Interventions All patients receive best practices primary care including collaborative care by a dementia care manager over two years; this best practices primary care program represents the local adaptation and implementation of our prior collaborative care intervention in the urban public health system. Intervention patients also receive in-home occupational therapy delivered in twenty-four sessions over two years in addition to best practices primary care. The focus of the occupational therapy intervention is delaying functional decline and helping both subjects and caregivers adapt to functional impairments. The in-home sessions are tailored to the specific needs and goals of each patient-caregiver dyad; these needs are expected to change over the course of the study. Objective To determine whether best practices primary care plus home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline among patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared

  17. PLUTO trial protocol: percutaneous shunting for lower urinary tract obstruction randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Mark; Khan, Khalid; Morris, Katie; Daniels, Jane; Gray, Richard; Magill, Laura; Martin, Bill; Thompson, Peter; Alfirevic, Zarko; Kenny, Simon; Bower, Sarah; Sturgiss, Stephen; Anumba, Dilly; Mason, Gerald; Tydeman, Graham; Soothill, Peter; Brackley, Karen; Loughna, Pamela; Cameron, Alan; Kumar, Sailesh; Bullen, Phil

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective is to determine whether intrauterine vesicoamniotic shunting for fetal bladder outflow obstruction, compared with conservative, noninterventional care, improves prenatal and perinatal mortality and renal function. The secondary objectives are to determine if shunting for fetal bladder outflow obstruction improves perinatal morbidity, to determine if improvement in outcomes is related to prognostic assessment at diagnosis and, if possible, derive a prognostic risk index and to determine the safety and long-term efficacy of shunting. A multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT). Fetal medicine units. Pregnant women with singleton, male fetus with isolated lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO). Following ultrasound diagnosis of LUTO in a male fetus and exclusion of other structural and chromosomal anomalies, participation in the trial will be discussed with the mother and written information given. Consent for participation in the trial will be taken and the mother randomised via the internet to either insertion of a vesicoamniotic shunt or expectant management. During pregnancy, both groups will be followed with regular ultrasound scans looking at viability, renal measurements and amniotic fluid volume. Following delivery, babies will be followed up by paediatric nephrologists/urologists at 4-6 weeks, 12 months and 3 and 5 years to assess renal function via serum creatinine, renal ultrasound and need for dialysis/transplant. The main outcome measures will be perinatal mortality rates and renal function at 4-6 weeks and 12 months measured via serum creatinine, renal ultrasound and need for dialysis/transplant. Wellbeing of Women. ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE: September 2010. TRIAL ALGORITHM: [flowchart: see text].

  18. Assessing the quality of reports about randomized controlled trials of acupuncture treatment on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the reports' qualities which are about randomized controlled trials (RCTs of acupuncture treatment on Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight databases including The Cochrane Library(1993-Sept.,2011, PubMed (1980-Sept., 2011, EMbase (1980-Sept.,2011, SCI Expanded (1998-Sept.,2011, China Biomedicine Database Disc (CBMdisc, 1978-Sept., 2011, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, 1979-Sept., 2011 , VIP (a full text issues database of China, 1989-Sept., 2011, Wan Fang (another full text issues database of China 1998-Sept., 2011 were searched systematically. Hand search for further references was conducted. Language was limited to Chinese and English. We identified 75 RCTs that used acupuncture as an intervention and assessed the quality of these reports with the Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials statement 2010 (CONSORT2010 and Standards for Reporting Interventions Controlled Trials of Acupuncture 2010(STRICTA2010. 24 articles (32% applied the method of random allocation of sequences. No article gave the description of the mechanism of allocation concealment, no experiment applied the method of blinding. Only one article (1.47% could be identified directly from its title as about the Randomized Controlled Trials, and only 4 articles gave description of the experimental design. No article mentioned the number of cases lost or eliminated. During one experiment, acupuncture syncope led to temporal interruption of the therapy. Two articles (2.94% recorded the number of needles, and 8 articles (11.76% mentioned the depth of needle insertion. None of articles reported the base of calculation of sample size, or has any analysis about the metaphase of an experiment or an explanation of its interruption. One (1.47% mentioned intentional analysis (ITT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The quality of the reports on RCTs of acupuncture for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is moderate to low

  19. Selection and utilization of assessment instruments in substance abuse treatment trials: the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Rosa, Udi Ghitza, Betty TaiCenter for the Clinical Trials Network, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Based on recommendations from a US Institute of Medicine report, the National Institute on Drug Abuse established the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN in 1999, to accelerate the translation of science-based addiction treatment research into community-based practice, and to improve the quality of addiction treatment, using science as the vehicle. One of the CTN's primary tasks is to serve as a platform to forge bi-directional communications and collaborations between providers and scientists, to enhance the relevance of research, which generates empirical results that impact practice. Among many obstacles in moving research into real-world settings, this commentary mainly describes challenges and iterative experiences in regard to how the CTN develops its research protocols, with focus on how the CTN study teams select and utilize assessment instruments, which can reasonably balance the interests of both research scientists and practicing providers when applied in CTN trials. This commentary also discusses the process by which the CTN further selects a core set of common assessment instruments that may be applied across all trials, to allow easier cross-study analyses of comparable data.Keywords: addiction, assessment, drug abuse treatment, drug dependence, NIDA Clinical Trials Network, substance use disorder

  20. Cognitive-behavioural emotion writing tasks: a controlled trial of multiple processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Adam J; Dadds, Mark R

    2008-12-01

    We report on a controlled trial of three structured writing paradigms that engage the writer with cognitive-behavioural emotion-processes: exposure, devaluation, and benefit-finding. University students (N=198) wrote once a week for three weeks about their most upsetting experience. The long-term effects of these structured writing procedures were compared to an unstructured emotion writing condition and control. Outcomes indicated that exposure writing sped the reduction of intrusive and avoidant symptoms, while benefit-finding writing increased reports of positive growth. Results suggest the use of these paradigms to study emotion-processing mechanisms and, potentially, in practice to enhance coping in process-specific ways.

  1. Effect of Playful Balancing Training - A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jessen, Jari Due

    2013-01-01

    We used the modular playware in the form of modular interactive tiles for playful training of community-dwelling elderly with balancing problem. During short-term play on the modular interactive tiles, the elderly were playing physical, interactive games that were challenging their dynamic balance......, agility, endurance, and sensor-motoric reaction. A population of 12 elderly (average age: 79) with balancing problems (DGI average score: 18.7) was randomly assigned to control group or tiles training group, and tested before and after intervention. The tiles training group had statistical significant...... increase in balancing performance (DGI score: 21.3) after short-term playful training with the modular interactive tiles, whereas the control group remained with a score indicating balancing problems and risk of falling (DGI score: 16.6). The small pilot randomized controlled trial suggests...

  2. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbutt Jane M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. Methods and design This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1 effective use of controller medications, 2 effective use of rescue medications and 3 monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1 the child's asthma control score, 2 the parent's quality of life score, and 3 the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications

  3. Randomized control trial of computer-based rehabilitation of spatial neglect syndrome: the RESPONSE trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleet, Thomas Van; DeGutis, Joseph; Dabit, Sawsan; Chiu, Christopher

    2014-02-07

    Spatial neglect is a frequent and debilitating consequence of acquired brain injury and currently has no widely accepted standard of care. While previous interventions for spatial neglect have targeted patients' overt spatial deficits (e.g., reduced contralesional visual scanning), far fewer have directly targeted patients' non-spatial deficits (e.g., sustained attention deficits). Considering that non-spatial deficits have shown to be highly predictive of long-term disability, we developed a novel computer based training program that targets both sustained (tonic) and moment-to-moment (phasic) aspects of non-spatial attention (Tonic and Phasic Alertness Training, TAPAT). Preliminary studies demonstrate that TAPAT is safe and effective in improving both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits in the post-acute recovery phase in neglect patients. The purpose of the current trial (referred to as the REmediation of SPatial Neglect or RESPONSE trial) is to compare TAPAT to an active control training condition, include a larger sample of patients, and assess both cognitive and functional outcomes. We will employ a multi-site, longitudinal, blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) design with a target sample of 114 patients with spatial neglect. Patients will either perform, at their home, the experimental TAPAT training program or an active control computer games condition for thirty minutes/day, five days a week, over three months. Patients will be assessed on a battery of cognitive and functional outcomes on three occasions: a) immediately before training, b) within forty-eight hours post completion of total training, and c) after a three-month no-contact period post completion of total training, to assess the longevity of potential training effects. The strengths of this protocol are that it tests an innovative, in-home administered treatment that targets a fundamental deficit in neglect, employs highly sensitive computer-based assessments of cognition as well as

  4. Laparoscopic versus open gastrectomy for gastric cancer, a multicenter prospectively randomized controlled trial (LOGICA-trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Leonie; Brenkman, Hylke J F; Seesing, Maarten F J; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Luyer, Misha D P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; van Lanschot, Jan J B; de Steur, Wobbe O; Hartgrink, Henk H; Stoot, Jan H M B; Hulsewé, Karel W E; Spillenaar Bilgen, Ernst J; Rütter, Jeroen E; Kouwenhoven, Ewout A; van Det, Marc J; van der Peet, Donald L; Daams, Freek; Draaisma, Werner A; Broeders, Ivo A M J; van Stel, Henk F; Lacle, Miangela M; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2015-07-29

    For gastric cancer patients, surgical resection with en-bloc lymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of curative treatment. Open gastrectomy has long been the preferred surgical approach worldwide. However, this procedure is associated with considerable morbidity. Several meta-analyses have shown an advantage in short-term outcomes of laparoscopic gastrectomy compared to open procedures, with similar oncologic outcomes. However, it remains unclear whether the results of these Asian studies can be extrapolated to the Western population. In this trial from the Netherlands, patients with resectable gastric cancer will be randomized to laparoscopic or open gastrectomy. The study is a non-blinded, multicenter, prospectively randomized controlled superiority trial. Patients (≥18 years) with histologically proven, surgically resectable (cT1-4a, N0-3b, M0) gastric adenocarcinoma and European Clinical Oncology Group performance status 0, 1 or 2 are eligible to participate in the study after obtaining informed consent. Patients (n = 210) will be included in one of the ten participating Dutch centers and are randomized to either laparoscopic or open gastrectomy. The primary outcome is postoperative hospital stay (days). Secondary outcome parameters include postoperative morbidity and mortality, oncologic outcomes, readmissions, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In this randomized controlled trial laparoscopic and open gastrectomy are compared in patients with resectable gastric cancer. It is expected that laparoscopic gastrectomy will result in a faster recovery of the patient and a shorter hospital stay. Secondly, it is expected that laparoscopic gastrectomy will be associated with a lower postoperative morbidity, less readmissions, higher cost-effectiveness, better postoperative quality of life, but with similar mortality and oncologic outcomes, compared to open gastrectomy. The study started on 1 December 2014. Inclusion and follow-up will take 3 and 5

  5. Treatment success in pragmatic randomised controlled trials: a review of trials funded by the UK Health Technology Assessment programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftery James

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research reviewed treatment success and whether the collective uncertainty principle is met in RCTs in the US National Cancer Institute portfolio. This paper classifies clinical trials funded by the UK HTA programme by results using the method applied to the US Cancer Institute trials, and compares the two portfolios. Methods Data on all completed randomised controlled trials funded by the HTA programme 1993-2008 were extracted. Each trial's primary results was classified into six categories; 1 statistically significant in favour of the new treatment, 2 statistically significant in favour of the control treatment 3 true negative, 4 truly inconclusive, 5 inconclusive in favour of new treatment or 6 inconclusive in favour of control treatment. Trials were classified by comparing the 95% confidence interval for the difference in primary outcome to the difference specified in the sample size calculation. The results were compared with Djulbegovic's analysis of NCI trials. Results Data from 51 superiority trials were included, involving over 48,000 participants and a range of diseases and interventions. 85 primary comparisons were available because some trials had more than two randomised arms or had several primary outcomes. The new treatment had superior results (whether significant or not in 61% of the comparisons (52/85 95% CI 49.9% to 71.6%. The results were conclusive in 46% of the comparisons (19% statistically significant in favour of the new treatment, 5% statistically significant in favour of the control and 22% true negative. The results were classified as truly inconclusive (i.e. failed to answer the question asked for 24% of comparisons (20/85. HTA trials included fewer truly inconclusive and statistically significant results and more results rated as true negative than NCI trials. Conclusions The pattern of results in HTA trials is similar to that of the National Cancer Institute portfolio. Differences that

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Caries Prevention in Dental Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, M; O'Neill, C; Donaldson, M; Birch, S; Noble, S; Killough, S; Murphy, L; Greer, M; Brodison, J; Verghis, R; Worthington, H V

    2017-07-01

    We conducted a parallel group randomized controlled trial of children initially aged 2 to 3 y who were caries free, to prevent the children becoming caries active over the subsequent 36 mo. The setting was 22 dental practices in Northern Ireland, and children were randomly assigned by a clinical trials unit (CTU) (using computer-generated random numbers, with allocation concealed from the dental practice until each child was recruited) to the intervention (22,600-ppm fluoride varnish, toothbrush, 50-mL tube of 1,450 ppm fluoride toothpaste, and standardized, evidence-based prevention advice) or advice-only control at 6-monthly intervals. The primary outcome measure was conversion from caries-free to caries-active states. Secondary outcome measures were number of decayed, missing, or filled teeth (dmfs) in caries-active children, number of episodes of pain, and number of extracted teeth. Adverse reactions were recorded. Calibrated external examiners, blinded to the child's study group, assessed the status of the children at baseline and after 3 y. In total, 1,248 children (624 randomized to each group) were recruited, and 1,096 (549 intervention, 547 control) were included in the final analyses. Eighty-seven percent of intervention and 86% of control children attended every 6-mo visit ( P = 0.77). A total of 187 (34%) in the intervention group converted to caries active compared to 213 (39%) in the control group (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-1.04; P = 0.11). Mean dmfs of those with caries in the intervention group was 7.2 compared to 9.6 in the control group ( P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in the number of episodes of pain between groups ( P = 0.81) or in the number of teeth extracted in caries-active children ( P = 0.95). Ten children in the intervention group had adverse reactions of a minor nature. This well-conducted trial failed to demonstrate that the intervention kept children caries free, but there was evidence that once

  7. Aerobic exercise for Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sciver, Angela; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Honea, Robyn A.; Brooks, William M.; Billinger, Sandra A.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the role of physical exercise as a therapeutic strategy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We assessed the effect of 26 weeks (6 months) of a supervised aerobic exercise program on memory, executive function, functional ability and depression in early AD. Methods and findings This study was a 26-week randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of 150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise vs. non-aerobic stretching and toning control intervention in individuals with early AD. A total of 76 well-characterized older adults with probable AD (mean age 72.9 [7.7]) were enrolled and 68 participants completed the study. Exercise was conducted with supervision and monitoring by trained exercise specialists. Neuropsychological tests and surveys were conducted at baseline,13, and 26 weeks to assess memory and executive function composite scores, functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia), and depressive symptoms (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia). Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and brain MRI was performed at baseline and 26 weeks. Aerobic exercise was associated with a modest gain in functional ability (Disability Assessment for Dementia) compared to individuals in the ST group (X2 = 8.2, p = 0.02). There was no clear effect of intervention on other primary outcome measures of Memory, Executive Function, or depressive symptoms. However, secondary analyses revealed that change in cardiorespiratory fitness was positively correlated with change in memory performance and bilateral hippocampal volume. Conclusions Aerobic exercise in early AD is associated with benefits in functional ability. Exercise-related gains in cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with improved memory performance and reduced hippocampal atrophy, suggesting cardiorespiratory fitness gains may be important in driving brain benefits. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01128361 PMID:28187125

  8. Statistical issues in randomised controlled trials: a narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolaji Emmanuel Egbewale

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled trials (RCT s are gold standard in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in medical investigations, only if well designed and implemented. Till date, distorted views and misapplications of statistical procedures involved in RCTs are still in practice. Hence, clarification of concepts and acceptable practices related to certain statistical issues involved in the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials is needed. This narrative synthesis aimed at providing succinct but clear information on the concepts and practices of selected statistical issues in RCT s to inform correct applications. The use of tests of significance is no longer acceptable as means to compare baseline similarity between treatment groups and in determining which covariate(s should be included in the model for adjustment. Distribution of baseline attributes simply presented in tabular form is however, rather preferred. Regarding covariate selection, such approach that makes use of information on the degree of correlation between the covariate(s and the outcome variable is more in tandem with statistical principle(s than that based on tests of significance. Stratification and minimisation are not alternatives to covariate adjusted analysis; in fact they establish the need for one. Intention-to-treat is the preferred approach for the evaluation of primary outcome measures and researchers have responsibility to report whether or not the procedure was followed. A major use of results from subgroup analysis is to generate hypothesis for future clinical trials. Since RCT s are gold standard in the comparison of medical interventions, researchers cannot afford the practices of distorted allocation or statistical procedures in this all important experimental design method.

  9. Statistical issues in randomised controlled trials: a narrative synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bolaji; Emmanuel; Egbewale

    2015-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials(RCTs) are gold standard in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in medical investigations, only if well designed and implemented. Till date, distorted views and misapplications of statistical procedures involved in RCTs are still in practice. Hence, clarification of concepts and acceptable practices related to certain statistical issues involved in the design, conduct and reporting of randomised controlled trials is needed. This narrative synthesis aimed at providing succinct but clear information on the concepts and practices of selected statistical issues in RCTs to inform correct applications. The use of tests of significance is no longer acceptable as means to compare baseline similarity between treatment groups and in determining which covariate(s) should be included in the model for adjustment. Distribution of baseline attributes simply presented in tabular form is however, rather preferred. Regarding covariate selection, such approach that makes use of information on the degree of correlation between the covariate(s) and the outcome variable is more in tandem with statistical principle(s) than that based on tests of significance. Stratification and minimisation are not alternatives to covariate adjusted analysis; in fact they establish the need for one. Intention-totreat is the preferred approach for the evaluation of primary outcome measures and researchers have responsibility to report whether or not the procedure was followed. A major use of results from subgroup analysis is to generate hypothesis for future clinical trials. Since RCTs are gold standard in the comparison of medical interventions, researchers cannot afford the practices of distorted allocation or statistical procedures in this all important experimental design method.

  10. A cluster randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Intermediate Care Clinics for Diabetes (ICCD: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong Natalie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background World-wide healthcare systems are faced with an epidemic of type 2 diabetes. In the United Kingdom, clinical care is primarily provided by general practitioners (GPs rather than hospital specialists. Intermediate care clinics for diabetes (ICCD potentially provide a model for supporting GPs in their care of people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and in their management of cardiovascular risk factors. This study aims to (1 compare patients with type 2 diabetes registered with practices that have access to an ICCD service with those that have access only to usual hospital care; (2 assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention; and (3 explore the views and experiences of patients, health professionals and other stakeholders. Methods/Design This two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial (with integral economic evaluation and qualitative study is set in general practices in three UK Primary Care Trusts. Practices are randomized to one of two groups with patients referred to either an ICCD (intervention or to hospital care (control. Intervention group: GP practices in the intervention arm have the opportunity to refer patients to an ICCD - a multidisciplinary team led by a specialist nurse and a diabetologist. Patients are reviewed and managed in the ICCD for a short period with a goal of improving diabetes and cardiovascular risk factor control and are then referred back to practice. or Control group: Standard GP care, with referral to secondary care as required, but no access to ICCD. Participants are adults aged 18 years or older who have type 2 diabetes that is difficult for their GPs to control. The primary outcome is the proportion of participants reaching three risk factor targets: HbA1c (≤7.0%; blood pressure ( Discussion Forty-nine practices have been randomized, 1,997 patients have been recruited to the trial, and 20 patients have been recruited to the qualitative study. Results will be available late 2012

  11. Impact of efalizumab on patient-reported outcomes in high-need psoriasis patients: results of the international, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III Clinical Experience Acquired with Raptiva (CLEAR trial [NCT00256139

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumack Stephen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic psoriasis can negatively affect patients' lives. Assessing the impact of treatment on different aspects of a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL is therefore important and relevant in trials of anti-psoriasis agents. The recombinant humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody efalizumab targets multiple T-cell-dependent steps in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. Efalizumab has demonstrated safety and efficacy in several clinical trials, and improves patients' quality of life. Objective: To evaluate the impact of efalizumab on HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, including a large cohort of High-Need patients for whom at least 2 other systemic therapies were unsuitable because of lack of efficacy, intolerance, or contraindication. Methods A total of 793 patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive efalizumab 1 mg/kg/wk (n = 529 or placebo (n = 264 for 12 weeks. The study population included 526 High-Need patients (342 efalizumab, 184 placebo. The treatment was evaluated by patients using the HRQOL assessment tools Short Form-36 (SF-36 and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI. Other patient-reported assessments included the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA, a visual analog scale (VAS for itching, and the Patient's Global Psoriasis Assessment (PGPA. Results Efalizumab was associated with improvements at Week 12 from baseline in patient-reported outcomes, both in the total study population and in the High-Need cohort. Among all efalizumab-treated patients, the DLQI improved by 5.7 points from baseline to Week 12, relative to an improvement of 2.3 points for placebo patients (P P Conclusion A 12-week course of efalizumab improved HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. The benefits of efalizumab therapy in High-Need patients were similar to those observed in the total study population, indicating

  12. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation support application on a smartphone - randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tomohiko; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Nishiyama, Chika; Murakami, Yukiko; Ando, Masahiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Tasaki, Osamu; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Shimazu, Takeshi; Iwami, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This simulation trial aimed to compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with and without the newly-developed CPR support application on smartphones. In this trial, participants were randomly assigned to either the CPR support application group or the control group, stratified by sex and previous CPR training. Participants' CPR skills were evaluated by a 2-min case-based scenario test using the Leardal Resusci Anne PC Skill reporting Manikin System(®). The outcome measures were the proportion of chest compressions performed in each group and the number of total chest compressions and appropriate chest compressions performed during the 2-min test period. A total of 84 participants were enrolled and completed the protocol. All participants in the CPR support application group performed chest compressions, compared with only 31 (75.6%) in the control group (Psmartphones contributed to increasing the implementation rate and the number of total chest compressions performed and may assist in improving the survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (UMIN000004740).

  13. Sleep disorders in patients with depression or schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial using acupuncture treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.; Yeo, S.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this preliminary clinical trial was to investigate whether acupuncture has a positive influence on sleep and symptomatology in patients with schizophrenia or depression. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was used. One hundred participants were recruited: 40

  14. Protocol for the saMS trial (supportive adjustment for multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to supportive listening for adjustment to multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrone Paul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an incurable, chronic, potentially progressive and unpredictable disease of the central nervous system. The disease produces a range of unpleasant and debilitating symptoms, which can have a profound impact including disrupting activities of daily living, employment, income, relationships, social and leisure activities, and life goals. Adjusting to the illness is therefore particularly challenging. This trial tests the effectiveness of a Cognitive Behavioural intervention compared to Supportive Listening to assist adjustment in the early stages of MS. Methods/Design This is a two arm randomized multi-centre parallel group controlled trial. 122 consenting participants who meet eligibility criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Supportive Listening. Eight one hour sessions of therapy (delivered over a period of 10 weeks will be delivered by general nurses trained in both treatments. Self-report questionnaire data will be collected at baseline (0 weeks, mid-therapy (week 5 of therapy, post-therapy (15 weeks and at six months (26 weeks and twelve months (52 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes are distress and MS-related social and role impairment at twelve month follow-up. Analysis will also consider predictors and mechanisms of change during therapy. In-depth interviews to examine participants' experiences of the interventions will be conducted with a purposively sampled sub-set of the trial participants. An economic analysis will also take place. Discussion This trial is distinctive in its aims in that it aids adjustment to MS in a broad sense. It is not a treatment specifically for depression. Use of nurses as therapists makes the interventions potentially viable in terms of being rolled out in the NHS. The trial benefits from incorporating patient input in the development and evaluation stages. The trial will provide important information about the

  15. Cognitive Stimulation in Patients with Dementia: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mapelli

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study explores the effective outcomes of a structured cognitive stimulation treatment to improve cognition and behavioral symptoms in people with dementia (PWDs, using a randomized controlled clinical trial. Methods: Thirty PWDs were divided into three groups: experimental (treated with cognitive stimulation, placebo (treated with occupational therapy, and control (continuing with the usual activities of the nursing home. Assessment, at baseline and after a period of 8 weeks, was performed using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, activities of daily living, Mini-Mental State Examination, Esame Neuropsicologico Breve 2, Geriatric Depression Scale and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Scale. Results: Only the experimental group improved its performance in cognitive tests (p Conclusions: The results suggest that a cognitive stimulation treatment for PWDs would improve not only their cognition, but also behavioral symptoms.

  16. A control clinicial trial of a new anxiolytic 'clobazam'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Kumar, V; Kapur, R

    1984-04-01

    Clobazam as a twice-a-day dosage (10 mg-20 mg) regimen and Diazepam in a thrice-a-day schedule (5 mg-5 mg-5 mg) were both effective in controlling moderate to severe anxiety neurosis. 83 patients were studied in a controlled, randomised, double-blind trial. Patients received active drug for the first six weeks and placebo for the next two weeks. Weekly evaluation was performed clinically for anxiolytic effect as well as effect on motor coordination studied on the Pursuit Rotor. Clobazam did not significantly differ from Diazepam in the dosage schedules studied. At the end of the two-week placebo treatment period, patients on Clobazam showed more improvement. Motor coordination was not impaired in both treatment groups. Clobazam treated patients had better motor performance at the end of the 14-day post-treatment placebo period. Side effects were reported with equal frequency in both the populations.

  17. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleine Azar

    Full Text Available Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1 adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2 registration status; and, (3 among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals.Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1 adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2 whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3 adequacy of outcome registration.Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1% adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3% had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7% registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029. The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7% was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709.The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  18. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Marleine; Riehm, Kira E; McKay, Dean; Thombs, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT) results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP) is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA) journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1) adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2) registration status; and, (3) among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals. Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1) adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2) whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3) adequacy of outcome registration. Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1%) adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3%) had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7%) registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029). The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7%) was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709). The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  19. Basic radiological studies contamination control experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duce, S.W.; Winberg, M.R.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of experiments relating to contamination control performed in support of the Environmental Restoration Programs Retrieval Project. During the years 1950 to 1970 waste contaminated with plutonium and other transuranic radionuclides was disposed of in shallow land-filled pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Due to potential for migration of radionuclides to an existing aquifer the feasibility of retrieving and repackaging the waste for placement in a final repository is being examined as part of a retrieval project. Contamination control experiments were conducted to determine expected respirable and nonrespirable plutonium contaminated dust fractions and the effectiveness of various dust suppression techniques. Three soil types were tested to determine respirable fractions: Rocky Flats Plant generic soil, Radioactive Waste Management Complex generic soil, and a 1:1 blend of the two soil types. Overall, the average respirable fraction of airborne dust was 5.4% by weight. Three contamination control techniques were studied: soil fixative sprays, misting agents, and dust suppression agents. All of the tested agents proved to be effective in reducing dust in the air. Details of product performance and recommended usage are discussed.

  20. Randomized Controlled Trial of Primary Care Pediatric Parenting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Huberman, Harris S.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether pediatric primary care–based programs to enhance parenting and early child development reduce media exposure and whether enhanced parenting mediates the effects. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban public hospital pediatric primary care clinic. Participants A total of 410 mother-newborn dyads enrolled after childbirth. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions, the Video Interaction Project (VIP) and Building Blocks (BB) interventions, or to a control group. The VIP intervention comprised 1-on-1 sessions with a child development specialist who facilitated interactions in play and shared reading through review of videotapes made of the parent and child on primary care visit days; learning materials and parenting pamphlets were also provided. The BB intervention mailed parenting materials, including age-specific newsletters suggesting activities to facilitate interactions, learning materials, and parent-completed developmental questionnaires (Ages and Stages questionnaires). Outcome Measures Electronic media exposure in the home using a 24-hour recall diary. Results The mean (SD) exposure at 6 months was 146.5 (125.0) min/d. Exposure to VIP was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with the BB and control groups (mean [SD] min/d for VIP, 131.6 [118.7]; BB, 151.2 [116.7]; control, 155.4 [138.7]; P=.009). Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level (Sobel statistic=2.49; P=.01). Conclusion Pediatric primary care may represent an important venue for addressing the public health problem of media exposure in young children at a population level. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212576 PMID:21199979

  1. Pressure ulcers: effectiveness of risk-assessment tools. A randomised controlled trial (the ULCER trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Coleman, Kerrie; Mudge, Alison; Marquart, Louise; Gardner, Glenn; Stankiewicz, Monica; Kirby, Julie; Vellacott, Catherine; Horton-Breshears, Margaret; McClymont, Alice

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two pressure-ulcer screening tools against clinical judgement in preventing pressure ulcers. A single blind randomised controlled trial. A large metropolitan tertiary hospital. 1231 patients admitted to internal medicine or oncology wards. Patients were excluded if their hospital stay was expected to be 2 days or less. Participants allocated to either a Waterlow (n=410) or Ramstadius (n=411) screening tool group or to a clinical judgement group (n=410) where no formal risk screening instrument was used. Incidence of hospital acquired pressure ulcers ascertained by regular direct observation. Use of any devices for the prevention of pressure ulcers, documentation of a pressure plan and any dietetic or specialist skin integrity review were recorded. On admission, 71 (5.8%) patients had an existing pressure ulcer. The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers was similar between groups (clinical judgement 28/410 (6.8%); Waterlow 31/411 (7.5%); Ramstadius 22/410 (5.4%), p=0.44). Significant associations with pressure injury in regression modelling included requiring a dietetic referral, being admitted from a location other than home and age over 65 years. The authors found no evidence to show that two common pressure-ulcer risk-assessment tools are superior to clinical judgement to prevent pressure injury. Resources associated with use of these tools might be better spent on careful daily skin inspection and improving management targetted at specific risks. The trial was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinicat Trials Registry (ACTRN 12608000541303).

  2. Guidelines for controlled trials of prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silberstein, S.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.; Dodick, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    In 1991 the Clinical Trials Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS) developed and published its first edition of the Guidelines on controlled trials of drugs in episodic migraine because only quality trials can form the basis for international collaboration on drug therapy...... to assist in the design of well-controlled clinical trials of chronic migraine in adults, and do not apply to studies in children or adolescents Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  3. Testing the activitystat hypothesis: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomersall Sjaan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activitystat hypothesis proposes that when physical activity or energy expenditure is increased or decreased in one domain, there will be a compensatory change in another domain to maintain an overall, stable level of physical activity or energy expenditure. To date, there has been no experimental study primarily designed to test the activitystat hypothesis in adults. The aim of this trial is to determine the effect of two different imposed exercise loads on total daily energy expenditure and physical activity levels. Methods This study will be a randomised, multi-arm, parallel controlled trial. Insufficiently active adults (as determined by the Active Australia survey aged 18–60 years old will be recruited for this study (n=146. Participants must also satisfy the Sports Medicine Australia Pre-Exercise Screening System and must weigh less than 150 kg. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups using a computer-generated allocation sequence. Participants in the Moderate exercise group will receive an additional 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks, and those in the Extensive exercise group will receive an additional 300 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week for six weeks. Exercise targets will be accumulated through both group and individual exercise sessions monitored by heart rate telemetry. Control participants will not be given any instructions regarding lifestyle. The primary outcome measures are activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water and physical activity (accelerometry. Secondary measures will include resting metabolic rate via indirect calorimetry, use of time, maximal oxygen consumption and several anthropometric and physiological measures. Outcome measures will be conducted at baseline (zero weeks, mid- and end-intervention (three and six weeks with three (12 weeks and six month (24 week follow-up. All assessors will be

  4. Hepatitis C - Assessment to Treatment Trial (HepCATT) in primary care: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kirsty; Macleod, John; Metcalfe, Chris; Simon, Joanne; Horwood, Jeremy; Hollingworth, William; Marlowe, Sharon; Gordon, Fiona H; Muir, Peter; Coleman, Barbara; Vickerman, Peter; Harrison, Graham I; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Irving, William; Hickman, Matthew

    2016-07-29

    Public Health England (PHE) estimates that there are upwards of 160,000 individuals in England and Wales with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but until now only around 100,000 laboratory diagnoses have been reported to PHE and of these 28,000 have been treated. Targeted case-finding in primary care is estimated to be cost-effective; however, there has been no robust randomised controlled trial evidence available of specific interventions. Therefore, this study aims to develop and conduct a complex intervention within primary care and to evaluate this approach using a cluster randomised controlled trial. A total of 46 general practices in South West England will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either a complex intervention comprising: educational training on HCV for the practice; poster and leaflet display in the practice waiting rooms to raise awareness and encourage opportunistic testing; a HCV risk prediction algorithm based on information on possible risk markers in the electronic patient record run using Audit + software (BMJ Informatica). The audit will then be used to recall and offer patients a HCV test. Control practices will follow usual care. The effectiveness of the intervention will be measured by comparing number and rates of HCV testing, the number and proportion of patients testing positive, onward referral, rates of specialist assessment and treatment in control and intervention practices. Intervention costs and health service utilisation will be recorded to estimate the NHS cost per new HCV diagnosis and new HCV patient initiating treatment. Longer-term cost-effectiveness of the intervention in improving quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) will be extrapolated using a pre-existing dynamic health economic model. Patients' and health care workers' experiences and acceptability of the intervention will be explored through semi-structured qualitative interviews. This trial has the potential to make an important impact on patient

  5. Dilatation or no dilatation of the cervix during cesarean section (Dondi Trial): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, Jade; Weiss, Christel; Nickol, Jana; Berlit, Sebastian; Tuschy, Benjamin; Hoch, Benjamin; Trebin, Amelie-Verena; Große-Steffen, Thomas; Sütterlin, Marc; Kehl, Sven

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effects of mechanical dilatation of the cervix during cesarean section on postoperative morbidity. A total of 447 women with elective cesarean section were included in the Dondi trial (Dilatation or no dilatation of the cervix during cesarean section). The primary outcome measure of this randomized controlled trial was postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) within 6 weeks. Infectious morbidity (puerperal fever, endometritis, wound infection, and urinary tract infection), blood loss (need for blood transfusion or change in hemoglobin levels), and operating time were also evaluated. The rate of PPH within 6 weeks was not different between the two groups [dilatation group: 5 (2.4 %), no dilatation group: 3 (1.2 %), p = 0.479]. Infectious morbidity, blood loss, and operating time were not diverse as well. The only significant difference between the two groups was the rate of retained products of conception with fewer cases after cervical dilatation (0 versus 6.2 %, p cesarean section compared with no dilatation of the cervix did not influence the risk of postpartum hemorrhage. However, there were fewer cases with retained products of conception after dilatation.

  6. APECS - The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Muders, D; Hafok, H; Hatchell, J; Koenig, C; Polehampton, E; Schaaf, R; Schuller, F; Tak, F; Wyrowski, F

    2006-01-01

    APECS is the distributed control system of the new Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope located on the Llano de Chajnantor at an altitude of 5107 m in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. APECS is based on Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) software and employs a modern, object-oriented design using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) as the middleware. New generic device interfaces simplify adding instruments to the control system. The Python based observer command scripting language allows using many existing software libraries and facilitates creating more complex observing modes. A new self-descriptive raw data format (Multi-Beam FITS or MBFITS) has been defined to store the multi-beam, multi-frequency data. APECS provides an online pipeline for initial calibration, observer feedback and a quick-look display. APECS is being used for regular science observations in local and remote mode since August 2005.

  7. Comparison of treatment effects between animal experiments and clinical trials: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine concordance between treatment effects in animal experiments and clinical trials.Study design Systematic review.Data sources Medline, Embase, SIGLE, NTIS, Science Citation Index, CAB, BIOSIS.Study selection Animal studies for interventions with unambiguous evidence of a treatment effect (benefit or harm) in clinical trials: head injury, antifibrinolytics in haemorrhage, thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke, tirilazad in acute ischaemic stroke, antenatal corticosteroids t...

  8. Likely country of origin in publications on randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials during the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2007-01-01

    The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study.......The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study....

  9. Amantadine for dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Sawada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dyskinesias are some of the major motor complications that impair quality of life for patients with Parkinson's disease. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of amantadine in Parkinson's disease patients suffering from dyskinesias. METHODS: In this multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, 36 patients with Parkinson's disease and dyskinesias were randomized, and 62 interventions, which included amantadine (300 mg/day or placebo treatment for 27 days, were analyzed. At 15 days after washout, the treatments were crossed over. The primary outcome measure was the changes in the Rush Dyskinesia Rating Scale (RDRS during each treatment period. The secondary outcome measures were changes in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part IVa (UPDRS-IVa, dyskinesias, part IVb (motor fluctuations, and part III (motor function. RESULTS: RDRS improved in 64% and 16% of patients treated with amantadine or placebo, respectively, with significant differences between treatments. The adjusted odds-ratio for improvement by amantadine was 6.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 31.5. UPDRS-IVa was improved to a significantly greater degree in amantadine-treated patients [mean (SD of 1.83 (1.56] compared with placebo-treated patients [0.03 (1.51]. However, there were no significant effects on UPDRS-IVb or III scores. CONCLUSIONS: Results from the present study demonstrated that amantadine exhibited efficacious effects against dyskinesias in 60-70% of patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000000780.

  10. Acupuncture for dry eye: a randomised controlled trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ae-Ran

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dry eye is usually managed by conventional medical interventions such as artificial tears, anti-inflammatory drugs and surgical treatment. However, since dry eye is one of the most frequent ophthalmologic disorders, safer and more effective methods for its treatment are necessary, especially for vulnerable patients. Acupuncture has been widely used to treat patients with dry eye. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for this condition. Methods/Design A randomised, patient-assessor blinded, sham (non-acupuncture point, shallow acupuncture controlled study was established. Participants allocated to verum acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups will be treated three times weekly for three weeks for a total of nine sessions per participant. Seventeen points (GV23; bilateral BL2, GB4, TE23, Ex1 (Taiyang, ST1 and GB20; and left SP3, LU9, LU10 and HT8 for men, right for women have been selected for the verum acupuncture; for the sham acupuncture, points have been selected that do not coincide with a classical acupuncture point and that are located close to the verum points, except in the case of the rim of the eye. Ocular surface disease index, tear film breakup time, the Schirmer I test, medication quantification scale and general assessment of improvement will be used as outcome variables for evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture. Safety will also be assessed at every visit. Primary and secondary outcomes will be assessed four weeks after screening. All statistical analyses will be performed using analysis of covariance. Discussion The results of this trial will be used as a basis for clarifying the efficacy of acupuncture for dry eye. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00969280.

  11. Mixing Methods in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs): Validation, Contextualization, Triangulation, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, James P.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Dorner, Lisa; Barnes, Carol; May, Henry; Huff, Jason; Camburn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we described how we mixed research approaches in a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of a school principal professional development program. Using examples from our study we illustrate how combining qualitative and quantitative data can address some key challenges from validating instruments and measures of mediator variables to…

  12. Mixing Methods in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs): Validation, Contextualization, Triangulation, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, James P.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Dorner, Lisa; Barnes, Carol; May, Henry; Huff, Jason; Camburn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we described how we mixed research approaches in a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of a school principal professional development program. Using examples from our study we illustrate how combining qualitative and quantitative data can address some key challenges from validating instruments and measures of mediator variables to…

  13. What device should be used for telementoring? Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budrionis, Andrius; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Bellika, Johan Gustav

    2015-09-01

    The paper analyzes behavioral patterns of mentors while using different mentoring devices to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-platform mentoring. The fundamental differences of devices supporting telementoring create threats for the perception and interpretation of the transmitted video, highlighting the necessity of exploring hardware usability aspects in a safety critical surgical mentoring scenario. Three types of devices, based on the screen size, formed the arms for the randomized controlled trial. Streaming video recordings of a laparoscopic procedure to the mentors imitated the mentoring scenario. User preferences and response times were recorded while participating in a session performed on all devices. Median response to a mentoring request times were similar for mobile platforms; expected durations were considerably longer for stationary computer. Ability to perceive and identify anatomical structures was insignificantly lower on small sized devices. Stationary and tablet platforms were nearly equally preferred by the most of participants as default telementoring hardware. As a side effect, incompatibility of daily duties of the surgeons in the hospital and telementoring responsibilities while implementing systems locally was identified. Scaling up the use of the service in combination with the organizational changes of clinical staff looks like a promising solution. The trial demonstrated the feasibility of using all three types of devices for the purpose of mentoring, allowing users to choose the preferred platform. The paper provided initial results on the quality assurance of telementoring systems imposed by the regulatory documents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Krohn Garnæs

    2016-07-01

    .04. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the exercise group (mean 120.4 mm Hg compared to the control group (mean 128.1 mm Hg, with a mean difference of -7.73 mm Hg (95% CI -13.23, -2.22; p = 0.006. No significant between-group differences were seen in diastolic blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, or body composition in late pregnancy. In per protocol analyses, late pregnancy systolic blood pressure was 115.7 (95% CI 110.0, 121.5 mm Hg in the exercise group (significant between-group difference, p = 0.001, and diastolic blood pressure was 75.1 (95% CI 71.6, 78.7 mm Hg (significant between-group difference, p = 0.02. We had planned to recruit 150 women into the trial; hence, under-recruitment represents a major limitation of our results. Another limitation to our study was the low adherence to the exercise program, with only 50% of the women included in the intention-to-treat analysis adhering as described in the study protocol.In this trial we did not observe a reduction in GWG among overweight/obese women who received a supervised exercise training program during their pregnancy. The incidence of GDM in late pregnancy seemed to be lower in the women randomized to exercise training than in the women receiving standard maternity care only. Systolic blood pressure in late pregnancy was also apparently lower in the exercise group than in the control group. These results indicate that supervised exercise training might be beneficial as a part of standard pregnancy care for overweight/obese women.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01243554.

  15. Stress debriefing after childbirth: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Susan R; Henderson, Jenni; Evans, Sharon F; Hagan, Ronald

    2003-06-02

    To test whether critical incident stress debriefing after childbirth reduces the incidence of postnatal psychological disorders. Randomised single-blind controlled trial stratified for parity and delivery mode. Two large maternity hospitals in Perth. 1745 women who delivered healthy term infants between April 1996 and December 1997 (875 allocated to intervention and 870 to control group). An individual, standardised debriefing session based on the principles of critical incident stress debriefing carried out within 72 hours of delivery. Diagnosis of stress disorders or depression in the 12 months postpartum, using structured psychological interview and criteria of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition. Follow-up information was available for 1730 women (99.1%), 482 of whom underwent psychological interview. There were no significant differences between control and intervention groups in scores on Impact of Events or Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scales at 2, 6 or 12 months postpartum, or in proportions of women who met diagnostic criteria for a stress disorder (intervention, 0.6% v control, 0.8%; P = 0.58) or major or minor depression (intervention, 17.8% v control, 18.2%; relative risk [95% CI], 0.99 [0.87-1.11]) during the postpartum year. Nor were there differences in median time to onset of depression (intervention, 6 [interquartile range, 4-9] weeks v control, 4 [3-8] weeks; P = 0.84), or duration of depression (intervention, 24 [12-46] weeks v control, 22 [10-52] weeks; P = 0.98). There is a high prevalence of depression in women during the first year after childbirth. A session of midwife-led, critical incident stress debriefing was not effective in preventing postnatal psychological disorders, but had no adverse effects.

  16. Preventing hypothermia in elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery patients: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duff Jed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients having arthroscopic shoulder surgery frequently experience periods of inadvertent hypothermia. This common perioperative problem has been linked to adverse patient outcomes such as myocardial ischaemia, surgical site infection and coagulopathy. International perioperative guidelines recommend patient warming, using a forced air warming device, and the use of warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions for the prevention of hypothermia in at-risk patient groups. This trial will investigate the effect of these interventions on patients’ temperature, thermal comfort, and total recovery time. Method/Design The trial will employ a randomised 2 x 2 factorial design. Eligible patients will be stratified by anaesthetist and block randomised into one of four groups: Group one will receive preoperative warming with a forced air warming device; group two will receive warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions; group three will receive both preoperative warming and warmed intraoperative irrigation solutions; and group four will receive neither intervention. Participants in all four groups will receive active intraoperative warming with a forced air warming device. The primary outcome measures are postoperative temperature, thermal comfort, and total recovery time. Primary outcomes will undergo a two-way analysis of variance controlling for covariants such as operating room ambient temperature and volume of intraoperative irrigation solution. Discussion This trial is designed to confirm the effectiveness of these interventions at maintaining perioperative normothermia and to evaluate if this translates into improved patient outcomes. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number ACTRN12610000591055

  17. The Power of Malaria Vaccine Trials Using Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; de Vlas, Sake J.

    2017-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) in healthy human volunteers is an important and powerful tool in clinical malaria vaccine development. However, power calculations are essential to obtain meaningful estimates of protective efficacy, while minimizing the risk of adverse events. To optimize power calculations for CHMI-based malaria vaccine trials, we developed a novel non-linear statistical model for parasite kinetics as measured by qPCR, using data from mosquito-based CHMI experiments in 57 individuals. We robustly account for important sources of variation between and within individuals using a Bayesian framework. Study power is most dependent on the number of individuals in each treatment arm; inter-individual variation in vaccine efficacy and the number of blood samples taken per day matter relatively little. Due to high inter-individual variation in the number of first-generation parasites, hepatic vaccine trials required significantly more study subjects than erythrocytic vaccine trials. We provide power calculations for hypothetical malaria vaccine trials of various designs and conclude that so far, power calculations have been overly optimistic. We further illustrate how upcoming techniques like needle-injected CHMI may reduce required sample sizes. PMID:28081133

  18. FIELD TRIALS OF MOLLUSCICIDE (WL 8008 IN BILHARZIASIS CONTROL PROJECT AREA, IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Massoud

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available Field trials of molluscicide WL8008 (N-tritylmorpholine were carried out in Khuzestan, Iran. The liquid 2 (FX/28, a 16.5 w/v emulsifiable concentrate in tetrachloroethylene in concentrations of 0.25 ppm and 0.5 ppm was used against Bulinus truncatus and Lymnaea gedrosiana in standing and running water systems . Bio-assay tests and laboratory experiments were made parallel to the field trials. Only a few of the B.truncatus were affected by 0.25 ppm of N-tritylmorpholine, but L.gedrosiana proved to be more susceptible to the chemical and an almost complete kill of L.gedrosiana was achieved. A concentration of 0.5 ppm completely killed both B.truncatus and L.gedrosiana, but had no effect on egg-masses. N-trityl-morpholine may play an important part in future snail control projects, particularly on Lymnaea snails.

  19. Exercise and manual physiotherapy arthritis research trial (EMPART: a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Paul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip is a major cause of functional disability and reduced quality of life. Management options aim to reduce pain and improve or maintain physical functioning. Current evidence indicates that therapeutic exercise has a beneficial but short-term effect on pain and disability, with poor long-term benefit. The optimal content, duration and type of exercise are yet to be ascertained. There has been little scientific investigation into the effectiveness of manual therapy in hip OA. Only one randomized controlled trial (RCT found greater improvements in patient-perceived improvement and physical function with manual therapy, compared to exercise therapy. Methods and design An assessor-blind multicentre RCT will be undertaken to compare the effect of a combination of manual therapy and exercise therapy, exercise therapy only, and a waiting-list control on physical function in hip OA. One hundred and fifty people with a diagnosis of hip OA will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of 3 groups: exercise therapy, exercise therapy with manual therapy and a waiting-list control. Subjects in the intervention groups will attend physiotherapy for 6–8 sessions over 8 weeks. Those in the control group will remain on the waiting list until after this time and will then be re-randomised to one of the two intervention groups. Outcome measures will include physical function (WOMAC, pain severity (numerical rating scale, patient perceived change (7-point Likert scale, quality of life (SF-36, mood (hospital anxiety and depression scale, patient satisfaction, physical activity (IPAQ and physical measures of range of motion, 50-foot walk and repeated sit-to stand tests. Discussion This RCT will compare the effectiveness of the addition of manual therapy to exercise therapy to exercise therapy only and a waiting-list control in hip OA. A high quality methodology will be used in keeping with CONSORT guidelines. The

  20. INvestigational Vertebroplasty Efficacy and Safety Trial (INVEST: a randomized controlled trial of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stout Lydia

    2007-12-01

    -primary outcomes are the modified Roland score and pain numerical rating scale at 1 month. Discussion Although extensively utilized throughout North America for palliation of pain, vertebroplasty still has not undergone rigorous study. The study outlined above represents the first randomized, controlled study that can account for a placebo effect in the setting of vertebroplasty. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81871888

  1. Clinical review: Strict or loose glycemic control in critically ill patients - implementing best available evidence from randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M.J.; Harmsen, R.E.; Spronk, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Glycemic control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as 'strict glycemic control' (SGC), decreased mortality and morbidity of adult critically ill patients in two randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Five successive RCTs, however, failed to show benefit of SGC with one trial even reporti

  2. Effects of the Finnish Alzheimer disease exercise trial (FINALEX): a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkälä, Kaisu H; Pöysti, Minna M; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa; Tilvis, Reijo S; Savikko, Niina; Kautiainen, Hannu; Strandberg, Timo E

    2013-05-27

    Few rigorous clinical trials have investigated the effectiveness of exercise on the physical functioning of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). To investigate the effects of intense and long-term exercise on the physical functioning and mobility of home-dwelling patients with AD and to explore its effects on the use and costs of health and social services. A randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 home-dwelling patients with AD living with their spousal caregiver. The 3 trial arms included (1) group-based exercise (GE; 4-hour sessions with approximately 1-hour training) and (2) tailored home-based exercise (HE; 1-hour training), both twice a week for 1 year, and (3) a control group (CG) receiving the usual community care. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the Short Physical Performance Battery, and information on the use and costs of social and health care services. All groups deteriorated in functioning during the year after randomization, but deterioration was significantly faster in the CG than in the HE or GE group at 6 (P = .003) and 12 (P = .015) months. The FIM changes at 12 months were -7.1 (95% CI, -3.7 to -10.5), -10.3 (95% CI, -6.7 to -13.9), and -14.4 (95% CI, -10.9 to -18.0) in the HE group, GE group, and CG, respectively. The HE and GE groups had significantly fewer falls than the CG during the follow-up year. The total costs of health and social services for the HE patient-caregiver dyads (in US dollars per dyad per year) were $25,112 (95% CI, $17,642 to $32,581) (P = .13 for comparison with the CG), $22,066 in the GE group ($15,931 to $28,199; P = .03 vs CG), and $34,121 ($24,559 to $43,681) in the CG. An intensive and long-term exercise program had beneficial effects on the physical functioning of patients with AD without increasing the total costs of health and social services or causing any significant adverse effects. anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12608000037303.

  3. Reporting of consistency of blood pressure control in randomized controlled trials of antihypertensive drugs: a systematic review of 1372 trial reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Urs; Webb, Alastair J S; Howard, Sally C; Rothwell, Peter M

    2012-07-01

    Hypertension is a powerful treatable risk factor for stroke. Reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of antihypertensive drugs rightly concentrate on clinical outcomes, but control of blood pressure (BP) during follow-up is also important, particularly given that inconsistent control is associated with a high risk of stroke and that antihypertensive drug classes differ in this regard. We performed a systematic review of reporting of BP control in RCTs of antihypertensive drugs. We searched bibliographic databases (1950-2009) for systematic reviews of RCTs of BP-lowering and identified the main report of all trials. We identified 94 larger trials (>100 participants/arm, >1-year follow-up) and 1278 smaller/shorter trials. Ninety-one (96.8%) larger trials reported some data on mean BP during follow-up, but none reported effects on the consistency of control of BP over time. Although 81 (86.2%) larger trials reported group distribution of BP at baseline (usually SD), only 22 (23.4%) reported such data at any follow-up visit. Eleven (11.7%) larger trials reported group distribution of the change in BP from baseline to follow-up, but 61 (64.9%) reported no data at all on group distribution of BP at follow-up. Thirty-nine (41.5%) trials reported the proportion of patients reaching some BP target during follow-up, but no trial reported data on the consistency of control to target within individuals over time. Similar proportions were observed in the 1278 smaller/short trials. Reporting of BP control is limited in RCTs of BP-lowering drugs. We suggest reporting guidelines.

  4. ROLE OF CELECOXIB IN BENIGN BREAST DISEASE: RANDOMISED CONTROL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumen Das

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Benign Breast Disease (BBD, commonest cause of morbidity in females due to breast diseases, still offers therapeutic challenge. Several drug therapies (with Evening Primrose Oil, Danazol etc have been tried, but none made gold standard. Reports on effect of Cox-2 inhibitors are scarce. This randomized control trial aims at determination of effect of Cox- inhibitors (Celecoxib in BBD in comparison to Evening Primrose Oil (EPO . Celecoxib showed better reduction in lump size (in 80% than EPO group (in 50%. Pain reduction was excellent in COX -2 groups as compared to EPO group. Recurrence rate was also lower in Celecoxib group at 10 weeks. Side effects were almost nil in both the groups. Celecoxib is better than EPO in the management of BBD. Short course therapy with COX-2 inhibitors gives good pain relief, greater reduction in lump size, low recurrence with minimum side effects.

  5. Acupressure therapy for morning sickness. A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, E

    1989-01-01

    A prospective, controlled clinical trial examined the efficacy of acupressure therapy for morning sickness, using a two group, random assignment, crossover design. Subjects in Group 1 (N = 8) used acupressure wristbands for five days, followed by five days without therapy. Subjects in Group 2 (N = 8) had no therapy for five days, followed by five days use of wristbands. The Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist and Sickness Impact Profile were used, and extent of nausea was assessed at baseline, day five, and day ten. Use of acupressure wristbands relieved morning sickness for 12 of 16 subjects (chi 2 = 5.31 with Yates' correction factor, df = 1, p less than .025). Acupressure therapy resulted in statistically significant (p less than .05) reductions in anxiety, depression, behavioral dysfunction, and nausea. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are presented.

  6. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect.

  7. Controlled trial of plasma exchange in treatment of Raynaud's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, M J; Talpos, G; Roberts, V C; White, J M; Cotton, L T

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with Raynaud's syndrome had their digital vessel patency assessed by Doppler ultrasound after different thermal stresses. Digital vessel patency rates differed significantly after stresses at 15 degrees C and 45 degrees C. In a randomised controlled trial placebo and heparin had no effect either on patients' symptoms or on the patency of their digital vessels. Plasma exchange improved both symptoms and vessel patency rates at 15 degrees C and 21 degrees C. Improvement in seven out of eight of these patients has been maintained for six months. Assessing digital vessel patency by Doppler techniques allow continuous, atraumatic, and safe evaluation of the effects of different methods of treatment on the patency of the digital vessels and has helped to indicate that plasma exchange is a useful adjunct in the management of patients with severe Raynaud's syndrome. PMID:376042

  8. Guidelines for controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache: second edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, L; Bigal, M E; Cerbo, R; Diener, H C; Holroyd, K; Lampl, C; Mitsikostas, D D; Steiner, T J; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    2010-01-01

    The Clinical Trials Subcommittee of the International Headache Society published its first edition of the guidelines on controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache in 1995. These aimed 'to improve the quality of controlled clinical trials in tension-type headache', because 'good quality controlled trials are the only way to convincingly demonstrate the efficacy of a drug, and form the basis for international agreement on drug therapy'. The Committee published similar guidelines for clinical trials in migraine and cluster headache. Since 1995 several studies on the treatment of episodic and chronic tension-type headache have been published, providing new information on trial methodology for this disorder. Furthermore, the classification of the headaches, including tension-type headache, has been revised. These developments support the need for also revising the guidelines for drug treatments in tension-type headache. These Guidelines are intended to assist in the design of well-controlled clinical trials in tension-type headache.

  9. Hypnosis Antenatal Training for Childbirth (HATCh: a randomised controlled trial [NCT00282204

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghurst Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although medical interventions play an important role in preserving lives and maternal comfort they have become increasingly routine in normal childbirth. This may increase the risk of associated complications and a less satisfactory birth experience. Antenatal hypnosis is associated with a reduced need for pharmacological interventions during childbirth. This trial seeks to determine the efficacy or otherwise of antenatal group hypnosis preparation for childbirth in late pregnancy. Methods/design A single centre, randomised controlled trial using a 3 arm parallel group design in the largest tertiary maternity unit in South Australia. Group 1 participants receive antenatal hypnosis training in preparation for childbirth administered by a qualified hypnotherapist with the use of an audio compact disc on hypnosis for re-enforcement; Group 2 consists of antenatal hypnosis training in preparation for childbirth using an audio compact disc on hypnosis administered by a nurse with no training in hypnotherapy; Group 3 participants continue with their usual preparation for childbirth with no additional intervention. Women > 34 and Discussion If effective, hypnosis would be a simple, inexpensive way to improve the childbirth experience, reduce complications associated with pharmacological interventions, yield cost savings in maternity care, and this trial will provide evidence to guide clinical practice.

  10. Singing teaching as a therapy for chronic respiratory disease - a randomised controlled trial and qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Julia L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite optimal pharmacological therapy and pulmonary rehabilitation, patients with COPD continue to be breathless. There is a need to develop additional strategies to alleviate symptoms. Learning to sing requires control of breathing and posture and might have benefits that translate into daily life. Methods To test this hypothesis we performed a randomised controlled trial, comparing a six week course of twice weekly singing classes to usual care, in 28 COPD patients. The experience of singing was assessed in a qualitative fashion, through interviews with a psychologist. In addition, we surveyed patients with chronic respiratory conditions who participated in a series of open singing workshops. Results In the RCT, the physical component score of the SF36 improved in the singers (n = 15 compared to the controls (n = 13; +7.5(14.6 vs. -3.8(8.4 p = 0.02. Singers also had a significant fall in HAD anxiety score; -1.1(2.7 vs. +0.8(1.7 p = 0.03. Singing did not improve single breath counting, breath hold time or shuttle walk distance. In the qualitative element, 8 patients from the singing group were interviewed. Positive effects on physical sensation, general well-being, community/social support and achievement/efficacy emerged as common themes. 150 participants in open workshops completed a questionnaire. 96% rated the workshops as "very enjoyable" and 98% thought the workshop had taught them something about breathing in a different way. 81% of attendees felt a "marked physical difference" after the workshop. Conclusion Singing classes can improve quality of life measures and anxiety and are viewed as a very positive experience by patients with respiratory disease; no adverse consequences of participation were observed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials - ISRCTN17544114.

  11. Use of the experience sampling method in the context of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Simone J W; Hasmi, Laila; Drukker, Marjan; van Os, J; Delespaul, Philippe A E G

    2016-01-01

    Objective The experience sampling method (ESM) is a structured diary technique to appraise subjective experiences in daily life. It is applied in psychiatric patients, as well as in patients with somatic illness. Despite the potential of ESM assessment, the improved logistics and its increased administration in research, its use in clinical trials remains limited. This paper introduces ESM for clinical trials in psychiatry and beyond. Methods ESM is an ecologically valid method that yields a comprehensive view of an individual's daily life. It allows the assessment of various constructs (eg, quality of life, psychopathology) and psychological mechanisms (eg, stress-sensitivity, coping). These constructs are difficult to assess using cross-sectional questionnaires. ESM can be applied in treatment monitoring, as an ecological momentary intervention, in clinical trials, or in single case clinical trials. Technological advances (eg, smartphone applications) make its implementation easier. Results Advantages of ESM are highlighted and disadvantages are discussed. Furthermore, the ecological nature of ESM data and its consequences are explored, including the potential pitfalls of ambiguously formulated research questions and the specificities of ESM in statistical analyses. The last section focuses on ESM in relation to clinical trials and discusses its future use in optimising clinical decision-making. Conclusions ESM can be a valuable asset in clinical trial research and should be used more often to study the benefits of treatment in psychiatry and somatic health. PMID:27443678

  12. A controlled trial of the father's role in breastfeeding promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, Alfredo; Continisio, Grazia Isabella; Aldinucci, Maria; D'Amora, Stefania; Continisio, Paola

    2005-10-01

    To investigate whether supporting fathers to recognize the relevance of their role in the success of breastfeeding and teaching them how to prevent and to manage the most common lactation problems would result in more women breastfeeding. A controlled trial, in which the participating fathers were allocated in 2-month blocks to a child care training session, was conducted of 280 mothers considering breastfeeding and their 280 partners at a university obstetric department in Naples, Italy. Support and advice about breastfeeding was provided to all of the mothers. Among the fathers of the intervention group, the training session included the management of breastfeeding; among those of the control group, it did not. Primary outcome was the prevalence of full breastfeeding at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were the proportion of women who perceived their milk to be insufficient, who stopped breastfeeding because of problems, and who reported to have received help in breastfeeding management by their partners. The prevalence of full breastfeeding at 6 months was 25% (35 of 140) in the intervention group and 15% (21 of 140) in the control group and that of any breastfeeding at 12 months was 19% (27) and 11% (16), respectively. Perceived milk insufficiency was significantly more frequent among the mothers of the control group (38 [27%] of 140 vs 12 [8.6%] of 140), as well as breastfeeding interruption because of problems with lactation (25 [18%] of 140 vs 6 [4%] of 140). Moreover, significantly more women in the intervention group reported receiving support and relevant help with infant feeding management from their partners (128 [91%] of 140 vs 48 [34%] of 140). Among the women who had reported difficulties with lactation in the intervention and control groups (96 [69%] and 89 [64%], respectively), the prevalence of full breastfeeding at 6 months was 24% and 4.5%, respectively. Teaching fathers how to prevent and to manage the most common lactation difficulties is

  13. Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET – rationale and design: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Magnusson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pacemaker system consists of one or two leads connected to a device that is implanted into a pocket formed just below the collarbone. This pocket is typically subcutaneous, that is, located just above the pectoral fascia. Even though the size of pacemakers has decreased markedly, complications due to superficial implants do occur. An alternative technique would be intramuscular placement of the pacemaker device, but there are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs to support this approach, which is the rationale for the Placement Of Cardiac PacemaKEr Trial (POCKET. The aim is to study if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a pacemaker pocket. Methods: In October 2016, we started to enroll 200 consecutive patients with an indication for bradycardia pacemaker implantation. Patients are randomized to random block sizes, stratified by age group (cut-off: 65 years and sex, and then randomized to either subcutaneous or intramuscular implant. A concealed allocation procedure is employed, using sequentially numbered, sealed envelopes. Pocket site is blinded to the patient and in all subsequent care. The primary endpoint is patient overall satisfaction with the pocket location at 24 months as measured using a visual analog scale (VAS 0-10. Secondary endpoints are: complications, patient-reported satisfaction at 1, 12, and 24 months (overall satisfaction, pain, discomfort, degree of unsightly appearance, movement problems, and sleep problems due to device. Conclusions: POCKET is a prospective interventional RCT designed to evaluate if intramuscular is superior to subcutaneous placement of a bradycardia pacemaker during a two-year follow-up.

  14. The chronic kidney disease Water Intake Trial (WIT): results from the pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William F; Sontrop, Jessica M; Huang, Shih-Han; Gallo, Kerri; Moist, Louise; House, Andrew A; Weir, Matthew A; Garg, Amit X

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Increased water intake may benefit kidney function. Prior to initiating a larger randomised controlled trial (RCT), we examined the safety and feasibility of asking adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to increase their water intake. Design, setting, participants and measurements Beginning in October 2012, we randomly assigned 29 adults with stage 3 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 30–60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and albuminuria) to one of the two groups of water intake: hydration (n=18) or standard (n=11). We asked the hydration group to increase their water intake by 1.0–1.5 L/day (in addition to usual intake, depending on sex and weight) for 6 weeks, while the control group carried on with their usual intake. Participants collected a 24 h urine sample at baseline and at 2 and 6 weeks after randomisation. Our primary outcome was the between-group difference in change in 24 h urine volume from baseline to 6 weeks. Results (63%)of participants were men, 81% were Caucasians and the average age was 61 years (SD 14 years). The average baseline eGFR was 40 mL/min/1.73 m2 (SD 11 mL/min/1.73 m2); the median albumin to creatinine ratio was 19 mg/mmol (IQR 6–74 mg/mmol). Between baseline and 6-week follow-up, the hydration group's average 24 h urine volume increased by 0.7 L/day (from 2.3 to 3.0 L/day) and the control group's 24 h urine decreased by 0.3 L/day (from 2.0 to 1.7 L/day; between-group difference in change: 0.9 L/day (95% CI 0.4 to 1.5; p=0.002)). We found no significant changes in urine, serum osmolality or electrolyte concentrations, or eGFR. No serious adverse events or changes in quality of life were reported. Conclusions A pilot RCT indicates adults with stage 3 CKD can successfully and safely increase water intake by up to 0.7 L/day in addition to usual fluid intake. Trial registration Registered with Clinical Trials—government identifier NCT01753466. PMID:24362012

  15. Complex realities: community engagement for a paediatric randomized controlled malaria vaccine trial in Kilifi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angwenyi, Vibian; Kamuya, Dorcas; Mwachiro, Dorothy; Kalama, Betty; Marsh, Vicki; Njuguna, Patricia; Molyneux, Sassy

    2014-02-25

    Community engagement (CE) is increasingly promoted for biomedical research conducted in resource poor settings for both intrinsic and instrumental purposes. Given the potential importance of CE, but also complexities and possibility of unexpected negative outcomes, there is need for more documentation of CE processes in practice. We share experiences of formal CE for a paediatric randomized controlled malaria vaccine trial conducted in three sites within Kilifi County, Kenya. Social scientists independent of the trial held in-depth individual interviews with trial researchers (n=5), community leaders (n=8) and parents (15 with enrolled children and 4 without); and group discussions with fieldworkers (n=6) and facility staff (n=2). We conducted a survey of participating households (n=200) and observed over 150 CE activities. The overall CE plan was similar across the three study sites, although less community-based information in site C. Majority perceived CE activities to clear pre-existing concerns and misconceptions; increase visibility, awareness of and trust in trial staff. Challenges included: some community leaders attempting to exert pressure on people to enrol; local wording in information sheets and consent forms feeding into serious anxieties about the trial; and concerns about reduced CE over time. Negative effects of these challenges were mitigated through changes to on-going CE activities, and final information sharing and consent being conducted individually by trained clinical staff. One year after enrolment, 31% (n = 62) of participants' parents reported malaria prevention as the main aim of the activities their children were involved in, and 93% wanted their children to remain involved. The trial teams' goals for CE were relatively clear from the outset. Other actors' hopes and expectations (like higher allowances and future employment) were not openly discussed, but emerged over the course of engagements. Encouraging open discussion of all actors

  16. Recruitment issues when primary care population clusters are used in randomised controlled clinical trials: climbing mountains or pushing boulders uphill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddinott, Pat; Britten, Jane; Harrild, Kirsten; Godden, David J

    2007-05-01

    Cluster randomised controlled trials for health promotion, education, public health or organisational change interventions are becoming increasingly common to inform evidence-based policy. However, there is little published methodological evidence on recruitment strategies for primary care population clusters. In this paper, we discuss how choosing which population cluster to randomise can impact on the practicalities of recruitment in primary care. We describe strategies developed through our experiences of recruiting primary care organisations to participate in a national randomised controlled trial of a policy to provide community breastfeeding groups for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, the BIG (Breastfeeding in Groups) trial. We propose an iterative qualitative approach to recruitment; collecting data generated through the recruitment process, identifying themes and using the constant comparative method of analysis. This can assist in developing successful recruitment strategies and contrasts with the standardised approach commonly used when recruiting individuals to participate in randomised controlled trials. Recruiting primary care population clusters to participate in trials is currently an uphill battle in Britain. It is a complex process, which can benefit from applying qualitative methods to inform trial design and recruitment strategy. Recruitment could be facilitated if health service managers were committed to supporting peer reviewed, funded and ethics committee approved research at national level.

  17. Optimal Macronutrient Content of the Diet for Adolescents With Prediabetes; RESIST a Randomised Control Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garnett, Sarah P; Gow, Megan; Ho, Mandy; Baur, Louise A; Noakes, Manny; Woodhead, Helen J; Broderick, Carolyn R; Burrell, Susie; Chisholm, Kerryn; Halim, Jocelyn; De, Sukanya; Steinbeck, Katherine; Srinivasan, Shubha; Ambler, Geoffrey R; Kohn, Michael R; Cowell, Chris T

    2013-01-01

    ...: This study was a randomized controlled trial, known as Researching Effective Strategies to Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Children and Teenagers, in 2 hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Participants...

  18. Handsearching the EMHJ for reports of randomized controlled trials by U.K. Cochrane Centre (Bahrain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hajeri, A; Al Sayyad, J; Eisinga, A

    2006-01-01

    This study used handsearching to find reports of randomized controlled trials in the Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal (EMHJ). EMBASE and MEDLINE were also searched electronically to identify if the reports found by the handsearch were already included in either of these databases. Nine reports were identified: 7 randomized controlled trials and 2 controlled clinical trials. The added value of the handsearch over EMBASE was 6 additional reports and over MEDLINE was 4. Reports identified were sent to the UK Cochrane Centre for verification and publication in The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL).

  19. What can qualitative research do for randomised controlled trials? A systematic mapping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, A; Thomas, K J; Drabble, S J; Rudolph, A; Hewison, J

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop an empirically based framework of the aspects of randomised controlled trials addressed by qualitative research. Design Systematic mapping review of qualitative research undertaken with randomised controlled trials and published in peer-reviewed journals. Data sources MEDLINE, PreMEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Health Technology Assessment, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Social Sciences Citation Index and ASSIA. Eligibility criteria Articles reporting qualitative research undertaken with trials published between 2008 and September 2010; health research, reported in English. Results 296 articles met the inclusion criteria. Articles focused on 22 aspects of the trial within five broad categories. Some articles focused on more than one aspect of the trial, totalling 356 examples. The qualitative research focused on the intervention being trialled (71%, 254/356); the design, process and conduct of the trial (15%, 54/356); the outcomes of the trial (1%, 5/356); the measures used in the trial (3%, 10/356); and the target condition for the trial (9%, 33/356). A minority of the qualitative research was undertaken at the pretrial stage (28%, 82/296). The value of the qualitative research to the trial itself was not always made explicit within the articles. The potential value included optimising the intervention and trial conduct, facilitating interpretation of the trial findings, helping trialists to be sensitive to the human beings involved in trials, and saving money by steering researchers towards interventions more likely to be effective in future trials. Conclusions A large amount of qualitative research undertaken with specific trials has been published, addressing a wide range of aspects of trials, with the potential to improve the endeavour of generating evidence of effectiveness of health interventions. Researchers can increase the impact of this work on trials by undertaking more of it at the pretrial stage and being explicit

  20. The Norwegian tenecteplase stroke trial (NOR-TEST): Randomised controlled trial of tenecteplase vs. alteplase in acute ischaemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alteplase is the only approved thrombolytic agent for acute ischaemic stroke. The overall benefit from alteplase is substantial, but some evidence indicates that alteplase also has negative effects on the ischaemic brain. Tenecteplase may be more effective and less harmfull than alteplase, but large randomised controlled phase 3 trials are lacking. The Norwegian Tenecteplase Stroke Trial (NOR-TEST) aims to compare efficacy and safety of tenecteplase vs. alteplase. Methods/Desig...

  1. The reporting quality of randomized controlled trials in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempesi, Evangelia; Koletsi, Despina; Fleming, Padhraig S; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2014-06-01

    Accurate trial reporting facilitates evaluation and better use of study results. The objective of this article is to investigate the quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in leading orthodontic journals, and to explore potential predictors of improved reporting. The 50 most recent issues of 4 leading orthodontic journals until November 2013 were electronically searched. Reporting quality assessment was conducted using the modified CONSORT statement checklist. The relationship between potential predictors and the modified CONSORT score was assessed using linear regression modeling. 128 RCTs were identified with a mean modified CONSORT score of 68.97% (SD = 11.09). The Journal of Orthodontics (JO) ranked first in terms of completeness of reporting (modified CONSORT score 76.21%, SD = 10.1), followed by American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO) (73.05%, SD = 10.1). Journal of publication (AJODO: β = 10.08, 95% CI: 5.78, 14.38; JO: β = 16.82, 95% CI: 11.70, 21.94; EJO: β = 7.21, 95% CI: 2.69, 11.72 compared to Angle), year of publication (β = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.67 for each additional year), region of authorship (Europe: β = 5.19, 95% CI: 1.30, 9.09 compared to Asia/other), statistical significance (significant: β = 3.10, 95% CI: 0.11, 6.10 compared to non-significant) and methodologist involvement (involvement: β = 5.60, 95% CI: 1.66, 9.54 compared to non-involvement) were all significant predictors of improved modified CONSORT scores in the multivariable model. Additionally, median overall Jadad score was 2 (IQR = 2) across journals, with JO (median = 3, IQR = 1) and AJODO (median = 3, IQR = 2) presenting the highest score values. The reporting quality of RCTs published in leading orthodontic journals is considered suboptimal in various CONSORT areas. This may have a bearing in trial result interpretation and use in clinical decision making and evidence- based orthodontic treatment interventions. Copyright

  2. Reduction of neonatal pain following administration of 25% lingual dextrose: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Sinojia, Ankit; Dongara, Ashish

    2013-06-01

    Neonates experience painful procedures during routine care. Orally administered, sweet tasting solutions are commonly used in management of neonatal pain. We conducted a double-blind randomized control trial in neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad-Gujarat-India, of lingual administration of 25% dextrose vs. no intervention, to evaluate reduction of pain following oropharyngeal infant feeding tube insertions. Pain was assessed using Premature Infant Pain Profile score. Almost all the patients in the control group (98%) experienced moderate-to-severe pain as compared with the intervention group (71%). Mean Premature Infant Pain Profile score was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group (8.21) as compared with control group (10.31). (p pain during orogastric tube insertion.

  3. Accrual and drop out in a primary prevention randomised controlled trial: qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Jackie F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruitment and retention of participants are critical to the success of a randomised controlled trial. Gaining the views of potential trial participants who decline to enter a trial and of trial participants who stop the trial treatment is important and can help to improve study processes. Limited research on these issues has been conducted on healthy individuals recruited for prevention trials in the community. Methods Semi-structured interviews with people who were eligible but had declined to participate in the Aspirin for Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis (AAA trial (N = 11, and AAA trial participants who had stopped taking the trial medication (N = 11. A focus group with further participants who had stopped taking the trial medication (N = 6. (Total participants N = 28. Results Explanations for declining to participate could be divided into two groups: the first group were characterised by a lack of necessity to participate and a tendency to prioritise other largely mundane problems. The second group's concern was with a high level of perceived risk from participating. Explanations for stopping trial medication fell into four categories: side effects attributed to the trial medication; starting on aspirin or medication contraindicating to aspirin; experiencing an outcome event, and changing one's mind. Conclusions These results indicate that when planning trials (especially in preventive medicine particular attention should be given to designing appropriate recruitment materials and processes that fully inform potential recruits of the risks and benefits of participation. Trial registration ISRCTN66587262

  4. Effects of acupuncture treatment on depression insomnia: a study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yuan-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 70% of patients with depression who see their doctors experience insomnia. Insomnia treatment is a very important link for depression treatment. Furthermore, antidepression treatment is also important for depression insomnia. In acupuncture, LU-7 (Lie Que and KID-6 (Zhao Hai, which are two of the eight confluence points in meridian theory, are used as main points. An embedded needle technique is used, alternately, at two groups of points to consolidate the treatment effect. These two groups of points are BL-15 (Xin Shu with BL-23 (Shen Shu and BL-19 (Dan Shu with N-HN-54 (An Mian. The effectiveness of these optimized acupuncture formulas is well proven in the practice by our senior acupuncturists in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of TCM. This study has been designed to examine whether this set of optimized clinical formulas is able to increase the clinical efficacy of depression insomnia treatment. Methods/design In this randomized controlled multicenter trial, all the eligible participants are diagnosed with depression insomnia. All participants are randomly assigned to one of two groups in a ratio of 1:1 and receive either conventional acupuncture treatment or optimized acupuncture treatment. Patients are evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index(PSQIand the Hamilton rating scale(HAMD for depression. The use of antidepression and hypnotics drugs is also considered. Results are obtained at the start of treatment, 1 and 2 months after treatment has begun, and at the end of treatment. The entire duration of the study will be approximately 36 months. Discussion A high quality of trial methodologies is utilized in the study, and the results may provide better evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for depression insomnia. The optimized acupuncture formula has potential benefits in increasing the efficacy of treating depression insomnia. Trial registration The trial was registered in

  5. Biofeedback treatment for Tourette syndrome: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoko; Cavanna, Andrea E; Critchley, Hugo D; Stern, Jeremy J; Robertson, Mary M; Joyce, Eileen M

    2014-03-01

    To study the clinical effectiveness of biofeedback treatment in reducing tics in patients with Tourette syndrome. Despite advances in the pharmacologic treatment of patients with Tourette syndrome, many remain troubled by their tics, which may be resistant to multiple medications at tolerable doses. Electrodermal biofeedback is a noninvasive biobehavioral intervention that can be useful in managing neuropsychiatric and neurologic conditions. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of electrodermal biofeedback training in 21 patients with Tourette syndrome. After training the patients for 3 sessions a week over 4 weeks, we observed a significant reduction in tic frequency and improved indices of subjective well-being in both the active-biofeedback and sham-feedback (control) groups, but there was no difference between the groups in these measurements. Furthermore, the active-treatment group did not demonstrably learn to reduce their sympathetic electrodermal tone using biofeedback. Our findings indicate that this form of biofeedback training was unable to produce a clinical effect greater than placebo. The main confounding factor appeared to be the 30-minute duration of the training sessions, which made it difficult for patients to sustain a reduction in sympathetic tone when their tics themselves were generating competing phasic electrodermal arousal responses. Despite a negative finding in this study, electrodermal biofeedback training may have a role in managing tics if optimal training schedules can be identified.

  6. Student Experience of Oral Communication Assessment Tasks Online from a Multi-Disciplinary Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Bonnie; Drew, Antony; James, Carole; Phelan, Liam; Harris, Keith M; Archer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the experiences of tertiary students learning oral presentation skills in a range of online and blended learning contexts across diverse disciplines. Design/methodology/approach: The research was designed as a "federation" of trials of diverse online oral communications assessment tasks…

  7. TASAR Flight Trial 2: Assessment of Air Traffic Controller Acceptability of TASAR Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Husni; Enea, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    In support of the Flight Trial (FT-2) of NASA's prototype of the Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests (TASAR) concept, observations were conducted at the air traffic facilities to identify and assess the main factors that affect the acceptability of pilot requests by air traffic controllers. Two observers shadowed air traffic controllers at the Atlanta (ZTL) and Jacksonville (ZJX) air traffic control centers as the test flight pilot made pre-scripted requests to invoke acceptability issues and then they interviewed the observed and other controllers voluntarily. Fifty controllers were interviewed with experience ranging from one to thirty-five years. All interviewed controllers were enthusiastic about the technology and accounting for sector boundaries in pilot requests, particularly if pilots can be made aware of high workload situations. All interviewed controllers accept more than fifty percent of pilot requests; forty percent of them reject less than ten percent of requests. The most common reason for rejecting requests is conflicting with traffic followed by violating letters of agreement (LOAs) and negatively impacting neighboring sector workload, major arrival and departure flows and flow restrictions. Thirty-six requests were made during the test, eight of which were rejected due to: the aircraft already handed off to another sector, violating LOA, opposing traffic, intruding into an active special use airspace (SUA), intruding into another center, weather, and unfamiliarity with the requested waypoint. Nine requests were accepted with delay mostly because the controller needed to locate unfamiliar waypoints or to coordinate with other controllers.

  8. Myopia Control with Bifocal Contact Lenses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Thomas A; Liu, Maria; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-04-01

    Most studies have reported only minimal reductions in myopia progression with bifocal or progressive multifocal spectacles, although somewhat larger, although mostly still clinically insignificant, effects have been reported in children with nearpoint esophoria and/or accommodative dysfunctions. The CONTROL study was a 1-year, prospective, randomized, clinical trial of bifocal contact lenses for control of myopia in children with eso fixation disparities at near. Eighty-six myopic subjects, aged 8 to 18 years, were enrolled in the study after passing the screening examination. Of these, 79 completed lens assignment and 78 completed the study. The mean refractive error of these 79 subjects was -2.69 ± 1.40D (SD), and all had progressed by -0.50D or more since their last examination. All subjects also had eso fixation disparity at near. Subjects were randomly assigned to wear either Vistakon Acuvue 2 (single-vision soft contact lenses [SVSCLs]) or Vistakon Acuvue Bifocal (bifocal soft contact lenses [BFSCLs]). Bifocal adds were selected to neutralize the associated phoria. Treatment outcomes included cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length, assessed in terms of changes after 6 and 12 months of treatment from pretreatment baseline values. The BFSCLs significantly slowed myopia progression, with statistically significant differences between the treatment groups after 6 months. After 12 months of treatment, the SVSCL group had progressed by -0.79 ± 0.43D compared with -0.22 ± 0.34D for the BFSCL group (cycloplegic objective spherical equivalent, average of two eyes). Corresponding axial length changes were 0.24 ± 0.17 mm and 0.05 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. All of these differences were found to be statistically significant (unpaired t-tests, p 70%) compared with most published results with multifocal spectacles. Further studies are warranted to identify the critical factors and mechanisms underlying this myopia control effect.

  9. Safety profile of Cerebrolysin: clinical experience from dementia and stroke trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, J; Doppler, E

    2012-04-01

    The safety of Cerebrolysin has been shown through many years of clinical use, observations from postmarketing surveillance studies, and safety data from randomized, controlled clinical trials. The reported events showed that adverse reactions to Cerebrolysin were generally mild and transient. Most common adverse events included vertigo, agitation and feeling hot. In the controlled clinical trials analyzed for this report, the incidence of adverse events was similar in Cerebrolysin- and placebo-treated groups. Cerebrolysin seems to be safe when used in combination with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator or cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil or rivastigmine. To our knowledge, Cerebrolysin was not associated with major changes in vital signs or laboratory parameters.

  10. The chronic care for wet age related macular degeneration (CHARMED) study: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Markun, Stefan; Dishy, Avraham; Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Rosemann, Thomas; Frei, Anja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD) continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). METHODS: Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, ...

  11. The Chronic Care for Wet Age Related Macular Degeneration (CHARMED) Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Markun; Avraham Dishy; Stefan Neuner-Jehle; Thomas Rosemann; Anja Frei

    2015-01-01

    Background In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD) continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Methods Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, using...

  12. Early intervention in panic: randomized controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Balkom Anton

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panic disorder (PD is a common, severe and persistent mental disorder, associated with a high degree of distress and occupational and social disability. A substantial proportion of the population experiences subthreshold and mild PD and is at risk of developing a chronic PD. A promising intervention, aimed at preventing panic disorder onset and reducing panic symptoms, is the 'Don't Panic' course. It consists of eight sessions of two hours each. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this early intervention – based on cognitive behavioural principles – on the reduction of panic disorder symptomatology. We predict that the experimental condition show superior clinical and economic outcomes relative to a waitlisted control group. Methods/design A pragmatic, pre-post, two-group, multi-site, randomized controlled trial of the intervention will be conducted with a naturalistic follow-up at six months in the intervention group. The participants are recruited from the general population and are randomized to the intervention or a waitlist control group. The intervention is offered by community mental health centres. Included are people over 18 years of age with subthreshold or mild panic disorder, defined as having symptoms of PD falling below the cut-off of 13 on the Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR. Primary outcomes are panic disorder and panic symptoms. Secondary outcomes are symptoms of agoraphobia, anxiety, cognitive aspects of panic disorder, depressive symptoms, mastery, health-related quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. We will examine the following variables as potential mediators: cognitive aspects of panic disorder, symptoms of agoraphobia, anxiety and mastery. Potential moderating variables are: socio-demographic characteristics, panic disorder, agoraphobia, treatment credibility and mastery. Discussion This study was designed to evaluate the (cost effectiveness of an

  13. Recruitment and retention in a multicentre randomised controlled trial in Bell's palsy: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Fergus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is notoriously difficult to recruit patients to randomised controlled trials in primary care. This is particularly true when the disease process under investigation occurs relatively infrequently and must be investigated during a brief time window. Bell's palsy, an acute unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve is just such a relatively rare condition. In this case study we describe the organisational issues presented in setting up a large randomised controlled trial of the management of Bell's palsy across primary and secondary care in Scotland and how we managed to successfully recruit and retain patients presenting in the community. Methods Where possible we used existing evidence on recruitment strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. We consider that the key issues in the success of this study were; the fact that the research was seen as clinically important by the clinicians who had initial responsibility for recruitment; employing an experienced trial co-ordinator and dedicated researchers willing to recruit participants seven days per week and to visit them at home at a time convenient to them, hence reducing missed patients and ensuring they were retained in the study; national visibility and repeated publicity at a local level delivered by locally based principal investigators well known to their primary care community; encouraging recruitment by payment to practices and reducing the workload of the referring doctors by providing immediate access to specialist care; good collaboration between primary and secondary care and basing local investigators in the otolarnygology trial centres Results Although the recruitment rate did not meet our initial expectations, enhanced retention meant that we exceeded our planned target of recruiting 550 patients within the planned time-scale. Conclusion While difficult, recruitment to and retention within multi-centre trials from primary care can be successfully

  14. Manual and Electroacupuncture for Labour Pain: Study Design of a Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Vixner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Results from previous studies on acupuncture for labour pain are contradictory and lack important information on methodology. However, studies indicate that acupuncture has a positive effect on women’s experiences of labour pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different acupuncture stimulations, manual or electrical stimulation, compared with standard care in the relief of labour pain as the primary outcome. This paper will present in-depth information on the design of the study, following the CONSORT and STRICTA recommendations. Methods. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial based on western medical theories. Nulliparous women with normal pregnancies admitted to the delivery ward after a spontaneous onset of labour were randomly allocated into one of three groups: manual acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or standard care. Sample size calculation gave 101 women in each group, including a total of 303 women. A Visual Analogue Scale was used for assessing pain every 30 minutes for five hours and thereafter every hour until birth. Questionnaires were distributed before treatment, directly after the birth, and at one day and two months postpartum. Blood samples were collected before and after the first treatment. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01197950.

  15. Evaluating cognitive effort in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis H; Renfroe, Jenna B; Morella, Kristen; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2016-09-01

    Many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropsychiatric conditions involve cognitive outcome measures; however, validity of cognitive data relies on adequate effort during testing, and such screening is seldom performed. Given well-established rates of 10 to 30% poor effort in clinical settings, this is not a trivial concern. This preliminary study evaluated effort during cognitive testing in an RCT of omega-3 supplementation to reduce suicidality in a high-risk psychiatric population. An interim analysis of sustained attentions measures from the Connors Performance Test (CPT-2) at baseline for the first 60 participants was conducted. Previously validated cut points to detect insufficient effort on the CPT-2 were applied. At baseline, 12% (7) were identified as giving poor effort. Follow-up analyses indicated less psychiatric distress and suicidality among those who gave poor effort. Results suggest comparable likelihood of a poor effort on cognitive testing in clinical and RCT participation. Reduced psychiatric distress in the poor effort group raises concern regarding interpretation of other measures. The importance of screening cognitive data for effort in RCTs is highlighted. Future studies will examine effort at follow-up visits, and explore relationships to attrition, adherence, and response to treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Clinical randomized controlled trial of chemomechanical caries removal (Carisolv).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Chourio, M A; Zambrano, O; González, H; Quero, M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the chemomechanical caries-removal system (Carisolv) with high-speed excavation in cavitated occlusal caries of primary molars. Design and setting. The study was a randomized controlled, clinical trial in which the two techniques were compared in each subject. Participants were chosen from public schools, in Maracaibo County, Zulia State, Venezuela. The sample consisted of 80 primary molars selected from 40 children (mean age 7.7+/-0.7 years). Each patient had at least two contralateral primary molars with cavitated occlusal caries and approximately equal-size access to lesions. The outcome variables were: clinically complete caries removal, size of the opening of the cavity, volume of carious tissue removed, pain during caries removal, anaesthesia requested by the patient, caries-removal time, and behaviour and preference of patients. All treated molars were clinically caries free whichever caries-removal procedure was used. When Carisolv' was used the final cavity entrance sizes were smaller (Premoved was less (Premoval was three times longer (7.51+/-1.83 min, Premoval of occlusal dentinal caries in cavitated primary molars; it is more conservative of dental tissue and appeared to be more comfortable for most patients, although the clinical time spent is longer than when using high-speed excavation.

  17. Pneumatic retinopexy versus scleral buckling: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, A; Fulcher, T; Datta, V; Acheson, R

    1996-01-01

    Pneumatic retinopexy (PR) is a technique for repairing certain retinal detachments which is easier to perform than conventional sceral buckling (SB) surgery but has comparable results. We performed a prospective, randomised, controlled trial to determine for ourselves whether PR is a safe and acceptable procedure. Twenty patients presenting consecutively with retinal detachments which fulfilled the selection criteria were randomised to have their detachments repaired by either PR or SB, ten patients in each group. The suitable patients had a single retinal break or small group of breaks of not greater than one clock hour in size, situated within the superior eight clock hours of retina. Patients with significant proliferative vitreoretinopathy or other fundus disorders were excluded. All patients in the PR group had local anaesthesia while all those in the SB group had general anaesthesia. Successful reattachment of the retina was achieved with one or more procedures in 90 percent of the PR group and in 100 percent of the SB group. We feel that narrowing the selection criteria for PR may further improve the success rate.

  18. Improving pediatric prevention via the internet: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Rivara, Frederick P; Ebel, Beth

    2006-09-01

    Innovations to improve the delivery of pediatric preventive care are needed. We enrolled children, 0 to 11 years of age, into a factorial, randomized, controlled trial of a tailored, evidence-based, Web site (MyHealthyChild) that provided information on prevention topics before a scheduled well-child visit. There were 2 components of the intervention, namely, parental Web content and provider notification. Parental Web content provided information to parents about prevention topics; provider notification communicated to physicians topics that were of interest to parents. We assigned 887 children randomly to 4 groups (usual care, content only, content and notification, or notification only). Outcomes were determined with telephone follow-up surveys conducted 2 to 4 weeks after the visit. Poisson regression analysis was used to determine the independent effects of each intervention on the number of topics discussed and the number of preventive practices implemented. Parents in the notification/content group and in the notification-only group reported discussing more MyHealthyChild topics with their provider. Parents in the notification/content group and in the content-only group reported implementing more MyHealthyChild topic suggestions (such as use of a safety device). A Web-based intervention can activate parents to discuss prevention topics with their child's provider. Delivery of tailored content can promote preventive practices.

  19. [Review of controled clinical trials of behavioral treatment for obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Ibáñez, B; Armendáriz-Anguiano, A L; Bacardí-Gascón, M; Jiménez-Cruz, A

    2008-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity has been associated to an increment in chronic-degenerative diseases. The behavioral conduct therapies (BCT) have been used to help subjects develop a series of skills to reach a healthy weight. We conducted a review of the literature of BCT from controlled clinical trials registered at PubMed from January 2000 to november 2006. We found five long-term (> or = 12 months) studies and analyzed each study. The percent of weight loss at the end of follow up ranged from 3% to 9% of the initial weight; the percent of retention fluctuated from 92% at three months to 55% at 24 months. There were no similar reported studies conducted in Latino or Hispanic population. These results suggest that the change in loss of weight with BCT are modest at the end of the follow up period and that most of the studies report low adherence to treatment. It is recommended that public and private funds are needed to implement effective and safe multicentric long term randomized studies on different cultural populations, including most Latin-American countries.

  20. Validating Obstetric Emergency Checklists using Simulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Komal; Rivera-Chiauzzi, Enid Y; Lee, Colleen; Shepard, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter S; Moore-Murray, Tanya; Smith, Heather; Nathan, Lisa; Walker, Katie; Chazotte, Cynthia; Goffman, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Background The World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has demonstrated significant reduction in surgical morbidity. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District II Safe Motherhood Initiative (SMI) safety bundles include eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) checklists. Objective To determine whether use of the SMI checklists during simulated obstetric emergencies improved completion of critical actions and to elicit feedback to facilitate checklist revision. Study Design During this randomized controlled trial, teams were assigned to use a checklist during one of two emergencies: eclampsia and PPH. Raters scored teams on critical step completion. Feedback was elicited through structured debriefing. Results In total, 30 teams completed 60 scenarios. For eclampsia, trends toward higher completion were noted for blood pressure and airway management. For PPH, trends toward higher completion rates were noted for PPH stage assessment and fundal massage. Feedback resulted in substantial checklist revision. Participants were enthusiastic about using checklists in a clinical emergency. Conclusion Despite trends toward higher rates of completion of critical tasks, teams using checklists did not approach 100% task completion. Teams were interested in the application of checklists and provided feedback necessary to substantially revise the checklists. Intensive implementation planning and training in use of the revised checklists will result in improved patient outcomes.

  1. Sexual Absorption of Vaginal Progesterone: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Merriam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine if sexual intercourse reduces absorption of vaginal progesterone gel in women and to determine if progesterone is absorbed by the male during intercourse. Study Design. Prospective, randomized, cross over, controlled study of 20 reproductive-aged women and their male sexual partners randomized to receive vaginal progesterone gel (Crinone 8% gel, Actavis Inc., USA or placebo cream. Serum progesterone for both male and female partners were measured 10 hours after intercourse. One week later, subjects were crossed over to receive the opposite formulation. In the third week, women used progesterone gel at night and abstained from intercourse. Results. Serum progesterone was significantly reduced with vaginal progesterone gel + intercourse compared with vaginal progesterone gel + abstinence (P=0.0075. Men absorbed significant progesterone during intercourse with a female partner using vaginal progesterone gel compared to placebo (P=0.0008. Conclusion(s. Vaginal progesterone gel is reduced in women after intercourse which may decrease drug efficacy during luteal phase support. Because men absorb low levels of progesterone during intercourse, exposure could cause adverse effects such as decreased libido. This study is registered under Clinical Trial number NCT01959464.

  2. Is the randomized controlled drug trial in Europe lagging behind the USA?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Knol, Mirjam J.; Tijssen, Robert J. W.; van Leeuwen, Thed N.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT? center dot The USA, UK and Germany have a strong position in performance of drug and nondrug randomized controlled trials. center dot Europe's position in the quantitative and qualitative performance in drug randomized controlled trials in particular, and fa

  3. Acceptance and commitment therapy for fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicksell, R K; Kemani, M; Jensen, K; Kosek, E; Kadetoff, D; Sorjonen, K; Ingvar, M; Olsson, G L

    2013-04-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain and co-morbid symptoms such as fatigue and depression. For FM, medical treatments alone appear insufficient. Recent meta-analyses point to the utility of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT), but effects are moderate. Within the continuous development of CBT, the empirical support for acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has increased rapidly. ACT focuses on improving functioning by increasing the patient's ability to act in accordance with personal values also in the presence of pain and distress (i.e., psychological flexibility). However, no study has yet explored the utility of ACT in FM. To evaluate the efficacy of ACT for FM and the role of psychological inflexibility as a mediator of improvement. In this randomized controlled trial, ACT was evaluated in comparison to a waiting list control condition. Forty women diagnosed with FM participated in the study. Assessments were made pre- and post-treatment and at 3 months of follow-up. The ACT intervention consisted of 12 weekly group sessions. Significant differences in favour of ACT were seen in pain-related functioning, FM impact, mental health-related quality of life, self-efficacy, depression, anxiety and psychological inflexibility. Changes in psychological inflexibility during the course of treatment were found to mediate pre- to follow-up improvements in outcome variables. The results correspond with previous studies on ACT for chronic pain and suggest the utility of ACT for FM as well as the role of psychological inflexibility as a mediator of improvement. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  4. Phytothermotherapy in osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Manica, Patrizia; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of adding a cycle of phytothermotherapy (a traditional treatment with fermenting grass used in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy) to the usual drug treatment, in patients with primary symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, hip, or lumbar spine. In this randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, 218 outpatients were enrolled; 109 patients were treated with a cycle of phytothermotherapy at the thermal resort of Garniga Terme (Trento, Italy) for 10 days; the other 109 patients continued regular outpatient care. Patients were assessed at baseline, after 2 weeks, and after 3 months from the beginning of the study and were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, a Health Assessment Questionnaire, the Lequesne index for hip and knee osteoarthritis, and the Rolland Morris Questionnaire for lumbar spine OA and symptomatic drug consumption. In patients treated with phytothermotherapy, a significant improvement of VAS and a reduction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug consumption at the end of treatment and 3 months later were observed. In the control group, no significant differences were noted. The analyses performed separately for each subgroup for OA localization showed that the best results were evident in lumbar spine OA. Concerning tolerability, in the group treated with phytothermotherapy 10% of patients presented side-effects due to treatment, but these were of low intensity and did not interrupt the therapy. In conclusion, the results show beneficial effects of a cycle of phytothermotherapy in patients with OA of the hip, knee, or lumbar spine. Phytothermotherapy may therefore be a useful aid alongside the usual pharmacologic and physiokinesic therapies, or may be used as a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacologic treatments.

  5. Guidelines for controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache: second edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, L; Bigal, M E; Cerbo, R

    2010-01-01

    controlled trials are the only way to convincingly demonstrate the efficacy of a drug, and form the basis for international agreement on drug therapy'. The Committee published similar guidelines for clinical trials in migraine and cluster headache. Since 1995 several studies on the treatment of episodic......The Clinical Trials Subcommittee of the International Headache Society published its first edition of the guidelines on controlled trials of drugs in tension-type headache in 1995. These aimed 'to improve the quality of controlled clinical trials in tension-type headache', because 'good quality...... and chronic tension-type headache have been published, providing new information on trial methodology for this disorder. Furthermore, the classification of the headaches, including tension-type headache, has been revised. These developments support the need for also revising the guidelines for drug treatments...

  6. Echinacea for treating the common cold: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Rakel, Dave; Mundt, Marlon; Bone, Kerry; Barlow, Shari; Ewers, Tola

    2011-01-01

    Background Echinacea is widely used to treat common cold. Objective To assess potential benefits of echinacea as common cold treatment. Design Randomized controlled trial with four parallel groups: 1) no pills, 2) placebo pills (blinded), 3) echinacea pills (blinded), or 4) echinacea pills (open-label). (NCT00065715) Setting Community-based trial. Participants People aged 12 to 80 years with new onset common cold. Interventions Extracts of Echinacea purpurea and E. angustifolia root were used to make tablets standardized to alkamide content. Indistinguishable placebo tablets contained only inert ingredients. Measurements The primary outcome was area-under-the-curve global severity, with severity assessed twice daily by self report on the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Secondary outcomes included interleukin-8 and neutrophil count from nasal wash assessed at intake and two days later. Results Of 719 enrolled, 713 completed the protocol. Participants were 64% female and 88% white, with mean age 33.7 years. Mean global severity was 236 and 258 for blinded and unblinded echinacea, 264 for blinded placebo, and 286 for those without pills. Contrasting the two blinded groups yields a 28 point (95% CI = −69 to 13) trend toward benefit for echinacea (p=0.089). Mean illness duration for the blinded and unblinded echinacea groups was 6.34 and 6.76 days, respectively, compared to 6.87 days for blinded placebo and 7.03 for no pills. Contrasting blinded groups yields a 0.53 day (95% CI = −1.25 to 0.19) trend toward benefit (p = 0.075). Median change interleukin-8 (pg/mL) and neutrophil cell count were: no pills (30, 1), blinded placebo (39, 1), blinded echinacea (58, 2), and open-label echinacea (70, 1), also not statistically significant. Limitations Higher-than-expected variability limited power to detect small-but-potentially-important benefits. Conclusions The observed shorter illness duration and lower severity seen in the echinacea groups were

  7. Probiotics in the prevention of eczema: a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stephen J; Jordan, Sue; Storey, Melanie; Thornton, Catherine A; Gravenor, Michael B; Garaiova, Iveta; Plummer, Susan F; Wang, Duolao; Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a multistrain, high-dose probiotic in the prevention of eczema. Design A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group trial. Settings Antenatal clinics, research clinic, children at home. Patients Pregnant women and their infants. Interventions Women from 36 weeks gestation and their infants to age 6 months received daily either the probiotic (Lactobacillus salivarius CUL61, Lactobacillus paracasei CUL08, Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis CUL34 and Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20; total of 1010 organisms/day) or matching placebo. Main outcome measure Diagnosed eczema at age 2 years. Infants were followed up by questionnaire. Clinical examination and skin prick tests to common allergens were done at 6 months and 2 years. Results The cumulative frequency of diagnosed eczema at 2 years was similar in the probiotic (73/214, 34.1%) and placebo arms (72/222, 32.4%; OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.6). Among the secondary outcomes, the cumulative frequency of skin prick sensitivity at 2 years was reduced in the probiotic (18/171; 10.5%) compared with the placebo arm (32/173; 18.5%; OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.98). The statistically significant differences between the arms were mainly in sensitisation to cow's milk and hen's egg proteins at 6 months. Atopic eczema occurred in 9/171 (5.3%) children in the probiotic arm and 21/173 (12.1%) in the placebo arm (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.91). Conclusions The study did not provide evidence that the probiotic either prevented eczema during the study or reduced its severity. However, the probiotic seemed to prevent atopic sensitisation to common food allergens and so reduce the incidence of atopic eczema in early childhood. Trial registration Number ISRCTN26287422. PMID:24947281

  8. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour : randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an interm

  9. Systemic corticosteroid monotherapy for clinically diagnosed acute rhinosinusitis: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, R.P.; Bonten, M.J.; Rovers, M.M.; Verheij, T.J.; Sachs, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with acute rhinosinusitis are frequently encountered in primary care. Although corticosteroids are being increasingly used for symptom control, evidence supporting their use is inconclusive. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to examine the effectiveness of systemic cort

  10. Influence of reported study design characteristics on intervention effect estimates from randomised controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savović, J; Jones, He; Altman, Dg

    2012-01-01

    The design of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) should incorporate characteristics (such as concealment of randomised allocation and blinding of participants and personnel) that avoid biases resulting from lack of comparability of the intervention and control groups. Empirical evidence suggests...

  11. Predictors of Missed Research Appointments in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie J.E. Becker

    2014-09-01

     Younger patients with no college education, who believe their health can be controlled, are more likely to miss a research appointment when enrolled in a randomized placebo injection-controlled trial

  12. Control Group Design, Contamination and Drop-Out in Exercise Oncology Trials : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, Charlotte N. Steins; Courneya, Kerry S.; Velthuis, Miranda J.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Jones, Lee W.; Friedenreich, Christine; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H. M.; May, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Important considerations for exercise trials in cancer patients are contamination and differential drop-out among the control group members that might jeopardize the internal validity. This systematic review provides an overview of different control groups design characteristics of

  13. Labour pain with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia : a randomised equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Slm; Oude Rengerink, K; Verhoeven, C J; Freeman, L M; van den Akker, Esa; Godfried, M B; van Beek, E; Borchert, Owhm; Schuitemaker, N; van Woerkens, Ecsm; Hostijn, I; Middeldorp, J M; van der Post, J A; Mol, B W

    OBJECTIVE: To distinguish satisfaction with pain relief using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (RPCA) compared with epidural analgesia (EA) in low-risk labouring women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: Eighteen midwifery practices and six hospitals in the

  14. Randomised controlled trial of the use of an educational board game in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderska, Nina; Thomason, Elinor; Hart, Anna; Shaw, Ben N J

    2013-05-01

    Games have been used in healthcare education to encourage active learning. To investigate whether an educational board game which had been developed in the speciality of neonatology could influence the learning experience of medical students during their neonatal attachment. A randomised controlled trial of using the game was conducted amongst 67 student participants. The average final assessment score was 4.15 points higher in the group of students that played the game compared to the control group (95% CI-0.88-9.17; p = 0.09). The game was well received by the students. Although we cannot conclude firmly that the game produces an effect on learning, this study suggests that educational games should be investigated further in the delivery of undergraduate learning in specialities where exposure is brief.

  15. Participant Recruitment and Engagement in Automated eHealth Trial Registration: Challenges and Opportunities for Recruiting Women Who Experience Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; McLean, Christine; Rohan, Maheswaran; Sisk, Rose; Dobbs, Terry; Nada-Raja, Shyamala; Wilson, Denise; Vandal, Alain C

    2016-10-25

    Automated eHealth Web-based research trials offer people an accessible, confidential opportunity to engage in research that matters to them. eHealth trials may be particularly useful for sensitive issues when seeking health care may be accompanied by shame and mistrust. Yet little is known about people's early engagement with eHealth trials, from recruitment to preintervention autoregistration processes. A recent randomized controlled trial that tested the effectiveness of an eHealth safety decision aid for New Zealand women in the general population who experienced intimate partner violence (isafe) provided the opportunity to examine recruitment and preintervention participant engagement with a fully automated Web-based registration process. The trial aimed to recruit 340 women within 24 months. The objective of our study was to examine participant preintervention engagement and recruitment efficiency for the isafe trial, and to analyze dropout through the registration pathway, from recruitment to eligibility screening and consent, to completion of baseline measures. In this case study, data collection sources included the trial recruitment log, Google Analytics reports, registration and program metadata, and costs. Analysis included a qualitative narrative of the recruitment experience and descriptive statistics of preintervention participant engagement and dropout rates. A Koyck model investigated the relationship between Web-based online marketing website advertisements (ads) and participant accrual. The isafe trial was launched on September 17, 2012. Placement of ads in an online classified advertising platform increased the average number of recruited participants per month from 2 to 25. Over the 23-month recruitment period, the registration website recorded 4176 unique visitors. Among 1003 women meeting eligibility criteria, 51.55% (517) consented to participate; among the 501 women who enrolled (consented, validated, and randomized), 412 (82.2%) were

  16. A descriptive analysis of a representative sample of pediatric randomized controlled trials published in 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Denise

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs are the gold standard for trials assessing the effects of therapeutic interventions; therefore it is important to understand how they are conducted. Our objectives were to provide an overview of a representative sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 and assess the validity of their results. Methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials using a pediatric filter and randomly selected 300 RCTs published in 2007. We extracted data on trial characteristics; outcomes; methodological quality; reporting; and registration and protocol characteristics. Trial registration and protocol availability were determined for each study based on the publication, an Internet search and an author survey. Results Most studies (83% were efficacy trials, 40% evaluated drugs, and 30% were placebo-controlled. Primary outcomes were specified in 41%; 43% reported on adverse events. At least one statistically significant outcome was reported in 77% of trials; 63% favored the treatment group. Trial registration was declared in 12% of publications and 23% were found through an Internet search. Risk of bias (ROB was high in 59% of trials, unclear in 33%, and low in 8%. Registered trials were more likely to have low ROB than non-registered trials (16% vs. 5%; p = 0.008. Effect sizes tended to be larger for trials at high vs. low ROB (0.28, 95% CI 0.21,0.35 vs. 0.16, 95% CI 0.07,0.25. Among survey respondents (50% response rate, the most common reason for trial registration was a publication requirement and for non-registration, a lack of familiarity with the process. Conclusions More than half of this random sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 was at high ROB and three quarters of trials were not registered. There is an urgent need to improve the design, conduct, and reporting of child health research.

  17. ACGT: advancing clinico-genomic trials on cancer - four years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Luis; Anguita, Alberto; Graf, Norbert; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Brochhausen, Mathias; Rüping, Stefan; Bucur, Anca; Sfakianakis, Stelios; Sengstag, Thierry; Buffa, Francesca; Stenzhorn, Holger

    2011-01-01

    The challenges regarding seamless integration of distributed, heterogeneous and multilevel data arising in the context of contemporary, post-genomic clinical trials cannot be effectively addressed with current methodologies. An urgent need exists to access data in a uniform manner, to share information among different clinical and research centers, and to store data in secure repositories assuring the privacy of patients. Advancing Clinico-Genomic Trials (ACGT) was a European Commission funded Integrated Project that aimed at providing tools and methods to enhance the efficiency of clinical trials in the -omics era. The project, now completed after four years of work, involved the development of both a set of methodological approaches as well as tools and services and its testing in the context of real-world clinico-genomic scenarios. This paper describes the main experiences using the ACGT platform and its tools within one such scenario and highlights the very promising results obtained.

  18. The experience of older patients with cancer in phase 1 clinical trials: a qualitative case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, Elizabeth A; Woodby, Lesa; Williams, Beverly Rosa

    2010-11-01

    This article explores the experiences of older patients with cancer in phase 1 clinical trials. Conducting a case series of face-to-face, in-depth, open-ended interviews and using qualitative methods of analysis, we find that the psychosocial process of social comparison is relevant for understanding older adults' phase 1 clinical trial participation. Social comparison influences decisions to enroll in a phase 1 clinical trial, shapes perceptions of supportive care needs, and encourages the utilization of hope. Additional research should develop strategies for addressing supportive care needs among this patient cohort whose use of social comparison can inhibit articulation of pain, suffering, and symptom burden as well as use of informal support systems.

  19. Lactation support and breastfeeding duration in jaundiced infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Catherine M; Moreau, Katherine; Rohde, Kristina; Barrowman, Nick; Aglipay, Mary; Farion, Ken J; Plint, Amy C

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal jaundice is the most common problem in full-term infants during the immediate post-natal period. We examined the effect of a lactation support intervention on breastfeeding duration in hospitalized jaundiced infants. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with a qualitative component involving mothers of hospitalized jaundiced breastfed infants <4 weeks of age. Mothers receiving the intervention met with an International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant in hospital and 1-3 times post discharge. Both groups received the standard care for jaundice. The primary outcome was exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months. To the exception of research assistants enrolling participants and completing qualitative interviews, all research staff, investigators and statisticians were blinded to group assignment. Qualitative interviews elicited feedback on breastfeeding experiences for both groups. 99 participants were recruited, and 86 analyzed for primary outcome. There was no difference in exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months between groups (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.56-1.24, p = 0.40) or in the secondary outcomes. 31 participants were included in the qualitative analysis. Participants in the intervention group described an increase in comfort and confidence levels with breastfeeding. Participants in the control group reported limited lactation support. Our hospital-based lactation support program did not result in a higher proportion of mothers exclusively breastfeeding at 3 months compared to current hospital standard care. Qualitative feedback from the intervention group suggests that mothers' confidence was increased, which is linked to breastfeeding duration. The decision to breastfeed is multifactorial and hospital-based lactation support may be only a small piece of the puzzle in hospitalized jaundiced infants. Further studies may be needed to fully elucidate the impact of an in-hospital lactation support program on successful breastfeeding for these infants. ClinicalTrials

  20. Effect of different warm-up strategies on simulated laparoscopy performance: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brönnimann, Enrico; Hoffmann, Henry; Schäfer, Juliane; Hahnloser, Dieter; Rosenthal, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this trial was to assess which type of warm-up has the highest effect on virtual reality (VR) laparoscopy performance. The following warm-up strategies were applied: a hands-on exercise (group 1), a cognitive exercise (group 2), and no warm-up (control, group 3). This is a 3-arm randomized controlled trial. The trial was conducted at the department of surgery of the University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. A total of 94 participants, all laypersons without any surgical or VR experience, completed the study. A total of 96 participants were randomized, 31 to group 1, 31 to group 2, and 32 to group 3. There were 2 postrandomization exclusions. In the multivariate analysis, we found no evidence that the intervention had an effect on VR performance as represented by 6 calculated subscores of accuracy, time, and path length for (1) camera manipulation and (2) hand-eye coordination combined with 2-handed maneuvers (p = 0.795). Neither the comparison of the average of the intervention groups (groups 1 and 2) vs control (group 3) nor the pairwise comparisons revealed any significant differences in VR performance, neither multivariate nor univariate. VR performance improved with increasing performance score in the cognitive exercise warm-up (iPad 3D puzzle) for accuracy, time, and path length in the camera navigation task. We were unable to show an effect of the 2 tested warm-up strategies on VR performance in laypersons. We are currently designing a follow-up study including surgeons rather than laypersons with a longer warm-up exercise, which is more closely related to the final task. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mindfulness for irritable bowel syndrome: protocol development for a controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garland Eric L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a functional bowel disorder with symptoms of abdominal pain and disturbed defecation experienced by 10% of U.S. adults, results in significant disability, impaired quality of life, and health-care burden. Conventional medical care focusing on pharmacological approaches, diet, and lifestyle management has been partially effective in controlling symptoms. Behavioral treatments, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis, are promising. This paper describes an on-going feasibility study to assess the efficacy of mindfulness training, a behavioral treatment involving directing and sustaining attention to present-moment experience, for the treatment of IBS. Methods/Design The study design involves randomization of adult women with IBS according to Rome II criteria, to either an eight-week mindfulness training group (based on a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction [MBSR] format or a previously validated IBS social-support group as an attention-control condition. The primary hypothesis is that, compared to Support Group participants, those in the Mindfulness Program will demonstrate significant improvement in IBS symptoms as measured by the IBS Symptom Severity Scale 1. Discussion 214 individuals have been screened for eligibility, of whom 148 were eligible for the study. Of those, 87 were enrolled, with 21 withdrawing after having given consent. 66 have completed or are in the process of completing the interventions. It is feasible to undertake a rigorous randomized clinical trial of mindfulness training for people with IBS, using a standardized MBSR protocol adapted for those experiencing IBS, compared to a control social-support group previously utilized in IBS studies. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00680693

  2. Empowerment of personal injury victims through the internet: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbers Nieke A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has shown that current claims settlement process can have a negative impact on psychological and physical recovery of personal injury (PI victims. One of the explanations for the negative impact on health is that the claims settlement process is a stressful experience and victims suffer from renewed victimization caused by the claims settlement process. PI victims can experience a lack of information, lack of involvement, lack of 'voice', and poor communication. We present the first study that aims to empower PI victims with respect to the negative impact of the claims settlement process by means of an internet intervention. Methods/design The study is a two armed, randomized controlled trial (RCT, in which 170 PI victims are randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group will get access to a website providing 1 an information module, so participants learn what is happening and what to expect during the claims settlement process, and 2 an e-coach module, so participants learn to cope with problems they experience during the claims settlement process. The control group will get access to a website with hyperlinks to commonly available information only. Participants will be recruited via a PI claims settlement office. Participants are included if they have been involved in a traffic accident which happened less than two years ago, and are at least 18 years old. The main study parameter is the increase of empowerment within the intervention group compared to the control group. Empowerment will be measured by the mastery scale and a self-efficacy scale. The secondary outcomes are perceived justice, burden, well being, work ability, knowledge, amount of damages, and lawyer-client communication. Data are collected at baseline (T0 measurement before randomization, at three months, six months, and twelve months after baseline. Analyses will be conducted according to the intention

  3. Use of qualitative methods alongside randomised controlled trials of complex healthcare interventions: methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Oxman, Andrew D

    2009-09-10

    To examine the use of qualitative approaches alongside randomised trials of complex healthcare interventions. Review of randomised controlled trials of interventions to change professional practice or the organisation of care. Systematic sample of 100 trials published in English from the register of the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Review Group. Published and unpublished qualitative studies linked to the randomised controlled trials were identified through database searches and contact with authors. Data were extracted from each study by two reviewers using a standard form. We extracted data describing the randomised controlled trials and qualitative studies, the quality of these studies, and how, if at all, the qualitative and quantitative findings were combined. A narrative synthesis of the findings was done. 30 of the 100 trials had associated qualitative work and 19 of these were published studies. 14 qualitative studies were done before the trial, nine during the trial, and four after the trial. 13 studies reported an explicit theoretical basis and 11 specified their methodological approach. Approaches to sampling and data analysis were poorly described. For most cases (n=20) we found no indication of integration of qualitative and quantitative findings at the level of either analysis or interpretation. The quality of the qualitative studies was highly variable. Qualitative studies alongside randomised controlled trials remain uncommon, even where relatively complex interventions are being evaluated. Most of the qualitative studies were carried out before or during the trials with few studies used to explain trial results. The findings of the qualitative studies seemed to be poorly integrated with those of the trials and often had major methodological shortcomings.

  4. A randomised control trial of experiential learning to promote physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Philip A; Tully, Mark A; Cupples, Margaret E; Gilliland, Andrew E; Gormley, Gerard J

    2013-09-01

    The paucity of training in physical activity (PA) promotion in UK medical schools is a barrier to health professionals' promotion of PA to their patients. Doctors who are more physically active are more likely to counsel patients in this regard. We used a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to examine the effect of an intervention which engaged students in goal-setting, using pedometer step counts, on their PA behaviour and intentions to promote PA in future practice. We invited fourth-year medical students to participate in the study during their four-week placement in primary care. Following baseline pedometer measurement of daily step counts for one week, students were randomly allocated to intervention (individual step count goal-setting) or control groups. Using pedometers, both groups monitored their PA during the following week. Intentions to promote PA were assessed using a questionnaire based on the theory of planned behaviour at baseline, four weeks and nine weeks. Focus groups explored the students' experiences of PA measurement, goalsetting for behaviour change and health promotion teaching. One-hundred and thirty-six students participated (70 intervention; 66 control). The mean change in daily step count was greater ( P =0.001) in the intervention group (1245, 95% CI 762 to 1727) than in the control group (-65, 95% CI -644 to 573). Scores for perceived behavioural control over PA counselling increased in both groups, with a trend for higher scores in the intervention group. Intervention group students described how experience of personal PA behaviour change gave insights into barriers patients may face and improved their confidence in PA counselling. Medical students' personal experience of goal setting in increasing PA appears to lead to a more positive perception of their ability to deliver effective PA promotion in future practice. Inclusion of this learning experience within the undergraduate curriculum may improve doctors' skills in health promotion.

  5. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  6. Reduction of claustrophobia during magnetic resonance imaging: methods and design of the "CLAUSTRO" randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teichgräber Ulf

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has been described as the most important medical innovation in the last 25 years. Over 80 million MR procedures are now performed each year and on average 2.3% (95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 2.5% of all patients scheduled for MR imaging suffer from claustrophobia. Thus, prevention of MR imaging by claustrophobia is a common problem and approximately 2,000,000 MR procedures worldwide cannot be completed due to this situation. Patients with claustrophobic anxiety are more likely to be frightened and experience a feeling of confinement or being closed in during MR imaging. In these patients, conscious sedation and additional sequences (after sedation may be necessary to complete the examinations. Further improvements in MR design appear to be essential to alleviate this situation and broaden the applicability of MR imaging. A more open scanner configuration might help reduce claustrophobic reactions while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Methods/Design We propose to analyze the rate of claustrophobic reactions, clinical utility, image quality, patient acceptance, and cost-effectiveness of an open MR scanner in a randomized comparison with a recently designed short-bore but closed scanner with 97% noise reduction. The primary aim of this study is thus to determine whether an open MR scanner can reduce claustrophobic reactions, thereby enabling more examinations of claustrophobic patients without incurring the safety issues associated with conscious sedation. In this manuscript we detail the methods and design of the prospective "CLAUSTRO" trial. Discussion This randomized controlled trial will be the first direct comparison of open vertical and closed short-bore MR systems in regards to claustrophobia and image quality as well as diagnostic utility. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00715806

  7. Metabolic deterioration of the sedentary control group in clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahesh J. Patel; Cris A. Slentz; William E. Kraus

    2011-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials of exercise training regimens in sedentary individuals have provided a mechanistic understanding of the long-term health benefits and consequences of physical activity and inactivity...

  8. Attitudes toward Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Patients with Schizophrenia in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Sugawara

    Full Text Available Although the use of placebo in clinical trials of schizophrenia patients is controversial because of medical and ethical concerns, placebo-controlled clinical trials are commonly used in the licensing of new drugs.The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials among patients with schizophrenia in Japan.Using a cross-sectional design, we recruited patients (n = 251 aged 47.7±13.2 (mean±SD with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were admitted to six psychiatric hospitals from December 2013 to March 2014. We employed a 14-item questionnaire specifically developed to survey patients' attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials.The results indicated that 33% of the patients would be willing to participate in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Expectations for improvement of disease, a guarantee of hospital treatment continuation, and encouragement by family or friends were associated with the willingness to participate in such trials, whereas a belief of additional time required for medical examinations was associated with non-participation.Fewer than half of the respondents stated that they would be willing to participate in placebo-controlled clinical trials. Therefore, interpreting the results from placebo-controlled clinical trials could be negatively affected by selection bias.

  9. Effect of Rosa aromatherapy on anxiety before cardiac catheterization: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atye Babaii

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Most patients experience moderate to severe anxiety before cardiac catheterization. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Rosa aromatherapy on anxiety before cardiac catheterization. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were conveniently sampled and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. In the experimental group, patients received routine care and Rosa aromatherapy for eighteen minutes. The level of anxiety was measured immediately before, and after the treatment. Results: In the stages before and after the study, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the terms of the mean scores of state and total anxiety. However, the mean score of trait anxiety in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between pre- and post-treatment in both groups. Conclusion: Most of the patients experience moderate to severe anxiety before cardiac catheterization. The findings of this study demonstrate that aromatherapy, as administered in this study, is not beneficial.

  10. Patient perspectives on participation in the ENABLE II randomized controlled trial of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention: benefits and burdens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Cristine; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Li, Zhongze; Hegel, Mark; Ahles, Tim A; Bakitas, Marie

    2013-04-01

    ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise Before Life Ends) II was one of the first randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention on quality of life, mood, and symptom control for advanced cancer patients and their caregivers. However, little is known about how participants experience early palliative care and the benefits and burdens of participating in a palliative care clinical trial. To gain a deeper understanding of participants' perspectives of the intervention and palliative care trial participation. A qualitative descriptive study using thematic analysis to determine benefits and burdens of a new palliative care intervention and trial participation. Of the 72 participants who were alive when the study commenced, 53 agreed to complete an in-depth, semi-structured interview regarding the ENABLE II intervention and clinical trial participation. Participants' perceptions of intervention benefits were represented by four themes: enhanced problem-solving skills, better coping, feeling empowered, and feeling supported or reassured. Three themes related to trial participation: helping future patients and contributing to science, gaining insight through completion of questionnaires, and trial/intervention aspects to improve. The benefits of the intervention and the positive aspects of trial participation outweighed trial "burdens". This study raises additional important questions relevant to future trial design and intervention development: when should a palliative care intervention be initiated and what aspects of self-care and healthy living should be offered in addition to palliative content for advanced cancer patients when they are feeling well?

  11. Randomized Controlled Trials of Pediatric Massage: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shay Beider

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing reviews of massage therapy (MT research are either limited to infants, adults, or were conducted prior to the publication of the most recent studies using pediatric samples. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of pediatric MT are reviewed. A literature search yielded 24 RCTs of pediatric MT, defined as the manual manipulation of soft tissue intended to promote health and well-being in recipients between 2 and 19 years of age. Because RCTs of pediatric MT varied considerably in the amount and types of data reported, quantitative and narrative review methods were both used. Single-dose and multiple-dose effects were examined separately. Among single-dose effects, significant reductions of state anxiety were observed at the first session (g = 0.59, P < 0.05 and the last session (g = 1.10, P < 0.01 of a course of treatment. Effects for salivary cortisol (g = 0.28, negative mood (g = 0.52 and behavior (g = 0.37 were non-significant. Three of eleven multiple-dose effects were statistically significant. These were trait anxiety (g = 0.94, P < 0.05, muscle tone (g = 0.90, P < 0.01 and arthritis pain (g = 1.33, P < 0.01. Results of studies not permitting effect size calculation were judged to be generally consistent with quantitative results. MT benefits pediatric recipients, though not as universally as sometimes reported. Numerous weaknesses endemic to MT research (e.g. low statistical power, frequent failure to report basic descriptive statistics are identified, and recommendations for future pediatric MT research are discussed.

  12. Exercise training and habitual physical activity: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Earnest, Conrad P; Johnson, William D; Blair, Steven N; Sénéchal, Martin; Church, Timothy S

    2012-12-01

    Exercise training reduces adiposity and risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the combined effects of habitual free-living physical activity and aerobic training on waist circumference, weight, fitness, and blood pressure in postmenopausal women are unknown. To evaluate the effects of habitual physical activity levels during aerobic training on weight, waist circumference, fitness, and blood pressure. Secondary analysis of an RCT. Original data collected April 2001 to June 2005 and analyzed in 2012. Postmenopausal women in a supervised exercise trial. Women (n=325) were randomized to 4, 8, or 12 kcal/kg per week of aerobic training or a control group for 6 months. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and follow-up. Changes in dependent variables within each training group were evaluated across tertiles of pedometer-determined habitual physical activity outside exercise training sessions. Changes in waist circumference and weight. Reductions in waist circumference were significantly greater with higher steps/day accumulated outside exercise training compared to lower levels in the 4 (high: -4.8 cm vs low: -1.4 cm, p=0.03); 8 (high: -4.2 cm vs low: -0.4 cm, p=0.03), and 12 kcal/kg per week groups (high: -4.1 cm vs low: -0.7 cm, p=0.05). For all groups, p-trend≤0.03. A trend was observed for greater weight reduction with higher steps/day in the 4 kcal/kg per week group (p-trend=0.04) but not for the other exercise doses. No effects were observed for blood pressure or fitness measures (all p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, higher habitual physical activity while participating in aerobic training was associated with greater reductions in central adiposity, and was supportive of weight loss compared to lower levels. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF AMLODIPINE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECT HOMOGENEITY IN CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Gorbunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare influence of amlodipine and spirapril on ambulatory blood pressure profile, including antihypertensive effect smoothness in patients with arterial hypertension (HT.Methods. 39 patients (aged 53,7±10,0 y.o. with HT were included in the open, randomized, cross-over study, 30 patients completed study. The duration of every therapies was 4 weeks, initial control period and wash-out period between therapies lasted 1 week. The initial daily dose of amlodipine was 5 mg, standard dose of spirapril (6 mg/daily was not changed during the trial. After 1-2 weeks of treatment amlodipine dose was increased up to 10 mg/daily as well as dihydrochlorothiazide was added, if necessary. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed initially and at the end of both therapies.Results. Both drugs demonstrated good antihypertensive effect according to ABPM data. Decrease of systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 11,2±1,8/7,6±1,2 mm Hg in amlodipine therapy and 10,0±1,8/7,1±1,2 in spirapril therapy (p<0,0001. The smoothness indexes (SI were 0,65/0,45 and 0,55/0,45, respectively, differences between two therapies were not significant. However the individual analysis of the SI distribution (with SI=0,5 as a satisfactory criterion, showed that antihypertensive effect smoothness is better in amlodipine therapy than this in spirapril one.Conclusion. Amlodipine has prominent as well as smooth antihypertensive effect, that gives it advantages in the long-term antihypertensive therapy.

  14. Preventing deformational plagiocephaly through parent guidance: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnivala, Henri; Vuollo, Ville; Harila, Virpi; Heikkinen, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Valkama, A Marita

    2015-09-01

    Deformational plagiocephaly (DP) occurs frequently in otherwise healthy infants. Many infants with DP undergo physiotherapy or helmet therapy, and ample treatment-related research is available. However, the possibility of preventing DP has been left with little attention. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention in the newborn's environment, positioning, and handling on the prevalence of DP at 3 months and to investigate the causal relationship between DP and cervical imbalance. We carried out a randomized controlled trial, with healthy newborns randomized into two groups at birth. All families received standard positioning instructions to prevent SIDS. Additionally, the intervention group received detailed instructions regarding the infant's environment, positioning, and handling, with the goal of creating a nonrestrictive environment that promotes spontaneous physical movement and symmetrical motor development. Two- and three-dimensional photogrammetry served to assess cranial shape and goniometry to measure cervical motion. At 3 months, the prevalence of DP was lower in the intervention group in both 2D (11 vs 31 %) and 3D analyses (15 vs 33 %), and the asymmetry was milder in the intervention group. Infants with DP at follow-up had also developed more torticollis. An early educational intervention reduces the prevalence and severity of DP at 3 months. •Deformational plagiocephaly, often with associated torticollis, is common in healthy infants. •Parental education is frequently recommended for preventing deformational plagiocephaly, although information regarding the effectiveness of preventive strategies is scarce. •Early parent guidance effectively reduces the prevalence and severity of DP and improves the cervical range of motion at three months. •Educating both parents and professionals about proper infant positioning on a national scale could help minimize public healthcare costs.

  15. Extended treatment for cigarette smoking cessation: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laude, Jennifer R; Bailey, Steffani R; Crew, Erin; Varady, Ann; Lembke, Anna; McFall, Danielle; Jeon, Anna; Killen, Diana; Killen, Joel D; David, Sean P

    2017-08-01

    To test the potential benefit of extending cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) relative to not extending CBT on long-term abstinence from smoking. Two-group parallel randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized to receive non-extended CBT (n = 111) or extended CBT (n = 112) following a 26-week open-label treatment. Community clinic in the United States. A total of 219 smokers (mean age: 43 years; mean cigarettes/day: 18). All participants received 10 weeks of combined CBT + bupropion sustained release (bupropion SR) + nicotine patch and were continued on CBT and either no medications if abstinent, continued bupropion + nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) if increased craving or depression scores, or varenicline if still smoking at 10 weeks. Half the participants were randomized at 26 weeks to extended CBT (E-CBT) to week 48 and half to non-extended CBT (no additional CBT sessions). The primary outcome was expired CO-confirmed, 7-day point-prevalence (PP) at 52- and 104-week follow-up. Analyses were based on intention-to-treat. PP abstinence rates at the 52-week follow-up were comparable across non-extended CBT (40%) and E-CBT (39%) groups [odds ratio (OR) = 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.55, 1.78]. A similar pattern was observed across non-extended CBT (39%) and E-CBT (33%) groups at the 104-week follow-up (OR = 0.79; 95% CI= 0.44, 1.40). Prolonging cognitive-behavioral therapy from 26 to 48 weeks does not appear to improve long-term abstinence from smoking. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. A randomised controlled trial using the Epidrum for labour epidurals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deighan, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to determine if using the Epidrum to site epidurals improves success and reduces morbidity. Three hundred parturients requesting epidural analgesia for labour were enrolled. 150 subjects had their epidural sited using Epidrum and 150 using standard technique. We recorded subject demographics, operator experience, number of attempts, Accidental Dural Puncture rate, rate of failure to site epidural catheter, rate of failure of analgesia, Post Dural Puncture Headache and Epidural Blood Patch rates. Failure rate in Epidrum group was 9\\/150 (6%) vs 0 (0%) in the Control group (P = 0.003). There were four (2.66%) accidental dural punctures in the Epidrum group and none in the Control group (P = 0.060), and 2 epidurals out of 150 (1.33%) in Epidrum group were re-sited, versus 3\\/150 (2%) in the control group (P = 1.000). The results of our study do not suggest that using Epidrum improves success or reduces morbidity.

  17. A controlled trial of a Quit and Win contest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Ellen J; Rayens, Mary Kay; Warnick, Todd A; Chirila, Costel; Rasnake, Robert T; Paul, Todd P; Christie, Dawn

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a state-of-the-art Quit and Win contest on tobacco quit rates at 3, 6, and 12 months after the 30-day quit period. Quasi-experimental with a volunteer sample of 494 Quit and Win contest registrants (treatment group) and 512 randomly selected tobacco users not exposed to the promotional media campaign (control group). Intervention included a 30-day quit period to be eligible for large cash prizes; provider advice via weekly mailings; online and telephone quit assistance; media campaign; and community support. Community-based intervention in Kentucky. A total of 1006 adult tobacco users. Quit rates were measured using 7-day point prevalence for tobacco use. Urine cotinine measurements confirmed self-reported quitting. Treatment group participants were significantly more likely than controls to experience quitting during the 1-year follow-up, as determined by both self-report and urine confirmation. After adjusting for baseline differences in demographics, tobacco use, and stage of change, those in the treatment group had 2.6 times the odds of reporting quitting in the postintervention period and 5.3 times the odds of experiencing quitting confirmed by urine cotinine, relative to controls. Women, minorities, and low-income tobacco users had equal odds of quitting as men, whites, and those with higher incomes. That the contest was minimally intensive and yielded a relatively high, quit rate demonstrates the potential effectiveness of the intervention.

  18. A randomised controlled trial of Silirum vaccine for control of paratuberculosis in farmed red deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, L A; Wilson, P R; Heuer, C; Mackintosh, C G

    2013-12-07

    A randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of Silirum vaccine in control of paratuberculosis in young farmed deer was carried out in 2008-2009 in six New Zealand herds with a history of clinical disease. Vaccination with Silirum was carried out in four-month-old deer, and vaccinates (n=1671) and controls (n=1664) were weighed at vaccination and at 8 and 12 months old, when faecal samples were collected from 125 vaccinates and 123 controls on five farms. Deer were slaughtered between 11 and 20 months of age, and the incidence of gross visceral lymph node (VLN) pathology typical of paratuberculosis in deer, that is, enlarged and/or granulomatous VLN, was recorded. Clinical disease was confirmed in 18 controls and seven vaccinates, representing a vaccine efficacy estimate of 60 per cent (95% CI 3 per cent to 83 per cent, P=0.04). Forty-seven percent (95% CI 38 per cent to 56 per cent) of faecal samples from vaccinates and 55 per cent (95% CI 46 per cent to 64 per cent) from controls were Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis positive (P=0.5). Average daily liveweight gain did not differ between the cohorts. At slaughter, 1.4 per cent of vaccinates and 4.5 per cent of controls had VLN pathology, RR=0.32 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.54, Pvaccination with Silirum may be useful as an aid to control losses associated with clinical paratuberculosis in young deer.

  19. Massage Therapy and Labor Outcomes: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Patricia; Shroff, Farah; Jaspar, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Massage is a time-honored method by which women have received comfort throughout the millennia, yet it has not been rigorously evaluated in the modern day delivery suite. No study to date that we are aware of has evaluated the effect of massage therapy by a regulated massage therapist on labor pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of massage therapy provided by registered massage therapists in managing pain among women in active labor. Methods BC Women’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Research Design: a randomized controlled trial. Participants: 77 healthy nulliparous women presenting in spontaneous labor. Intervention: Swedish massage administered for up to five hours by a registered massage therapist during labor vs. standard care. Main outcome measures include: cervical dilation at the time of administration of epidural, compared using estimated marginal means in an analysis of covariance. We also compared perception of pain at three time periods during labor according to cervical dilation at 3–4 cm, 5–7 cm, and 8–10 cm using the McGill Present Pain Intensity Scale. Results The mean cervical dilation at the time of epidural insertion after adjustment for station of the presenting part, cervical dilation, and status of membranes on admission to hospital was 5.9 cm (95% CI 5.2–6.7) compared to 4.9 in the control group (95% CI 4.2–5.8). Scores on the McGill Pain Scale were consistently lower in the massage therapy group (13.3 vs. 16.9 at 3–4 cm, 13.3 vs. 15.8 at 5–6 cm, and 19.4 vs. 28.3 at 7–8 cm), although these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Our findings from this pilot study suggest that massage therapy by a registered massage therapist has the potential to be an effective means of pain management that may be associated with delayed use of epidural analgesia. It may therefore have the potential to reduce exposure to epidural analgesia during labor and decrease rates of associated

  20. Secnidazole Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Sharon L; Nyirjesy, Paul; Waldbaum, Arthur S; Schwebke, Jane R; Morgan, Franklin G; Adetoro, Nikki A; Braun, Carol J

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate secnidazole as a single oral dose treatment for bacterial vaginosis in a phase 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In a phase 2, randomized, double-blind, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled study, women with bacterial vaginosis who met all Amsel criteria (discharge; pH 4.7 or greater; 20% or greater clue cells; positive whiff test) were randomized one to one to one at 24 U.S. centers to 1 or 2 g secnidazole compared with placebo. The primary endpoint was clinical cure (normalization of discharge, amine odor, and clue cells) 21-30 days after treatment. Secondary endpoints included microbiologic cure, defined as a Nugent score of 0-3, and therapeutic cure, defined as meeting criteria for both clinical and microbiologic cure. The modified intent to treat was used for efficacy analyses and included all randomized patients who met the enrollment criteria. Assuming a clinical cure rate of 40% in the active groups and 15% in the placebo group, a sample size of 52 patients per group provided approximately 80% power to detect a significant difference between groups (.05 level [two-sided]) using a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Between May and September 2014, 215 patients were enrolled. In the intent-to-treat population, the clinical cure rate was 65.3% for the 2-g group, 49.3% for the 1-g group, and 19.4% for the placebo group. The modified intent-to-treat population included 188 women (median age 33 years; 32% with four or more bacterial vaginosis episodes in the previous year; 54% black) with baseline Nugent scores 4 or greater. Clinical, microbiologic, and therapeutic cure rates were 67.7%, 40.3%, and 40.3% for 2 g secnidazole and 51.6%, 23.4%, and 21.9% for 1 g secnidazole compared with 17.7%, 6.5%, and 6.5% for placebo, respectively (Pbacterial vaginosis treatment (Pbacterial vaginosis treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02147899.

  1. Mobile phone-based telemonitoring for heart failure management: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Emily; Leonard, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Barnsley, Jan; Masino, Caterina; Ross, Heather J

    2012-02-16

    improvements from baseline to post-study in BNP (decreased by 150 pg/mL, P = .02), LVEF (increased by 7.4%, P = .005) and self-care maintenance (increased by 7 points, P = .05) and management (increased by 14 points, P = .03), while the control group did not. No differences were found between the telemonitoring and control groups in terms of hospitalization, mortality, or emergency department visits, but the trial was underpowered to detect differences in these metrics. Our findings provide evidence of improved quality of life through improved self-care and clinical management from a mobile phone-based telemonitoring system. The use of the mobile phone-based system had high adherence and was feasible for patients, including the elderly and those with no experience with mobile phones. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00778986.

  2. Up-date on the NeoVitaA Trial: Obstacles, challenges, perspectives, and local experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sascha; Gortner, Ludwig

    2016-09-26

    The aim of the NeoVitaA Trial is to assess the role of postnatal additional high-dose oral vitamin A supplementation for 28 days in reducing Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants at 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). All infants (both intervention and control group) will be provided with basic vitamin A (1000 IU/kg/day) in addition to trial intervention.In this short communication, we will give an up-date on obstacles, challenges as well as perspectives and potential solutions when putting into place a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial in this cohort of extremely susceptible infants.

  3. Sham Acupressure Controls Used in Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review and Critique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yu Tan

    Full Text Available To explore the commonly utilized sham acupressure procedures in existing acupressure trials, and to assess whether different types of sham interventions yield different therapeutic outcomes, and, as far as possible, to identify directions for the future development of an adequate sham acupressure method.Randomized controlled trials comparing true acupressure with sham interventions were included. Thirteen electronic databases were adopted to locate relevant studies from inception to July 3, 2014. Meanwhile, eight Chinese journals on complementary and alternative medicine were manually searched to locate eligible articles. In addition, eligible studies listed in the reference lists of the included papers and other related systematic reviews on acupressure were also screened to further search any potentially eligible trials. Methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated using the risk of bias assessment tool developed by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Descriptive analysis was adopted to summarize the therapeutic outcomes.Sixty-six studies with 7265 participants were included. Methodological quality of the included trials was generally satisfactory. Six types of sham acupressure approaches were identified and "non-acupoint" stimulation was the most frequently utilized sham point while an acupressure device was the most commonly used approach for administering sham treatments. Acupressure therapy was a beneficial approach in managing a variety of health problems and the therapeutic effect was found to be more effective in the true acupressure groups than that in the sham comparative groups. No clear association could be identified between different sham acupressure modalities and the reported treatment outcomes.A great diversity of sham acupressure controls have been used in clinical practice and research. A solid conclusion whether different sham alternatives are related to different treatment outcomes cannot be derived because of

  4. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasha Omrana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months; neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months; and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will

  5. Flexible trial design in practice - stopping arms for lack-of-benefit and adding research arms mid-trial in STAMPEDE: a multi-arm multi-stage randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydes Matthew R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic Therapy for Advanced or Metastatic Prostate cancer: Evaluation of Drug Efficacy (STAMPEDE is a randomized controlled trial that follows a novel multi-arm, multi-stage (MAMS design. We describe methodological and practical issues arising with (1 stopping recruitment to research arms following a pre-planned intermediate analysis and (2 adding a new research arm during the trial. Methods STAMPEDE recruits men who have locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer who are starting standard long-term hormone therapy. Originally there were five research and one control arms, each undergoing a pilot stage (focus: safety, feasibility, three intermediate ‘activity’ stages (focus: failure-free survival, and a final ‘efficacy’ stage (focus: overall survival. Lack-of-sufficient-activity guidelines support the pairwise interim comparisons of each research arm against the control arm; these pre-defined activity cut-off becomes increasingly stringent over the stages. Accrual of further patients continues to the control arm and to those research arms showing activity and an acceptable safety profile. The design facilitates adding new research arms should sufficiently interesting agents emerge. These new arms are compared only to contemporaneously recruited control arm patients using the same intermediate guidelines in a time-delayed manner. The addition of new research arms is subject to adequate recruitment rates to support the overall trial aims. Results (1 Stopping Existing Therapy: After the second intermediate activity analysis, recruitment was discontinued to two research arms for lack-of-sufficient activity. Detailed preparations meant that changes were implemented swiftly at 100 international centers and recruitment continued seamlessly into Activity Stage III with 3 remaining research arms and the control arm. Further regulatory and ethical approvals were not required because this was already included in the

  6. Maximising the value of combining qualitative research and randomised controlled trials in health research: the QUAlitative Research in Trials (QUART) study--a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Thomas, Kate J; Drabble, Sarah J; Rudolph, Anne; Goode, Jackie; Hewison, Jenny

    2014-06-01

    Researchers sometimes undertake qualitative research with randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of health interventions. To systematically explore how qualitative research is being used with trials and identify ways of maximising its value to the trial aim of providing evidence of effectiveness of health interventions. A sequential mixed methods study with four components. (1) Database search of peer-reviewed journals between January 2008 and September 2010 for articles reporting the qualitative research undertaken with specific trials, (2) systematic search of database of registered trials to identify studies combining qualitative research and trials, (3) survey of 200 lead investigators of trials with no apparent qualitative research and (4) semistructured telephone interviews with 18 researchers purposively sampled from the first three methods. Qualitative research was undertaken with at least 12% of trials. A large number of articles reporting qualitative research undertaken with trials (n=296) were published between 2008 and 2010. A total of 28% (82/296) of articles reported qualitative research undertaken at the pre-trial stage and around one-quarter concerned drugs or devices. The articles focused on 22 aspects of the trial within five broad categories. Some focused on more than one aspect of the trial, totalling 356 examples. The qualitative research focused on the intervention being trialled (71%, 254/356), the design and conduct of the trial (15%, 54/356), the outcomes of the trial (1%, 5/356), the measures used in the trial (3%, 10/356), and the health condition in the trial (9%, 33/356). The potential value of the qualitative research to the trial endeavour included improving the external validity of trials and facilitating interpretation of trial findings. This value could be maximised by using qualitative research more at the pre-trial stage and reporting findings with explicit attention to the implications for the trial endeavour. During interviews

  7. Experiences of patients and professionals participating in the HITS home blood pressure telemonitoring trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Janet; Ure, Jenny; Pagliari, Claudia; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-05-28

    To explore the experiences of patients and professionals taking part in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of remote blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring supported by primary care. To identify factors facilitating or hindering the effectiveness of the intervention and those likely to influence its potential translation to routine practice. Qualitative study adopting a qualitative descriptive approach. 25 patients, 11 nurses and 9 doctors who were participating in an RCT of BP telemonitoring. A maximum variation sample of patients from within the trial based on age, sex and deprivation status of the practice was sought. 6 primary care practices in Scotland. Data were collected via taped semistructured interviews. Initial thematic analysis was inductive. Multiple strategies were employed to ensure that the analysis was credible and trustworthy. Prior to the trial, both patients and professionals were reluctant to increase the medication based on single BP measurements taken in the surgery. BP measurements based on multiple electronic readings were perceived as more accurate as a basis for action. Patients using telemonitoring became more engaged in the clinical management of their condition. Professionals reported that telemonitoring challenged existing roles and work practices and increased workload. Lack of integration of telemonitoring data with the electronic health record was perceived as a drawback. BP telemonitoring in a usual care setting can provide a trusted basis for medication management and improved BP control. It increases patients' engagement in the management of their condition, but supporting telemetry and greater patient engagement can increase professional workloads and demand changes in service organisation. Successful service design in practice would have to take account of how additional roles and responsibilities could be realigned with existing work and data management practices. The embedded qualitative study was included in the protocol for

  8. Guidelines to site selection for population surveillance and mosquito control trials: a case study from Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyaloo, Diana P; Elahee, Khouaildi B; Bheecarry, Ambicadutt; Lees, Rosemary Susan

    2014-04-01

    Many novel approaches to controlling mosquito vectors through the release of sterile and mass reared males are being developed in the face of increasing insecticide resistance and other limitations of current methods. Before full scale release programmes can be undertaken there is a need for surveillance of the target population, and investigation of parameters such as dispersal and longevity of released, as compared to wild males through mark-release-recapture (MRR) and other experiments, before small scale pilot trials can be conducted. The nature of the sites used for this field work is crucial to ensure that a trial can feasibly collect sufficient and relevant information, given the available resources and practical limitations, and having secured the correct regulatory, community and ethical approvals and support. Mauritius is considering the inclusion of the sterile insect technique (SIT), for population reduction of Aedes albopictus, as a component of the Ministry of Health and Quality of Life's 'Operational Plan for Prevention and Control of Chikungunya and Dengue'. As part of an investigation into the feasibility of integrating the SIT into the Integrated Vector Management (IVM) scheme in Mauritius a pilot trial is planned. Two potential sites have been selected for this purpose, Pointe des Lascars and Panchvati, villages in the North East of the country, and population surveillance has commenced. This case study will here be used to explore the considerations which go into determining the most appropriate sites for mosquito field research. Although each situation is unique, and an ideal site may not be available, this discussion aims to help researchers to consider and balance the important factors and select field sites that will meet their needs.

  9. Inositol for the prevention of neural tube defects: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Leung, Kit-Yi; Gay, Victoria; Burren, Katie; Mills, Kevin; Chitty, Lyn S; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-03-28

    Although peri-conceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation can prevent a proportion of neural tube defects (NTD), there is increasing evidence that many NTD are FA non-responsive. The vitamin-like molecule inositol may offer a novel approach to preventing FA-non-responsive NTD. Inositol prevented NTD in a genetic mouse model, and was well tolerated by women in a small study of NTD recurrence. In the present study, we report the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects by Inositol (PONTI) pilot study designed to gain further experience of inositol usage in human pregnancy as a preliminary trial to a future large-scale controlled trial to evaluate efficacy of inositol in NTD prevention. Study subjects were UK women with a previous NTD pregnancy who planned to become pregnant again. Of 117 women who made contact, ninety-nine proved eligible and forty-seven agreed to be randomised (double-blind) to peri-conceptional supplementation with inositol plus FA or placebo plus FA. In total, thirty-three randomised pregnancies produced one NTD recurrence in the placebo plus FA group (n 19) and no recurrences in the inositol plus FA group (n 14). Of fifty-two women who declined randomisation, the peri-conceptional supplementation regimen and outcomes of twenty-two further pregnancies were documented. Two NTD recurred, both in women who took only FA in their next pregnancy. No adverse pregnancy events were associated with inositol supplementation. The findings of the PONTI pilot study encourage a large-scale controlled trial of inositol for NTD prevention, but indicate the need for a careful study design in view of the unwillingness of many high-risk women to be randomised.

  10. Factors Affecting Recruitment and Attrition in Randomised Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Pregnancy-Related Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Close

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs investigating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM for pregnancy-related issues have encountered issues with recruitment and attrition. Little is known about the cause of these issues. Methods. Data was gathered from an antenatal CAM randomised controlled trial. During foetal anomaly appointments, women meeting inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the trial. Numbers of women invited and eligible were recorded. Reasons for noninterest were noted and analysed. Focus groups exploring trial experience of participants were also conducted. Findings. Of the 428 women invited to participate, 376 were eligible and just under a quarter participated. Reasons for nonparticipation included concerns about CAM and lack of interest in participation in research. Other factors negatively affecting recruitment included recruitment timing, competition for participants, limited support from staff, and inadequate trial promotion. Factors encouraging recruitment included being interested in research and seeking pain relief. Reasons for dropping out were time constraints, travel issues, work commitments, and pregnancy issues. Several women in the sham and usual care group dropped out due to dissatisfaction with treatment allocation. Conclusion. CAM researchers must explore problems encountered with recruitment and attrition so that evidence-based implementation strategies to address the issues can be developed.

  11. Blinding in randomized control trials: the enigma unraveled.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vartika Saxena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for new treatments and testing of new ideas begins in the laboratory and then established in clinical research settings. Studies addressing the same therapeutic problem may produce conflicting results hence Randomised Clinical Trial is regarded as the most valid method for assessing the benefits and harms of healthcare interventions. The next challenge face by the medical community is the validity of such trials as theses tend to deviate from the truth because of various biases. For the avoidance of the same it has been suggested that the validity or quality of primary trials should be assessed under blind conditions. Thus blinding, is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. Blinding can be defined as withholding information about the assigned interventions from people involved in the trial who may potentially be prejudiced by this knowledge. In this article we make an effort to define blinding, explain its chronology, hierarchy and discuss methods of blinding, its assessment, its possibility, un-blinding and finally the latest guidelines.

  12. Preoperative education interventions to reduce anxiety and improve recovery among cardiac surgery patients: a review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To update evidence of the effectiveness of preoperative education among cardiac surgery patients. Patients awaiting cardiac surgery may experience high levels of anxiety and depression, which can adversely affect their existing disease and surgery and result in prolonged recovery. There is evidence that preoperative education interventions can lead to improved patient experiences and positive postoperative outcomes among a mix of general surgical patients. However, a previous review suggested limited evidence to support the positive impact of preoperative education on patients' recovery from cardiac surgery. Comprehensive review of the literature. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for English-language articles published between 2000-2011. Original articles were included reporting randomised controlled trials of cardiac preoperative education interventions. Six trials were identified and have produced conflicting findings. Some trials have demonstrated the effects of preoperative education on improving physical and psychosocial recovery of cardiac patients, while others found no evidence that patients' anxiety is reduced or of any effect on pain or hospital stay. Evidence of the effectiveness of preoperative education interventions among cardiac surgery patients remains inconclusive. Further research is needed to evaluate cardiac preoperative education interventions for sustained effect and in non-Western countries. A nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary preoperative education approach may offer a way forward to provide a more effective and efficient service. Staff training in developing and delivering such interventions is a priority. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. DeLLITE Depression in late life: an intervention trial of exercise. Design and recruitment of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Sally

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity shows potential in combating the poor outcomes associated with depression in older people. Meta-analyses show gaps in the research with poor trial design compromising certainty in conclusions and few programmes showing sustained effects. Methods/design The Depression in Late Life: an Intervention Trial of Exercise (DeLLITE is a 12 month randomised controlled trial of a physical activity intervention to increase functional status in people aged 75 years and older with depressive symptoms. The intervention involves an individualised activity programme based on goal setting and progression of difficulty of activities delivered by a trained nurse during 8 home visits over 6 months. The control group received time matched home visits to discuss social contacts and networks. Baseline, 6 and 12 months measures were assessed in face to face visits with the primary outcome being functional status (SPPB, NEADL. Secondary outcomes include depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale, quality of life (SF-36, physical activity (AHS Physical Activity Questionnaire and falls (self report. Discussion Due to report in 2008 the DeLLITE study has recruited 70% of those eligible and tests the efficacy of a home based, goal setting physical activity programme in improving function, mood and quality of life in older people with depressive symptomatology. If successful in improving function and mood this trial could prove for the first time that there are long term health benefit of physical activity, independent of social activity, in this high risk group who consume excess health related costs. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12605000475640

  14. Operational experience with the CEBAF control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovater, C.; Chowdhary, M.; Karn, J.; Tiefenback, M.; Zeijts, J. van; Watson, W.

    1996-10-01

    The CEBAF accelerator at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) successfully began its experimental nuclear physics program in November of 1995 and has since surpassed predicted machine availability. Part of this success can be attributed to using the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) control system toolkit. The CEBAF control system is one of the largest accelerator control system now operating. It controls approximately 338 SRF cavities, 2,300 magnets, 500 beam position monitors and other accelerator devices, such as gun hardware and other beam monitoring devices. All told, the system must be able to access over 125,000 database records. The system has been well received by both operators and the hardware designers. The EPICS utilities have made the task of troubleshooting systems easier. The graphical and test-based creation tools have allowed operators to custom build control screens. In addition, the ability to integrate EPICS with other software packages, such as Tcl/Tk, has allowed physicists to quickly prototype high-level application programs, and to provide GUI front ends for command line driven tools. Specific examples of the control system applications are presented in the areas of energy and orbit control, cavity tuning and accelerator tune up diagnostics.

  15. Streamlining IRB review in multisite trials through single-study IRB Cooperative Agreements: experience of the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornquist, Mark D; Edelstein, Cim; Goodman, Gary E; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2002-02-01

    With their extensive data and specimen repositories, clinical trials are a long-term, valuable resource to health researchers. However, assuring protection of participants' rights can be challenging, particularly when such trials are conducted at multiple sites with multiple Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). One little-used mechanism that can streamline IRB review in multisite trials while maintaining participants' protections is the single-study IRB Cooperative Agreement. This agreement is entirely different from reciprocity agreements between institutions. Beginning in 1996, the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial established single-study IRB Cooperative Agreements among its performance sites, which reduced the average time to complete IRB approval from over 6 months to 1 month for each of many substudies. We describe our experience and make recommendations for other multisite clinical trials.

  16. Bio-control trials of Chaetomium spirale ND35 against apple canker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XINYa-fen; SHANGJin-jie

    2005-01-01

    A new endophytic antagonistic fungus, Chaetomium spirale ND35 from Populus tomentosa, was reported. The bio-control trials of C. spirale ND35 against the Valsa Canker of apple were preliminarily investigated. The results of dual culture on PDA plate showed that C. spirale ND35 was capable of strong antagonism against Valsa ceratosperma, and for inhibiting the mycelial growth of V. ceratosperma,.the crude extract of liquid culture of corn steep powder broth was more effective than that one of malt extract broth (MEB). The results of bio-control in greenhouse and field indicated that the disease incidence of apple tree treated with C. spirale ND35 was lower significantly than that treated by other methods. The re-isolation experiment suggested that C. spirale ND35 could colonize in stems and branches of apple trees successfully, and the ND35 colonization rate of the treatment with solid wheat bran culture was higher than that of corn steep powder broth, but the field experiment result the control effect of liquid culture of C. spirale ND35 was better than that of solid culture.

  17. Reporting of positive results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-based mental health interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coronado-Montoya, S.; Levis, A.W.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Steele, R.J.; Turner, E.H.; Thombs, B.D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A large proportion of mindfulness-based therapy trials report statistically significant results, even in the context of very low statistical power. The objective of the present study was to characterize the reporting of "positive" results in randomized controlled trials of mindfulness-bas

  18. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Cathain, A.; Hoddinott, P.; Lewin, S.; Thomas, K.J.; Young, B.; Adamson, J.; Jansen, J.F.M.; Mills, N.; Moore, G.; Donovan, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full t

  19. Ipsilateral transversus abdominis plane block provides effective analgesia after appendectomy in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2010-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block provides effective postoperative analgesia in adults undergoing major abdominal surgery. Its efficacy in children remains unclear, with no randomized clinical trials in this population. In this study, we evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after appendectomy performed through an open abdominal incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  20. Survey and Practice of Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ting-qian; MAO Bing; WANG Gang; CHANG Jing; WANG Lei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been generally accepted as the gold standard in the evaluation of clinical effectiveness. Readers need to understand the trial design, implementation, results, analysis and interpretation, so as to fully understand the results of RCTs. Thus, the investigators of RCTs have to report these items in a complete, accurate and clear manner.

  1. Trial History Effects in Stroop Task Performance Are Independent of Top-Down Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, Monicque M.; Jolij, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    In this study we sought to elucidate what mechanisms underlie the effects of trial history on information processing. We explicitly focused on the contribution of conflict control and S-R binding to sequential trial effects. Performance and brain activity were measured during two hours of continuous

  2. Covariate Adjustment Strategy Increases Power in the Randomized Controlled Trial With Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarkhani, Maryam; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial, a decision needs to be made about the total number of subjects for adequate statistical power. One way to increase the power of a trial is by including a predictive covariate in the model. In this article, the effects of various covariate adjustment strategies on increasing the power is studied for discrete-time…

  3. The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) In Stroke (PAIS) trial : a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase III trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, Heleen M.; van der Worp, H. Bart; van Gemert, H. Maarten A.; Algra, Ate; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Van Gijn, Jan; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background High body temperature in the first 12-24 h after stroke onset is associated with poor functional outcome. The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) In Stroke (PAIS) trial aimed to assess whether early treatment with paracetamol improves functional outcome in patients with acute stroke by reducing b

  4. Cosmesis and body image after single-port laparoscopic or conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a multicenter double blinded randomised controlled trial (SPOCC-trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonlanthen René

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging attempts have been made to reduce operative trauma and improve cosmetic results of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. There is a trend towards minimizing the number of incisions such as natural transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES and single-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SPLC. Many retrospective case series propose excellent cosmesis and reduced pain in SPLC. As the latter has been confirmed in a randomized controlled trial, patient's satisfaction on cosmesis is still controversially debated. Methods/Design The SPOCC trial is a prospective, multi-center, double blinded, randomized controlled study comparing SPLC with 4-port conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (4PLC in elective surgery. The hypothesis and primary objective is that patients undergoing SPLC will have a better outcome in cosmesis and body image 12 weeks after surgery. This primary endpoint is assessed using a validated 8-item multiple choice type questionnaire on cosmesis and body image. The secondary endpoint has three entities: the quality of life 12 weeks after surgery assessed by the validated Short-Form-36 Health Survey questionnaire, postoperative pain assessed by a visual analogue scale and the use of analgesics. Operative time, surgeon's experience with SPLC and 4PLC, use of additional ports, conversion to 4PLC or open cholecystectomy, length of stay, costs, time of work as well as intra- and postoperative complications are further aspects of the secondary endpoint. Patients are randomly assigned either to SPLC or to 4PLC. Patients as well as treating physicians, nurses and assessors are blinded until the 7th postoperative day. Sample size calculation performed by estimating a difference of cosmesis of 20% (alpha = 0.05 and beta = 0.90, drop out rate of 10% resulted in a number of 55 randomized patients per arm. Discussion The SPOCC-trial is a prospective, multi-center, double-blind, randomized controlled study to assess cosmesis and body

  5. Flexible manipulator control experiments and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, S.; Ozguner, U.; Tzes, A.; Kotnik, P. T.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling and control design for flexible manipulators, both from an experimental and analytical viewpoint, are described. From the application perspective, an ongoing effort within the laboratory environment at the Ohio State University, where experimentation on a single link flexible arm is underway is described. Several unique features of this study are described here. First, the manipulator arm is slewed by a direct drive dc motor and has a rigid counterbalance appendage. Current experimentation is from two viewpoints: (1) rigid body slewing and vibration control via actuation with the hub motor, and (2) vibration suppression through the use of structure-mounted proof-mass actuation at the tip. Such an application to manipulator control is of interest particularly in design of space-based telerobotic control systems, but has received little attention to date. From an analytical viewpoint, parameter estimation techniques within the closed-loop for self-tuning adaptive control approaches are discussed. Also introduced is a control approach based on output feedback and frequency weighting to counteract effects of spillover in reduced-order model design. A model of the flexible manipulator based on experimental measurements is evaluated for such estimation and control approaches.

  6. Multidisciplinary transmural rehabilitation for older persons with a stroke: the design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vluggen Tom PMM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke is one of the major causes of loss of independence, decreased quality of life and mortality among elderly people. About half of the elderly stroke patients discharged after rehabilitation in a nursing home still experience serious impairments in daily functioning one year post stroke, which can lead to difficulties in picking up and managing their social life. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a new multidisciplinary transmural rehabilitation programme for older stroke patients. Methods A two group multicentre randomised controlled trial is used to evaluate the effects of the rehabilitation programme. The programme consists of three care modules: 1 neurorehabilitation treatment for elderly stroke patients; 2 empowerment training for patient and informal caregiver; and 3 stroke education for patient and informal caregiver. The total programme has a duration of between two and six months, depending on the individual problems of the patient and informal caregiver. The control group receives usual care in the nursing home and after discharge. Patients aged 65 years and over are eligible for study participation when they are admitted to a geriatric rehabilitation unit in a nursing home due to a recent stroke and are expected to be able to return to their original home environment after discharge. Data are gathered by face-to-face interviews, self-administered questionnaires, focus groups and registration forms. Primary outcomes for patients are activity level after stroke, functional dependence, perceived quality of life and social participation. Outcomes for informal caregivers are perceived care burden, objective care burden, quality of life and perceived health. Outcome measures of the process evaluation are implementation fidelity, programme deliverance and the opinion of the stroke professionals, patients and informal caregivers about the programme. Outcome measures of the

  7. Slewing control experiment for a flexible panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    1987-01-01

    Technology areas are identified in which better analytical and/or experimental methods are needed to adequately and accurately control the dynamic responses of multibody space platforms such as the space station. A generic space station solar panel is used to experimentally evaluate current control technologies. Active suppression of solar panel vibrations induced by large angle maneuvers is studied with a torque actuator at the root of the solar panel. These active suppression tests will identify the hardware requirements and adequacy of various controller designs.

  8. The talking card: Randomized controlled trial of a novel audio-recording tool for asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowden, John D; Wilkerson-Amendell, Sharon; Weathers, Laura; Gonzalez, Emma D; Dinakar, Chitra; Westbrook, David H; Williams, Arthur R

    2015-01-01

    Asthma care plans typically include complicated written instructions. Customized, audio-recorded instructions may bridge health literacy gaps and improve treatment plan understanding. To measure the effects of a recordable greeting card-style tool (Talking Card) on asthma control and parental care of children with asthma. Multisite randomized trial in two primary care clinics, including children 4-11 years old with uncontrolled asthma and their parents. Parent-child dyads were randomized to usual care of asthma or usual care plus the Talking Card. Dyads completed three asthma-focused visits over 3 months. At the visit, card recipients received customized instructions recorded by the pediatrician onto an audio chip in the card. Asthma control was measured by using the Childhood Asthma Control Test. Card use and parental satisfaction were measured by parental survey (card arm only). Outcomes were analyzed by using generalized estimating equations and frequency distributions. Sixty-four dyads participated and attended 166 clinic visits. Card use was associated with a 1.6-point increase in Childhood Asthma Control Test score (p = 0.02) and a clinic visit regardless of card use with a three-point increase (p asthma. The Talking Card, a novel audio communication tool, was associated with improved asthma control and deemed highly desirable by parents and children struggling to control asthma. This inexpensive portable tool may be useful in other chronic disorders and in locales with low literacy and poor access to digital technology.

  9. Acceptance and commitment therapy for adults with advanced cancer (CanACT): study protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Joseph; Serfaty, Marc; Davis, Sarah; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Gola, Anna; Omar, Rumana Z; King, Michael; Tookman, Adrian; Austen, Janet St John; Turner, Karen; Jones, Louise

    2016-02-11

    One-third of people with cancer experience psychological distress and may suppress distressing thoughts, emotions, and concerns, leading to further problems. Conventional psychological treatments reduce distress by problem solving, but in advanced cancer, when ill health is progressive and death may be approaching, physical and psychological difficulties are complex and have no simple solutions. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy encourages acknowledgement and acceptance of mental experiences, increasing people's ability to work with problems that cannot be solved. Previous pilot work in advanced cancer confirms that distress can be associated with an avoidance of experiencing uncomfortable thoughts and emotions. This feasibility randomised controlled trial of Acceptance Commitment Therapy aims to establish parameters for a larger trial. Fifty-four participants with advanced cancer will be randomly allocated to up to eight sessions (each 1 hour) of Acceptance Commitment Therapy or a talking control. Participants will be recruited from those attending outpatient services and hospice day care at three specialist palliative care units in North and East London, United Kingdom. The primary outcome is a measure of functioning in four areas of life (physical, social/family, emotional, and general activity) using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapies--General questionnaire at 3 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes are (i) acceptance using the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire; (ii) psychological distress using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale; (iii) physical functioning using a timed walk and sit-to-stand test; and (iv) quality of life measures including the Euroqol-5 Dimensions and ICECAP Supportive Care measures. Qualitative data will be collected at 3 months to explore the participants' experiences of the trial and therapy. Data will be collected on the costs of care. Data generated on the recruitment, retention, and experience of the

  10. Cooperative adaptive cruise control: design and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, G.; Vugts, R.; Ploeg, J.; Molengraft, R. van de; Steinbuch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The design of a CACC system and corresponding experiments are presented. The design targets string stable system behavior, which is assessed using a frequency-domain-based approach. Following this approach, it is shown that the available wireless information enables small inter-vehicle distances, wh

  11. Cooperative adaptive cruise control: design and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, G.; Vugts, R.; Ploeg, J.; Molengraft, R. van de; Steinbuch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The design of a CACC system and corresponding experiments are presented. The design targets string stable system behavior, which is assessed using a frequency-domain-based approach. Following this approach, it is shown that the available wireless information enables small inter-vehicle distances, wh

  12. Treating fibromyalgia with mindfulness-based stress reduction: results from a 3-armed randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Grossman, Paul; Schwarzer, Barbara; Jena, Susanne; Naumann, Johannes; Walach, Harald

    2011-02-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a structured 8-week group program teaching mindfulness meditation and mindful yoga exercises. MBSR aims to help participants develop nonjudgmental awareness of moment-to-moment experience. Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome with chronic pain, fatigue, and insomnia as major symptoms. Efficacy of MBSR for enhanced well-being of fibromyalgia patients was investigated in a 3-armed trial, which was a follow-up to an earlier quasi-randomized investigation. A total of 177 female patients were randomized to one of the following: (1) MBSR, (2) an active control procedure controlling for nonspecific effects of MBSR, or (3) a wait list. The major outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 2 months post-treatment. Secondary outcomes were disorder-specific quality of life, depression, pain, anxiety, somatic complaints, and a proposed index of mindfulness. Of the patients, 82% completed the study. There were no significant differences between groups on primary outcome, but patients overall improved in HRQoL at short-term follow-up (P=0.004). Post hoc analyses showed that only MBSR manifested a significant pre-to-post-intervention improvement in HRQoL (P=0.02). Furthermore, multivariate analysis of secondary measures indicated modest benefits for MBSR patients. MBSR yielded significant pre-to-post-intervention improvements in 6 of 8 secondary outcome variables, the active control in 3, and the wait list in 2. In conclusion, primary outcome analyses did not support the efficacy of MBSR in fibromyalgia, although patients in the MBSR arm appeared to benefit most. Effect sizes were small compared to the earlier, quasi-randomized investigation. Several methodological aspects are discussed, e.g., patient burden, treatment preference and motivation, that may provide explanations for differences. In a 3-armed randomized controlled trial in female patients suffering from fibromyalgia, patients benefited modestly from a mindfulness

  13. Beyond Randomized Controlled Trials in Attempted Suicide Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Simon; Sharon, Cynthia; Coggan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence about what is the best treatment for people who present to hospital after self harm. Most treatment trials have been small and involved unrepresentative groups of patients which result in inconclusive findings. Here we note some of the characteristics of attempted suicide which make it a difficult subject to study. We…

  14. Beyond Randomized Controlled Trials in Attempted Suicide Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Simon; Sharon, Cynthia; Coggan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence about what is the best treatment for people who present to hospital after self harm. Most treatment trials have been small and involved unrepresentative groups of patients which result in inconclusive findings. Here we note some of the characteristics of attempted suicide which make it a difficult subject to study. We…

  15. Randomized controlled trials in frontotemporal dementia: cognitive and behavioral outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Justin B. Miller; Banks, Sarah J.; Léger, Gabriel C; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Targets for intervention have been identified, therapies are being developed, and clinical trials are advancing. A major challenge for FTD research is that multiple underlying pathologies can be associated with heterogeneous phenotypes. The neuropsychological profiles associated with FTD spectrum disorders often include executive dysfunction, language impairments and behavioral disturb...

  16. Can user testing of a clinical trial patient information sheet make it fit-for-purpose? - a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silcock Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The participant information sheet (PIS provided to potential trial participants is a critical part of the process of valid consent. However, there is long-standing concern that these lengthy and complex documents are not fit-for-purpose. This has been supported recently through the application of a performance-based approach to testing and improving readability called user testing. This method is now widely used to improve patient medicine leaflets - determining whether people can find and understand key facts. This study applied for the first time a controlled design to determine whether a PIS developed through user testing had improved readability over the original, using a sheet from a UK trial in acute myeloid leukemia (AML16. Methods In the first phase the performance of the original PIS was tested on people in the target group for the trial. There were three rounds of testing including 50 people in total - with the information revised according to its performance after each of the first 2 rounds. In the second phase, the revised PIS was compared with the original in a parallel groups randomised controlled trial (RCT A total of 123 participants were recruited and randomly allocated to read one version of the PIS to find and show understanding of 21 key facts. Results The first, developmental phase produced a revised PIS significantly altered in its wording and layout. In the second, trial phase 66% of participants who read the revised PIS were able to show understanding of all aspects of the trial, compared with 15% of those reading the original version (Odds Ratio 11.2; Chi-square = 31.5 p p Conclusions The original PIS for the AML16 trial may not have enabled valid consent. Combining performance-based user testing with expertise in writing for patients and information design led to a significantly improved and preferred information sheet. User testing is an efficient method for indicating strengths and weaknesses in

  17. Randomised controlled trial of screening for Chlamydia trachomatis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease: the POPI (prevention of pelvic infection) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakeshott, Pippa; Kerry, Sally; Aghaizu, Adamma; Atherton, Helen; Hay, Sima; Taylor-Robinson, David; Simms, Ian; Hay, Phillip

    2010-04-08

    To determine whether screening and treating women for chlamydial infection reduces the incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease over the subsequent 12 months. Randomised controlled trial. Common rooms, lecture theatres, and student bars at universities and further education colleges in London. 2529 sexually active female students, mean age 21 years (range 16-27). Participants completed a questionnaire and provided self taken vaginal swabs, with follow-up after one year. Samples were randomly allocated to immediate testing and treatment for chlamydial infection, or storage and analysis after a year (deferred screening controls). Incidence of clinical pelvic inflammatory disease over 12 months. Baseline prevalence of chlamydia was 5.4% (68/1254) in screened women and 5.9% (75/1265) in controls. 94% (2377/2529) of women were followed up after 12 months. The incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease was 1.3% (15/1191) in screened women compared with 1.9% (23/1186) in controls (relative risk 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 1.22). Seven of 74 control women (9.5%, 95% confidence interval 4.7% to 18.3%) who tested positive for chlamydial infection at baseline developed pelvic inflammatory disease over 12 months compared with one of 63 (1.6%) screened women (relative risk 0.17, 0.03 to 1.01). However, most episodes of pelvic inflammatory disease occurred in women who tested negative for chlamydia at baseline (79%, 30/38). 22% (527/2377) of women reported being tested independently for chlamydia during the trial. Although some evidence suggests that screening for chlamydia reduces rates of pelvic inflammatory disease, especially in women with chlamydial infection at baseline, the effectiveness of a single chlamydia test in preventing pelvic inflammatory disease over 12 months may have been overestimated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00115388.

  18. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherril, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival. Safety endpoints were grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events and withdrawals or deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials reporting on the efficacy or safety of treatments for relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma, and if outcomes were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 10 randomized controlled trials of treatments for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. The most prominent drug investigated (alone or in combination) was rituximab. Most trials did not report median overall survival. Two trials reported median event-free survival (range, 1.2-23.2 months). Six of ten trials reported objective response rate (range, 9-93%). Meta-analysis showed only one statistically significant result: rituximab + bortezomib yielded a significantly higher objective response rate than rituximab monotherapy (relative risk, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.47). Otherwise, there were no discernable differences in overall survival or progression-free survival, partly due to insufficient reporting of results in the clinical trials. The relatively small number of randomized controlled trials, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in the randomized controlled trial features and in the endpoints studied complicate the formal comparison of therapies for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to fully understand the relative outcomes of older and more recently developed therapies.

  19. Controlled Nucleosynthesis Breakthroughs in Experiment and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Adamenko, Stanislav; Merwe, Alwyn

    2007-01-01

    This book ushers in a new era of experimental and theoretical investigations into collective processes, structure formation, and self-organization of nuclear matter. It reports the results of experiments wherein for the first time the nuclei constituting our world (those displayed in Mendeleev's table as well as the super-heavy ones) have been artificially created. Pioneering breakthroughs are described, achieved at the "Proton-21" Laboratory, Kiev, Ukraine, in a variety of new physical and technological directions. A detailed description of the main experiments, their analyses, and the interpretation of copious experimental data are given, along with the methodology governing key measurements and the processing algorithms of the data that empirically confirm the occurrence of macroscopic self-organizing processes leading to the nuclear transformations of various materials. The basic concepts underlying the initiation of self-sustaining collective processes that result in the formation of nuclear structures a...

  20. Dynamic nonprehensile manipulation: Controllability, planning, and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, K.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Mason, M.T. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

    1999-01-01

    The authors are interested in using low-degree-of-freedom robots to perform complex tasks by nonprehensile manipulation (manipulation without a form- or force-closure grasp). By not grasping, the robot can use gravitational, centrifugal, and Coriolis forces as virtual motors to control more degrees of freedom of the part. The part`s extra motion freedoms are exhibited as rolling, slipping, and free flight. This paper describes controllability, motion planning, and implementation of planar dynamic nonprehensile manipulation. The authors show that almost any planar object is controllable by point contact, and the controlling robot requires only two degrees of freedom (a point translating in the plane). They then focus on a one-joint manipulator (with a two-dimensional state space), and show that even this simplest of robots, by using slipping and rolling, can control a planar object to a full-dimensional subset of its six-0dimensional state space. The authors have developed a one-joint robot to perform a variety of dynamic tasks, including snatching an object from a table, rolling an object on the surface of the arm, and throwing and catching. Nonlinear optimization is used to plan robot trajectories that achieve the desired object motion via coupling forces through the nonprehensile contact.

  1. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelim L F D Gomes

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20 or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16. Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO, maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol and lung function.No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05. Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  2. International collaborative trials, placebo controls and The Declaration of Helsinki: need for clarification in paragraph 32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A Y; Ghafoor, F

    2012-01-01

    Inequities in socio-economic and healthcare systems between developed and developing countries have been thrown into sharp relief by globalisation. At the same time, pharmaceutical companies have started conducting clinical trials in developing countries in order to reduce their costs substantially. Together, these two developments create ethical challenges for sponsors and researchers of these trials. One such challenge is that of placebo-controlled trials (PCTs). In this paper we analyse Paragraph 32 of the Declaration of Helsinki referring to PCTs, identifying ambiguities in the wording, and then examine three arguments presented by sponsors of PCTs in developing countries, in defence of such trials. These arguments are: (i) a placebo control provides a definitive answer, and is therefore methodologically superior; (ii) placebo-controlled trials are ethical because they serve the principle of utility, and (iii) interpreting the "best current proven intervention" as the local standard of care allows PCTs to be conducted, if the local standard of care is "no treatment". We argue that PCTs are not methodologically superior; nor are they ethically defensible. Other trial designs conforming to the ethics of research are feasible; the reason for conducting PCTs is expediency. We further propose that, given the global applicability of the Declaration of Helsinki, it is imperative to remove the ambiguities in Paragraph 32. In the context of collaborative trials, when a treatment exists, conducting PCTs is ethically unacceptable, irrespective of the geographic location of the trial. Universal standards ought to be applied universally.

  3. Using Guasha to treat musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review of controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Sun-Mi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guasha is a therapeutic method for pain management using tools to scrape or rub the surface of the body to relieve blood stagnation. This study aims to systematically review the controlled clinical trials on the effectiveness of using Guasha to treat musculoskeletal pain. Methods We searched 11 databases (without language restrictions: MEDLINE, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Korean Studies Information (KSI, DBPIA, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI, KoreaMed, Research Information Service System (RISS, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and the Cochrane Library. The search strategy was Guasha (OR scraping AND pain. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane criteria (i.e. sequence generation, blinding, incomplete outcome measures and allocation concealment. Results Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs and two controlled clinical trials (CCTs were included in the present study. Two RCTs compared Guasha with acupuncture in terms of effectiveness, while the other trials compared Guasha with no treatment (1 trial, acupuncture (4 trials, herbal injection (1 trial and massage or electric current therapy (1 trial. While two RCTs suggested favorable effects of Guasha on pain reduction and response rate, the quality of these RCTs was poor. One CCT reported beneficial effects of Guasha on musculoskeletal pain but had low methodological quality. Conclusion Current evidence is insufficient to show that Guasha is effective in pain management. Further RCTs are warranted and methodological quality should be improved.

  4. Dawn Spacecraft Reaction Control System Flight Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Nakazono, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Dawn spacecraft mission is studying conditions and processes of the solar system's earliest epoch by investigating two protoplanets remaining intact since their formations, Ceres and Vesta. Launch was in 2007. Ion propulsion is used to fly to and enter orbit around Vesta, depart Vesta and fly to Ceres, and enter orbit around Ceres. A conventional blowdown hydrazine reaction control system (RCS) is used to provide external torques for attitude control. Reaction wheel assemblies were intended to provide attitude control in most cases. However, the spacecraft experienced one, then two apparent failures of reaction wheels. Also, similar thrusters experienced degradation in a long life application on another spacecraft. Those factors led to RCS being operated in ways completely different than anticipated prior to launch. Numerous mitigations and developments needed to be implemented. The Vesta mission was fully successful. Even with the compromises necessary due to those anomalies, the Ceres mission is also projected to be feasible.

  5. Effects of Gyejibongnyeong-hwan on dysmenorrhea caused by blood stagnation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jeong-Su

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gyejibongnyeong-hwan (GJBNH is one of the most popular Korean medicine formulas for menstrual pain of dysmenorrhea. The concept of blood stagnation in Korean medicine is considered the main factor of causing abdominal pain, or cramps, during menstrual periods. To treat the symptoms, GJBNH is used to fluidify the stagnated blood and induce the blood flow to be smooth, reducing pain as the result. The purpose of this trial is to identify the efficacy of GJBNH in dysmenorrhea caused by blood stagnation. Methods This study is a multi-centre, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial with two parallel arms: the group taking GJBNH and the group taking placebo. 100 patients (women from age 18 to 35 will be enrolled to the trial. Through randomization 50 patients will be in experiment arm, and the other 50 patients will be in control arm. At the second visit (baseline, all participants who were already screened that they fulfil both the inclusion and the exclusion criteria will be randomised into two groups. Each group will take the intervention three times per day during two menstrual cycles. After the treatment for two cycles, each patient will be followed up during their 3rd, 4th and 5th menstrual cycles. From the screening (Visit 1 through the second follow-up (Visit 6 the entire process will take 25 weeks. Discussion This trial will provide evidence for the effectiveness of GJBNH in treating periodical pain due to dysmenorrhea that is caused by blood stagnation. The primary outcome between the two groups will be measured by changes in the Visual Analogue Score (VAS of pain. The secondary outcome will be measured by the Blood Stagnation Scale, the Short-form McGill questionnaire and the COX menstrual symptom scale. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA and repeated measured ANOVA will be used to analyze the data analysis. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN30426947

  6. The Nordic Aortic Valve Intervention (NOTION trial comparing transcatheter versus surgical valve implantation: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyregod Hans Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative aortic valve (AV stenosis is the most prevalent heart valve disease in the western world. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR has until recently been the standard of treatment for patients with severe AV stenosis. Whether transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI can be offered with improved safety and similar effectiveness in a population including low-risk patients has yet to be examined in a randomised setting. Methods/Design This randomised clinical trial will evaluate the benefits and risks of TAVI using the transarterial CoreValve System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA (intervention group compared with SAVR (control group in patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Randomisation ratio is 1:1, enrolling a total of 280 patients aged 70 years or older without significant coronary artery disease and with a low, moderate, or high surgical risk profile. Trial outcomes include a primary composite outcome of myocardial infarction, stroke, or all-cause mortality within the first year after intervention (expected rates 5% for TAVI, 15% for SAVR. Exploratory safety outcomes include procedure complications, valve re-intervention, and cardiovascular death, as well as cardiac, cerebral, pulmonary, renal, and vascular complications. Exploratory efficacy outcomes include New York Heart Association functional status, quality of life, and valve prosthesis and cardiac performance. Enrolment began in December 2009, and 269 patients have been enrolled up to December 2012. Discussion The trial is designed to evaluate the performance of TAVI in comparison with SAVR. The trial results may influence the choice of treatment modality for patients with severe degenerative AV stenosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01057173

  7. Physical activity as an aid to smoking cessation during pregnancy (LEAP trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussher Michael

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many women try to stop smoking in pregnancy but fail. One difficulty is that there is insufficient evidence that medications for smoking cessation are effective and safe in pregnancy and thus many women prefer to avoid these. Physical activity (PA interventions may assist cessation; however, trials examining these interventions have been too small to detect or exclude plausible beneficial effects. The London Exercise And Pregnant smokers (LEAP trial is investigating whether a PA intervention is effective and cost-effective when used for smoking cessation by pregnant women, and will be the largest study of its kind to date. Methods/design The LEAP study is a pragmatic, multi-center, two-arm, randomized, controlled trial that will target pregnant women who smoke at least one cigarette a day (and at least five cigarettes a day before pregnancy, and are between 10 and 24 weeks pregnant. Eligible patients are individually randomized to either usual care (that is, behavioral support for smoking cessation or usual care plus a intervention (entailing supervised exercise on a treadmill plus PA consultations. The primary outcome of the trial is self-reported and biochemically validated continuous abstinence from smoking between a specified quit date and the end of pregnancy. The secondary outcomes, measured at 1 and 4 weeks after the quit date, and at the end of pregnancy and 6 months after childbirth, are PA levels, depression, self-confidence, and cigarette withdrawal symptoms. Smoking status will also be self-reported at 6 months after childbirth. In addition, perinatal measures will be collected, including antenatal complications, duration of labor, mode of delivery, and birth and placental weight. Outcomes will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis, and logistic regression models used to compare treatment effects on the primary outcome. Discussion This trial will assess whether a PA intervention is effective when used for

  8. Systematic care for caregivers of patients with dementia: a multicenter, cluster-randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, A.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Teerenstra, S.; Graff, M.J.L.; Adang, E.M.M.; Verhey, F.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Systematic Care Program for Dementia (SCPD) on patient institutionalization and to determine the predictors of institutionalization. DESIGN: Single-blind, multicenter, cluster-randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: Six community mental health services

  9. Screening and brief intervention targeting risky drinkers in Danish general practice - a pragmatic controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beich, A.; Gannik, D.; Saelan, H.;

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Recommendations for routine alcohol screening and brief counselling intervention in primary health care rest on results from intervention efficacy studies. By conducting a pragmatic controlled trial (PCT), we aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the WHO recommendations for screening...

  10. Promotion of physical activity and fitness in sedentary patients with Parkinson's disease : randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Marlies; Speelman, Arlene D.; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Smulders, Katrijn; Dontje, Manon L.; Borm, George F.; Backx, Frank J. G.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Munneke, Marten

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a multifaceted behavioural change programme increases physical activities in patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting 32 community hospitals in the Netherlands, collaborating in a nationwide network (ParkinsonNet). Parti

  11. Promotion of physical activity and fitness in sedentary patients with Parkinson's disease : randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, Marlies; Speelman, Arlene D.; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Smulders, Katrijn; Dontje, Manon L.; Borm, George F.; Backx, Frank J. G.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Munneke, Marten

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether a multifaceted behavioural change programme increases physical activities in patients with Parkinson's disease. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting 32 community hospitals in the Netherlands, collaborating in a nationwide network (ParkinsonNet). Parti

  12. Evaluation of occupational health interventions using a randomized controlled trial: challenges and alternative research designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelvis, R.M; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Burdorf, A.; Blatter, B.M.; Strijk, J.E.; Beek, A.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health researchers regularly conduct evaluative intervention research for which a randomized controlled trial (RCT) may not be the most appropriate design (eg, effects of policy measures, organizational interventions on work schedules). This article demonstrates the appropriateness of a

  13. [Effects of a stepwise approach to behavioural problems in dementia: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, M.J.; Francke, A.L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Scherder, E.J.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Kovach, C.R.; Achterberg, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether implementation of a stepwise multidisciplinary intervention ('STA OP!' ['STAND UP!']) is effective in reducing behavioural problems and depressive symptoms in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. DESIGN: Cluster randomised controlled trial. METHOD: We

  14. Representation of people with intellectual disabilities in randomised controlled trials on antipsychotic treatment for behavioural problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheifes, A.; Stolker, J.J.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Heerdink, E.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Behavioural problems are common in people with intellectual disability (ID) and are often treated with antipsychotics. Aim To establish the frequency and characteristics of people with ID included in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on antipsychotic treatment for behavioural problems

  15. Structured risk assessment and violence in acute psychiatric wards: randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abderhalden, Christoph; Needham, Ian; Dassen, Theo; Halfens, Ruud; Haug, Hans-Joachim; Fischer, Joachim E

    2008-01-01

    .... To assess whether such risk assessments decrease the incidence of violence and coercion. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted with 14 acute psychiatric admission wards as the units of randomisation, including a preference arm...

  16. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in euthymic bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steinan, Mette Kvisten; Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Langsrud, Knut; Sand, Trond; Kallestad, Håvard; Morken, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    .... In this randomized controlled trial, we wish to compare CBT-I and treatment as usual with treatment as usual alone to determine its effect in improving quality of sleep, stabilizing minor mood...

  17. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J.T. Luiten (Ernest); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.F. Lange (Johan); H.A. Bruining (Hajo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic infectio

  18. Augmented cognitive behavioral therapy for poststroke depressive symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Lem, F.C.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of individually tailored cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for reducing depressive symptoms with or without anxiety poststroke. DESIGN: Multicenter, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Ambulatory rehabilitation setting. PARTICIPANTS:

  19. Development of early mathematical skills with a tablet intervention: a randomized control trial in Malawi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pitchford, Nicola J

    2015-01-01

    .... This study reports a randomized control trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a tablet intervention for supporting the development of early mathematical skills in primary school children in Malawi...

  20. Rizatriptan vs. ibuprofen in migraine: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Yadav, Rama Kant

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of rizatriptan and ibuprofen in migraine. The study was a randomised placebo-controlled trial in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Migraine patients with

  1. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  2. Supervised exercise therapy versus usual care for patellofemoral pain syndrome : an open label randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Linschoten, R.; van Middelkoop, M.; Berger, M. Y.; Heintjes, E. M.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Willemsen, S. P.; Koes, B. W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy compared with usual care with respect to recovery, pain, and function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting General practice and sport physician practice. Participants

  3. Augmented cognitive behavioral therapy for post stroke depressive symptoms : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, Joyce A; Rasquin, Sascha Mc; Lem, Frederik C; van Heugten, Caroline M; Fasotti, Luciano; Geurts, Alexander C

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of individually tailored cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for reducing depressive symptoms with or without anxiety post stroke. DESIGN: Multi-center, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Six ambulatory rehabilitation settings in The Nethe

  4. Yoga for persistent fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bower, Julienne E; Garet, Deborah; Sternlieb, Beth; Ganz, Patricia A; Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Greendale, Gail

    2012-01-01

    .... The authors conducted a 2-group randomized controlled trial to determine the feasibility and efficacy of an Iyengar yoga intervention for breast cancer survivors with persistent post-treatment fatigue...

  5. Arthrocentesis as initial treatment for temporomandibular joint arthropathy : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, L. M.; Huddleston Slater, J. J. R.; Stegenga, B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of arthrocentesis compared to conservative treatment as initial treatment with regard to temporomandibular joint pain and mandibular movement. Patients and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 80 patients with arthralgia of the TMJ (classified accor

  6. Randomized controlled trial of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh laryngoscopes in predicted difficult intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential for the Pentax AWS and the Glidescope to reduce the difficulty of tracheal intubation in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  7. International Conference on Harmonisation; choice of control group and related issues in clinical trials; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "E10 Choice of Control Group and Related Issues in Clinical Trials." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance sets forth general principles that are relevant to all controlled trials and are especially pertinent to the major clinical trials intended to demonstrate drug (including biological drug) efficacy. The guidance describes the principal types of control groups and discusses their appropriateness in particular situations. The guidance is intended to assist sponsors and investigators in the choice of control groups for clinical trials.

  8. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD : A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W.; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van Dijk, Sandra

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Study Design: Open randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants: Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands.

  9. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J.T. Luiten (Ernest); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.F. Lange (Johan); H.A. Bruining (Hajo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic

  10. The challenge of recruiting patients into a placebo-controlled surgical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, L Stefan; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    patient into the RCT, 11.9 individuals needed to be screened. A total of 69% of participating patients considered the oral information to be the most important and the most common reason for participating was the contribution to research (90%). CONCLUSIONS: Patients are willing to participate...... in an orthopedic placebo-controlled surgical trial. Oral information given by the surgeon to the patient and the contribution to research are important aspects to enhance patient recruitment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01264991, registered 21 December 2010....... component only adds to this complexity. The purpose of this study was to report the challenges of recruiting patients into an orthopedic placebo-controlled surgical trial, to determine the number of patients needed to be screened and allocated in order to include one participant into the trial...

  11. Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Prospective Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Dae Kim; In Heo; Byung-Cheul Shin; Cindy Crawford; Hyung-Won Kang; Jung-Hwa Lim

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were “acupuncture” and “PTSD.” No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional th...

  12. Flexible trial design in practice - stopping arms for lack-of-benefit and adding research arms mid-trial in STAMPEDE: a multi-arm multi-stage randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydes, Matthew R; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Mason, Malcolm D; Clarke, Noel W; Amos, Claire; Anderson, John; de Bono, Johann; Dearnaley, David P; Dwyer, John; Green, Charlene; Jovic, Gordana; Ritchie, Alastair W S; Russell, J Martin; Sanders, Karen; Thalmann, George; James, Nicholas D

    2012-09-15

    Systemic Therapy for Advanced or Metastatic Prostate cancer: Evaluation of Drug Efficacy (STAMPEDE) is a randomized controlled trial that follows a novel multi-arm, multi-stage (MAMS) design. We describe methodological and practical issues arising with (1) stopping recruitment to research arms following a pre-planned intermediate analysis and (2) adding a new research arm during the trial. STAMPEDE recruits men who have locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer who are starting standard long-term hormone therapy. Originally there were five research and one control arms, each undergoing a pilot stage (focus: safety, feasibility), three intermediate 'activity' stages (focus: failure-free survival), and a final 'efficacy' stage (focus: overall survival). Lack-of-sufficient-activity guidelines support the pairwise interim comparisons of each research arm against the control arm; these pre-defined activity cut-off becomes increasingly stringent over the stages. Accrual of further patients continues to the control arm and to those research arms showing activity and an acceptable safety profile. The design facilitates adding new research arms should sufficiently interesting agents emerge. These new arms are compared only to contemporaneously recruited control arm patients using the same intermediate guidelines in a time-delayed manner. The addition of new research arms is subject to adequate recruitment rates to support the overall trial aims. (1) Stopping Existing Therapy: After the second intermediate activity analysis, recruitment was discontinued to two research arms for lack-of-sufficient activity. Detailed preparations meant that changes were implemented swiftly at 100 international centers and recruitment continued seamlessly into Activity Stage III with 3 remaining research arms and the control arm. Further regulatory and ethical approvals were not required because this was already included in the initial trial design.(2) Adding New Therapy: An application to

  13. Oxygen partial pressure control for microgravity experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Michael; Brillo, Jürgen; Stenzel, Christian; Fritze, Holger

    2012-01-01

    A system consisting of a high-temperature yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) based oxygen ion pump and potentiometric sensor enables precise measurement and control of oxygen partial pressure, pO2, at elevated temperatures within 0.2 to 10^-20 bar.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of mindfulness to reduce stress and burnout among intern medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Michael J; Clough, Bonnie; Gill, Kim; Langan, Fleur; O'Connor, Angela; Spencer, Lyndall

    2017-04-01

    Stress and burnout are highly prevalent among medical doctors, and are associated with negative consequences for doctors, patients, and organizations. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of a mindfulness training intervention in reducing stress and burnout among medical practitioners, by means of a Randomised Controlled Trial design. Participants were 44 intern doctors completing an emergency department rotation in a major Australian hospital. Participants were randomly assigned to either an active control (one hour extra break per week) or the 10-week mindfulness training intervention. Measures of stress and burnout were taken pre-, mid- and post intervention. Participants undergoing the 10-week mindfulness training program reported greater improvements in stress and burnout relative to participants in the control condition. Significant reduction in stress and burnout was observed for participants in the mindfulness condition. No such reductions were observed for participants in the control condition. Mindfulness interventions may provide medical practitioners with skills to effectively manage stress and burnout, thereby reducing their experience of these symptoms. It is likely that doctors would benefit from the inclusion of such a training program as a part of their general medical education.

  15. Femicomfort in the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndromes: A Double-Blind, Randomized and Placebo Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Akhondzadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective:Premenstrual syndromes (PMS affecting 20-40% of women of reproductive age. The aim of this double blind and placebo controlled trial was to investigate whether femicofort a supplement contains Vitamin B6, Vitamin E and evening primrose oil could relieve symptoms of PMS. "nMethod: This was a randomized and double blind clinical trial. The trial was conducted between November 2009 and April March 2010. Women aged 20 to 45 years with regular menstrual cycles and experience of PMS symptoms (According to the current diagnostic criteria proposed by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology for at least 6 months were eligible for the study. Patients were randomized to receive femicomfort or placebo in a 1: ratio using a computer-generated code. The assignments were kept in sealed, opaque envelopes until the point of analysis of data. In this double-blind, patients were randomly assigned to receive capsule of femicomfort (Group A or capsule placebo for two menstrual cycles (cycles 3 and 4. The primary outcome measure was the Daily Symptom Report, a checklist of 17 premenstrual symptoms rated from 0 to 4 according to their severity throughout the menstrual cycle. Secondary outcome measure was Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (17-item. "nResults:Femicomfort at this dose was found to be effective in relieving symptoms of PMS. The difference between the femicomfort and placebo in the frequency of side effects was not significant. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate the efficacy of femicomfort in the treatment of PMS.

  16. Reduction of claustrophobia during magnetic resonance imaging: methods and design of the "CLAUSTRO" randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Judith; Zimmermann, Elke; Rief, Matthias; Martus, Peter; Klingebiel, Randolf; Asbach, Patrick; Klessen, Christian; Diederichs, Gerd; Bengner, Thomas; Teichgräber, Ulf; Hamm, Bernd; Dewey, Marc

    2011-02-10

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been described as the most important medical innovation in the last 25 years. Over 80 million MR procedures are now performed each year and on average 2.3% (95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 2.5%) of all patients scheduled for MR imaging suffer from claustrophobia. Thus, prevention of MR imaging by claustrophobia is a common problem and approximately 2,000,000 MR procedures worldwide cannot be completed due to this situation. Patients with claustrophobic anxiety are more likely to be frightened and experience a feeling of confinement or being closed in during MR imaging. In these patients, conscious sedation and additional sequences (after sedation) may be necessary to complete the examinations. Further improvements in MR design appear to be essential to alleviate this situation and broaden the applicability of MR imaging. A more open scanner configuration might help reduce claustrophobic reactions while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy. We propose to analyze the rate of claustrophobic reactions, clinical utility, image quality, patient acceptance, and cost-effectiveness of an open MR scanner in a randomized comparison with a recently designed short-bore but closed scanner with 97% noise reduction. The primary aim of this study is thus to determine whether an open MR scanner can reduce claustrophobic reactions, thereby enabling more examinations of claustrophobic patients without incurring the safety issues associated with conscious sedation. In this manuscript we detail the methods and design of the prospective "CLAUSTRO" trial. This randomized controlled trial will be the first direct comparison of open vertical and closed short-bore MR systems in regards to claustrophobia and image quality as well as diagnostic utility. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00715806.

  17. A selected controlled trial of supplementary vitamin E for treatment of muscle cramps in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Zaib, Salwat

    2010-01-01

    Muscle cramps are not uncommon complications of hemodialysis (HD) treatments and lead to early termination of HD sessions and are therefore a significant cause of under-dialysis. The etiology of cramps in dialysis patients remains a matter of debate. Many reports suggested that vitamin E (vit. E) may be effective for the prevention of HD-associated cramps. We decided to perform a selected controlled trial of supplementary vit. E for treatment of patients on HD who experience frequent attacks during and between HD sessions. The goal was to compare the number of attacks of muscle cramps with the patient's baseline over a specific period of time. In this study, 19 HD patients were randomly selected of different age groups and ethnicity. Patient must have had at least 60 attacks of muscle cramps during and between HD sessions over a 12-week period. All selected patients received vit. E at a dose of 400 international units daily for 12 weeks, and the number of attacks of muscle cramps was recorded. The frequency of muscle cramps decreased significantly during vit. E therapy, and, at the end of the trial, vit. E led to cramp reductions of 68.3%. The reduction in number of attacks of muscle cramps had no significant correlation with age, sex, etiology of end-stage renal disease, serum electrolytes, or HD duration, and it showed a statistically positive correlation (P = 0.0001) with vit. E therapy. No vit. E-related adverse effects were encountered during the trial. Short-term treatment with vit. E is safe and effective in reducing number of attacks of muscle cramps in HD patients, as shown in our study.

  18. Inactive experiments for advanced separation processes prior to high activity trials in ATALANTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhamet, Jean; Lanoe, Jean-Yves; Rivalier, Patrick; Borda, Gilles [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), CEA/DEN/VRH/DTEC/SGCS, Centre de Marcoule - BP 17171, 302007 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Many trials have been performed in ATALANTE's shielded cells to demonstrate the technical feasibility of processes involving minor actinide separation. They required developments of new extractors as well as a step by step procedure have been used to lower the risks of malfunction during high active operation. The design of the extractors developed by Cea has included shielded cells restrictions, miniaturization to lower the quantity of high active material and wastes and the care for being representative of industrial equipment. After individual shake down inactive tests, with actual phases, each process experiment scheduled in ATALANTE has been tested at G1 Facility in Marcoule. The objective was to reproduce as much as possible all the equipment chosen for active tests. This procedure has demonstrated its efficiency to detect many problems that would have heavy impact if they have been discovered during active trials. It was also used for operators'training. (authors)

  19. Open versus laparoscopically-assisted oesophagectomy for cancer: a multicentre randomised controlled phase III trial - the MIRO trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Msika Simon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Open transthoracic oesophagectomy is the standard treatment for infracarinal resectable oesophageal carcinomas, although it is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates of 2 to 10% and 30 to 50%, respectively, for both the abdominal and thoracic approaches. The worldwide popularity of laparoscopic techniques is based on promising results, including lower postoperative morbidity rates, which are related to the reduced postoperative trauma. We hypothesise that the laparoscopic abdominal approach (laparoscopic gastric mobilisation in oesophageal cancer surgery will decrease the major postoperative complication rate due to the reduced surgical trauma. Methods/Design The MIRO trial is an open, controlled, prospective, randomised multicentre phase III trial. Patients in study arm A will receive laparoscopic-assisted oesophagectomy, i.e., a transthoracic oesophagectomy with two-field lymphadenectomy and laparoscopic gastric mobilisation. Patients in study arm B will receive the same procedure, but with the conventional open abdominal approach. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the major postoperative 30-day morbidity. Secondary objectives are to assess the overall 30-day morbidity, 30-day mortality, 30-day pulmonary morbidity, disease-free survival, overall survival as well as quality of life and to perform medico-economic analysis. A total of 200 patients will be enrolled, and two safety analyses will be performed using 25 and 50 patients included in arm A. Discussion Postoperative morbidity remains high after oesophageal cancer surgery, especially due to major pulmonary complications, which are responsible for 50% of the postoperative deaths. This study represents the first randomised controlled phase III trial to evaluate the benefits of the minimally invasive approach with respect to the postoperative course and oncological outcomes in oesophageal cancer surgery. Trial Registration NCT00937456 (ClinicalTrials.gov

  20. How informed is consent in vulnerable populations? Experience using a continuous consent process during the MDP301 vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavit Natujwa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV prevention trials conducted among disadvantaged vulnerable at-risk populations in developing countries present unique ethical dilemmas. A key concern in bioethics is the validity of informed consent for trial participation obtained from research subjects in such settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a continuous informed consent process adopted during the MDP301 phase III vaginal microbicide trial in Mwanza, Tanzania. Methods A total of 1146 women at increased risk of HIV acquisition working as alcohol and food vendors or in bars, restaurants, hotels and guesthouses have been recruited into the MDP301 phase III efficacy and safety trial in Mwanza. During preparations for the trial, participatory community research methods were used to develop a locally-appropriate pictorial flipchart in order to convey key messages about the trial to potential participants. Pre-recorded audio tapes were also developed to facilitate understanding and compliance with gel-use instructions. A comprehension checklist is administered by clinical staff to all participants at screening, enrolment, 12, 24, 40 and 50 week follow-up visits during the trial. To investigate women's perceptions and experiences of the trial, including how well participants internalize and retain key messages provided through a continuous informed consent process, a random sub-sample of 102 women were invited to participate in in-depth interviews (IDIs conducted immediately after their 4, 24 and 52 week follow-up visits. Results 99 women completed interviews at 4-weeks, 83 at 24-weeks, and 74 at 52 weeks (a total of 256 interviews. In all interviews there was evidence of good comprehension and retention of key trial messages including that the gel is not currently know to be effective against HIV; that this is the key reason for conducting the trial; and that women should stop using gel in the event of pregnancy. Conclusions

  1. Comparison of Topical Nifedipine With Oral Nifedipine for Treatment of Anal Fissure: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Golfam, Farzaneh; Golfam, Parisa; Golfam, Babak; Pahlevani, Puyan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical sphincterotomy has gained popularity as a treatment for anal fissure. Calcium channel blockers in topical forms could also be appropriate with low adverse effects. Objectives: This was a prospective randomized controlled trial to compare topical and oral nifedipine in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. Patients and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted at two centers of Shahed University. One hundred and thirty patients with chronic anal fiss...

  2. Effect of prenatal DHA supplementation on the infant epigenome: results from a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Susan J.; Zhou, Jing; Peters, Timothy J; Buckley, Michael; Sutcliffe, Brodie; Oytam, Yalchin; Robert A Gibson; McPhee, Andrew; Yelland, Lisa N; Makrides, Maria; Molloy, Peter L.; Beverly S Muhlhausler

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence is accumulating that nutritional exposures in utero can influence health outcomes in later life. Animal studies and human epidemiological studies have implicated epigenetic modifications as playing a key role in this process, but there are limited data from large well-controlled human intervention trials. This study utilized a large double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial to test whether a defined nutritional exposure in utero, in this case docosahexaenoic acid (D...

  3. Effect of diclofenac suppository on pain control during flexible cystoscopy-A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Ather, M Hammad

    2016-01-01

    TRIAL DESIGN: To compare the difference in pain score during flexible cystoscopy between patients undergoing the procedure with plain lubricating gel  only and plain gel with diclofenac suppository in a randomized control trial. METHODS:  A total of 60 male patients with an indication of flexible cystoscopy were enrolled in a prospective, randomized controlled study. Patients were randomized in two groups. In group “A”, patients received diclofenac suppository one hour prior to the procedure while group “B” did not receive diclofenac suppository. Both groups received 10 ml of intra-urethral  plain gel for lubrication during flexible cystoscopy. Pain score was recorded immediately after the procedure using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Pre- and post-procedure pulse rate and systolic blood pressure was also recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square test and student t-test. Regression analysis was performed to address the confounding variables. RESULTS: Both groups were comparable for variables including age, duration of procedure, level of operating surgeon and indication of procedure. Most common indication for flexible cystoscopy was removal of double J stent. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean pain score between two groups ( p = 0.012).  The difference in post-procedure mean pulse rate in the two groups was statistically significant ( p= 0.01) however there was no difference observed in mean post procedure systolic blood pressure. Regression analysis showed that none of the confounding variables were significantly affecting pain perception. CONCLUSIONS: Intra rectal diclofenac suppository is simple and effective pre-emptive analgesia. We recommend its routine use during flexible cystoscopy for better pain control. PMID:28299180

  4. Targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR): protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Claire; Bray, Emma P; Bryan, Stirling; Greenfield, Sheila M; Haque, M Sayeed; Hobbs, F D Richard; Jones, Miren I; Jowett, Sue; Kaambwa, Billingsley; Little, Paul; Mant, Jonathan; Penaloza, Cristina; Schwartz, Claire; Shackleford, Helen; Varghese, Jinu; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2013-03-23

    Self-monitoring of hypertension with self-titration of antihypertensives (self-management) results in lower systolic blood pressure for at least one year. However, few people in high risk groups have been evaluated to date and previous work suggests a smaller effect size in these groups. This trial therefore aims to assess the added value of self-management in high risk groups over and above usual care. The targets and self-management for the control of blood pressure in stroke and at risk groups (TASMIN-SR) trial will be a pragmatic primary care based, unblinded, randomised controlled trial of self-management of blood pressure (BP) compared to usual care. Eligible patients will have a history of stroke, coronary heart disease, diabetes or chronic kidney disease and will be recruited from primary care. Participants will be individually randomised to either usual care or self-management. The primary outcome of the trial will be difference in office SBP between intervention and control groups at 12 months adjusted for baseline SBP and covariates. 540 patients will be sufficient to detect a difference in SBP between self-management and usual care of 5 mmHg with 90% power. Secondary outcomes will include self-efficacy, lifestyle behaviours, health-related quality of life and adverse events. An economic analysis will consider both within trial costs and a model extrapolating the results thereafter. A qualitative analysis will gain insights into patients' views, experiences and decision making processes. The results of the trial will be directly applicable to primary care in the UK. If successful, self-management of blood pressure in people with stroke and other high risk conditions would be applicable to many hundreds of thousands of individuals in the UK and beyond. ISRCTN87171227.

  5. Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tickle, Martin

    2011-10-10

    Abstract Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP) trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education) with dental health education alone in young children. Methods\\/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years), fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F) (supplied twice per year), a toothbrush (supplied twice a year) or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit). 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine) or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs which will

  6. Protocol for Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP trial: a randomised controlled trial to measure the effects and costs of a dental caries prevention regime for young children attending primary care dental services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Solveig

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries is a persistent public health problem with little change in the prevalence in young children over the last 20 years. Once a child contracts the disease it has a significant impact on their quality of life. There is good evidence from Cochrane reviews including trials that fluoride varnish and regular use of fluoride toothpaste can prevent caries. The Northern Ireland Caries Prevention in Practice Trial (NIC-PIP trial will compare the costs and effects of a caries preventive package (fluoride varnish, toothpaste, toothbrush and standardised dental health education with dental health education alone in young children. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial on children initially aged 2 and 3 years old who are regular attenders at the primary dental care services in Northern Ireland. Children will be recruited and randomised in dental practices. Children will be randomised to the prevention package of both fluoride varnish (twice per year for three years, fluoride toothpaste (1,450 ppm F (supplied twice per year, a toothbrush (supplied twice a year or not; both test and control groups receive standardised dental health education delivered by the dentist twice per year. Randomisation will be conducted by the Belfast Trust Clinical Research Support Centre ([CRSC] a Clinical Trials Unit. 1200 participants will be recruited from approximately 40 dental practices. Children will be examined for caries by independent dental examiners at baseline and will be excluded if they have caries. The independent dental examiners will examine the children again at 3 years blinded to study group. The primary end-point is whether the child develops caries (cavitation into dentine or not over the three years. One secondary outcome is the number of carious surfaces in the primary dentition in children who experience caries. Other secondary outcomes are episodes of pain, extraction of primary teeth, other adverse events and costs

  7. Millikan's Oil-Drop Experiment as a Remotely Controlled Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Bodo; Grober, Sebastian; Vetter, Martin; Jodl, Hans-Jorg

    2012-01-01

    The Millikan oil-drop experiment, to determine the elementary electrical charge e and the quantization of charge Q = n [middle dot] e, is an essential experiment in physics teaching but it is hardly performed in class for several reasons. Therefore, we offer this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory (RCL). We describe the interactivity…

  8. Minimum intervention dentistry approach to managing early childhood caries: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, Peter; Klobas, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    A pragmatic randomized control trial was undertaken to compare the minimum intervention dentistry (MID) approach, based on the atraumatic restorative treatment procedures (MID-ART: Test), against the standard care approach (Control) to treat early childhood caries in a primary care setting. Consenting parent/child dyads were allocated to the Test or Control group using stratified block randomization. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Participants were examined at baseline and at follow-up by two calibrated examiners blind to group allocation status (κ = 0.77), and parents completed a questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. Dental therapists trained in MID-ART provided treatment to the Test group and dentists treated the Control group using standard approaches. The primary outcome of interest was the number of children who were referred for specialist pediatric care. Secondary outcomes were the number of teeth treated, changes in child oral health-related quality of life and dental anxiety and parental perceptions of care received. Data were analyzed on an intention to treat basis; risk ratio for referral for specialist care, test of proportions, Wilcoxon rank test and logistic regression were used. Three hundred and seventy parents/carers were initially screened; 273 children were examined at baseline and 254 were randomized (Test = 127; Control = 127): mean age = 3.8 years, SD 0.90; 59% male, mean dmft = 4.9, SD 4.0. There was no statistically significant difference in age, sex, baseline caries experience or child oral health-related quality of life between the Test and Control group. At follow-up (mean interval 11.4 months, SD 3.1 months), 220 children were examined: Test = 115, Control = 105. Case-notes review of 231 children showed Test = 6 (5%) and Control = 53 (49%) were referred for specialist care, P Control group (mean = 1.54, SD 2.20), Wilcoxon's test, P controlling for age and baseline caries experience, showed a

  9. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-06-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients.

  10. Chronic pain self-management for older adults: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN11899548

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Mary; Turner, Judith A; Cain, Kevin C; Kemp, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is a common and frequently disabling problem in older adults. Clinical guidelines emphasize the need to use multimodal therapies to manage persistent pain in this population. Pain self-management training is a multimodal therapy that has been found to be effective in young to middle-aged adult samples. This training includes education about pain as well as instruction and practice in several management techniques, including relaxation, physical exercise, modification of negative thoughts, and goal setting. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of this therapy in older adult samples. Methods/Design This is a randomized, controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a pain self-management training group intervention, as compared with an education-only control condition. Participants are recruited from retirement communities in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and must be 65 years or older and experience persistent, noncancer pain that limits their activities. The primary outcome is physical disability, as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), pain intensity (Brief Pain Inventory), and pain-related interference with activities (Brief Pain Inventory). Randomization occurs by facility to minimize cross-contamination between groups. The target sample size is 273 enrolled, which assuming a 20% attrition rate at 12 months, will provide us with 84% power to detect a moderate effect size of .50 for the primary outcome. Discussion Few studies have investigated the effects of multimodal pain self-management training among older adults. This randomized controlled trial is designed to assess the efficacy of a pain self-management program that incorporates physical and psychosocial pain coping skills among adults in the mid-old to old-old range. PMID:15285783

  11. Web-based consultation between general practitioners and nephrologists: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-de Haan, Nynke D; van Berkel, Saskia; Akkermans, Reinier P; de Grauw, Inge S; Adang, Eddy M; Assendelft, Pim J; de Grauw, Wim J C; Biermans, Marion C J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2017-08-01

    Consultation of a nephrologist is important in aligning care for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at the primary-secondary care interface. However, current consultation methods come with practical difficulties that can lead to postponed consultation or patient referral instead. This study aimed to investigate whether a web-based consultation platform, telenephrology, led to a lower referral rate of indicated patients. Furthermore, we assessed consultation rate, quality of care, costs and general practitioner (GPs') experiences with telenephrology. Cluster randomized controlled trial with 47 general practices in the Netherlands was randomized to access to telenephrology or to enhanced usual care. A total of 3004 CKD patients aged 18 years or older who were under primary care were included (intervention group n = 1277, control group n = 1727) and 2693 completed the trial. All practices participated in a CKD management course and were given an overview of their CKD patients. The referral rates amounted to 2.3% (n = 29) in the intervention group and 3.0% (n = 52) in the control group, which was a non-significant difference, OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.31 to 1.23. The intervention group's consultation rate was 6.3% (n = 81) against 5.0% (n = 87) (OR 2.00; 95% CI 0.75-5.33). We found no difference in quality of care or costs. The majority of GPs had a positive opinion about telenephrology. The data in our study do not allow for conclusions on the effect of telenephrology on the rate of patient referrals and provider-to-provider consultations, compared to conventional methods. It was positively evaluated by GPs and was non-inferior in terms of quality of care and costs.

  12. A controlled trial of amitriptyline and cianopramine in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellsop, G W; Burgess, C D; Vijayasenan, M E

    1985-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of amitriptyline and cianopramine were compared in a double-blind, randomized, flexible-dose trial in 40 patients with major depressive episodes. The two drugs were equally effective in reducing scores on the Hamilton Psychiatric Rating Scale for Depression and on a global scale. Both drugs were associated with significant adverse effects. Fewer adverse effects were associated with cianopramine, however, which lacks antimuscarinic activity.

  13. Statin tolerability: In defence of placebo-controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Statin intolerance is a barrier to effective lipid-lowering treatment. A significant number of patients stop prescribed statins, or can take only a reduced dose, because of adverse events attributed to the statin, and are then considered statin-intolerant. Methods Examination of differences between statin and placebo in withdrawal rates due to adverse events – a good measure of tolerability – in statin cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with advanced disease and complex medi...

  14. Targeting intensive versus conventional glycaemic control for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Kähler, Pernille; Grevstad, Berit; Almdal, Thomas; Gluud, Christian; Wetterslev, Jørn; Vaag, Allan; Hemmingsen, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the benefits and harms of targeting intensive versus conventional glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Design A systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. Data sources The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded and LILACS to January 2013. Study selection Randomised clinical trials that prespecified different targets of glycaemic control in participants at any age with...

  15. Mindfulness Meditation Training and Executive Control Network Resting State Functional Connectivity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taren, Adrienne A; Gianaros, Peter J; Greco, Carol M; Lindsay, Emily K; Fairgrieve, April; Brown, Kirk Warren; Rosen, Rhonda K; Ferris, Jennifer L; Julson, Erica; Marsland, Anna L; Creswell, J David

    Mindfulness meditation training has been previously shown to enhance behavioral measures of executive control (e.g., attention, working memory, cognitive control), but the neural mechanisms underlying these improvements are largely unknown. Here, we test whether mindfulness training interventions foster executive control by strengthening functional connections between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC)-a hub of the executive control network-and frontoparietal regions that coordinate executive function. Thirty-five adults with elevated levels of psychological distress participated in a 3-day randomized controlled trial of intensive mindfulness meditation or relaxation training. Participants completed a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan before and after the intervention. We tested whether mindfulness meditation training increased resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) between dlPFC and frontoparietal control network regions. Left dlPFC showed increased connectivity to the right inferior frontal gyrus (T = 3.74), right middle frontal gyrus (MFG) (T = 3.98), right supplementary eye field (T = 4.29), right parietal cortex (T = 4.44), and left middle temporal gyrus (T = 3.97, all p < .05) after mindfulness training relative to the relaxation control. Right dlPFC showed increased connectivity to right MFG (T = 4.97, p < .05). We report that mindfulness training increases rsFC between dlPFC and dorsal network (superior parietal lobule, supplementary eye field, MFG) and ventral network (right IFG, middle temporal/angular gyrus) regions. These findings extend previous work showing increased functional connectivity among brain regions associated with executive function during active meditation by identifying specific neural circuits in which rsFC is enhanced by a mindfulness intervention in individuals with high levels of psychological distress. Clinicaltrials.gov,NCT01628809.

  16. Experience with GOLTIX® TITAN® controlling annual dicotyledonous weeds in beets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fell, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The herbicide GOLTIX® TITAN® is the unique combination of two active ingredients, Metamitrone (525 g/L and Quinmerac (40 g/L. GOLTIX® TITAN® is used for the control of annual dicotyledonous weeds in sugar and fodder beets. Registration was granted for the post emergence splitting application with 3 x 2,0 L/ha (3 applications. This corresponds to the amount of 3150 g Metamitrone and 240 g Quinmerac per hectare at maximum application rate. The registration application for pre-emergence application has been submitted. Several field trials were carried out between 2009 and 2013. These trials revealed the optimized efficacy on important weeds in sugar beet production including Fool´s parsley (Aethusa cynapium, Cleavers (Gallium aparine and Fat-hen (Chenopodium album. Selectivity was examined in all of these trials and showed good results with all relevant mixtures at all application times. The two active ingredients have different modes of action; hence, the product plays an important role in resistance management. They can be applied flexibly and do not have any known negative influence on the environment. The successful formulation of this highly sophisticated sugar beet herbicide was confirmed by the available trial results. GOLTIX® TITAN® with its specified characteristics is the base for every weed control measure.

  17. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poh Catherine F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. Method/Design This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160 and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240. Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm or white light-guided surgery (control arm. The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1 the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization; or 2 further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. Discussion In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS

  18. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Liv M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity, mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost

  19. The run control and monitoring system of the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Gerry; /MIT; Boyer, Vincent; /CERN; Branson, James; /UCLA; Brett, Angela; Cano, Eric; Carboni, Andrea; Ciganek, Marek; Cittolin, Sergio; /CERN; O' Dell, Vivian; /Fermilab; Erhan, Samim; /CERN /UC, San Diego; Gigi, Dominique; /CERN /Kyungpook Natl. U. /MIT /UCLA /CERN /INFN, Legnaro

    2007-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the LHC at CERN will start taking data in 2008. To configure, control and monitor the experiment during data-taking the Run Control and Monitoring System (RCMS) was developed. This paper describes the architecture and the technology used to implement the RCMS, as well as the deployment and commissioning strategy of this important component of the online software for the CMS experiment.

  20. The effects of improving sleep on mental health (OASIS): a randomised controlled trial with mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Sheaves, Bryony; Goodwin, Guy M; Yu, Ly-Mee; Nickless, Alecia; Harrison, Paul J; Emsley, Richard; Luik, Annemarie I; Foster, Russell G; Wadekar, Vanashree; Hinds, Christopher; Gumley, Andrew; Jones, Ray; Lightman, Stafford; Jones, Steve; Bentall, Richard; Kinderman, Peter; Rowse, Georgina; Brugha, Traolach; Blagrove, Mark; Gregory, Alice M; Fleming, Leanne; Walklet, Elaine; Glazebrook, Cris; Davies, E Bethan; Hollis, Chris; Haddock, Gillian; John, Bev; Coulson, Mark; Fowler, David; Pugh, Katherine; Cape, John; Moseley, Peter; Brown, Gary; Hughes, Claire; Obonsawin, Marc; Coker, Sian; Watkins, Edward; Schwannauer, Matthias; MacMahon, Kenneth; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Espie, Colin A

    2017-10-01

    Sleep difficulties might be a contributory causal factor in the occurrence of mental health problems. If this is true, improving sleep should benefit psychological health. We aimed to determine whether treating insomnia leads to a reduction in paranoia and hallucinations. We did this single-blind, randomised controlled trial (OASIS) at 26 UK universities. University students with insomnia were randomly assigned (1:1) with simple randomisation to receive digital cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia or usual care, and the research team were masked to the treatment. Online assessments took place at weeks 0, 3, 10 (end of therapy), and 22. The primary outcome measures were for insomnia, paranoia, and hallucinatory experiences. We did intention-to-treat analyses. The trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN61272251. Between March 5, 2015, and Feb 17, 2016, we randomly assigned 3755 participants to receive digital CBT for insomnia (n=1891) or usual practice (n=1864). Compared with usual practice, the sleep intervention at 10 weeks reduced insomnia (adjusted difference 4·78, 95% CI 4·29 to 5·26, Cohen's d=1·11; p<0·0001), paranoia (-2·22, -2·98 to -1·45, Cohen's d=0·19; p<0·0001), and hallucinations (-1·58, -1·98 to -1·18, Cohen's d=0·24; p<0·0001). Insomnia was a mediator of change in paranoia and hallucinations. No adverse events were reported. To our knowledge, this is the largest randomised controlled trial of a psychological intervention for a mental health problem. It provides strong evidence that insomnia is a causal factor in the occurrence of psychotic experiences and other mental health problems. Whether the results generalise beyond a student population requires testing. The treatment of disrupted sleep might require a higher priority in mental health provision. Wellcome Trust. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by

  1. Family nurture intervention (FNI: methods and treatment protocol of a randomized controlled trial in the NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welch Martha G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The stress that results from preterm birth, requisite acute care and prolonged physical separation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU can have adverse physiological/psychological effects on both the infant and the mother. In particular, the experience compromises the establishment and maintenance of optimal mother-infant relationship, the subsequent development of the infant, and the mother's emotional well-being. These findings highlight the importance of investigating early interventions that are designed to overcome or reduce the effects of these environmental insults and challenges. Methods This study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT with blinded assessment comparing Standard Care (SC with a novel Family Nurture Intervention (FNI. FNI targets preterm infants born 26-34 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA and their mothers in the NICU. The intervention incorporates elements of mother-infant interventions with known efficacy and organizes them under a new theoretical context referred to collectively as calming activities. This intervention is facilitated by specially trained Nurture Specialists in three ways: 1 In the isolette through calming interactions between mother and infant via odor exchange, firm sustained touch and vocal soothing, and eye contact; 2 Outside the isolette during holding and feeding via the Calming Cycle; and 3 through family sessions designed to engage help and support the mother. In concert with infant neurobehavioral and physiological assessments from birth through 24 months corrected age (CA, maternal assessments are made using standard tools including anxiety, depression, attachment, support systems, temperament as well as physiological stress parameters. Quality of mother-infant interaction is also assessed. Our projected enrolment is 260 families (130 per group. Discussion The FNI is designed to increase biologically important activities and behaviors that enhance maternally

  2. Periodontal treatment to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients: study protocol of the randomized, controlled DIAPERIO trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bou Christophe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontitis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative bacteria leading to destruction of tissues supporting the teeth. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown increased frequency, extent and severity of periodontitis among diabetic adults. More recently, some controlled clinical trials have also suggested that periodontal treatment could improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients. However current evidence does not provide sufficient information on which to confidently base any clinical recommendations. The main objective of this clinical trial is to assess whether periodontal treatment could lead to a decrease in glycated haemoglobin levels in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. Methods The DIAPERIO trial is an open-label, 13-week follow-up, randomized, controlled trial. The total target sample size is planned at 150 participants, with a balanced (1:1 treatment allocation (immediate treatment vs delayed treatment. Periodontal treatment will include full mouth non-surgical scaling and root planing, systemic antibiotherapy, local antiseptics (chlorhexidine 0.12% and oral health instructions. The primary outcome will be the difference in change of HbA1c between the two groups after the 13-weeks' follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be the difference in change of fructosamine levels and quality of life between the two groups. Discussion The DIAPERIO trial will provide insight into the question of whether periodontal treatment could lead to an improvement in glycaemic control in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from periodontitis. The results of this trial will help to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians and a draft framework for designing national health policies. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15334496

  3. A randomized controlled trial of Human Papillomavirus (HPV testing for cervical cancer screening: trial design and preliminary results (HPV FOCAL Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Laurie W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the HPV FOCAL trial, we will establish the efficacy of hr-HPV DNA testing as a stand-alone screening test followed by liquid based cytology (LBC triage of hr-HPV-positive women compared to LBC followed by hr-HPV triage with ≥ CIN3 as the outcome. Methods/Design HPV-FOCAL is a randomized, controlled, three-armed study over a four year period conducted in British Columbia. It will recruit 33,000 women aged 25-65 through the province's population based cervical cancer screening program. Control arm: LBC at entry and two years, and combined LBC and hr-HPV at four years among those with initial negative results and hr-HPV triage of ASCUS cases; Two Year Safety Check arm: hr-HPV at entry and LBC at two years in those with initial negative results with LBC triage of hr-HPV positives; Four Year Intervention Arm: hr-HPV at entry and combined hr-HPV and LBC at four years among those with initial negative results with LBC triage of hr-HPV positive cases Discussion To date, 6150 participants have a completed sample and epidemiologic questionnaire. Of the 2019 women enrolled in the control arm, 1908 (94.5% were cytology negative. Women aged 25-29 had the highest rates of HSIL (1.4%. In the safety arm 92.2% of women were hr-HPV negative, with the highest rate of hr-HPV positivity found in 25-29 year old women (23.5%. Similar results were obtained in the intervention arm HPV FOCAL is the first randomized trial in North America to examine hr-HPV testing as the primary screen for cervical cancer within a population-based cervical cancer screening program. Trial Registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register, ISRCTN79347302

  4. A MultiCenter Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Major Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, D A; Boyle, E; McCartan, D; Bourke, M; Medani, M; Ferguson, J; Yagoub, H; Bashar, K; O'Donnell, M; Newell, J; Canning, C; McMonagle, M; Dowdall, J; Cross, S; O'Daly, S; Manning, B; Fulton, G; Kavanagh, E G; Burke, P; Grace, P A; Moloney, M Clarke; Walsh, S R

    2015-11-01

    A pilot randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effect of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) on clinical outcomes following major vascular surgery was performed. Eligible patients were those scheduled to undergo open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb revascularization procedures. Patients were randomized to RIPC or to control groups. The primary outcome was a composite clinical end point comprising any of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, new-onset arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, congestive cardiac failure, cerebrovascular accident, renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy, mesenteric ischemia, and urgent cardiac revascularization. Secondary outcomes were components of the primary outcome and myocardial injury as assessed by serum troponin values. The primary outcome occurred in 19 (19.2%) of 99 controls and 14 (14.1%) of 99 RIPC group patients (P = .446). There were no significant differences in secondary outcomes. Our trial generated data that will guide future trials. Further trials are urgently needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Diarrhea and dengue control in rural primary schools in Colombia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overgaard Hans J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrheal diseases and dengue fever are major global health problems. Where provision of clean water is inadequate, water storage is crucial. Fecal contamination of stored water is a common source of diarrheal illness, but stored water also provides breeding sites for dengue vector mosquitoes. Poor household water management and sanitation are therefore potential determinants of both diseases. Little is known of the role of stored water for the combined risk of diarrhea and dengue, yet a joint role would be important for developing integrated control and management efforts. Even less is known of the effect of integrating control of these diseases in school settings. The objective of this trial was to investigate whether interventions against diarrhea and dengue will significantly reduce diarrheal disease and dengue entomological risk factors in rural primary schools. Methods/design This is a 2×2 factorial cluster randomized controlled trial. Eligible schools were rural primary schools in La Mesa and Anapoima municipalities, Cundinamarca, Colombia. Eligible pupils were school children in grades 0 to 5. Schools were randomized to one of four study arms: diarrhea interventions (DIA; dengue interventions (DEN; combined diarrhea and dengue interventions (DIADEN; and control (C. Schools were allocated publicly in each municipality (strata at the start of the trial, obviating the need for allocation concealment. The primary outcome for diarrhea is incidence rate of diarrhea in school children and for dengue it is density of adult female Aedes aegypti per school. Approximately 800 pupils from 34 schools were enrolled in the trial with eight schools in the DIA arm, nine in the DEN, eight in the DIADEN, and nine in the control arms. The trial status as of June 2012 was: completed baseline data collections; enrollment, randomization, and allocation of schools. The trial was funded by the Research Council of Norway and the Lazos de

  6. Diarrhea and dengue control in rural primary schools in Colombia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Diarrheal diseases and dengue fever are major global health problems. Where provision of clean water is inadequate, water storage is crucial. Fecal contamination of stored water is a common source of diarrheal illness, but stored water also provides breeding sites for dengue vector mosquitoes. Poor household water management and sanitation are therefore potential determinants of both diseases. Little is known of the role of stored water for the combined risk of diarrhea and dengue, yet a joint role would be important for developing integrated control and management efforts. Even less is known of the effect of integrating control of these diseases in school settings. The objective of this trial was to investigate whether interventions against diarrhea and dengue will significantly reduce diarrheal disease and dengue entomological risk factors in rural primary schools. Methods/design This is a 2×2 factorial cluster randomized controlled trial. Eligible schools were rural primary schools in La Mesa and Anapoima municipalities, Cundinamarca, Colombia. Eligible pupils were school children in grades 0 to 5. Schools were randomized to one of four study arms: diarrhea interventions (DIA); dengue interventions (DEN); combined diarrhea and dengue interventions (DIADEN); and control (C). Schools were allocated publicly in each municipality (strata) at the start of the trial, obviating the need for allocation concealment. The primary outcome for diarrhea is incidence rate of diarrhea in school children and for dengue it is density of adult female Aedes aegypti per school. Approximately 800 pupils from 34 schools were enrolled in the trial with eight schools in the DIA arm, nine in the DEN, eight in the DIADEN, and nine in the control arms. The trial status as of June 2012 was: completed baseline data collections; enrollment, randomization, and allocation of schools. The trial was funded by the Research Council of Norway and the Lazos de Calandaima Foundation

  7. Supervisory control experience on large industrial flotation columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, L.G.; Yianatos, J.B. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Santa Maria Univ., Valparaiso (Chile)

    1999-07-01

    The industrial experience in developing supervisory control systems for flotation columns is discussed. Procedures for diagnosis of instrumentation calibration and maintenance, prior to the implementation of control schemes on top of the distributed control system, are discussed. This strategy contributes to better control by using data validation, by opportunely detecting measurement and operating problems and by consistently coordinating control actions in managing the local control loop setpoints. Examples based on the control systems developed for El Teniente and Salvador concentrators, from Codelco-Chile, are used to illustrate how to relax some of the constraints on the controllability of the process. (author)

  8. Maximising the impact of qualitative research in feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials: guidance for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Hoddinott, Pat; Lewin, Simon; Thomas, Kate J; Young, Bridget; Adamson, Joy; Jansen, Yvonne Jfm; Mills, Nicola; Moore, Graham; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies are increasingly undertaken in preparation for randomised controlled trials in order to explore uncertainties and enable trialists to optimise the intervention or the conduct of the trial. Qualitative research can be used to examine and address key uncertainties prior to a full trial. We present guidance that researchers, research funders and reviewers may wish to consider when assessing or undertaking qualitative research within feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials. The guidance consists of 16 items within five domains: research questions, data collection, analysis, teamwork and reporting. Appropriate and well conducted qualitative research can make an important contribution to feasibility studies for randomised controlled trials. This guidance may help researchers to consider the full range of contributions that qualitative research can make in relation to their particular trial. The guidance may also help researchers and others to reflect on the utility of such qualitative research in practice, so that trial teams can decide when and how best to use these approaches in future studies.

  9. Pain control: mastery through group experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, E; Baptiste, S

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a group program which is part of the therapeutic management of out-patients with chronic pain at the multidisciplinary Pain Clinic in Hamilton, Ontario (McMaster Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospital). The programme seeks to assist chronic pain sufferers in developing more adaptive coping styles. Groups of 12--14 patients meet for 9 weeks, 3 h/week, under the co-leadership of a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist with backgrounds in psychology and psychiatry. Seventy-five patients with diverse aetiologies of chronic pain have completed these "pain control classes". Outcome was assessed on the basis of several parameters. Results indicate a considerable reduction in depression, pain perception and analgesic intake. Conversely, employment figures increased from 20 to 48% after completion of the program. 21% were considered failures. Significant variables differentiating successes from failures were sex, marital status, work incentive, employment and absence of litigation or Workmen's Compensation claims.

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive Debiasing Improves Assessment and Treatment Selection for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Melissa M.; Youngstrom, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the efficacy of a new cognitive debiasing intervention in reducing decision-making errors in the assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Method The study was a randomized controlled trial using case vignette methodology. Participants were 137 mental health professionals working in different regions of the US (M=8.6±7.5 years of experience). Participants were randomly assigned to a (1) brief overview of PBD (control condition), or (2) the same brief overview plus a cognitive debiasing intervention (treatment condition) that educated participants about common cognitive pitfalls (e.g., base-rate neglect; search satisficing) and taught corrective strategies (e.g., mnemonics, Bayesian tools). Both groups evaluated four identical case vignettes. Primary outcome measures were clinicians’ diagnoses and treatment decisions. The vignette characters’ race/ethnicity was experimentally manipulated. Results Participants in the treatment group showed better overall judgment accuracy, p clinical recommendations, particularly in cases where participants missed comorbid conditions, failed to detect the possibility of hypomania or mania in depressed youths, and misdiagnosed classic manic symptoms. In contrast, effects of patient race were negligible. Conclusions The cognitive debiasing intervention outperformed the control condition. Examining specific heuristics in cases of PBD may identify especially problematic mismatches between typical habits of thought and characteristics of the disorder. The debiasing intervention was brief and delivered via the Web; it has the potential to generalize and extend to other diagnoses as well as to various practice and training settings. PMID:26727411

  11. Sunflower therapy for children with specific learning difficulties (dyslexia): a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Leona

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the clinical and perceived effectiveness of the Sunflower therapy in the treatment of childhood dyslexia. The Sunflower therapy includes applied kinesiology, physical manipulation, massage, homeopathy, herbal remedies and neuro-linguistic programming. A multi-centred, randomised controlled trial was undertaken with 70 dyslexic children aged 6-13 years. The research study aimed to test the research hypothesis that dyslexic children 'feel better' and 'perform better' as a result of treatment by the Sunflower therapy. Children in the treatment group and the control group were assessed using a battery of standardised cognitive, Literacy and self-esteem tests before and after the intervention. Parents of children in the treatment group gave feedback on their experience of the Sunflower therapy. Test scores were compared using the Mann Whitney, and Wilcoxon statistical tests. While both groups of children improved in some of their test scores over time, there were no statistically significant improvements in cognitive or Literacy test performance associated with the treatment. However, there were statistically significant improvements in academic self-esteem, and reading self-esteem, for the treatment group. The majority of parents (57.13%) felt that the Sunflower therapy was effective in the treatment of learning difficulties. Further research is required to verify these findings, and should include a control group receiving a dummy treatment to exclude placebo effects.

  12. Headache : The placebo effects in the control groups in randomized clinical trials; An analysis of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Femke M.; Voogt-Bode, Annieke; Passchier, Jan; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the effects in the placebo and "no treatment" arms in trials with headache patients. Method: This is a secondary analysis of randomized controlled trials from 8 systematic reviews and selected trials with a "no treatment" or placebo control group.

  13. Collaborative Depression Trial (CADET: multi-centre randomised controlled trial of collaborative care for depression - study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessler David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprising of both organisational and patient level components, collaborative care is a potentially powerful intervention for improving depression treatment in UK primary Care. However, as previous models have been developed and evaluated in the United States, it is necessary to establish the effect of collaborative care in the UK in order to determine whether this innovative treatment model can replicate benefits for patients outside the US. This Phase III trial was preceded by a Phase II patient level RCT, following the MRC Complex Intervention Framework. Methods/Design A multi-centre controlled trial with cluster-randomised allocation of GP practices. GP practices will be randomised to usual care control or to "collaborative care" - a combination of case manager coordinated support and brief psychological treatment, enhanced specialist and GP communication. The primary outcome will be symptoms of depression as assessed by the PHQ-9. Discussion If collaborative care is demonstrated to be effective we will have evidence to enable the NHS to substantially improve the organisation of depressed patients in primary care, and to assist primary care providers to deliver a model of enhanced depression care which is both effective and acceptable to patients. Trial Registration Number ISRCTN32829227

  14. Lactation support and breastfeeding duration in jaundiced infants: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Pound

    Full Text Available Neonatal jaundice is the most common problem in full-term infants during the immediate post-natal period. We examined the effect of a lactation support intervention on breastfeeding duration in hospitalized jaundiced infants.We conducted a randomized controlled trial with a qualitative component involving mothers of hospitalized jaundiced breastfed infants <4 weeks of age. Mothers receiving the intervention met with an International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant in hospital and 1-3 times post discharge. Both groups received the standard care for jaundice. The primary outcome was exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months. To the exception of research assistants enrolling participants and completing qualitative interviews, all research staff, investigators and statisticians were blinded to group assignment. Qualitative interviews elicited feedback on breastfeeding experiences for both groups.99 participants were recruited, and 86 analyzed for primary outcome. There was no difference in exclusive breastfeeding at 3 months between groups (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.56-1.24, p = 0.40 or in the secondary outcomes. 31 participants were included in the qualitative analysis. Participants in the intervention group described an increase in comfort and confidence levels with breastfeeding. Participants in the control group reported limited lactation support.Our hospital-based lactation support program did not result in a higher proportion of mothers exclusively breastfeeding at 3 months compared to current hospital standard care. Qualitative feedback from the intervention group suggests that mothers' confidence was increased, which is linked to breastfeeding duration. The decision to breastfeed is multifactorial and hospital-based lactation support may be only a small piece of the puzzle in hospitalized jaundiced infants. Further studies may be needed to fully elucidate the impact of an in-hospital lactation support program on successful breastfeeding for these

  15. Evaluation of an online Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (DNAT for health professionals: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellner Thomas

    2009-07-01

    period to assess the acceptability of the learning formats and the perceived usefulness and usability of the materials. After a further month, all learners will receive a series of questions to evaluate self-reported changes in clinical practice as a result of this educational experience and asked to include specific examples of any changes in their diabetes care practice. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN67215088

  16. Experience with ActiveX control for simple channel access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timossi, C.; Nishimura, H.; McDonald, J.

    2003-05-15

    Accelerator control system applications at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) are typically deployed on operator consoles running Microsoft Windows 2000 and utilize EPICS[2]channel access for data access. In an effort to accommodate the wide variety of Windows based development tools and developers with little experience in network programming, ActiveX controls have been deployed on the operator stations. Use of ActiveX controls for use in the accelerator control environment has been presented previously[1]. Here we report on some of our experiences with the use and development of these controls.

  17. Recommendations on multiple testing adjustment in multi-arm trials with a shared control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Dena R; Brown, Julia M; Todd, Susan; Gregory, Walter M

    2016-09-19

    Multi-arm clinical trials assessing multiple experimental treatments against a shared control group can offer efficiency advantages over independent trials through assessing an increased number of hypotheses. Published opinion is divided on the requirement for multiple testing adjustment to control the family-wise type-I error rate (FWER). The probability of a false positive error in multi-arm trials compared to equivalent independent trials is affected by the correlation between comparisons due to sharing control data. We demonstrate that this correlation in fact leads to a reduction in the FWER, therefore FWER adjustment is not recommended solely due to sharing control data. In contrast, the correlation increases the probability of multiple false positive outcomes across the hypotheses, although standard FWER adjustment methods do not control for this. A stringent critical value adjustment is proposed to maintain equivalent evidence of superiority in two correlated comparisons to that obtained within independent trials. FWER adjustment is only required if there is an increased chance of making a single claim of effectiveness by testing multiple hypotheses, not due to sharing control data. For competing experimental therapies, the correlation between comparisons can be advantageous as it eliminates bias due to the experimental therapies being compared to different control populations.

  18. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Relf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or bias. This indicates significant deficiencies in laser trial methodology. We report the development and preliminary testing of a novel laser machine that can blind both patient and operator to treatment allocation without staff participation. The new laser machine combines sealed preset and non-bypassable randomization codes, decoy lights and sound, and a conical perspex tip to overcome laser diode glow detection.

  19. Post-operative behavioural management in bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, A; Hilbert, A

    2013-04-01

    Recent research has provided evidence that bariatric surgery maximizes long-term weight loss in patients with severe obesity. However, a substantial number of patients experience poor weight loss outcome and weight regain over time. Post-operative behavioural management may facilitate long-term weight control in bariatric surgery population. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the effects of post-operative behavioural management on weight loss following bariatric surgery. Eligible articles were systematically searched in electronic databases. Among the 414 citations, five randomized controlled trials, two prospective and eight retrospective cohort trials analysing behavioural lifestyle interventions and support groups fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The main finding is that behavioural management had a positive effect on weight loss following surgery. In 13 studies, patients receiving behavioural management had greater weight loss than patients receiving usual care or no treatment. A meta-analysis of five randomized controlled trials suggests greater weight loss in patients with behavioural lifestyle interventions compared with control groups. Post-operative behavioural management has the potential to facilitate optimal weight loss following bariatric surgery, but conclusions were limited by the small and heterogeneous samples of studies. A more rigorous empirical evaluation on its clinical significance is warranted to improve effectiveness of bariatric surgery.

  20. The CHIPS Randomized Controlled Trial (Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Singer, Joel; Lee, Terry; Rey, Evelyne; Ross, Susan; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kellie E.; Menzies, Jennifer; Sanchez, Johanna; Gafni, Amiram; Helewa, Michael; Hutton, Eileen; Koren, Gideon; Lee, Shoo K.; Logan, Alexander G.; Ganzevoort, Wessel; Welch, Ross; Thornton, Jim G.; Moutquin, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether clinical outcomes differed by occurrence of severe hypertension in the international CHIPS trial (Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study), adjusting for the interventions of “less tight” (target diastolic blood pressure [dBP] 100 mm Hg) versus “tight” control (target dBP 85 mm Hg). In this post-hoc analysis of CHIPS data from 987 women with nonsevere nonproteinuric preexisting or gestational hypertension, mixed effects logistic regression was used to compare the following outcomes according to occurrence of severe hypertension, adjusting for allocated group and the influence of baseline factors: CHIPS primary (perinatal loss or high-level neonatal care for >48 hours) and secondary outcomes (serious maternal complications), birth weight <10th percentile, preeclampsia, delivery at <34 or <37 weeks, platelets <100×109/L, elevated liver enzymes with symptoms, maternal length of stay ≥10 days, and maternal readmission before 6 weeks postpartum. Three hundred and thirty-four (34.1%) women in CHIPS developed severe hypertension that was associated with all outcomes examined except for maternal readmission (P=0.20): CHIPS primary outcome, birth weight <10th percentile, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, elevated liver enzymes (all P<0.001), platelets <100×109/L (P=0.006), and prolonged hospital stay (P=0.03). The association between severe hypertension and serious maternal complications was seen only in less tight control (P=0.02). Adjustment for preeclampsia (464, 47.3%) did not negate the relationship between severe hypertension and the CHIPS primary outcome (P<0.001), birth weight <10th percentile (P=0.005), delivery at <37 (P<0.001) or <34 weeks (P<0.001), or elevated liver enzymes with symptoms (P=0.02). Severe hypertension is a risk marker for adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes, independent of BP control or preeclampsia co-occurrence. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://pre-empt.cfri.ca/. Unique identifier: ISRCTN

  1. REFOCUS Trial: protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial of a pro-recovery intervention within community based mental health teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade Mike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a consensus about the importance of 'recovery' in mental health services, but the evidence base is limited. Methods/Design A two centre, cluster randomised controlled trial. Participants are community-based mental health teams, and service users aged 18-65 years with a primary clinical diagnosis of psychosis. In relation to the REFOCUS Manual researchintorecovery.com/refocus, which describes a 12-month, pro-recovery intervention based on the REFOCUS Model, the objectives are: (1 To establish the effectiveness of the intervention described in the REFOCUS Manual; (2 To validate the REFOCUS Model; (3 To establish and optimise trial parameters for the REFOCUS Manual; and (4 To understand the relationship between clinical outcomes and recovery outcomes. The hypothesis for the main study is that service users in the intervention arm will experience significantly greater increases in measures of personal recovery (as measured by the QPR compared to service users receiving care from control teams. The hypothesis for the secondary study is that black service users in the intervention arm will experience significantly greater increases in measures of personal recovery (as measured by the QPR and client satisfaction (as measured by the CSQ compared to Black service users receiving care from control teams. The intervention comprises treatment as usual plus two components: recovery-promoting relationships and working practices. The control condition is treatment as usual. The primary outcme is the Process of Recovery Questionnaire (QPR. Secondary outcomes are satisfaction, Goal setting - Personal Primary Outcome, hope, well-being, empowerment, and quality of life. Primary outcomes for the secondary study will be QPR and satisfaction. Cost data will be estimated, and clinical outcomes will also be reported (symptomatology, need, social disability, functioning. 29 teams (15 intervention and 14 control will be randomised. Within

  2. Acupuncture, Counseling, and Usual care for Depression (ACUDep: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacPherson Hugh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence on the effect of acupuncture or counseling for depression is not conclusive yet is sufficient to warrant further research. Our aim is to conduct a full-scale RCT to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of acupuncture and counseling compared to usual care alone. We will explore the experiences and perspectives of patients and practitioners. Methods/Design Randomized controlled trial with three parallel arms: acupuncture plus usual care, counseling plus usual care, and usual care alone, in conjunction with a nested qualitative study using in-depth interviews with purposive samples of trial participants. Participants: Patients aged over 18 years diagnosed with depression or mood disorder by their GP and with a score of 20 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. Randomization: Computer randomization by York Trials Unit to acupuncture, counseling, and usual care alone in proportions of 2:2:1, respectively, with secure allocation concealment. Interventions: Patients allocated to acupuncture and counseling groups receive the offer of up to 12 weekly sessions. Both interventions allow flexibility to address patient variation, yet are constrained within defined protocols. Acupuncture is based on traditional Chinese medicine and counseling is non-directive within the humanistic tradition. Outcome: The PHQ-9 is the primary outcome measure, collected at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Also measured is BDI-II, SF-36 Bodily pain subscale, and EQ-5D. Texted mood scores are collected weekly over the first 15 weeks. Health-related resource use is collected over 12 months. Analysis: The sample size target was for 640 participants, calculated for an effect size of 0.32 on the PHQ-9 when comparing acupuncture with counseling given 90% power, 5% significance, and 20% loss to follow-up. Analysis of covariance will be used on an intention-to-treat basis. Thematic analysis will be used for qualitative data. We will

  3. Should we embed randomized controlled trials within action research: arguing from a case study of telemonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Day

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Action research (AR and randomized controlled trials (RCTs are usually considered to be theoretically and practically incompatible. However, we argue that their respective strengths and weaknesses can be complementary. We illustrate our argument from a recent study assessing the effect of telemonitoring on health-related quality of life, self-care, hospital use, costs and the experiences of patients, informal carers and health care professionals in two urban hospital services and one remote rural primary care service in New Zealand. Methods Data came from authors’ observations and field notes of discussions with three groups: the healthcare providers and healthcare consumers who participated in the research, and a group of 17 researchers and collaborators. The consumers had heart failure (Site A, urban, airways disease (Site B, urban, and diabetes (Site C, rural. The research ran from 2008 (project inception until 2012 (project close-off. Researchers came from a wide range of disciplines. Both RCT and AR methods were recognised from early in the process but often worked in parallel rather than together. In retrospect, we have mapped our observed research processes to the AR cycle characteristics (creation of communicative space, democracy and participation, iterative learning and improvement, emergence, and accommodation of different ways of knowing. Results We describe the context, conduct and outcomes of the telemonitoring trial, framing the overall process in the language of AR. Although not fully articulated at the time, AR processes made the RCT sensitive to important context, e.g. clinical processes. They resulted in substantive changes to the design and conduct of the RCT, and to interpretation and uptake of findings, e.g. a simpler technology procurement process emerged. Creating a communicative space enabled co-design between the researcher group and collaborators from the provider participant group, and a stronger

  4. The FIB-PPH trial: fibrinogen concentrate as initial treatment for postpartum haemorrhage: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wikkelsoe Anne

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH remains a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. In Denmark 2% of parturients receive blood transfusion. During the course of bleeding fibrinogen (coagulation factor I may be depleted and fall to critically low levels, impairing haemostasis and thus worsening the ongoing bleeding. A plasma level of fibrinogen below 2 g/L in the early phase of postpartum haemorrhage is associated with subsequent development of severe haemorrhage. Use of fibrinogen concentrate allows high-dose substitution without the need for blood type crossmatch. So far no publications of randomised controlled trials involving acutely bleeding patients in the obstetrical setting have been published. This trial aims to investigate if early treatment with fibrinogen concentrate reduces the need for blood transfusion in women suffering severe PPH. Methods/Design In this randomised placebo-controlled double-blind multicentre trial, parturients with primary PPH are eligible following vaginal delivery in case of: manual removal of placenta (blood loss ≥ 500 ml or manual exploration of the uterus after the birth of placenta (blood loss ≥ 1000 ml. Caesarean sections are also eligible in case of perioperative blood loss ≥ 1000 ml. The exclusion criteria are known inherited haemostatic deficiencies, prepartum treatment with antithrombotics, pre-pregnancy weight Primary outcome is the need for blood transfusion. To investigate a 33% reduction in the need for blood transfusion, a total of 245 patients will be included. Four university-affiliated public tertiary care hospitals will include patients during a two-year period. Adverse events including thrombosis are assessed in accordance with International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH good clinical practice (GCP. Discussion A widespread belief in the benefits of early fibrinogen substitution in cases of PPH has led to increased off-label use. The FIB

  5. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Del Prete, Valerio; Steurer-Stey, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate blood pressure (BP) control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140–180 mmHg systolic BP or >90–110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP) improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement. Methods In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal <140/90 mmHg), and adherence with home BP measurement after 6 months. Results One hundred and twenty-one of 137 included patients qualified for analysis. After 6 months, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic BP was achieved in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups (16.1/7.9 mmHg in the intervention group versus 13.1/8.6 mmHg in the control group, P=0.3/0.7). BP control (treatment target <140/90 mmHg) was achieved significantly more often in the intervention group (43% versus 25%; P=0.037; number needed to treat of 5). Adherence with home BP measurement overall was high, with a trend in favor of the intervention group (98.6% versus 96.2%; P=0.1) Conclusion Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months), but no significant between-group difference was observed in BP change. A markedly higher percentage of patients achieved BP values in the normal range. This simple, inexpensive approach of color-coded BP self-monitoring is user-friendly and applicable in primary care

  6. Reducing Delusional Conviction Through a Cognitive-Based Group Training Game: A Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial

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    Yasser eKhazaal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: Michael’s Game is a card game targeting the ability to generate alternative hypotheses to explain a given experience. The main objective was to evaluate the effect of MG on delusional conviction as measured by the primary study outcome: the change in scores on the conviction subscale of the Peters Delusions Inventory (PDI-21. Other variables of interest were the change in scores on the distress and preoccupation subscales of the PDI-21, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale, and belief flexibility assessed with the Maudsley Assessment of Delusions Schedule. Methods: We performed a parallel, assessor-blinded, randomised controlled superiority trial comparing treatment as usual plus participation in Michael’s Game (MG with treatment as usual plus being on a waiting list (TAU in a sample of adult outpatients with psychotic disorders and persistent positive psychotic symptoms at inclusion. Results: The 172 participants were randomised, with 86 included in each study arm. Assessments were performed at inclusion (T1: baseline, at 3 months (T2: post-treatment, and at 6 months after the second assessment (T3: follow-up. At T2, a positive treatment effect was observed on the primary outcome, the PDI-21 conviction subscale (p=0.005. At T3, a sustained effect was observed for the conviction subscale (p=0.002. Further effects were also observed at T3 on the PDI-21 distress (p=0.002 and preoccupation subscales (p=0.001, as well as on one of the MADS measures of belief flexibility (anything against the belief (p=0.001. Conclusions: The study demonstrated some significant beneficial effect of MG. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN37178153/Funding: Swiss National Science Foundation Grant 32003B-121038

  7. Effects of a Worksite Weight-Control Programme in Obese Male Workers: A Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Yae; Murayama, Nobuko

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a randomized controlled crossover trial to evaluate the effects of a new worksite weight-control programme designed for men with or at risk of obesity using a combination of nutrition education and nutrition environmental interventions. Subjects and methods: Male workers with or at risk of obesity were recruited for this…

  8. Fluoxetine for poststroke depression A randomized placebo controlled clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Kong; Wanli Dong; Chunfeng Liu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that poststroke depression(PSD) may be related with the disequilibrium between noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused by cerebral injury. The injured regions involve noradrenergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurons as well as conduction pathway.The levels of noradrenaline and 5-HT would be decreased.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of fluoxetine on preventing against PSD and recovery of neurologic function, and analyze the relationship of fluoxetine and the 5-HT level.DESIGN: A randomized controlled clinical trial.SETTING: Department of Neurology, First Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University.PARTICIPANTS: Ninety consecutive patients, 47 female and 43 male, were recruited who admitted to hospital for recent stroke in the Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between September 2003 and February 2005. Subjects were aged (64±7) years, ranging from 47 to 79 years old. They all met the diagnosis criteria of various cerebrovascular diseases formulated in the 4th National Cerebrovascular Disease Conference and confirmed as stroke by skull CT or MRI; The time from onset to tentative administration was less than 7 days; The patients had clear consciousness, without obvious language disorder. They were randomized into treatment group (n =48) and placebo group (n =42).METHODS: ①All the patients were given routine treatment according to treatment guideline of cerebrovascular disease after admission. Patients in the treatment group and placebo group received 20 mg/d fluoxetine and placebo (component: vitamin C) for 8 weeks, respectively. ② Neurologic deficit was assessed according to 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) and Activity of Daily Living Scale (ADL) before and at 2,4 and 8 weeks after test, separately; Meanwhile, the levels of platelet 5-HT and plasma 5-HT were determined. Grading criteria of HAMD intergral depression: non-depression < 8 points

  9. Pancreatitis of biliary origin, optimal timing of cholecystectomy (PONCHO trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouwense Stefan A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After an initial attack of biliary pancreatitis, cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis and other gallstone-related complications. Guidelines advocate performing cholecystectomy within 2 to 4 weeks after discharge for mild biliary pancreatitis. During this waiting period, the patient is at risk of recurrent biliary events. In current clinical practice, surgeons usually postpone cholecystectomy for 6 weeks due to a perceived risk of a more difficult dissection in the early days following pancreatitis and for logistical reasons. We hypothesize that early laparoscopic cholecystectomy minimizes the risk of recurrent biliary pancreatitis or other complications of gallstone disease in patients with mild biliary pancreatitis without increasing the difficulty of dissection and the surgical complication rate compared with interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods/Design PONCHO is a randomized controlled, parallel-group, assessor-blinded, superiority multicenter trial. Patients are randomly allocated to undergo early laparoscopic cholecystectomy, within 72 hours after randomization, or interval laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 25 to 30 days after randomization. During a 30-month period, 266 patients will be enrolled from 18 hospitals of the Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. The primary endpoint is a composite endpoint of mortality and acute re-admissions for biliary events (that is, recurrent biliary pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, symptomatic/obstructive choledocholithiasis requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography including cholangitis (with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy, and uncomplicated biliary colics occurring within 6 months following randomization. Secondary endpoints include the individual endpoints of the composite endpoint, surgical and other complications, technical difficulty of cholecystectomy and costs. Discussion The PONCHO trial is designed to show that early

  10. Control of animal brucellosis: The Malaysian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamri-Saad, M; Kamarudin, M I

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease characterized by reproductive failure in animals and undulent fever in humans. In cattle, it is caused by Brucella abortus while in goats by Brucella melitensis, the main cause of brucellosis in humans. Brucellosis in livestock has been associated with importation of animals from breeder herd of unknown disease status. The prevalence of bovine brucellosis Brucella abortus in 2014 ranged between 1% and 2% in Thailand and Indonesia, and 4%-5% in Malaysia and Myanmar. Prevalence of goat brucellosis Brucella melitensis is approximately 1% in Malaysia and Thailand. 'Test-and-slaughter' is the general policy against brucellosis adopted by most ASEAN countries to eradicate the disease. Under this program, the Rose Bengal Plate Test (RBPT) is used as the screening test to identify infected farm/herd while the complement fixation test (CFT) is the confirmatory test. The test-and-slaughter eradication strategy that was implemented since 1979 had managed to keep the prevalence rate to less than 5%, from 3.3% in 1979, 0.23% in 1988, 1% in 1998 and 5% in 2016. The test-and-slaughter program seemed effective in reducing the prevalence of brucellosis but was unable to eradicate the disease due to several factors, which include failure to locate and identify the remaining affected animals and to control their movement, importation of breeder animals from non-brucellosis free countries and lack of participation by the farmers following unreliable test results. To support the eradication policy, research activities since 1980s have suggested combinations of serological tests to improve diagnosis while surveillance should be focused on hotspots areas. The prevalence can be further reduced by strictly sourcing breeder animals from brucella-free areas or countries. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of a community-based randomized controlled prenatal care trial in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuochun; Viisainen, Kirsi; Wang, Ying; Hemminki, Elina

    2011-05-04

    A community-based randomized control prenatal care trial was performed in a rural county of China during 2000-2003. The purpose of this paper is to describe the trial implementation and the impact of the trial on the utilization of prenatal care and perinatal outcomes. In the study county, 10 townships (from a total of 55) were each paired with a control (20 study townships in total), with the criteria for pairing being the township's socioeconomic development, perinatal health, and maternal care utilization and provision. One of each township pair was randomly allocated to the intervention or control groups. The trial interventions were: 1) training township hospital midwives and instructing them in how to provide systematic maternal care, 2) informing women in the community of the importance of prenatal care, 3) if needed, providing basic medical instruments to the hospitals. A variety of data sources were used to describe the trial implementation (observations, group discussions, field notes, survey to women). The data on pregnancy and perinatal outcomes were from the original hand-written work-records in the village family planning centers of the study townships. Implementation of the intervention was deficient. The factors hindering the trial implementation included poor coordination between midwives and family planning officers, broader policy changes implemented by the provincial government during the trial, the decentralization of county governance, and the lack of government funding for maternal care. There was only little difference in the use of maternal care, in women's opinions related to maternal care or content of prenatal care, and no difference in the perinatal outcomes between the intervention and control townships. A community based randomized controlled trial could not be fully carried out in rural China as planned due to the changing political landscape, the complexity of the socio-economic situation and a lengthy planning stage. The study

  12. Randomized controlled trial investigating the effect of music on the virtual reality laparoscopic learning performance of novice surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskovic, D; Rosenthal, R; Zingg, U; Oertli, D; Metzger, U; Jancke, L

    2008-11-01

    Findings have shown that music affects cognitive performance, but little is known about its influence on surgical performance. The hypothesis of this randomized controlled trial was that arousing (activating) music has a beneficial effect on the surgical performance of novice surgeons in the setting of a laparoscopic virtual reality task. For this study, 45 junior surgeons with no previous laparoscopic experience were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Group 1 listened to activating music; group 2 listened to deactivating music; and group 3 had no music (control) while each participant solved a surgical task five times on a virtual laparoscopic simulator. The assessed global task score, the total task time, the instrument travel distances, and the surgeons' heart rate were assessed. All surgical performance parameters improved significantly with experience (task repetition). The global score showed a trend for a between-groups difference, suggesting that the group listening to activating music had the worst performance. This observation was supported by a significant between-groups difference for the first trial but not subsequent trials (activating music, 35 points; deactivating music, 66 points; no music, 91 points; p = 0.002). The global score (p = 0.056) and total task time (p = 0.065) showed a trend toward improvement when participants considered the music pleasant rather than unpleasant. Music in the operating theater may have a distracting effect on novice surgeons performing new tasks. Surgical trainers should consider categorically switching off music during teaching procedures.

  13. Application of dietary fiber in clinical enteral nutrition: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Yang; Xiao-Ting Wu; Yong Zhou; Ying-Li Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of dietary fiber (DF) as a part of enteral nutrition (EN) formula on diarrhea, infection, and length of hospital stay.METHODS: Following electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials about DF: Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. RevMan 4.1 was used for statistical analysis.RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials with 400pat-ients were included. The supplement of DF in EN was compared with standard enteral formula in five trials.Combined analysis did not show a significant reduction in occurrence of diarrhea, but there were valuable results for non-critically iii patients. Combined analysis of two trials observing the infection also did not show any valid evidence that DF could decrease the infection rate, though the length of hospital stay was reduced significantly.CONCLUSION: Based on the current eligible randomized controlled trials, there is no evidence that the value of DF in the diarrhea can be proved. Though length of hospital stay was shortened by the use of DF, there is no available evidence in preventing infection by DF. Further studies are needed for evaluating the value of DF in EN.

  14. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of telmisartan for flow-mediated dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2014-09-01

    There have been a number of small-sized underpowered randomized controlled trials to assess effects of telmisartan on flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). To determine whether telmisartan increases FMD, we performed a meta-analysis of these trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through December 2013. Eligible studies were prospective randomized controlled trials of telmisartan reporting FMD as an outcome. Search terms included: telmisartan; endothelial function/dysfunction; flow-mediated dilation/dilatation/vasodilation/vasodilatation; and randomized, randomly or randomization. Included studies were reviewed to determine the number of patients randomized, mean duration of treatment and percent changes of FMD. Of 25 potentially relevant articles screened initially, seven reports of randomized trials enrolling a total of 398 patients were identified and included. A pooled analysis of the seven trials demonstrated a statistically significant increase in FMD by 48.7%, with telmisartan relative to control in the random-effects model (mean difference, 48.72%; 95% confidence interval, 15.37-82.08%; P for effect=0.004; P for heterogeneity telmisartan, which suggests that telmisartan may improve endothelial dysfunction.

  15. Treatment success in cancer: industry compared to publicly sponsored randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Djulbegovic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess if commercially sponsored trials are associated with higher success rates than publicly-sponsored trials. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTINGS: We undertook a systematic review of all consecutive, published and unpublished phase III cancer randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK and the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (CTG. We included all phase III cancer RCTs assessing treatment superiority from 1980 to 2010. Three metrics were assessed to determine treatment successes: (1 the proportion of statistically significant trials favouring the experimental treatment, (2 the proportion of the trials in which new treatments were considered superior according to the investigators, and (3 quantitative synthesis of data for primary outcomes as defined in each trial. RESULTS: GSK conducted 40 cancer RCTs accruing 19,889 patients and CTG conducted 77 trials enrolling 33,260 patients. 42% (99%CI 24 to 60 of the results were statistically significant favouring experimental treatments in GSK compared to 25% (99%CI 13 to 37 in the CTG cohort (RR = 1.68; p = 0.04. Investigators concluded that new treatments were superior to standard treatments in 80% of GSK compared to 44% of CTG trials (RR = 1.81; p<0.001. Meta-analysis of the primary outcome indicated larger effects in GSK trials (odds ratio = 0.61 [99%CI 0.47-0.78] compared to 0.86 [0.74-1.00]; p = 0.003. However, testing for the effect of treatment over time indicated that treatment success has become comparab