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Sample records for controlled rate cooling

  1. DKDP crystal growth controlled by cooling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Qi, Hongji; Shao, Jianda

    2017-08-01

    The performance of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystal directly affects beam quality, energy and conversion efficiency in the Inertial Confinement Fusion(ICF)facility, which is related with the initial saturation temperature of solution and the real-time supersaturation during the crystal growth. However, traditional method to measure the saturation temperature is neither efficient nor accurate enough. Besides, the supersaturation is often controlled by experience, which yields the higher error and leads to the instability during the crystal growth. In this paper, DKDP solution with 78% deuteration concentration is crystallized in different temperatures. We study the relation between solubility and temperature of DKDP and fit a theoretical curve with a parabola model. With the model, the measurement of saturation temperature is simplified and the control precision of the cooling rate is improved during the crystal growth, which is beneficial for optimizing the crystal growth process.

  2. Controlled rate cooling of fungi using a stirling cycle freezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew J; Kasulyte-Creasey, Daiva; Kermode, Anthony; San, Shwe Phue; Buddie, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    The use of a Stirling cycle freezer for cryopreservation is considered to have significant advantages over traditional methodologies including N2 free operation, application of low cooling rates, reduction of sample contamination risks and control of ice nucleation. The study assesses the suitability of an 'N2-free' Stirling Cycle controlled rate freezer for fungi cryopreservation. In total, 77 fungi representing a broad taxonomic coverage were cooled using the N2 free cooler following a cooling rate of -1 degrees C min(-1). Of these, 15 strains were also cryopreserved using a traditional 'N2 gas chamber' controlled rate cooler and a comparison of culture morphology and genomic stability against non-cryopreserved starter cultures was undertaken. In total of 75 fungi survived cryopreservation, only a recalcitrant Basidiomycete and filamentous Chromist failed to survive. No changes were detected in genomic profile after preservation, suggesting that genomic function is not adversely compromised as a result of using 'N2 free' cooling. The results demonstrate the potential of 'N2-free' cooling for the routine cryopreservation of fungi in Biological Resource Centres.

  3. Effects of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium by cooling rate-controlled solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yichi; Liu, Debao; You, Chen; Chen, Minfang

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of grain size on the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium developed for biomedical applications. High-purity magnesium samples with different grain size were prepared by the cooling rate-controlled solidification. Electrochemical and immersion tests were employed to measure the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium with different grain size. The electrochemical polarization curves indicated that the corrosion susceptibility increased as the grain size decrease. However, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and immersion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of pure magnesium is improved as the grain size decreases. The improvement in the corrosion resistance is attributed to refine grain can produce more uniform and density film on the surface of sample.

  4. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  5. Heating and cooling rates and their effects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The heating and cooling rates of adult Chersina angulata were investigated to ascertain whether these tortoises can physiologically alter their rates of heat exchange. In addition, heart rates were recorded to provide an insight into the control of heat exchange. C. angulata heats significantly faster than it cools. Heart rates ...

  6. Biofouling Control in Cooling Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Reg Bott

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect of environmental engineering is the control of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuel-fired power stations, for instance, represent a substantial contribution to this problem. Unless suitable steps are taken the accumulation of microbial deposits (biofouling on the cooling water side of the steam condensers can reduce their efficiency and in consequence, the overall efficiency of power production, with an attendant increase in fuel consumption and hence CO2 production. Biofouling control, therefore, is extremely important and can be exercised by chemical or physical techniques or a combination of both. The paper gives some examples of the effectiveness of different approaches to biofouling control.

  7. EFFECT OF COOLING RATES ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... eutectic under three cooling conditions were proposed. In the DTA mode (slow cooling), the relationship between the two phases was stable. However as the cooling rates increased ( quenching and meltspun modes), the relationship tended towards metastability. KEY WORDS: alloy, solidification, microstructure, eutectic, ...

  8. Laser cooling in a feedback-controlled optical shaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilensky, Mark Y.; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.; Prior, Yehiam

    2006-01-01

    We explore the prospects of optical shaking, a recently suggested generic approach to laser cooling of neutral atoms and molecules. Optical shaking combines elements of Sisyphus cooling and of stochastic cooling techniques and is based on feedback-controlled interaction of particles with strong nonresonant laser fields. The feedback loop guarantees a monotonous energy decrease without a loss of particles. We discuss two types of feedback algorithms and provide an analytical estimation of their cooling rate. We study the robustness of optical shaking against noise and establish minimal stability requirements for the lasers. The analytical predictions are in a good agreement with the results of detailed numerical simulations

  9. Effect of cooling rates on the weld heat affected zone coarse grain microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Celin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a cooling rate on the S690Q quenched and tempered steel welded joint coarse grain heat affected zone microstructure was investigated using a dilatometer with controlled heating and cooling fixture. Steel samples were heated to a peak temperature of 1350 °C and cooled at the different cooling time Dt8/5. A dilatometric analysis and hardness measurements of the simulated thermal cycle coarse grain samples were done. Transformation start and finish temperature were determined using dilatation vs. temperature data analysis. The microstructure of the sample with a cooling time 5 s consists of martensite, whereas at cooling time 80 s a bainitic microstructure was observed. The investigated steel cooling cycle using simulation approach makes possible to determine the range of an optimum CG HAZ cooling time for the welding.

  10. Effect of cooling rate on crystallization in an aluminophosphosilicate melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on spontaneous crystallization behavior of an alumino-phospho-silicate melt is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and viscometry. The cooling rates of 160, 2100 and 12000 K/s are attained by subjecting ......, the opalescence of the glass can be tuned by adjusting the cooling rate. This makes the production of opal glasses or transparent glass ceramics more efficient and energy saving, since the conventional isothermal treatment procedure can be left out....

  11. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Albloushi, Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    The use of seawater in cooling towers for industrial applications has much merit in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries due to the scarcity and availability of fresh water. Seawater make-up in cooling towers is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in coastal areas. Such latent-heat removal with seawater in cooling towers is several folds more efficient than sensible heat extraction via heat exchangers. Operational challenges such as scaling, corrosion, and biofouling are a major challenge in conventional cooling towers, where the latter is also a major issue in seawater cooling towers. Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of cooling towers. The most popular methods used in cooling treatment to control biofouling are disinfection by chlorination. However, the disadvantages of chlorination are formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in the presence of high organic loading and safety concerns in the storage of chlorine gas. In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities

  12. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2016-02-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H2 atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s-1 and 0.005 K s-1, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U1-yPuyO2-x uranium-plutonium mixed oxides.

  13. Cation ordering in orthopyroxenes and cooling rates of meteorites: Low temperature cooling rates of Estherville, Bondoc and Shaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, J.; Yang, H.; Ghose, S.

    1993-01-01

    The cooling rates of meteorites provide important constraints on the size of their parent bodies, and their accretionary and evolutionary histories. However, the cooling rates obtained so far from the commonly used metallographic, radiometric and fission-track methods have been sometimes quite controversial, such as in the case of the mesosiderites and the meteorite Shaw. We have undertaken a systematic study of the cooling rates of meteorites using a different approach, which involves single crystal x-ray determination of Fe(2+)-Mg ordering in orthopyroxenes (OP(x)) in meteorites, subject to bulk compositional constraints, and numerical simulation of the evolution of the ordering state as a function of cooling rate, within the framework of the thermodynamic and kinetic principles governing cation ordering. We report the results obtained for OP(x) crystals from Shaw and two mesosiderites, Estherville and Bondoc.

  14. Mass-loss rates of cool stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrien Els Decin, Leen

    2015-08-01

    Over much of the initial mass function, stars lose a significant fraction of their mass through a stellar wind during the late stages of their evolution when being a (super)giant star. As of today, we can not yet predict the mass-loss rate during the (super)giant phase for a given star with specific stellar parameters from first principles. This uncertainty directly impacts the accuracy of current stellar evolution and population synthesis models that predict the enrichment of the interstellar medium by these stellar winds. Efforts to establish the link between the initial physical and chemical conditions at stellar birth and the mass-loss rate during the (super)giant phase have proceeded on two separate tracks: (1) more detailed studies of the chemical and morpho-kinematical structure of the stellar winds of (super)giant stars in our own Milky Way by virtue of the proximity, and (2) large scale and statistical studies of a (large) sample of stars in other galaxies (such as the LMC and SMC) and globular clusters eliminating the uncertainty on the distance estimate and providing insight into the dependence of the mass-loss rate on the metallicity. In this review, I will present recent results of both tracks, will show how recent measurements confirm (some) theoretical predictions, but also how results from the first track admonish of common misconceptions inherent in the often more simplified analysis used to analyse the large samples from track 2.

  15. Device and method of cooling control rod drives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togashi, Hidetoshi; Mase, Noriaki; Matsumura, Yuichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the generation of local temperature rise depending on the reactor core position of the control rod drives and control the temperature to an averaged state in BWR type reactors. Method: Control rod drives having a large charging length of the housing in the pressure vessel involve such a factor that the temperature of the control rod drives is increased by the synergistic effect due to the radiation heat from the reactor core and to the unevenness of the cooling water flow rate, which renders an appropriate temperature control difficult for the reactor core position. A cooling water flow rate controlling device having a restriction mechanism is disposed on the cooling water feed path for each of the hydraulic control units of the control rod drives, so that flow rate to the control rod drives is increased at the center of the reactor core and decreased at the periphery thereof. As a result, average temperature state can be set, temperature increase due to cloggings can be prevented and the thermal effect can be eliminated to thereby improve the reliability. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-08-09

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  17. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2018-01-30

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  18. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities. Test results of GAC bio-filter showed that around 70 % removal of total organic carbon in the seawater feed was achieved and was effective in keeping the microbial growth to a minimum. The measured results from this study enable designers of seawater cooling towers to manage the biofouling problems when such cooling towers are extrapolated to a pilot scale.

  19. Passive cooling of control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Schwirian, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for passively cooling the control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) in the reactor vessel of a nuclear power plant. Passive cooling is achieved by dispersing a plurality of chimneys within the CRDM array in positions where a control rod is not required. The chimneys induce convective air currents which cause ambient air from within the containment to flow over the CRDM coils. The air heated by the coils is guided into inlets in the chimneys by baffles. The chimney is insulated and extends through the seismic support platform and missile shield disposed above the closure head. A collar of adjustable height mates with plate elements formed at the distal end of the CRDM pressure housings by an interlocking arrangement so that the seismic support platform provides lateral restraint for the chimneys. (Author)

  20. MEASURING THE EVOLUTIONARY RATE OF COOLING OF ZZ Ceti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Fraser, Oliver; Riecken, T. S.; Kronberg, M. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bischoff-Kim, Agnes [Georgia College and State University, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); Corsico, A. H. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, K. I.; Falcon, Ross E.; Reaves, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78759 (United States); Kepler, S. O.; Romero, A. D. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Chandler, D. W. [Meyer Observatory, Central Texas Astronomical Society, 3409 Whispering Oaks, Temple, TX 76504 (United States); Kuehne, J. W. [McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Sullivan, D. J. [Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand); Von Hippel, T. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States); Mullally, F. [SETI Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Shipman, H. [Delaware Asteroseismic Research Center, Mt. Cuba Observatory, Greenville, DE 19807 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    We have finally measured the evolutionary rate of cooling of the pulsating hydrogen atmosphere (DA) white dwarf ZZ Ceti (Ross 548), as reflected by the drift rate of the 213.13260694 s period. Using 41 yr of time-series photometry from 1970 November to 2012 January, we determine the rate of change of this period with time to be dP/dt = (5.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} employing the O - C method and (5.45 {+-} 0.79) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} using a direct nonlinear least squares fit to the entire lightcurve. We adopt the dP/dt obtained from the nonlinear least squares program as our final determination, but augment the corresponding uncertainty to a more realistic value, ultimately arriving at the measurement of dP/dt = (5.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. After correcting for proper motion, the evolutionary rate of cooling of ZZ Ceti is computed to be (3.3 {+-} 1.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. This value is consistent within uncertainties with the measurement of (4.19 {+-} 0.73) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} for another similar pulsating DA white dwarf, G 117-B15A. Measuring the cooling rate of ZZ Ceti helps us refine our stellar structure and evolutionary models, as cooling depends mainly on the core composition and stellar mass. Calibrating white dwarf cooling curves with this measurement will reduce the theoretical uncertainties involved in white dwarf cosmochronometry. Should the 213.13 s period be trapped in the hydrogen envelope, then our determination of its drift rate compared to the expected evolutionary rate suggests an additional source of stellar cooling. Attributing the excess cooling to the emission of axions imposes a constraint on the mass of the hypothetical axion particle.

  1. Effect of local cooling on sweating rate and cold sensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, L. I.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Stamford, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects resting in a 39 C environment were stimulated in different skin regions with a water-cooled thermode. Results indicate that cooling different body regions produces generally equivalent decreases in sweating rate and increases in cold sensation, with the forehead showing a much greater sensitivity per unit area and temperature decrease than other areas. The high thermal sensitivity of the face may have evolved when it was the thinnest-furred area of the body; today's clothing habits have reestablished the importance of the face in the regulation of body temperature.

  2. Can reptile embryos influence their own rates of heating and cooling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Du

    Full Text Available Previous investigations have assumed that embryos lack the capacity of physiological thermoregulation until they are large enough for their own metabolic heat production to influence nest temperatures. Contrary to intuition, reptile embryos may be capable of physiological thermoregulation. In our experiments, egg-sized objects (dead or infertile eggs, water-filled balloons, glass jars cooled down more rapidly than they heated up, whereas live snake eggs heated more rapidly than they cooled. In a nest with diel thermal fluctuations, that hysteresis could increase the embryo's effective incubation temperature. The mechanisms for controlling rates of thermal exchange are unclear, but may involve facultative adjustment of blood flow. Heart rates of snake embryos were higher during cooling than during heating, the opposite pattern to that seen in adult reptiles. Our data challenge the view of reptile eggs as thermally passive, and suggest that embryos of reptile species with large eggs can influence their own rates of heating and cooling.

  3. Dynamic crystallization of a eucrite basalt. [achondrite textural features produced by superheating and differing cooling rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Powell, M. A.; Hays, J. F.; Lofgren, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The textural features produced in Stannern, a non-porpyritic representative of the eucrite basaltic achondrite class of meteorite, at differing cooling rates and various degrees of initial superheating were studied. Textures produced from mildly superheated melts were found to be fasciculate rather than porphyritic as the result of the cosaturated bulk chemistry of Stannern. The qualitative type of texture apparently depends mainly on the degree of initial superheating, whereas cooling rate exerts a strong influence on the coarseness of texture. Increasing the degree of superheating produces textures from intergranular/subophitic to fasciculate/porphyritic. With initial superheating to 1200 deg C the transition to quasi-porphyritic is controlled by cooling rate, but the development of phenocrysts is merely an overprint on the fasciculate background texture of the groundmass. The suppression of fasciculate texture is completed by a decrease of the degree of initial superheating below the plagioclast entry and suppression of quasi-porphyritic texture is completed by decrease of the degree of initial superheating below pyroxene entry; these qualitative changes do not seem to be produced by changes of cooling rate. A grain size/cooling rate dependence has been used to deduce the cooling rate of fasciculate-textured Stannern clasts (10.1 to 100 deg C/hr).

  4. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  5. Cooling rate effects on structure of amorphous graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoang, Vo

    2015-01-01

    Simple monatomic amorphous 2D models with Honeycomb structure are obtained from 2D simple monatomic liquids with Honeycomb interaction potential (Rechtsman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 228301 (2005)) via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Models are observed by cooling from the melt at various cooling rates. Temperature dependence of thermodynamic and structural properties including total energy, mean ring size, mean coordination number is studied in order to show evolution of structure and thermodynamics upon cooling from the melt. Structural properties of the amorphous Honeycomb structures are studied via radial distribution function (RDF), coordination number and ring distributions together with 2D visualization of the atomic configurations. Amorphous Honeycomb structures contain a large amount of structural defects including new ones which have not been previously reported yet. Cooling rate dependence of structural properties of the obtained amorphous Honeycomb structures is analyzed. Although amorphous graphene has been proposed theoretically and/or recently obtained by the experiments, our understanding of structural properties of the system is still poor. Therefore, our simulations highlight the situation and give deeper understanding of structure and thermodynamics of the glassy state of this novel 2D material

  6. Deposit control in process cooling water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, B.

    1981-01-01

    In order to achieve efficient heat transfer in cooling water systems, it is essential to control the fouling of heat exchanger surfaces. Solubilities of scale forming salts, their growth into crystals, and the nature of the surfaces play important roles in the deposition phenomenon. Condensed phosphates, organic polymers and compounds like phosphates are effective in controlling deposition of scale forming salts. The surface active agents inhibit crystal growth and modify the crystals of the scale forming salts, and thus prevent deposition of dense, uniformly structured crystalline mass on the heat transfer surface. Understanding the mechanism of biofouling is essential to control it by surface active agents. Certain measures taken in the plant, such as back flushing, to control scaling, sometimes may not be effective and can be detrimental to the system itself. (author)

  7. Legionella control in power station cooling towers using oxidising biocides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Christian; Rawlinson, Julia; Killeen, Paul [Ecolab PTY LTD, Ascot, WA (Australia)

    2009-02-15

    Power stations have used oxidising biocides such as chlorine or bromine for many years to control microbial growth in their cooling towers. In this paper Ecolab trademark looks at the direct effect halogen concentration has on Legionella populations in order to determine the most effective halogenation rate required to ensure that the site key performance indicator (KPI) of < 100 colony-forming units (cfu) per mL can be maintained. (orig.)

  8. Atomic size effect on critical cooling rate and glass formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Payman; Li Mo

    2005-01-01

    Atomic size effect on critical cooling rate and glass formability in a model binary system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. To isolate atomic size effect from the rest of the factors that critically influence the glass formation, a hard sphere model is employed in conjunction with a newly developed densification method. The glass formability is defined as a set of optimal conditions that result in the slowest cooling rate of the glass-forming liquid. Critical cooling rates are identified from extensive molecular dynamics simulations. A kinetic glass-forming diagram is mapped out that marks the boundary between the glass-forming regions and competing crystalline phases in terms of the parameters of the atomic size ratio and alloy concentration. It is found that the potency of the atomic size difference on glass formation is influenced greatly by the competing metastable and equilibrium crystalline phases in the system, and the kinetic processes leading to the formation of these phases. The mechanisms of the atomic size effect on topological instability of crystal packing and glass formation are discussed

  9. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2015-08-18

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  10. Predicting temperature drop rate of mass concrete during an initial cooling period using genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Santosh; Zhou, Yihong; Zhao, Chunju; Zhou, Huawei

    2018-02-01

    Thermal cracking on concrete dams depends upon the rate at which the concrete is cooled (temperature drop rate per day) within an initial cooling period during the construction phase. Thus, in order to control the thermal cracking of such structure, temperature development due to heat of hydration of cement should be dropped at suitable rate. In this study, an attempt have been made to formulate the relation between cooling rate of mass concrete with passage of time (age of concrete) and water cooling parameters: flow rate and inlet temperature of cooling water. Data measured at summer season (April-August from 2009 to 2012) from recently constructed high concrete dam were used to derive a prediction model with the help of Genetic Programming (GP) software “Eureqa”. Coefficient of Determination (R) and Mean Square Error (MSE) were used to evaluate the performance of the model. The value of R and MSE is 0.8855 and 0.002961 respectively. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the relative impact on the target parameter due to input parameters. Further, testing the proposed model with an independent dataset those not included during analysis, results obtained from the proposed GP model are close enough to the real field data.

  11. Warming by immersion or exercise affects initial cooling rate during subsequent cold water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chris G; Ducharme, Michel B; Haman, François; Kenny, Glen P

    2004-11-01

    We examined the effect of prior heating, by exercise and warm-water immersion, on core cooling rates in individuals rendered mildly hypothermic by immersion in cold water. There were seven male subjects who were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) seated rest for 15 min (control); 2) cycling ergometry for 15 min at 70% Vo2 peak (active warming); or 3) immersion in a circulated bath at 40 degrees C to an esophageal temperature (Tes) similar to that at the end of exercise (passive warming). Subjects were then immersed in 7 degrees C water to a Tes of 34.5 degrees C. Initial Tes cooling rates (initial approximately 6 min cooling) differed significantly among the treatment conditions (0.074 +/- 0.045, 0.129 +/- 0.076, and 0.348 +/- 0.117 degrees C x min(-1) for control, active, and passive warming conditions, respectively); however, secondary cooling rates (rates following initial approximately 6 min cooling to the end of immersion) were not different between treatments (average of 0.102 +/- 0.085 degrees C x min(-1)). Overall Tes cooling rates during the full immersion period differed significantly and were 0.067 +/- 0.047, 0.085 +/- 0.045, and 0.209 +/- 0.131 degrees C x min(-1) for control, active, and passive warming, respectively. These results suggest that prior warming by both active and, to a greater extent, passive warming, may predispose a person to greater heat loss and to experience a larger decline in core temperature when subsequently exposed to cold water. Thus, functional time and possibly survival time could be reduced when cold water immersion is preceded by whole-body passive warming, and to a lesser degree by active warming.

  12. Misting-cooling systems for microclimatic control in public space

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Joao; Zoilo, Inaki; Jacinto, Nuno; Nunes, Ana; Torres-Campos, Tiago; Pacheco, Manuel; Fonseca, David

    2011-01-01

    Misting-cooling systems have been used in outdoor spaces mainly for aesthetic purposes, and punctual cooling achievement. However, they can be highly effective in outdoor spaces’ bioclimatic comfort, in terms of microclimatic control, as an evaporative cooling system. Recent concerns in increasing bioclimatic standards in public outdoor spaces, along with more sustainable practices, gave origin to reasoning where plastic principles are combined with the study of cooling efficacy, in order to ...

  13. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium–plutonium mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauchy, Romain, E-mail: romain.vauchy@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC, Marcoule, 30207, Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hodaj, Fiqiri [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, SIMAP, F-38000, Grenoble (France); CNRS, Grenoble INP, SIMAP, F-38000, Grenoble (France)

    2016-02-15

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium–plutonium mixed oxides U{sub 1−y}Pu{sub y}O{sub 2−x} with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H{sub 2} atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s{sup −1} and 0.005 K s{sup −1}, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U{sub 1−y}Pu{sub y}O{sub 2−x} uranium–plutonium mixed oxides.

  14. The SNS Resonance Control Cooling System Control Valve Upgrade Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Derrick C.; Schubert, James Phillip; Tang, Johnny Y.

    2008-01-01

    The normal-conducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) uses 10 separate Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) water skids to control the resonance of 6 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and 4 Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) accelerating structures. The RCCS water skids use 2 control valves; one to regulate the chilled water flow and the other to bypass water to a chilled water heat exchanger. These valves have hydraulic actuators that provide position and feedback to the control system. Frequency oscillations occur using these hydraulic actuators due to their coarse movement and control of the valves. New pneumatic actuator and control positioners have been installed on the DTL3 RCCS water skid to give finer control and regulation of DTL3 cavity temperature. This paper shows a comparison of resonance control performance for the two valve configurations.

  15. Application of fuzzy control in cooling systems save energy design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M.L.; Liang, H.Y. [Chienkuo Technology Univ., Changhua, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    A fuzzy logic programmable logic controller (PLC) was used to control the cooling systems of frigorific equipment. Frigorific equipment is used to move unwanted heat outside of building in order to control indoor temperatures. The aim of the fuzzy logic PLC was to improve the energy efficiency of the cooling system. Control of the cooling pump and cooling tower in the system was based on the water temperature of the condenser during frigorific system operation. A human computer design for the cooling system control was used to set speeds and to automate and adjust the motor according to the fuzzy logic controller. It was concluded that if fuzzy logic controllers are used with all components of frigorific equipment, energy efficiency will be significantly increased. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  16. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  17. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both.

  18. Smart Cooling Controlled System Exploiting Photovoltaic Renewable Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Atieh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A smart cooling system to control the ambient temperature of a premise in Amman, Jordan, is investigated and implemented. The premise holds 650 people and has 14 air conditioners with the cooling capacity ranging from 3 to 5 ton refrigerant (TR each. The control of the cooling system includes implementing different electronics circuits that are used to sense the ambient temperature and humidity, count the number of people in the premise and then turn ON/OFF certain air conditioner(s. The data collected by different electronic circuits are fed wirelessly to a microcontroller, which decides which air conditioner will be turned ON/OFF, its location and its desired set cooling temperature. The cooling system is integrated with an on-grid solar photovoltaic energy system to minimize the operational cost of the overall cooling system.

  19. Corrosion control for open cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karweer, S.B.; Ramchandran, R.

    2000-01-01

    Frequent stoppage of water circulation due to shut down of the Detritiation Plant in Heavy Water Division, Trombay resulted in considerable algae growth. As polyphosphate is a nutrient to algae growth, studies were directed in the evaluation of a nonpolyphosphate formulation for controlling corrosion and scale formation of carbon-steel, copper and aluminium. A blend of HEDP, polyacrylate, zinc, and benzotriazole was used and the optimum condition was determined. In presence of 25 ppm kw-1002 [proprietary formulation, containing HEDP and polyacrylate], 10 ppm kw-201 [active ingredient benzotriazole] and 2 ppm zinc (as zinc sulphate), the corrosion rate of carbon-steel in Mumbai Municipal Corporation (MMC) water at pH 7.5 ± 0.1 for a period of 31 days was 10.4 x 10 -3 μm/h. When MMC water concentrated to half its original volume was used, the corrosion rate was still 9.74 x 10 -3 μm/h close to the original value without concentration. Hence, this formulation was used for controlling scale and corrosion. The results were satisfactory. (author)

  20. Cooling rates and intensity limitations for laser-cooled ions at relativistic energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidam, Lewin; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Winters, Danyal

    2018-04-01

    The ability of laser cooling for relativistic ion beams is investigated. For this purpose, the excitation of relativistic ions with a continuous wave and a pulsed laser is analyzed, utilizing the optical Bloch equations. The laser cooling force is derived in detail and its scaling with the relativistic factor γ is discussed. The cooling processes with a continuous wave and a pulsed laser system are investigated. Optimized cooling scenarios and times are obtained in order to determine the required properties of the laser and the ion beam for the planed experiments. The impact of beam intensity effects, like intrabeam scattering and space charge are analyzed. Predictions from simplified models are compared to particle-in-cell simulations and are found to be in good agreement. Finally two realistic example cases of Carbon ions in the ESR and relativistic Titanium ions in SIS100 are compared in order to discuss prospects for future laser cooling experiments.

  1. Cavity Control and Cooling of Nanoparticles in High Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, James

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres, and control the rotation of nanorods, with the potential to produce cold, aligned nanostructures. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  2. Preliminary calculations on the cooling rate of the Renca batholit, Sierra de San Luis, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez de Luchi, M.G.; Ostera, H.A.; Linares, E; Rosello, E.A

    2001-01-01

    Cooling rates can be used to constrain the unroofing history of plutonic-metamorphic system. Geocronological cooling rates (Spear and Parrish, 1996) can be unravelled using age calculations on minerals that were open systems and subsequently passed through their closure temperatures (Dodson, 1973) during cooling. Several age determinations on different minerals are needed in order to accurately constrain the cooling path of a pluton (Hodges 1991, Spear and Parrish, 1996 and references therein). Isotopic open-system behaviour in minerals can be modelled as volume diffusion process (Hodges, 1991 and references therein), which depends on the cooling rate of the whole system. We present the first results on the calculation of the cooling rate of the Renca batholith on the basis of the combination of both thermometric calculations and available crystallization and cooling ages (au)

  3. Control rod homogenization in heterogeneous sodium-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The sodium-cooled fast reactor is one of the candidates for a sustainable nuclear reactor system. In particular, the French ASTRID project employs an axially heterogeneous design, proposed in the so-called CFV (low sodium effect) core, to enhance the inherent safety features of the reactor. This thesis focuses on the accurate modeling of the control rods, through the homogenization method. The control rods in a sodium-cooled fast reactor are used for reactivity compensation during the cycle, power shaping, and to shutdown the reactor. In previous control rod homogenization procedures, only a radial description of the geometry was implemented, hence the axially heterogeneous features of the CFV core could not be taken into account. This thesis investigates the different axial variations the control rod experiences in a CFV core, to determine the impact that these axial environments have on the control rod modeling. The methodology used in this work is based on previous homogenization procedures, the so-called equivalence procedure. The procedure was newly implemented in the PARIS code system in order to be able to use 3D geometries, and thereby be take axial effects into account. The thesis is divided into three parts. The first part investigates the impact of different neutron spectra on the homogeneous control-rod cross sections. The second part investigates the cases where the traditional radial control-rod homogenization procedure is no longer applicable in the CFV core, which was found to be 5-10 cm away from any material interface. In the third part, based on the results from the second part, a 3D model of the control rod is used to calculate homogenized control-rod cross sections. In a full core model, a study is made to investigate the impact these axial effects have on control rod-related core parameters, such as the control rod worth, the capture rates in the control rod, and the power in the adjacent fuel assemblies. All results were compared to a Monte

  4. Influence of cooling rate on residual stress profile in veneering ceramic: measurement by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2011-09-01

    The manufacture of dental crowns and bridges generates residual stresses within the veneering ceramic and framework during the cooling process. Residual stress is an important factor that control the mechanical behavior of restorations. Knowing the stress distribution within the veneering ceramic as a function of depth can help the understanding of failures, particularly chipping, a well-known problem with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objective of this study is to investigate the cooling rate dependence of the stress profile in veneering ceramic layered on metal and zirconia frameworks. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. The stress profile was measured in bilayered disc samples 20 mm in diameter, with a 0.7 mm thick metal or Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal framework and a 1.5mm thick veneering ceramic. Three different cooling procedures were investigated. The magnitude of the stresses in the surface of the veneering ceramic was found to increase with cooling rate, while the interior stresses decreased. At the surface, compressive stresses were observed in all samples. In the interior, compressive stresses were observed in metal samples and tensile in zirconia samples. Cooling rate influences the magnitude of residual stresses. These can significantly influence the mechanical behavior of metal-and zirconia-based bilayered systems. The framework material influenced the nature of the interior stresses, with zirconia samples showing a less favorable stress profile than metal. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of cooling rate during solidification of Sn-9Zn lead-free solder alloy on its microstructure, tensile strength and ductile-brittle transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, K.N., E-mail: prabhukn_2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025 (India); Deshapande, Parashuram; Satyanarayan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, Mangalore 575 025 (India)

    2012-01-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of cooling rate on tensile and impact properties of Sn-9Zn alloy was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both DBTT and UTS of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An optimum cooling rate during solidification would minimize DBTT and maximize UTS. - Abstract: Solidification rate is an important variable during processing of materials, including soldering, involving solidification. The rate of solidification controls the metallurgical microstructure at the solder joint and hence the mechanical properties. A high tensile strength and a lower ductile-brittle transition temperature are necessary for reliability of solder joints in electronic circuits. Hence in the present work, the effect of cooling rate during solidification on microstructure, impact and tensile properties of Sn-9Zn lead-free solder alloy was investigated. Four different cooling media (copper and stainless steel moulds, air and furnace cooling) were used for solidification to achieve different cooling rates. Solder alloy solidified in copper mould exhibited higher cooling rate as compared to other cooling media. The microstructure is refined as the cooling rate was increased from 0.03 to 25 Degree-Sign C/s. With increase in cooling rate it was observed that the size of Zn flakes became finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Fractured surfaces of impact test specimens showed cleavage like appearance and river like pattern at very low temperatures and dimple like appearance at higher temperatures. The tensile strength of the solder alloy solidified in Cu and stainless moulds were higher as compared to air and furnace cooled samples. It is therefore suggested that the cooling rate during solidification of the solder alloy should be optimum to maximize the strength and minimize the

  6. Effect of cooling rate during solidification of Sn–9Zn lead-free solder alloy on its microstructure, tensile strength and ductile–brittle transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, K.N.; Deshapande, Parashuram; Satyanarayan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of cooling rate on tensile and impact properties of Sn–9Zn alloy was assessed. ► Both DBTT and UTS of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. ► An optimum cooling rate during solidification would minimize DBTT and maximize UTS. - Abstract: Solidification rate is an important variable during processing of materials, including soldering, involving solidification. The rate of solidification controls the metallurgical microstructure at the solder joint and hence the mechanical properties. A high tensile strength and a lower ductile–brittle transition temperature are necessary for reliability of solder joints in electronic circuits. Hence in the present work, the effect of cooling rate during solidification on microstructure, impact and tensile properties of Sn–9Zn lead-free solder alloy was investigated. Four different cooling media (copper and stainless steel moulds, air and furnace cooling) were used for solidification to achieve different cooling rates. Solder alloy solidified in copper mould exhibited higher cooling rate as compared to other cooling media. The microstructure is refined as the cooling rate was increased from 0.03 to 25 °C/s. With increase in cooling rate it was observed that the size of Zn flakes became finer and distributed uniformly throughout the matrix. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the solder alloy increased with increase in cooling rate. Fractured surfaces of impact test specimens showed cleavage like appearance and river like pattern at very low temperatures and dimple like appearance at higher temperatures. The tensile strength of the solder alloy solidified in Cu and stainless moulds were higher as compared to air and furnace cooled samples. It is therefore suggested that the cooling rate during solidification of the solder alloy should be optimum to maximize the strength and minimize the DBTT.

  7. Rate dependency and role of nitric oxide in the vascular response to direct cooling in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Fumio; Sone, Ryoko; Zhao, Kun; Alvarez, Guy E; Kosiba, Wojciech A; Johnson, John M

    2006-01-01

    Local cooling of nonglabrous skin without functional sympathetic nerves causes an initial vasodilation followed by vasoconstriction. To further characterize these responses to local cooling, we examined the importance of the rate of local cooling and the effect of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in intact skin and in skin with vasoconstrictor function inhibited. Release of norepinephrine was blocked locally (iontophoresis) with bretylium tosylate (BT). Skin blood flow was monitored from the forearm by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as the ratio of LDF to blood pressure. Local temperature was controlled over 6.3 cm2 around the sites of LDF measurement. Local cooling was applied at -0.33 or -4 degrees C/min. At -4 degrees C/min, CVC increased (P cooling (-4 degrees C/min) to 24 degrees C decreased (P cooling, CVC decreased at BT + saline sites relative to the precooling levels (P cooling, but not functional NOS, is an important determinant of the early non-adrenergic vasodilator response to local cooling and that functional NOS, adrenergic nerves, as well as other mechanisms play roles in vasoconstriction during prolonged local cooling of skin.

  8. Control of cooling processes with forced-air aimed at efficiency energetic and the cooling time of horticultural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Joao Carlos Teles Ribeiro da; Mederos, Barbara Janet Teruel [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Agricola

    2008-07-01

    The application of cooling technologies for the conservation of horticultural products is one of the stages the Cold Chain. In Brazil particularly, as a country with tropical climate with average high temperature almost all year, the application of these technologies is very important because the shelf-life of fresh horticultural products, with quality that the market demands, is directly related to temperature. In particular, the systems of forced air cooling operate according to the flow of air predetermined in the project according to the quantity of product to cool. When actual conditions differ from considerations of the project, as to the quantity of product, a situation very common in agricultural properties and packing houses, the fan will continue providing the nominal flow rate, causing alteration of the cost-benefit relation of process. This project aims at the development of a micro-processing equipment (output current of 4 to 20 mA) to control the rotational speed of the motor of the fan systems, air forced through an inverter of frequency. The objective is development of a Man-Machine Interface, based on an algorithm, which, through the introduction of mass product data and the automatic acquisition of data from temperature of the product and the camera, is calculated the cooling time. The rotation of the engine fan will be amended automatically, to maintain air flow with a proper cost-benefit, in connection with the reduction of cooling time, energy consumption, for the increasing the shelf life of products. (author)

  9. Effects of cooling rate on particle rearrangement statistics: Rapidly cooled glasses are more ductile and less reversible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meng; Wang, Minglei; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2017-02-01

    Amorphous solids, such as metallic, polymeric, and colloidal glasses, display complex spatiotemporal response to applied deformations. In contrast to crystalline solids, during loading, amorphous solids exhibit a smooth crossover from elastic response to plastic flow. In this study, we investigate the mechanical response of binary Lennard-Jones glasses to athermal, quasistatic pure shear as a function of the cooling rate used to prepare them. We find several key results concerning the connection between strain-induced particle rearrangements and mechanical response. We show that the energy loss per strain dU_{loss}/dγ caused by particle rearrangements for more rapidly cooled glasses is larger than that for slowly cooled glasses. We also find that the cumulative energy loss U_{loss} can be used to predict the ductility of glasses even in the putative linear regime of stress versus strain. U_{loss} increases (and the ratio of shear to bulk moduli decreases) with increasing cooling rate, indicating enhanced ductility. In addition, we characterized the degree of reversibility of particle motion during a single shear cycle. We find that irreversible particle motion occurs even in the linear regime of stress versus strain. However, slowly cooled glasses, which undergo smaller rearrangements, are more reversible during a single shear cycle than rapidly cooled glasses. Thus, we show that more ductile glasses are also less reversible.

  10. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of FeCrVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleckmann, M.; Gleinig, J.; Hufenbach, J.; Wendrock, H.; Giebeler, L.; Zeisig, J.; Diekmann, U.; Eckert, J.; Kühn, U.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of cooling rate on microstructure and microhardness of newly developed steel. • Intensive study of DSC measurements was done including different cooling rates. • Examinations by XRD, EDS and EBSD as well as microhardness on the DSC samples. • Matrix phase changes with cooling rates from ferrit to martensite. • Thermodynamic calculations of solidification process shows good agreement. - Abstract: In this work a systematic investigation of the influence of the cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of a newly developed Fe92.7Cr4.2V2.1C1 (FeCrVC) tool steel is presented. By applying a tailored casting process and sufficiently high cooling rates excellent mechanical properties are obtained for the presented alloy already in the as-cast state. Since no subsequent heat treatment is required, the cooling parameters applied during the casting process play a key role with respect to the evolving microstructure and resulting properties. In the present publication the effect of the cooling rate on the microstructure and properties of as-solidified FeCrVC was investigated. By using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), several samples were heated up and cooled with continuous rates of 3–50 K/min. The received DSC data was used to investigate the alloy’s solidification and phase transformation behavior. Subsequently, these samples were studied regarding their properties and microstructure by different analysis methods (EDX/WDX, EBSD, XRD). With increasing cooling rates the liquidus and solidus temperature are lowered, whereas the solidification interval is enlarged. A higher cooling rate is accompanied by a lower solidification time which results in a refinement of the dendritic microstructure. Furthermore, with rising cooling rates the microhardness increased. This provides the opportunity to make predictions from the applied cooling parameters upon the hardness and vice versa and enables one to draw first conclusions on the

  11. Provision of servo-controlled cooling during neonatal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ewen D; Becher, Julie-Clare; Mitchell, Anne P; Stenson, Benjamin J

    2012-09-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia is a time critical intervention for infants who have experienced a hypoxic-ischaemic event. Previously reported methods of cooling during transport do not demonstrate the same stability achieved in the neonatal unit. The authors developed a system which allowed provision of servo-controlled cooling throughout transport, and present their first year's experience. Retrospective review of routinely collected patient data. 14 out-born infants were referred for cooling during a 12-month period. Nine infants were managed with the servo-controlled system during transport. Cooling was commenced in all infants before 6 h of life. Median time from team arrival to the infant having a temperature in the target range (33-34°C) was 45 min. Median temperature during transfer was 33.5°C (range 33-34°C). Temperature on arrival at the cooling centre ranged from 33.4°C to 33.8°C. Servo-controlled cooling during transport is feasible and provides an optimal level of thermal control.

  12. Effect of cooling rate on the properties of high density polyethylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dong; Harkin-Jones, Eileen [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen’s University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Linton, David [School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queen’s University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-22

    High density polyethylene (HDPE)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites were prepared by melt mixing using twin-screw extrusion. The extruded pellets were compression moulded at 200°C for 5min followed by cooling at different cooling rates (20°C/min and 300°C/min respectively) to produce sheets for characterization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the MWCNTs are uniformly dispersed in the HDPE. At 4 wt% addition of MWCNTs composite modulus increased by over 110% compared with the unfilled HDPE (regardless of the cooling rate). The yield strength of both unfilled and filled HDPE decreased after rapid cooling by about 10% due to a lower crystallinity and imperfect crystallites. The electrical percolation threshold of composites, irrespective of the cooling rate, is between a MWCNT concentration of 1∼2 wt%. Interestingly, the electrical resistivity of the rapidly cooled composite with 2 wt% MWCNTs is lower than that of the slowly cooled composites with the same MWCNT loading. This may be due to the lower crystallinity and smaller crystallites facilitating the formation of conductive pathways. This result may have significant implications for both process control and the tailoring of electrical conductivity in the manufacture of conductive HDPE/MWCNT nanocomposites.

  13. Effect of cooling rate on the properties of high density polyethylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Dong; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Linton, David

    2015-01-01

    High density polyethylene (HDPE)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites were prepared by melt mixing using twin-screw extrusion. The extruded pellets were compression moulded at 200°C for 5min followed by cooling at different cooling rates (20°C/min and 300°C/min respectively) to produce sheets for characterization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the MWCNTs are uniformly dispersed in the HDPE. At 4 wt% addition of MWCNTs composite modulus increased by over 110% compared with the unfilled HDPE (regardless of the cooling rate). The yield strength of both unfilled and filled HDPE decreased after rapid cooling by about 10% due to a lower crystallinity and imperfect crystallites. The electrical percolation threshold of composites, irrespective of the cooling rate, is between a MWCNT concentration of 1∼2 wt%. Interestingly, the electrical resistivity of the rapidly cooled composite with 2 wt% MWCNTs is lower than that of the slowly cooled composites with the same MWCNT loading. This may be due to the lower crystallinity and smaller crystallites facilitating the formation of conductive pathways. This result may have significant implications for both process control and the tailoring of electrical conductivity in the manufacture of conductive HDPE/MWCNT nanocomposites

  14. Control of Non-linear Marine Cooling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of designing control laws for a marine cooling system used for cooling the main engine and auxiliary components aboard several classes of container vessels. We focus on achieving simple set point control for the system and do not consider compensation of the non-linearitie......-linearities, closed circuit flow dynamics or transport delays that are present in the system. Control laws are therefore designed using classical control theory and the performance of the design is illustrated through two simulation examples....

  15. Effects of Nb Modification and Cooling Rate on the Microstructure in an Ultrahigh Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Matthew D.; Webler, Bryan A.; Picard, Yoosuf N.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, two different melting methods were used to investigate effects of Nb modification on microstructure in ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS). Nb-free and Nb-modified UHCS samples were produced by melting and resolidifying an industrially produced base UHCS with and without addition of Nb powder. Microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron dispersive spectroscopy. Equilibrium computations of phase fractions and compositions were utilized to help describe microstructural changes caused by the Nb additions. Nb combined with C to form NbC structures before and during austenite solidification, reducing the effective amount of carbon available for the other phases. Cementite network spacing in the Nb-free samples was controlled by the cooling rate during solidification (faster cooling led to a more refined network). Network spacing in the Nb-modified UHCS could be enlarged by NbC structures that formed cooperatively with austenite.

  16. Correlation of Mechanical Properties with Diameter and Cooling Rate of 1080 Wire-Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, A.; Poirier, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    More than 540 heats of 1080 wire-rod were statistically analyzed by regression analyses to see whether tensile strength and percent reduction in area (%RA) relate to wire-rod diameter and composition. As diameter increases from 5.6 to 12.7 mm, the trend in %RA shows a decrease with negligible effect on the trend of the tensile strength. It was found that the estimated cooling rate at 700 °C during controlled cooling is responsible for the "diameter effect." The effect of composition on %RA is minor when contrasted to the "diameter effect." In particular, the effect of the concentrations of the residual elements on %RA within the compositional range studied is negligible.

  17. The influence of various cooling rates during laser alloying on nodular iron surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowska, Marta; Makuch, Natalia; Kulka, Michał

    2018-06-01

    the alloyed zone formed at higher cooling rates. The hardness of nodular iron surface layer, alloyed with cobalt, was up to 4-times higher than the hardness of core material. The hardness of alloyed zones strongly depended on laser treatment conditions. In the case of lower cooling rate, lower hardness was observed due to more coarse-grained microstructure and a presence of pearlite. The hardness of the alloyed zone increased (from 850 to 950HV0.1) together with the increasing cooling rate (from 2 · 103 to nearly 9 · 103 °C/s). Laser treatment enabled a formation of surface layers on nodular iron, alloyed with cobalt. The microstructure of such a surface layer could be controlled by the laser processing parameters. High hardness and fine microstructure of the laser-alloyed nodular iron with cobalt should result in higher resistance to wear, corrosion and even (due to effect of cobalt addition) elevated temperatures during operation conditions of machine parts.

  18. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, S.; Ramisetti, N.K.; Misra, R.D.K.; Mannering, T.; Panda, D.; Jansto, S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe here the effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-microalloyed steels that were processed as structural beams at three different cooling rates. Nb-microalloyed steels exhibited increase in yield strength with increase in cooling rate during processing. However, the increase in the yield strength was not accompanied by loss in toughness. The microstructure at conventional cooling rate, primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite-pearlite microconstituents, while at intermediate cooling rate besides polygonal ferrite and pearlite contained significant fraction of degenerated pearlite and lath-type ferrite. At higher cooling rate, predominantly, lath-type (acicular) or bainitic ferrite was obtained. The precipitation characteristics were similar at the three cooling rates investigated with precipitation occurring at grain boundaries, on dislocations, and in the ferrite matrix. The fine scale (∼8-12 nm) precipitates in the ferrite matrix were MC type of niobium carbides. The microstructural studies suggest that the increase in toughness of Nb-microalloyed steels with increase in cooling rate is related to the change in the microstructure from predominantly ferrite-pearlite to predominantly bainitic ferrite

  19. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-microalloyed steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Ramisetti, N.K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)], E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu; Mannering, T. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Panda, D. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Jansto, S. [Reference Metals, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    We describe here the effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nb-microalloyed steels that were processed as structural beams at three different cooling rates. Nb-microalloyed steels exhibited increase in yield strength with increase in cooling rate during processing. However, the increase in the yield strength was not accompanied by loss in toughness. The microstructure at conventional cooling rate, primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite-pearlite microconstituents, while at intermediate cooling rate besides polygonal ferrite and pearlite contained significant fraction of degenerated pearlite and lath-type ferrite. At higher cooling rate, predominantly, lath-type (acicular) or bainitic ferrite was obtained. The precipitation characteristics were similar at the three cooling rates investigated with precipitation occurring at grain boundaries, on dislocations, and in the ferrite matrix. The fine scale ({approx}8-12 nm) precipitates in the ferrite matrix were MC type of niobium carbides. The microstructural studies suggest that the increase in toughness of Nb-microalloyed steels with increase in cooling rate is related to the change in the microstructure from predominantly ferrite-pearlite to predominantly bainitic ferrite.

  20. Cool-down flow-rate limits imposed by thermal stresses in LNG pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, J. K.; Edeskuty, F. J.; Bartlit, J. R.

    Warm cryogenic pipelines are usually cooled to operating temperature by a small, steady flow of the liquid cryogen. If this flow rate is too high or too low, undesirable stresses will be produced. Low flow-rate limits based on avoidance of stratified two-phase flow were calculated for pipelines cooled with liquid hydrogen or nitrogen. High flow-rate limits for stainless steel and aluminum pipelines cooled by liquid hydrogen or nitrogen were determined by calculating thermal stress in thick components vs flow rate and then selecting some reasonable stress limits. The present work extends these calculations to pipelines made of AISI 304 stainless steel, 6061 aluminum, or ASTM A420 9% nickel steel cooled by liquid methane or a typical natural gas. Results indicate that aluminum and 9% nickel steel components can tolerate very high cool-down flow rates, based on not exceeding the material yield strength.

  1. Injection molding of ceramic filled polypropylene: The effect of thermal conductivity and cooling rate on crystallinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suplicz, A.; Szabo, F.; Kovacs, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • BN, talc and TiO 2 in 30 vol% were compounded with polypropylene matrix. • According to the DSC measurements, the fillers are good nucleating agents. • The thermal conductivity of the fillers influences the cooling rate of the melt. • The higher the cooling rate is, the lower the crystallinity in the polymer matrix. - Abstract: Three different nano- and micro-sized ceramic powders (boron-nitride (BN), talc and titanium-dioxide (TiO 2 )) in 30 vol% have been compounded with a polypropylene (PP) matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the particles are dispersed smoothly in the matrix and larger aggregates cannot be discovered. The cooling gradients and the cooling rate in the injection-molded samples were estimated with numerical simulations and finite element analysis software. It was proved with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements that the cooling rate has significant influence on the crystallinity of the compounds. At a low cooling rate BN works as a nucleating agent so the crystallinity of the compound is higher than that of unfilled PP. On the other hand, at a high cooling rate, the crystallinity of the compound is lower than that of unfilled PP because of its higher thermal conductivity. The higher the thermal conductivity is, the higher the real cooling rate in the material, which influences the crystallization kinetics significantly

  2. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  3. Survival of mouse embryos after vitrification depending on the cooling rate of the cryoprotectant solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hredzák, R; Ostró, A; Zdilová, Viera; Maracek, I; Kacmárik, J

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between the rate of cooling of eight-cell mouse embryos to the temperature of liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) and their developmental capacity after thawing on the basis of their ability to leave the zona pellucida ('hatching') during in vitro culturing. Eight-cell embryos were obtained from superovulated female mice and divided into three experimental and one control group. Embryos from the experimental groups were cryopreserved by the vitrification method using ethylene glycol as cryoprotectant. The vitrification protocols used in the study differed in the rate of cooling of the cryoprotectant solution. Embryos from the first group were frozen in conventional 0.25-ml plastic straws, those from the second group in pipetting 'tips', and embryos from the third group, placed in vitrification solution, were introduced dropwise directly into liquid nitrogen. The control group of embryos was cultured in vitro without freezing in a culturing medium in an environment consisting of 95% air and 5% CO2. The developmental capacity of thawed embryos was assessed on the basis of their ability to leave the zona pellucida ('hatching') after three days of in vitro culturing. In the control group 95.1% of embryos 'hatched'. A significantly higher number of embryos that 'hatched' after thawing was observed in the group introduced dropwise directly into liquid nitrogen (60.0%) compared to the group frozen in pipetting 'tips' (37.9%). The group frozen in straws yielded significantly the lowest proportion of 'hatching' embryos (8.1%). These results showed that increasing cooling rates during vitrification of embryos improved their survival.

  4. SNS Resonance Control Cooling Systems and Quadrupole Magnet Cooling Systems DIW Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magda, Karoly [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    This report focuses on control of the water chemistry for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS)/Quadrupole Magnet Cooling System (QMCS) deionized water (DIW) cooling loops. Data collected from spring 2013 through spring 2016 are discussed, and an operations regime is recommended.It was found that the RCCS operates with an average pH of 7.24 for all lines (from 7.0 to 7.5, slightly alkaline), the average low dissolved oxygen is in the area of < 36 ppb, and the main loop average resistivity of is > 14 MΩ-cm. The QMCS was found to be operating in a similar regime, with a slightly alkaline pH of 7.5 , low dissolved oxygen in the area of < 45 ppb, and main loop resistivity of 10 to 15 MΩ-cm. During data reading, operational corrections were done on the polishing loops to improve the water chemistry regime. Therefore some trends changed over time.It is recommended that the cooling loops operate in a regime in which the water has a resistivity that is as high as achievable, a dissolved oxygen concentration that is as low as achievable, and a neutral or slightly alkaline pH.

  5. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  6. Optimizing condenser fan control for air-cooled centrifugal chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, F.W.; Chan, K.T. [Dept. of Building Services Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Hung Hom, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-07-15

    The current design and operation of air-cooled condensers can cause a significant decrease in chiller performance under part load conditions. This paper demonstrates optimal condenser fan control to improve the coefficient of performance (COP) of air-cooled chillers. This control involves identifying the optimum set point of condensing temperature with the optimized power relationships of the compressors and condenser fans and enhancing the airflow and heat transfer area of the condensers. An example application of this control for an air-cooled centrifugal chiller indicated that the COP could increase by 11.4-237.2%, depending on the operating conditions. Such the increase of the COP results in a reduction of up to 14.1 kWh/m{sup 2}, or 27.3% in the annual electricity consumption per unit A/C floor area of chillers, given that the chillers serve an office building requiring an annual cooling energy per unit A/C floor area of 173.3 kWh/m{sup 2}. The simulation results of this study will give HVAC engineers a better understanding of how to optimize the design and operation of air-cooled chillers. (author)

  7. Cooling water conditioning and quality control for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gootgeld, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Designers and operators of Tokamaks and all associated water cooled, peripheral equipment, are faced with the task of providing and maintaining closed-loop, low conductivity, low impurity, cooling water systems. The primary reason for supplying low conductivity water to the DIII-D vacuum vessel coils, power supplies and auxiliary heating components is to assure, along with the use of a non-conducting break in the supply piping, sufficient electrical resistance and thus an acceptable current-leakage path to ground at operating voltage potentials. As important, good quality cooling water significantly reduces the likelihood of scaling and fouling of flow passages and heat transfer surfaces. Dissolved oxygen gas removal is also required in one major DIII-D cooling water system to minimize corrosion in the ion sources of the neutral beam injectors. Currently, the combined pumping capacity of the high quality cooling water systems at DIII-D is ∼5,000 gpm. Another area that receives close attention at DIII-D is the chemical treatment of the water used in the cooling towers. This paper discusses the DIII-D water quality requirements, the means used to obtain the necessary quality and the instrumentation used for control and monitoring. Costs to mechanically and chemically condition and maintain water quality are discussed as well as the various aspects of complying with government standards and regulations

  8. Development and application of online Stelmor Controlled Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wanhua; Chen Shaohui; Kuang Yonghai; Cao Kaichao

    2009-01-01

    An online Stelmor Controlled Cooling System (SCCS) has been developed successfully for the Stelmor production line, which can communicate with the material flow management system and Program Logic Control System (PLCs) automatically through local network. This online model adopts Implicit Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method to calculate temperature evolution and phase transformation during the production process and predicts final properties. As Continuous Cooling Temperature (CCT) curves of various steels can be coupled in the model, it can predict the latent heat rise and range of phase transformation for various steels, which can provide direct guidance for new steel development and optimization of present Stelmor cooling process. This unique online system has been installed in three Stelmor production lines at present with good results.

  9. Influence of the cooling rate on the ageing of lead-calcium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F.; Lambertin, M. [LaBoMaP, Arts et Metiers ParisTech, Rue porte de Paris, 71250 Cluny (France); Delfaut-Durut, L. [CEA, centre de Valduc [SEMP, LECM], 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Maitre, A. [SPCTS, UFR Sciences et Techniques, 87060 Limoges (France); Vilasi, M. [LCSM, Universite Nancy I, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    2009-03-01

    Cast lead-calcium alloys were known to be sensitive to experimental parameters, which cause large variations on the ageing and overageing behaviour. From the study of these parameters, the quenching rate was the only significant parameter. A critical cooling rate was defined based on hardness, electrical resistivity and metallographical observations. The inconsistencies in the literature noticed on the evolutions of lead-calcium alloys can now be explained by whether or not this critical cooling rate was respected. (author)

  10. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties in SA508 Gr4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minchul; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The microstructure of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel is a mixture of tempered martensite and tempered lower bainite and that of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel is predominantly tempered upper bainite. Higher strength and toughness steels are very attractive as an eligible RPV steel, so several researchers have studied to use the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel for the NPP application. Because of the thickness of reactor vessel, there are large differences in austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations of thickness in RPV. Because the cooling rates after austenitization determine the microstructure, it would affect the mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, and it may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics when the commercial scale of RPV is fabricated. In order to apply the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to RPV, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite and bainite fractions on mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined by controlling the cooling rate after austenitization. First of all, continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagram was established from the dilatometric analyses. Then, the phase fractions at each cooling rate were quantitatively evaluated. Finally, the mechanical properties were correlated with the phase fraction, especially fraction of martensite in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel.

  11. Cooling water conditioning and quality control for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gootgeld, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    Designers and operators of Tokamaks and all associated water cooled, peripheral equipment, are faced with the task of providing and maintaining closed-loop, low conductivity, low impurity, cooling water systems. Most of these systems must provide large volumes of high quality cooling water at reasonable cost and comply with local and state government orders and EPA mandated national pretreatment standards and regulations. This paper discusses the DIII-D water quality requirements, the means used to obtain the necessary quality and the instrumentation used for control and monitoring. Costs to mechanically and chemically condition and maintain water quality are discussed as well as the various aspects of complying with government standards and regulations

  12. The influence of cooling rate from annealing temperature on the microstructure of Haynes 230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, Injin; Hong, Sunghoon; Jang, Changheui

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cooling rate from annealing temperature, which simulated the diffusion bonding process, on the microstructure of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr-14W-5Co) were investigated. While the grain boundaries are slightly covered with Cr-rich M 23 C 6 carbides for the diffusion-bonded and quenched condition, precipitates were extensively present on/near the grain boundaries for the furnace-cooled specimens. For the furnace-cooled specimens, lamellar precipitates were extensively formed near the grain boundaries below 1 000 deg. C, with intervals of a few hundred nanometers. Also, grain boundaries were severely serrated for the furnace-cooled specimens. Through electron probe micro analysis and transmission electron microscope, the lamellar precipitates were identified as (Cr,W)-rich M 23 C 6 -type lamellar carbides. Despite the differences in microstructure, tensile properties were not much affected by the cooling rate. Creep tests are underway and results will be presented. (authors)

  13. Influence of cooling rate on phase formation in spray-formed H13 tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.M. [Industrial Technology Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2050 (United States)], E-mail: kevin.mchugh@inl.gov; Lin, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Lavernia, E.J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2008-03-25

    Spray forming is an effective way to process many tool steels into near-net-shape molds, dies, and related tooling. The general approach involves depositing atomized droplets onto a refractory pattern in order to image the pattern's features. The pattern is removed and the die insert is mounted in a standard mold base or holding block. This approach results in significant cost and lead-time savings compared to conventional machining. Spray-formed dies perform well in many industrial forming operations, oftentimes exhibiting extended die life compared to conventional dies of the same material and design. Care must be exercised when spray forming tool steel dies to minimize porosity and control the nature and distribution of phases and residual stresses. Selection of post-deposition heat treatment is important to tailor the die's properties (hardness, strength, impact energy, etc.) for a particular application. This paper examines how the cooling rate during spray processing and heat treatment of H13 tool steel influences phase formation. Porosity and hardness were evaluated over a range of deposit cooling rates and residual stresses were evaluated for a die in the as-deposited condition. Finally, the performance of spray-formed dies during production runs in forging, extrusion, and die casting is described.

  14. Influence of cooling rate on phase formation in spray-formed H13 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, K.M.; Lin, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Lavernia, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Spray forming is an effective way to process many tool steels into near-net-shape molds, dies, and related tooling. The general approach involves depositing atomized droplets onto a refractory pattern in order to image the pattern's features. The pattern is removed and the die insert is mounted in a standard mold base or holding block. This approach results in significant cost and lead-time savings compared to conventional machining. Spray-formed dies perform well in many industrial forming operations, oftentimes exhibiting extended die life compared to conventional dies of the same material and design. Care must be exercised when spray forming tool steel dies to minimize porosity and control the nature and distribution of phases and residual stresses. Selection of post-deposition heat treatment is important to tailor the die's properties (hardness, strength, impact energy, etc.) for a particular application. This paper examines how the cooling rate during spray processing and heat treatment of H13 tool steel influences phase formation. Porosity and hardness were evaluated over a range of deposit cooling rates and residual stresses were evaluated for a die in the as-deposited condition. Finally, the performance of spray-formed dies during production runs in forging, extrusion, and die casting is described

  15. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2015-09-22

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  16. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2017-11-07

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  17. Influence of cooling rate on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of Al–Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorin, T.; Stanford, N.; Birbilis, N.; Gupta, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cooling rate from 0.1 to 500 °C/s, mass loss rate decreased by 6 times. • Increase in corrosion resistance was attributed to the refined Fe-intermetallics. • Increased cooling rate resulted in increased Fe content in solid solution. • Direct strip casting can produce alloys with higher acceptable content of impurities. • Direct Strip Casting is a potential candidate to improve recyclability of Al alloys - Abstract: The effect of Fe in Al is technologically important for commercial Al-alloys, and in recycled Al. This work explores the use of the novel rapid solidification technology, known as direct strip casting, to improve the recyclability of Al-alloys. We provide a comparison between the corrosion and microstructure of Al–Fe alloys prepared with wide-ranging cooling rates (0.1 °C/s to 500 °C/s). Rapid cooling was achieved via direct strip casting, while slow cooling was achieved using sand casting. Corrosion was studied via polarisation and immersion tests, followed by surface analysis using scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. It was shown that the corrosion resistance of Al–Fe alloys is improved with increased cooling rates, attributed to the reduced size and number of Fe-containing intermetallics.

  18. Radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Bonnin, X.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative losses and electron cooling rates are calculated for carbon and oxygen ions under conditions relevant to fusion plasmas. Both rates are calculated with the most recent recommended atomic data. A modified coronal model which includes the effects of metastable states is described and used to calculate the rates. Comparisons with other approaches are also discussed. (author). 36 ref, figs

  19. Automatic Strain-Rate Controller,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    D—AO37 9~e2 ROME AIR DEVELOPMENT CENTER GRIFFISS AFB N 1’ FIG 13/ 6AUTOMATIC STRAIN—RATE CONTROLLER, (U) DEC 76 R L HUNTSINGER. J A ADAMSK I...goes to zero. CONTROLLER, Leeds and Northrup Series 80 CAT with proportional band , rate , reset, and approach controls . Input from deviation output...8) through ( 16) . (8) Move the set-point slowl y up to 3 or 4. (9) If the recorder po inter hunts , adjust the func t ion controls on tine Ser

  20. The Influence of Cooling Rates on Paleointensity of Volcanic Glasses: an Experimental Approach on Synthetic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aulock, F. W.; Ferk, A.; Leonhardt, R.; Hess, K.-U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2009-04-01

    The suitability of volcanic glass for paleointensity determinations has been proposed in many studies throughout the last years. Besides the mainly single domain magnetic remanence carriers and the pristine character of the volcanic glass, this was also reasoned by the possibility to correct paleointensity data for cooling rate dependency using relaxation geospeedometry. This method gives the cooling rate of a glass at the glass transition interval which marks the change of a ductile supercooled liquid to a brittle glass. In this study the cooling rate correction as carried out for example by Leonhardt et al. 2006 is tested on synthetic volcanic glass. In order to obtain a stable multicomponent glass with ideal magnetic properties, a natural phonolithic glass from Tenerife (Spain) was melted to avoid heterogeneity and degassing. Further it was tempered for 5 hours at 900 °C to yield a sufficient concentration of magnetic remanence carriers. To exclude nucleation or crystallisation 7 samples were then heated to about 50 °C above the glass transition temperature at around 720 °C and quenched at different rates from 0.1 to 15 K/min. After carrying out a paleointensity experiment using a modified Thellier method, which incorporated alteration, additivity and tail checks, the dependence of the thermoremance on cooling rate was investigated. Using the original cooling rates we corrected the data and obtained paleointensities of around 46 T, which is a good approximation of the ambient field of 48 T. Taking into account that the uncorrected mean paleointensity is about 57 T, this suggests that cooling rate correction is not only working, but also a necessary tool to yield the true field value. R. Leonhardt , J. Matzka, A.R.L. Nichols , D.B. Dingwell Cooling rate correction of paleointensity determination for volcanic glasses by relaxation geospeedometry; Earth and Planetary Science Letters 243 (2006) 282-292

  1. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  2. The Impact of Cooling Rate on the Safety of Food Products as Affected by Food Containers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coorey, Ranil; Ng, Denise Sze Hu; Jayamanne, Vijith S.

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, the demand for ready‐to‐eat (RTE) food items prepared by the food catering sector has increased together with the value of cook‐serve, cook‐chill, and cook‐freeze food products. The technologies by which foods are cooked, chilled, refrigerated for storage, and reheated before...... serving are of prime importance to maintain safety. Packaging materials and food containers play an important role in influencing the cooling rate of RTE foods. Food items that are prepared using improper technologies and inappropriate packaging materials may be contaminated with foodborne pathogens....... Numerous research studies have shown the impact of deficient cooling technologies on the survival and growth of foodborne pathogens, which may subsequently pose a threat to public health. The operating temperatures and cooling rates of the cooling techniques applied must be appropriate to inhibit...

  3. Speed control variable rate irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed control variable rate irrigation (VRI) is used to address within field variability by controlling a moving sprinkler’s travel speed to vary the application depth. Changes in speed are commonly practiced over areas that slope, pond or where soil texture is predominantly different. Dynamic presc...

  4. On the cooling rate of strip cast ingots for sintered NdFeB magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.Q. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yan, M. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)]. E-mail: mse_yanmi@dial.zju.edu.cn; Wu, J.M. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Luo, W. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Cui, X.G. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ying, H.G. [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2007-04-30

    Effects of the cooling rate of strip cast ingots on magnetic properties of sintered NdFeB magnets were studied. It is found that the magnetic properties greatly depend on wheel speed due to different alloy microstructures, which affect readily the particle size distribution of powders obtained after the subsequent jet milling. At higher cooling rate, interlamellar spacing between Nd-rich platelets of the alloy was small, resulting in a lower saturated magnetization due to increased amounts of small particles after jet milling. With further decreasing cooling rate, the resultant larger interlamellar spacing led to too large particle sizes as well as a more irregular shape; thus deteriorated the magnetic properties of the final magnet. A model was developed to disclose the effects of particle sizes on the magnetic alignment process. In the current investigation, optimum magnetic properties of the final magnets were obtained with a cooling rate of 2.6 m/s for preparing the strip. The magnets made by conventionally cast ingot technique exhibited the lowest magnetic properties because of the slowest cooling rate.

  5. Legionella in industrial cooling towers: monitoring and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, A; Verani, M; Battistini, R

    2010-01-01

    Legionella contamination of industrial cooling towers has been identified as the cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of legionellosis among people living nearby. To evaluate and control Legionella contamination in industrial cooling tower water, microbiological monitoring was carried out to determine the effectiveness of the following different disinfection treatments: (i) continuous chlorine concentration of 0.01 ppm and monthly chlorine shock dosing (5 ppm) on a single cooling tower; (ii) continuous chlorine concentration of 0.4 ppm and monthly shock of biocide P3 FERROCID 8580 (BKG Water Solution) on seven towers. Legionella spp. and total bacterial count (TBC) were determined 3 days before and after each shock dose. Both strategies demonstrated that when chlorine was maintained at low levels, the Legionella count grew to levels above 10(4) CFU l(-1) while TBC still remained above 10(8 )CFU l(-1). Chlorine shock dosing was able to eliminate bacterial contamination, but only for 10-15 days. Biocide shock dosing was also insufficient to control the problem when the disinfectant concentration was administered at only one point in the plant and at the concentration of 30 ppm. On the other hand, when at a biocide concentration of 30 or 50 ppm was distributed throughout a number of points, depending on the plant hydrodynamics, Legionella counts decreased significantly and often remained below the warning limit. Moreover, the contamination of water entering the plant and the presence of sediment were also important factors for Legionella growth. For effective decontamination of outdoor industrial cooling towers, disinfectants should be distributed in a targeted way, taking into account the possible sources of contamination. The data of the research permitted to modify the procedure of disinfection for better reduce the water and aerosol contamination and consequently the exposure risk.

  6. A dilatometer to measure the influence of cooling rate and melt shearing on specific volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Beek, M.H.E.; Peters, G.W.M.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a dilatometer to investigate the specific volume of polymers as a function of pressure (to 100 MPa), temperature (to 260 oC), cooling rate (to 80 C/s), and shear rate (to 77 1/s). The dilatometeris based on the principle of con¯ned compression and comprises of a pressure cell used in

  7. Cooling Rates of Mantle Peridotites Estimated from Lithophile Trace Element Diffusion in Orthopyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Handt, A.; Hellebrand, E.; Snow, J. E.

    2007-12-01

    Cooling rates of ocean floor mantle rocks from mid-ocean ridges can potentially provide important information about ridge dynamics, emplacement mechanisms and mantle uplift. There are a growing number of geospeedometric methods to retrieve such cooling rates in various settings. However, few exist for typical four- phase mantle peridotites and they only cover temperatures below 800° C. The down-temperature lithophile trace element exchange between clinopyroxene (cpx) and orthopyroxene (opx) can provide such a high- temperature spinel peridotite geospeedometer. Orthopyroxenes studied by SIMS from two fresh Gakkel Ridge peridotites are zoned in all trace elements while clinopyroxenes are homogeneous. This allows the calculation of equilibrium temperatures [1]. Several profiles in opx cover a range of 1250° C (opx core) to 800° C (opx rim) and are in agreement with straightforward diffusion and closure temperature models. The systematics of REE diffusion in opx deviate from the results of a recent experimental study [2]. The data allow us to estimate diffusion systematics of 16 elements (REE and TE) and their cation distributions in orthopyroxene. The data set is internally coherent as all elements were subjected to the same extrinsic parameters. 1. Decreasing ionic radius increases REE diffusion in opx (as it does in cpx). 2. M2-site diffusion is controlled more by ionic radius than by cationic charge. 3. M1-site diffusion is controlled by both ionic radius and cationic charge. 4. M1-site diffusion is generally slower than M2-site diffusion for isovalent cations, most likely because of higher M1- site energies compared to M2-site. The advantages of this geospeedometer should be its relatively good precision, use of standard analytical methods and its coverage of the important range between solidus temperatures and 800° C. In combination with other geospeedometers it will be possible to retrieve the continuous cooling history of a mantle rock from its solidus down

  8. Control of radioactive material transport in sodium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, W.F.

    1980-03-01

    The Radioactivity Control Technology (RCT) program was established by the Department of Energy to develop and demonstrate methods to control radionuclide transport to ex-core regions of sodium-cooled reactors. This radioactive material is contained within the reactor heat transport system with any release to the environment well below limits established by regulations. However, maintenance, repair, decontamination, and disposal operations potentially expose plant workers to radiation fields arising from radionuclides transported to primary system components. This paper deals with radioactive material generated and transported during steady-state operation, which remains after 24 Na decay. Potential release of radioactivity during postulated accident conditions is not discussed. The control methods for radionuclide transport, with emphasis on new information obtained since the last Environmental Control Symposium, are described. Development of control methods is an achievable goal

  9. The influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    The emergence of high energy density welding, laser surface modification and rapid solidification as commonly used metallurgical processing techniques has greatly increased the range of cooling rates that can be accessed during the solidification of metals and alloys. The microstructures which develop during these rapid cooling conditions may be significantly different from those which develop during low cooling rate conditions as the result of access to new metastable phases with the additional kinetic limitations that accompany rapid solidification. This investigation explores the influence of cooling rate on a series of seven ternary alloys which span the line of two-fold saturation in the Fe-Ni-Cr system. High speed electron beam surface melting was used to resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were estimated from dendrite arm spacing measurements and were confirmed by heat flow modeling to vary from 7 /times/ 10/sup 0/ /degree/C/s to 8 /times/ 10/sup 6/ /degree/C/s. The microstructures that developed from each solidification condition were examined using optical metallography, electron microprobe analysis, scanning electron microscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. These results were used to create diagrams to predict the primary mode of solidification, the ferrite content and the complex microstructural morphologies which develop as a function of interface velocity and composition. 158 refs., 90 figs., 45 tabs.

  10. Vaporization Rate Analysis of Primary Cooling Water from Reactor PUSPATI TRIGA (RTP) Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonny Anak Lanyau; Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Yahya Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Primary cooling system consists of pumps, heat exchangers, probes, a nitrogen-16 diffuser and associated valves is connected to the reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) tank by aluminium pipes. Both the primary cooling system and the reactor tank is filled with demineralized light water (H 2 O), which serves as a coolant, moderator as well as shielding. During reactor operation, vaporization in the reactor tank will reduce the primary water and contribute to the formation of vapor in the reactor hall. The vaporization may influence the function of the water subsequently may affect the safety of the reactor operation. It is essential to know the vaporization rate of the primary water to ensure its functionality. This paper will present the vaporization rate of the primary cooling water from the reactor tank and the influence of temperature of the water in the reactor tank to the vaporization rate. (author)

  11. Evaporation Loss of Light Elements as a Function of Cooling Rate: Logarithmic Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yong-Liang; Hewins, Roger H.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about the evaporation loss of light elements is important to our understanding of chondrule formation processes. The evaporative loss of light elements (such as B and Li) as a function of cooling rate is of special interest because recent investigations of the distribution of Li, Be and B in meteoritic chondrules have revealed that Li varies by 25 times, and B and Be varies by about 10 times. Therefore, if we can extrapolate and interpolate with confidence the evaporation loss of B and Li (and other light elements such as K, Na) at a wide range of cooling rates of interest based upon limited experimental data, we would be able to assess the full range of scenarios relating to chondrule formation processes. Here, we propose that evaporation loss of light elements as a function of cooling rate should obey the logarithmic law.

  12. Application of hafnium hydride control rod to large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazumi, E-mail: kazumi_ikeda@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki_moriwaki@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Ohkubo, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: yoshiyuki_okubo@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR Systems, Inc., 34-17, Jingumae 2-Chome, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Iwasaki, Tomohiko, E-mail: tomohiko.iwasaki@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken 980-8579 (Japan); Konashi, Kenji, E-mail: konashi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Higashi-Ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki-ken 311-1313 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Application of hafnium hydride control rod to large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • This paper treats application of an innovative hafnium hydride control rod to a large sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. • Hydrogen absorption triples the reactivity worth by neutron spectrum shift at H/Hf ratio of 1.3. • Lifetime of the control rod quadruples because produced daughters of hafnium isotopes are absorbers. • Nuclear and thermal hydraulic characteristics of the reactor are as good as or better than B-10 enriched boron carbide. - Abstract: This study treats the feasibility of long-lived hafnium hydride control rod in a large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor by nuclear and thermal analyses. According to the nuclear calculations, it is found that hydrogen absorption of hafnium triples the reactivity by the neutron spectrum shift at the H/Hf ratio of 1.3, and a hafnium transmutation mechanism that produced daughters are absorbers quadruples the lifetime due to a low incineration rate of absorbing nuclides under irradiation. That is to say, the control rod can function well for a long time because an irradiation of 2400 EFPD reduces the reactivity by only 4%. The calculation also reveals that the hafnium hydride control rod can apply to the reactor in that nuclear and thermal characteristics become as good as or better than 80% B-10 enriched boron carbide. For example, the maximum linear heat rate becomes 3% lower. Owing to the better power distribution, the required flow rate decreases approximately by 1%. Consequently, it is concluded on desk analyses that the long lived hafnium hydride control rod is feasible in the large sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor.

  13. Effect of cooling rates on bare bulk and silver wrapped pellets of Bi-2223 superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzioglu, C.; Oztuerk, O.; Kilic, A.; Gencer, A.; Belenli, I.

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the effect of cooling rates on oxygen content of Bi-2223 phase samples with and without silver sheating. Two sets of samples with and without silver sheating were annealed under identical conditions and cooled with rates of 10 deg. C/h, 25 deg. C/h, 50 deg. C/h, 75 deg. C/h, and 100 deg. C/h. XRD examination of the samples showed that a high percentage of Bi-2223 was obtained. Microstructure examinations were performed by scanning electron microscopy. Resistive and magnetic transitions of the samples were studied. All the reported data were discussed and related

  14. Influence of cooling rate on microstructure of NdFeB strip casting flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binglin Guo; Bo Li; Dongling Wang; Xiaojun Yu [Central Iron and Steel Research Inst., Beijing, BJ (China); Jifan Hu [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, flakes of NdFeB cast alloys were prepared by using the strip casting technique. Microstructure and composition of phases in NdFeB SC flakes were studied by SEM and energy spectra. Especially, the influences of cooling rate on the microstructure of SC flakes were discussed, helping us to master strip casting technology. The results show that the cooling rate plays an important role in obtaining the perfect microstructure of SC flakes, which thickness is supposed not less than 0.32mm in these studies. (orig.)

  15. Amelioration of the cooling load based chiller sequencing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Sen; Zuo, Wangda; Sohn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We developed a new approach for the optimal load distribution for chillers. • We proposed a new approach to optimize the number of operating chillers. • We provided a holistic solution to address chiller sequencing control problems. - Abstract: Cooling Load based Control (CLC) for the chiller sequencing is a commonly used control strategy for multiple-chiller plants. To improve the energy efficiency of these chiller plants, researchers proposed various CLC optimization approaches, which can be divided into two groups: studies to optimize the load distribution and studies to identify the optimal number of operating chillers. However, both groups have their own deficiencies and do not consider the impact of each other. This paper aims to improve the CLC by proposing three new approaches. The first optimizes the load distribution by adjusting the critical points for the chiller staging, which is easier to be implemented than existing approaches. In addition, by considering the impact of the load distribution on the cooling tower energy consumption and the pump energy consumption, this approach can achieve a better energy saving. The second optimizes the number of operating chillers by modulating the critical points and the condenser water set point in order to achieve the minimal energy consumption of the entire chiller plant that may not be guaranteed by existing approaches. The third combines the first two approaches to provide a holistic solution. The proposed three approaches were evaluated via a case study. The results show that the total energy consumption saving for the studied chiller plant is 0.5%, 5.3% and 5.6% by the three approaches, respectively. An energy saving of 4.9–11.8% can be achieved for the chillers at the cost of more energy consumption by the cooling towers (increases of 5.8–43.8%). The pumps’ energy saving varies from −8.6% to 2.0%, depending on the approach.

  16. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallo, Dario, E-mail: Dario.cavallo@unige.it [University of Genoa, Dept. of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genoa (Italy); Portale, Giuseppe [ESRF, Dubble CRG, Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research (NWO), 38043 Grenoble (France); Androsch, René [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Center of Engineering Sciences, D-06099 Halle/S. (Germany)

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  17. High and highly variable cooling rates during pyroclastic eruptions on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helo, Christoph; Clague, David A.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Stix, John

    2013-03-01

    We present a calorimetric analysis of pyroclastic glasses and glassy sheet lava flow crusts collected on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean, at a water depth of about 1400 m. The pyroclastic glasses, subdivided into thin limu o Pele fragments and angular, blocky clasts, were retrieved from various stratigraphic horizons of volcaniclastic deposits on the upper flanks of the volcanic edifice. Each analysed pyroclastic sample consists of a single type of fragment from one individual horizon. The heat capacity (cp) was measured via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and analysed using relaxation geospeedometry to obtain the natural cooling rate across the glass transition. The limu o Pele samples (1 mm grain size fraction) and angular fragments (0.5 mm grain size fraction) exhibit cooling rates of 104.3 to 106.0 K s- 1 and 103.9 to 105.1 K s- 1, respectively. A coarser grain size fraction, 2 mm for limu o Pele and 1 mm for the angular clasts yields cooling rates at the order of 103.7 K s- 1. The range of cooling rates determined for the different pyroclastic deposits presumably relates to the size or intensity of the individual eruptions. The outer glassy crusts of the sheet lava flows were naturally quenched at rates between 63 K s- 1 and 103 K s- 1. By comparing our results with published data on the very slow quenching of lava flow crusts, we suggest that (1) fragmentation and cooling appear to be coupled dynamically and (2) ductile deformation upon the onset of cooling is restricted due to the rapid increase in viscosity. Lastly, we suggest that thermally buoyant plumes that may arise from rapid heat transfer efficiently separate clasts based on their capability to rise within the plume and as they subsequently settle from it.

  18. Parametric study on the advantages of weather-predicted control algorithm of free cooling ventilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medved, Sašo; Babnik, Miha; Vidrih, Boris; Arkar, Ciril

    2014-01-01

    Predicted climate changes and the increased intensity of urban heat islands, as well as population aging, will increase the energy demand for the cooling of buildings in the future. However, the energy demand for cooling can be efficiently reduced by low-exergy free-cooling systems, which use natural processes, like evaporative cooling or the environmental cold of ambient air during night-time ventilation for the cooling of buildings. Unlike mechanical cooling systems, the energy for the operation of free-cooling system is needed only for the transport of the cold from the environment into the building. Because the natural cold potential is time dependent, the efficiency of free-cooling systems could be improved by introducing a weather forecast into the algorithm for the controlling. In the article, a numerical algorithm for the optimization of the operation of free-cooling systems with night-time ventilation is presented and validated on a test cell with different thermal storage capacities and during different ambient conditions. As a case study, the advantage of weather-predicted controlling is presented for a summer week for typical office room. The results show the necessity of the weather-predicted controlling of free-cooling ventilation systems for achieving the highest overall energy efficiency of such systems in comparison to mechanical cooling, better indoor comfort conditions and a decrease in the primary energy needed for cooling of the buildings. - Highlights: • Energy demand for cooling will increase due to climate changes and urban heat island • Free cooling could significantly reduce energy demand for cooling of the buildings. • Free cooling is more effective if weather prediction is included in operation control. • Weather predicted free cooling operation algorithm was validated on test cell. • Advantages of free-cooling on mechanical cooling is shown with different indicators

  19. Integrated thermal control and system assessment in plug-chip spray cooling enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Cheng, Wen-Long; Shao, Shi-Dong; Jiang, Li-Jia; Hong, Da-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel multi-heat source plug-chip spray cooling enclosure was designed. • Enhanced surfaces with different geometric were analyzed in integrated enclosure. • Overall thermal control with adjustable parameters in enclosure was studied. • Temperature disequilibrium of multi-heat source in enclosure was tested. • A comprehensive assessment system used to evaluate the practicality was proposed. - Abstract: Practical and integrated spray cooling system is urgently needed for the cooling of high-performance electronic chips due to the growth requirements of thermal management in workstation. The integration of multi heat sources and the management of integral system are particularly lacking. In order to fill the vacancies in the study of plug-chip spray cooling, an integrated cooling enclosure was designed in this paper. Multi heat sources were placed in sealed space and the heat was removed by spray. The printed circuit board plug-ins and radio frequency resistors were used as analog motherboards and chips, respectively. The enhanced surfaces with four different geometries and the plain surface were studied under the conditions of different inclination angles. The results were compared and the maximum critical heat flux (CHF) was obtained. Moreover, with the intention of the overall management of multi-heat source in integrated enclosure, the effect of the flow rate and the temperature disequilibrium, and the pulse heating in the process of transient cooling were also analyzed. In addition, a comprehensive assessment system, used to evaluate the practicality of spray cooling experimental devices, was proposed and the performance of enclosure was evaluated.

  20. Effect of Cooling Rates on Shape and Crystal Size Distributions of Mefenamic Acid Polymorph in Ethyl Acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalip, S. K. Abdul; Adam, F.; Parveen, J.; Abu Bakar, M. R.; Amran, N.; Sulaiman, S. Z.; Che Man, R.; Arshad, Z. I. Mohd; Shaarani, S. Md.

    2017-06-01

    This study investigate the effect of cooling rates on mefenamic acid crystallisation in ethyl acetate. The cooling rate was varied from 0.2 to 5 °C/min. The in-line conductivity system and turbidity system were employed to detect the onset of the crystallization process. The crystals produced were analysed using optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that the crystals produced at different cooling rates were needle-like and exhibit polymorphic form type I. However, the aspect ratio and crystal size distributions were varied with the increased of cooling rate. A high crystals aspect ratio and narrower CSD (100-900 μm) was obtained at cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min. Thus, can be suggested as the most suitable cooling rate for crystallization of mefenamic acid in ethyl acetate.

  1. Rapid cooling rates at an active mid-ocean ridge from zircon thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Axel K.; Perfit, Michael R.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Smith, Matthew C.; Cotsonika, Laurie A.; Zellmer, Georg F.; Ridley, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic spreading ridges are Earth's most productive crust generating environment, but mechanisms and rates of crustal accretion and heat loss are debated. Existing observations on cooling rates are ambiguous regarding the prevalence of conductive vs. convective cooling of lower oceanic crust. Here, we report the discovery and dating of zircon in mid-ocean ridge dacite lavas that constrain magmatic differentiation and cooling rates at an active spreading center. Dacitic lavas erupted on the southern Cleft segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge, an intermediate-rate spreading center, near the intersection with the Blanco transform fault. Their U–Th zircon crystallization ages (29.3-4.6+4.8 ka; 1δ standard error s.e.) overlap with the (U–Th)/He zircon eruption age (32.7 ± 1.6 ka) within uncertainty. Based on similar 238U-230Th disequilibria between southern Cleft dacite glass separates and young mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) erupted nearby, differentiation must have occurred rapidly, within ~ 10–20 ka at most. Ti-in-zircon thermometry indicates crystallization at 850–900 °C and pressures > 70–150 MPa are calculated from H2O solubility models. These time-temperature constraints translate into a magma cooling rate of ~ 2 × 10-2 °C/a. This rate is at least one order-of-magnitude faster than those calculated for zircon-bearing plutonic rocks from slow spreading ridges. Such short intervals for differentiation and cooling can only be resolved through uranium-series (238U–230Th) decay in young lavas, and are best explained by dissipating heat convectively at high crustal permeability.

  2. Effects of Cooling Rate on 6.5% Silicon Steel Ordering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jun [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Macziewski, Chad [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Jensen, Brandt [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Ouyang, Gaoyuan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Zhou, Lin [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Dennis, Kevin [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Zarkevich, Nikolai [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Jiang, Xiujuan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tang, Wei [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Zhou, Shihuai [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Simsek, Emrah [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Napolitano, Ralph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Kramer, Matt [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-03-02

    Increasing Si content improves magnetic and electrical properties of electrical steel, with 6.5% Si as the optimum. Unfortunately, when Si content approaches 5.7%, the Fe-Si alloy becomes brittle. At 6.5%, the steel conventional cold rolling process is no longer applicable. The heterogeneous formation of B2 and D03 ordered phases is responsible for the embrittlement. The formation of these ordered phases can be impeded by rapid cooling. However, only the cooling rates of water and brine water were investigated. A comprehensive study of the effect of rapid cooling rate on the formation of the ordered phases was carried out by varying wheel speed and melt-injection rate. Thermal imaging employed to measure cooling rates while microstructures of the obtained ribbons are characterized using X-ray diffraction and TEM. The electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties are characterized using 4-pt probe, VSM, and macro-indentation methods. The relations between physical properties and ordered phases are established.

  3. AN EMPIRICAL MEASURE OF THE RATE OF WHITE DWARF COOLING IN 47 TUCANAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsbury, R.; Heyl, J.; Richer, H. B.; Woodley, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present an empirical determination of the white dwarf cooling sequence in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Using spectral models, we determine temperatures for 887 objects from Wide Field Camera 3 data, as well as 292 objects from data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We make the assumption that the rate of white dwarf formation in the cluster is constant. Stellar evolution models are then used to determine the rate at which objects are leaving the main sequence, which must be the same as the rate at which objects are arriving on the white dwarf sequence in our field. The result is an empirically derived relation between temperature (T eff ) and time (t) on the white dwarf cooling sequence. Comparing this result to theoretical cooling models, we find general agreement with the expected slopes between 20,000 K and 30,000 K and between 6000 K and 20,000 K, but the transition to the Mestel cooling rate of T eff ∝t –0.4 is found to occur at hotter temperatures, and more abruptly than is predicted by any of these models.

  4. Control of cooling of an oil-immersed power transformer by varying speed of fans

    OpenAIRE

    Đorđević, Nikola Z.; Žakula, Dane M.; Jevtić, Milica M.; Tomašević, Radojica Ž.; Radaković, Zoran R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a prototype system for speed control of cooling fans for a small oil-immersed 6.6 kVA transformer, implemented on a standard PLC. Generally, the potential for optimization of the cooling process depends on the accessible cooling modes and construction of the transformer; basically the aim of the cooling system control is reduction in power consumption of the fans / pumps and keeping the top-oil temperature at constant value (to reduce transformer 'breathing' and infiltratio...

  5. Chemistry control challenges in a supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzonas, David; Tremaine, Peter; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    The long-term viability of a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) will depend on the ability of designers to predict and control water chemistry to minimize corrosion and the transport of corrosion products and radionuclides. Meeting this goal requires an enhanced understanding of water chemistry as the temperature and pressure are raised beyond the critical point. A key aspect of SCWR water chemistry control will be mitigation of the effects of water radiolysis; preliminary studies suggest markedly different behavior than that predicted from simple extrapolations from conventional water-cooled reactor behavior. The commonly used strategy of adding excess hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to suppress the net radiolytic production of primary oxidizing species may not be effective in an SCWR. The behavior of low concentrations of impurities such as transition metal corrosion products, chemistry control agents, anions introduced via make-up water or from ion-exchange resins, and radionuclides (e.g., 60 Co) needs to be understood. The formation of neutral complexes increases with temperature, and can become important under near-critical and supercritical conditions; the most important region is from 300-450 C, where the properties of water change dramatically, and solvent compressibility effects exert a huge influence on solvation. The potential for increased transport and deposition of corrosion products (active and inactive), leading to (a) increased deposition on fuel cladding surfaces, and (b) increased out-of-core radiation fields and worker dose, must be assessed. There are also significant challenges associated with chemistry sampling and monitoring in an SCWR. The typical methods used in current reactor designs (grab samples, on-line monitors at the end of a cooled, depressurized sample line) will be inadequate, and in-situ measurements of key parameters will be required. This paper describes current Canadian activities in SCWR chemistry and chemistry

  6. Microstructural changes after control rolling and interrupted accelerated cooling simulations in pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Mourino, Nuria; Petrov, Roumen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Bae, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kisoo [Sheet Products and Process Research Group, POSCO, Jeonnam, 545-090 (Korea, Republic of); Kestens, Leo A.I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 903, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    The {gamma}-{alpha} transformation and final microstructure in pipeline steel was studied by carrying out a number of physical simulations of industrial hot rolling schedules. Particularly, the effect of the reheating temperature, deformation and cooling parameters on the transformation temperatures and final grain size were considered with a goal to obtain an appropriate thermo-mechanical processing route which will generate appropriate microstructures for pipeline applications. The CCT diagram of the steel was derived experimentally by means of dilatometric tests. Hot torsion experiments were applied in a multi-deformation cycle at various temperatures in the austenite region to simulate industrial rolling schedules. By variation of the reheating temperature, equivalent strain, and accelerated cooling, different types of microstructures were obtained. It was found that the deformation increases the transformation temperatures whereas the higher cooling rates after deformation decrease them. Post-deformation microstructure consists of fine bainitic-ferrite grains with dispersed carbides and small amount of dispersed martensite/austenite islands which can be controlled by varying the reheating temperature, deformation and post-deformation cooling. The detailed microstructure characteristics obtained from the present work could be used to optimize the mechanical properties, strength and toughness of pipeline steel grades by an appropriate control of the thermo-mechanical processing. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Study of cooling rates during metallic glass formation in a hammer and anvil apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, D.M.; Coghlan, W.A.; Easton, D.S.; Koch, C.C.; Scarbrough, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    A model is presented of the simultaneous spreading and cooling of the liquid drop in a hammer and anvil apparatus for rapid quenching of liquid metals. The viscosity of the melt is permitted to vary with temperature, and to avoid mathematical complications which would be associated with spatial variation of the viscosity, Newtonian cooling is assumed. From an expression for the force required to spread the specimen, coupled equations for the mechanical energy balance for the system and the heat transfer from the sample to the hearth and hammer were obtained, and solved numerically. The sample reaches its final thickness when the force required to deform it becomes greater than the force exerted on it by the decelerating hammer. The model was fit to measurements of sample thickness versus hammer speed, using the interface heat transfer coefficient, h, as an adjustable parameter. The values of h so obtained vary somewhat with the melt alloy/substrate metal combination. From predicted cooling curves, the effects of hammer speed, sample size, and initial melt temperature on the cooling rate and the efficiency of glass formation can be assessed. Addition of sample superheat shifts the cooling curve relative to the expected position of the time-temperature-transformation curve for formation of crystalline material from the melt, and thus is an effective means of increasing the probability of glass formation in this type of apparatus

  8. Overview of environmental control aspects for the gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Environmental control aspects relating to release of radionuclides have been analyzed for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Information on environmental control systems was obtained for the most recent GCFR designs, and was used to evaluate the adequacy of these systems. The GCFR has been designed by the General Atomic Company as an alternative to other fast breeder reactor designs, such as the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). The GCFR design includes mixed oxide fuel and helium coolant. The environmental impact of expected radionuclide releases from normal operation of the GCFR was evaluated using estimated collective dose equivalent commitments resulting from 1 year of plant operation. The results were compared to equivalent estimates for the Light Water Reactor (LWR) and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). A discussion of uncertainties in system performances, tritium production rates, and radiation quality factors for tritium is included

  9. A method for measuring the corrosion rate of materials in spallation neutron source target/blanket cooling loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ongoing evaluation of the susceptibility of materials in accelerator target/blanket cooling loops to corrosion. To simulate the exposure environment in a target/blanket cooling loop, samples were irradiated by an 800 MeV proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). To accomplish this, a cooling water loop capable of exposing corrosion samples to an 800 MeV proton beam at currents upwards of 1 mA was constructed. This loop allowed control and evaluation hydrogen water chemistry, water conductivity, and solution pH. Specially designed ceramic sealed samples were used to measure the real-time corrosion rates of materials placed directly in the proton beam using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS was also used to measure real-time corrosion rates of samples that were out of the proton beam and downstream from the in-beam samples. These out-of-beam probes primarily examined the effects of long lived water radiolysis products from proton irradiation on corrosion rates. An overview of the LANSCE corrosion loop, the corrosion probes, and data from an in-beam alloy 718 probe are presented

  10. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  11. Thermoelectric generator cooling system and method of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Gregory P; Meisner, Gregory P; Glassford, Daniel B

    2012-10-16

    An apparatus is provided that includes a thermoelectric generator and an exhaust gas system operatively connected to the thermoelectric generator to heat a portion of the thermoelectric generator with exhaust gas flow through the thermoelectric generator. A coolant system is operatively connected to the thermoelectric generator to cool another portion of the thermoelectric generator with coolant flow through the thermoelectric generator. At least one valve is controllable to cause the coolant flow through the thermoelectric generator in a direction that opposes a direction of the exhaust gas flow under a first set of operating conditions and to cause the coolant flow through the thermoelectric generator in the direction of exhaust gas flow under a second set of operating conditions.

  12. Effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Dong Jun; Shin, Eun Joo; Choi, Young Won; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Non-equilibrium segregation of B in steel depends strongly on the cooling rate. ► A higher austenitization temperature reduced the B hardenability effect. ► An increase in B concentration at γ grain boundaries accelerates the B precipitation. ► The loss of B hardenability effect is due to intragranular borocarbide precipitation. ► The controlled cooling after hot deformation increased the B hardenability effect. - Abstract: The phase transformation behavior of high-strength boron steel was studied considering the segregation and precipitation behavior of boron (B). The effects of cooling rate, austenitizing temperature and austenite deformation on the transformation behavior of B-bearing steel as compared with B-free steel were investigated by using dilatometry, microstructural observations and analysis of B distribution. The effects of these variables on hardenability were discussed in terms of non-equilibrium segregation mechanism and precipitation behavior of B. The retardation of austenite-to-ferrite transformation by B addition depends strongly on cooling rate (CR); this is mainly due to the phenomenon of non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation of B. The hardenability effect of B-bearing steel decreased at higher austenitizing temperature due to the precipitation of borocarbide along austenite grain boundaries. Analysis of B distribution by second ion mass spectroscopy confirmed that the grain boundary segregation of B occurred at low austenitizing temperature of 900 °C, whereas B precipitates were observed along austenite grain boundaries at high austenitizing temperature of 1200 °C. The significant increase in B concentration at austenite grain boundaries due to grain coarsening and a non-equilibrium segregation mechanism may lead to the B precipitation. In contrast, solute B segregated to austenite grain boundaries during cooling after heavy deformation became more stable because the increase in boundary area by grain

  13. Chlorination for biofouling control in power plant cooling water system - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, K.K.; Ruth Nithila, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Fresh water is becoming a rare commodity day by day and thus power plant authorities are turning into sea to make use of the copious amount of seawater available at an economical rate for condenser cooling. Unfortunately, biofouling; the growth and colonization of marine organisms affect the smooth operation of power plant cooling water systems. This is more so, if the plant is located in tropical climate having clean environment, which enhances the variety and density of organisms. Thus, biofouling needs to be controlled for efficient operation of the power plant. Biocide used for biofouling control is decided based on three major criteria viz: it should be economically, operationally and environmentally acceptable to the power plant authorities. Chlorine among others stands out on the top and meets all the above requirements in spite of a few shortcomings. Therefore it is no wonder that still chlorine rules the roost and chlorination remains the most common method of biofouling control in power plant cooling water system all over the world. Although, it is easier said than done, a good amount of R and D work is essential before a precise chlorination regime is put into pragmatic use. This paper discusses in details the chemistry of chlorination such as chlorine demand, chlorine decay, break point chlorination, speciation of chlorine residual and role of temperature and ammonia on chlorination in biofouling control. Moreover, targeted and pulse chlorination are also discussed briefly. (author)

  14. Coolant and ambient temperature control for chillerless liquid cooled data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2016-02-02

    Cooling control methods include measuring a temperature of air provided to a plurality of nodes by an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, measuring a temperature of at least one component of the plurality of nodes and finding a maximum component temperature across all such nodes, comparing the maximum component temperature to a first and second component threshold and comparing the air temperature to a first and second air threshold, and controlling a proportion of coolant flow and a coolant flow rate to the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the plurality of nodes based on the comparisons.

  15. Treatment of cooling appliances. Interrelations between environmental protection, resource conservation, and recovery rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laner, David; Rechberger, Helmut

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of cooling appliances in Austria is primarily influenced by two factors. On the one hand is their changing composition and on the other hand the ordinance on Waste Prevention, Collection and Treatment of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE ordinance), which stipulates a minimum recycling rate of 75% for cooling appliances. This paper investigates whether this recycling rate leads to optimal treatment practices for cooling appliances with respect to resource conservation and environmental protection. Two different treatment technologies which achieve recycling rates between 50-60% and 80-90%, respectively, are compared both for cooling appliances containing Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and for appliances containing Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC). Materials and energy balances are developed for each model. To evaluate resource consumption, expenditures as well as savings of energy and materials are incorporated via the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED). In order to analyse the environmental impact of the different practices, balances for CFC, CO 2 , HF, HCl and solid residues are established. The results show that the treatment type aiming for a maximum of materials recycling contributes more to resource conservation than the other treatment type. But for CFC appliances the former is associated with substantial CFC emissions, which turn out to be most relevant when treating these appliances. Generally, it is found that the optimum recycling rate is a function of the composition of the appliance and the technologies applied, both in recycling and in primary production. A high recycling rate per se does not automatically result in an optimal solution with regard to resource conservation and environmental protection. (author)

  16. The optimal operation of cooling tower systems with variable-frequency control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Huang, Liqing; Cui, Zhiguo; Liu, Jing

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates the energy performance of chiller and cooling tower systems integrated with variable-frequency control for cooling tower fans and condenser water pumps. With regard to an example chiller system serving an office building, Chiller and cooling towers models were developed to assess how different variable-frequency control methods of cooling towers fans and condenser water pumps influence the trade-off between the chiller power, pump power and fan power under various operating conditions. The matching relationship between the cooling tower fans frequency and condenser water pumps frequency at optimal energy consumption of the system is introduced to achieve optimum system performance.

  17. Effects of the cooling rate on the shear behavior of continuous glass fiber/impact polypropylene composites (GF-IPP)

    KAUST Repository

    Wafai, Husam; Lubineau, Gilles; Yudhanto, Arief; Mulle, Matthieu; Schijve, W.; Verghese, N.

    2016-01-01

    ) are particularly attractive to the automotive industry due to their low cost and good impact resistance. In such composites, the cooling rate varies depending on processing techniques and manufacturing choices. Here, we study the effects of the cooling rate of GF

  18. Effects of Cooling Rates on Hydride Reorientation and Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Alloy Claddings under Interim Dry Storage Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Su-Jeong; Kim, Myeong-Su; Won, Chu-chin; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    As-received Zr-Nb cladding tubes and 600 ppm hydrogen-charged tubes were employed to evaluate the effects of cladding cooling rates on the extent of hydride reorientation from circumferential hydrides to radial ones and mechanical property degradations with the use of cooling rates of 2, 4 and 15 °C/min from 400 °C to room temperature simulating cladding cooling under interim dry storage conditions. The as-received cladding tubes generated nearly the same ultimate tensile strengths and plastic elongations, regardless of the cooling rates, because of a negligible hydrogen content in the cladding. The 600 ppm-H cladding tubes indicate that the slower cooling rate generated the larger radial hydride fraction and the longer radial hydrides, which resulted in greater mechanical performance degradations. The cooling rate of 2 °C/min generates an ultimate tensile strength of 758 MPa and a plastic elongation of 1.0%, whereas the cooling rate of 15 °C/min generates an ultimate tensile strength of 825 MPa and a plastic elongation of 15.0%. These remarkable mechanical property degradations of the 600 ppm-H cladding tubes with the slowest cooling rate may be characterized by cleavage fracture surface appearance enhanced by longer radial hydrides and their higher fraction that have been precipitated through a relatively larger nucleation and growth rate.

  19. The effect of the melting spinning cooling rate on transformation temperatures in ribbons Ti-Ni-Cu shape memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, A.P.; Castro, W.B.; Anselmo, G.C. dos S.

    2014-01-01

    Ti-Ni-Cu alloys have been attracting attention by their high performance of shape memory effect and decrease of thermal and stress hysteresis in comparison with Ti-Ni binary alloys. One important challenge of microsystems design is the implementation of miniaturized actuation principles efficient at the micro-scale. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have early on been considered as a potential solution to this problem as these materials offer attractive properties like a high-power to weight ratio, large deformation and the capability to be processed at the micro-scale. Shape memory characteristics of Ti-37,8Cu-18,7Ni alloy ribbons prepared by melt spinning were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. In these experiments particular attention has been paid to change of the velocity of cooling wheel from 21 to 63 m/s. Then the cooling rates of ribbons were controlled. The effect of this cooling rate on austenitic and martensitic transformations behaviors is discussed. (author)

  20. The Effect of Wind Velocity on the Cooling Rate of Water

    OpenAIRE

    Shrey Aryan

    2016-01-01

    The effect of wind velocity on the cooling rate of water was investigated by blowing air horizontally over the surface of water contained in a plastic water-bottle cap. The time taken for the temperature to fall to the average of the surrounding and initial temperatures was recorded at different values of wind velocity. It was observed that on increasing the wind velocity, the time taken to achieve average temperature not only decreased but also remained the same after a certain point.

  1. Stabilization of iron and molybdenum amorphous state with interstitials under high rates of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barmin, Yu.V.; Vavilova, V.V.; Verevkin, A.G.; Gertsen, A.T.; Kovneristyj, Yu.K.; Kotyurgin, E.A.; Mirkin, B.V.; Palij, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous solidification of iron and molybdenum is investigated in thin films and on surface laser irradiated on air at 10 12 and 10 8 /Ks cooling rates correspondingly. Amorphous solidification occurs during ion plasma spraying in thin films of 50 nm at saturation of carbon and oxygen atoms in the ratio of C:0=2.3, but amorphous state is absent at room temperature. Metastable fcc phase, among bcc, is formed by crystallization

  2. Quantitative theoretical analysis of lifetimes and decay rates relevant in laser cooling BaH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Keith; Lane, Ian C.

    2018-05-01

    Tiny radiative losses below the 0.1% level can prove ruinous to the effective laser cooling of a molecule. In this paper the laser cooling of a hydride is studied with rovibronic detail using ab initio quantum chemistry in order to document the decays to all possible electronic states (not just the vibrational branching within a single electronic transition) and to identify the most populated final quantum states. The effect of spin-orbit and associated couplings on the properties of the lowest excited states of BaH are analysed in detail. The lifetimes of the A2Π1/2, H2Δ3/2 and E2Π1/2 states are calculated (136 ns, 5.8 μs and 46 ns respectively) for the first time, while the theoretical value for B2 Σ1/2+ is in good agreement with experiments. Using a simple rate model the numbers of absorption-emission cycles possible for both one- and two-colour cooling on the competing electronic transitions are determined, and it is clearly demonstrated that the A2Π - X2Σ+ transition is superior to B2Σ+ - X2Σ+ , where multiple tiny decay channels degrade its efficiency. Further possible improvements to the cooling method are proposed.

  3. Bypass flow rate control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyama, Yoichi.

    1997-01-01

    In a PWR type reactor, bypass flow rate is controlled by exchanging existent jetting hole plugs of a plurality of nozzles disposed to the upper end of incore structures in order to flow a portion of primary coolants as a bypass flow to the upper portion of the pressure vessel. Two kinds of exchange plugs, namely, a first plug and a second plug each having a jetting out hole of different diameter are used as exchange plugs. The first plug has the diameter as that of an existent plug and the second plug has a jetting out hole having larger diameter than that of the existent plug. Remained extent plugs are exchanged to a combination of the first and the second plugs without exchanging existent plugs having seizing with the nozzles, in which the number and the diameter of the jetting out holes of the second plugs are previously determined based on predetermined total bypass flow rate to be jetted from the entire plugs after exchange of plugs. (N.H.)

  4. Study of the Al-Si-X system by different cooling rates and heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Suarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The solidification behavior of the Al-12.6% Si (A1, the hypereutectic Al-20%Si (A2 and the Al-20%Si-1.5% Fe-0.5%Mn (A3 (in wt. (% alloys, at different cooling rates is reported and discussed. The cooling rates ranged between 0.93 °C/s and 190 °C/s when cast in sand and copper wedge-shaped molds, respectively. A spheroidization heat treatment was carried out to the alloys in the as-cast condition at 540 °C for 11 hours and quench in water with a subsequent heat treatment at 170 °C for 5 hours with the purpose of improving the mechanical properties. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mechanically by tensile test, in order to evaluate the response of the heat treatment on the different starting microstructures and mechanical properties. It was found that alloys cooled at rates greater than 10.8 °C/s had a smaller particle size and better distribution, also showed a greater response to spheroidization heat treatment of all silicon (Si phases. The spheroidization heat treatment caused an increase in the ultimate tensile stress (UTS and elongation when compared with the alloys in the as-cast condition. The highest UTS value of 174 MPa was obtained for the (A1 alloy.

  5. Effects of different cooling rates during two casting processes on the microstructures and mechanical properties of extruded Mg–Al–Ca–Mn alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S.W.; Oh-ishi, K.; Kamado, S.; Takahashi, H.; Homma, T.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ordered monolayer GP zone was formed by increasing cooling rate. ► Finer extruded microstructure was obtained by increasing cooling rate. ► Higher number density precipitates was obtained by increasing cooling rate. ► Tensile 0.2% proof stress was increased by 105 MPa by increasing cooling rate. ► Extruded DC-cast alloy shows higher tensile 0.2% proof stress of 409 MPa. - Abstract: In this study, Mg–3.6Al–3.4Ca–0.3Mn (wt.%) (which is denoted AXM4303) alloy ingots were prepared by two casting processes with different cooling rates: permanent mold (PM) casting, which has a lower cooling rate of 10–20 °C/s and direct chill (DC) casting, which has a higher cooling rate of 100–110 °C/s. Then, these two types of AXM4303 alloy ingots were hot extruded at 400 °C under the same conditions. The microstructures of the as-cast and extruded alloy samples were systematically investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) systems. The effects of the different cooling rates during the casting process on the microstructures and mechanical properties of the extruded AXM4303 alloy samples were evaluated. The results show that the strength of the extruded Mg–Al–Ca–Mn alloy can be substantially increased by microstructural control during the casting process. Because the cooling rate of the DC casting process is much faster than the cooling rate of PM casting, the DC-cast AXM4303 has the following properties: (i) the lamellar eutectic structure and dendrite cell size are significantly refined, (ii) the ordered monolayer GP zones enriched with Al and Ca nucleate with no growth, and (iii) most of the Mn remains in solution in the matrix. Thus, after hot extrusion, the DC-cast AXM4303 has finer dynamically recrystallized (DRXed) grain size, finer and more uniformly distributed fragmented eutectic particles, finer planar Al 2 Ca precipitates

  6. Influence of the post-annealing cooling rate on the superconducting and mechanical properties of LFZ textured Bi-2212 rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natividad, E; Gomez, J A; Angurel, L A; Salazar, A; Pastor, J Y; Llorca, J

    2002-01-01

    Laser floating zone textured Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ (Bi-2212) thin rods were manufactured and subjected to a two-step annealing process at 870 deg C and 801 deg C in air. It was found that the subsequent cooling process led to marked changes in electrical properties. Three cooling rates were tested: (i) quenching in liquid nitrogen, (ii) cooling in air inside an alumina tube and (iii) cooling inside the furnace. The results showed that the faster the cooling rate, the higher the normal state resistivity. The T c distribution across the rods was also affected by the cooling rate, but no large differences were observed in the magnitude of the critical current at 77 K since the homogeneity of furnace-cooled samples compensated for the higher outer J c values of fast-cooled ones. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and flexure strength) were not influenced by the cooling rate, but the samples quenched in liquid nitrogen were often cracked by thermal shock. The elastic modulus and the flexure strength of the rods were deteriorated by the existence of an outer ring of compact, poorly textured material and by the large bubbles found in the central region of the rod. Samples processed by a two-step texturing process which reduced the thickness of the outer ring and eliminated the bubbles had better electrical and mechanical properties

  7. Influence of the post-annealing cooling rate on the superconducting and mechanical properties of LFZ textured Bi-2212 rods

    CERN Document Server

    Natividad, E; Angurel, L A; Salazar, A; Pastor, J Y; Llorca, J

    2002-01-01

    Laser floating zone textured Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 sub + subdelta (Bi-2212) thin rods were manufactured and subjected to a two-step annealing process at 870 deg C and 801 deg C in air. It was found that the subsequent cooling process led to marked changes in electrical properties. Three cooling rates were tested: (i) quenching in liquid nitrogen, (ii) cooling in air inside an alumina tube and (iii) cooling inside the furnace. The results showed that the faster the cooling rate, the higher the normal state resistivity. The T sub c distribution across the rods was also affected by the cooling rate, but no large differences were observed in the magnitude of the critical current at 77 K since the homogeneity of furnace-cooled samples compensated for the higher outer J sub c values of fast-cooled ones. The mechanical properties (elastic modulus and flexure strength) were not influenced by the cooling rate, but the samples quenched in liquid nitrogen were often cracked by thermal shock. The elastic m...

  8. Effect of solution cooling rate on the γ' precipitation behaviors of a Ni-base P/M superalloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on the cooling "/' precipitation behaviors was investigated in a Ni-base powder/metallurgy (P/M)superalioy (FGH4096).The empirical equations were established between the cooling rate and the average sizes of secondary and tertiary γ' precipitates within grains and tertiary γ' precipitates at grain boundaries,as well as the apparent width of grain boundaries.The results show that the average sizes of secondary or tertiary γ' precipitates are inversely correlated with the cooling rate.The shape of secondary γ' precipitates within grains changes from butterfly-like to spherical with the increase of cooling rate,but all the tertiary γ' precipitates formed are spherical in shape.It is also found that tertiary γ' may be precipitated in the latter part of the cooling cycle only if the cooling rate is not faster than 4.3℃/s,and the apparent width of grain boundaries decreases linearly with the increase of cooling rate.

  9. Saving energy in ventilation cooling towers. Optimization by control; Energieeinsparung bei Ventilatorkuehltuermen. Optimierung durch Regelung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnell, Wolf-Dieter [Ingenieurbuero fuer Energietechnik, Langenargen/Bodensee (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Industrial-scale users of cooling water use bigger and higher natural-draught cooling towers to improve recirculation cooling. Smaller and medium-sized consumers as a rule use ventilation cooling towers.The market offers a wide choice of efficient products. At the same time, competition enforces savings so that often these ventilation cooling towers have no control option. However, optimum operation in the winter season necessitates variable air supply which is also a cost factor that can help to compensate the higher cost incurred in other seasons. (orig.)

  10. Nonlinear MIMO Control of a Continuous Cooling Crystallizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alberto Quintana-Hernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a feedback control algorithm was developed based on geometric control theory. A nonisothermal seeded continuous crystallizer model was used to test the algorithm. The control objectives were the stabilization of the third moment of the crystal size distribution (μ3 and the crystallizer temperature (T; the manipulated variables were the stirring rate and the coolant flow rate. The nonlinear control (NLC was tested at operating conditions established within the metastable zone. Step changes of magnitudes ±0.0015 and ±0.5°C were introduced into the set point values of the third moment and crystallizer temperature, respectively. In addition, a step change of ±1°C was introduced as a disturbance in the feeding temperature. Closed-loop stability was analyzed by calculating the eigenvalues of the internal dynamics. The system presented a stable dynamic behavior when the operation conditions maintain the crystallizer concentration within the metastable zone. Closed-loop simulations with the NLC were compared with simulations that used a classic PID controller. The PID controllers were tuned by minimizing the integral of the absolute value of the error (IAE criterion. The results showed that the NLC provided a suitable option for continuous crystallization control. For all analyzed cases, the IAEs obtained with NLC were smaller than those obtained with the PID controller.

  11. Tolerance of brown bear spermatozoa to conditions of pre-freezing cooling rate and equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Urueña, E; Alvarez, M; Gomes-Alves, S; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Borragan, S; Anel-López, L; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2014-06-01

    Specific protocols for the cryopreservation of endangered Cantabrian brown bear spermatozoa are critical to create a genetic resource bank. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cooling rates and equilibration time before freezing on post-thawed brown bear spermatozoa quality. Electroejaculates from 11 mature bears were extended to 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL in a TES-Tris-Fructose-based extender, cryopreserved following performance of the respective cooling/equilibration protocol each sample was assigned to, and stored at -196 °C for further assessment. Before freezing, after thawing, and after 1 hour's incubation post-thawing at 37 °C (thermal stress test), the quality of the samples was assessed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis, and for viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate /propidium iodide), and sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by flow cytometry. In experiment 1, three cooling rates (0.25 °C/min, 1 °C/min, and 4 °C/min) to 5 °C were assessed. After thawing, total motility (%TM) was higher and percentage of damaged acrosomes (%dACR) was lower (P bear sperm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  13. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  14. Effects of the Cooling Rate After Annealing Treatment on the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Gi-Hyoun; Park, Yong-Ho; Na, Young-Sang; Yoo, Wee-Do; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the cooling rate after heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 2507 duplex stainless steels. Heat treatment was carried out at 1050°C for 1 hr, followed by controlled cooling. The cooling rates were 175.6 × 10 - 3°C/s, 47.8 × 10 - 3°C/s, 33.3 × 10 - 3°C/s, 16.7 × 10 - 3°C/s, 11.7 × 10 - 3°C/s, 5.8 × 10 - 3°C/s and 2.8 × 10 - 3°C/s, which resulted in variations of the microstructure, such as the fractional change of the ferrite phase and sigma phase formation. Fatigue, hardness, impact and tensile tests were performed on the specimens with different cooling rates. The precipitation of the σ phase caused a hardness increase and a sharp decrease of toughness and tensile elongation. The fatigue limit of the sample with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10 - 3°C/s was 26 MPa higher than that of the sample with a cooling rate of 175.6 × 10 - 3°C/s. Our observations of the fracture surface confirmed that the higher fatigue resistance of the specimen with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10 - 3°C/s was caused by the delay of the fatigue crack growth, in addition to higher yield strength.

  15. Effects of the Cooling Rate After Annealing Treatment on the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Gi-Hyoun; Park, Yong-Ho [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Na, Young-Sang; Yoo, Wee-Do; Lee, Jong-Hoon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the cooling rate after heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 2507 duplex stainless steels. Heat treatment was carried out at 1050°C for 1 hr, followed by controlled cooling. The cooling rates were 175.6 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 47.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 33.3 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 16.7 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 11.7 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, 5.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s and 2.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s, which resulted in variations of the microstructure, such as the fractional change of the ferrite phase and sigma phase formation. Fatigue, hardness, impact and tensile tests were performed on the specimens with different cooling rates. The precipitation of the σ phase caused a hardness increase and a sharp decrease of toughness and tensile elongation. The fatigue limit of the sample with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s was 26 MPa higher than that of the sample with a cooling rate of 175.6 × 10{sup -}3°C/s. Our observations of the fracture surface confirmed that the higher fatigue resistance of the specimen with a cooling rate of 5.8 × 10{sup -}3°C/s was caused by the delay of the fatigue crack growth, in addition to higher yield strength.

  16. Effectiveness of Ti-micro alloying in relation to cooling rate on corrosion of AZ91 Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candan, S.; Celik, M.; Candan, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, micro Ti-alloyed AZ91 Mg alloys (AZ91 + 0.5wt.%Ti) have been investigated in order to clarify effectiveness of micro alloying and/or cooling rate on their corrosion properties. Molten alloys were solidified under various cooling rates by using four stage step mold. The microstructural investigations were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion behaviors of the alloys were evaluated by means of immersion and electrochemical polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. Results showed that the Mg 17 Al 12 (β) intermetallic phase in the microstructure of AZ91 Mg alloy formed as a net-like structure. The Ti addition has reduced the distribution and continuity of β intermetallic phase and its morphology has emerged as fully divorced eutectic. Compared to AZ91 alloy, the effect of the cooling rate in Ti-added alloy on the grain size was less pronounced. When AZ91 and its Ti-added alloys were compared under the same cooling conditions, the Ti addition showed notably high corrosion resistance. Electrochemical test results showed that while I corr values of AZ91 decrease with the increase in the cooling rate, the effect of the cooling rate on I corr values was much lower in the Ti-added alloy. The corrosion resistance of AZ91 Mg alloy was sensitive towards the cooling rates while Ti-added alloy was not affected much from the cooling conditions. - Highlights: • Effect the cooling rate on grain size was less pronounced in the Ti-added alloy. • The morphology of the β phase transformed into fully divorced eutectics. • Ti addition exhibited significantly higher corrosion resistance. • Ti micro alloying is more effective than faster cooling of the alloy on corrosion.

  17. Cooling curve analysis in binary Al-Cu alloys: Part II- Effect of Cooling Rate and Grain Refinement on The Thermal and Thermodynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehnavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Al-Cu alloys have been widely used in aerospace, automobile, and airplane applications. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys for grain refinement. The cooling curve analysis (CCA has been used extensively in metal casting industry to predict microstructure constituents, grain refinement and to calculate the latent heat of solidification. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling rate and grain refinement on the thermal and thermodynamic characteristics of Al-Cu alloys by cooling curve analysis. To do this, Al-Cu alloys containing 3.7, and 4.8 wt.% Cu were melted and solidified with 0.04, 0.19, 0.42, and 1.08 K/s cooling rates. The temperature of the samples was recorded using a K thermocouple and a data acquisition system connected to a PC. Some samples were Grain refined by Al-5Ti-1B to see the effect of grain refinement on the aforementioned properties. The results show that, in a well refined alloy, nucleation will occur in a shorter time, and a undercooling approximately decreases to zero. The other results show that, with considering the cooling rate being around 0.1 °C/s, the Newtonian method is efficient in calculating the latent heat of solidification.

  18. Impact of irrigation flow rate and intrapericardial fluid on cooled-tip epicardial radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryana, Arash; O'Neill, Padraig Gearoid; Pujara, Deep K; Singh, Steve K; Bowers, Mark R; Allen, Shelley L; d'Avila, André

    2016-08-01

    The optimal irrigation flow rate (IFR) during epicardial radiofrequency (RF) ablation has not been established. This study specifically examined the impact of IFR and intrapericardial fluid (IPF) accumulation during epicardial RF ablation. Altogether, 452 ex vivo RF applications (10 g for 60 seconds) delivered to the epicardial surface of bovine myocardium using 3 open-irrigated ablation catheters (ThermoCool SmartTouch, ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF, and FlexAbility) and 50 in vivo RF applications delivered (ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF) in 4 healthy adult swine in the presence or absence of IPF were examined. Ex vivo, RF was delivered at low (≤3 mL/min), reduced (5-7 mL/min), and high (≥10 mL/min) IFRs using intermediate (25-35 W) and high (35-45 W) power. In vivo, applications were delivered (at 9.3 ± 2.2 g for 60 seconds at 39 W) using reduced (5 mL/min) and high (15 mL/min) IFRs. Ex vivo, surface lesion diameter inversely correlated with IFR, whereas maximum lesion diameter and depth did not differ. While steam pops occurred more frequently at low IFR using high power (ThermoCool SmartTouch and ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF), tissue disruption was rare and did not vary with IFR. In vivo, charring/steam pop was not detected. Although there were no discernible differences in lesion size with IFR, surface lesion diameter, maximum diameter, depth, and volume were all smaller in the presence of IPF at both IFRs. Cooled-tip epicardial RF ablation created using reduced IFRs (5-7 mL/min) yields lesion sizes similar to those created using high IFRs (≥10 mL/min) without an increase in steam pop/tissue disruption, whereas the presence of IPF significantly reduces the lesion size. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of bovine cloned embryos with donor cells frozen at a slow cooling rate in a conventional freezer (20 C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, L.; Gomez, M.C.; Jenkins, J.A.; Leibo, S.P.; Wirtu, G.; Dresser, B.L.; Pope, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Usually, fibroblasts are frozen in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, 10% v/v) at a cooling rate of 1 C/min in a low-temperature (80 C) freezer (LTF) before storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2); however, a LTF is not always available. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate apoptosis and viability of bovine fibroblasts frozen in a LTF or conventional freezer (CF; 20 C) and their subsequent ability for development to blastocyst stage after fusion with enucleated bovine oocytes. Percentages of live cells frozen in LTF (49.5%) and CF (50.6%) were similar, but significantly less than non-frozen control (88%). In both CF and LTF, percentages of live apoptotic cells exposed to LN2 after freezing were lower (4% and 5%, respectively) as compared with unexposed cells (10% and 18%, respectively). Cells frozen in a CF had fewer cell doublings/24 h (0.45) and required more days (9.1) to reach 100% confluence at the first passage (P) after thawing and plating as compared with cells frozen in a LTF (0.96 and 4.0 days, respectively). Hypoploidy at P12 was higher than at P4 in cells frozen in either a CF (37.5% vs. 19.2%) or in a LTF (30.0% vs. 15.4%). A second-generation cryo-solution reduced the incidence of necrosis (29.4%) at 0 h after thawing as compared with that of a first generation cryo-solution (DMEM + DMSO, 60.2%). The percentage of apoptosis in live cells was affected by cooling rate (CF = 1.9% vs. LFT = 0.7%). Development of bovine cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage was not affected by cooling rate or freezer type. ?? 2009 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Effects of the cooling rate on the shear behavior of continuous glass fiber/impact polypropylene composites (GF-IPP)

    KAUST Repository

    Wafai, Husam

    2016-09-20

    Fiber-reinforced composites with improved dissipation of energy during impact loading have recently been developed based on a polypropylene copolymer commonly called impact polypropylene (IPP). Composites made of IPP reinforced with glass fibers (GF) are particularly attractive to the automotive industry due to their low cost and good impact resistance. In such composites, the cooling rate varies depending on processing techniques and manufacturing choices. Here, we study the effects of the cooling rate of GF-IPP composites on shear behavior, which is critical in impact applications, using [±45]s monotonic and cyclic (load/unload) tensile specimens. The specimens were manufactured under a wide range of cooling rates (3 °C/min, 22 °C/min, 500–1000 °C/min). Mainly dominated by the properties of the matrix, the global shear behavior of GF-IPP composites differed considerably with respect to the cooling rate. However, the performance of the fiber-matrix interface (chemically modified) appeared to be unaffected by the range of cooling rates used in this study. We found that the cooling rate has a minor effect on the rate of damage accumulation, while it strongly modifies the shear-activated rate-dependant viscoelastic behavior. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Magnetic Trapping and Coherent Control of Laser-Cooled Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H. J.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Truppe, S.; Rodewald, J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate coherent microwave control of the rotational, hyperfine, and Zeeman states of ultracold CaF molecules, and the magnetic trapping of these molecules in a single, selectable quantum state. We trap about 5 ×103 molecules for almost 2 s at a temperature of 70 (8 ) μ K and a density of 1.2 ×105 cm-3. We measure the state-specific loss rate due to collisions with background helium.

  2. The Effect of Wind Velocity on the Cooling Rate of Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrey Aryan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wind velocity on the cooling rate of water was investigated by blowing air horizontally over the surface of water contained in a plastic water-bottle cap. The time taken for the temperature to fall to the average of the surrounding and initial temperatures was recorded at different values of wind velocity. It was observed that on increasing the wind velocity, the time taken to achieve average temperature not only decreased but also remained the same after a certain point.

  3. Heat generation and cooling of SSC magnets at high ramp rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snitchler, G.; Capone, D.; Kovachev, V.; Schermer, R.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will address a summary of AC loss calculations (SSCL), experimental results on cable samples (Westinghouse STC), short model magnets test results (FNAL, KEK-Japan), and recent full length magnets test data on AC losses and quench current ramp rate sensitivity (FNAL, BNL). Possible sources of the observed enhanced heat generation and quench sensitivity for some magnets will be discussed. A model for cooling conditions of magnet coils considering heat generation distribution and specific anisotropy of the heat transfer will be presented. The crossover contact resistance in cables and curing procedure influence on resistivity, currently under study, will be briefly discussed. (author)

  4. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2017-03-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  5. Operation method and operation control device for emergency core cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Tadashi [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mizutani, Akira

    1996-05-07

    The present invention provides a method of reducing continuous load capacity of an emergency cooling system of a BWR type reactor and a device reducing a rated capacity of an emergency power source facility. Namely, the emergency core cooling system comprises a first cooling system having a plurality of power source systems based on a plurality of emergency power sources and a second cooling system having a remaining heat removing function. In this case, when the first cooling system is operated the manual starting under a predetermined condition that an external power source loss event should occur, a power source division different from the first cooling system shares the operation to operate the secondary cooling system simultaneously. Further, the first cooling system is constituted as a high pressure reactor core water injection system and the second cooling system is constituted as a remaining heat removing system. With such a constitution, a high pressure reactor core water injection system for manual starting and a remaining heat removing system of different power source division can be operated simultaneously before automatic operation of the emergency core cooling system upon loss of external power source of a nuclear power plant. (I.S.)

  6. Parametrization of the average ionization and radiative cooling rates of carbon plasmas in a wide range of density and temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Gil de la Fe, Juan Miguel; Rodriguez Perez, Rafael; Florido, Ricardo; Garcia Rubiano, Jesus; Mendoza, M.A.; Nuez, A. de la; Espinosa, G.; Martel Escobar, Carlos; Mínguez Torres, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the influence of the thermodynamic regime on the monochromatic emissivity, the radiative power loss and the radiative cooling rate for optically thin carbon plasmas over a wide range of electron temperature and density assuming steady state situations. Furthermore, we propose analytical expressions depending on the electron density and temperature for the average ionization and cooling rate based on polynomial fittings which are valid for the whole range...

  7. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  8. Analysis of transient and hysteresis behavior of cross-flow heat exchangers under variable fluid mass flow rate for data center cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Tianyi; Murray, Bruce; Sammakia, Bahgat

    2015-01-01

    Effective thermal management of data centers is an important aspect of reducing the energy required for the reliable operation of data processing and communications equipment. Liquid and hybrid (air/liquid) cooling approaches are becoming more widely used in today's large and complex data center facilities. Examples of these approaches include rear door heat exchangers, in-row and overhead coolers and direct liquid cooled servers. Heat exchangers are primary components of liquid and hybrid cooling systems, and the effectiveness of a heat exchanger strongly influences the thermal performance of a cooling system. Characterizing and modeling the dynamic behavior of heat exchangers is important for the design of cooling systems, especially for control strategies to improve energy efficiency. In this study, a dynamic thermal model is solved numerically in order to predict the transient response of an unmixed–unmixed crossflow heat exchanger, of the type that is widely used in data center cooling equipment. The transient response to step and ramp changes in the mass flow rate of both the hot and cold fluid is investigated. Five model parameters are varied over specific ranges to characterize the transient performance. The parameter range investigated is based on available heat exchanger data. The thermal response to the magnitude, time period and initial and final conditions of the transient input functions is studied in detail. Also, the hysteresis associated with the fluid mass flow rate variation is investigated. The modeling results and performance data are used to analyze specific dynamic performance of heat exchangers used in practical data center cooling applications. - Highlights: • The transient performance of a crossflow heat exchanger was modeled and studied. • This study provides design information for data center thermal management. • The time constant metric was used to study the impacts of many variable inputs. • The hysteresis behavior

  9. Diffusively cooled thin-sheath high-repetition-rate TEA and TEMA lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsiv, Shaul; Gabay, Amnon; Sintov, Yoav

    1993-05-01

    Transverse electric atmospheric (TEA), or multi atmospheric (TEMA) lasers deliver intense short laser pulses of considerable energies. Recurrent high repetition rate pulse trains afford substantial average power levels. In a high rep-rate operation the gas flows across the cavity and is externally cooled to maintain a reasonably low temperature. The gas flow gear and heat exchanger are bulky and costly. In this work we present a repetitively pulsed TEA or TEMA laser that combines energy and peak power features in an individual pulse with the substantial average power levels of a pulse train in a thin layer of gas. Excess heat is disposed of, by conduction through the gas, to cooled enclosing walls. The gas does not flow. The method applies to vibrational transition molecular lasers in the infrared, where elevated temperatures are deleterious to the laser operation. The gist of the method draws on the law that heat conductivity in gases does not depend on their pressure. The fact lends unique operational flexibility and compactness, desirable for industrial and research purposes.

  10. Effect of HIP temperature and cooling rate on microstructure and hardness of joints for ODS-RAFM steels and JLF-1 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Haiying; Nagasaka, Takuya; Muroga, Takeo; Kimura, Akihiko; Ukai, Shigeharu

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilar-metal joints between ODS-RAFM (oxide-dispersion-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic) steels and JLF-1 steel were fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1000 - 1100degC with a cooling rate of 5degC/min. After the HIP, it was always quenched martensite for JLF-1 steel. However, coarse precipitates were found in 9Cr-ODS. Additional annealing experiments to simulate HIP conditions were conducted for 9Cr-ODS with cooling rate ranged from 0.5 to 36degC/min at 800 - 1100degC. The results showed that, to form quenched martensite for 9Cr-ODS, the HIP temperature should be above 1000degC with cooling rate no less than 25dgeC/min. When the cooling rate is increased to 36degC/min, the microstructure of 9Cr-ODS is quenched martensite with precipitate size similar as that before HIP. If the limitation of precipitate size in 9Cr-ODS is 0.2 µm, HIP temperature above 1050degC with cooling rate no less than 30degC/min is needed. In this case, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) with only tempering is necessary to recover the microstructure of 9Cr-ODS to tempered martensite. For 12Cr-ODS, the HIP temperature and cooling rate has no effect on hardness and precipitate size. PWHT is not necessary for the single-metal joint of 12Cr-ODS from the view point of precipitation control. However, for the dissimilar-metal joints between ODS-RAFM steels and JLF-1 steel, the PWHT condition should be comprehensively determined by considering microstructural evolution of each part in the joints after HIP. (author)

  11. Influence of different cooling rates on the microstructure of the HAZ and welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Shuhui, E-mail: shzheng@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Wu Qingsheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Huang Qunying [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Liu Shaojun; Han Yangyang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2011-10-15

    The evolution of microstructure in the weld HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) under welding thermal cycle was simulated by Gleeble-1500. The microstructures and properties of HAZ at different cooling rates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness test. The results showed that when the cooling rates ranged from 3600 K/min to 60 K/min, fully martensitic transformations were achieved, and the cooling rates had little influence on the microstructure and microhardness of martensite. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite was 60 K/min. When the cooling rates ranged from 60 K/min to 1 K/min, the microhardness of the HAZ began to decrease due to the presence of ferrite, and the lath sizes grew up to 0.13-0.15 {mu}m. The critical cooling rate to gain fully ferrite was found to be slower than 1 K/min. The welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel was constructed and it showed that there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of HAZ and became an important tool to evaluate weldability of CLAM steel.

  12. Influence of different cooling rates on the microstructure of the HAZ and welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Shuhui; Wu Qingsheng; Huang Qunying; Liu Shaojun; Han Yangyang

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in the weld HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) under welding thermal cycle was simulated by Gleeble-1500. The microstructures and properties of HAZ at different cooling rates were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness test. The results showed that when the cooling rates ranged from 3600 K/min to 60 K/min, fully martensitic transformations were achieved, and the cooling rates had little influence on the microstructure and microhardness of martensite. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite was 60 K/min. When the cooling rates ranged from 60 K/min to 1 K/min, the microhardness of the HAZ began to decrease due to the presence of ferrite, and the lath sizes grew up to 0.13-0.15 μm. The critical cooling rate to gain fully ferrite was found to be slower than 1 K/min. The welding CCT diagram of CLAM steel was constructed and it showed that there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of HAZ and became an important tool to evaluate weldability of CLAM steel.

  13. The rate of diffusion into advanced gas cooled reactor moderator bricks: an equivalent cylinder model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyte, W.S.

    1980-01-01

    The graphite moderator bricks which make up the moderator of an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor (AGR) are of many different and complex shapes. Many physico-chemical processes that occur within these porous bricks include a diffusional step and thus to model these processes it is necessary to solve the diffusion equation (with chemical reaction) in a porous medium of complex shape. A finite element technique is applied to calculating the rate at which nitrogen diffuses into and out of the porous moderator graphite during operation of a shutdown procedure for an AGR. However, the finite element method suffers from several disadvantages that undermine its general usefulness for calculating rates of diffusion in AGR moderator cores. A model which overcomes some of these disadvantages is presented (the equivalent cylinder model) and it is shown that this gives good results for a variety of different boundary and initial conditions

  14. Cold-Water Immersion Cooling Rates in Football Linemen and Cross-Country Runners With Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godek, Sandra Fowkes; Morrison, Katherine E; Scullin, Gregory

    2017-10-01

      Ideal and acceptable cooling rates in hyperthermic athletes have been established in average-sized participants. Football linemen (FBs) have a small body surface area (BSA)-to-mass ratio compared with smaller athletes, which hinders heat dissipation.   To determine cooling rates using cold-water immersion in hyperthermic FBs and cross-country runners (CCs).   Cohort study.   Controlled university laboratory.   Nine FBs (age = 21.7 ± 1.7 years, height = 188.7 ± 4 cm, mass = 128.1 ± 18 kg, body fat = 28.9% ± 7.1%, lean body mass [LBM] = 86.9 ± 19 kg, BSA = 2.54 ± 0.13 m 2 , BSA/mass = 201 ± 21.3 cm 2 /kg, and BSA/LBM = 276.4 ± 19.7 cm 2 /kg) and 7 CCs (age = 20 ± 1.8 years, height = 176 ± 4.1 cm, mass = 68.7 ± 6.5 kg, body fat = 10.2% ± 1.6%, LBM = 61.7 ± 5.3 kg, BSA = 1.84 ± 0.1 m 2 , BSA/mass = 268.3 ± 11.7 cm 2 /kg, and BSA/LBM = 298.4 ± 11.7 cm 2 /kg).   Participants ingested an intestinal sensor, exercised in a climatic chamber (39°C, 40% relative humidity) until either target core temperature (T gi ) was 39.5°C or volitional exhaustion was reached, and were immediately immersed in a 10°C circulated bath until T gi declined to 37.5°C. A general linear model repeated-measures analysis of variance and independent t tests were calculated, with P LBM/mass (r = 0.72, P LBM (r = -0.72, P 11 minutes) than smaller, leaner athletes (7.7 minutes). Cooling rates varied widely from 0.332°C·min -1 in a small runner to only 0.101°C·min -1 in a lineman, supporting the use of rectal temperature for monitoring during cooling.

  15. Rate control for electron gun evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellingerhout, A.J.G.; Janocko, M.A.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Mooij, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Principles for obtaining high-quality rate control for electron gun evaporation are discussed. The design criteria for rate controllers are derived from this analysis. Results are presented which have been obtained with e-guns whose evaporation rate is controlled by a Wehnelt electrode or by sweeping of the electron beam. Further improvements of rate stability can be obtained by improved design of e-guns and power supplies

  16. Influence of cooling rates on the transformation behaviour of 9Cr-1Mo-0.07C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Raghunathan, V.S.

    1992-01-01

    The choice of various decomposition mechanisms of austenite in a 9Cr-1 Mo-0.07C steel under different rates of cooling has been studied. The techniques employed were electron probe micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The observed morphological features may be explained based on the predominance of the two types of transformation, austenite → martensite and austenite → ferrite during cooling. In the steel used in this study, decomposition of austenite to proeutectoid ferrite was favoured at cooling rates less than about 2 Ks -1 . The mechanism by which the supersaturated proeutectoid ferrite relieves its excess solute concentration was also studied. A ''microstructural map'' has been proposed to predict the constitution at the end of any given cooling rate for 9Cr-1 Mo-0.07C steel. The choice of commercial treatment has been rationalized with respect to the resultant microstructural constituents. (Author)

  17. Simulation of the fuzzy-smith control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Deheng; Xu Xiaolin; Zheng Jie; Guo Renjun; Zhang Guifen

    1997-01-01

    The Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller to solve the control of the big delay system is developed, accompanied with the development of the mathematical model of the 10 MW high temperature gas cooled test reactor (HTR-10) and the design of its control system. The simulation results show the Fuzzy-Smith pre-estimate controller has the advantages of both fuzzy control and Smith pre-estimate controller; it has better compensation to the delay and better adaptability to the parameter change of the control object. So it is applicable to the design of the control system for the high temperature gas cooled reactor

  18. Analysis of isothermal and cooling rate dependent immersion freezing by a unifying stochastic ice nucleation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    Immersion freezing is an important ice nucleation pathway involved in the formation of cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Laboratory immersion freezing experiments are necessary to determine the range in temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at which ice nucleation occurs and to quantify the associated nucleation kinetics. Typically, isothermal (applying a constant temperature) and cooling rate dependent immersion freezing experiments are conducted. In these experiments it is usually assumed that the droplets containing ice nuclei (IN) all have the same IN surface area (ISA), however the validity of this assumption or the impact it may have on analysis and interpretation of the experimental data is rarely questioned. A stochastic immersion freezing model based on first principles of statistics is presented, which accounts for variable ISA per droplet and uses physically observable parameters including the total number of droplets (Ntot) and the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet(T). This model is applied to address if (i) a time and ISA dependent stochastic immersion freezing process can explain laboratory immersion freezing data for different experimental methods and (ii) the assumption that all droplets contain identical ISA is a valid conjecture with subsequent consequences for analysis and interpretation of immersion freezing. The simple stochastic model can reproduce the observed time and surface area dependence in immersion freezing experiments for a variety of methods such as: droplets on a cold-stage exposed to air or surrounded by an oil matrix, wind and acoustically levitated droplets, droplets in a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC), the Leipzig aerosol cloud interaction simulator (LACIS), and the aerosol interaction and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber. Observed time dependent isothermal frozen fractions exhibiting non-exponential behavior with time can be readily explained by this model considering varying ISA. An

  19. Recycle flow rate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumida, Susumu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Oka, Yoko.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To attain stable low hydraulic power operation with no abnormal changes in the reactor water level by smoothly varying the speed control for the recycling pump for regulating the reactor core flowrate in BWR type reactors. Constitution: In a recycling control system equipped with an internal pump having a response characteristic higher by ten and several times or more than that of prior pump, a previously programed recycling run-back signal is inputted to a speed regulator upon load interruption of the electric generator to thereby control the operation of the internal pump driving motor such that the speed is decreased rapidly at the initial state and smoothly thereafter. The run-back singal is passed through a primary delay circuit so that the interruption of the motor operation does not directly performed by the signal interruption upon failure. As the result, the amount of void produced is also made smooth and the reactor water level varies smoothly as well, whereby the reactor power can be reduced with a sufficient margin. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. The effects of radiant cooling versus convective cooling on human eye tear film stability and blinking rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Linette; Uth, Simon C.; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    2014-01-01

    The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation. The subj......The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation....... The subjects participated in four two-hour experiments. The room air temperature was kept at 26 °C or 28 °C. Tear film samples were collected after 30 min of acclimatisation and at the end of the exposures. Eye blinking frequency was analysed for the first and last 15 min of each exposure. The tear film...... stability decreased as the temperature increased. The highest number of subjects with unchanged or improved tear film quality was observed with the localised chilled beam at 26 °C. A trend was found between subjects who reported eye irritation and had a bad tear film quality....

  1. A novel optical freezing array for the examination of cooling rate dependence in heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budke, Carsten; Dreischmeier, Katharina; Koop, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Homogeneous ice nucleation is a stochastic process, implying that it is not only temperature but also time dependent. For heterogeneous ice nucleation it is still under debate whether there is a significant time dependence or not. In case of minor time dependence it is probably sufficient to use a singular or slightly modified singular approach, which mainly supposes temperature dependence and just small stochastic variations. We contribute to this discussion using a novel optical freezing array termed BINARY (Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY). The setup consists of an array of microliter-sized droplets on a Peltier cooling stage. The droplets are separated from each other with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) spacer to prevent a Bergeron-Findeisen process, in which the first freezing droplets grow at the expense of the remaining liquid ones due to their vapor pressure differences. An automatic detection of nucleation events is realized optically by the change in brightness during freezing. Different types of ice nucleating agents were tested with the presented setup, e. g. pollen and clay mineral dust. Exemplarily, cooling rate dependent measurements are shown for the heterogeneous ice nucleation induced by Snomax®. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG) through the project BIOCLOUDS (KO 2944/1-1) and through the research unit INUIT (FOR 1525) under KO 2944/2-1. We particularly thank our INUIT partners for fruitful collaboration and sharing of ideas and IN samples.

  2. Corrosion control when using passively treated abandoned mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Li, Heng; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-09-01

    Passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of abandoned mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloramine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

  3. Late Paleozoic-Middle Mesozoic uplift rate, cooling rate and geothermal gradient for south-central New York state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Apatite and zircon crystals were recovered from the Tioga metabentonite (Middle Devonian) at Cherry Valley, New York and from a metabentonite at the top of the Black River Group (Middle Ordovician) at Middleville, New York. Fission-track ages obtained from these minerals are younger than the stratigraphic ages of the units, indicating total or partial resetting of the mineral ages due to thermal annealing of fission-tracks. The age data allow for calculation of a mean uplift rate of 0.019 +- 0.009 mm/yr for the interval 193 to 155 Myr, and a mean cooling rate of 0.38 +- 0.11 0 C/Myr for the interval 354 to 155 Myr. An average geothermal gradient for the interval 354 to 155 Myr is 20 +- 11 C/km. The partially reset zircon age from the Black River metabentonite indicates that the Middle Ordovician rocks of south-central New York have been exposed to temperatures approaching approx. 175 C. This temperature, in conjunction with the calculated geothermal gradient, implies burial of these units to depths approaching 8 km. Such burial suggests that extensive Carboniferous sediments once covered southern New York, and that the Alleghenian Orogeny had a stronger sedimentalogical influence in the northern portion of the Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. (author)

  4. Active Control of Transverse Jets for Film Cooling Applications: A Limited Statement of Work

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikitopoulos, D. E

    2006-01-01

    .... A theoretical analysis was conducted and mechanisms that can play a defining role in film cooling control were identified on the basis of fundamental fluid-dynamics, prior experiments and preliminary...

  5. An Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Concept Using Uranium-Free Metallic Fuels for Maximizing TRU Burning Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuseong You

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we designed and analyzed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor cores using uranium-free metallic fuels for maximizing burning rate of transuranics (TRU nuclides from PWR spent fuels. It is well known that the removal of fertile nuclides such as 238U from fuels in liquid metal cooled fast reactor leads to the degradation of important safety parameters such as the Doppler coefficient, coolant void worth, and delayed neutron fraction. To resolve the degradation of the Doppler coefficient, we considered adding resonant nuclides to the uranium-free metallic fuels. The analysis results showed that the cores using uranium-free fuels loaded with tungsten instead of uranium have a significantly lower burnup reactivity swing and more negative Doppler coefficients than the core using uranium-free fuels without resonant nuclides. In addition, we considered the use of axially central B4C absorber region and moderator rods to further improve safety parameters such as sodium void worth, burnup reactivity swing, and the Doppler coefficient. The results of the analysis showed that the final design core can consume ~353 kg per cycle and satisfies self-controllability under unprotected accidents. The fuel cycle analysis showed that the PWR–SFR coupling fuel cycle option drastically reduces the amount of waste going to repository and the SFR burner can consume the amount of TRUs discharged from 3.72 PWRs generating the same electricity.

  6. Automatic control of human thermal comfort with a liquid-cooled garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetz, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    Water cooling in a liquid-cooled garment is used to maintain the thermal comfort of crewmembers during extravehicular activity. The feasibility of a simple control that will operate automatically to maintain the thermal comfort is established. Data on three test subjects are included to support the conclusion that heat balance can be maintained well within allowable medical limits. The controller concept was also successfully demonstrated for ground-based applications and shows potential for any tasks involving the use of liquid-cooled garments.

  7. Thermal History of CBb Chondrules and Cooling Rate Distributions of Ejecta Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewins, R. H.; Condie, C.; Morris, M.; Richardson, M. L. A.; Ouellette, N.; Metcalf, M.

    2018-03-01

    It has been proposed that some meteorites, CB and CH chondrites, contain material formed as a result of a protoplanetary collision during accretion. Their melt droplets (chondrules) and FeNi metal are proposed to have formed by evaporation and condensation in the resulting impact plume. We observe that the skeletal olivine (SO) chondrules in CBb chondrites have a blebby texture and an enrichment in refractory elements not found in normal chondrules. Because the texture requires complete melting, their maximum liquidus temperature of 1928 K represents a minimum temperature for the putative plume. Dynamic crystallization experiments show that the SO texture can be created only by brief reheating episodes during crystallization, giving a partial dissolution of olivine. The ejecta plume formed in a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation served as the basis for 3D modeling with the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH4.3. Tracer particles that move with the fluid cells are used to measure the in situ cooling rates. Their cooling rates are ∼10,000 K hr‑1 briefly at peak temperature and, in the densest regions of the plume, ∼100 K hr‑1 for 1400–1600 K. A small fraction of cells is seen to be heating at any one time, with heating spikes explained by the compression of parcels of gas in a heterogeneous patchy plume. These temperature fluctuations are comparable to those required in crystallization experiments. For the first time, we find an agreement between experiments and models that supports the plume model specifically for the formation of CBb chondrules.

  8. Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation : Successful and Failed Strict Rate Control Against a Background of Lenient Rate Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenveld, Hessel F.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Hillege, Hans L.; Alings, Marco; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate differences in outcome between patients treated with successful strict, failed strict, and lenient rate control. Background The RACE II (Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation) study showed no difference in outcome between lenient and

  9. Measurement of the radiative cooling rates for high-ionization species of krypton using an electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R.; Biedermann, C.; Fuchs, T.; Fussmann, G.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a measurement of the radiative cooling rate for krypton made at the Berlin electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT was tuned to a charge-state distribution approaching the ionization balance of a plasma at a temperature of about 5 keV. To determine the cooling rate, we made use of EBIT's capabilities to sample a wide range of electron-beam energies and distinguish between different radiation channels. We have measured the x-ray emission from bremsstrahlung, radiative recombination, dielectronic recombination, and line radiation following electron-impact excitation. The dominant contribution to the cooling rate is made by the n=3-2, n=4-2,... x rays of the L-shell spectra of krypton, which produce more than 75% of the total radiation loss. A difference with theoretical calculations is noted for the measured total cooling rate. The predicted values are lower by a factor of 1.5-2, depending on the theoretical model. For our measurement of the cooling rate, we estimate an uncertainty interval of 22-30 %. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Effects of Controlled Cooling-Induced Ferrite-Pearlite Microstructure on the Cold Forgeability of XC45 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengliang; Chen, Lunqiang; Zhao, Zhen; Gong, Aijun; Shi, Weibing

    2018-05-01

    The combination of hot/warm and cold forging with an intermediate controlled cooling process is a promising approach to saving costs in the manufacture of automobile parts. In this work, the effects of the ferrite-pearlite microstructure, which formed after controlled cooling, on the cold forgeability of a medium-carbon steel were investigated. Different specimens for both normal and notched tensile tests were directly heated to high temperature and then cooled down at different cooling rates, producing different ferrite volume fractions, ranging from 6.69 to 40.53%, in the ferrite-pearlite microstructure. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elongation rate, percentage reduction of area, and fracture strain were measured by tensile testing. The yield strength, indicating deformation resistance, and fracture strain, indicating formability, were used to evaluate the cold forgeability. As the ferrite volume fraction increased, the cold forgeability of the dual-phase ferritic-pearlitic steel improved. A quantitatively relationship between the ferrite volume fraction and the evaluation indexes of cold forgeability for XC45 steel was obtained from the test data. To validate the mathematical relationship, different tensile specimens machined from real hot-forged workpieces were tested. There was good agreement between the predicted and measured values. Our predictions from the relationship for cold forgeability had an absolute error less than 5%, which is acceptable for industrial applications and will help to guide the design of combined forging processes.

  11. Performance Optimization of the Water Cooling System for Resonance Frequency Control of the PEFP DTL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. Y.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, H. S.; Yoon, J. C.; Sohn, Y. K.; Kweon, S. J.; Park, J.; Kim, K. S.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of in this research project is prototype cooling water skid of separated closed loop in order to supply and withdraw low conductivity deionized water in drift tube of drift tube linac as core components of proton accelerates. This report is dealt with design specification of J-PARC 400 MeV Linac cooling water system, PEFP DTL cooling system, specification of RCCS21-24, RCCS101 with pump, loss coefficient for DTL2 modeling, pressure drop with flow rate of heat exchanger.

  12. Performance test of filtering system for controlling the turbidity of secondary cooling water in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. C.; Woo, J. S.; Jo, Y. K.; Loo, J. S.; Lim, N. Y.

    2001-01-01

    There is about 80 m 3 /h loss of the secondary cooling water by evaporation, windage and blowdown during the operation of HANARO, 30 MW research reactor. When the secondary cooling water is treated by high Ca-hardness treatment program for minimizing the blowdown loss, only the trubidity exceeds the limit. By adding filtering system it was confirned, through the relation of turbidity and filtering rate of secondary cooling water, that the turbidity is reduced below the limit (5 deg.) by 2 % of filtering rate without blowdown. And it was verified, through the field performace test of filtering system under normal operation condition, that the circulation pumps get proper capacity and that filter units reduce the turbidity below the limit. Therefore, the secondary cooling water can be treated by the high Ca-hardness program and filter system without blowdown

  13. The effect of cooling rate from the γ-phase on the strain-rate sensitivity of a uranium 2 sup(w)/o molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, G.A.C.; Harding, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile tests have been performed at strain rates from 10 -4 to about 2000/s and temperatures from -150 deg C to +250 deg C on a uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy which had been aged for 2 hours at 500 deg C after a fast gas cool from the γ-phase at a controlled rate of 40 deg C/minute. The results are compared with those for standard as-extruded material which had received the same aging treatment. Stress-strain curves are presented and the effect of strain rate and temperature on the flow stress, the ultimate tensile stress and the elongation to fracture is determined. A thorough structural characterisation of the specimen materials, using X-ray analysis and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, allows the different mechanical responses to be related to the corresponding microstructural state of the material. Flow stress data at different temperatures and strain rates are analysed in terms of the theory of thermally-activated flow and estimates made of the various activation parameters. (author)

  14. ITER FW cooling by a flat channel, adapted to low flow rate and high pressure drop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, I.B.; Bondarchuk, D.E.; Gervash, A.A.; Glazunov, D.A.; Komarov, A.O.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Mazul, I.V.; Rulev, R.V.; Yablokov, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► ITER FW cooling: pressure drop quotation must be assigned according to thermal load. ► Flat channel solutions with wide range (1:500) of hydraulic resistivity are presented. ► Simulations in Ansys CFX were carried out for presented designs. ► Usage of pressure drop quotation significantly reduces surface temperature. ► Experiments in TSEFEY-M facility confirm simulations. - Abstract: Application of hypervapotron (HV) to cool in-vessel components of ITER – divertor and first wall (FW) – is characterized by the same design load (5 MW/m 2 ) but water flow rate for FW is 8–9 times (almost by order!) less for parallel feeding elements so it seems it would be better to use other design. Several variants of a flat channel design different from HV are suggested that enable to adapt a channel to pressure quota up to 1 MPa and higher. A main feature of the suggested variants is a spiral or multi-spiral stream (flat multi spiral––FMS) that improves heat rejection and can be obtained both by exciting of such mode and forced by channel geometry. Comparison of the variants was carried out in simulations (Ansys CFX) as well as in experiments on the TSEFEY-M facility with electron-beam gun. It is shown that excitation of a spiral stream in a channel significantly reduces a temperature of a loaded surface of a channel. Miniature thermocouples were used to measure temperature near the surface.

  15. Biocorrosion of mild steel and copper used in cooling tower water and its control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao Lei; Narenkumar, Jayaraman; Rajasekar, Aruliah; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2018-03-01

    The present study describes the biocorrosion of mild steel (MS1010) and pure copper (Cu) in cooling water environments (both field and lab study). Electrochemical and surface analyses of both metals were carried out to confirm the corrosion susceptibility in the presence of bacteria and inhibitor. Surface analysis of the MS and Cu coupons revealed that biofilm was developed with increasing exposure time in the field study. In the lab study, accumulation of extracellular polymeric substance over the metal surface was noticed and led to the severe pitting type of corrosion on both metal surfaces. Besides, the anti-corrosive study was carried out using the combinations of commercial corrosion inhibitor (S7653-10 ppm) with biocide (F5100-5 ppm), and the results reveal that the corrosion rate of MS and Cu was highly reduced to 0.0281 and 0.0021 mm/year (inhibitor system) than 0.1589 and 0.0177 mm/year (control system). Inhibition efficiency for both metals in the presence of inhibitor with biocide was found as 82 and 88% for MS and Cu, respectively. The present study concluded that MS was very susceptible to biocorrosion, compared to copper metal in cooling water environment. Further, the combination of the both inhibitor and biocide was effectively inhibiting the biocorrosion which was due to its antibacterial and anti-corrosive properties.

  16. Method for controlling a coolant liquid surface of cooling system instruments in an atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monta, Kazuo.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To prevent coolant inventory within a cooling system loop in an atomic power plant from being varied depending on loads thereby relieving restriction of varied speed of coolant flow rate to lowering of a liquid surface due to short in coolant. Structure: Instruments such as a superheater, an evaporator, and the like, which constitute a cooling system loop in an atomic power plant, have a plurality of free liquid surface of coolant. Portions whose liquid surface is controlled and portions whose liquid surface is varied are adjusted in cross-sectional area so that the sum total of variation in coolant inventory in an instrument such as a superheater provided with an annulus portion in the center thereof and an inner cylindrical portion and a down-comer in the side thereof comes equal to that of variation in coolant inventory in an instrument such as an evaporator similar to the superheater. which is provided with an overflow pipe in its inner cylindrical portion or down-comer, thereby minimizing variation in coolant inventory of the entire coolant due to loads thus minimizing variation in varied speed of the coolant. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. The effect of primary copper slag cooling rate on the copper valorization in the flotation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Mihajlović

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Technological procedure of slow cooling slag from primary copper production is applied in the purpose of copper recovery in the level of 98.5% to blister. This technological procedure is divided into two phases, first slow cooling of slag on the air for 24 hours, and then accelerated cooling with water for 48 hours. Within the research following methods were used: calculation of nonstationary slag cooling, verification of the calculation using computer simulation of slag cooling in the software package COMSOL Multiphysics and experimental verification of simulation results. After testing of the experimentally gained samples of slowly cooled slag it was found that this technological procedure gives the best results in promoting growth or coagulation of dispersed particles of copper sulfide and copper in the slag, thereby increasing the utilization of the flotation process with a decrease of copper losses through very fine particles.

  18. Parametrization of the average ionization and radiative cooling rates of carbon plasmas in a wide range of density and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.; Florido, R.; Rubiano, J.G.; Mendoza, M.A.; Nuez, A. de la; Espinosa, G.; Martel, P.; Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the influence of the thermodynamic regime on the monochromatic emissivity, the radiative power loss and the radiative cooling rate for optically thin carbon plasmas over a wide range of electron temperature and density assuming steady state situations. Furthermore, we propose analytical expressions depending on the electron density and temperature for the average ionization and cooling rate based on polynomial fittings which are valid for the whole range of plasma conditions considered in this work. -- Highlights: ► We compute the average ionization, cooling rates and emissivities of carbon plasmas. ► We compare LTE and NLTE calculations of these magnitudes. ► We perform a parametrization of these magnitudes in a wide range of plasma conditions. ► We provide information about where LTE regime assumption is accurate

  19. Control of dew and frost formation on leaf by radiative cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, T.; Eguchi, H.; Mori, K.

    1981-01-01

    A radiative cooling system was developed to control dew and frost formations and to examine the effect of the radiative cooling on the leaf temperature. The growth chamber was provided with a box which was constructed by using heat insulating materials to minimize the disturbances and to regulate the air current. A cooling coil (cooling surface of 300 cm was equipped at the bottom of the box and manipulated by a refrigerator of 1, 430 kcal hour -1 , and a concave mirror was attached to the ceiling of the box to facilitate the reflection of the radiation from the leaf to the cooling coil. The moisture in air was supplied by flowing the controlled air (0.2 m min -1 ) into the box. The distribution of dew point temperatures was almost uniform horizontally even under vertically slight conversion (downward velocity of 1.3 cm sec -1 ) of the air. The leaf temperature became about 1.0°C lower than the ambient air temperature under the radiative cooling. The dew and the frost were clearly observed on the leaf after the time when the leaf temperature had become lower than the dew point temperature. The dew increased in size in course of time, and the frost varied in shape and in size with the temperatures. Thus, artificial formations of the dew and the frost were made possible by the radiative cooling system developed in this experiment

  20. Influence of quenching cooling rate on residual stress and tensile properties of 2A14 aluminum alloy forgings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu-xun, E-mail: zhangyuxun198@163.com; Yi, You-ping, E-mail: yyp@csu.edu.cn; Huang, Shi-quan, E-mail: huangsqcsu@sina.com; Dong, Fei

    2016-09-30

    To balance the quenching residual stress and the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys, the influence of cooling rate on the residual stress and tensile properties was investigated by numerical simulation and quenching experiments. During the quenching experiments, 2A14 aluminum alloy samples were treated with different water temperatures (20 °C, 70 °C, 100 °C) and a step quenching process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to measure the residual stress. Prior to them, the quenching sensitivity was studied. For this purpose, the time-temperature-properties (TTP) curves were measured and the alloy microstructure was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the mechanical properties of 2A14 aluminum alloys were mainly determined by the cooling rate within the quenching sensitive temperature range from 300 to 400 °C. Lower cooling rates reduced the tensile strength and yield strength due to a decrease amount of fine precipitates, and reduced the residual stress with the reduction of plastic strain and the degree of inhomogeneous plastic deformation. In addition, the residual stress changed faster than the tensile properties with decreasing cooling rate. Therefore, warm water (70 °C) was used to balance the residual stress and tensile properties of 140-mm-thick 2A14 aluminum alloy forgings, since it can achieve low cooling rates. Furthermore, by combining this characteristic and the material quenching sensitivity, step quenching produced similar tensile properties and lower residual stress, compared with the sample quenched in warm water (70 °C), by increasing cooling rate within quenching sensitivity range and reducing it in other ranges.

  1. Influence of quenching cooling rate on residual stress and tensile properties of 2A14 aluminum alloy forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yu-xun; Yi, You-ping; Huang, Shi-quan; Dong, Fei

    2016-01-01

    To balance the quenching residual stress and the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys, the influence of cooling rate on the residual stress and tensile properties was investigated by numerical simulation and quenching experiments. During the quenching experiments, 2A14 aluminum alloy samples were treated with different water temperatures (20 °C, 70 °C, 100 °C) and a step quenching process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to measure the residual stress. Prior to them, the quenching sensitivity was studied. For this purpose, the time-temperature-properties (TTP) curves were measured and the alloy microstructure was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the mechanical properties of 2A14 aluminum alloys were mainly determined by the cooling rate within the quenching sensitive temperature range from 300 to 400 °C. Lower cooling rates reduced the tensile strength and yield strength due to a decrease amount of fine precipitates, and reduced the residual stress with the reduction of plastic strain and the degree of inhomogeneous plastic deformation. In addition, the residual stress changed faster than the tensile properties with decreasing cooling rate. Therefore, warm water (70 °C) was used to balance the residual stress and tensile properties of 140-mm-thick 2A14 aluminum alloy forgings, since it can achieve low cooling rates. Furthermore, by combining this characteristic and the material quenching sensitivity, step quenching produced similar tensile properties and lower residual stress, compared with the sample quenched in warm water (70 °C), by increasing cooling rate within quenching sensitivity range and reducing it in other ranges.

  2. Control of cooling of an oil-immersed power transformer by varying speed of fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Nikola Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a prototype system for speed control of cooling fans for a small oil-immersed 6.6 kVA transformer, implemented on a standard PLC. Generally, the potential for optimization of the cooling process depends on the accessible cooling modes and construction of the transformer; basically the aim of the cooling system control is reduction in power consumption of the fans / pumps and keeping the top-oil temperature at constant value (to reduce transformer 'breathing' and infiltration of moisture. The following constraints should be taken into account: hot-spot temperature, its current value and the one which would appear for planned overloads must not exceed the allowed limit. Based on the results in steady state, the paper offers the quantitative determination of transformer thermal characteristics depending on the fan speed.

  3. Variable cooling circuit for thermoelectric generator and engine and method of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Gregory P

    2012-10-30

    An apparatus is provided that includes an engine, an exhaust system, and a thermoelectric generator (TEG) operatively connected to the exhaust system and configured to allow exhaust gas flow therethrough. A first radiator is operatively connected to the engine. An openable and closable engine valve is configured to open to permit coolant to circulate through the engine and the first radiator when coolant temperature is greater than a predetermined minimum coolant temperature. A first and a second valve are controllable to route cooling fluid from the TEG to the engine through coolant passages under a first set of operating conditions to establish a first cooling circuit, and from the TEG to a second radiator through at least some other coolant passages under a second set of operating conditions to establish a second cooling circuit. A method of controlling a cooling circuit is also provided.

  4. Effect of Cooling Rate on Phase Transformations in a High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel Studied from the Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorin, Thomas; Stanford, Nicole; Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phase transformation and precipitation in a high-strength low-alloy steel have been studied over a large range of cooling rates, and a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram has been produced. These experiments are unique because the measurements were made from samples cooled directly from the melt, rather than in homogenized and re-heated billets. The purpose of this experimental design was to examine conditions pertinent to direct strip casting. At the highest cooling rates which simulate strip casting, the microstructure was fully bainitic with small regions of pearlite. At lower cooling rates, the fraction of polygonal ferrite increased and the pearlite regions became larger. The CCT diagram and the microstructural analysis showed that the precipitation of NbC is suppressed at high cooling rates, and is likely to be incomplete at intermediate cooling rates.

  5. Development of Intermediate Cooling Technology and Its Control for Two-Stand Plate Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a plate rolling production line, thermomechanically controlled processing is critical for plate quality. In this paper, a set of intermediate cooling equipment of a two-stand plate mill with super density nozzles, medium pressure, and small flow is developed. Based on a simplified dynamic model, a cooling control scheme with combined feedforward, feedback, and adaptive algorithms is put forward. The new controlled rolling process and the highly efficient control system improve the controlled rolling efficiency by an average of 17.66%. The proposed intermediate cooling system can also effectively inhibit the growth of austenite grain, improve the impact toughness and yield strength of Q345B steel plate, reduce the formation of secondary oxide scale on the plate surface and the chromatic aberration of the plate surface, and greatly improve the surface quality of the steel plate.

  6. Passive radiative cooling of a HTS coil for attitude orbit control in micro-spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takaya; Ozaki, Naoya; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiative cooling system for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil for an attitude orbit control system in nano- and micro-spacecraft missions. These days, nano-spacecraft (1-10 kg) and micro-spacecraft (10-100 kg) provide space access to a broader range of spacecraft developers and attract interest as space development applications. In planetary and high earth orbits, most previous standard-size spacecraft used thrusters for their attitude and orbit control, which are not available for nano- and micro-spacecraft missions because of the strict power consumption, space, and weight constraints. This paper considers orbit and attitude control methods that use a superconducting coil, which interacts with on-orbit space plasmas and creates a propulsion force. Because these spacecraft cannot use an active cooling system for the superconducting coil because of their mass and power consumption constraints, this paper proposes the utilization of a passive radiative cooling system, in which the superconducting coil is thermally connected to the 3 K cosmic background radiation of deep space, insulated from the heat generation using magnetic holders, and shielded from the sun. With this proposed cooling system, the HTS coil is cooled to 60 K in interplanetary orbits. Because the system does not use refrigerators for its cooling system, the spacecraft can achieve an HTS coil with low power consumption, small mass, and low cost.

  7. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Microstructure of Al-Zn Alloys with Addition of Silicon as Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. García-Villarreal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Al-43.5Zn-1.5Si (wt% alloys are widely used as coatings on steel substrates. This kind of coatings is manufactured by hot-dip process, in which Si is added as solid particles or master alloy. The role of Si during formation of the coating is to control the metallurgical reactions between solid steel and liquid Al-Zn-Si alloy initially forming an AlZnFeSi intermetallic layer and next the excess of Si forms intermetallic compounds, which grows over this alloy layer, segregates into the Zn rich interdendritic regions, and solidifies as eutectic reaction product as massive particles with needle like morphology. Therefore, during the experimental procedure is very difficult to control the final morphology and distribution of the silicon phase. The acicular morphology of this phase greatly affects the mechanical properties of the alloy because it acts as stress concentrators. When the coated steel sheet is subjected to bending, the coating presents huge cracks due to the presence of silicon phase. Therefore, the aim of the paper was to propose a new methodology to control the silicon phase through its addition to Al-Zn alloy as nanocomposite and additionally determine the effect of cooling rate (between 10 and 50°Cs−1 on the solidification microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn alloy.

  8. Effect of Controlled Cooling on Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Low C Nb-Ti-Containing HSLA Steel for Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-mechanical control processing (TMCP of low carbon (C Nb-Ti-containing HSLA steel with different cooling rates from 5 to 20 °C/s was simulated using a Gleeble 3500 system. The samples’ microstructure was characterized and the tensile properties measured. The results show that a microstructure mainly consisting of quasi-polygonal ferrite (QPF, granular bainitic ferrite (GBF, and martensite/austenite (M/A constituent formed in each sample. Furthermore, the accelerated cooling led to a significant grain refinement of the QPF and GBF, and an increase in the density of dislocations, as well as suppressed the precipitation of nanoscale particles; however, the overall yield strength (YS still increased obviously. The accelerated cooling also brought about a decrease in amount of M/A constituent acting as a mixed hard phase, which weakened the overall strain-hardening capacity of the QPF + GBF + M/A multiphase steel and simultaneously elevated yield-to-tensile strength ratio (YR. In addition, the mechanisms in dominating the influence of controlled cooling on the final microstructure and tensile properties were discussed.

  9. Legionella species colonization in cooling towers: risk factors and assessment of control measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Goutziana, Georgia; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2010-02-01

    Cooling towers can be colonized by Legionella spp, and inhalation of aerosols generated by their operation may cause Legionnaires' disease in susceptible hosts. Environmental investigations of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks linked with cooling towers have revealed poorly maintained systems, lack of control measures, and failure of system equipment. The purpose of this study was to identify Legionella-contaminated cooling towers, identify risk factors for contamination, and assess the effectiveness of control measures. A total of 96 cooling towers of public buildings were registered and inspected, and 130 samples were collected and microbiologically tested. Microbiological test results were associated with characteristics of cooling towers, water samples, inspection results, and maintenance practices. Of the total 96 cooling towers examined, 47 (48.9%) were colonized by Legionella spp, and 22 (22.9%) required remedial action. A total of 65 samples (50.0%) were positive (> or = 500 cfu L(-1)), and 30 (23%) were heavily contaminated (> or = 10(4) cfu L(-1)). Of the 69 isolates identified, 55 strains (79.7.%) were L pneumophila. Legionella colonization was positively associated with the absence of training on Legionella control (relative risk [RR] = 1.66; P = .02), absence of regular Legionella testing (RR = 2.07: P = .002), absence of sunlight protection (RR = 1.63: P = .02), with samples in which the free residual chlorine level in the water sample was cooling towers (median, 17 years; interquartile range [IQR] =5.0 to 26.0 years) compared with noncolonized cooling towers (median age, 6 years; IQR =1.0 to 13.5 years). After the 22 legionellae-positive cooling towers were disinfected with chlorine, 2 (9%) of them remained positive for Legionella spp with a concentration > or = 1000 cfu L(-1). Cooling towers can be heavily colonized by Legionella spp and thus present a potential risk for infection. This study demonstrates the importance of a risk assessment and

  10. Rate Control for MPEG-4 Bit Stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振洲; 李桂苓

    2003-01-01

    For a very long time video processing dealt exclusively with fixed-rate sequences of rectangular shaped images. However, interest has been recently moving toward a more flexible concept in which the subject of the processing and encoding operations is a set of visual elements organized in both time and space in a flexible and arbitrarily complex way. The moving picture experts group (MPEG-4) standard supports this concept and its verification model (VM) encoder has adopted scalable rate control (SRC) as the rate control scheme, which is based on the spatial domain and compatible with constant bit rate (CBR) and variable bit rate (VBR). In this paper,a new rate control algorithm based on the DCT domain instead of the pixel domain is presented. More-over, macroblock level rate control scheme to compute the quantization step for each macroblock has been adopted. The experimental results show that the new algorithm can achieve a much better result than the original one in both peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the coding bits, and that the new algorithm is more flexible than test model 5 (TM5) rate control algorithm.

  11. Cutaneous cooling to manage botulinum toxin injection-associated pain in patients with facial palsy: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucks, N; Thomas, A; Hallam, M J; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum toxin injections are an effective, well-established treatment to manage synkinesis secondary to chronic facial palsy, but they entail painful injections at multiple sites on the face up to four times per year. Cutaneous cooling has long been recognised to provide an analgesic effect for cutaneous procedures, but evidence to date has been anecdotal or weak. This randomised controlled trial aims to assess the analgesic efficacy of cutaneous cooling using a cold gel pack versus a room-temperature Control. The analgesic efficacy of a 1-min application of a Treatment cold (3-5 °C) gel pack versus a Control (room-temperature (20 °C)) gel pack prior to botulinum toxin injection into the platysma was assessed via visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of pain before, during and after the procedure. Thirty-five patients received both trial arms during two separate clinic appointments. Cold gel packs provided a statistically significant reduction in pain compared with a room-temperature Control (from 26.4- to 10.2-mm VAS improvement (p injected or the order in which the Treatment or Control gel packs were applied. Cryoanalgesia using a fridge-cooled gel pack provides an effective, safe and cheap method for reducing pain at the botulinum toxin injection site in patients with facial palsy. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of mechanical properties of Al alloys with change of cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Zhi Dong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The solidification process significantly affects the mechanical properties and there are lots of factors that affect the solidification process. Much progress has been made in the research on the effect of solidification on mechanical properties. Among them, the PF (Phase Field model and CA (Cellular Automata model are widely used as simulation methods which can predict nucleation and its growth, and the size and morphology of the grains during solidification. Although they can give accurate calculation results, it needs too much computational memory and calculation time. So it is difficult to apply the simulation to the real production process. In this study, a more practical simulation approach which can predict the mechanical properties of real aluminum alloys is proposed, by identifying through experiment the relationship between cooling rate and SDAS (Secondary Dendrite Arm Spacing and mechanical properties. The experimentally measured values and the values predicted by simulation have relatively small differences and the mechanical properties of a variety of Al alloys are expected to be predicted before casting through use of the simulation.

  13. Palaeointensity determination on an early medieval kiln from Switzerland and the effect of cooling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadini, F.; Kovacheva, M.; Kostadinova, M.; Hedley, I. G.; Pesonen, L. J.

    The archaeomagnetic intensity reference curve for Western Europe lacks data during the period from 600 to 1000 AD. Baked clay from the walls of a pottery kiln at Reinach (Switzerland), archaeologically dated to the beginning of the 9th century AD, and having a 14C date of 1250 ± 50 BP, was investigated in order to refine the ancient geomagnetic field intensity during this period. A previous study to test the suitability of the material has shown that the magnetic properties of the baked clay from this Reinach kiln are appropriate for an archaeomagnetic study, and furthermore an archaeomagnetic directional date agrees well with the 14C date. A series of palaeointensity measurements was carried out in Sofia (Bulgaria). Here we present the results obtained from the same material, as performed in Helsinki (Finland) using different techniques. The comparison of the results shows significant differences between the two datasets. Based on the literature data, the discrepancy can be explained in terms of the different cooling rates of the samples used during the experiments in the two laboratories. Nevertheless, the results show that the geomagnetic field intensity had a high mean value of 86.85 ± 1.49 μT when the kiln was last used. This observation is consistent with recent studies from France covering the period during which the Reinach kiln functioned.

  14. Control of biological growth in recirculating cooling systems using treated secondary effluent as makeup water with monochloramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Chowdhury, Indranil; Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2012-12-01

    Secondary-treated municipal wastewater, an abundant and widely distributed impaired water source, is a promising alternative water source for thermoelectric power plant cooling. However, excessive biological growth is a major challenge associated with wastewater reuse in cooling systems as it can interfere with normal system operation as well as enhance corrosion and scaling problems. Furthermore, possible emission of biological aerosols (e.g., Legionella pneumophila) with the cooling tower drift can lead to public health concerns within the zone of aerosol deposition. In this study, the effectiveness of pre-formed and in-situ-formed monochloramine was evaluated for its ability to control biological growth in recirculating cooling systems using secondary-treated municipal wastewater as the only makeup water source. Bench-scale studies were compared with pilot-scale studies for their ability to predict system behavior under realistic process conditions. Effectiveness of the continuous addition of pre-formed monochloramine and monochloramine formed in-situ through the reaction of free chlorine with ammonia in the incoming water was evaluated in terms of biocide residual and its ability to control both planktonic and sessile microbial populations. Results revealed that monochloramine can effectively control biofouling in cooling systems employing secondary-treated municipal wastewater and has advantages relative to use of free chlorine, but that bench-scale studies seriously underestimate biocide dose and residual requirements for proper control of biological growth in full-scale systems. Pre-formed monochloramine offered longer residence time and more reliable performance than in-situ-formed monochloramine due to highly variable ammonia concentration in the recirculating water caused by ammonia stripping in the cooling tower. Pilot-scale tests revealed that much lower dosing rate was required to maintain similar total chlorine residual when pre-formed monochloramine

  15. Controlled cooling versus rapid freezing of teratozoospermic semen samples: Impact on sperm chromatin integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivananda N Kalludi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study evaluates the impact of controlled slow cooling and rapid freezing techniques on the sperm chromatin integrity in teratozoospermic and normozoospermic samples. Setting: The study was done in a university infertility clinic, which is a tertiary healthcare center serving the general population. Design: It was a prospective study designed in vitro. Materials and Methods: Semen samples from normozoospermic (N=16 and teratozoospermic (N=13 infertile men were cryopreserved using controlled cooling and rapid freezing techniques. The sperm chromatin integrity was analyzed in fresh and frozen-thawed samples. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were reported as mean and standard error (mean ± SEM of mean. The difference between two techniques was determined by a paired t-test. Results: The freeze-thaw induced chromatin denaturation was significantly (P<0.01 elevated in the post-thaw samples of normozoospermic and teratozoospermic groups. Compared to rapid freezing, there was no difference in the number of red sperms (with DNA damage by the controlled slow cooling method in both normozoospermic and teratozoospermic groups. Freeze-thaw induced sperm chromatin denaturation in teratozoospermic samples did not vary between controlled slow cooling and rapid freezing techniques. Conclusions: Since the controlled slow cooling technique involves the use of expensive instrument and is a time consuming protocol, rapid freezing can be a good alternative technique for teratozoospermic and normozoospermic samples when sperm DNA damage is a concern.

  16. Bio-fouling and its control in the cooling water system of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpathy, K.K.; Kannan, S.E.

    2004-06-01

    This report gives an overview of the bio-fouling problems that could be visualized in the different sections of the cooling system of PFBR, which is based on the experience observed at MAPS as well as from the experience of some of the work carried out at Kalpakkam. International as well as the MAPS practices of bio-fouling control are discussed. Based on these, an appropriate method for bio-fouling control is suggested. In addition, a few time bound, field, as well as laboratory experiments are proposed to be carried out, for deciding precise and accurate method of bio-fouling control for PFBR cooling water system. (author)

  17. Fertile assembly for a fast neutron nuclear reactor cooled by liquid sodium, with regulation of the cooling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradal, L.; Berte, M.; Chiarelli, C.

    1985-01-01

    The assembly has a casing in which are arranged the fertile elements, the liquid sodium flowing through the casing along these elements. It includes several apertured diaphragms transverse to the rods to regulate the liquid sodium flow rate. At least one diaphragm, in its central part around its aperture, of a material soluble in liquid sodium, such as copper. The invention applies, more particularly, to fast neutron nuclear reactor having a heterogeneous core. The coolant flow can increase with time to match the increased power generated by the fertile assembly along its life [fr

  18. Integrated control of the cooling system and surface openings using the artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Woo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at suggesting an indoor temperature control method that can provide a comfortable thermal environment through the integrated control of the cooling system and the surface openings. Four control logic were developed, employing different application levels of rules and artificial neural network models. Rule-based control methods represented the conventional approach while ANN-based methods were applied for the predictive and adaptive controls. Comparative performance tests for the conventional- and ANN-based methods were numerically conducted for the double-skin-facade building, using the MATLAB (Matrix Laboratory) and TRNSYS (Transient Systems Simulation) software, after proving the validity by comparing the simulation and field measurement results. Analysis revealed that the ANN-based controls of the cooling system and surface openings improved the indoor temperature conditions with increased comfortable temperature periods and decreased standard deviation of the indoor temperature from the center of the comfortable range. In addition, the proposed ANN-based logic effectively reduced the number of operating condition changes of the cooling system and surface openings, which can prevent system failure. The ANN-based logic, however, did not show superiority in energy efficiency over the conventional logic. Instead, they have increased the amount of heat removal by the cooling system. From the analysis, it can be concluded that the ANN-based temperature control logic was able to keep the indoor temperature more comfortably and stably within the comfortable range due to its predictive and adaptive features. - Highlights: • Integrated rule-based and artificial neural network based logics were developed. • A cooling device and surface openings were controlled in an integrated manner. • Computer simulation method was employed for comparative performance tests. • ANN-based logics showed the advanced features of thermal environment. • Rule

  19. Irradiation control of pathogenic bacteria and their growth during storage time in cooled chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Yiming; Wang Feng; Fan Bei; Liu Shuliang; Ju Hua

    2009-01-01

    The growth of pathogenic bacteria during storage time and their D 10 values by irradiation in cooled chicken were evaluated. The total numbers of colony, E.coli 10003, Campylobacter jejuni33560 and CY04 of the D 10 values were 1.434 kGy, 0.408 kGy, 0.175 kGy, 0.2 kGy respectively in cooled chicken. The results show that total bacteria count in vacuum packaged cooled chicken sample is 5.66 lg(CFU/g) and 4.90 lg (CFU/g) after 3 kGy and 5 kGy irradiation. And in storage at 0∼4 degree C the storage shelf-life of irradiated vacuum packaged cooled chicken could extend to 21 d and 28 d. It can be deduced that pathogenic bacteria can be controlled effectively by irradiation. (authors)

  20. Determination of fan flow and water rate adjustment for off-design cooling tower tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    The determination of the performance of a mechanical draft cooling tower requires that the air mass flow through the tower be known. Since this flow is not measured, it has been customary to use the manufacturer's design air flow and adjust it by the one-third power of the ratio of the design to test fan horsepower. The most nearly correct approximation of air flow through a tower can be obtained by incrementally moving through the tower from air inlet to outlet while calculating mass flows, energy balances, and pressure drops for each increment and then utilizing fan curves to determine volumetric and mass flows. This procedure would account for changes in air humidity and density through the tower, evaporation of water, effect of water rate on air pressure drop, and changes in fan characteristics. These type calculations may be within the capabilities of all in the near future, but for the interim, it is recommended that a more elementary approach be used which can be handled with a good calculator and without any proprietary data. This approach depends on certain assumptions which are acceptable if the tower test is conducted within CTI code requirements. The fan must be considered a constant suction volume blower for a given blade pitch. The total pressure at the fan, a function of volumetric flow and wet air density, must be assumed to be unaffected by other considerations, and the fan horsepower must be assumed to change only as volumetric flow and wet air density changes. Given these assumptions, along with design information normally provided with a tower, the determination of air flow through a tower in a test can be made from CTI test data. The air flow, and consequently the water rate adjustment and corrected water to air ratio, are derived and found to be direct functions of horsepower and density and an inverse function of wet air humidities

  1. Effect of Cooling Rate and Chemical Modification on the Tensile Properties of Mg-5wt% Si Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshahi, Farshid; Meratian, Mahmood; Zahrani, Mohsen Mohammadi; Zahrani, Ehsan Mohammadi

    Hypereutectic Mg-Si alloys are a new class of light materials usable for aerospace and other advanced engineering applications. In this study, the effects of both cooling rate and bismuth modification on the micro structure and tensile properties of hypereutectic Mg-5wt% Si alloy were investigated. It was found that the addition of 0.5% Bi, altered the morphology of primary Mg2Si particles from bulky to polygonal shape and reduced their mean size from more than 70 μm to about 30 (am. Also, the tensile strength and elongation of the modified alloy increased about 10% and 20%, respectively, which should be ascribed to the modification of Mg2Si morphology and more uniform distribution of the primary particles. Moreover, an increase in tensile strength value with increase in cooling rate were observed which is attributed to finer micro structure of alloy in higher cooling rates. It was observed that Bi addition is significantly more effective in refining the morphology of primary Mg2Si particles than applying faster cooling rates.

  2. Influence of Cooling Rate in High-Temperature Area on Hardening of Deposited High-Cutting Chrome-Tungsten Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malushin, N N; Valuev, D V; Valueva, A V; Serikbol, A; Borovikov, I F

    2015-01-01

    The authors study the influence of cooling rate in high-temperature area for thermal cycle of high-cutting chrome-tungsten metal weld deposit on the processes of carbide phase merging and austenite grain growth for the purpose of providing high hardness of deposited metal (HRC 64-66). (paper)

  3. Influence of Cooling Rate in High-Temperature Area on Hardening of Deposited High-Cutting Chrome-Tungsten Metal

    OpenAIRE

    Malushin, N. N.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich; Valueva, Anna Vladimirovna; Serikbol, A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors study the influence of cooling rate in high-temperature area for thermal cycle of high-cutting chrome-tungsten metal weld deposit on the processes of carbide phase merging and austenite grain growth for the purpose of providing high hardness of deposited metal (HRC 64-66).

  4. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Q n distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3 B and 4 B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  5. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  6. The Controlled Electric Drive of the Automatic Cooling System of the Engine Room on a Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevz Dennis V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of an automatic cooling system control by the Zelio Logic controller. Development of the simulation model of the open-loop system “frequency inverter – asynchronous motor with IR-compensation” in Matlab Simulink. Analysis of the transient characteristics ω = f(t, M = f(t at the start of the asynchronous motor.

  7. Towards a Better Control of Chemicals Dosing in Condenser Open-Recirculating Cooling Systems Through the Use of Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Philippa; Lepine, Gaelle; Rapenne, Sophie; Demay, Eric; Jardin, Audrey; Shakourzadeh, Khalil; Alos-Ramos, Olga

    2012-09-01

    The main issue of condenser open recirculating cooling systems remains scaling. This can have high economic consequences due to a loss of thermal exchange, an increase of maintenance costs and potentially plant shutdown. To tackle this problem, EDF is currently designing new chemicals' dosing equipment for anti-scalants or acid. To optimise treatment cost and limit the chemicals' environmental impact, dosing and control systems should be efficient enough to add only the required quantity to prevent scaling without overdosing. CooliSS C , a model developed for simulating the water chemistry of open recirculating cooling systems, can be used to adjust acid dosage and to pre-evaluate selected acid control systems. In circuits with no current treatment, where the scaling situation is being monitored, CooliSS C is a useful tool in predicting scaling potential and could even be used to predict the expected quantity of deposits. In the first case study, CooliSS ST, the static version of the model, was used to evaluate the sulfuric acid injection needs for Golfech nuclear power plant following a modification to the condenser cooling water circuit operating conditions. The results obtained via simulation were compared with manual calculations in order to demonstrate the accuracy of the software. In the second case study, CooliSS DX, the dynamic version of the CooliSS C model, was used to evaluate new acid control systems planned for Cruas nuclear power plant before the systems' commissioning. CooliSS DX predicts the scaling rate in the different parts of the cooling water system as a function of time. In fact, this version is able to calculate the variations of chemical composition along the circuit when operating conditions change (make-up quality, flow rates, evaporation rate, temperature...). A module was combined to CooliSS DX to evaluate acid control equipment. This module allows the initial calculation of the acid flow rate as a function of operating

  8. Modification of n-Si Characteristics by Annealing and Cooling at Different Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhi K. Salih

    2003-01-01

    for samples annealed at lower than 550°C. For samples annealed at higher temperatures, quenching gave better dark-current density vs. potential plots. SEM measurements showed parallel results to these findings. Enhanced surface textures were observed for slowly cooled wafers from temperatures below 550°C. Samples quenched from temperatures above 550°C showed better surfaces than slowly cooled counterparts.

  9. Employment of neural networks for analysis of chemical composition and cooling rate effect on CCT diagrams shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Trzaska, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents possibility of employment of the original supercooled austenite transformation anisothermic diagrams forecasting method for analysis of the chemical composition effect on the CCT diagrams shape. The developed model makes it possible to substitute computer simulation for the costly and time consuming experiments. The information derived from calculations make it possible to plot diagrams illustrating the effects of the particular elements or pairs of elements, as well as cooling rate and/or austenitizing temperature, on any temperature or time describing transformations in steel during its continuous cooling. Evaluation is also possible of the effect of the aforementioned factors on hardness and fractions of the particular structural constituents. (author)

  10. Do Children with Better Inhibitory Control Donate More? Differentiating between Early and Middle Childhood and Cool and Hot Inhibitory Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control may play an important part in prosocial behavior, such as donating behavior. However, it is not clear at what developmental stage inhibitory control becomes associated with donating behavior and which aspects of inhibitory control are related to donating behavior during development in early to middle childhood. The present study aimed to clarify these issues with two experiments. In Experiment 1, 103 3- to 5-year-old preschoolers completed cool (Stroop-like and hot (delay of gratification inhibitory control tasks and a donating task. The results indicated that there were no relationships between cool or hot inhibitory control and donating behavior in the whole group and each age group of the preschoolers. In Experiment 2, 140 elementary school children in Grades 2, 4, and 6 completed cool (Stroop-like and hot (delay of gratification inhibitory control tasks and a donating task. The results showed that inhibitory control was positively associated with donating behavior in the whole group. Cool and hot inhibitory control respectively predicted donating behavior in the second and sixth graders. Therefore, the present study reveals that donating behavior increasingly relies on specific inhibitory control, i.e., hot inhibitory control as children grow in middle childhood.

  11. Plant Control Concept for the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Kim, S. O.

    2010-12-01

    A power plant is designed for incorporation into a utility's grid system and follows the load demand through the steam generator, intermediate heat exchanger(IHX), from the nuclear core. During the load-following transients, various plant parameters must be controlled to protect the reactor core and other components in the plant. The purpose of this report is to review design considerations to establish SFR plant control and to design plant control concepts. The governing equations and solution procedure of the computer code to calculate plant temperature conditions during the part-load operation was reviewed and 4 types of plant operation concepts were designed, and the results of the calculations were compared

  12. Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-03-01

    Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

  13. Retrofitting the instrumentation and control system of primary cooling circuit from TRIGA INR 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, M.; Ciocanescu, M.; Ana, E. M.; Cristea, D.

    2008-01-01

    Activities of retrofitting the instrumentation and control system from TRIGA INR primary cooling circuit consists in replacement of actual system for: - parameter measurement; - safety; - reactor external scramming; - protection, command and supply for electrical elements of the system. This retrofitting project is designed to ensure the necessary features of reactor external safety and for technological parameter measurement. The new safety system of main cooling circuit is completely separated from its operating system and is arranged in a panel assembly in reactor control room. The operating system has the following features: - data acquisition; - parameter value and state of command elements displaying; - command elements on hierarchical levels; - operator information through visual and acoustic alarm. (authors)

  14. The Water Quality Control of the Secondary Cooling Water under a Normal Operation of 30 MWth in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Chul; Lee, Young Sub; Lim, Rag Yong

    2008-01-01

    HANARO, a multi-purpose research reactor, a 30 MWth open-tank-in-pool type, has been under a full power operation since 2005. The heat generated by the core of HANARO is transferred to the primary cooling water. And the cooling water transfers the heat to the secondary cooling water through the primary cooling heat exchanger. The heat absorbed by the secondary cooling water is removed through a cooling tower. The quality of the secondary cooling water is deteriorated by a temperature variation of the cooling water and a foreign material flowing over the cooling water through the cooling tower fan for a cooling. From these, a corrosion reduces the life time of a system, a scale degrades the heat transfer effect and a sludge and slime induces a local corrosion. For reducing these impacts, the quality of the secondary cooling water is treated by a high ca-hardness water quality program by maintaining a super saturated condition of ions, 12 of a ca-hardness concentration. After an overhaul maintenance of a secondary cooling tower composed of a secondary cooling system in 2007, a secondary cooling water stored in the cooling tower basin was replaced with a fresh city water. In this year, a water quality deterioration test has been performed under a full power operation and a mode of a twenty three day operation and twelve day maintenance for setting a beginning control limit of the secondary cooling water. This paper describes the water quality deterioration test for the secondary cooling system under a full power operation of 30 MWth including a test method, a test requirement and a test result

  15. Potentially pathogenic amoeba-associated microorganisms in cooling towers and their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnier, Isabelle; Merchat, Michèle; La Scola, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    Cooling towers provide a favorable environment for the proliferation of microorganisms. Cooling towers generate a biofilm and often aerosolize contaminated water, thereby increasing the risk of microorganism dissemination by human inhalation. This pathogen dissemination was first revealed by the epidemics of Legionnaires' disease that were directly related to the presence of cooling towers, and since then, the ecology of Legionella pneumophila has been well studied. Each country has specific standards regarding the acceptable amount of microorganisms in cooling tower systems. However, those standards typically only concern L. pneumophila, even though many other microorganisms can also be isolated from cooling towers, including protozoa, bacteria and viruses. Microbiological control of the cooling tower system can be principally achieved by chemical treatments and also by improving the system's construction. Several new treatments are being studied to improve the efficiency of disinfection. However, as most of these treatments continue to focus solely on L. pneumophila, reports of other types of pathogens continue to increase. Therefore, how their dissemination affects the human populous health should be addressed now.

  16. Optimal control and performance test of solar-assisted cooling system

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2010-10-01

    The solar-assisted cooling system (SACH) was developed in the present study. The ejector cooling system (ECS) is driven by solar heat and connected in parallel with an inverter-type air conditioner (A/C). The cooling load can be supplied by the ECS when solar energy is available and the input power of the A/C can be reduced. In variable weather, the ECS will probably operate at off-design condition of ejector and the cooling capability of the ECS can be lost completely. In order to make the ejector operate at critical or non-critical double-choking condition to obtain a better performance, an electronic expansion valve was installed in the suction line of the ejector to regulate the opening of the expansion valve to control the evaporator temperature. This will make the SACH always produce cooling effect even at lower solar radiation periods while the ejector performs at off-design conditions. The energy saving of A/C is experimentally shown 50-70% due to the cooling performance of ECS. The long-term performance test results show that the daily energy saving is around 30-70% as compared to the energy consumption of A/C alone (without solar-driven ECS). The total energy saving of A/C is 52% over the entire test period. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Control of heat transfer in continuous-feeding Czochralski-silicon crystal growth with a water-cooled jacket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenhan; Liu, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    The continuous-feeding Czochralski method is an effective method to reduce the cost of single crystal silicon. By promoting the crystal growth rate, the cost can be reduced further. However, more latent heat will be released at the melt-crystal interface under a high crystal growth rate. In this study, a water-cooled jacket was applied to enhance the heat transfer at the melt-crystal interface. Quasi-steady-state numerical calculation was employed to investigate the impact of the water-cooled jacket on the heat transfer at the melt-crystal interface. Latent heat released during the crystal growth process at the melt-crystal interface and absorbed during feedstock melting at the feeding zone was modeled in the simulations. The results show that, by using the water-cooled jacket, heat transfer in the growing crystal is enhanced significantly. Melt-crystal interface deflection and thermal stress increase simultaneously due to the increase of radial temperature at the melt-crystal interface. With a modified heat shield design, heat transfer at the melt-crystal interface is well controlled. The crystal growth rate can be increased by 20%.

  18. Control Strategies for Ventilative Cooling of Overheated Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Duer, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    -family house from the 1970s. The case study is renovated deeply and high- efficient (nZEB) creating two different scenarios. Mechanical ventilation system and manual control of the openings for both renovation scenarios cannot sufficiently eliminate the overheating risk indoors. The discharge coefficient...

  19. Model Based Control of Single-Phase Marine Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    in this work is on the development of a nonlinear robust control design. The design is based on principles from feedback. linearization to compensate for nonlinearities as well as transport delays by including a delay estimate in the feedback law. To deal with the uncertainties that emerged from the feedback...

  20. Effects of Undercooling and Cooling Rate on Peritectic Phase Crystallization Within Ni-Zr Alloy Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, P.; Wang, H. P.

    2018-04-01

    The liquid Ni-16.75 at. pct Zr peritectic alloy was substantially undercooled and containerlessly solidified by an electromagnetic levitator and a drop tube. The dependence of the peritectic solidification mode on undercooling was established based on the results of the solidified microstructures, crystal growth velocity, as well as X-ray diffraction patterns. Below a critical undercooling of 124 K, the primary Ni7Zr2 phase preferentially nucleates and grows from the undercooled liquid, which is followed by a peritectic reaction of Ni7Zr2+L → Ni5Zr. The corresponding microstructure is composed of the Ni7Zr2 dendrites, peritectic Ni5Zr phase, and inter-dendritic eutectic. Nevertheless, once the liquid undercooling exceeds the critical undercooling, the peritectic Ni5Zr phase directly precipitates from this undercooled liquid. However, a negligible amount of residual Ni7Zr2 phase still appears in the microstructure, indicating that nucleation and growth of the Ni7Zr2 phase are not completely suppressed. The micromechanical property of the peritectic Ni5Zr phase in terms of the Vickers microhardness is enhanced, which is ascribed to the transition of the peritectic solidification mode. To suppress the formation of the primary phase completely, this alloy was also containerlessly solidified in free fall experiments. Typical peritectic solidified microstructure forms in large droplets, while only the peritectic Ni5Zr phase appears in smaller droplets, which gives an indication that the peritectic Ni5Zr phase directly precipitates from the undercooled liquid by completely suppressing the growth of the primary Ni7Zr2 phase and the peritectic reaction due to the combined effects of the large undercooling and high cooling rate.

  1. Effect of solution treatment temperature and cooling rate on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Anjali, E-mail: anjalikumari1261@gmail.com; Prabhu, G.; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.

    2017-03-14

    The present study investigates the effect of solution treatment temperature and cooling rate on mechanical properties of a tungsten heavy alloy (89.6W-6.2Ni-1.8Fe-2.4Co). In addition to water quenching, rapid argon quenching has been attempted in this study since it is a relatively cleaner process and it can be used in conjunction with vacuum treatment. Since in these alloys, there is a possibility of incomplete dissolution of intermetallics or segregation of impurities during heat treatment, which results in scatter in the mechanical properties, it was decided that the solution treatment temperature for both water and argon quenching would be varied from 1100 to 1250 °C in order to see its effect on the microstructure and mechanical properties. Solution treatment at varying temperatures followed by water quenching resulted in tensile strength ranging from 908 to 921 MPa and % elongation varied from 19% to 26%. On the other hand, the argon quenching heat treatment resulted in tensile strength in the range of 871–955 MPa and % elongation from 9% to 25%. No significant trend with respect to solution treatment temperature on tensile properties was seen in both argon and water quenched samples. % elongation to failure and impact values of water quenched specimens were better than those of argon quenched specimens for a given solution treatment temperature. The impact values appeared to improve with increasing solution treatment temperature in water quenched condition. The properties were correlated with underlying microstructure and fractographs of the failed specimens. The study showed the argon quenching may not be appropriate for the heat treatment of heavy alloys since it results in inferior mechanical properties as compared to water quenching.

  2. Biologically inspired rate control of chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Scheper, Tjeerd V

    2017-10-01

    The overall intention of chaotic control is to eliminate chaos and to force the system to become stable in the classical sense. In this paper, I demonstrate a more subtle method that does not eliminate all traces of chaotic behaviour; yet it consistently, and reliably, can provide control as intended. The Rate Control of Chaos (RCC) method is derived from metabolic control processes and has several remarkable properties. RCC can control complex systems continuously, and unsupervised, it can also maintain control across bifurcations, and in the presence of significant systemic noise. Specifically, I show that RCC can control a typical set of chaotic models, including the 3 and 4 dimensional chaotic Lorenz systems, in all modes. Furthermore, it is capable of controlling spatiotemporal chaos without supervision and maintains control of the system across bifurcations. This property of RCC allows a dynamic system to operate in parameter spaces that are difficult to control otherwise. This may be particularly interesting for the control of forced systems or dynamic systems that are chaotically perturbed. These control properties of RCC are applicable to a range of dynamic systems, thereby appearing to have far-reaching effects beyond just controlling chaos. RCC may also point to the existence of a biochemical control function of an enzyme, to stabilise the dynamics of the reaction cascade.

  3. Temperature control of an automotive engine cooling system utilizing a magneto-rheological fan clutch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok; Park, Young-Gee; Lee, Soojin

    2010-01-01

    In this note, the temperature control of an automotive engine cooling system is undertaken using a magneto-rheological (MR) fluid-based fan clutch (MR fan clutch in short). In order to achieve this goal, an appropriate size of controllable fan clutch using an MR fluid is firstly devised by considering the design parameters of a conventional fan clutch to reflect the practical application. Then, the principal design parameters of the MR fan clutch such as the length of the disc are optimally determined through finite element analysis. The drum-type MR fan clutch is manufactured and its time response to input current is experimentally evaluated. A robust sliding mode controller is then formulated by treating the time constant of the fan clutch system as an uncertain parameter. After identifying the relationship between angular velocity of the MR fan clutch and the temperature of the cooling system, the sliding mode controller is experimentally realized for the cooling system. It has been clearly demonstrated that the proposed sliding mode controller follows well the desired temperature with a small regulating error. It is expected from this feasibility work that the proposed control system associated with an MR fan clutch can be effectively utilized for the automotive cooling system to improve the fuel efficiency. (technical note)

  4. Rate-cost tradeoffs in control

    KAUST Repository

    Kostina, Victoria

    2017-02-13

    Consider a distributed control problem with a communication channel connecting the observer of a linear stochastic system to the controller. The goal of the controller is minimize a quadratic cost function. The most basic special case of that cost function is the mean-square deviation of the system state from the desired state. We study the fundamental tradeoff between the communication rate r bits/sec and the limsup of the expected cost b, and show a lower bound on the rate necessary to attain b. The bound applies as long as the system noise has a probability density function. If target cost b is not too large, that bound can be closely approached by a simple lattice quantization scheme that only quantizes the innovation, that is, the difference between the controller\\'s belief about the current state and the true state.

  5. Spallation Neutron Source Drift Tube Linac Resonance Control Cooling System Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Johnny Y; Champion, Marianne M; Feschenko, Alexander; Gibson, Paul; Kiselev, Yuri; Kovalishin, A S; Kravchuk, Leonid V; Kvasha, Adolf; Schubert, James P

    2005-01-01

    The Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS) for the warm linac of the Spallation Neutron Source was designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary design focus was on water cooling of individual component contributions. The sizing the RCCS water skid was accomplished by means of a specially created SINDA/FLUINT model tailored to these system requirements. A new model was developed in Matlab Simulink and incorporates actual operational values and control valve interactions. Included is the dependence of RF input power on system operation, cavity detuning values during transients, time delays that result from water flows through the heat exchanger, the dynamic process of water warm-up in the cooling system due to dissipated RF power on the cavity surface, differing contributions on the cavity detuning due to drift tube and wall heating, and a dynamic model of the heat exchanger with characteristics in close agreement to the real unit. Because of the Matlab Simulink model, investigation of a wide range ...

  6. Effects of a GPC-PID control strategy with hierarchical structure for a cooling coil unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Li Shaoyuan; Cai Wenjian; Lu Lu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a GPC-PID control strategy for a cooling-coil unit in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. By analysis of the cooling towers and chillers, different models in the occupied period are considered in each operating condition. Because of the complication of components, well tuned PID controllers are unsatisfied, and the results are poor over a wide range of operation conditions. To solve this problem, a GPC-PID controller with hierarchical structure is proposed based on minimizing the generalized predictive control criterion to tune conventional PID controller parameters. Simulation and experiments show that the proposed controller is able to deal with a wide range of operating conditions and to achieve better performance than conventional methods

  7. Influence of cooling rate in planar thermally assisted magnetic random access memory: Improved writeability due to spin-transfer-torque influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavent, A.; Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Creuzet, C.; Alvarez-Hérault, J.; Vila, L.; Sousa, R. C.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of a controlled cooling rate on magnetic field reversal assisted by spin transfer torque (STT) in thermally assisted magnetic random access memory. By using a gradual linear decrease of the voltage at the end of the write pulse, the STT decays more slowly or at least at the same rate as the temperature. This condition is necessary to make sure that the storage layer magnetization remains in the desired written direction during cooling of the cell. The influence of the write current pulse decay rate was investigated on two exchange biased synthetic ferrimagnet (SyF) electrodes. For a NiFe based electrode, a significant improvement in writing reproducibility was observed using a gradual linear voltage transition. The write error rate decreases by a factor of 10 when increasing the write pulse fall-time from ∼3 ns to 70 ns. For comparison, a second CoFe/NiFe based electrode was also reversed by magnetic field assisted by STT. In this case, no difference between sharp and linear write pulse fall shape was observed. We attribute this observation to the higher thermal stability of the CoFe/NiFe electrode during cooling. In real-time measurements of the magnetization reversal, it was found that Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling in the SyF electrode vanishes for the highest pulse voltages that were used due to the high temperature reached during write. As a result, during the cooling phase, the final state is reached through a spin-flop transition of the SyF storage layer

  8. Investigation of the effects of cooling rate on the microstructure of investment cast biomedical grade Co alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R; Browne, D J; Williamson, K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the microstructural characteristics of investment cast cobalt alloy as the cross-sectional area is varied, thus changing the local effective cooling rates and solidification times. The extent of published work on the as-cast properties of cobalt alloys is minimal. The primary aim of this work is therefore to extend knowledge of the behaviour of such alloys as they solidify, which will influence the design of new products as well as the industrial optimisation of the casting process. Wedge-shaped parts were cast from a biomedical grade cobalt alloy employing the method of lost wax investment casting. Analytical techniques such as optical microscopy, image analysis and microhardness testing were used to characterise the as-cast parts. Parameters studied include variations in grain structure, nature of the columnar and equiaxed zones and the spread of porosity (both shrinkage and gas). Changes in microstructure were compared to microhardness values obtained. The solidification profile of the alloy through the prototype cast component was investigated based on measurement of the dendrite arm spacings. A discussion on the physical phenomena controlling the microstructural variations is presented.

  9. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahi, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Duraschlag, H. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Elliott, D. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Hartsough, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Shukla, N. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Kosny, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  10. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahi, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Durschlag, H. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Elliott, D. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Hartsough, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Shukla, N. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Kosny, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulkinsulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosedreflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  11. Modeling and Control of a Single-Phase Marine Cooling System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents two model-based control design approaches for a single-phase marine cooling system. Models are derived from first principles and aim at describing significant system dynamics including nonlinearities and transport delays, while keeping the model complexity low. The two...

  12. Anti-seismic air condition's cooling capability increase of the second control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Secondary area (SCA) air-conditioning system is an important ventilation system in plant. It should achieve the indoor temperature controllable. To resolve the problem of cooling capacity insufficiency, on the basis of ventilation and refrigeration theory, the thesis analyzes the design modification plan. (author)

  13. An alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Towner, S G; Wolford, R S; Stephenson, T E; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggests that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  14. Alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    States, S.J.; Conley, L.F.; Towner, S.G.; Wolford, R.S.; Stephenson, T.E.; McNamara, M.; Wadowsky, R.M.; Yee, R.B.

    1987-08-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggest that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat.

  15. Effect of Grain Refinement and Cooling Rate on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Secondary Al-Si-Cu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timelli, Giulio; Camicia, Giordano; Ferraro, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    The effect of AlTi5B1 grain refinement and different solidification rates on metallurgical and mechanical properties of a secondary AlSi7Cu3Mg alloy is reported. While the Ti content ranges from 0.04 up to 0.225 wt.%, the cooling rate varies between 0.1 and 5.5 °C/s. Metallographic and thermal analysis techniques have been used to quantitatively examine the macro- and microstructural changes occurring with grain refiner addition at various cooling rates. The results indicate that a small AlTi5B1 addition produces the greatest refinement, while no significant reduction of grain size is obtained with a great amount of grain refiner. On increasing the cooling rate, a lower amount of AlTi5B1 master alloy is necessary to produce a uniform grain size throughout the casting. The combined addition of AlTi5B1 and Sr does not produce any reciprocal interaction or effect on primary α-Al and eutectic solidification. The grain refinement improves the plastic behavior of the alloy and increases the reliability of castings, as evidenced by the Weibull statistics.

  16. Automatic dose-rate controlling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szasz, T.; Nagy Czirok, Cs.; Batki, L.; Antal, S.

    1977-01-01

    The patent of a dose-rate controlling equipment that can be attached to X-ray image-amplifiers is presented. In the new equipment the current of the photocatode of the image-amplifier is led into the regulating unit, which controls the X-ray generator automatically. The advantages of the equipment are the following: it can be simply attached to any type of X-ray image-amplifier, it accomplishes fast and sensitive regulation, it makes possible the control of both the mA and the kV values, it is attached to the most reliable point of the image-transmission chain. (L.E.)

  17. Safety actuator of the Cabri reactor as a function of its power and cooling fluid flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Jean; Da Costa Vieira, David; Tattegrain, Alain

    1969-04-01

    This report present a device which is to provide a stop command to the Cabri reactor when the rate of its power to the cooling fluid rate reaches a value determined with respect to water temperature in the circuit. The stop command is delivered by an actuator which opens a relay contact when the power reaches a specific value. The authors present the device, its characteristics, and principle. They also present the different amplifier circuits, the input and output circuits (flow rate input, temperature input, and output circuit), the energy supply, and the various adjustments

  18. Effect Of Cooling Rate On Thermal And Mechanical Properties Of Cu-%24.2Mn Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celik, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this research, different heat and mechanical treatments have been applied to the Cu-%24.2Mn and some samples have been obtained from this alloy. On these samples, phase transformations have been formed by thermal and mechanical effect. Morphological, mechanical and crystallographic properties of the phase transformations have been examined by using different physical methods. Austenite phase has been obtained in the samples which have been applied slow and rapid cooling according to the SEM analysis. It has been observed that the grain size obtained by the rapid cooling is smaller than the grain size obtained by the slow cooling. Therefore, it has been concluded that the cooling process differences, changes the grain size of the alloy. Compression stress has been applied to the alloy in order to search the deformation effect on the austenite phase transformation. The structural features of the phase transformations have been examined. Slip lines and martensite structural were observed on the surface of the alloys after the deformation. Changes in phase structure of the alloy are also examined by means of XRD technique.

  19. Water supply rates for recirculating evaporative cooling systems in poultry housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaporative cooling (EC) is an important tool to reduce heat stress in animal housing systems. Expansion of ventilation capacity in tunnel ventilated poultry facilities has resulted in increased water demand for EC systems. As water resources become more limited and costly, proper planning and des...

  20. Effect of heating and cooling rate on the kinetics of allotropic phase changes in uranium: A differential scanning calorimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Arun Kumar; Raju, S.; Jeyaganesh, B.; Mohandas, E.; Sudha, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic aspects of allotropic phase changes in uranium are studied as a function of heating/cooling rate in the range 10 0 -10 2 K min -1 by isochronal differential scanning calorimetry. The transformation arrest temperatures revealed a remarkable degree of sensitivity to variations of heating and cooling rate, and this is especially more so for the transformation finish (T f ) temperatures. The results obtained for the α → β and β → γ transformations during heating confirm to the standard Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) model for a nucleation and growth mediated process. The apparent activation energy Q eff for the overall transformation showed a mild increase with increasing heating rate. In fact, the heating rate normalised Arrhenius rate constant, k/β reveals a smooth power law decay with increasing heating rate (β). For the α → β phase change, the observed DSC peak profile for slower heating rates contained a distinct shoulder like feature, which however is absent in the corresponding profiles found for higher heating rates. The kinetics of γ → β phase change on the other hand, is best described by the two-parameter Koistinen-Marburger empirical relation for the martensitic transformation

  1. Testing jumps via false discovery rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yu-Min

    2013-01-01

    Many recently developed nonparametric jump tests can be viewed as multiple hypothesis testing problems. For such multiple hypothesis tests, it is well known that controlling type I error often makes a large proportion of erroneous rejections, and such situation becomes even worse when the jump occurrence is a rare event. To obtain more reliable results, we aim to control the false discovery rate (FDR), an efficient compound error measure for erroneous rejections in multiple testing problems. We perform the test via the Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (BNS) test statistic, and control the FDR with the Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure. We provide asymptotic results for the FDR control. From simulations, we examine relevant theoretical results and demonstrate the advantages of controlling the FDR. The hybrid approach is then applied to empirical analysis on two benchmark stock indices with high frequency data.

  2. Testing jumps via false discovery rate control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Yen

    Full Text Available Many recently developed nonparametric jump tests can be viewed as multiple hypothesis testing problems. For such multiple hypothesis tests, it is well known that controlling type I error often makes a large proportion of erroneous rejections, and such situation becomes even worse when the jump occurrence is a rare event. To obtain more reliable results, we aim to control the false discovery rate (FDR, an efficient compound error measure for erroneous rejections in multiple testing problems. We perform the test via the Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (BNS test statistic, and control the FDR with the Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure. We provide asymptotic results for the FDR control. From simulations, we examine relevant theoretical results and demonstrate the advantages of controlling the FDR. The hybrid approach is then applied to empirical analysis on two benchmark stock indices with high frequency data.

  3. Development of a new controller for simultaneous heating and cooling of office buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarini, Alessandro; Afshari, Alireza; Hultmark, Göran

    2016-01-01

    by signals of actual room air temperatures and return water temperature. Depending on the minimum and maximum air temperatures in the rooms, the supply water temperature was set by adjusting the return water temperature with two offsets, one for heating demand and one for cooling demand. The behaviour......This paper aims to develop a new controller to regulate the supply water temperature of a room-temperature loop integrated in a novel HVAC for office buildings. The main feature of the room-temperature loop is its ability to provide simultaneous heating and cooling by circulating water...... with a temperature of about 22 °C. Therefore, the same supply water temperature is delivered to all the thermal zones in the building, no matter whether a single zone needs heating or cooling. In previous studies, the supply water temperature varied between 20 °C and 23 °C, according to outdoor air temperature...

  4. Risk Analyses of Charging Pump Control Improvements for Alternative RCP Seal Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are two events that significantly affect the plant risk during a TLOCCW event. One is an event in which the seal assembly of a reactor coolant pump (RCP) fails due to heating stress from the loss of cooling water; the other is an event in which the operators fail to conduct alternative cooling for the RCP seal during the accident. KHNP reviewed the replacement of the RCP seal with a qualified shutdown seal in order to remove the risk due to RCP seal failure during a TLOCCW. As an optional measure, a design improvement in the alternative cooling method for the RCP seal is being considered. This analysis presents the alternative RCP seal cooling improvement and its safety effect. K2 is a nuclear power plant with a Westinghouse design, and it has a relatively high CDF during TLOCCW events because it has a different CCW system design and difficulty in preparing alternative cooling water sources. This analysis confirmed that an operator action providing cold water to the RWST as RCP seal injection water during a TLOCCW event is very important in K2. The control circuit improvement plan for the auxiliary charging pump was established in order to reduce the failure probability of this operator action. This analysis modeled the improvement as a fault tree and evaluated the resulting CDF change. The consequence demonstrated that the RCP seal injection failure probability was reduced by 89%, and the CDF decreased by 28%.

  5. The effects of annealing temperature and cooling rate on carbide precipitation behavior in H13 hot-work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Minwoo; Park, Gyujin; Jung, Jae-Gil; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Young-Kook

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Unexpected Mo carbides formed during slow cooling from low annealing temperatures. • Mo carbides formed during the migration of Mo for a transition of Cr-rich carbide. • Mo carbides were precipitated at the boundaries of M 7 C 3 carbides and ferrite grains. • Annealing conditions for the precipitation of Mo carbides were discussed. - Abstract: The precipitation behavior of H13 hot-work tool steel was investigated as a function of both annealing temperature and cooling rate through thermodynamic calculations and microstructural analyses using transmission and scanning electron microscope and a dilatometer. The V-rich MC carbide and Cr-rich M 7 C 3 and M 23 C 6 carbides were observed in all annealed specimens regardless of annealing and cooling conditions, as expected from an equilibrium phase diagram of the steel used. However, Mo-rich M 2 C and M 6 C carbides were unexpectedly precipitated at a temperature between 675 °C and 700 °C during slow cooling at a rate of below 0.01 °C/s from the annealing temperatures of 830 °C and below. The solubility of Mo in both M 7 C 3 and ferrite reduces with decreasing temperature during cooling. Mo atoms diffuse out of both M 7 C 3 and ferrite, and accumulate locally at the interface between M 7 C 3 and ferrite. Mo carbides were form at the interface of M 7 C 3 carbides during the transition of Cr-rich M 7 C 3 to stable M 23 C 6

  6. Theoretical assessment of evaporation rate of isolated water drop under the conditions of cooling tower of thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevelev Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer at evaporation of water drops under the conditions which are typical for a modern chimney-type cooling tower of a thermal power plant. The dual task of heat and mass transfer with movable boundary at convective cooling and evaporation for a ‘drop–humid air’ system in a spherical coordinate system has been solved. It has been shown that there is a rapid decline of water evaporation rate at the initial stage of the process according to temperature decrease of its surface. It has been stated that the effect of evaporation rate decrease appears greatly in the area of small radiuses.

  7. Pressure and cooling rate effect on polyhedron clusters in Cu-Al alloy by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Fatih Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of crystal-type and icosahedral (icos)-type polyhedrons in Cu-50 at%Al alloy based on the embedded atom method (EAM) model is studied at two cooling rates under normal and high pressures by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The cluster-type index method (CTIM) which describes icos and defective icos polyhedrons and the new cluster-type index method (CTIM-2) which describes crystal-type polyhedrons have been used to perform polyhedron analysis in the model alloy system. The results of our simulations demonstrate that the effects of the cooling rate and pressure play an important role in the numbers of polyhedrons and their structures in the system.

  8. Pressure and cooling rate effect on polyhedron clusters in Cu–Al alloy by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, Fatih Ahmet, E-mail: facelik@beu.edu.tr

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of crystal-type and icosahedral (icos)-type polyhedrons in Cu–50 at%Al alloy based on the embedded atom method (EAM) model is studied at two cooling rates under normal and high pressures by using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The cluster-type index method (CTIM) which describes icos and defective icos polyhedrons and the new cluster-type index method (CTIM-2) which describes crystal-type polyhedrons have been used to perform polyhedron analysis in the model alloy system. The results of our simulations demonstrate that the effects of the cooling rate and pressure play an important role in the numbers of polyhedrons and their structures in the system.

  9. Cooling and squeezing the fluctuations of a nanomechanical beam by indirect quantum feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Liu Yuxi; Nori, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We study cooling and squeezing the fluctuations of a nanomechanical beam using quantum feedback control. In our model, the nanomechanical beam is coupled to a transmission line resonator via a superconducting quantum interference device. The leakage of the electromagnetic field from the transmission line resonator is measured using homodyne detection. This measured signal is then used to design a quantum feedback control signal to drive the electromagnetic field in the transmission line resonator. Although the control is imposed on the transmission line resonator, this quantum feedback control signal indirectly affects the thermal motion of the nanomechanical beam via the inductive beam-resonator coupling, making it possible to cool and squeeze the fluctuations of the beam, allowing it to approach the standard quantum limit.

  10. The effect of ultrasound irradiation on the convective heat transfer rate during immersion cooling of a stationary sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-11-01

    It has been proven that ultrasound irradiation can enhance the rate of heat transfer processes. The objective of this work was to study the heat transfer phenomenon, mainly the heat exchange at the surface, as affected by ultrasound irradiation around a stationary copper sphere (k=386W m(-1)K(-1), C(p)=384J kg(-1)K(-1), ρ=8660kg m(-3)) during cooling. The sphere (0.01m in diameter) was immersed in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-10°C) in an ultrasonic cooling system that included a refrigerated circulator, a flow meter, an ultrasound generator and an ultrasonic bath. The temperature of the sphere was recorded using a data logger equipped with a T-type thermocouple in the center of the sphere. The temperature of the cooling medium was also monitored by four thermocouples situated at different places in the bath. The sphere was located at different positions (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06m) above the transducer surface of the bath calculated considering the center of the sphere as the center of the reference system and was exposed to different intensities of ultrasound (0, 120, 190, 450, 890, 1800, 2800, 3400 and 4100W m(-2)) during cooling. The frequency of the ultrasound was 25kHz. It was demonstrated that ultrasound irradiation can increase the rate of heat transfer significantly, resulting in considerably shorter cooling times. Higher intensities caused higher cooling rates, and Nu values were increased from about 23-27 to 25-108 depending on the intensity of ultrasound and the position of the sphere. However, high intensities of ultrasound led to the generation of heat at the surface of the sphere, thus limiting the lowest final temperature achieved. An analytical solution was developed considering the heat generation and was fitted to the experimental data with R(2) values in the range of 0.910-0.998. Visual observations revealed that both cavitation and acoustic streaming were important for heat transfer phenomenon. Cavitation clouds at the surface of the sphere

  11. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of C-Mn-Al-Si-Nb Hot-Rolled TRIP Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, B.; Y Lu, M.; Y Yang, W.; Li, L. F.; Y Zhao, Z.

    2017-12-01

    A novel thermomechanical process to manufacture hot-rolled TRIP steels has been proposed based on dynamic transformation of undercooled austenite (DTUA). The cooling rate between DTUA and isothermal bainitic treatment in the novel process is important. In the present study, effect of this cooling rate on the final microstructures and mechanical properties of a C-Mn-Al-Si-Nb TRIP steel was investigated. The results showed that the volume fractions of acicular ferrite and retained austenite were increased with the increment of cooling rate. As a consequence, higher yield strength and larger total elongation were obtained for the investigated steel with higher cooling rate. In addition, a value of 30.24 GPa% for the product of tensile strength and total elongation was acquired when the cooling rate was 25 K/s. This value has met the standard of the “Third Generation” of advanced high strength sheet steels.

  12. Cost-effective control systems for solar heating and cooling applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejsa, J. H.; Bassett, W. W.; Wenzler, S. A.; Nguyen, K. H.; Olson, T. J.

    1978-09-01

    A methodology has been defined to arrive at control recommendations for a variety of climate control system designs, applications and regions, and the results are presented in two parts. Part I consists of a literature and market-place survey, involving control strategies, functions, sensors, actuators, and the controllers themselves. Part II represents the bulk of the study effort - an attempt to simulate and evaluate system performance for several representative residential and commercial heating and cooling designs and thus to derive improved performance techniques within cost-effective control systems. (MHR)

  13. System design and installation for RS600 programmable control system for solar heating and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Procedures for installing, operating, and maintaining a programmable control system which utilizes a F8 microprocessor to perform all timing, control, and calculation functions in order to customize system performance to meet individual requirements for solar heating, combined heating and cooling, and/or hot water systems are described. The manual discusses user configuration and options, displays, theory of operation, trouble-shooting procedures, and warranty and assistance. Wiring lists, parts lists, drawings, and diagrams are included.

  14. INFLUENCE OF THE COOLING RATE AND THE BLEND RATIO ON THE PHYSICAL STABILTIY OF CO-AMORPHOUS NAPROXEN/INDOMETHACIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Andreas; Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    Co-amorphisation represents a promising approach to increase the physical stability and dissolution rate of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) as an alternative to polymer glass solutions. For amorphous and co-amorphous systems, it is reported that the preparation method and the b......Co-amorphisation represents a promising approach to increase the physical stability and dissolution rate of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) as an alternative to polymer glass solutions. For amorphous and co-amorphous systems, it is reported that the preparation method...... and the blend ratio play major roles with regard to the resulting physical stability. Therefore, in the present study, co-amorphous naproxen-indomethacin (NAP/IND) was prepared by melt-quenching at three different cooling rates and at ten different NAP/IND blend ratios. The samples were analyzed using XRPD...... and FTIR, both directly after preparation and during storage to investigate their physical stabilities. All cooling methods led to fully amorphous samples, but with significantly different physical stabilities. Samples prepared by fast cooling had a higher degree of crystallinity after 300 d of storage...

  15. Influence of Cooling on the Glycolysis Rate and Development of PSE (Pale, Soft, Exudative Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayka Reghiany Pedrão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate pH values fall rate in chicken breast meat under commercial refrigeration processing conditions and the development of PSE (pale, soft, exudative meat. Broiler breast samples from the Cobb breed, both genders, at 47 days of age (n = 100 were taken from refrigerated carcasses (RS immersed in water and ice in a tank chilled at 0°C (±2. pH and temperature (T values were recorded at several periods throughout refrigeration in comparison to samples left at room T as control (CS. The ultimate pH (pHu value of 5.86 for RS carcasses were only reached at 11°C after 8.35 h post mortem (PM while, for CS samples, pHu value was 5.94 at 22°C after 4.08 h PM. Thus, under commercial refrigeration conditions, the glycolysis rate was retarded by over 4.0 h PM and the breast meat color was affected. At 24.02 h PM, PSE meat incidence was 30% while for CS, meat remained dark and PSE meat was not detected. Results show retardation in the glycolysis rate and PSE meat development was promoted by the refrigeration treatment when compared with samples stored at processing room temperature.

  16. Wind dependence on the flow rate in a natural draught cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, E.; Ernst, G.; Wurz, D.

    1981-01-01

    The efficiency of a natural draught cooling tower depends, among other things, on the effect of the wind on the flow in the tower stack. Determinations were made on a natural draught wet cooling tower 100 metres high, for the purpose of studying this effects. As characteristic quantity, a typical height was determined, the values of which were worked out from the results of the measurements. The efficiency of the stack is affected the most in the case of average wind velocities (when the velocity of the wind is about equal to the mean velocity of the plume). This effect diminishes when the velocity of the wind increases. In the case of average wind velocities, the direction of the wind has an effect, owing to the neighbouring buildings; for slightly greater wind velocities, no effect could be found [fr

  17. Cooling rate dependence of simulated Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glass structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryltsev, R. E. [Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Kosygina Str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Klumov, B. A. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Kosygina Str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Aix-Marseille-Université, CNRS, Laboratoire PIIM, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); High Temperature Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/2 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Chtchelkatchev, N. M. [Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 Kosygina Str., 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutskiy Per., Dolgoprudny, 141700 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, 22 Sushchevskaya, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shunyaev, K. Yu. [Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 101 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom model potential, we study structural evolution of Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} alloy during the cooling in a wide range of cooling rates γ ∈ (1.5 ⋅ 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 13}) K/s. Investigating short- and medium-range orders, we show that the structure of Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} metallic glass essentially depends on cooling rate. In particular, a decrease of the cooling rate leads to an increase of abundances of both the icosahedral-like clusters and Frank-Kasper Z16 polyhedra. The amounts of these clusters in the glassy state drastically increase at the γ{sub min} = 1.5 ⋅ 10{sup 9} K/s. Analysing the structure of the glass at γ{sub min}, we observe the formation of nano-sized crystalline grain of Cu{sub 2}Zr intermetallic compound with the structure of Cu{sub 2}Mg Laves phase. The structure of this compound is isomorphous with that for Cu{sub 5}Zr intermetallic compound. Both crystal lattices consist of two types of clusters: Cu-centered 13-atom icosahedral-like cluster and Zr-centered 17-atom Frank-Kasper polyhedron Z16. That suggests the same structural motifs for the metallic glass and intermetallic compounds of Cu–Zr system and explains the drastic increase of the abundances of these clusters observed at γ{sub min}.

  18. Development of an Integrated Cooling System Controller for Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid electrical bus employs both a turbo diesel engine and an electric motor to drive the vehicle in different speed-torque scenarios. The cooling system for such a vehicle is particularly power costing because it needs to dissipate heat from not only the engine, but also the intercooler and the motor. An electronic control unit (ECU has been designed with a single chip computer, temperature sensors, DC motor drive circuit, and optimized control algorithm to manage the speeds of several fans for efficient cooling using a nonlinear fan speed adjustment strategy. Experiments suggested that the continuous operating performance of the ECU is robust and capable of saving 15% of the total electricity comparing with ordinary fan speed control method.

  19. Expanded calculation of weak-interaction-mediated neutrino cooling rates due to 56Ni in stellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2010-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the neutrino cooling rates is required in order to study the various stages of stellar evolution of massive stars. Neutrino losses from proto-neutron stars play a crucial role in deciding whether these stars would be crushed into black holes or explode as supernovae. Both pure leptonic and weak-interaction processes contribute to the neutrino energy losses in stellar matter. At low temperatures and densities, the characteristics of the early phase of presupernova evolution, cooling through neutrinos produced via the weak interaction, are important. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently been used with success for the calculation of stellar weak-interaction rates of fp-shell nuclide. The lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y e ) during early phases of stellar evolution of massive stars changes substantially, mainly due to electron captures on 56 Ni. The stellar matter is transparent to the neutrinos produced during the presupernova evolution of massive stars. These neutrinos escape the site and assist the stellar core in maintaining a lower entropy. Here, an expanded calculation of weak-interaction-mediated neutrino and antineutrino cooling rates due to 56 Ni in stellar matter using the pn-QRPA theory is presented. This detailed scale is appropriate for interpolation purposes and is of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculated rates are compared with earlier calculations. During the relevant temperature and density regions of stellar matter the reported rates show few differences compared with the shell model rates and might contribute in fine-tuning of the lepton-to-baryon ratio during the presupernova phases of stellar evolution of massive stars.

  20. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilocca, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10 3 atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their application

  1. Effect of Fe content, cooling rate and porosity on the tensile properties of cast 319 and 356 aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Z.; Samuel, A.M.; Samuel, F.H.; Doty, H.W.; Valtierra, S.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of Fe content, cooling rate and porosity on the tensile properties of cast 319 and 356 alloys. Both experimental and industrial 319 alloys (containing 0.1 and 0.4 wt% Mg) and industrial 356 alloys were used, with 200-300 ppm strontium additions to study the modification effect. The Fe content was varied from 0.2 to 0.8 wt% in the 319 alloys, and from 0.1 to 0.6 wt% in the 356 alloy in keeping with Fe levels observed in industry. An end-chilled mold was employed to obtain directionally solidified castings, where the cooling rate varied with the height of the casting. Tensile and microstructural samples were sectioned at heights corresponding to dendrite arm spacings of ∼23 to ∼83 μm. The microstructures were examined using optical- and scanning electron microscopy. The effect of Fe content and cooling rate was investigated through measurements of the β-Al 5 FeSi platelets, using image analysis. Porosity measurements were also made. Phase identification was done using EPMA, EDX and XRD. The results show that the β-Al 5 FeSi platelet size has a significant effect on ductility and tensile strength up to sizes of ∼100 μm in the 319 alloys and ∼70 μm in the 356 alloy, but has no significant effect on the yield strength. While tensile properties are interpreted by means of UTS vs. log Elongation plots (after the Quality index concept of Drouzy et al. (5)), in the present study, the properties for all sample conditions were best interpreted by means of log UTS vs. log Elongation plots, where the properties increased linearly within low cooling rate-high Fe and high cooling rate-low Fe condition extremities. The results are explained in terms of the β-Al 5 FeSi platelet size and porosity values obtained. (author)

  2. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their

  3. Controlling indoor climate. Passive cooling of residential buildings in hot-humid climates in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiwu, Wang

    1996-10-01

    Overheating is a paramount problem in residential buildings in hot and humid climates in China during summer. This study aims to deal with the overheating problem and the problem of poor air quality in dwellings. The main objective is to improve indoor thermal conditions by passive cooling approaches, climatisation techniques in buildings without auxiliary cooling from air conditioning equipment. This thesis focuses on the study of cross-ventilation in apartments, which is one of the most effective ways of natural cooling in a hot humid climate, but is also one of the least understood parts in controlling indoor climate. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique is used, which is a new approach, since cross-ventilation studies have been conventionally made by wind tunnel tests. The validations of the CFD technique are examined by a comparison between wind tunnel tests and computer simulations. The factors influencing indoor air movement are investigated for a single room. Cross-ventilation in two apartments is studied, and the air change efficiency in a Chinese kitchen is calculated with CFD techniques. The thermal performance of ventilated roofs, a simple and widely used type of roof in the region, is specially addressed by means of a full-scale measurement, wind tunnel tests and computer simulations. An integrated study of passive cooling approaches and factors affecting indoor thermal comfort is carried out through a case study in a southern Chinese city, Guangzhou. This thesis demonstrates that passive cooling measure have a high potential in significantly improving indoor thermal conditions during summer. This study also gives discussions and conclusions on the evaluation of indoor thermal environment; effects influencing cross-ventilation in apartments; design guidelines for ventilated roofs and an integrated study of passive cooling. 111 refs, 83 figs, 65 tabs

  4. Robust nonlinear control design with application to a marine cooling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2012-01-01

    . In this context, we apply a bilinear transformation to obtain a well-posed H-inf problem. The design procedure is applied to a marine cooling system with flow dependent delays and performance of the resulting control design is evaluated through a simulation example where a comparison is made to a linear control......In this paper we consider design of control laws for a class of nonlinear systems with time-varying state delays by use of principles from feedback linearization. To deal with model uncertainties and delay mismatches, a robust linear H-inf controller is designed for the feedback linearized system...

  5. Optimal control of quantum dissipative dynamics: Analytic solution for cooling the three-level Λ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklarz, Shlomo E.; Tannor, David J.; Khaneja, Navin

    2004-01-01

    We study the problem of optimal control of dissipative quantum dynamics. Although under most circumstances dissipation leads to an increase in entropy (or a decrease in purity) of the system, there is an important class of problems for which dissipation with external control can decrease the entropy (or increase the purity) of the system. An important example is laser cooling. In such systems, there is an interplay of the Hamiltonian part of the dynamics, which is controllable, and the dissipative part of the dynamics, which is uncontrollable. The strategy is to control the Hamiltonian portion of the evolution in such a way that the dissipation causes the purity of the system to increase rather than decrease. The goal of this paper is to find the strategy that leads to maximal purity at the final time. Under the assumption that Hamiltonian control is complete and arbitrarily fast, we provide a general framework by which to calculate optimal cooling strategies. These assumptions lead to a great simplification, in which the control problem can be reformulated in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of ρ, rather than ρ itself. By combining this formulation with the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman theorem we are able to obtain an equation for the globally optimal cooling strategy in terms of the spectrum of the density matrix. For the three-level Λ system, we provide a complete analytic solution for the optimal cooling strategy. For this system it is found that the optimal strategy does not exploit system coherences and is a 'greedy' strategy, in which the purity is increased maximally at each instant

  6. Cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of 5KhNM steel, machined by electroerosion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foteev, N.K.; Ploshkin, V.V.; Lyakishev, V.A.; Shirokov, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of steel 5KhNM machined by electroerosion method have been studied. It is shown that the difference in heating rate of the surface layers with electric discharge over the 5KhNM steel samples depth results in the intensive size reduction of the microstructure. In the surface layer alongside with martensite residual austenite is present, the lattice period of which increases with the increase of pulse duration, carbide phase of complex composition appears, and concentrational heterogeneity in alloying elements (except carbon) is absent

  7. Cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of 5KhNM steel, machined by electroerosion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foteev, N.K.; Ploshkin, V.V.; Lyakishev, V.A.; Shirokov, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling rate and microstructure of surface layers of steel 5KhNM machined by electroerosion method have been studied. It is shown that the difference in heating rate of the surface layers with electric discharge over the 5KhNM steel samples depth results in the intensive size reduction of the microstructure. In the surface layer alongside with martensite residual austenite is present, the lattice period of which increases with the increase of pulse duration, carbide phase of complex composition appears, and concentrational heterogeneity in alloying elements (except carbon) is absent.

  8. Effect of Cooling Rates on the Transformation Behavior and Mechanical Properties of a Ni-Rich NiTi Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Stephen; Shamimi, Ali; Duerig, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Slightly nickel-rich Ni-Ti alloys (typically 50.5-51% atomic percent nickel) are commonly used to produce devices that are superelastic at body temperature. This excess nickel can be tolerated in the NiTi matrix when its temperature is above the solvus of about 600 °C, but will precipitate out during lower temperatures. Recent work has been done on exploring the effect lower temperatures have on the material properties of NiTi. Findings showed that properties begin to change at temperatures as low as 100 °C. It is because of these results that it was deemed important to better understand what may be happening during the quenching process itself. Through running a combination of DSC and tensile tests on samples cooled at varying rates, it was found that the cooling rate has an effect on properties when heat treated above a specific temperature. Understanding how quickly the alloy must be cooled to fully retain the supersaturated NiTi matrix is important to optimizing processes and anticipating material properties after a heat treatment.

  9. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part I. Experimental design and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model which incorporates heat flow, phase transformation kinetics, and property-structure-composition relationships to predict the mechanical properties of steel rod being control cooled under industrial conditions. Thus, the principles of microstructural engineering have been brought to bear on this interdisciplinary problem by combining computer modeling with laboratory measurements of heat flow, austenite decomposition kinetics, microstructure and mechanical properties, and industrial trials to determine heat transfer and obtain rod samples under known conditions. Owing to the length and diversity of the study, it is reported in three parts,[8191]the first of which is concerned with the heat flow measurements. A relatively simple and reliable technique, involving a preheated steel rod instrumented with a thermocouple secured at its centerline, has been devised to determine the cooling rate in different regions of the moving bed of rod loops on an operating Stelmor line. The measured thermal response of the rod has been analyzed by two transient conduction models (lumped and distributed parameter, respectively) to yield overall heat-transfer coefficients for radiation and convection. The adequacy of the technique has been checked by cooling instrumented rods under well-defined, air crossflow conditions in the laboratory and comparing measured heat-transfer coefficients to values predicted from well-established equations. The industrial thermal measurements have permitted the characterization of a coefficient to account for radiative interaction among adjacent rod loops near the edge and at the center of the bed.

  10. A lab-based study of subground passive cooling system for indoor temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Mun-Hong; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    Passive cooling is an alternative cooling technique which helps to reduce high energy consumption. Respectively, dredged marine soil (DMS) is either being dumped or disposed as waste materials. Dredging works had resulted high labor cost, therefore reuse DMS as to fill it along the coastal area. In this study, DMS chosen to examine the effectiveness of passive cooling system by model tests. Soil characterization were carried out according to BS1377: Part 2: 1990. Model were made into scale of 3 cm to 1 m. Heat exchange unit consists of three pipe designs namely, parallel, ramp and spiral. Preliminary tests including flow rate test and soil sample selection were done to select the best heat exchange unit to carry out the model test. Model test is classified into 2 conditions, day and night, each condition consists of 4 configurations which the temperature results are determined. The result shows that window left open and fan switched on (WO/FO) recorded the most effective cooling effects, from 29 °C to 27 °C with drop of 6.9 %.

  11. [Awareness rate, treatment rate and control rate of dyslipidemia in Chinese adults, 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-hong; Wang, Li-min; Mi, Sheng-quan; Zhang, Mei; Li, Yi-chong; Jiang, Yong; Xu, Yu; Dai, Meng; Wang, Lin-hong

    2012-08-01

    To explore the awareness, treatment and control rates of dyslipidemia among Chinese adults aged over 18 in 2010, and to analyze the prevalent features. 97 409 subjects aged over 18 were recruited from 162 monitoring sites around 31 provinces in China mainland in 2010, applying multi-stage stratified cluster random sampling method. Information about subjects' history of dyslipidemia, treatment and control were collected by face-to-face interview; and each subject's fasting venous blood was drawn in the morning before having food, to test total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). In total, 51 818 cases of dyslipidemia ever or now, including 2235 subjects who once suffered from dyslipidemia but had their blood lipid controlled to normal, were screened out. And the awareness, treatment and control rates were calculated by complex weighting. The awareness rate of dyslipidemia among Chinese adults was 10.93%, while the stratified rates were 6.00%, 16.75% and 18.74% in the groups of subjects aged 18 - 44, 45 - 59 and over 60 years old, respectively (χ² = 1293.02, P China, respectively (χ² = 117.04, P China, respectively (χ² = 50.71, P control rate of dyslipidemia was 3.53% among total subjects, while whose stratified rates were 1.64%, 5.49% and 6.94% in the groups of subjects aged 18 - 44, 45 - 59 and over 60 years old, respectively (χ² = 554.12, P China, respectively (χ² = 91.45, P control rates of dyslipidemia have been comparatively low among Chinese adults, especially among the population who were young, or who were from rural area or western China.

  12. Simplified Building Thermal Model Used for Optimal Control of Radiant Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MPC has the ability to optimize the system operation parameters for energy conservation. Recently, it has been used in HVAC systems for saving energy, but there are very few applications in radiant cooling systems. To implement MPC in buildings with radiant terminals, the predictions of cooling load and thermal environment are indispensable. In this paper, a simplified thermal model is proposed for predicting cooling load and thermal environment in buildings with radiant floor. In this thermal model, the black-box model is introduced to derive the incident solar radiation, while the genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the parameters of the thermal model. In order to further validate this simplified thermal model, simulated results from TRNSYS are compared with those from this model and the deviation is evaluated based on coefficient of variation of root mean square (CV. The results show that the simplified model can predict the operative temperature with a CV lower than 1% and predict cooling loads with a CV lower than 10%. For the purpose of supervisory control in HVAC systems, this simplified RC thermal model has an acceptable accuracy and can be used for further MPC in buildings with radiation terminals.

  13. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouse, Lon; Brouse, Richard; Brouse, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Application of toxic antibacterial agents is considered necessary to control prevalent fresh water microorganisms that grow in evaporative cooling water systems, but can adversely affect the environment and human health. However, natural antibacterial water chemistry has been applied in industrial cooling water systems for over 10 years to inhibit microorganisms with excellent results. The water chemistry method concentrates natural minerals in highly-softened water to produce elevated pH and dissolved solids, while maintaining low calcium and magnesium content. The method provides further benefits in water conservation, and generates a small volume of non-toxic natural salt concentrate for cost efficient separation and disposal if required. This report describes the antimicrobial effects of these chemistry modifications in the cooling water environment and the resultant collective inhibition of microbes, biofilm, and pathogen growth. This article also presents a novel perspective of parasitic microbiome functional relationships, including “Trojan Protozoans” and biofilms, and the function of polyvalent metal ions in the formation and inhibition of biofilms. Reducing global dependence on toxic antibacterial agents discharged to the environment is an emerging concern due to their impact on the natural microbiome, plants, animals and humans. Concurrently, scientists have concluded that discharge of antibacterial agents plays a key role in development of pathogen resistance to antimicrobials as well as antibiotics. Use of natural antibacterial chemistry can play a key role in managing the cooling water environment in a more ecologically sustainable manner. PMID:28420074

  14. Numerical examination of temperature control in helium-cooled high flux test module of IFMIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Shinji; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    For long term irradiation of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), test specimens are needed to retain constant temperature to avoid change of its irradiation characteristics. The constant temperatures control is one of the most challenging issues for the IFMIF test facilities. We have proposed a new concept of test module which is capable of precisely measuring temperature, keeping uniform temperature with enhanced cooling performance. In the system according to the new design, cooling performances and temperature distributions of specimens were examined numerically under diverse conditions. Some transient behaviors corresponding to the prescribed temperature control mode were perseveringly simulated. It was confirmed that the thermal characteristics of the new design satisfied the severe requirement of IFMIF

  15. Controlling the Rate of GWAS False Discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyski, Damian; Peterson, Christine B; Sobczyk, Piotr; Candès, Emmanuel J; Bogdan, Malgorzata; Sabatti, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of both the number and the complexity of traits of interest, control of the false discovery rate (FDR) in genetic association studies has become an increasingly appealing and accepted target for multiple comparison adjustment. While a number of robust FDR-controlling strategies exist, the nature of this error rate is intimately tied to the precise way in which discoveries are counted, and the performance of FDR-controlling procedures is satisfactory only if there is a one-to-one correspondence between what scientists describe as unique discoveries and the number of rejected hypotheses. The presence of linkage disequilibrium between markers in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often leads researchers to consider the signal associated to multiple neighboring SNPs as indicating the existence of a single genomic locus with possible influence on the phenotype. This a posteriori aggregation of rejected hypotheses results in inflation of the relevant FDR. We propose a novel approach to FDR control that is based on prescreening to identify the level of resolution of distinct hypotheses. We show how FDR-controlling strategies can be adapted to account for this initial selection both with theoretical results and simulations that mimic the dependence structure to be expected in GWAS. We demonstrate that our approach is versatile and useful when the data are analyzed using both tests based on single markers and multiple regression. We provide an R package that allows practitioners to apply our procedure on standard GWAS format data, and illustrate its performance on lipid traits in the North Finland Birth Cohort 66 cohort study. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Electrical supply and controls for induced-draft cooling towers at Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mock, C.H.; Boehms, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Design considerations are given for selection of electrical features as required for addition of mechanical-draft-type cooling towers at an existing multiunit nuclear generating station. Environmental and nuclear safety problems were solved economically by use of enclosed 161-kV power connections, oil-filled transformers, supervisory-type control, and unique schemes for redundancy to minimize need for Class 1E construction

  17. Influence of hot plastic deformation and cooling rate on martensite and bainite start temperatures in 22MnB5 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikravesh, M.; Naderi, M.; Akbari, G.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Reduction of cooling rate, can cause to increase or decrease M s and M f . ► 40% hot plastic deformation hindered the martensitic transformation. ► Hot plastic deformation, caused to decrease M f and M s , while B s increased. ► The critical cooling rate increased 40 °C/s due to apply 40% hot deformation. - Abstract: During hot stamping process, hot forming, cooling and phase transformations are performed in a single step. As a matter of fact, multifunctional phenomena happen and affect each other. Among these phenomena, martensitic and bainitic transformations have the greatest importance. In the current research, the start temperatures of martensite and bainite of 22MnB5 boron steel have been measured in undeformed and 40% deformed conditions, and in various cooling rates from 0.4 °C/s to 100 °C/s by means of deformation dilatometer. It is concluded that, reduction of cooling rate, could bring about an increase or decrease in M s and M f , depending on other phases formation before martensite. Also, hot plastic deformation, hindered the martensitic transformation and decreased M f and M s especially at lower cooling rates, while B s increased. Furthermore, the critical cooling rate, increased about 40 °C/s by applying 40% hot plastic deformation.

  18. Drop performance test of conceptually designed control rod assembly for prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Lee, Jae Han; Kim, Hoe Woong; KIm, Sung Kyun; Kim, Jong Bum [Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor NSSS Design Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The control rod assembly controls reactor power by adjusting its position during normal operation and shuts down chain reactions by its free drop under scram conditions. Therefore, the drop performance of the control rod assembly is important for the safety of a nuclear reactor. In this study, the drop performance of the conceptually designed control rod assembly for the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor that is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a next-generation nuclear reactor was experimentally investigated. For the performance test, the test facility and test procedure were established first, and several free drop performance tests of the control rod assembly under different flow rate conditions were then carried out. Moreover, performance tests under several types and magnitudes of seismic loading conditions were also conducted to investigate the effects of seismic loading on the drop performance of the control rod assembly. The drop time of the conceptually designed control rod assembly for 0% of the tentatively designed flow rate was measured to be 1.527 seconds, and this agrees well with the analytically calculated drop time. It was also observed that the effect of seismic loading on the drop time was not significant.

  19. A Real-Time Temperature Data Transmission Approach for Intelligent Cooling Control of Mass Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the study presented in this paper is to propose a real-time temperature data transmission approach for intelligent cooling control of mass concrete. A mathematical description of a digital temperature control model is introduced in detail. Based on pipe mounted and electrically linked temperature sensors, together with postdata handling hardware and software, a stable, real-time, highly effective temperature data transmission solution technique is developed and utilized within the intelligent mass concrete cooling control system. Once the user has issued the relevant command, the proposed programmable logic controllers (PLC code performs all necessary steps without further interaction. The code can control the hardware, obtain, read, and perform calculations, and display the data accurately. Hardening concrete is an aggregate of complex physicochemical processes including the liberation of heat. The proposed control system prevented unwanted structural change within the massive concrete blocks caused by these exothermic processes based on an application case study analysis. In conclusion, the proposed temperature data transmission approach has proved very useful for the temperature monitoring of a high arch dam and is able to control thermal stresses in mass concrete for similar projects involving mass concrete.

  20. Effect of cooling rate on the structure and properties of thick films of YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.R.; Oleinikov, N.N.; Gas'kov, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    A problem associated with the production of quality films is chemical interaction of the HTSC material with the substrate. This leads to a considerable worsening or complete loss of the superconducting properties of a functional material. A second problem is selection of a substrate whose thermal expansion coefficient (TCE) is as close as possible to the TCE of the superconducting material. Omission of this condition leads to production of a HTSC material which is subject to perturbing mechanical stresses (compressive or tensile stress), and this is a potential cause of the reduction of the functional parameters of the material. The authors note that other substrate requirements should be considered only during production of thin films. Unfortunately, the production of quality thick films is apparently not worked out with resolution of the latter two problems. It is very important in production of HTSC materials to consider the rate of cooling at the moment of formation of the orthorhombic phase (in the following, the tetragonal-orthorhombic transition). Undesirable relaxation can be avoided if the cooling rate is lowered below some critical value. According to the computations, this problem is solved most successfully in HTSC materials of the composition YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x if their ceramic structure consists of crystallites whose size does not exceed 1-2 μm. The goal of this work is to elucidate the effect of the cooling rate of thick films of composition YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x in the temperature range corresponding to transition of the tetragonal to the orthorhombic phase on their structure and properties

  1. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  2. Evaluation of cooling water treatment programme at RAPS-3 and 4 with reference to chlorination and microbial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rao, T.S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Water from Rana Pratap Sagar Lake is used in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station (RAPS) units 3 and 4 for cooling the condenser system. As the lake water is rich in nutrients and microflora, investigations were carried out on the nutrient quality, microflora distribution and chlorine decay to evaluate the cooling water treatment programme. Algal growth in emergency storage makeup water pools, weed growth on the cooling tower decks and biofilm growth on various materials (carbon steel, stainless steel, admiralty brass and cupronickel) were studied with an objective to understand the reasons for corrosion and failure of fire water pipeline. Visual examination showed that the emergency makeup water pools were infested with green algae and cyano-bacterial mats. Some algal growth was observed on induced draft cooling tower-3 structures. The bacterial counts in various water samples were low, except in emergency makeup water pool. Sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) were present in makeup and demineralised waters. Chlorophyll pigment analysis showed that the makeup and emergency storage water pool had abundant algal growth. To prevent biofouling, chlorine is dosed at the rate of 7 kg/hr for 10 minutes; free residual oxidant (FRO) and chlorine decay were monitored at regular intervals. After 24 hrs, biofilm thickness on different materials ranged from 27-45 μm. However, the thickness was reduced by 50 % after exposure to 2 ppm of chlorine for 15 minutes. In further investigations, it was found that the anion resin beads of demineraliser plant were infested with filamentous microbes. Hence, It is recommended to treat the feed water of DM plant. Tubercles were observed inside the failed fire water carbon steel pipeline and on removing the tubercles concentric ring patterns, typical signatures of SRB corrosion were observed. For controlling the biofouling problem in the cooling water system, it is recommended to maintain a chlorine dose of 2.3 ppm (which gives 0.8 ppm FRO) for two

  3. Cardiovascular autonomic control during short-term thermoneutral and cool head-out immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourot, Laurent; Bouhaddi, Malika; Gandelin, Emmanuel; Cappelle, Sylvie; Dumoulin, Gilles; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Rouillon, Jean Denis; Regnard, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Moderately cold head-out water immersion stimulates both baro- and cold-receptors, and triggers complex and contradictory effects on the cardiovascular system and its autonomic nervous control. To assess the effects of water immersion and cold on cardiovascular status and related autonomic nervous activity. Hemodynamic variables and indexes of autonomic nervous activity (analysis of heart rate and blood pressure variability) were evaluated in 12 healthy subjects during 3 exposures of 20 min each in the upright position, i.e., in air (AIR, 24-25 degrees C), and during head-out water immersion at 35-36 degrees C (WIn) and 26-27 degrees C (WIc). Plasma noradrenaline, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and total peripheral resistances were reduced during WIn compared to AIR (263.9 +/- 39.4 vs. 492.5 +/- 35.7 pg x ml(-1), 116.5 +/- 3.7 and 65.4 +/- 1.7 mmHg vs. 140.8 +/- 4.7 and 89.8 +/- 2.8 mmHg, 14.1 +/- 1.0 vs. 16.3 +/- 0.9 mmHg x L(-1) x min, respectively) while they were increased during WIc (530.8 +/- 84.7 pg ml(-1), 148.0 +/- 7.0 mmHg, 80.8 +/- 3.0 mmHg, and 25.8 +/- 1.9 mmHg x L(-1) x min, respectively). The blood pressure variability was reduced to the same extent during WIc and Win compared to AIR. Heart rate decreased during WIn (67.8 +/- 2.7 vs. 81.2 +/- 2.7 bpm during AIR), in parallel with an increased cardiac parasympathetic activity. This pattern was strengthened during WIc (55.3 +/- 2.2 bpm). Thermoneutral WI lowered sympathetic activity and arterial tone, while moderate whole-body skin cooling triggered vascular sympathetic activation. Conversely, both WI and cold triggered cardiac parasympathetic activation, highlighting a complex autonomic control of the cardiovascular system.

  4. Air cooling analysis and design of impacted flexible actuator’s servo controller based on PLECS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Mingjun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, SUAV (small unmanned aerial vehicle is developing with small shape, high dynamic performance and distributed structure. Meanwhile the power by wire, which can replace traditional hydraulic system to lighten weight and improve reliability, is important developing direction of actuator technology in future. When a plane which applies power by wire is doing high-g routine, the power devices’ loss is giant because of the high power. Thus it is necessary to design cooling structure to carry out heat from controller inner. To avoid over design and analyze more exactly, this paper introduces a method based on MATLAB and PLECS union Simulink to calculate controller’s loss. By power devices’ thermal resistance and working temperature referred from products manual, it is possible to define cooler’s size. Then we can achieve wind pressure and flow characteristic curve, and select the cooling fan. Compared with theory calculation, this method can achieve exact controller loss in different working conditions and take effects which influenced by temperature in consideration, by what we can avoid cooling structure’s over design.

  5. Part load performance of air-cooled centrifugal chillers with variable speed condenser fan control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, F.W.; Chan, K.T. [Department of Building Services Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-11-15

    Air-cooled centrifugal chillers are commonly used in commercial buildings but their performance analysis is lacking. This paper investigates the part load performance of the chillers via a thermodynamic model. The model was validated using a wide range of operating data from an existing chiller with specific settings of outdoor temperature and condensing pressure in controlling the condensing temperature. The validated model was developed specifically to ascertain the maximum coefficient of performance of chiller (COP) together with the strategy for optimizing the condensing temperature under various operating conditions. It is found that the highest COP occurs at a part load ratio (PLR) of 0.71-0.84, depending on the outdoor temperature and the control of condensing temperature, rather than at full load. Yet the chillers operating at such part load conditions will cause extra energy used for the early staging of chilled water pumps. To minimize the overall chiller plant energy consumption, it is still preferable to implement chiller sequencing based on the full load condition than on the aforementioned PLRs. The results of this paper present criteria for implementing low-energy strategies for operating air-cooled chillers satisfying a given building cooling load profile. (author)

  6. Performance assessment of oxidants as a biocide for biofouling control in industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed; Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Jeong, Sanghyun; Amy, Gary L.; Leiknes, TorOve

    2017-01-01

    Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of seawater cooling towers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone (O3) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2)) comparing with commonly being used chlorine in biofouling control. Effects of cycle of concentration, temperature and oxidant dosage along with residual decay and kinetics were studied. Even at lower oxidant dosage (total residual oxidant equivalent=0.1mg/L Cl2), ClO2 showed a better disinfection effect compared to chlorine and O3. Results of bench-scale studies will be helpful in the selection of appropriate oxidant for seawater cooling tower operation.

  7. SWR 1000 severe accident control through in-vessel melt retention by external RPV cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, N.I. [Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power, NDSI, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power is being designing a new generation NPP with boiling water reactor SWR1000. Besides of various of modern passive and active safety features the system is also designed for controlling of a postulated severe accident with extreme low probability of occurrence. This work presents the rationales behind the decision to select the external cooling as a safety management strategy during severe accident. Bounding scenery are analyzed regarding the core melting, melt-water interaction during relocation of the melt from the core region into the lower head and the external coolability of the lower head. The conclusion is reached that the external cooling for the SWR1000 is a valuable strategy for accident management during postulated severe accidents. (authors)

  8. SWR 1000 severe accident control through in-vessel melt retention by external RPV cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power is being designing a new generation NPP with boiling water reactor SWR1000. Besides of various of modern passive and active safety features the system is also designed for controlling of a postulated severe accident with extreme low probability of occurrence. This work presents the rationales behind the decision to select the external cooling as a safety management strategy during severe accident. Bounding scenery are analyzed regarding the core melting, melt-water interaction during relocation of the melt from the core region into the lower head and the external coolability of the lower head. The conclusion is reached that the external cooling for the SWR1000 is a valuable strategy for accident management during postulated severe accidents. (authors)

  9. An On-Site Thermoelectric Cooling Device for Cryotherapy and Control of Skin Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Natalia; Dedow, Karl; Nguy, Lindsey; Sullivan, Patrick; Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    Cryotherapy involves the surface application of low temperatures to enhance the healing of soft tissue injuries. Typical devices embody a remote source of chilled water that is pumped through a circulation bladder placed on the treatment site. In contrast, the present device uses thermoelectric refrigeration modules to bring the cooling source directly to the tissue to be treated, thereby achieving significant improvements in control of therapeutic temperature while having a reduced size and weight. A prototype system was applied to test an oscillating cooling and heating protocol for efficacy in regulating skin blood perfusion in the treatment area. Data on 12 human subjects indicate that thermoelectric coolers (TECs) delivered significant and sustainable changes in perfusion for both heating (increase by (±SE) 173.0 ± 66.0%, P device for cryotherapy with local temperature regulation.

  10. Performance assessment of oxidants as a biocide for biofouling control in industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-10-14

    Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of seawater cooling towers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone (O3) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2)) comparing with commonly being used chlorine in biofouling control. Effects of cycle of concentration, temperature and oxidant dosage along with residual decay and kinetics were studied. Even at lower oxidant dosage (total residual oxidant equivalent=0.1mg/L Cl2), ClO2 showed a better disinfection effect compared to chlorine and O3. Results of bench-scale studies will be helpful in the selection of appropriate oxidant for seawater cooling tower operation.

  11. Control of Canadian once-through direct cycle supercritical water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Peiwei; Wang, Baosheng; Zhang, Jianmin; Su, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic characteristics of Canadian SCWR are analyzed. • Hybrid feedforward and feedback control is adopted to deal with cross-coupling. • Gain scheduling control with smooth weight is applied to deal with nonlinearity. • It demonstrates through simulation that the control requirements are satisfied. - Abstract: Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) can be modelled as a Multiple-input Multiple-output (MIMO) system. It has a high power-to-flow ratio, strong cross-coupling and high degree of nonlinearity in its dynamic characteristics. Among the outputs, the steam temperature is strongly affected by the reactor power and the most challenging to control. It is difficult to adopt a traditional control system design methodology to obtain a control system with satisfactory performance. In this paper, feedforward control is applied to reduce the effect on steam temperature from the reactor power. Single-input Single-output (SISO) feedback controllers are synthesized in the frequency domain. Using the feedforward controller, the steam temperature variation due to disturbances at the reactor power has been significantly suppressed. The control system can effectively maintain the overall system stability and regulate the plant around a specified operating condition. To deal with the nonlinearities, gain scheduling control strategy is adopted. Different sets of controllers combined by smooth weight functions are used for the plant at different load conditions. The proposed control strategies have been evaluated under various operating scenarios. Simulation results show that satisfactory performance can successfully achieved by the designed control system

  12. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  13. The influence of cooling rate and Fe/Cr content on the evolution of Fe-rich compounds in a secondary Al-Si-Cu diecasting alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, A.; Timelli, G.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the morphological evolution of primary α-Al(Fe,Mn,Cr)Si phase in a secondary Al-Si-Cu alloy with respect to the initial Fe and Cr contents as well as to the cooling rate. The solidification experiments have been designed in order to cover a wide range of cooling rates, and the Fe and Cr contents have been varied over two levels. Metallographic and image analysis techniques have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructural changes occurring at different experimental conditions. The morphological evolution of the α-Fe phase has been also analysed by observing deep etched samples. By changing the cooling rate, α-Al15(Fe,Mn,Cr)3Si2 dodecahedron crystals, as well as Chinese- script, branched structures and dendrites form, while primary coarse β-Al5(Fe,Mn)Si needles appear in the alloy with the highest Fe content at low cooling rates.

  14. The influence of cooling rate and Fe/Cr content on the evolution of Fe-rich compounds in a secondary Al-Si-Cu diecasting alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrizi, A; Timelli, G

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the morphological evolution of primary α-Al(Fe,Mn,Cr)Si phase in a secondary Al-Si-Cu alloy with respect to the initial Fe and Cr contents as well as to the cooling rate. The solidification experiments have been designed in order to cover a wide range of cooling rates, and the Fe and Cr contents have been varied over two levels. Metallographic and image analysis techniques have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructural changes occurring at different experimental conditions. The morphological evolution of the α-Fe phase has been also analysed by observing deep etched samples. By changing the cooling rate, α-Al 15 (Fe,Mn,Cr) 3 Si 2 dodecahedron crystals, as well as Chinese- script, branched structures and dendrites form, while primary coarse β-Al 5 (Fe,Mn)Si needles appear in the alloy with the highest Fe content at low cooling rates. (paper)

  15. Altering the cooling rate dependence of phase formation during rapid solidification in the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branagan, D.J. [USDOE, Ames, IA (United States). Ames Lab.]|[Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; McCallum, R.W. [USDOE, Ames, IA (United States). Ames Lab.]|[Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-04-26

    In order to evaluate the effects of additions on the solidification behavior of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B, a stoichiometric alloy was modified with elemental additions of Ti or C and a compound addition of Ti with C. For each alloy, a series of wheel speed runs was undertaken, from which the optimum wheel speeds and optimum energy products were determined. On the BH{sub max} versus wheel speed plots, regions were identified in order to analyze the changes with cooling rates leading to phase formation brought about by the alloy modifications. The compilation of the regional data of the modified alloys showed their effects on altering the cooling rate dependence of phase formation. It was found that the regions of properitectic iron formation, glass formation, and the optimum cooling rate can be changed by more than a factor of two through appropriate alloying additions. The effects of the alloy modifications can be visualized in a convenient fashion through the use of a model continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram which represents phase formation during the solidification process under continuous cooling conditions for a wide range of cooling rates from rapid solidification to equilibrium cooling. ((orig.)).

  16. Study on influence of flow rates on voids in waxy crude oil subjected to dynamic and static cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girma T. Chala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The assumption of constant yield stress in the conventional restart pressure equation neglects the effects of thermal shrinkage and gas voids formation, which in turn resulted in an over-designed production piping systems. This paper presents a study on the effects of flow rates on the formation of voids in gelled waxy crude oil. A flow loop rig simulating offshore waxy crude oil transportation was used to produce a gel. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI was used to scan the gelled crude oil over the three planes. Waxy crude oil underwent both dynamic and static cooling to observe the effects of volume flow rates on the voids formed in wax-oil gel. Volume flow rate was found to have different influences on the intra-gel voids in the pipeline. A volume flow rate of 5 L/min resulted in a maximum total voids volume of 6.98% while 20 L/min produced a minimum total voids volume of 5.67% in the entire pipe. Slow flow rates resulted in a larger voids volume near the pipe wall. In contrast, faster flow rates produced insignificantly higher voids volume around pipe core. Generally, slower flow rates favoured the formation of higher total voids volume following sufficient steady time of wax crystal formation, producing larger voids areas in gelled waxy crude oil.

  17. Effect of cooled hyperbaric bupivacaine on unilateral spinal anesthesia success rate and hemodynamic complications in inguinal hernia surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomak, Yakup; Erdivanli, Basar; Sen, Ahmet; Bostan, Habib; Budak, Ersel Tan; Pergel, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    We hypothesized that cooling hyperbaric bupivacaine from 23 to 5 °C may limit the intrathecal spread of bupivacaine and therefore increase the success rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia and decrease the rate of hemodynamic complications. A hundred patients scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal hernia surgery were randomly allocated to receive 1.8 ml of 0.5 % hyperbaric bupivacaine intrathecally at either 5 °C (group I, n = 50) or at 23 °C (group II, n = 50). Following spinal block at the L2-3 interspace, the lateral decubitus position was maintained for 15 min. Unilateral spinal anesthesia was assessed and confirmed at 15 and 30 min. The levels of sensory and motor block on the operative side were evaluated until complete resolution. The rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia at 15 and 30 min was significantly higher in group I (p = 0.015 and 0.028, respectively). Hypotensive events and bradycardia were significantly rarer in group I (p = 0.014 and 0.037, respectively). The density and viscosity of the solution at 5 °C was significantly higher than at 23 °C (p < 0.0001). Compared with group II, sensory block peaked later in group I (17.4 vs 12.6 min) and at a lower level (T9 vs T7), and two-segment regression of sensory block (76.4 vs 84.3 min) and motor block recovery was shorter (157.6 vs 193.4 min) (p < 0.0001). Cooling of hyperbaric bupivacaine to 5 °C increased the density and viscosity of the solution and the success rate of unilateral spinal anesthesia, and decreased the hemodynamic complication rate.

  18. Rotational Laser Cooling of MgH+ Ions and Rotational Rate Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus

    by varying a delay between two such pairs of firings and measuring the yield of the second pair obtain the refilling rates. These rotational transition rate measurements are not only of direct interest for us to understand our rotational state preparation schemes, but will be important input to quantum...

  19. Numerical studies of fast ion slowing down rates in cool magnetized plasma using LSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Kolmes, Elijah; Cohen, Samuel A.; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Bruce; Meier, Eric; Welch, Dale R.

    2016-10-01

    In MFE devices, rapid transport of fusion products from the core into the scrape-off layer (SOL) could perform the dual roles of energy and ash removal. The first-orbit trajectories of most fusion products from small field-reversed configuration (FRC) devices will traverse the SOL, allowing those particles to deposit their energy in the SOL and be exhausted along the open field lines. Thus, the fast ion slowing-down time should affect the energy balance of an FRC reactor and its neutron emissions. However, the dynamics of fast ion energy loss processes under the conditions expected in the FRC SOL (with ρe code, to examine the effects of SOL density and background B-field on the slowing-down time of fast ions in a cool plasma. As we use explicit algorithms, these simulations must spatially resolve both ρe and λDe, as well as temporally resolve both Ωe and ωpe, increasing computation time. Scaling studies of the fast ion charge (Z) and background plasma density are in good agreement with unmagnetized slowing down theory. Notably, Z-scaling represents a viable way to dramatically reduce the required CPU time for each simulation. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Effect of cooling rate on the transition temperature in Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yugui; Wang Jinsong; Wang Nanlin; Jiao Xinping; Han Guchang; Chen Zhaojia; Wang Keqin; Wu Xiaoguang

    1989-12-01

    The resistance and a.c. susceptibility measurement show that cooling rate of the cast-annealing samples in heat treatment process has some effect on the 110K superconducting phase in Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system. Rapid quenching of the sample in air from 845 deg C causes oxygen deficiency in lattice and brings about a trifling change of unit cell size along c-axis direction. The d.c. magnetization and specific heat anomaly Δc measurements demostrate that fast cooling rate can reduce the transition temperature of high-T c phase and the lower critical field, and weaken the pinning forces for vertex lines. The peak value of specific heat anomaly of the sample with nominal composition of Bi 1.7 Pb 0.3 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 4.5 O v is still small in comparison with YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 . From the magnetization curve the authors estimate that the superconducting volume fraction is about 20%

  1. False belief understanding and cool inhibitory control in 3-and 4-year-old Italian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eBellagamba

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During preschool years, major developments occur in both executive function and theory of mind (ToM, and several studies have demonstrated a correlation between these processes. Research on the development of inhibitory control (IC has distinguished between more cognitive, cool aspects of self-control, measured by conflict tasks, that require inhibiting an habitual response to generate an arbitrary one, and hot, affective aspects, such as affective decision making, measured by delay tasks, that require inhibition of a prepotent response. The aim of this study was to investigate the relations between 3- and 4-year-olds’ performance on a task measuring false belief understanding, the most widely used index of ToM in preschoolers, and two tasks measuring cognitive versus affective aspects of IC. To this end, we tested 101 Italian preschool children in three tasks: (a the Unexpected Content False Belief task, (b the Conflict task (a simplified version of the Day-Night Stroop task, and (c the Delay task. Children’s receptive vocabulary was assessed by the Peabody Picture Vocabulary test. Children’s performance in the False Belief task was significantly related only to performance in the Conflict task, controlling for vocabulary and age. Importantly, children’s performance in the Conflict task did not significantly correlate with their performance in the Delay task, suggesting that these tasks measure different components of IC. The dissociation between the Conflict and the Delay task may indicate that monitoring and regulating a cool process (as flexible categorization may involve different abilities than monitoring and regulating a hot process (not touching an available and highly attractive stimulus. Moreover, our findings support the view that cool aspects of IC and ToM are interrelated, extending to an Italian sample of children previous findings on an association between self-control and ToM.

  2. Re-Engineering Control Systems using Automatic Generation Tools and Process Simulation: the LHC Water Cooling Case

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, W; Bradu, B; Gomez Palacin, L; Quilichini, M; Willeman, D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the approach used at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) to perform the re-engineering of the control systems dedicated to the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) water cooling systems.

  3. Prediction models and control algorithms for predictive applications of setback temperature in cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jin Woo; Yoon, Younju; Jeon, Young-Hoon; Kim, Sooyoung

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Initial ANN model was developed for predicting the time to the setback temperature. • Initial model was optimized for producing accurate output. • Optimized model proved its prediction accuracy. • ANN-based algorithms were developed and tested their performance. • ANN-based algorithms presented superior thermal comfort or energy efficiency. - Abstract: In this study, a temperature control algorithm was developed to apply a setback temperature predictively for the cooling system of a residential building during occupied periods by residents. An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to determine the required time for increasing the current indoor temperature to the setback temperature. This study involved three phases: development of the initial ANN-based prediction model, optimization and testing of the initial model, and development and testing of three control algorithms. The development and performance testing of the model and algorithm were conducted using TRNSYS and MATLAB. Through the development and optimization process, the final ANN model employed indoor temperature and the temperature difference between the current and target setback temperature as two input neurons. The optimal number of hidden layers, number of neurons, learning rate, and moment were determined to be 4, 9, 0.6, and 0.9, respectively. The tangent–sigmoid and pure-linear transfer function was used in the hidden and output neurons, respectively. The ANN model used 100 training data sets with sliding-window method for data management. Levenberg-Marquart training method was employed for model training. The optimized model had a prediction accuracy of 0.9097 root mean square errors when compared with the simulated results. Employing the ANN model, ANN-based algorithms maintained indoor temperatures better within target ranges. Compared to the conventional algorithm, the ANN-based algorithms reduced the duration of time, in which the indoor temperature

  4. Effect of Salted Ice Bags on Surface and Intramuscular Tissue Cooling and Rewarming Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Eric J; Ostrowski, Jennifer; Donahue, Matthew; Crowley, Caitlyn; Herzog, Valerie

    2016-02-01

    Many researchers have investigated the effectiveness of different cryotherapy agents at decreasing intramuscular tissue temperatures. However, no one has looked at the effectiveness of adding salt to an ice bag. To compare the cooling effectiveness of different ice bags (wetted, salted cubed, and salted crushed) on cutaneous and intramuscular temperatures. Repeated-measures counterbalanced design. University research laboratory. 24 healthy participants (13 men, 11 women; age 22.46 ± 2.33 y, height 173.25 ± 9.78 cm, mass 74.51 ± 17.32 kg, subcutaneous thickness 0.63 ± 0.27 cm) with no lower-leg injuries, vascular diseases, sensitivity to cold, compromised circulation, or chronic use of NSAIDs. Ice bags made of wetted ice (2000 mL ice and 300 mL water), salted cubed ice (intervention A; 2000 mL of cubed ice and 1/2 tablespoon of salt), and salted crushed ice (intervention B; 2000 mL of crushed ice and 1/2 tablespoon of salt) were applied to the posterior gastrocnemius for 30 min. Each participant received all conditions with at least 4 d between treatments. Cutaneous and intramuscular (2 cm plus adipose thickness) temperatures of nondominant gastrocnemius were measured during a 10-min baseline period, a 30-min treatment period, and a 45-min rewarming period. Differences from baseline were observed for all treatments. The wetted-ice and salted-cubed-ice bags produced significantly lower intramuscular temperatures than the salted-crushed-ice bag. Wetted-ice bags produced the greatest temperature change for cutaneous tissues. Wetted- and salted-cubed-ice bags were equally effective at decreasing intramuscular temperature at 2 cm subadipose. Clinical practicality may favor salted-ice bags over wetted-ice bags.

  5. Analysis of isothermal and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing by a unifying stochastic ice nucleation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Peter A.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2016-02-01

    Immersion freezing is an important ice nucleation pathway involved in the formation of cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Laboratory immersion freezing experiments are necessary to determine the range in temperature, T, and relative humidity, RH, at which ice nucleation occurs and to quantify the associated nucleation kinetics. Typically, isothermal (applying a constant temperature) and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing experiments are conducted. In these experiments it is usually assumed that the droplets containing ice nucleating particles (INPs) all have the same INP surface area (ISA); however, the validity of this assumption or the impact it may have on analysis and interpretation of the experimental data is rarely questioned. Descriptions of ice active sites and variability of contact angles have been successfully formulated to describe ice nucleation experimental data in previous research; however, we consider the ability of a stochastic freezing model founded on classical nucleation theory to reproduce previous results and to explain experimental uncertainties and data scatter. A stochastic immersion freezing model based on first principles of statistics is presented, which accounts for variable ISA per droplet and uses parameters including the total number of droplets, Ntot, and the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet(T). This model is applied to address if (i) a time and ISA-dependent stochastic immersion freezing process can explain laboratory immersion freezing data for different experimental methods and (ii) the assumption that all droplets contain identical ISA is a valid conjecture with subsequent consequences for analysis and interpretation of immersion freezing. The simple stochastic model can reproduce the observed time and surface area dependence in immersion freezing experiments for a variety of methods such as: droplets on a cold-stage exposed to air or surrounded by an oil matrix, wind and acoustically levitated droplets

  6. Analysis of isothermal and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing by a unifying stochastic ice nucleation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Alpert

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Immersion freezing is an important ice nucleation pathway involved in the formation of cirrus and mixed-phase clouds. Laboratory immersion freezing experiments are necessary to determine the range in temperature, T, and relative humidity, RH, at which ice nucleation occurs and to quantify the associated nucleation kinetics. Typically, isothermal (applying a constant temperature and cooling-rate-dependent immersion freezing experiments are conducted. In these experiments it is usually assumed that the droplets containing ice nucleating particles (INPs all have the same INP surface area (ISA; however, the validity of this assumption or the impact it may have on analysis and interpretation of the experimental data is rarely questioned. Descriptions of ice active sites and variability of contact angles have been successfully formulated to describe ice nucleation experimental data in previous research; however, we consider the ability of a stochastic freezing model founded on classical nucleation theory to reproduce previous results and to explain experimental uncertainties and data scatter. A stochastic immersion freezing model based on first principles of statistics is presented, which accounts for variable ISA per droplet and uses parameters including the total number of droplets, Ntot, and the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient, Jhet(T. This model is applied to address if (i a time and ISA-dependent stochastic immersion freezing process can explain laboratory immersion freezing data for different experimental methods and (ii the assumption that all droplets contain identical ISA is a valid conjecture with subsequent consequences for analysis and interpretation of immersion freezing. The simple stochastic model can reproduce the observed time and surface area dependence in immersion freezing experiments for a variety of methods such as: droplets on a cold-stage exposed to air or surrounded by an oil matrix, wind and

  7. Effect of cooling rate on tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in hot pressed ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, W.Z.; Ding, Z.S.; Lei, T.C.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    It is well documented that the tetragonal (T) to monoclinic (M) transition in either pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia is the origin of toughening in that resistance to the propagation of cracks can be greatly enhanced by the concurrent appearance of the stress field of the transformation. In the present paper, the effect of cooling rate on the T → M phase transformation in yttria-containing zirconia and its resultant mechanical properties have been studied by means of thermal expansion analysis. Both the T → M and M → T transformations are affected by the cooling and heating rates, respectively. The amount of M-phase decreases with increasing cooling rate. T → M transition occurring within the interior part of specimen can be completely inhibited by the cooling rate of 100 C/min for ZrO 2 (2mol% Y 2 O 3 ) ceramic sintered at 1,600 C. The start point and end point of the T → M transformation decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cooling rate. Both the start point and end point of the M → T transformation increase with increasing cooling rate. The divergence between the results of X-ray diffraction and the thermal expansion analysis has been rationalized in terms of the both internal and external factors, namely, preferential sites of surface for the formation of the M-phase and limited sensitivity of measurement of the thermal expansion apparatus. Both the water-cooled and air-cooled specimens show much improved mechanical properties regardless of the sintering temperatures or yttria content because of the relatively higher T-phase fraction retained to room temperature

  8. Performance of highly rated UO2 fuel in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schankula, M. H.; Hastings, I. J.

    1977-07-15

    Information on oxide fuel behaviour in organic coolant was required as part of the organic-cooled power reactor (OCR) study. Of major interest were data on the release of fission gases from fuel operating at high fuel surface temperatures and low external restraint; features which are peculiar to the OCR. To provide these and other data, UO2 fuel with cold-worked Zr-2.5wt%Nb sheathing was irradiated in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor to burnups of 135-154 MWh/kgU at a time-averaged linear power of 60-63 kW/m. Elements with 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing showed maximum diametral increases averaging 3.7 and 1.7% respectively at pellet mid-planes. Reduced fuel/sheath heat transfer resulting from a difference between internal gas pressure and coolant pressure produced high operating temperatures, and there was evidence of central melting in some elements. Fission gas releases were 30-60%. In the heat affected zone adjacent to brazed appendages, the diametral increases were lower, averaging 0.9 and 0.5% for 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing respectively. Heat treatment during the brazing process produced a local improvement in sheath creep strength. Highly rated oxide fuel irradiated in organic coolant will require sheathing with improved high temperature creep properties; heat-treated Zr-2.5 wt% Nb may provide this improvement.

  9. Extracting information on the spatial variability in erosion rate stored in detrital cooling age distributions in river sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jean; Gemignani, Lorenzo; van der Beek, Peter

    2018-03-01

    One of the main purposes of detrital thermochronology is to provide constraints on the regional-scale exhumation rate and its spatial variability in actively eroding mountain ranges. Procedures that use cooling age distributions coupled with hypsometry and thermal models have been developed in order to extract quantitative estimates of erosion rate and its spatial distribution, assuming steady state between tectonic uplift and erosion. This hypothesis precludes the use of these procedures to assess the likely transient response of mountain belts to changes in tectonic or climatic forcing. Other methods are based on an a priori knowledge of the in situ distribution of ages to interpret the detrital age distributions. In this paper, we describe a simple method that, using the observed detrital mineral age distributions collected along a river, allows us to extract information about the relative distribution of erosion rates in an eroding catchment without relying on a steady-state assumption, the value of thermal parameters or an a priori knowledge of in situ age distributions. The model is based on a relatively low number of parameters describing lithological variability among the various sub-catchments and their sizes and only uses the raw ages. The method we propose is tested against synthetic age distributions to demonstrate its accuracy and the optimum conditions for it use. In order to illustrate the method, we invert age distributions collected along the main trunk of the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra river system in the eastern Himalaya. From the inversion of the cooling age distributions we predict present-day erosion rates of the catchments along the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra river system, as well as some of its tributaries. We show that detrital age distributions contain dual information about present-day erosion rate, i.e., from the predicted distribution of surface ages within each catchment and from the relative contribution of any given catchment to the

  10. Extracting information on the spatial variability in erosion rate stored in detrital cooling age distributions in river sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Braun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main purposes of detrital thermochronology is to provide constraints on the regional-scale exhumation rate and its spatial variability in actively eroding mountain ranges. Procedures that use cooling age distributions coupled with hypsometry and thermal models have been developed in order to extract quantitative estimates of erosion rate and its spatial distribution, assuming steady state between tectonic uplift and erosion. This hypothesis precludes the use of these procedures to assess the likely transient response of mountain belts to changes in tectonic or climatic forcing. Other methods are based on an a priori knowledge of the in situ distribution of ages to interpret the detrital age distributions. In this paper, we describe a simple method that, using the observed detrital mineral age distributions collected along a river, allows us to extract information about the relative distribution of erosion rates in an eroding catchment without relying on a steady-state assumption, the value of thermal parameters or an a priori knowledge of in situ age distributions. The model is based on a relatively low number of parameters describing lithological variability among the various sub-catchments and their sizes and only uses the raw ages. The method we propose is tested against synthetic age distributions to demonstrate its accuracy and the optimum conditions for it use. In order to illustrate the method, we invert age distributions collected along the main trunk of the Tsangpo–Siang–Brahmaputra river system in the eastern Himalaya. From the inversion of the cooling age distributions we predict present-day erosion rates of the catchments along the Tsangpo–Siang–Brahmaputra river system, as well as some of its tributaries. We show that detrital age distributions contain dual information about present-day erosion rate, i.e., from the predicted distribution of surface ages within each catchment and from the relative contribution of

  11. Late Quaternary cooling rate constrained by multiple IRSL thermochronometers of potassium feldspars for granites from Kongur Shan, Chinese Pamir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jintang; Chen, Jie; Valla, Pierre; Herman, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    The Kongur Shan (East Pamir), located at the northwestern Tibetan Plateau, is one of the most active orogens on Earth, where both tectonic processes along major active faults and climatic forcing (extensive glaciers coverage) are contributing to the regional landscape evolution. The exhumation rates since late Miocene was constrained to be ~6.5 - 4.2 mm/yr. However, it is still debated whether the exhumation rate accelerated since the Quaternary, of which the climate was featured by the cyclic glaciations with periods of 100 ka and 40 ka. In this study, we tried to employ luminescence thermochronology, which is a still in developing method, to resolve the impact of glacial cycles on exhumation rate. Our study site is located ~10 km to the east of the active Kongur normal fault, along the major valley of Gez river. We sampled three granite rocks from a sub-horizontal tunnel across the granite massif; one was from the entrance of the tunnel, and other two samples were from inside of the tunnel, where the measured ambient temperature is as high as 60-70 ° C. The distances of these samples are within 2 km. Four types of IRSL signals extracted from potassium feldspars (K-feldspars) were measured for each individual sample, and the results of isothermal decay experiments indicated these signals were of different thermal stabilities. Therefore, they may serve as four thermochronometers with different closure temperature. We employ these multiple thermochronometers together for each single sample to constrain their cooling rates. Our preliminary results, which are based on the simplified luminescence model of K-feldspars, suggest that the averaged cooling rate of the last 200 ka is as high as 1.4 oC/ka, which corresponds to an exhumation rate of ~ 2.3 to 0.9 cm/yr with the geothermal gradient assumed to be 60 to 150 oC/km. It seems to imply that the glacial cycles during the Quaternary substantially accelerated the exhumation rate of granite massif of Kongur Shan.

  12. Adaptive individual-cylinder thermal state control using piston cooling for a GDCI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Gregory T; Husted, Harry L; Sellnau, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A system for a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine includes a plurality of nozzles, at least one nozzle per cylinder, with each nozzle configured to spray oil onto the bottom side of a piston of the engine to cool that piston. Independent control of the oil spray from the nozzles is provided on a cylinder-by-cylinder basis. A combustion parameter is determined for combustion in each cylinder of the engine, and control of the oil spray onto the piston in that cylinder is based on the value of the combustion parameter for combustion in that cylinder. A method for influencing combustion in a multi-cylinder engine, including determining a combustion parameter for combustion taking place in in a cylinder of the engine and controlling an oil spray targeted onto the bottom of a piston disposed in that cylinder is also presented.

  13. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  14. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level

  15. Feedback linearization based control of a variable air volume air conditioning system for cooling applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thosar, Archana; Patra, Amit; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2008-07-01

    Design of a nonlinear control system for a Variable Air Volume Air Conditioning (VAVAC) plant through feedback linearization is presented in this article. VAVAC systems attempt to reduce building energy consumption while maintaining the primary role of air conditioning. The temperature of the space is maintained at a constant level by establishing a balance between the cooling load generated in the space and the air supply delivered to meet the load. The dynamic model of a VAVAC plant is derived and formulated as a MIMO bilinear system. Feedback linearization is applied for decoupling and linearization of the nonlinear model. Simulation results for a laboratory scale plant are presented to demonstrate the potential of keeping comfort and maintaining energy optimal performance by this methodology. Results obtained with a conventional PI controller and a feedback linearizing controller are compared and the superiority of the proposed approach is clearly established.

  16. Development of fluorocarbon evaporative cooling recirculators and controls for the ATLAS inner silicon tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bayer, C; Bonneau, P; Bosteels, Michel; Burckhart, H J; Cragg, D; English, R; Hallewell, G D; Hallgren, Björn I; Ilie, S; Kersten, S; Kind, P; Langedrag, K; Lindsay, S; Merkel, M; Stapnes, Steinar; Thadome, J; Vacek, V

    2000-01-01

    We report on the development of evaporative fluorocarbon cooling recirculators and their control systems for the ATLAS inner silicon tracker. We have developed a prototype circulator using a dry, hermetic compressor with C/sub 3/F/sup 8/ refrigerant, and have prototyped the remote-control analog pneumatic links for the regulation of coolant mass flows and operating temperatures that will be necessary in the magnetic field and radiation environment around ATLAS. pressure and flow measurement and control use 150+ channels of standard ATLAS LMB ("Local Monitor Board") DAQ and DACs on a multi-drop CAN network administered through a BridgeVIEW user interface. A hardwired thermal interlock system has been developed to cut power to individual silicon modules should their temperatures exceed safe values. Highly satisfactory performance of the circulator under steady state, partial-load and transient conditions was seen, with proportional fluid flow tuned to varying circuit power. Future developments, including a 6 kW...

  17. Nucleation behavior of melted Bi films at cooling rates from 101 to 104 K/s studied by combining scanning AC and DC nano-calorimetry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Kechao; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We proposed a general data reduction scheme that combines scanning AC and DC calorimetry results for the study of reaction kinetics. • Calorimetry measurements at cooling rates ranging from 30 K/s to 20,000 K/s were achieved. • Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaks up into thousands of isolated islands, and highly repeatable nucleation behavior is observed. • The nucleation rate of melted Bi is calculated, which can be well described by classical nucleation theory over a wide range of cooling rates. - Abstract: We study the nucleation behavior of undercooled liquid Bi at cooling rates ranging from 10 1 to 10 4 K/s using a combination of scanning DC and AC nano-calorimetry techniques. Upon initial melting, the Bi thin-film sample breaks up into silicon nitride-coated isolated islands. The number of islands in a typical sample is sufficiently large that highly repeatable nucleation behavior is observed, despite the stochastic nature of the nucleation process. We establish a data reduction technique to evaluate the nucleation rate from DC and AC calorimetry results. The results show that the driving force for the nucleation of melted Bi is well described by classical nucleation theory over a wide range of cooling rates. The proposed technique provides a unique and efficient way to examine nucleation kinetics with cooling rates over several orders of magnitude. The technique is quite general and can be used to evaluate reaction kinetics in other materials

  18. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  19. Automatic learning rate adjustment for self-supervising autonomous robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arras, Michael K.; Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    Described is an application in which an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) controls the positioning of a robot arm with five degrees of freedom by using visual feedback provided by two cameras. This application and the specific ANN model, local liner maps, are based on the work of Ritter, Martinetz, and Schulten. We extended their approach by generating a filtered, average positioning error from the continuous camera feedback and by coupling the learning rate to this error. When the network learns to position the arm, the positioning error decreases and so does the learning rate until the system stabilizes at a minimum error and learning rate. This abolishes the need for a predetermined cooling schedule. The automatic cooling procedure results in a closed loop control with no distinction between a learning phase and a production phase. If the positioning error suddenly starts to increase due to an internal failure such as a broken joint, or an environmental change such as a camera moving, the learning rate increases accordingly. Thus, learning is automatically activated and the network adapts to the new condition after which the error decreases again and learning is 'shut off'. The automatic cooling is therefore a prerequisite for the autonomy and the fault tolerance of the system.

  20. Experimental constraints on heating and cooling rates of refractory inclusions in the early solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boynton, W.V.

    1987-01-01

    The refractory inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites were the subject of considerable interest since their discovery. These inclusions contain minerals that are predicted to be some of the earliest condensates from the solar nebula, and contain a plethora of isotopic anomalies of unknown origin. Of particular interest are those coarse-grained inclusions that contain refractory metal particles (Fe, Ni, Pt, Ru, Os Ir). Experimental studies of these inclusions in terrestrial laboratories are, however, complicated because the dense particles tend to settle out of a molten or partially molten silicate material. Heating experiments in the Space Station technology and microgravity in order to observe the effects of metal nuggets (which may act as heterogeneous nucleation sites) on nucleation rates in silicate systems and to measure simultaneously the relative volatilization rate of siderophile and lithophile species. Neither experiment is possible in the terrestrial environment

  1. Effect of cooling rate on the phase transformation behavior and mechanical properties of Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motemani, Y. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Nili-Ahmadabadi, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, 14395-731 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tan, M.J. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)], E-mail: mmjtan@ntu.edu.sg; Bornapour, M.; Rayagan, Sh. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, 14395-731 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-02-05

    TiNi alloy is a well-known shape memory alloy and has been widely used for bio-medical, mechanical and electrical applications. In this study, a Ni-rich NiTi alloy was prepared by vacuum arc melting in a water-cooled copper crucible. Three samples of this alloy were heated to 1000 deg. C and cooled in three media: furnace, water, and dry-ice bath. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness measurement and tensile test were carried out to investigate the effect of cooling rate on transformation temperature and mechanical properties. The results show that Ni{sub 3}Ti intermetallic compounds have a great influence on martensitic phase transformation temperature. These tests clearly showed the correlation between cooling rate and properties of the alloy.

  2. Cooling system upon reactor isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Oda, Shingo; Miura, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    A water level indicator for detecting the upper limit value for a range of using a suppression pool and a thermometer for detecting the temperature of water at the cooling water inlet of an auxiliary device are disposed. When a detection signal is intaken and the water level in the suppression pool reach the upper limit value for the range of use, a secondary flow rate control value is opened and a primary flow rate control valve is closed. When the temperature of the water at the cooling water inlet of the auxiliary device reaches the upper limit value, the primary and the secondary flow rate control valves are opened. During a stand-by state, the first flow rate control valve is set open and the secondary flow rate control valve is set closed respectively. After reactor isolation, if a reactor water low level signal is received, an RCIC pump is actuated and cooling water is sent automatically under pressure from a condensate storage tank to the reactor and the auxiliary device requiring coolants by way of the primary flow rate control valve. Rated flow rate is ensured in the reactor and cooling water of an appropriate temperature can be supplied to the auxiliary device. (N.H.)

  3. Effect of organic on chemical oxidation for biofouling control in pilot-scale seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-09-14

    Due to the scarcity of potable water in many regions of the world, the demand for seawater as an alternative evaporative cooling medium in cooling towers (CTs) has increased significantly in recent years. Seawater make-up in CTs is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in the coastal areas of Gulf and Red Sea. However, the seawater CTs have higher challenges greatly mitigating their performances because it is an open system where biofouling and bio-corrosion occurring within the fillers and piping of recirculation systems. Their pilot-scale CTs were constructed to assess the performance of three types of oxidizing biocides or oxidants, namely chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and ozone, for biofouling control. The test results showed that the addition of organic (5mg/L of methanol (MeOH)) increased the bacterial growth in CT basin. All oxidants were effective in keeping the microbial growth to the minimum. Oxidation increased the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level from 270 to 600mV. Total residual oxidant (TRO) was increased with oxidation but it was slightly increased with organic addition. Other parameters including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity levels were not changed. However, higher formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was detected with chlorination and ozonation. This indicates the organic level should be limited in the oxidation for biofouling control in seawater CTs.

  4. Effect of organic on chemical oxidation for biofouling control in pilot-scale seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed; Saththasivam, Jayaprakash; Jeong, Sanghyun; Amy, Gary L.; Leiknes, TorOve

    2017-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of potable water in many regions of the world, the demand for seawater as an alternative evaporative cooling medium in cooling towers (CTs) has increased significantly in recent years. Seawater make-up in CTs is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in the coastal areas of Gulf and Red Sea. However, the seawater CTs have higher challenges greatly mitigating their performances because it is an open system where biofouling and bio-corrosion occurring within the fillers and piping of recirculation systems. Their pilot-scale CTs were constructed to assess the performance of three types of oxidizing biocides or oxidants, namely chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and ozone, for biofouling control. The test results showed that the addition of organic (5mg/L of methanol (MeOH)) increased the bacterial growth in CT basin. All oxidants were effective in keeping the microbial growth to the minimum. Oxidation increased the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) level from 270 to 600mV. Total residual oxidant (TRO) was increased with oxidation but it was slightly increased with organic addition. Other parameters including pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity levels were not changed. However, higher formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was detected with chlorination and ozonation. This indicates the organic level should be limited in the oxidation for biofouling control in seawater CTs.

  5. Effect of cooling rate on microstructure and deformation behavior of Ti-based metallic glassy/crystalline powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D.J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Huang, Y.J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shen, J., E-mail: junshen@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Y.Q.; Huang, H. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Zou, J., E-mail: j.zou@uq.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2010-08-20

    The microstructures and deformation behavior of Ti-based metallic powders were comprehensively investigated. It has been found that, with increasing the powder size, the phase constituent alters from pure glassy to glassy with crystalline phases (face centered cubic structured NiSnZr and hexagonal structured Ti{sub 3}Sn phases). Our results suggest that the synergetic effect of the thermodynamics and kinetics determines the subsequent characteristics of the crystalline precipitations. Through comparative nanoindentation tests, it was found that the small powders exhibit more pop-in events and a larger pile-up ratio, suggesting that the plastic deformation of the metallic powders is governed by the combined effects of the free volume and the crystallization, which are determined by the cooling rate.

  6. Thermal expansion and cooling rate dependence of transition temperature in ZrTiO4 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal expansion in ZrTiO 4 single crystal was investigated in the temperature range covering the normal, incommensurate, and commensurate phases. Remarkable change was found at the normal-incommensurate phase transition (T I ) in all thermal expansion coefficients a, b, and c. The spontaneous strains χ as and χ bs along the a and b axes show linear temperature dependence, while the spontaneous strain χ cs along the c axis shows a nonlinear temperature dependence. Small discontinuity along the c direction was observed at the incommensurate-commensurate transition temperature, T c = 845 C. dT I /dP and dT c /dP depend on the cooling rate

  7. The construction and space qualification of the control electronics for the tracker detector cooling system of the AMS-02 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menichelli, M.; Accardo, L.; Alberti, G.; Bardet, M.; Battiston, R.; Blasko, S.; He, Z.; Koutsenko, V.; Lebedev, A.; Ni, J.; Papi, A.; Pauw, A.; Van Ess, J.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zwartbol, T.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the control electronics for the silicon tracker cooling system in the AMS-02 apparatus. It also contains a brief description of the cooling system itself necessary for the description of the electronics. The tracker cooling system includes a set of various sensors and actuators which are necessary for bringing the tracker detector to a uniform temperature at which it can operate correctly. In order to test the system performing the various qualification activities we have built also an Electronic Ground support equipment (EGSE). The EGSE should simulate the behaviour of all sensors and actuators previously mentioned.

  8. High energy resolution and high count rate gamma spectrometry measurement of primary coolant of generation 4 sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, R.

    2010-01-01

    Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors are under development for the fourth generation of nuclear reactor. Breeders reactors could gives solutions for the need of energy and the preservation of uranium resources. An other purpose is the radioactive wastes production reduction by transmutation and the control of non-proliferation using a closed-cycle. These thesis shows safety and profit advantages that could be obtained by a new generation of gamma spectrometry system for SFR. Now, the high count rate abilities, allow us to study new methods of accurate power measurement and fast clad failure detection. Simulations have been done and an experimental test has been performed at the French Phenix SFR of the CEA Marcoule showing promising results for these new measurements. (author) [fr

  9. Energy reduction for a dual circuit cooling water system using advanced regulatory control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, C.J.; Craig, I.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Potentially reduce energy required by a dual circuit cooling water system by 30%. • Accomplished using an advanced regulatory control and switching strategy. • No formal process model is required. • Can be implemented on control system hardware commonly used in industry. - Abstract: Various process utilities are used in the petrochemical industry as auxiliary variables to facilitate the addition/removal of energy to/from the process, power process equipment and inhibit unwanted reaction. Optimisation activities usually focus on the process itself or on the utility consumption though the generation and distribution of these utilities are often overlooked in this regard. Many utilities are prepared or generated far from the process plant and have to be transported or transmitted, giving rise to more losses and potential inefficiencies. To illustrate the potential benefit of utility optimisation, this paper explores the control of a dual circuit cooling water system with focus on energy reduction subject process constraints. This is accomplished through the development of an advanced regulatory control (ARC) and switching strategy which does not require the development of a system model, only rudimentary knowledge of the behaviour of the process and system constraints. The novelty of this manuscript lies in the fact that it demonstrates that significant energy savings can be obtained by applying ARC to a process utility containing both discrete and continuous dynamics. Furthermore, the proposed ARC strategy does not require a plant model, uses only existing plant equipment, and can be implemented on control system hardware commonly used in industry. The simulation results indicate energy saving potential in the region of 30% on the system under investigation.

  10. The Effects of Cooling Rate on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ti{sub 4}0Zr{sub 1}0Cu{sub 3}6Pd{sub 1}4 Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seon Yong; Lim, Ka Ram; Na, Young Sang; Kim, Seong Eon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Youn Suk [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the microstructure and mechanical properties in the Ti{sub 4}0Zr{sub 1}0Cu{sub 3}6Pd{sub 1}4 alloy can be tailored by controlling the cooling rate during solidification. A lower cooling rate increases the volume fraction of crystalline phase such as B2 but decreases the free volume of the glassy matrix. The increase of the B2 volume fraction can dramatically enhance the toughness of the composites, since the B2 phase is relatively ductile compared to the glassy matrix and seems to have good interface stability with the matrix. From the experimental results, it was found that there is a transition point in the plasticity of the composites depending on the cooling rate. Here, we explain how the toughness of the composites varies in accordance with the cooling rate in the Ti{sub 4}0Zr{sub 1}0Cu{sub 3}6Pd{sub 1}4 alloy system.

  11. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chengming; Chen, Rongshun

    2015-05-20

    Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN) with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server's fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption.

  12. Optimal Self-Tuning PID Controller Based on Low Power Consumption for a Server Fan Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, saving the cooling power in servers by controlling the fan speed has attracted considerable attention because of the increasing demand for high-density servers. This paper presents an optimal self-tuning proportional-integral-derivative (PID controller, combining a PID neural network (PIDNN with fan-power-based optimization in the transient-state temperature response in the time domain, for a server fan cooling system. Because the thermal model of the cooling system is nonlinear and complex, a server mockup system simulating a 1U rack server was constructed and a fan power model was created using a third-order nonlinear curve fit to determine the cooling power consumption by the fan speed control. PIDNN with a time domain criterion is used to tune all online and optimized PID gains. The proposed controller was validated through experiments of step response when the server operated from the low to high power state. The results show that up to 14% of a server’s fan cooling power can be saved if the fan control permits a slight temperature response overshoot in the electronic components, which may provide a time-saving strategy for tuning the PID controller to control the server fan speed during low fan power consumption.

  13. Influence of hot plastic deformation and cooling rate on martensite and bainite start temperatures in 22MnB5 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikravesh, M., E-mail: nikravesh@yahoo.com [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, M. [Department of Mining and Metallurgy, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbari, G.H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction of cooling rate, can cause to increase or decrease M{sub s} and M{sub f}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 40% hot plastic deformation hindered the martensitic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot plastic deformation, caused to decrease M{sub f} and M{sub s}, while B{sub s} increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical cooling rate increased 40 Degree-Sign C/s due to apply 40% hot deformation. - Abstract: During hot stamping process, hot forming, cooling and phase transformations are performed in a single step. As a matter of fact, multifunctional phenomena happen and affect each other. Among these phenomena, martensitic and bainitic transformations have the greatest importance. In the current research, the start temperatures of martensite and bainite of 22MnB5 boron steel have been measured in undeformed and 40% deformed conditions, and in various cooling rates from 0.4 Degree-Sign C/s to 100 Degree-Sign C/s by means of deformation dilatometer. It is concluded that, reduction of cooling rate, could bring about an increase or decrease in M{sub s} and M{sub f}, depending on other phases formation before martensite. Also, hot plastic deformation, hindered the martensitic transformation and decreased M{sub f} and M{sub s} especially at lower cooling rates, while B{sub s} increased. Furthermore, the critical cooling rate, increased about 40 Degree-Sign C/s by applying 40% hot plastic deformation.

  14. Implications for Metallographic Cooling Rates, Derived from Fine-Scale Analytical Traverses Across Kamacite, Taenite, and Tetrataenite in the Butler Iron Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Ross, D. K.; Chabot, N. L.; Keller, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    The "M-shaped" Ni concentrations across Widmanstatten patterns in iron meteorites, mesosiderites, and ordinary chondrites are commonly used to calculate cooling rates. As Ni-poor kamacite exolves from Ni-rich taenite, Ni concentrations build up at the kamacite-taenite interface because of the sluggish diffusivity of Ni. Quantitative knowledge of experimentally-determined Ni diffusivities, coupled with the shape of the M-profile, have been used to allow calculation of cooling rates that pertained at low temperatures, less than or equal to 500 C. However, determining Ni metallographic cooling rates are challenging, due to the sluggish diffusivity of Ni at low temperatures. There are three potential difficulties in using Ni cooling rates at low temperatures: (i) Ni diffusivities are typically extrapolated from higher-temperature measurements; (ii) Phase changes occur at low temperatures that may be difficult to take into account; and (iii) It appears that Ge in kamacite and taenite has continued to equilibrate (or attempted to equilibrate) at temperatures below those that formed the M-shaped Ni profile. Combining Ni measurements with those of other elements has the potential to provide a way to confirm or challenge Ni-determined cooling rates, as well as provide insight into the partitioning behaviors of elements during the cooling of iron meteorites. Despite these benefits, studies that examine elemental profiles of Ni along with other elements in iron meteorites are limited, often due to the low concentration levels of the other elements and associated analytical challenges. The Butler iron meteorite provides a good opportunity to conduct a multi-element analytical study, due to the higher concentration levels of key elements in addition to Fe and Ni. In this work, we perform combined analysis for six elements in the Butler iron to determine the relative behaviors of these elements during the evolution of iron meteorites, with implications for metallographic cooling

  15. High cloud variations with surface temperature from 2002 to 2015: Contributions to atmospheric radiative cooling rate and precipitation changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Run; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Su, Hui; Gu, Yu; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Liu, Shaw Chen

    2017-05-01

    The global mean precipitation is largely constrained by atmospheric radiative cooling rates (Qr), which are sensitive to changes in high cloud fraction. We investigate variations of high cloud fraction with surface temperature (Ts) from July 2002 to June 2015 and compute their radiative effects on Qr using the Fu-Liou-Gu plane-parallel radiation model. We find that the tropical mean (30°S-30°N) high cloud fraction decreases with increasing Ts at a rate of about -1.0 ± 0.34% K-1 from 2002 to 2015, which leads to an enhanced atmospheric cooling around 0.86 W m-2 K-1. On the other hand, the northern midlatitudes (30°N-60°N) high cloud fraction increases with surface warming at a rate of 1.85 ± 0.65% K-1 and the near-global mean (60°S-60°N) high cloud fraction shows a statistically insignificant decreasing trend with increasing Ts over the analysis period. Dividing high clouds into cirrus, cirrostratus, and deep convective clouds, we find that cirrus cloud fraction increases with surface warming at a rate of 0.32 ± 0.11% K-1 (0.01 ± 0.17% K-1) for the near-global mean (tropical mean), while cirrostratus and deep convective clouds decrease with surface warming at a rate of -0.02 ± 0.18% K-1 and -0.33 ± 0.18% K-1 for the near-global mean and -0.64 ± 0.23% K-1 and -0.37 ± 0.13% K-1 for the tropical mean, respectively. High cloud fraction response to feedback to Ts accounts for approximately 1.9 ± 0.7% and 16.0 ± 6.1% of the increase in precipitation per unit surface warming over the period of 2002-2015 for the near-global mean and the tropical mean, respectively.

  16. Novel Controls for Time-Dependent Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling Heating and Power (CCHP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsen, Scott; Brouwer, Jack

    2013-08-31

    The research and development effort detailed in this report directly addresses the challenge of reducing U.S. industrial energy and carbon intensity by contributing to an increased understanding of potential CCHP technology, the CCHP market and the challenges of widespread adoption. This study developed a number of new tools, models, and approaches for the design, control, and optimal dispatch of various CCHP technologies. The UC Irvine campus served as a ‘living laboratory’ of new CCHP technologies and enabled the design and demonstration of several novel control methods. In particular, the integration of large scale thermal energy storage capable of shifting an entire day of cooling demand required a novel approach to the CCHP dispatch optimization. The thermal energy storage proved an economically viable resource which reduced both costs and emissions by enabling generators and chillers to operate under steady high efficiency conditions at all times of the day.

  17. Rate Control in Dual Source Evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielinga, T.; Gruisinga, W.; Leeuwis, H.; Lodder, J.C.; van Weers, J.F.; Wilmans, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Two-component thin films are deposited in a high-vacuum system from two close sources, heated by an electron beam which is deflected between them. By using quartz-crystal monitors the evaporation rates are measured seperately, which is usually considered to be problematical. One rate signal is used

  18. Rate-cost tradeoffs in control

    KAUST Repository

    Kostina, Victoria; Hassibi, Babak

    2017-01-01

    function is the mean-square deviation of the system state from the desired state. We study the fundamental tradeoff between the communication rate r bits/sec and the limsup of the expected cost b, and show a lower bound on the rate necessary to attain b

  19. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature control characteristics analysis of lead-cooled fast reactor with natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Minghan; Song, Yong; Wang, Jianye; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The LFR temperature control system are analyzed with frequency domain method. • The temperature control compensator is designed according to the frequency analysis. • Dynamic simulation is performed by SIMULINK and RELAP5-HD. - Abstract: Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) with natural circulation in primary system is among the highlights in advance nuclear reactor research, due to its great superiority in reactor safety and reliability. In this work, a transfer function matrix describing coolant temperature dynamic process, obtained by Laplace transform of the one-dimensional system dynamic model is developed in order to investigate the temperature control characteristics of LFR. Based on the transfer function matrix, a close-loop coolant temperature control system without compensator is built. The frequency domain analysis indicates that the stability and steady-state of the temperature control system needs to be improved. Accordingly, a temperature compensator based on Proportion–Integration and feed-forward is designed. The dynamic simulation of the whole system with the temperature compensator for core power step change is performed with SIMULINK and RELAP5-HD. The result shows that the temperature compensator can provide superior coolant temperature control capabilities in LFR with natural circulation due to the efficiency of the frequency domain analysis method.

  1. Quality control of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mitsunobu

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of the coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors is characterized by the fact that the size of the target product to be controlled is very small, and the quantity is very large. Accordingly, the sampling plan and the method of evaluating the population through satisfically treating the measured data of the samples are the important subjects to see and evaluate the quality of a batch or a lot. This paper shows the fabrication process and the quality control procedure for the coated fuel particles. The development work of a HTGR was started by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1969, and as for the production technology for coated fuel particles, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. has continued the development work. The pilot plan with the capacity of about 40 kg/year was established in 1972. The fuel product fabricated in this plant was put to the irradiation experiment and out-of-pile evaluation test. In 1983, the production capacity was expanded to 200 kg/year, and the fuel compacts for the VHTRC in JAERI were produced for two years. The basic fuel design, the fabrication process, the quality control, the process control and the quality assurance are reported. For the commercial product, the studies from the viewpoint of production and quality control costs are required. (Kako, I.)

  2. Preliminary Report: Controller Prototyping and Validation for Photo-Voltaic Comfort Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agesen, Mads Kronborg; Skou, Arne Joachim; Pedersen, Keld Lotzfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Large office buildings - typically with glass fronts - often suffer from a high cooling demand during summertime. Typically, this requires a large amount of additional electricity for the cooling system. One straightforward alternative is to store cooling energy using electricity generated by solar...

  3. Water chemical control of the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor primary cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, Lucia M.L.A; Chaves, Renata D.A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Oliveira, Paulo F.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Damazio, Ilza; Fagundes, Oliene dos R.; Cintra, Maria Olivia C.; Andrade, Geraldo V. de; Amaral, Angela M.; Franco, Milton B.; Fortes, Flavio; Gomes, Nilton Carlos; Vidal, Andrea; Maretti Junior, Fausto; Knupp, Eliana A.N.; Souza, Wagner de; Guedes, Joao B.; Furtado, Renato C.S.

    2013-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark I IPR-R1 reactor located at CDTN/CNEN has been in operation and contributed to research and with services to society since 1960. Is has been used in several activities such as nuclear power plant operation, graduate and post-graduate training courses, isotope production, and as an analytical irradiation tool of different types of samples. Among the several structural and operational safety requirements is the chemical quality control of the primary circuit cooling water. The aim of this work was to check the cooling water quality from the pool reactor. A water sampling plan was proposed (May, 2011 - June, 2012) and presents the results obtained in this period. The natural radioactivity level as gross alpha and gross beta activity and other chemical parameters (pH and electric conductivity) of the samples were analyzed. Some instrumental techniques were used: potentiometric methods (pH), conductometric methods (electrical conductivity, EC) and gross α and gross β proportional counting system). (author)

  4. Modelling of a condenser-fan control for an air-cooled centrifugal chiller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, F.W.; Chan, K.T.

    2007-01-01

    There is a lack of detailed experimental and simulation studies on air-cooled centrifugal chillers. This paper investigates how to optimize the control of condenser fans within the chillers to maximize their coefficients of performance (COPs). A thermodynamic model for the chillers was developed and used to analyse the steady-state COP under various load and ambient conditions. An algorithm is introduced to compute the number of staged condenser fans based on settings of the condensing pressure and outdoor temperature. The model was validated using the experimental data and performance data of an existing chiller running under various operating conditions. It is found that the best strategy for switching condenser fans is to vary their rotating speed by the use of a set point of the condensing temperature, which is adjusted in response to the chiller load and condenser air-inlet temperature. The results of this paper provide an important insight into how to increase the COPs of air-cooled chillers

  5. Modelling of a condenser-fan control for an air-cooled centrifugal chiller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, F.W.; Chan, K.T. [Department of Building Services Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-11-15

    There is a lack of detailed experimental and simulation studies on air-cooled centrifugal chillers. This paper investigates how to optimize the control of condenser fans within the chillers to maximize their coefficients of performance (COPs). A thermodynamic model for the chillers was developed and used to analyse the steady-state COP under various load and ambient conditions. An algorithm is introduced to compute the number of staged condenser fans based on settings of the condensing pressure and outdoor temperature. The model was validated using the experimental data and performance data of an existing chiller running under various operating conditions. It is found that the best strategy for switching condenser fans is to vary their rotating speed by the use of a set point of the condensing temperature, which is adjusted in response to the chiller load and condenser air-inlet temperature. The results of this paper provide an important insight into how to increase the COPs of air-cooled chillers. (author)

  6. Cooling system and climate control of fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ap, N.S. [Valeo Engine Cooling, La Varriere (France); Cloarec, M.; Rouveyre, L. [PSA-Renault, Trappes (France)

    2000-07-01

    This paper described the special thermal aspects of the fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) program established in 1999 by the combined efforts of the two French car manufacturers PSA and Renault. One of the objectives of the program was to examine the climate control and particularly the air conditioning in the passenger compartment which had not been previously studied. The heat dissipation of FCEV is in the order of 2.5 to 3 times higher than that of a comparable internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV). In addition, the fuel cell powertrain has two temperature levels. The first level is high for the fuel cell stack and the second is low for the electrical, electronic components and other auxiliaries. This paper presented and described each component of two cooling loops along with the heat performance of each type. The first cooling loop used de-ionized water as a coolant, and the second made use of an ethylene-glycol-water mixture as a coolant. The air conditioning capability is a major aspect of the FCEV thermal management. The electrical source availability creates the condition to introduce an enhanced comfort level. Both winter preheating and summer precooling are possible. refs., figs.

  7. Control device for can failures of liquid cooled nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althaus, D.; Mohm, F.; Nyhof, M.

    1974-01-01

    Checking of the fuel or breeding elements of, e.g., sodium-cooled reactors is done by detecting fission products in the coolant, with a flushing gas like argon removing the fission products from the coolant and carrying them to a detector system. In order to increase the escape rate of the fission products from the elements, these are lifted by a hoisting unit into a pit reaching down below the coolant level and are then heated. Heating is achieved by the decay heat or by an additional heating in the receiving pit which at this point is thermically insulated from the exterior. The flushing gas is blown radially into the receiving pit from below. The rising bubbles take along the fission products to a scintillation counter mounted on the head of the receiving vessel. This vessel may have double walls with coolant flowing through the interspace. (DG) [de

  8. Utilization of control rod drive (CRD) system for long term core cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta B, A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we consider an application of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to risk management. Foreseeable risk management strategies to prevent core damage are constrained by the availability of first line systems as well as support systems. The actual trend in the evaluation of risk management options can be performed in a number of ways. An example is the identification of back-up systems which could be used to perform the same safety functions. In this work we deal with the evaluation of the feasibility, for BWR's, to use the Control Rod Drive system to maintain an adequate reactor core long term cooling in some accident sequences. This preliminary evaluation is carried out as a part of the Internal Events Analysis for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP) that is currently under way by the Mexican Nuclear Regulatory Body. This analysis addresses the evaluation and incorporation of all the systems, including the safety related and the back-up non safety related systems, that are available for the operator in order to prevent core damage. As a part of this analysis the containment venting capability is also evaluated as a back-up of the containment heat removal function. This will prevent the primary containment overpressurization and loss of certain core cooling systems. A selection of accident sequences in which the Control Rod Drive system could be used to mitigate the accident and prevent core damage are discussed. A personal computer transient analysis code is used to carry out thermohydraulic simulations in order to evaluate the Control Rod Drive system performance, the corresponding results are presented. Finally, some preliminary conclusions are drawn. (author). 9 refs, 5 figs

  9. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  10. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Critical Experiment and its Application to Thorium Absorption Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardes, R.G.; Brown, J.R.; Drake, M.K.; Fischer, P.U.; Pound, D.C.; Sampson, J.B.; Stewart, H.B.

    1964-01-01

    In developing the concept of the HTGR and its first prototype at Peach Bottom, General Atomic made the decision that a critical experiment was required to provide adequately certain necessary input data for the nuclear analysis. The specific needs of the nuclear design theory for input data relating to thorium absorptions led to an experimental design consisting of a central lattice-type critical assembly with surrounding buffer and driver regions. This type of assembly, in which the spectrum of interest can be established in the relatively small central lattice having a desired geometry, provides a useful tool for obtaining a variety of input data for nuclear analysis surveys of new concepts. The particular advantages of this approach over that of constructing a mock-up assembly will be discussed, as well as the role of the theory in determining what experiments are most useful and how these experiments are then used in verifying design techniques. Two relatively new techniques were developed for use in the lattice assembly. These were a reactivity oscillation technique for determining the thorium Doppler coefficient, and an activation technique for determining both the resonance integral of thorium dispersed in graphite and its temperature dependence (activation Doppler coefficient). The Doppler coefficient measurement by reactivity oscillation utilized the entire central fuel element in a technique which permitted heating this fuel element to 800°F and accurately subtracting experimentally the thermal-base effects, that is, those effects not contributing to the thorium resonance capture. Comparison of results with theory for a range of conditions shows excellent agreement. The measurement of the thorium resonance integral and its temperature dependence will be described. The technique developed for measuring resonance capture makes use of gold as the standard and vanadium as die material giving the 1/v absorption rate. This technique is dictated by the fact

  11. Definition of a Robust Supervisory Control Scheme for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponciroli, R.; Passerini, S.; Vilim, R. B.

    2016-04-17

    In this work, an innovative control approach for metal-fueled Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors is proposed. With respect to the classical approach adopted for base-load Nuclear Power Plants, an alternative control strategy for operating the reactor at different power levels by respecting the system physical constraints is presented. In order to achieve a higher operational flexibility along with ensuring that the implemented control loops do not influence the system inherent passive safety features, a dedicated supervisory control scheme for the dynamic definition of the corresponding set-points to be supplied to the PID controllers is designed. In particular, the traditional approach based on the adoption of tabulated lookup tables for the set-point definition is found not to be robust enough when failures of the implemented SISO (Single Input Single Output) actuators occur. Therefore, a feedback algorithm based on the Reference Governor approach, which allows for the optimization of reference signals according to the system operating conditions, is proposed.

  12. Transient Analysis of a Gas-cooled Fast Reactor for Single Control Assembly Withdrawal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok

    2014-01-01

    The Energy Multiplier Module (EMZ) system response has been evaluated for control assembly withdrawal transients. Currently the EM2 core is equipped with six cylindrical drum-type control assemblies in the reflector zone for excess reactivity control and power maneuvering during the operating core life. This study investigates the system response to the control assembly withdrawal accident with various rotational speeds and reactivity worth to determine feasible control assembly design requirements from the physics viewpoint. The simulations have been conducted for single control assembly withdrawal transients without scram by a gas-cooled reactor plant simulator, which is based on a simplified plant nodal model, including the point reactor kinetics, single channel core thermal-fluid model, and a turbo-machinery performance model. Simulations were conducted for the middle-of- cycle core, when the excess reactivity of the core is the highest. Control assembly withdrawal times were varied from 1 (runaway) to 180 sec and reactivity worth was varied from 100 to 400 pcm. For a single control assembly withdrawal, the simulation has shown that the peak fuel temperature is expected to be ~1820°C when the assembly worth is 200 pcm and the runaway time is 1 sec per 180 degree rotation. The peak temperature could be reduced to ~1780°C if the assembly is rotated out in a moderate speed such as 1 degree/sec. These peak temperatures give a thermal margin of 22 to 24% to the melting point of uranium carbide fuel. The results also indicate that the current design with a single control assembly worth of 314 pcm may need adjustments in the future design. (author)

  13. Reactor core flow rate control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Hitoshi; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Tetsuya.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal pump is started by a variable frequency power source device, if magnetic fields of an AC generator are introduced after the rated speed is reached, neutron flux high scram occurs by abrupt increase of a reactor core flow rate. Then, in the present invention, magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced at a speed previously set at which the fluctuation range of the reactor core flow rate (neutron flux) by the start up of the internal pump is within an allowable value. Since increase of the speed of the internal pump upon its start up is suppressed to determine the change of the reactor core flow rate within an allowable range, increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed to enable stable start up. Then, since transition boiling of fuels caused by abrupt decrease of the reactor core flow rate upon occurrence of abnormality in an external electric power system is prevented, and the magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced in such a manner to put the speed increase fluctuation range of the internal pump upon start up within an allowable value, neutron flux high scram is not caused to enable stable start-up. (N.H.)

  14. Theoretical prediction of the effect of heat transfer parameters on cooling rates of liquid-filled plastic straws used for cryopreservation of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinen, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Baez, R; Chirife, J

    2010-01-01

    Heat transfer plays a key role in cryopreservation of liquid semen in plastic straws. The effect of several parameters on the cooling rate of a liquid-filled polypropylene straw when plunged into liquid nitrogen was investigated using a theoretical model. The geometry of the straw containing the liquid was assimilated as two concentric finite cylinders of different materials: the fluid and the straw; the unsteady-state heat conduction equation for concentric cylinders was numerically solved. Parameters studied include external (convection) heat transfer coefficient (h), the thermal properties of straw manufacturing material and wall thickness. It was concluded that the single most important parameter affecting the cooling rate of a liquid column contained in a straw is the external heat transfer coefficient in LN2. Consequently, in order to attain maximum cooling rates, conditions have to be designed to obtain the highest possible heat transfer coefficient when the plastic straw is plunged in liquid nitrogen.

  15. Characterization of cooling systems based on heat pipe principle to control operation temperature of high-tech electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobre, Tanase; Parvulescu, Oana Cristina; Stoica, Anicuta; Iavorschi, Gustav

    2010-01-01

    The use of cooling systems based on heat pipe principle to control operation temperature of electronic components is very efficient. They have an excellent miniaturizing capacity and this fact creates adaptability for more practical situations. Starting from the observation that these cooling systems are not precisely characterized from the thermal efficiency point of view, the present paper proposes a methodology of data acquisition for their thermal characterization. An experimental set-up and a data processing algorithm are shown to describe the cooling of a heat generating electronic device using heat pipes. A Thermalright SI-97 PC cooling system is employed as a case-study to determine the heat transfer characteristics of a fins cooler.

  16. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  17. Background and anthropogenic radionuclide derived dose rates to freshwater ecosystem - Nuclear power plant cooling pond - Reference organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedveckaite, T.; Filistovic, V.; Marciulioniene, D.; Prokoptchuk, N.; Plukiene, R.; Gudelis, A.; Remeikis, V.; Yankovich, T.; Beresford, N.-A.

    2011-01-01

    The radiological assessment of non-human biota to demonstrate protection is now accepted by a number of international and national bodies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a scientific basis to assess and evaluate exposure of biota to ionizing radiation. Radionuclides from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Lithuania) were discharged into Lake Druksiai cooling pond. Additional radionuclide migration and recharge to this lake from a hypothetical near-surface, low-level radioactive waste disposal, to be situated 1.5 km from the lake, had been simulated using RESRAD-OFFSITE code. This paper uses ERICA Integrated Approach with associated tools and databases to compare the radiological dose to freshwater reference organisms. Based on these data, it can be concluded that background dose rates to non-human biota in Lake Druksiai far exceed those attributable to anthropogenic radionuclides. With respect the fishery and corresponding annual committed effective human dose as a result of this fish consumption Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body with intensive angling and possible commercial fishing. - Highlights: → Dose rates to the reference organisms are lower than expected from the background radioactivity. → Pelagic fish part of adult human annual committed effective dose would be as small as a few μSv y -1 . → With respect the fishery Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body.

  18. Fabrication of cermet bearings for the control system of a high temperature lithium cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacobucci, H. G.; Heestand, R. L.; Kizer, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques used to fabricate cermet bearings for the fueled control drums of a liquid metal cooled reference-design reactor concept are presented. The bearings were designed for operation in lithium for as long as 5 years at temperatures to 1205 C. Two sets of bearings were fabricated from a hafnium carbide - 8-wt. % molybdenum - 2-wt. % niobium carbide cermet, and two sets were fabricated from a hafnium nitride - 10-wt. % tungsten cermet. Procedures were developed for synthesizing the material in high purity inert-atmosphere glove boxes to minimize oxygen content in order to enhance corrosion resistance. Techniques were developed for pressing cylindrical billets to conserve materials and to reduce machining requirements. Finishing was accomplished by a combination of diamond grinding, electrodischarge machining, and diamond lapping. Samples were characterized in respect to composition, impurity level, lattice parameter, microstructure and density.

  19. Effect of Controlled Rolling and Cooling On Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 30crmnti Wire Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Shipeng; Dong, Qing; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    The effect of controlled rolling and cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy structure steel 30CrMnTi wire rod with diameter 6.5mm was studied. The results show that the lower finish rolling temperature resulted in a decrease in tensile strength but an increase in elongation and reduction of area. When the finish rolling temperature decreases from 950°C to 850°C, the tensile strength value decreases from 750MPa to 660MPa, and the elongation increases from 21% to 30%, the reduction of area increases from 64% to 71%. The grain size also refines from 20μm to 9.9μm when the finish rolling temperature decreases from 950°C to 850°C. The decrease of tensile strength is due to the change of microstructure which evolved from more bainite to ferrite and pearlite.

  20. Cryogenic thermometer calibration system using a helium cooling loop and a temperature controller [for LHC magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Chanzy, E; Thermeau, J P; Bühler, S; Joly, C; Casas-Cubillos, J; Balle, C

    1998-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay and CERN are designing in close collaboration a fully automated cryogenic thermometer calibration facility which will calibrate in 3 years 10,000 cryogenic thermometers required for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operation. A reduced-scale model of the calibration facility has been developed, which enables the calibration of ten thermometers by comparison with two rhodium-iron standard thermometers in the 1.8 K to 300 K temperature range under vacuum conditions. The particular design, based on a helium cooling loop and an electrical temperature controller, gives good dynamic performances. This paper describes the experimental set-up and the data acquisition system. Results of experimental runs are also presented along with the estimated global accuracy for the calibration. (3 refs).

  1. Study on Air-cooled Self-humidifying PEMFC Control Method Based on Segmented Predict Negative Feedback Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiyu, You; Tao, Xu; Zhixiang, Liu; Yun, Peng; Weirong, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain the optimal output performance of the air-cooled self-humidifying proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), the operating temperature, the air flow, purge interval and some other parameters must be controlled strictly. As a key factor, the operating temperature mainly determines the optimal output performance of the fuel cell. However, some intrinsic issues such as long adjusting time, over-shoot still exist inevitably for the traditional PID temperature-controlled method in circumstances of the load variation. Consequently, output performance of PEMFC decreases because the operating temperature of the fuel cell fails to reach, and the corresponding lifetime of PEMFC is also reduced. In this study, a segmented predict negative feedback control method, based on the advance proportional control one, is proposed and verified by experiments to overcome the shortcomings of PID temperature control. The results demonstrate that the optimal output performance of PEMFC can be realized by utilizing the proposed method for temperature control due to its excellent properties, simple controlling and small over-shoot

  2. Capital Controls and the Real Exchange Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen, S.J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Capital import taxes lower (raise) world (home) interest rates. This shifts home expenditure from the present to the future and foreign expenditure from the future to today. With identical home and foreign expenditure patterns, the change in the composition of world expenditure has no effects on

  3. STEADY-STATE HEAT REJECTION RATES FOR A COAXIAL BOREHOLE HEAT EXCHANGER DURING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE COOLING DETERMINED WITH THE NOVEL STEP THERMAL RESPONSE TEST METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Macenić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At three locations in Zagreb, classical and extended thermal response test (TRT was conducted on installed coaxial heat exchangers. With classic TR test, thermogeological properties of the ground and thermal resistance of the borehole were determined at each location. It is seen that thermal conductivity of the ground varies, due to difference in geological profile of the sites. In addition, experimental research of steady-state thermal response step test (SSTRST was carried out to determine heat rejection rates for passive and active cooling in steady state regime. Results showed that heat rejection rate is only between 8-11 W/m, which indicates that coaxial system is not suitable for passive cooling demands. Furthermore, the heat pump in passive cooling mode uses additional plate heat exchanger where there is additional temperature drop of working fluid by approximately 1,5 °C. Therefore, steady-state rejection rate for passive cooling is even lower for a real case project. Coaxial heat exchanger should be always designed for an active cooling regime with an operation of a heat pump compressor in a classical vapour compression refrigeration cycle.

  4. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poh, Catherine F; Durham, J Scott; Brasher, Penelope M; Anderson, Donald W; Berean, Kenneth W; MacAulay, Calum E; Lee, J Jack; Rosin, Miriam P

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV) technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240). Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm) or white light-guided surgery (control arm). The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1) the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization); or 2) further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS trial, an example of translational research, may result in

  5. Artificial chameleon skin that controls spectral radiation: Development of Chameleon Cool Coating (C3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonome, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masashi; Okajima, Junnosuke; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2018-01-19

    Chameleons have a diagnostic thermal protection that enables them to live under various conditions. Our developed special radiative control therefore is inspired by the chameleon thermal protection ability by imitating its two superposed layers as two pigment particles in one coating layer. One particle imitates a chameleon superficial surface for color control (visible light), and another particle imitates a deep surface to reflect solar irradiation, especially in the near-infrared region. Optical modeling allows us to optimally design the particle size and volume fraction. Experimental evaluation shows that the desired spectral reflectance, i.e., low in the VIS region and high in NIR region, can be achieved. Comparison between the measured and calculated reflectances shows that control of the particle size and dispersion/aggregation of particle cloud is important in improving the thermal-protection performance of the coating. Using our developed coating, the interior temperature decreases and the cooling load is reduced while keeping the dark tone of the object.

  6. Non-linear Model Predictive Control for cooling strings of superconducting magnets using superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)673023; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique

    In each of eight arcs of the 27 km circumference Large Hadron Collider (LHC), 2.5 km long strings of super-conducting magnets are cooled with superfluid Helium II at 1.9 K. The temperature stabilisation is a challenging control problem due to complex non-linear dynamics of the magnets temperature and presence of multiple operational constraints. Strong nonlinearities and variable dead-times of the dynamics originate at strongly heat-flux dependent effective heat conductivity of superfluid that varies three orders of magnitude over the range of possible operational conditions. In order to improve the temperature stabilisation, a proof of concept on-line economic output-feedback Non-linear Model Predictive Controller (NMPC) is presented in this thesis. The controller is based on a novel complex first-principles distributed parameters numerical model of the temperature dynamics over a 214 m long sub-sector of the LHC that is characterized by very low computational cost of simulation needed in real-time optimizat...

  7. Control rod shadowing and anti-shadowing effects in a large gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.; Rimpault, G.; Coddington, P.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of control rod shadowing and anti-shadowing (interaction) effects has been carried out in the context of a design study of the control rod pattern for the large 2400 MWth Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). For the calculations, the deterministic code system ERANOS-2.0 has been used, in association with a full core model including a European Fast Reactor (EFR)-type pattern for the control rods. More specifically, the core contains a total of 33 control (CSD) and safety (DSD) rods implemented in three banks: -1) a first bank of 6 CSD rods, placed at 64 cm from core centre in the inner fuel zone (Pu content 16.3 % vol.), -2) a safety bank consisting of 9 DSD rods, at an average distance of 118 cm, and -3) a third bank with 18 CSD rods, placed at 171 cm, i.e. at the interface between the inner and outer (Pu content 19.2 % vol.) core regions. Each control rod has been modelled as a homogeneous material containing 90%-enriched B 4 C, steel and helium. Considerable shadowing effects have been observed between the first bank and the safety bank, as also between individual rods within the first bank. Large anti-shadowing effects take place in an even greater number of the studied rod configurations. The largest interaction is between the two CSD banks, the anti-shadowing value being 46% in this case, implying that the total rod worth is increased by a factor of almost 2 when compared to the sum of the individual bank values. Additional investigations have been performed, in particular the computation of the first order eigenvalue and the eigenvalue separation. The main finding is that the interactions are lower when one of the control rod banks is located at a radial position corresponding to half the core radius. (authors)

  8. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  9. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Per; Greenspan, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m 3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m 3 . This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X-PREX facility uses novel

  10. The influences of anneal temperature and cooling rate on microstructure and tensile properties of laser deposited Ti–4Al–1.5Mn titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, X.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Wang, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the heat treatment parameters of laser deposited near-α titanium alloy. • Microstructure/tensile property relationships are demonstrated and discussed. • Higher cooling rate leads to finer microstructure and higher strength. • Higher anneal temperature promotes strength without ductility obviously decreased. - Abstract: As a metal near-net-shape manufacturing technology, direct laser fabrication has a great potential to reduce costs and delivery time and received an intense attention in the field of titanium alloy aerospace components fabrications. However, the laser deposited titanium alloys usually have equivalent strength and lower ductility compared to the wrought counterparts due to their lamellar microstructure. To investigate the responses of laser deposit titanium alloy Ti–4Al–1.5Mn to anneal parameters, various anneal temperatures and cooling rates were applied in this study. Microstructures were examined by Optical Microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Microhardness test and room temperature tensile tests were employed to evaluate the tensile properties of the as-deposited and annealed specimens. Results show that air cooling from the α + β phase region generates a microstructure composed of coarse primary α plates and fine lamellar transformed β, while water quenching produces similar but much finer microstructure. Moreover, higher cooling rate generates more area fraction of fine transformed β. With increasing anneal temperature, the ultimate tensile strength and yield strength increase for both cooling methods. Moreover, higher cooling rate leads to higher strength as expected. It is worth noting that both the strength and ductility of the laser deposited alloy improved by water quenched from the α + β duplex phase region. The improved tensile properties were mainly owing to the fine lamellar transformed β in the special bimodal microstructure

  11. The Effects of Gun Ownership Rates and Gun Control Laws on Suicide Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Gius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of gun control laws and gun ownership rates on state-level suicide rates. Using the most recent data on suicide rates, gun control measures, and gun ownership rates, the results of the present study suggest that states that require handgun permits have lower gun-related suicide rates, and states that have higher gun ownership rates have higher gun-related suicide rates. Regarding non-gun suicides, results suggest that stricter gun c...

  12. Core cooling system for reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Amada, Tatsuo.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the function of residual heat dissipation from the reactor core in case of emergency by providing a secondary cooling system flow channel, through which fluid having been subjected to heat exchange with the fluid flowing in a primary cooling system flow channel flows, with a core residual heat removal system in parallel with a main cooling system provided with a steam generator. Constitution: Heat generated in the core during normal reactor operation is transferred from a primary cooling system flow channel to a secondary cooling system flow channel through a main heat exchanger and then transferred through a steam generator to a water-steam system flow channel. In the event if removal of heat from the core by the main cooling system becomes impossible due to such cause as breakage of the duct line of the primary cooling system flow channel or a trouble in a primary cooling system pump, a flow control valve is opened, and steam generator inlet and outlet valves are closed, thus increasing the flow rate in the core residual heat removal system. Thereafter, a blower is started to cause dissipation of the core residual heat from the flow channel of a system for heat dissipation to atmosphere. (Seki, T.)

  13. Critical heat flux analysis on change of plate temperature and cooling water flow rate for rectangular narrow gap with bilateral-heated cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M Hadi Kusuma; Mulya Juarsa; Anhar Riza Antariksawan

    2013-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer phenomena on rectangular narrow gap was related to the safety of nuclear reactors. Research done in order to study the safety of nuclear reactors in particular relating to boiling heat transfer and useful on the improvement of next-generation reactor designs. The research focused on calculation of the heat flux during the cooling process in rectangular narrow gap size 1.0 mm. with initial temperatures 200°C. 400°C, and 600°C, also the flow rates of cooling water 0,1 liters/second. 0,2 liters/second. and 0,3 liters/second. Experiments carried out by injecting water at a certain flow rate with the water temperature 85°C. Transient temperature measurement data recorded by the data acquisition system. Transient temperature measurement data is used to calculate the flux of heat gain is then used to obtain the heat transfer coefficient. This research aimed to obtain the correlation between critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient to changes in temperatures and water flow rates for bilaterally-heated cases on rectangular narrow gap. The results obtained for a constant cooling water flow rate, critical heat flux will increase when hot plate temperature also increased. While on a constant hot plate temperature, coefficient heat transfer will increase when cooling water flow rate also increased. Thus it can be said that the cooling water flow rate and temperature of the hot plate has a significant effect on the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient resulted in quenching process of vertical rectangular narrow gap with double-heated cases. (author)

  14. Feasibility study of automatic control of crew comfort in the shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit. [liquid cooled garment regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to demonstrate that crewman comfort can be assured by using automatic control of the inlet temperature of the coolant into the liquid cooled garment when input to the controller consists of measurements of the garment inlet temperature and the garment outlet temperature difference. Subsequent tests using a facsimile of the control logic developed in the computer program confirmed the feasibility of such a design scheme.

  15. Liquid-liquid phase separation and solidification behavior of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic alloy with different cooling rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Lin; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Lin; Wu, Di; Zuo, Min; Zhao, Degang

    2018-03-01

    The cooling rate has a significant effect on the solidification behavior and microstructure of monotectic alloy. In this study, different cooling rate was designed through casting in the copper mold with different bore diameters. The effects of different cooling rate on the solidification behavior of Al55Bi36Cu9 (at.%) immiscible alloy have been investigated. The liquid-liquid phase separation of Al55Bi36Cu9 immiscible alloy melt was investigated by resistivity test. The solidification microstructure and phase analysis of Al55Bi36Cu9 immiscible alloy were performed by the SEM and XRD, respectively. The results showed that the liquid-liquid phase separation occurred in the solidification of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic melt from 917 °C to 653 °C. The monotectic temperature, liquid phase separation temperature and immiscibility zone of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic alloy was lower than those of Al-Bi binary monotectic alloy. The solidification morphology of Al55Bi36Cu9 monotectic alloy was very sensitive to the cooling rate. The Al/Bi core-shell structure formed when Al55Bi36Cu9 melt was cast in the copper mold with a 8 mm bore diameter.

  16. Influence of cooling rate on growth of Bacillus cereus from spore inocula in cooked rice, beans, pasta, and combination products containing meat or poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess the ability of B. cereus spores to germinate and grow in order to determine a safe cooling rate for cooked rice, beans, and pasta, rice/chicken (4:1), rice/chicken/vegetables (3:1:1), rice/beef (4:1), and rice/beef/vegetables (3:1:1). Samples were inoculate...

  17. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of a novel FeCrNiBSi advanced high-strength steel: Slow, accelerated and fast casting cooling rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari-Paykani, Mohsen; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: shahverdi@modares.ac.ir; Miresmaeili, Reza

    2016-06-21

    In the current work, three different solidification routes and a two-step heat treatment process were applied to a novel FeCrNiBSi alloy system to introduce a new candidate for advanced high-strength steels. The evolution of the microstructure after solidification, heat treatment, and tensile deformation was characterized using optical and electron microscopy techniques, as well as hardness and room temperature uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of the different solidification routes and heat treatment parameters on the deformation and fracture mechanisms of this steel are discussed. Grain refinement, precipitation hardening, and solid solution as a result of the fast casting cooling rate led to an increase in strength at improved ductility. This result can be explained partly by the less severe stress/strain partitioning at the matrix grain/M{sub 2}B interfaces and better interface cohesion. Moreover, the stress/strain partitioning characteristics between the matrix grains and M{sub 2}B led to a higher initial strain hardening rate. The fast casting cooling rate further promoted ductile fracture mechanisms, which is a result of increased cleavage fracture stress. The higher casting cooling rate and two-step heat treatment resulted in a strong increase in formability index, from 8 GPa% to 24 GPa%, at which the mechanical properties occupy the TRIP envelope. Heat treatment of the fast-cooling specimens led to a small reduction in yield and tensile strength and 22% total elongation percentage improvement (from 10% to 32%).

  18. Effects of different casting mould cooling rates on microstructure and properties of sand-cast Al-7.5Si-4Cu alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guanglei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Al-7.5Si-4Cu alloy melt modified by Al-10Sr, RE and Al-5Ti-B master alloys was poured into multi-step moulds made from three moulding sands, including quartz, alumina and chromite, to investigate comparatively the effects of different cooling rates of the casting mould on the alloy's microstructures and mechanical properties. The results show that with an increase in wall thickness, the cooling rate decreases, the dendrite arm spacing (DAS increases significantly and the mechanical properties decrease steadily. The elongation is more sensitive to the cooling rate than the tensile strength. No obvious trend of the effect of wall thickness on hardness of the alloy was found. When the cooling rate is at its greatest, the microstructures and mechanical properties are the best when using chromite sand. The improvement of the properties is mainly attributed to the decrease of the DAS, the grain refinement and the metamorphic effect. Each of the three has a strong impact on the microstructures. Furthermore, a series of fitting models was established based on the data of the DAS to predict the mechanical properties of the multivariate sand-cast Al-7.5Si-4Cu alloy.

  19. Experimental characterization of self-sensing SMA actuators under controlled convective cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, N; York, A; Seelecke, S

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are attractive for actuation systems due to their high energy density, light weight and silent operation. In addition, they feature self-sensing capabilities by relating electrical resistance measurements to strain changes. In real world applications SMAs typically operate in non-ambient air and it is imperative to understand an actuator’s behavior under varying convective cooling conditions, especially for smaller diameter wires, where convective effects are amplified. This paper shows that the multi-functionality of SMA actuators can be further extended by related heating power to convective air speed. It investigates the relationship between the normalized excess power needed and corresponding airspeed under controlled, laminar airflow patterns in a small-scale wind tunnel. For each experiment, airflow through the wind tunnel, strain in the SMA wire, and power supplied to the SMA wire were controlled, while the stress and resistance of the wire were measured. The ability to understand and predict an SMA wire’s behavior under various external airflows will aid in the design and understanding of future SMA actuated structures, such as micro-air vehicles, and shows that SMAs can function as self-sensing actuators and airspeed sensors. (paper)

  20. Optimal control and performance test of solar-assisted cooling system

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.; Yen, C.W.; Wu, J.H.; Liu, J.H.; Hsu, H.Y.; Petrenko, V.O.; Chang, J.M.; Lu, C.W.

    2010-01-01

    temperature. This will make the SACH always produce cooling effect even at lower solar radiation periods while the ejector performs at off-design conditions. The energy saving of A/C is experimentally shown 50-70% due to the cooling performance of ECS

  1. Determination of the Optimal Exchange Rate Via Control of the Domestic Interest Rate in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virtue U. Ekhosuehi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic scenario has been considered where the government seeks to achieve a favourable balance-of-payments over a fixed planning horizon through exchange rate policy and control of the domestic interest rate. The dynamics of such an economy was considered in terms of a bounded optimal control problem where the exchange rate is the state variable and the domestic interest rate is the control variable. The idea of balance-of-payments was used as a theoretical underpinning to specify the objective function. By assuming that, changes in exchange rates were induced by two effects: the impact of the domestic interest rate on the exchange rate and the exchange rate system adopted by the government. Instances for both fixed and flexible optimal exchange rate regimes have been determined. The use of the approach has been illustrated employing data obtained from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN statistical bulletin. (original abstract

  2. Method of 16N generation for test of radiation controlled channels at nuclear power stations with water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khryachkov, V.A.; Bondarenko, I.P.; Dvornikov, P.A.; Zhuravlev, B.V.; Kovtun, S.N.; Khromyleva, T.A.; Pavlov, A.V.; Roshchin, N.G.

    2012-01-01

    The preferences of nuclear reaction use for radiation control channels test in water-cooled power reactors have been analyzed in the paper. The new measurements for more accurate determination of reaction cross section energy dependence have been carried out. A set of new methods for background reducing and improvement of events determination reliability has also been developed [ru

  3. Development and characterization of the control assembly system for the large 2400 MWth Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Rimpault, G.; Morin, F.; Bosq, J.C.; Coddington, P.; Mikityuk, K.; Chawla, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper is related to the design and neutronic characterization of the principal control assembly system for the reference large (2400 MWth) Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), which makes use of ceramic-ceramic (CERCER) plate-type fuel-elements with (U-Pu) carbide fuel contained within a SiC inert matrix. For the neutronic calculations, the deterministic code system ERANOS-2.0 has been used, in association with a full core model including a European fast reactor (EFR)-type pattern for the control assemblies as a starting point. More specifically, the core contains a total of 33 control (control system device: CSD) and safety (diverse safety device: DSD) assemblies implemented in three banks. In the design of the new control assembly system, particular attention was given to the heat generation within the assemblies, so that both neutronic and thermal-hydraulic constraints could be appropriately accounted for. The thermal-hydraulic calculations have been performed with the code COPERNIC, significant coolant mass flow rates being found necessary to maintain acceptable cladding temperatures of the absorber pins. Complementary to the design study, neutronic investigations have been performed to assess the impact of the control assemblies in the GFR core in greater detail (rod interactions, shift of the flux, peaking factors, etc.). Thus, considerable shadowing effects have been observed between the first bank and the safety bank, as also between individual assemblies within the first bank. Large anti-shadowing effects also occur, the most prominent being that between the two CSD banks, where the total assembly worth is almost doubled in comparison to the sum of the individual values. Additional investigations have been performed and, in this context, it has been found that computation of the first-order eigenvalue and the eigenvalue separation is a robust tool to anticipate control assembly interactions in a large fast-spectrum core. One interesting

  4. The effect of local skin cooling before a sustained, submaximal isometric contraction on fatigue and isometric quadriceps femoris performance: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenauer, Erich; Cescon, Corrado; Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; Clijsen, Ron

    2017-04-01

    The central- and peripheral mechanisms by which heat strain limits physical performance are not fully elucidated. Nevertheless, pre-cooling is often used in an attempt to improve subsequent performance. This study compared the effects of pre-cooling vs. a pre-thermoneutral application on central- and peripheral fatigue during 60% of isometric maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Furthermore, the effects between a pre-cooling and a pre-thermoneutral application on isometric MVC of the right quadriceps femoris muscle and subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were investigated. In this randomized controlled trial, 18 healthy adults voluntarily participated. The participants received either a cold (experimental) application (+8°C) or a thermoneutral (control) application (+32°C) for 20min on their right thigh (one cuff). After the application, central (fractal dimension - FD) and peripheral (muscle fiber conduction velocity - CV) fatigue was estimated using sEMG parameters during 60% of isometric MVC. Surface EMG signals were detected from the vastus medialis and lateralis using bidimensional arrays. Immediately after the submaximal contraction, isometric MVC and RPE were assessed. Participants receiving the cold application were able to maintain a 60% isometric MVC significantly longer when compared to the thermoneutral group (mean time: 78 vs. 46s; p=0.04). The thermoneutral application had no significant impact on central fatigue (p>0.05) compared to the cold application (p=0.03). However, signs of peripheral fatigue were significantly higher in the cold group compared to the thermoneutral group (p=0.008). Pre-cooling had no effect on isometric MVC of the right quadriceps muscle and ratings of perceived exertion. Pre-cooling attenuated central fatigue and led to significantly longer submaximal contraction times compared to the pre-thermoneutral application. These findings support the use of pre-cooling procedures

  5. Influence of the cooling rate on the main factors affecting current-carrying ability in pure and SiC-doped MgB2 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakova, O V; Pan, A V; Soltanian, S; Dou, S X; Wexler, D

    2007-01-01

    We have systematically studied and compared the effect of cooling rate on microstructure, critical current density, upper critical field and irreversibility field in pure and 10 wt% SiC-added MgB 2 superconductors. The sintering process was carried out on the samples at a temperature of 750 deg. C for 1 h followed by quenching or cooling to room temperature in 0.3 h (2433 deg. C h -1 ), 14 h (52 deg. C h -1 ) and 25 h (30 deg. C h -1 ). Changes in the microstructure due to variations in cooling rate have been studied with the help of scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Correlations between microstructure and superconducting properties have been observed, identified and explained for both pure and SiC-added MgB 2 samples. Modifications to the pinning environment and grain boundary transparency are considered to be responsible for variations in the current-carrying ability. The dominant pinning on grain boundaries in the pure MgB 2 samples and on nano-inclusions (inducing accompanying defects) in the SiC-doped samples is clearly distinguished. On the basis of our experimental results, we have concluded that the cooling rate can be an important parameter influencing the superconducting properties of MgB 2 samples

  6. Influence of cooling rate on the development of multiple generations of {gamma}' precipitates in a commercial nickel base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.R.P. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Nag, S., E-mail: nag.soumya@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Hwang, J.Y. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Viswanathan, G.B.; Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH (United States); Srinivasan, R. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States); Fraser, H.L. [Center for the Accelerated Maturation of Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The compositional and microstructural evolution of different generations of {gamma}' precipitates during the continuous cooling of a commercial nickel base superalloy, Rene88DT, has been characterized by three dimensional atom probe tomography coupled with energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy studies. After solutionizing in the single {gamma} phase field, continuous cooling at a very high rate results in a monomodal size distribution of {gamma}' precipitates with a high nucleation density and non-equilibrium compositions. In contrast, a relatively slower cooling rate ({approx} 24 deg. C/min) results in a multi-modal size distribution of {gamma}' precipitates with the larger first generation primary precipitates exhibiting close to equilibrium composition, along with the smaller scale secondary {gamma}' precipitates, exhibiting non-equilibrium composition (excess of Co and Cr, depleted in Al and Ti). The composition of the {gamma} matrix near these precipitates also exhibits similar trends with the composition being closer to equilibrium near the primary precipitates as compared to the secondary precipitates. - Highlights: {yields} Effect of cooling rate on the precipitation of {gamma}' particles in commercial nickel base superalloy. {yields} Couples EFTEM and 3DAP studies to determine the composition and morphology of {gamma}' precipitates. {yields} Determination of near and far field compositional variations within the gamma matrix leading to subsequent precipitation.

  7. Controlling Object Heat Release Rate using Geometrical Features

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, Stefan Marc

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the effect of complex geometries on the burning rate of materials made using additive manufacturing. Controlling heat release rate has applicability in limiting fire hazards as well as for designing fuels for optimal burning rate. The burning rate of a structure is a function of the material properties as well as the airflow through it, which is dictated by the geometry. This burning rate is generally proportional to the porosity for obj...

  8. A packet-based dual-rate PID control strategy for a slow-rate sensing Networked Control System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, A; Alcaina, J; Salt, J; Casanova, V; Pizá, R

    2018-05-01

    This paper introduces a packet-based dual-rate control strategy to face time-varying network-induced delays, packet dropouts and packet disorder in a Networked Control System. Slow-rate sensing enables to achieve energy saving and to avoid packet disorder. Fast-rate actuation makes reaching the desired control performance possible. The dual-rate PID controller is split into two parts: a slow-rate PI controller located at the remote side (with no permanent communication to the plant) and a fast-rate PD controller located at the local side. The remote side also includes a prediction stage in order to generate the packet of future, estimated slow-rate control actions. These actions are sent to the local side and converted to fast-rate ones to be used when a packet does not arrive at this side due to the network-induced delay or due to occurring dropouts. The proposed control solution is able to approximately reach the nominal (no-delay, no-dropout) performance despite the existence of time-varying delays and packet dropouts. Control system stability is ensured in terms of probabilistic Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMIs). Via real-time control for a Cartesian robot, results clearly reveal the superiority of the control solution compared to a previous proposal by authors. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the effects of cooling rate, hydrogen content, grain refiner and modifier on microporosity formation in Al A356 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, J.G.; Huang, J.; Asada, J.; Akiba, K. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-06-15

    Cast Aluminum-Silicon alloys are used in numerous automotive and industrial weight sensitive applications because of their low density and excellent castability. The presence of trapped gas and or shrinkage pores in certain locations within castings has been shown to influence fatigue life. These micromechanical defects can be found most anywhere in a casting depending on processing conditions. A large amount of porosity located in the center of the cast material thickness may have no effect on mechanical properties or fatigue performance. A smaller, isolated pore near a surface may have a significant impact on mechanical properties. Hence, it is important to develop a comprehensive model to predict the size, location and distribution of microporosity in castings. In this work, we model the effect of various casting process parameters on microporosity formation for aluminum A356 alloy castings. The process parameters include cooling rate, hydrogen content, grain refiner and modifier. The proposed two-dimensional model predicts the size, morphology and distribution of microporosity at a given location in the casting. The method couples a mathematical model of porosity evolution with a probabilistic grain structure prediction model. The porosity evolution model is based on the simultaneous solution of the continuity and momentum equations for the metal and the mass conservation equation for the dissolved gas. The nucleation and growth of grains are simulated with a probabilistic method that uses the information from a heat transfer simulation, i.e. temperature and solid fraction, to determine the transition rules for grain evolution. The simulation results correlate well with experimental observation of porosity in cast structures. (orig.)

  10. Concept of electric power output control system for atomic power generation plant utilizing cool energy of stored snow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Seiji; Toita, Takayuki

    2003-01-01

    A concept of the SEAGUL system (Snow Enhancing Atomic-power Generation UtiLity) is proposed in this paper. Lowering the temperature of sea water for cooling of atomic-power plant will make a efficiency of power generation better and bring several ten MW additional electric power for 1356 MW class plant. The system concept stands an idea to use huge amount of seasonal storage snow for cooling water temperature control. In a case study for the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, it is estimated to cool down the sea water of 29degC to 20degC by 80 kt snow for 3 hours in a day would brought 60 MWh electric power per a day. Annually 38.4 Mt of stored snow will bring 1800 MWh electric power. (author)

  11. Recovery Act: Federspiel Controls (now Vigilent) and State of California Department of General Services Data Center Energy Efficient Cooling Control Demonstration. Final technical project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federspiel, Clifford; Evers, Myah

    2011-09-30

    Eight State of California data centers were equipped with an intelligent energy management system to evaluate the effectiveness, energy savings, dollar savings and benefits that arise when powerful artificial intelligence-based technology measures, monitors and actively controls cooling operations. Control software, wireless sensors and mesh networks were used at all sites. Most sites used variable frequency drives as well. The system dynamically adjusts temperature and airflow on the fly by analyzing real-time demands, thermal behavior and historical data collected on site. Taking into account the chaotic interrelationships of hundreds to thousands of variables in a data center, the system optimizes the temperature distribution across a facility while also intelligently balancing loads, outputs, and airflow. The overall project will provide a reduction in energy consumption of more than 2.3 million kWh each year, which translates to $240,000 saved and a reduction of 1.58 million pounds of carbon emissions. Across all sites, the cooling energy consumption was reduced by 41%. The average reduction in energy savings across all the sites that use VFDs is higher at 58%. Before this case study, all eight data centers ran the cooling fans at 100% capacity all of the time. Because of the new technology, cooling fans run at the optimum fan speed maintaining stable air equilibrium while also expending the least amount of electricity. With lower fan speeds, the life of the capital investment made on cooling equipment improves, and the cooling capacity of the data center increases. This case study depicts a rare technological feat: The same process and technology worked cost effectively in eight very different environments. The results show that savings were achieved in centers with diverse specifications for the sizes, ages and types of cooling equipment. The percentage of cooling energy reduction ranged from 19% to 78% while keeping temperatures substantially within the

  12. Objective Provision Trees of Reactivity Control Safety Function for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Bongsuk; Yang, Huichang; Suh, Namduk

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this OPT is first to assure the DiD design during the licensing of Sf, but it will also contribute in evaluating the completeness of regulatory requirements under development by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). Based on the definition of Defense-in-Depth (DiD) levels and safety functions for KALIMER Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), suggested in the reference and, Objective Provision Trees (OPTs) of reactivity control function for level 1, 2, 3 and 4 DiD were developed and suggested in this paper. The challenges and mechanisms and provisions were briefly explained in this paper. Comparing the mechanisms and provisions with the requirements will contribute in identifying the missing requirements. Since the design of Prototype Gen-IV Sf (PGSFR) is not mature yet, the OPT is developed for KALIMER design. Developed level 1 to 4 OPTs in this study can be used for the identification of potential design vulnerabilities. When detailed identification of provisions in terms of design features were achieved through the next step of this study, it can contribute to the establishment of defense-in-depth evaluation frame for the regulatory reviews for the licensing process. In the next stage of this study, other safety function will be researched and findings can be suggested as recommendations for the safety improvement

  13. Objective Provision Trees of Reactivity Control Safety Function for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bongsuk; Yang, Huichang [TUEV Rheinland Korea Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this OPT is first to assure the DiD design during the licensing of Sf, but it will also contribute in evaluating the completeness of regulatory requirements under development by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). Based on the definition of Defense-in-Depth (DiD) levels and safety functions for KALIMER Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), suggested in the reference and, Objective Provision Trees (OPTs) of reactivity control function for level 1, 2, 3 and 4 DiD were developed and suggested in this paper. The challenges and mechanisms and provisions were briefly explained in this paper. Comparing the mechanisms and provisions with the requirements will contribute in identifying the missing requirements. Since the design of Prototype Gen-IV Sf (PGSFR) is not mature yet, the OPT is developed for KALIMER design. Developed level 1 to 4 OPTs in this study can be used for the identification of potential design vulnerabilities. When detailed identification of provisions in terms of design features were achieved through the next step of this study, it can contribute to the establishment of defense-in-depth evaluation frame for the regulatory reviews for the licensing process. In the next stage of this study, other safety function will be researched and findings can be suggested as recommendations for the safety improvement.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of an Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor control rod model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.; Green, P.L.; O’Driscoll, D.; Worden, K.; Sims, N.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A model was made of the AGR control rod mechanism. • The aim was to better understand the performance when shutting down the reactor. • The model showed good agreement with test data. • Sensitivity analysis was carried out. • The results demonstrated the robustness of the system. - Abstract: A model has been made of the primary shutdown system of an Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor nuclear power station. The aim of this paper is to explore the use of sensitivity analysis techniques on this model. The two motivations for performing sensitivity analysis are to quantify how much individual uncertain parameters are responsible for the model output uncertainty, and to make predictions about what could happen if one or several parameters were to change. Global sensitivity analysis techniques were used based on Gaussian process emulation; the software package GEM-SA was used to calculate the main effects, the main effect index and the total sensitivity index for each parameter and these were compared to local sensitivity analysis results. The results suggest that the system performance is resistant to adverse changes in several parameters at once.

  15. Gas cooled fast reactor control rod drive mechanism deceleration unit. Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, T.H.

    1981-10-01

    This report presents the results of the airtesting portion of the proof-of-principle testing of a Control Rod Scram Deceleration Device developed for use in the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The device utilizes a grooved flywheel to decelerate the translating assembly (T/A). Two cam followers on the translating assembly travel in the flywheel grooves and transfer the energy of the T/A to the flywheel. The grooves in the flywheel are straight for most of the flywheel length. Near the bottom of the T/A stroke the grooves are spiraled in a decreasing slope helix so that the cam followers accelerate the flywheel as they transfer the energy of the falling T/A. To expedite proof-of-principle testing, some of the materials used in the fabrication of certain test article components were not prototypic. With these exceptions the concept appears to be acceptable. The initial test of 300 scrams was completed with only one failure and the failure was that of a non-prototypic cam follower outer sleeve material

  16. The Cool Little Kids randomised controlled trial: population-level early prevention for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Jordana K; Rapee, Ronald M; Hiscock, Harriet; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Clifford, Susan; Wake, Melissa

    2011-01-05

    The World Health Organization predicts that by 2030 internalising problems (e.g. depression and anxiety) will be second only to HIV/AIDS in international burden of disease. Internalising problems affect 1 in 7 school aged children, impacting on peer relations, school engagement, and later mental health, relationships and employment. The development of early childhood prevention for internalising problems is in its infancy. The current study follows two successful 'efficacy' trials of a parenting group intervention to reduce internalising disorders in temperamentally inhibited preschool children. Cool Little Kids is a population-level randomised trial to determine the impacts of systematically screening preschoolers for inhibition then offering a parenting group intervention, on child internalising problems and economic costs at school entry. This randomised trial will be conducted within the preschool service system, attended by more than 95% of Australian children in the year before starting school. In early 2011, preschool services in four local government areas in Melbourne, Australia, will distribute the screening tool. The ≈16% (n≈500) with temperamental inhibition will enter the trial. Intervention parents will be offered Cool Little Kids, a 6-session group program in the local community, focusing on ways to develop their child's bravery skills by reducing overprotective parenting interactions. Outcomes one and two years post-baseline will comprise child internalising diagnoses and symptoms, parenting interactions, and parent wellbeing. An economic evaluation (cost-consequences framework) will compare incremental differences in costs of the intervention versus control children to incremental differences in outcomes, from a societal perspective. Analyses will use the intention-to-treat principle, using logistic and linear regression models (binary and continuous outcomes respectively) to compare outcomes between the trial arms. This trial addresses gaps

  17. The Cool Little Kids randomised controlled trial: Population-level early prevention for anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiscock Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization predicts that by 2030 internalising problems (e.g. depression and anxiety will be second only to HIV/AIDS in international burden of disease. Internalising problems affect 1 in 7 school aged children, impacting on peer relations, school engagement, and later mental health, relationships and employment. The development of early childhood prevention for internalising problems is in its infancy. The current study follows two successful 'efficacy' trials of a parenting group intervention to reduce internalising disorders in temperamentally inhibited preschool children. Cool Little Kids is a population-level randomised trial to determine the impacts of systematically screening preschoolers for inhibition then offering a parenting group intervention, on child internalising problems and economic costs at school entry. Methods/Design This randomised trial will be conducted within the preschool service system, attended by more than 95% of Australian children in the year before starting school. In early 2011, preschool services in four local government areas in Melbourne, Australia, will distribute the screening tool. The ≈16% (n≈500 with temperamental inhibition will enter the trial. Intervention parents will be offered Cool Little Kids, a 6-session group program in the local community, focusing on ways to develop their child's bravery skills by reducing overprotective parenting interactions. Outcomes one and two years post-baseline will comprise child internalising diagnoses and symptoms, parenting interactions, and parent wellbeing. An economic evaluation (cost-consequences framework will compare incremental differences in costs of the intervention versus control children to incremental differences in outcomes, from a societal perspective. Analyses will use the intention-to-treat principle, using logistic and linear regression models (binary and continuous outcomes respectively to compare outcomes

  18. To develop a dynamic model of a collector loop for purpose of improved control of solar heating and cooling. Final technical report. [TRNSYS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herczfeld, P R; Fischl, R

    1980-01-01

    The program objectives were to (1) assess the feasibility of using the TRNSYS computer code for solar heating and cooling control studies and modify it wherever possible, and (2) develop a new dynamic model of the solar collector which reflects the performance of the collector under transient conditions. Also, the sensitivity of the performance of this model to the various system parameters such as collector time constants, flow rates, turn-on and turn-off temperature set points, solar insolation, etc., was studied. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  19. Super cool X-1000 and Super cool Z-1000, two ice blockers, and their effect on vitrification/warming of mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrzadeh, H; Najmabadi, S; Paymani, R; Macaso, T; Azadbadi, Z; Ahmady, A

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the survival and blastocyst formation rates of mouse embryos after vitrification/thaw process with different ice blocker media. We used X-1000 and Z-1000 separately and mixed using V-Kim, a closed vitrification system. Mouse embryos were vitrified using ethylene glycol based medium supplemented with Super cool X-1000 and/or Super cool Z-1000. Survival rates for the control, Super cool X-1000, Super cool Z-1000, and Super cool X-1000/Z-1000 groups were 74%, 72%, 68%, and 85% respectively, with no significant difference among experimental and control groups; however, a significantly higher survival rate was noticed in the Super cool X-1000/Z-1000 group when compared with the Super cool Z-1000 group. Blastocyst formation rates for the control, Super cool X-1000, Super cool Z-1000, and Super cool X-1000/Z-1000 groups were 71%, 66%, 65%, and 72% respectively. There was no significant difference in this rate among control and experimental groups. In a closed vitrification system, addition of ice blocker Super cool X-1000 to the vitrification solution containing Super cool Z-1000 may improve the embryo survival rate. We recommend combined ice blocker usage to optimize the vitrification outcome. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cooling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    After an introduction to the general concepts of cooling of charged particle beams, some specific cooling methods are discussed, namely stochastic, electron and laser cooling. The treatment concentrates on the physical ideas of the cooling methods and only very crude derivations of cooling times are given. At the end three other proposed cooling schemes are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of tritium production rate in a gas-cooled reactor with continuous tritium recovery system for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Hideaki, E-mail: mat@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Yasuyuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shimakawa, Satoshi; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Nishikawa, Masabumi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The performance of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production system was studied. • A continuous tritium recovery using helium gas was considered. • Gas-cooled reactors with 3 GW output in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium in a year • Performance of the system was examined for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2} compounds. -- Abstract: The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production with continuous tritium recovery system is examined. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300-MWe (600 MW) nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations for the three-dimensional entire-core region of the GTHTR300 were performed. A Li loading pattern for the continuous tritium recovery system in the gas-cooled reactor is presented. It is shown that module gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium maximum in a year.

  2. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total quantities the order fill rate would be the preferred service level m...

  3. Control of modiolid mussels in cooling water systems by continuous chlorination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajagopal, S.; Venugopalan, V.P.; Velde, G. van der; Jenner, H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Modiolid mussels such as Modiolus philippinarum and Modiolus metcalfei constitute a numerically significant group in fouling communities, especially in tropical and subtropical industrial cooling water systems. Nevertheless, there are hardly any published reports on the tolerance of these

  4. Development of an Anti-Vibration Controller for Magnetic Bearing Cooling Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal outlines a program to develop a vibration-free reverse-Brayton cycle cooling system using specially-tuned magnetic bearings. Such a system is critical...

  5. Control room conceptual design of nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Qianqian; Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control room layout for the nuclear power plant with multiple modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors has been developed. The modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors may need to be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands to realize the economic efficiency. There are many differences between the multi-modular plant and the current NPPs in the control room. These differences may include the staffing level, the human-machine interface design, the operation mode, etc. The potential challenges of the human factor engineering (HFE) in the control room of the multi-modular plant are analyzed, including the operation workload of the multi-modular tasks, how to help the crew to keep situation awareness of all modules, and how to support team work, the control of shared system between modules, etc. A concept design of control room for the multi-modular plant is presented based on the design aspect of HTR-PM (High temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble bed module). HFE issues are considered in the conceptual design of control room for the multi-modular plant and some design strategies are presented. As a novel conceptual design, verifications and validations are needed, and focus of further work is sketch out. (author)

  6. EURISOL-DS METEX: Cooling and Temperature Control of the Mercury Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Stefan Joray

    The cooling of the mercury loop is described on pages two, three and four. The gaps in the water jackets of the heat exchangers are too large and the cooling water capacity is too low. Convection from the wall into water is bad. The mercury temperature is too high. On page five is a proposal how the mercury temperature can be kept low and constant.

  7. Effects of Cooling Rate on Precipitate Evolution and Residual Stresses in Al-Si-Mn-Mg Casting Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung; Walde, Caitlin; Mishra, Brajendra

    2018-03-01

    The residual stresses with different heat treatment conditions have been measured and correlated with the microstructural behavior of AA365. 30 and 100 K/min cooling of AA365 inhibited the transformation of precipitates under 773 K, respectively. The alloy cooled at 30 and 100 K/min exhibited tensile residual stresses of 6.2 and 5.4 MPa, respectively, while the alloy cooled at 1 and 10 K/min showed compressive stresses of - 12.8 and - 10.3 MPa, respectively. The formation β', β″, and other intermetallic compounds affected the compressive residual stresses, and that the fracture of the brittle intermetallic phases could reduce the extent of residual stresses in the lattice through plastic deformation.

  8. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Kobayashi, Masahide.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable a stable operation of an emergency core cooling system by preventing the system from the automatic stopping at an abnormally high level of the reactor water during its operation. Constitution: A pump flow rate signal and a reactor water level signal are used and, when the reactor water level is increased to a predetermined level, the pump flow rate is controlled by the reactor water level signal instead of the flow rate signal. Specifically, when the reactor water level is gradually increased by the water injection from the pump and exceeds a setting signal for the water level, the water level deviation signal acts as a demand signal for the decrease in the flow rate of the pump and the output signal from the water level controller is also decreased depending on the control constant. At a certain point, the output signal from the water level controller becomes smaller than the output signal from the flow rate controller. Thus, the output signal from the water level controller is outputted as the output signal for the lower level preference device. In this way, the reactor water level and the pump flow rate can be controlled within a range not exceeding the predetermined pump flow rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razam Ab Latip

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid and stearin (solid fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min, end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV, fatty acid composition (FAC, acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP, solid fat content (SFC, thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1 and palmitic (C16:0 respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of

  10. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total quantities the order fill rate would be the preferred service level...... measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions...

  11. Nucleation control and separation of paracetamol polymorphs through swift cooling crystallization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, C.; Srinivasan, K.

    2014-09-01

    Polymorphic nucleation behavior of pharmaceutical solid paracetamol has been investigated by performing swift cooling crystallization process. Saturated aqueous solution prepared at 318 K was swiftly cooled to 274 K in steps of every 1 K in the temperature range from 274 K to 313 K with uniform stirring of 100 rpm. The resultant supersaturation generated in the mother solution favours the nucleation of three different polymorphs of paracetamol. Lower supersaturation region σ=0.10-0.83 favours stable mono form I; the intermediate supersaturation region σ=0.92-1.28 favours metastable ortho form II and the higher supersaturation region σ=1.33-1.58 favours unstable form III polymorphic nucleation. Depending upon the level of supersaturation generated during swift cooling process and the corresponding solubility limit and metastable zone width (MSZW) of each polymorph, the nucleation of a particular polymorph occurs in the system. The type of polymorphs was identified by in-situ optical microscopy and the internal structure was confirmed by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) study. By this novel approach, the preferred nucleation regions of all the three polymorphs of paracetamol are optimized in terms of different cooling ranges employed during the swift cooling process. Also solution mediated polymorphic transformations from unstable to mono and ortho to mono polymorphs have been studied by in-situ.

  12. Evidence of refilled chamber gas pressure enhancing cooling rate during melt spinning of a Zr50Cu40Al10 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-wang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the refilled gas pressure on the glass forming behaviour of one of the best ternary glass forming alloys Zr50Cu40Al10 was studied for the melt spinning process. The amorphicity of as-quenched ribbons was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The refilled chamber atmospheric pressure is crucial to the cooling rate of melt spinning. At high vacuum, at pressure less than 0.0001 atm, fully crystalline fragments are obtained. Monolithic amorphous ribbons were only obtained at a gas pressure of 0.1 atm or higher. The extended contact length between thecribbons and the copper wheel contributes to the high cooling rate of melt spinning. Higher chamber gas pressure leads to more turbulence of liquid metal beneath the nozzle; therefore, lower pressure is preferable at practical melt spinning processes once glass forming conditions are fulfilled.

  13. Impact toughness and microstructure relationship in niobium- and vanadium-microalloyed steels processed with varied cooling rates to similar yield strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)]. E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu; Mannering, T. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Panda, D. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Jansto, S.G. [Reference Metals, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    We describe here the relationship between microstructure and impact toughness behavior as a function of cooling rate for industrially processed Nb- and V-microalloyed steels of almost similar yield strength ({approx}60 ksi). Both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels exhibited increase in toughness with increase in cooling rates during processing. However, Nb-microalloyed steels were characterized by relatively higher toughness than the V-microalloyed steels under identical processing conditions. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at conventional cooling rate, primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite-pearlite microconstituents, while Nb-microalloyed steels besides polygonal ferrite and pearlite contained significant fraction of degenerated pearlite. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at relatively higher cooling rate contained degenerated pearlite and lath-type (acicular) ferrite in addition to the primary ferrite-pearlite constituents. The fraction of degenerated pearlite was higher in Nb-microalloyed steels than in the V-microalloyed steels. In both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels the precipitation characteristics were similar with precipitation occurring at grain boundaries, dislocations, and in the ferrite matrix. Fine-scale ({approx}5-10 nm) precipitation was observed in the ferrite matrix of both the steels. The selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern analysis revealed that these fine precipitates were MC type of niobium and vanadium carbides in the respective steels and followed Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix. The microstructural studies suggest that the increase in toughness of Nb-microalloyed steels is attributed to higher fraction of degenerated pearlite in the steel.

  14. Impact toughness and microstructure relationship in niobium- and vanadium-microalloyed steels processed with varied cooling rates to similar yield strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, S.; Misra, R.D.K.; Mannering, T.; Panda, D.; Jansto, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the relationship between microstructure and impact toughness behavior as a function of cooling rate for industrially processed Nb- and V-microalloyed steels of almost similar yield strength (∼60 ksi). Both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels exhibited increase in toughness with increase in cooling rates during processing. However, Nb-microalloyed steels were characterized by relatively higher toughness than the V-microalloyed steels under identical processing conditions. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at conventional cooling rate, primarily consisted of polygonal ferrite-pearlite microconstituents, while Nb-microalloyed steels besides polygonal ferrite and pearlite contained significant fraction of degenerated pearlite. The microstructure of Nb- and V-microalloyed steels processed at relatively higher cooling rate contained degenerated pearlite and lath-type (acicular) ferrite in addition to the primary ferrite-pearlite constituents. The fraction of degenerated pearlite was higher in Nb-microalloyed steels than in the V-microalloyed steels. In both Nb- and V-microalloyed steels the precipitation characteristics were similar with precipitation occurring at grain boundaries, dislocations, and in the ferrite matrix. Fine-scale (∼5-10 nm) precipitation was observed in the ferrite matrix of both the steels. The selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern analysis revealed that these fine precipitates were MC type of niobium and vanadium carbides in the respective steels and followed Baker-Nutting orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix. The microstructural studies suggest that the increase in toughness of Nb-microalloyed steels is attributed to higher fraction of degenerated pearlite in the steel

  15. Cooling rate and starvation affect supercooling point and cold tolerance of the Khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts fourth instar larvae (Coleoptera: Dermestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, M; Izadi, H

    2018-01-01

    Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) is an important insect pest of stored products. In this study, the survival strategies of T. granarium fourth instar larvae were investigated at different sub-zero temperatures following different cooling rates, acclimation to different relative humidity (RH) and different starvation times. Our results show that larvae of T. granarium are freeze-intolerant. There was a strong link between cooling rates and supercooling point, which means the slower the decrease in temperature, the lower the supercooling point. Trehalose content was greater in insects cooled at a rate of 0.5°C/min. According to results, the RH did not affect supercooling point. However, acclimation to an RH of 25% increased mortality following exposure to - 10°C/24h. The time necessary to reach 95% mortality was 1737h and 428h at - 5°C and - 10°C. The lowest lipid and trehalose content was detected in insects acclimated to 25% RH, although, the different RH treatments did not significantly affect glycogen content of T. granarium larvae. The supercooling point of larvae was gradually increased following starvation. By contrast, fed larvae had the greatest lipid, glycogen, and trehalose content, and insects starved for eight days had the lowest energy contents. There was a sharp decline in the survival of larvae between - 11 and - 18°C after 1h exposure. Our results indicate the effects of cooling rate and starvation on energy reserves and survival of T. granarium. We conclude that T. granarium may not survive under similar stress conditions of the stored products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of cooling rate and Mg addition on the structural evaluation of rapidly solidified Al-20wt%Cu-12wt%Fe alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaköse, Ercan, E-mail: ekarakose@karatekin.edu.tr [Çankırı Karatekin University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, 18100 Çankırı (Turkey); Çolak, Hakan [Çankırı Karatekin University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 18100 Çankırı (Turkey)

    2016-11-15

    The present work examines the effect of Mg contents and cooling rate on the morphology and mechanical properties of Al{sub 20}Cu{sub 12}Fe quasicrystalline alloy. The microstructure of the alloys was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and the phase composition was identified by X-ray diffractometry. The melting characteristics were studied by differential thermal analysis under an Ar atmosphere. The mechanical features of the melt-spun and conventionally solidified alloys were tested by tensile-strength test and Vickers micro-hardness test. It was found that the final microstructure of the Al{sub 20}Cu{sub 12}Fe samples mainly depends on the cooling rate and Mg contents, which suggests that different cooling rates and Mg contents produce different microstructures and properties. The average grain sizes of the melt spun samples were about 100–300 nm at 35 m/s. The nanosize, dispersed, different shaped quasicrystal particles possessed a remarkable effect to the mechanical characteristics of the rapidly solidified ribbons. The microhardness values of the melt spun samples were approximately 18% higher than those of the conventionally counterparts. - Highlights: •Quasicrystal-creating materials have high potential for applications. •Different shaped nanosize quasicrystal particles were observed. •The addition of Mg has an important impact on the mechanical properties. •H{sub V} values of the MS0, MS3 and MS5 samples at 35 m/s were 8.56, 8.66 and 8.80 GPa. •The volume fraction of IQC increases with increasing cooling rates.

  17. Transient modeling of an air-cooled chiller with economized compressor. Part II: Application to control design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weijiang; Ding Shufu; Zhang Chunlu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the transient modeling developed in the previous paper, the control design of the air-cooled chiller is studied. The main electronic expansion valve (EXV) controls the suction superheat, the compressor controls the leaving water temperature and the sub EXV regulates the injection superheat. Since the system reliability is sensitive to the control of the suction superheat, it is the focus in this paper. Dynamic simulation cases are built to compare two control algorithms, PID and fuzzy logic. The case studies show that the fuzzy controller has higher reliability and performance. Both the two controllers are fully tested and tuned on a chiller test facility and the experiments indicate that the fuzzy controller works better as well.

  18. Control of droplet size in rain-zone in wet cooling tower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitkovicova Rut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the wet cooling tower is significantly affected by the droplet size occurring in the rain zone. In order to effectively manage the size of these droplets, it was necessary to experimentally determine the effect of the fills of the cooling towers on droplets. Five types of cooling fillers were used for experimental measurements: 3 film fills and 2 splash fills - trickle and grid. Drop size measurements were performed using the LIF method. Histograms of droplets size were obtained from measured droplet sizes under each fill, and for each fill, the Sauter droplet diameter was then calculated. According to a theoretical analysis of a breakdown of droplets, the combinations of some fills and the effect of their surface treatment on the droplet diameter were then measured for comparison.

  19. Restaurant Food Cooling Practices†

    Science.gov (United States)

    BROWN, LAURA GREEN; RIPLEY, DANNY; BLADE, HENRY; REIMANN, DAVE; EVERSTINE, KAREN; NICHOLAS, DAVE; EGAN, JESSICA; KOKTAVY, NICOLE; QUILLIAM, DANIELA N.

    2017-01-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study. PMID:23212014

  20. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total demanded quantity the order fill rate would be the preferred service...... level measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions...... extensions consider more general inventory control review policies with backordering, as well as some relations between service measures. A particularly important result in the paper concerns an alternative service measure, the customer order fill rate, and shows how this measure always exceeds the other two...

  1. Performance ratings and personality factors in radar controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether primary or second-order personality questionnaire factors were related to job performance ratings on the Employee Appraisal Record in a sample of 264 radar controllers. A Pearson correlation matrix wa...

  2. Evaluation of Control and Protection System for Loss of Electrical Power Supply System of Water-Cooling Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaemi, Tjipta; Djen Djen; Setyono; Jambiar, Riswan; Rozali, Bang; Setyo P, Dwi; Tjahyono, Hendro

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of control and protection system for loss of electrical power supply system of water-cooled nuclear power plant has been done. The loss of electrical power supply. The accident covered the loss of external electrical load and loss of ac power to the station auxiliaries. It is analysed by studying and observing the mechanism of electrical power system and mechanism of related control and protection system. The are two condition used in the evaluation i e without turbine trip and with turbine trip. From the evaluation it is concluded that the control and protection system can handled the failure caused by the loss of electrical power system

  3. Rate-control algorithms testing by using video source model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belyaev, Evgeny; Turlikov, Andrey; Ukhanova, Anna

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the method of rate control algorithms testing by the use of video source model is suggested. The proposed method allows to significantly improve algorithms testing over the big test set.......In this paper the method of rate control algorithms testing by the use of video source model is suggested. The proposed method allows to significantly improve algorithms testing over the big test set....

  4. Cooling rate dependence of structural order in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yang [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Feng, E-mail: fzhang@ameslab.gov; Ye, Zhuo [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ding, Zejun [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Ho, Kai-Ming [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials (ICQD), and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-07-07

    The atomic structure of Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10} metallic glass is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. By performing a long sub-T{sub g} annealing, we developed a glass model closer to the experiments than the models prepared by continuous cooling. Using the cluster alignment method, we found that “3661” cluster is the dominating short-range order in the glass samples. The connection and arrangement of “3661” clusters, which define the medium-range order in the system, are enhanced significantly in the sub-T{sub g} annealed sample as compared with the fast cooled glass samples. Unlike some strong binary glass formers such as Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5}, the clusters representing the short-range order do not form an interconnected interpenetrating network in Al{sub 90}Sm{sub 10,} which has only marginal glass formability.

  5. A neutron poison tritium breeding controller applied to a water cooled fusion reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, L.W.G.; Packer, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The issue of a potentially producing a large tritium surplus inventory, within a solid breeder, is addressed. • A possible solution to this problem is presented in the form of a neutron poison based tritium production controller. • The tritium surplus inventory has been modelled by the FATI code for a simplified WCCB model and as a function of time. • It has been demonstrated that the tritium surplus inventory can be managed, which may impact on safety considerations. - Abstract: The generation of tritium in sufficient quantities is an absolute requirement for a next step fusion device such as DEMO due to the scarcity of tritium sources. Although the production of sufficient quantities of tritium will be one of the main challenges for DEMO, within an energy economy featuring several fusion power plants the active control of tritium production may be required in order to manage surplus tritium inventories at power plant sites. The primary reason for controlling the tritium inventory in such an economy would therefore be to minimise the risk and storage costs associated with large quantities of surplus tritium. In order to ensure that enough tritium will be produced in a reactor which contains a solid tritium breeder, over the reactor's lifetime, the tritium breeding rate at the beginning of its lifetime is relatively high and reduces over time. This causes a large surplus tritium inventory to build up until approximately halfway through the lifetime of the blanket, when the inventory begins to decrease. This surplus tritium inventory could exceed several tens of kilograms of tritium, impacting on possible safety and licensing conditions that may exist. This paper describes a possible solution to the surplus tritium inventory problem that involves neutron poison injection into the coolant, which is managed with a tritium breeding controller. A simple PID controller and is used to manage the injection of the neutron absorbing compounds into

  6. A neutron poison tritium breeding controller applied to a water cooled fusion reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, L.W.G., E-mail: Lee.Morgan@CCFE.ac.uk; Packer, L.W.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The issue of a potentially producing a large tritium surplus inventory, within a solid breeder, is addressed. • A possible solution to this problem is presented in the form of a neutron poison based tritium production controller. • The tritium surplus inventory has been modelled by the FATI code for a simplified WCCB model and as a function of time. • It has been demonstrated that the tritium surplus inventory can be managed, which may impact on safety considerations. - Abstract: The generation of tritium in sufficient quantities is an absolute requirement for a next step fusion device such as DEMO due to the scarcity of tritium sources. Although the production of sufficient quantities of tritium will be one of the main challenges for DEMO, within an energy economy featuring several fusion power plants the active control of tritium production may be required in order to manage surplus tritium inventories at power plant sites. The primary reason for controlling the tritium inventory in such an economy would therefore be to minimise the risk and storage costs associated with large quantities of surplus tritium. In order to ensure that enough tritium will be produced in a reactor which contains a solid tritium breeder, over the reactor's lifetime, the tritium breeding rate at the beginning of its lifetime is relatively high and reduces over time. This causes a large surplus tritium inventory to build up until approximately halfway through the lifetime of the blanket, when the inventory begins to decrease. This surplus tritium inventory could exceed several tens of kilograms of tritium, impacting on possible safety and licensing conditions that may exist. This paper describes a possible solution to the surplus tritium inventory problem that involves neutron poison injection into the coolant, which is managed with a tritium breeding controller. A simple PID controller and is used to manage the injection of the neutron absorbing compounds into

  7. Influence of the quenching rate and step-wise cooling temperatures on microstructural and tensile properties of PER72 ® Ni-based superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Baillif Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The PER72® grade is used as a wrought engine turbine disk, which is a critical high temperature component. During the heat treatment process, residual stresses are generated during the quench, which may lead to irreversible damages on the workpiece. The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms involved in the residual stress generation. Therefore, the influence of quenching conditions on the high temperature tensile properties and the multi-scale microstructure evolutions are investigated after cooling. PER72® specimens are annealed above the solvus temperature, directly on the servo-hydraulic testing machine. Three quenching rates are used: 30 ∘C/min, 120 ∘C/min, and 300 ∘C/min. For each condition, the cooling is interrupted at 1000 ∘C, 850 ∘C, 600 ∘C and 20 ∘C to perform isothermal tensile test. Specimens are post-mortem analysed. On one hand the fracture surface is investigated using SEM. On the other hand the microstructure evolution was observed and quantified at different scales using SEM directly on the bulk or after the chemical extraction of precipitation. The precipitation size and volume fraction statistics, X-Ray diffraction for the crystallography and composition of the different phases are investigated. It was shown that the testing temperature does not significantly influence the γ′ distribution of particles. Conversely, the γ′ precipitation is strongly influenced by the cooling rate. Notably, the average size, the distance between particles as well as the number density of γ′ precipitates are significantly modified by the cooling rate. Changes in tensile properties are related to microstructural.

  8. Control of fouling organisms in estuarine cooling water systems by chlorine and bromine chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, D.T.; Margrey, S.L.

    1979-01-01

    The study described was initiated to evaluate the antifouling effectiveness of chlorine and bromine chloride in low velocity flow areas where estuarine waters are used for cooling purposes. The relative antifouling effectiveness of chlorine and bromine chloride under intermittent and continuous modes of application in low velocity flow areas was evaluated at an estuarine power plant located on the Chesapeake Bay

  9. From Steaming Mad to Staying Cool: A Constructive Approach to Anger Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feindler, Eva L.; Starr, Karen E.

    2003-01-01

    Teaching children and adolescents to recognize how they feel when they are angry and what pushes their buttons enables them to make better choices about how they express their anger. They learn that staying cool gives them the power to create more positive outcomes for potentially negative encounters. Through self-assessment and role-plays, they…

  10. A simplified modeling of mechanical cooling tower for control and optimization of HVAC systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Guang-Yu; Cai, Wen-Jian; Lu Lu; Lee, Eng Lock; Chiang, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a new, simple, yet accurate mechanical cooling tower model for the purpose of energy conservation and management. On the basis of Merkel's theory and effectiveness-NTU method, the model is developed by energy balance and heat, mass transfer analysis. Commissioning information is then used to identified, only three model parameters by Levenberg-Marquardt method. Compared with the existing models, the proposed model has simple characteristic parameters to be determined and without requiring iterative computation when the operating point changes. The model is validated by real operating data from the cooling towers of a heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system of a commercial hotel. The testing results show that the performance of the cooling tower varies from time to time due to different operating conditions and the proposed model is able to reflect these changes by tuning its parameters. With this feature, the proposed model can be simply used and accurately predict the performance of the real-time operating cooling tower

  11. Impact of environmental regulations on control of copper ion concentration in the DIII-D cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gootgeld, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    Tokamaks and industrial users are faced with the task of maintaining closed-loop, low conductivity, low impurity, cooling water systems. Operating these systems concentrates the impurities in the water requiring subsequent disposal. Environmental regulations are making this increasingly difficult. This paper will discuss the solution to the problem of removing and disposing of copper ions in the DIII-D low conductivity water system. Since the commissioning of the Doublet facility, the quality of the water in the 3000 gpm system that cools the DIII-D vacuum vessel coils, power supplies and auxiliary heating components has been controlled with mixed-bed ion exchangers. Low ion levels, particularly copper, are required to operate this equipment. In early 1992, the company that leases and regenerates DIII-D ion exchangers said they no longer can accept these resin beds for regeneration due to the level of copper ion on the resin. This change in policy, a change that has been adopted throughout their industry, was necessary to assure that the Metropolitan Sewerage System of the City of San Diego stays in compliance with State of California regulations and EPA-mandated national pretreatment standards and regulations. A cost effective solution was implemented which utilizes a reverse osmosis filtration system with the ion exchangers for make-up water. Levels of copper ion disposed to the sewer are in compliance with government standards. These measures have thus far proved effective in maintaining low conductivity and overall good quality cooling water. Specifically, this paper discusses DIII-D deionized cooling water quality requirements and an affective means to meet these requirements in order to be in compliance with government regulations for copper ion disposal. The problems discussed, the alternatives considered and the approach taken would be readily applicable to any deionized cooling water system containing copper where EPA standards and regulations are mandated

  12. Rate control is more cost-effective than rhythm control for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation - results from the RAte Control versus Electrical cardioversion (RACE) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, VE; Vermeulen, KM; TenVergert, EM; Van Veldhuisen, JGP; Bosker, HA; Kamp, O; Kingma, JH; Tijssen, JGP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    Aims To evaluate costs between a rate and rhythm control strategy in persistent atrial. fibrillation. Methods and results In a prospective substudy of RACE (Rate control versus electrical cardioversion for persistent atrial. fibrillation) in 428 of the total 522 patients (206 rate control and 222

  13. Oxygen uptake rate (OUR) control strategy for improving avermectin B

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glucose metabolism plays a crucial role in the process of avermectin B1a biosynthesis. Controlling glucose feeding based on oxygen uptake rate (OUR) was established to improve the efficiency of avermectin B1a production. The result showed that avermectin B1a production was greatly enhanced by OUR control strategy.

  14. Visual Perception Based Rate Control Algorithm for HEVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zeqi; Liu, PengYu; Jia, Kebin

    2018-01-01

    For HEVC, rate control is an indispensably important video coding technology to alleviate the contradiction between video quality and the limited encoding resources during video communication. However, the rate control benchmark algorithm of HEVC ignores subjective visual perception. For key focus regions, bit allocation of LCU is not ideal and subjective quality is unsatisfied. In this paper, a visual perception based rate control algorithm for HEVC is proposed. First bit allocation weight of LCU level is optimized based on the visual perception of luminance and motion to ameliorate video subjective quality. Then λ and QP are adjusted in combination with the bit allocation weight to improve rate distortion performance. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm reduces average 0.5% BD-BR and maximum 1.09% BD-BR at no cost in bitrate accuracy compared with HEVC (HM15.0). The proposed algorithm devotes to improving video subjective quality under various video applications.

  15. Exercise, Insulin Absorption Rates, and Artificial Pancreas Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Spencer; Hinshaw, Ling; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by an inability of a person to endogenously produce the hormone insulin. Because of this, insulin must be injected - usually subcutaneously. The size of the injected dose and the rate at which the dose reaches the circulatory system have a profound effect on the ability to control glucose excursions, and therefore control of diabetes. However, insulin absorption rates via subcutaneous injection are variable and depend on a number of factors including tissue perfusion, physical activity (vasodilation, increased capillary throughput), and other tissue geometric and physical properties. Exercise may also have a sizeable effect on the rate of insulin absorption, which can potentially lead to dangerous glucose levels. Insulin-dosing algorithms, as implemented in an artificial pancreas controller, should account accurately for absorption rate variability and exercise effects on insulin absorption. The aforementioned factors affecting insulin absorption will be discussed within the context of both fluid mechanics and data driven modeling approaches.

  16. Influence of cooling rate on the structure and mechanical properties of G17CrMoV5 – 10 cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of cooling rate on the structure and properties of G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF cast steel. The material for research was a section taken out from an outer cylinder of a steam turbine body after about 250 000 hours of operation at the temperature of 535°C and pressure 9 MPa. The investigated cast steel was subjected to heat treatment which consisted in cooling at the rates corresponding to the processes, such as: bainitic hardening, normalizing and full annealing. Tempering after the process of cooling from austenitizing temperature was carried out at the temperatures of: 700, 720 and 740°C. Performed research has proved that structures obtained after bainitic hardening and normalizing are characterized by a large strength margin which allows to apply high temperatures of tempering. It has been shown that the cast steel of bainitic structure, with similar mechanical properties as the cast steel of bainitic – ferritic structure, is characterized by almost twice as high impact energy. Full annealing and tempering of the examined cast steel ensures only the required impact strength, with mechanical properties comparable to those after service.

  17. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Longitudinal Modulus of Cu3Sn Phase of Ag-Sn-Cu Amalgam Alloy (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Rusli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of cooling rate (at the time of solidification on the elastic constants of Cu3Sn phase of Ag-Sn-Cu dental amalgam alloy were studied. In this study, three types of alloys were made, with the composition Cu-38-37 wt% Sn by means of casting, where each alloy was subjected to different cooling rate, such as cooling on the air (AC, air blown (AB, and quenched in the water (WQ. X-ray diffraction, metallography, and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy studies of three alloys indicated the existence of Cu3Sn phase. Determination of the modulus of elasticity of Cu3Sn (ε phase was carried out by the measurement of longitudinal and transversal waves velocity using ultrasonic technique. The result shows that Cu3Sn (ε phase on AC gives higher modulus of elasticity values than those of Cu3Sn (ε on AB and WQ. The high modulus of elasticity value will produce a strong Ag-Sn-Cu dental amalagam alloy.

  18. New cooling regulation technology of secondary cooling station in DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Yan, Jun-wei; Zhu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fei-long; Lei, Jun-xi [The Key Lab of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Liang, Lie-quan [The Key Lab of E-Commerce Market Application Technology of Guangdong Province, Guangdong University of Business Studies, Guangzhou 510320 (China)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a kind of new control technology of secondary cooling station (constant flow rate/variable temperature difference) in district cooling system (DCS) is proposed in view of serial consequences including low efficiency and high operating cost caused by low temperature of supply water in DCS. This technology has been applied in DCS of Guangzhou University City. The result has already indicated that such technology can increase the supply and return temperatures of buildings, return water temperature of primary side in the plate heat exchanger unit, moreover, the efficiency of both the chiller and the whole system are improved significantly. (author)

  19. Control of the Protein Turnover Rates in Lemna minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewavas, A.

    1972-01-01

    The control of protein turnover in Lemna minor has been examined using a method described in the previous paper for determining the rate constants of synthesis and degradation of protein. If Lemna is placed on water, there is a reduction in the rate constants of synthesis of protein and an increase (3- to 6-fold) in the rate constant of degradation. The net effect is a loss of protein from the tissue. Omission of nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, magnesium, or calcium results in increases in the rate constant of degradation of protein. An unusual dual effect of benzyladenine on the turnover constants has been observed. Treatment of Lemna grown on sucrose-mineral salts with benzyladenine results in alterations only in the rate constant of synthesis. Treatment of Lemna grown on water with benzyladenine alters only the rate constant of degradation. Abscisic acid on the other hand alters both rate constants of synthesis and degradation of protein together. Inclusion of growth-inhibiting amino acids in the medium results in a reduction in the rate constants of synthesis and increases in the rate constant of degradation of protein. It is concluded that the rate of turnover of protein in Lemna is very dependent on the composition of the growth medium. Conditions which reduce growth rates also reduce the rates of synthesis of protein and increase those of degradation. PMID:16657895

  20. Microbial analysis of meatballs cooled with vacuum and conventional cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Hande Mutlu; Ozturk, Harun Kemal; Koçar, Gunnur

    2017-08-01

    Vacuum cooling is a rapid evaporative cooling technique and can be used for pre-cooling of leafy vegetables, mushroom, bakery, fishery, sauces, cooked food, meat and particulate foods. The aim of this study was to apply the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling techniques for the cooling of the meatball and to show the vacuum pressure effect on the cooling time, the temperature decrease and microbial growth rate. The results of the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling (cooling in the refrigerator) were compared with each other for different temperatures. The study shows that the conventional cooling was much slower than the vacuum cooling. Moreover, the microbial growth rate of the vacuum cooling was extremely low compared with the conventional cooling. Thus, the lowest microbial growth occurred at 0.7 kPa and the highest microbial growth was observed at 1.5 kPa for the vacuum cooling. The mass loss ratio for the conventional cooling and vacuum cooling was about 5 and 9% respectively.

  1. A new boundary control scheme for simultaneous achievement of H-mode and radiative cooling (SHC boundary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, N.

    1995-05-01

    We have proposed a new boundary control scheme (SHC boundary), which could allow simultaneous achievement of the H-mode type confinement improvement and radiative cooling with wide heat flux distribution. In our proposed configuration, a low m island layer sharply separates a plasma confining region from an open 'ergodic' boundary. The degree of openness in the ergodic boundary must be high enough to make the plasma pressure constant along the field line, which in turn separates low density plasma just outside the plasma confining region (the key external condition for achieving a good H-mode discharge) from very high density, cold radiative plasma near the wall (required for effective edge radiative cooling). Examples of such proposed SHC boundaries for Heliotron typed devices and tokamaks are presented. (author)

  2. RETRAN-02 analysis of upper head cooling during controlled natural circulation cooldown of Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, N.; Helrich, R.E.; Bergeron, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    RETRAN-02 is particularly well-suited for investigating the fluid conditions in the upper head during a natural circulation cooldown. The RETRAN input model was developed with four basic objectives: (1) accurate description of the upper head cooling mechanisms; (2) proper simulation of natural circulation; (3) respresentations of operator actions required to proceed from full-power to shutdown-cooling-system conditions using both automatic and manual controls; and (4) reduction of the computer cost of simulating this evolution of approximately 10-hour duration. The response of the upper head fluid temperature calculated by RETRAN was in close agreement with measured data obtained from a natural circulation cooldown experiment performed for the Connecticut Yankee Plant, whose design is very similar to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station

  3. Rate-Based Model Predictive Control of Turbofan Engine Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    An innovative model predictive control strategy is developed for control of nonlinear aircraft propulsion systems and sub-systems. At the heart of the controller is a rate-based linear parameter-varying model that propagates the state derivatives across the prediction horizon, extending prediction fidelity to transient regimes where conventional models begin to lose validity. The new control law is applied to a demanding active clearance control application, where the objectives are to tightly regulate blade tip clearances and also anticipate and avoid detrimental blade-shroud rub occurrences by optimally maintaining a predefined minimum clearance. Simulation results verify that the rate-based controller is capable of satisfying the objectives during realistic flight scenarios where both a conventional Jacobian-based model predictive control law and an unconstrained linear-quadratic optimal controller are incapable of doing so. The controller is evaluated using a variety of different actuators, illustrating the efficacy and versatility of the control approach. It is concluded that the new strategy has promise for this and other nonlinear aerospace applications that place high importance on the attainment of control objectives during transient regimes.

  4. Cooling tower calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonkova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the dynamic calculation of cooling towers with forced and natural air draft. The quantities and relations are given characterizing the simultaneous exchange of momentum, heat and mass in evaporative water cooling by atmospheric air in the packings of cooling towers. The method of solution is clarified in the calculation of evaporation criteria and thermal characteristics of countercurrent and cross current cooling systems. The procedure is demonstrated of the calculation of cooling towers, and correction curves and the effect assessed of the operating mode at constant air number or constant outlet air volume flow on their course in ventilator cooling towers. In cooling towers with the natural air draft the flow unevenness is assessed of water and air relative to its effect on the resulting cooling efficiency of the towers. The calculation is demonstrated of thermal and resistance response curves and cooling curves of hydraulically unevenly loaded towers owing to the water flow rate parameter graded radially by 20% along the cross-section of the packing. Flow rate unevenness of air due to wind impact on the outlet air flow from the tower significantly affects the temperatures of cooled water in natural air draft cooling towers of a design with lower demands on aerodynamics, as early as at wind velocity of 2 m.s -1 as was demonstrated on a concrete example. (author). 11 figs., 10 refs

  5. Phase Transformations During Cooling of Automotive Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Matthew C.

    This thesis explores the effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and phases in advanced high strength steels (AHSS). In the manufacturing of automobiles, the primary joining mechanism for steel is resistance spot welding (RSW), a process that produces a high heat input and rapid cooling in the welded metal. The effect of RSW on the microstructure of these material systems is critical to understanding their mechanical properties. A dual phase steel, DP-600, and a transformation induced plasticity bainitic-ferritic steel, TBF-1180, were studied to assess the changes to their microstructure that take place in controlled cooling environments and in uncontrolled cooling environments, i.e. resistance spot welding. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were developed using strip specimens of DP-600 and TBF-1180 to determine the phase transformations that occur as a function of cooling rate. The resulting phases were determined using a thermal-mechanical simulator and dilatometry, combined with light optical microscopy and hardness measurements. The resulting phases were compared with RSW specimens where cooling rate was controlled by varying the welding time for two-plate welds. Comparisons were drawn between experimental welds of DP-600 and simulations performed using a commercial welding software. The type and quantity of phases present after RSW were examined using a variety of techniques, including light optical microscopy using several etchants, hardness measurements, and x-ray diffraction (XRD).

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Laser Cooling and Emittance Control of Neutral Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-31

    the collective atomic recoil serves to op reduce the momentum spread of an atomic sample (laser cooling) or to produce a diffraction pattern from a...mtasured 1.5 m downstream from the OKDE interaction region, permits a measure of the ODKE momentum spread. We will discuss each of the various...spectrometer provides a real-time measure of the hydrogen flux, which can be monitored continuously during data collection . We were able to generate

  7. Cryopreservation of boar semen. II: Effect of cooling rate and duration of freezing point plateau on boar semen frozen in mini- and maxi-straws and plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwanga, C O; Einarsson, S; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    1991-01-01

    The post-thaw motility and the acrosome integrity of semen from 4 boars frozen with a programmable freezing machine, in mini (0.25 ml) and maxi (5 ml) plastic straws and in 10 x 5 cm Teflon FEP-plastic bags (0.12 mm thick, 5 ml), were compared. The freezing of the semen was monitored by way of thermo-couples placed in the straws and the bags. Three freezing programmes were used, namely A: from +5 degrees C, at a rate of 3 degrees C/min, to -6 degrees C, held for 1 min at -6 degrees C, and followed by a cooling rate of 20 degrees C/min to -100 degrees C; B: a similar curve except that there was no holding time at -6 degrees C and that the cooling rate was 30 degrees C/min, and C: from +5 degrees C to -100 degrees C, with a cooling rate of 35 degrees C/min, followed by storage in liquid N2. Despite the freezing curve assayed, both the mini-straws and the bags depicted much shorter freezing point plateaus as compared to the maxi-straws. Post-thaw sperm motility as well as the amount of normal apical ridges were equally significantly higher when semen was frozen in mini-straws or in bags than in maxi-straws. Significant differences in these post-thawing parameters were obtained between the freezing curves used. The stepwise freezing procedure A appeared as the best alternative for boar semen, considering this in vitro evaluation.

  8. Tritium control and capture in salt-cooled fission and fusion reactors: Status, challenges, and path forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Lam, Stephen; Carpenter, David M.; Whyte, Dennis G.; Scarlat, Raluca

    2017-01-01

    Three advanced nuclear power systems use liquid salt coolants that generate tritium and thus face the common challenges of containing and capturing tritium to prevent its release to the environment. The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor (FHR) uses clean fluoride salt coolants and the same graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel as high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Molten salt reactors (MSRs) dissolve the fuel in a fluoride or chloride salt with release of fission product tritium into the salt. In most FHR and MSR systems, the base-line salts contain lithium where isotopically separated "7Li is proposed to minimize tritium production from neutron interactions with the salt. The Chinese Academy of Science plans to start operation of a 2-MWt molten salt test reactor by 2020. For high-magnetic-field fusion machines, the use of lithium enriched in "6Li is proposed to maximize tritium generation the fuel for a fusion machine. Advances in superconductors that enable higher power densities may require the use of molten lithium salts for fusion blankets and as coolants. Recent technical advances in these three reactor classes have resulted in increased government and private interest and the beginning of a coordinated effort to address the tritium control challenges in 700 °C liquid salt systems. We describe characteristics of salt-cooled fission and fusion machines, the basis for growing interest in these technologies, tritium generation in molten salts, the environment for tritium capture, models for high-temperature tritium transport in salt systems, alternative strategies for tritium control, and ongoing experimental work. Several methods to control tritium appear viable. Finally, limited experimental data is the primary constraint for designing efficient cost-effective methods of tritium control.

  9. Does runoff or temperature control chemical weathering rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiriksdottir, Eydis Salome; Gislason, Sigurdur Reynir; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The rate chemical weathering is affected by both temperature and runoff. Separating out these two factors is challenging because runoff tends to increase with increasing temperature. → In this study, natural river water samples collected on basaltic catchments over a five year period are used together with experimentally derived dissolution rate model for basaltic glass to pull apart the effects of runoff and temperature. → This study shows that the rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff, but is dominated by runoff. - Abstract: The rate of chemical denudation is controlled by both temperature and runoff. The relative role of these two factors in the rivers of NE Iceland is determined through the rigorous analysis of their water chemistry over a 5-a period. River catchments are taken to be analogous to laboratory flow reactors; like the fluid in flow reactors, the loss of each dissolved element in river water is the sum of that of the original rainwater plus that added from kinetically controlled dissolution and precipitation reactions. Consideration of the laboratory determined dissolution rate behaviour of basalts and measured water chemistry indicates that the maximum effect of changing temperature on chemical denudation in the NE Icelandic rivers was 5-25% of the total change, whereas that of runoff was 75-95%. The bulk of the increased denudation rates with runoff appear to stem from an increase in reactive surface area for chemical weathering of catchment solids.

  10. Improved Bit Rate Control for Real-Time MPEG Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranata Sugiri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The alteration of compressed video bitstream due to embedding of digital watermark tends to produce unpredictable video bit rate variations which may in turn lead to video playback buffer overflow/underflow or transmission bandwidth violation problems. This paper presents a novel bit rate control technique for real-time MPEG watermarking applications. In our experiments, spread spectrum watermarks are embedded in the quantized DCT domain without requantization and motion reestimation to achieve fast watermarking. The proposed bit rate control scheme evaluates the combined bit lengths of a set of multiple watermarked VLC codewords, and successively replaces watermarked VLC codewords having the largest increase in bit length with their corresponding unmarked VLC codewords until a target bit length is achieved. The proposed method offers flexibility and scalability, which are neglected by similar works reported in the literature. Experimental results show that the proposed bit rate control scheme is effective in meeting the bit rate targets and capable of improving the watermark detection robustness for different video contents compressed at different bit rates.

  11. Influence of Cooling Rate on Growth of Bacillus cereus from Spore Inocula in Cooked Rice, Beans, Pasta, and Combination Products Containing Meat or Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Vijay K; Mohr, Tim B; Silverman, Meryl; Snyder, O Peter

    2018-02-23

    The objective of this study was to assess the ability of Bacillus cereus spores to germinate and grow in order to determine a safe cooling rate for cooked rice, beans, and pasta, rice-chicken (4:1), rice-chicken-vegetables (3:1:1), rice-beef (4:1), and rice-beef-vegetables (3:1:1). Samples were inoculated with a cocktail of four strains of heat-shocked (80°C for 10 min) B. cereus spores (NCTC 11143, 935A/74, Brad 1, and Mac 1) to obtain a final spore concentration of approximately 2 log CFU/g. Thereafter, samples were exponentially cooled through the temperature range of 54.5 to 7.2°C in 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 h. At the end of the cooling period, samples were removed and plated on mannitol egg yolk polymyxin agar. The plates were incubated at 30°C for 24 h. The net B. cereus growth from spores in beans was beans, pasta, rice-chicken, rice-chicken-vegetables, rice-beef, and rice-beef-vegetables to guard against the hazards associated with B. cereus.

  12. Voice-Controlled and Wireless Solid Set Canopy Delivery (VCW-SSCD System for Mist-Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis Ampatzidis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available California growers in the San Joaquin Valley believe that climate change will affect the pistachio yield dramatically. As the central valley fog disappears, insufficient dormant chill accumulation results in poor flowering synchrony, flower quality, and fruit set in this dioecious species. We have developed a novel, user-friendly, and low-cost Voice-Controlled Wireless Solid Set Canopy Delivery (VCW-SSCD system to increase bud chill accumulation with evaporative cooling on sunny (winter days. This system includes: (i an automated solid-state canopy delivery (SSCD system; (ii a wireless weather-, crop-related data acquisition system; (iii a Voice-Controlled (VC system using Amazon Alexa; (iv a mobile application to visualize the collected data and wirelessly control the SSCD system; and (v a smart control system. The proposed system was deployed and evaluated in a commercial pistachio orchard in Bakersfield, CA. The system worked well with no reported errors. Results demonstrated the system’s ability to cool bud temperatures in a low relative humidity climate. At an ambient temperature of 10–20 °C, bud temperatures were lowered 5–10 °C.

  13. State estimation for networked control systems using fixed data rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Jin, Fang

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates state estimation for linear time-invariant systems where sensors and controllers are geographically separated and connected via a bandwidth-limited and errorless communication channel with the fixed data rate. All plant states are quantised, coded and converted together into a codeword in our quantisation and coding scheme. We present necessary and sufficient conditions on the fixed data rate for observability of such systems, and further develop the data-rate theorem. It is shown in our results that there exists a quantisation and coding scheme to ensure observability of the system if the fixed data rate is larger than the lower bound given, which is less conservative than the one in the literature. Furthermore, we also examine the role that the disturbances have on the state estimation problem in the case with data-rate limitations. Illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Preventing anxiety problems in children with Cool Little Kids Online: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Amy J; Rapee, Ronald M; Tamir, Elli; Goharpey, Nahal; Salim, Agus; McLellan, Lauren F; Bayer, Jordana K

    2015-11-05

    Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental health problem and begin early in life. Early intervention to prevent anxiety problems in young children who are at risk has the potential for long-term impact. The 'Cool Little Kids' parenting group program was previously established to prevent anxiety disorders in young children at risk because of inhibited temperament. This group program was efficacious in two randomised controlled trials and has recently been adapted into an online format. 'Cool Little Kids Online' was developed to widen and facilitate access to the group program's preventive content. A pilot evaluation of the online program demonstrated its perceived utility and acceptability among parents. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of Cool Little Kids Online in a large randomised controlled trial. Parents of young children who are 3-6 years old and who have an inhibited temperament will be recruited (n = 385) and randomly assigned to either immediate access to Cool Little Kids Online or delayed access after a waiting period of 24 weeks. The online program contains eight modules that help parents address key issues in the development of anxiety problems in inhibited children, including children's avoidant coping styles, overprotective parenting behaviours, and parents' own fears and worries. Intervention participants will be offered clinician support when requested. The primary outcome will be change in parent-reported child anxiety symptoms. Secondary outcomes will be child internalising symptoms, child and family life interference due to anxiety, over-involved/protective parenting, plus child anxiety diagnoses assessed by using a new online diagnostic tool. Assessments will take place at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks after baseline. This trial expands upon previous research on the Cool Little Kids parenting group program and will evaluate the efficacy of online delivery. Online delivery of the program could result in an easily accessible

  15. Corrosion evaluation and control of cooling systems of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, U. C.; Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.

    2002-04-01

    We supplemented a database for evaluation of problems in high temperature corrosion degradation at domestic NPPs, and investigated corrosion mitigation methodologies for modification of water chemistry guidelines and operating conditions for life extension as follows: 1) crevice chemistry evaluation by using CAP code, hide-out return tests in a Crevice Test Apparatus, analysis of water chemistry guideline revision history; 2) analysis on main steam generator tube damages, H 2 -dependent crack propagation rate tests of Alloy 600 CRDM material, SCC test of Ni-based alloy in mid-ranged pH by electrochemical polarization and of reduced sulfur influence by corrosion potential measurement, Pb-and CuO-SCC behavior tests, TiO 2 inhibitor penetration test, SCC evaluation, electrochemical observation; 3) loop tests on erosion-corrosion resistance of piping material with ICr-1/2Mo and 21/4 Cr-1Mo, evaluation of current pH-controlling agents based on thermodynamic analysis of amines; 4) SCC susceptibility and H 2 -embrittlement tests of turbine material(3.5NiCrMoV); 5) analyses of Zn-compound for radioactivity reduction and of hydrolysis equilibrium with adsorption test against resins, CERT tests on PWSCC susceptibility of Alloy 600, evaluation of operation mode-dependent radiation level by using CRUSIM code; 6) solubility calculation of radiolysis products of NH 3 , the pH-controlling agent of small-and medium-sized reactors, temperature estimation for obtaining lowest N 2 solubility and of NH 3 content required for optimum pH control, fatigue crack growth test of SG materials(ASTM Grade 2 Ti)

  16. Parallel efficient rate control methods for JPEG 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-del-Amor, Miguel Á.; Bruns, Volker; Sparenberg, Heiko

    2017-09-01

    Since the introduction of JPEG 2000, several rate control methods have been proposed. Among them, post-compression rate-distortion optimization (PCRD-Opt) is the most widely used, and the one recommended by the standard. The approach followed by this method is to first compress the entire image split in code blocks, and subsequently, optimally truncate the set of generated bit streams according to the maximum target bit rate constraint. The literature proposes various strategies on how to estimate ahead of time where a block will get truncated in order to stop the execution prematurely and save time. However, none of them have been defined bearing in mind a parallel implementation. Today, multi-core and many-core architectures are becoming popular for JPEG 2000 codecs implementations. Therefore, in this paper, we analyze how some techniques for efficient rate control can be deployed in GPUs. In order to do that, the design of our GPU-based codec is extended, allowing stopping the process at a given point. This extension also harnesses a higher level of parallelism on the GPU, leading to up to 40% of speedup with 4K test material on a Titan X. In a second step, three selected rate control methods are adapted and implemented in our parallel encoder. A comparison is then carried out, and used to select the best candidate to be deployed in a GPU encoder, which gave an extra 40% of speedup in those situations where it was really employed.

  17. Study on computer-aided control system design platform of 10MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Shi Lei; Sun Yuliang; Luo Shaojie

    2004-01-01

    the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) is the first modular pebble bed reactor built in China, which needs to be researched on engineering design, control study, safety analysis and operator training. An integrated system for simulation, control design and online assistance of the HTR-10 (HTRSIMU) has been developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University. The HTRSIMU system is based on a high-speed local area network, on which a computer-aided control system design platform (CDP) is developed and combined with the simulating subsystem in order to provide a visualized and convenient tool for the HTR-10 control system design. The CDP has friendly man-machine interface and good expansibility, in which eighteen types of control items are integrated. These control items are divided into two types: linear and non-linear control items. The linear control items include Proportion, Integral, Differential, Inertial, Leed-lag, Oscillation, Pure-lag, Common, PID and Fuzzy, while the non-linear control items include Saturation, Subsection, Insensitive, Backlash, Relay, Insensi-Relay, Sluggish-Relay and Insens-Slug. The CDP provides a visualized platform for control system modeling and the control loop system can be automatically generated and graphically simulated. Users can conveniently design control loop, modify control parameters, study control method, and analyze control results just by clicking mouse buttons. This kind of control system design method can provide a powerful tool and good reference for the actual system operation for HTR-10. A control scheme is also given and studied to demonstrate the functions of the CDP in this article. (author)

  18. Formation of perched lava ponds on basaltic volcanoes: Interaction between cooling rate and flow geometry allows estimation of lava effusion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L.; Parfitt, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Perched lava ponds are infrequent but distinctive topographic features formed during some basaltic eruptions. Two such ponds, each approximately 150 m in diameter, formed during the 1968 eruption at Napau Crater and the 1974 eruption of Mauna Ulu, both on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Each one formed where a channelized, high volume flux lava flow encountered a sharp reduction of slope: the flow spread out radially and stalled, forming a well-defined terminal levee enclosing a nearly circular lava pond. We describe a model of how cooling limits the motion of lava spreading radially into a pond and compare this with the case of a channelized flow. The difference in geometry has a major effect, such that the size of a pond is a good indicator of the volume flux of the lava forming it. Lateral spreading on distal shallow slopes is a major factor limiting the lengths of lava flows.

  19. Efficient rate control scheme using modified inter-layer dependency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The IRC from the prior art is modified to achieve better rate control per layer by recursive updates for mean absolute difference values of eachbasic unit. Proposed modified inter-layer dependency shows improvement in the PSNR for enhancement layers while the updated IRC enforces better IRC for all the layers.

  20. Conventional heat distribution systems and their control for room cooling; Konventionelle Waermeabgabesysteme und deren Regulierung fuer die Raumkuehlung - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, J. [Schnyder-Energie, Energie-Dienstleistungen, Bronschhofen (Switzerland); Feger, D.; Graf, J.; Rusterholtz, R. [Interstaatliche Hochschule fuer Technik Buchs NTB, Buchs (Switzerland); Schoeringhumer, D.; Cenci, D. [Arbonia AG, Arbon (Switzerland); Heule, D. [hps energieconsulting ag, Ingenieurbuero fuer nachhaltige Energie- und Gebaeudetechnik, Kuesnacht (Switzerland)

    2009-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines how conventional heat distribution systems such as radiators and floor heating systems can be used for room cooling and the appropriate control requirements. Thermostatic valves used 'in reverse', their functional testing and the results obtained are discussed. Possibilities for their optimisation are examined. The apparatus used for the measurements made on both radiator and floor-heating systems is reported on and the results obtained are presented and discussed. Further, simulations used are looked at and examples of the results obtained for rooms with varying glazed surfaces are presented and discussed.

  1. Development and computational simulation of thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps for controlling the fluid flow in liquid metal cooled space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric Electromagnetic (TEEM) Pumps can be used for controlling the fluid flow in the primary and secondary circuits of liquid metal cooled space nuclear reactor. In order to simulate and to evaluate the pumps performance, in steady-state, the computer program BEMTE has been developed to study the main operational parameters and to determine the system actuation point, for a given reactor operating power. The results for each stage of the program were satisfactory, compared to experimental data. The program shows to be adequate for the design and simulating of direct current electromagnetic pumps. (author)

  2. Atmospheric wet-type cooling tower with antifreeze system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coic, P.

    1985-01-01

    The cooling tower has air inlets at its base, a network of pipes which distributes the air to be cooled above the packing, and valves to isolate a part of the network. It includes also a bypass circuit, provided with means to control the flow rate fraction which is by-passed [fr

  3. Designing and Manufacturing a Noise Controlling Silencer for the Cooling Tower Pump of Sarcheshmeh Copper Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Zare

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the most common harmful factors in the workplace is noise. Noise control is a factor beneficial for health and safety in the workplace. Objectives The current study aimed to design and manufacture a silencer for the cooling tower pump of Sarcheshmeh Copper power station in order to control noise. Methods In this study, sound pressure level was measured by the use of a sound level meter (B & K 2260. Measurement was carried out in the light of ISO 1996 standard. After studying technical and acoustic features of the noise source, a dispersive-absorptive silencer was designed to control noise pollution generated by the cooling tower pump of the thermal station. After analyzing the frequencies of sound pressure level and using available data, a cylindrical silencer (with a diameter of 1.5 m and height of 3 m was designed and manufactured. The internal part of the silencer was filled with different columns of absorbent material covered with punched metal. Therefore, the silencer consisted of (1 acoustic diffuser, (2 acoustic chamber, and (3 acoustic channels. Results Measurements showed that, at a distance of 1 m from the source, sound pressure level reduced from 127 dBA before installing the silencer to 79 dBA after the installation, resulting in a reduction of 48 dBA. Conclusions Using a silencer with absorbent material (glass wool is very effective in reducing the noise generated by the pump.

  4. Monotonicity of fitness landscapes and mutation rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavkin, Roman V; Channon, Alastair; Aston, Elizabeth; Aston, John; Krašovec, Rok; Knight, Christopher G

    2016-12-01

    A common view in evolutionary biology is that mutation rates are minimised. However, studies in combinatorial optimisation and search have shown a clear advantage of using variable mutation rates as a control parameter to optimise the performance of evolutionary algorithms. Much biological theory in this area is based on Ronald Fisher's work, who used Euclidean geometry to study the relation between mutation size and expected fitness of the offspring in infinite phenotypic spaces. Here we reconsider this theory based on the alternative geometry of discrete and finite spaces of DNA sequences. First, we consider the geometric case of fitness being isomorphic to distance from an optimum, and show how problems of optimal mutation rate control can be solved exactly or approximately depending on additional constraints of the problem. Then we consider the general case of fitness communicating only partial information about the distance. We define weak monotonicity of fitness landscapes and prove that this property holds in all landscapes that are continuous and open at the optimum. This theoretical result motivates our hypothesis that optimal mutation rate functions in such landscapes will increase when fitness decreases in some neighbourhood of an optimum, resembling the control functions derived in the geometric case. We test this hypothesis experimentally by analysing approximately optimal mutation rate control functions in 115 complete landscapes of binding scores between DNA sequences and transcription factors. Our findings support the hypothesis and find that the increase of mutation rate is more rapid in landscapes that are less monotonic (more rugged). We discuss the relevance of these findings to living organisms.

  5. Leak-rate qualification of the FFTF control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billings, M.P.; Swenson, L.D.

    1983-06-01

    Positive experience with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Control Area boundary has demonstrated that strigent requirements for reactor control room leak-tightness can be met and maintained. Guidance contained in 10CFR50, Appendix A, Criteria 4 and 19, and Regulatory Guides 1.78 and 1.95 provided criteria for control room habitability, to provide safe, central control of the FFTF plant under normal and accident conditions. A leak rate criterion of 178 scfm for the approximate 53,000 cu. ft. Volume of the Control Area was established for the limiting condition of airborne sodium oxide aerosols from a postulated fire in one of the three secondary sodium loops. Numerous tests utilizing a variety of leak identification techniques were conducted

  6. Cooling rates and the depth of detachment faulting at oceanic core complexes: Evidence from zircon Pb/U and (U-Th)/He ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig B.; Cheadle, Michael J.; John, Barbara E.; Reiners, P.W.; Wooden, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic detachment faulting represents a distinct mode of seafloor spreading at slow spreading mid-ocean ridges, but many questions persist about the thermal evolution and depth of faulting. We present new Pb/U and (U-Th)/He zircon ages and combine them with magnetic anomaly ages to define the cooling histories of gabbroic crust exposed by oceanic detachment faults at three sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) holes 1270D and 1275D near the 15??20???N Transform, and Atlantis Massif at 30??N). Closure temperatures for the Pb/U (???800??C-850??C) and (U-Th)/He (???210??C) isotopic systems in zircon bracket acquisition of magnetic remanence, collectively providing a temperature-time history during faulting. Results indicate cooling to ???200??C in 0.3-0.5 Myr after zircon crystallization, recording time-averaged cooling rates of ???1000??C- 2000??C/Myr. Assuming the footwalls were denuded along single continuous faults, differences in Pb/U and (U-Th)/He zircon ages together with independently determined slip rates allow the distance between the ???850??C and ???200??C isotherms along the fault plane to be estimated. Calculated distances are 8.4 ?? 4.2 km and 5.0 2.1 km from holes 1275D and 1270D and 8.4 ?? 1.4 km at Atlantis Massif. Estimating an initial subsurface fault dip of 50 and a depth of 1.5 km to the 200??C isotherm leads to the prediction that the ???850??C isotherm lies ???5-7 km below seafloor at the time of faulting. These depth estimates for active fault systems are consistent with depths of microseismicity observed beneath the hypothesized detachment fault at the TAG hydrothermal field and high-temperature fault rocks recovered from many oceanic detachment faults. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Output feedback dissipation control for the power-level of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Because of its strong inherent safety features and the high outlet temperature, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR) is the chosen technology for a new generation of nuclear power plants. Such power plants are being considered for industrial applications with a wide range of power levels, thus power-level regulation is very important for their efficient and stable operation. Exploiting the large scale asymptotic closed-loop stability provided by nonlinear controllers, a nonlinear power-level regulator is presented in this paper that is based upon both the techniques of feedback dissipation and well-established backstepping. The virtue of this control strategy, i.e., the ability of globally asymptotic stabilization, is that it takes advantage of the inherent zero-state detectability property of the MHTGR dynamics. Moreover, this newly built power-level regulator is also robust towards modeling uncertainty in the control rod dynamics. If modeling uncertainty of the control rod dynamics is small enough to be omitted, then this control law can be simplified to a classical proportional feedback controller. The comparison of the control performance between the newly-built power controller and the simplified controller is also given through numerical study and theoretical analysis. (author)

  8. Output Feedback Dissipation Control for the Power-Level of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of its strong inherent safety features and the high outlet temperature, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR is the chosen technology for a new generation of nuclear power plants. Such power plants are being considered for industrial applications with a wide range of power levels, thus power-level regulation is very important for their efficient and stable operation. Exploiting the large scale asymptotic closed-loop stability provided by nonlinear controllers, a nonlinear power-level regulator is presented in this paper that is based upon both the techniques of feedback dissipation and well-established backstepping. The virtue of this control strategy, i.e., the ability of globally asymptotic stabilization, is that it takes advantage of the inherent zero-state detectability property of the MHTGR dynamics. Moreover, this newly built power-level regulator is also robust towards modeling uncertainty in the control rod dynamics. If modeling uncertainty of the control rod dynamics is small enough to be omitted, then this control law can be simplified to a classical proportional feedback controller. The comparison of the control performance between the newly-built power controller and the simplified controller is also given through numerical study and theoretical analysis.

  9. Special power supply and control system for the gas-cooled fast reactor-core flow test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, T.L.

    1981-09-01

    The test bundle in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor-Core Flow Test Loop (GCFR-CFTL) requires a source of electrical power that can be controlled accurately and reliably over a wide range of steady-state and transient power levels and skewed power distributions to simulate GCFR operating conditions. Both ac and dc power systems were studied, and only those employing silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs) could meet the requirements. This report summarizes the studies, tests, evaluations, and development work leading to the selection. it also presents the design, procurement, testing, and evaluation of the first 500-kVa LMPL supply. The results show that the LMPL can control 60-Hz sine wave power from 200 W to 500 kVA

  10. Radiant Floor Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries, hydronic radiant floor systems are widely used for heating all types of buildings such as residential, churches, gymnasiums, hospitals, hangars, storage buildings, industrial buildings, and smaller offices. However, few systems are used for cooling.This article describes a floor...... cooling system that includes such considerations as thermal comfort of the occupants, which design parameters will influence the cooling capacity and how the system should be controlled. Examples of applications are presented....

  11. Fumigant dosages below maximum label rate control some soilborne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shachaf Triky-Dotan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The activity of commercial soil fumigants on some key soilborne pathogens was assessed in sandy loam soil under controlled conditions. Seven soil fumigants that are registered in California or are being or have been considered for registration were used in this study: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS mixed with chloropicrin (Pic (79% DMDS and 21% Pic, Tri-Con (50% methyl bromide and 50% Pic, Midas Gold (33% methyl iodide [MI] and 67% Pic, Midas Bronze (50% MI and 50% Pic, Midas (MI, active ingredient [a.i.] 97.8%, Pic (a.i. 99% trichloronitromethane and Pic-Clor 60 (57% Pic and 37% 1,3-dichloropropene [1–3,D]. Dose-response models were calculated for pathogen mortality after 24 hours of exposure to fumigants. Overall, the tested fumigants achieved good efficacy with dosages below the maximum label rate against the tested pathogens. In this study, Pythium ultimum and citrus nematode were sensitive to all the fumigants and Verticillium dahliae was resistant. For most fumigants, California regulations restrict application rates to less than the maximum (federal label rate, meaning that it is possible that the fumigants may not control major plant pathogens. This research provides information on the effectiveness of these alternatives at these lower application rates. The results from this study will help growers optimize application rates for registered fumigants (such as Pic and 1,3-D and will help accelerate the adoption of new fumigants (such as DMDS if they are registered in California.

  12. Numerical Analysis on the Free Fall Motion of the Control Rod Assembly for the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Se-Hong; Choi, Choengryul; Son, Sung-Man [ELSOLTEC, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Yong; Yoon, Kyung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    On receiving the scram signal, the control rod assemblies are released to fall into the reactor core by its weight. Thus drop time and falling velocity of the control rod assembly must be estimated for the safety evaluation. However, because of its complex shape, it is difficult to estimate the drop time by theoretical method. In this study, numerical analysis has been carried out in order to estimate drop time and falling velocity of the control rod assembly to provide the underlying data for the design optimization. Numerical analysis has been carried out to estimate the drop time and falling velocity of the control rod assembly for sodium-cooled fast reactor. Before performing the numerical analysis for the control rod assembly, sphere dropping experiment has been carried out for verification of the CFD methodology. The result of the numerical analysis for the method verification is almost same as the result of the experiment. Falling velocity and drag force increase rapidly in the beginning. And then it goes to the stable state. When the piston head of the control rod assembly is inserted into the damper, the drag force increases instantaneously and the falling velocity decreases quickly. The falling velocity is reduced about 14 % by damper. The total drop time of the control rod assembly is about 1.47s. In the next study, the experiment for the control rod assembly will be carried out, and its result is going to be compared with the CFD analysis result.

  13. Modular jet impingement assemblies with passive and active flow control for electronics cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Feng; Dede, Ercan Mehmet; Joshi, Shailesh

    2016-09-13

    Power electronics modules having modular jet impingement assembly utilized to cool heat generating devices are disclosed. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a modular manifold having a distribution recess, one or more angled inlet connection tubes positioned at an inlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly couple the inlet tube to the distribution recess and one or more outlet connection tubes positioned at an outlet end of the modular manifold that fluidly coupling the outlet tube to the distribution recess. The modular jet impingement assemblies include a manifold insert removably positioned within the distribution recess and include one or more inlet branch channels each including an impinging slot and one or more outlet branch channels each including a collecting slot. Further a heat transfer plate coupled to the modular manifold, the heat transfer plate comprising an impingement surface including an array of fins that extend toward the manifold insert.

  14. Automatic control of a liquid nitrogen cooled, closed-circuit, cryogenic pressure tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    The control system design, performance analysis, microprocesser based controller software development, and specifications for the Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) are discussed. The control laws for the single-input single-output controllers were tested on the TCT simulator, and successfully demonstrated on the TCT.

  15. Experimental Study of Hydraulic Control Rod Drive Mechanism for Passive IN-core Cooling System of Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    CAREM 25 (27 MWe safety systems using hydraulic control rod drives (CRD) studied critical issues that were rod drops with interrupted flow [3]. Hydraulic control rod drive suggested fast shutdown condition using a large gap between piston and cylinder in order to fast drop of neutron absorbing rods. A Passive IN-core Cooling system (PINCs) was suggested for safety enhancement of pressurized water reactors (PWR), small modular reactor (SMR), sodium fast reactor (SFR) in UNIST. PINCs consist of hydraulic control rod drive mechanism (Hydraulic CRDM) and hybrid control rod assembly with heat pipe combined with control rod. The schematic diagram of the hydraulic CRDM for PINCs is shown in Fig. 1. The experimental results show the steady state and transient behavior of the upper cylinder at a low pressure and low temperature. The influence of the working fluid temperature and cylinder mass are investigated. Finally, the heat removal between evaporator section and condenser section is compared with or without the hybrid control rod. Heat removal test of the hybrid heat pipe with hydraulic CRDM system showed the heat transfer coefficient of the bundle hybrid control rod and its effect on evaporator pool. The preliminary test both hydraulic CRDM and heat removal system was conducted, which showed the possibility of the in-core hydraulic drive system for application of PINCs.

  16. Analysis and Experimental Investigation of Optimum Design of Thermoelectric Cooling/Heating System for Car Seat Climate Control (CSCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elarusi, Abdulmunaem; Attar, Alaa; Lee, HoSung

    2018-02-01

    The optimum design of a thermoelectric system for application in car seat climate control has been modeled and its performance evaluated experimentally. The optimum design of the thermoelectric device combining two heat exchangers was obtained by using a newly developed optimization method based on the dimensional technique. Based on the analytical optimum design results, commercial thermoelectric cooler and heat sinks were selected to design and construct the climate control heat pump. This work focuses on testing the system performance in both cooling and heating modes to ensure accurate analytical modeling. Although the analytical performance was calculated using the simple ideal thermoelectric equations with effective thermoelectric material properties, it showed very good agreement with experiment for most operating conditions.

  17. Model-based control and application of a thermomanagement engine cooling system; Modellbasierte Regelung und Applikation eines Thermomanagement-Motorkuehlsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, K.; Zeitz, M. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany); Schmitt, M.

    2002-07-01

    Efficient heat management is a central development goal today. So-called thermomanagement systems cool the engine as required, ensuring energy-efficient control of a given engine temperature. The contribution presents a model-based process guidance structure and an application concept which can be adapted to various thermomanagement systems, ensureing high control quality and low application expenditure. Application requirements are minimized by model-based generation of the greater part of the application data. [German] Im Bereich der Fahrzeugentwicklung wird derzeit intensiv an Konzepten fuer ein effizienteres Waermemanagement gearbeitet. Mit einem sogenannten Thermomanagement-System wird der Motor bedarfsgerecht gekuehlt. Hierfuer wird eine vorgegebene Motortemperatur moeglichst energieeffizient geregelt. In dem Beitrag werden eine modellbasierte Prozessfuehrungsstruktur und ein Applikationskonzept vorgestellt, die flexibel fuer verschiedene Thermomanagement-Systeme angepasst werden koennen und bei geringem Applikationsaufwand eine hohe Regelguete gewaehrleisten. Der Applikationsaufwand wird minimiert, indem ein Grossteil der Applikationsdaten modellbasiert generiert wird. (orig.)

  18. Speech rate in Parkinson's disease: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, F; Meilán, J J G; Carro, J; Gómez Íñiguez, C; Millian-Morell, L; Pujante Valverde, I M; López-Alburquerque, T; López, D E

    2016-09-01

    Speech disturbances will affect most patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) over the course of the disease. The origin and severity of these symptoms are of clinical and diagnostic interest. To evaluate the clinical pattern of speech impairment in PD patients and identify significant differences in speech rate and articulation compared to control subjects. Speech rate and articulation in a reading task were measured using an automatic analytical method. A total of 39 PD patients in the 'on' state and 45 age-and sex-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. None of the patients experienced dyskinesias or motor fluctuations during the test. The patients with PD displayed a significant reduction in speech and articulation rates; there were no significant correlations between the studied speech parameters and patient characteristics such as L-dopa dose, duration of the disorder, age, and UPDRS III scores and Hoehn & Yahr scales. Patients with PD show a characteristic pattern of declining speech rate. These results suggest that in PD, disfluencies are the result of the movement disorder affecting the physiology of speech production systems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1975-01-01

    The need for the use of cooling systems in power plant engineering is dealt with from the point of view of a non-polluting form of energy production. The various cooling system concepts up to the modern natural-draught cooling towers are illustrated by examples. (TK/AK) [de

  20. Onderzoeksrapportage duurzaam koelen : EOS Renewable Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Broeze, J.; Sluis, van der, S.; Wissink, E.

    2010-01-01

    For reducing energy use for cooling, alternative methods (that do not rely on electricity) are needed. Renewable cooling is based on naturally available resources such as evaporative cooling, free cooling, phase change materials, ground subcooling, solar cooling, wind cooling, night radiation & storage. The project was aimed to create innovative combinations of these renewable cooling technologies and sophisticated control systems, to design renewable climate systems for various applicati...

  1. Influence of cooling rate on the precipitation microstructure in a medium strength Al-Zn-Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, A. [SIMAP, INPGrenoble-CNRS-UJF BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France)], E-mail: alexis.deschamps@simap.grenoble-inp.fr; Texier, G.; Ringeval, S. [CEA-DAM centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-Sur-Tille (France); SIMAP, INPGrenoble-CNRS-UJF BP 75, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Delfaut-Durut, L. [CEA-DAM centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-Sur-Tille (France)

    2009-02-15

    Medium strength Al-Zn-Mg age hardening alloys are widely used when a low quench sensitivity is required, such as in welding applications. In this work we present a detailed characterization of the precipitate microstructures resulting from different quench rates from the solution treatment, and from the subsequent artificial ageing to the T6 state, in an Al-4.5Zn-1Mg (wt%) alloy. This work is carried out using differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and in situ small-angle X-ray scattering. It is shown that for quench rate between 5 and 200 deg. C/min substantial heterogeneous precipitation is observed, nucleated on dispersoids and on grain boundaries, the former being of much larger size than the latter. During subsequent ageing, it is shown that the precipitation kinetics in the material unaffected by the quench-induced precipitates is independent on the quench rate used.

  2. Saturated Adaptive Output-Feedback Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Dong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Small modular reactors (SMRs are those nuclear fission reactors with electrical output powers of less than 300 MWe. Due to its inherent safety features, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR has been seen as one of the best candidates for building SMR-based nuclear plants with high safety-level and economical competitive power. Power-level control is crucial in providing grid-appropriation for all types of SMRs. Usually, there exists nonlinearity, parameter uncertainty and control input saturation in the SMR-based plant dynamics. Motivated by this, a novel saturated adaptive output-feedback power-level control of the MHTGR is proposed in this paper. This newly-built control law has the virtues of having relatively neat form, of being strong adaptive to parameter uncertainty and of being able to compensate control input saturation, which are given by constructing Lyapunov functions based upon the shifted-ectropies of neutron kinetics and reactor thermal-hydraulics, giving an online tuning algorithm for the controller parameters and proposing a control input saturation compensator respectively. It is proved theoretically that input-to-state stability (ISS can be guaranteed for the corresponding closed-loop system. In order to verify the theoretical results, this new control strategy is then applied to the large-range power maneuvering control for the MHTGR of the HTR-PM plant. Numerical simulation results show not only the relationship between regulating performance and control input saturation bound but also the feasibility of applying this saturated adaptive control law practically.

  3. Remote control of a cooling system; Regelen en controleren op afstand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassa, E [ed.

    1996-10-01

    The renovation of a supermarket building in Nieuw-Lekkerland, Netherlands, included the replacement of the existing refrigerating facility. One of the arguments to choose a new unit was the introduction of the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) quality control system. The new unit is equipped with a remote control system, using the most up-to-date instruments

  4. Polymer degradation rate control of hybrid rocket combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D. B.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1970-01-01

    Polymer degradation to small fragments is treated as a rate controlling step in hybrid rocket combustion. Both numerical and approximate analytical solutions of the complete energy and polymer chain bond conservation equations for the condensed phase are obtained. Comparison with inert atmosphere data is very good. It is found that the intersect of curves of pyrolysis rate versus interface temperature for hybrid combustors, with the thermal degradation theory, falls at a pyrolysis rate very close to that for which a pressure dependence begins to be observable. Since simple thermal degradation cannot give sufficient depolymerization at higher pyrolysis rates, it is suggested that oxidative catalysis of the process occurs at the surface, giving a first order dependence on reactive species concentration at the wall. Estimates of the ratio of this activation energy and interface temperature are in agreement with best fit procedures for hybrid combustion data. Requisite active species concentrations and flux are shown to be compatible with turbulent transport. Pressure dependence of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate is thus shown to be describable in a consistent manner in terms of reactive species catalysis of polymer degradation.

  5. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Henríquez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW. A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT and eight moderately trained (MT, who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s, and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1 analysis of heart rate variability (HRV, using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s. Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05 and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05 and SD145-60s (p <0.05. The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW.

  6. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark