WorldWideScience

Sample records for controlled epitaxy final

  1. Magnetic state controllable critical temperature in epitaxial Ho/Nb bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhou Gu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We study the magnetic properties of Ho thin films with different crystallinity (either epitaxial or non-epitaxial and investigate their proximity effects with Nb thin films. Magnetic measurements show that epitaxial Ho has large anisotropy in two different crystal directions in contrast to non-epitaxial Ho. Transport measurements show that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc of Nb thin films can be significantly suppressed at zero field by epitaxial Ho compared with non-epitaxial Ho. We also demonstrate a direct control over Tc by changing the magnetic states of the epitaxial Ho layer, and attribute the strong proximity effects to exchange interaction.

  2. Nanoporous Silica Templated HeteroEpitaxy: Final LDRD Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Koleske, Daniel; Rowen, Adam M.; Williams, John Dalton; Fan, Hongyou; Arrington, Christian Lew

    2006-11-01

    This one-year out-of-the-box LDRD was focused on exploring the use of porous growth masks as a method for defect reduction during heteroepitaxial crystal growth. Initially our goal was to investigate porous silica as a growth mask, however, we expanded the scope of the research to include several other porous growth masks on various size scales, including mesoporous carbon, and the UV curable epoxy, SU-8. Use of SU-8 as a growth mask represents a new direction, unique in the extensive literature of patterned epitaxial growth, and presents the possibility of providing a single step growth mask. Additional research included investigation of pore viability via electrochemical deposition into high aspect ratio photoresist patterns and pilot work on using SU-8 as a DUV negative resist, another significant potential result. While the late start nature of this project pushed some of the initial research goals out of the time table, significant progress was made. 3 Acknowledgements This work was performed in part at the Nanoscience @ UNM facility, a member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, which is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant ECS 03-35765). Sandia is multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United Stated Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported under the Sandia LDRD program (Project 99405). 4

  3. Crystallization engineering as a route to epitaxial strain control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Akbashev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled synthesis of epitaxial thin films offers opportunities for tuning their functional properties via enabling or suppressing strain relaxation. Examining differences in the epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxide films, we report on an alternate, low-temperature route for strain engineering. Thin films of amorphous Bi–Fe–O were grown on (001SrTiO3 and (001LaAlO3 substrates via atomic layer deposition. In situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the crystallization of the amorphous films into the epitaxial (001BiFeO3 phase reveal distinct evolution profiles of crystallinity with temperature. While growth on (001SrTiO3 results in a coherently strained film, the same films obtained on (001LaAlO3 showed an unstrained, dislocation-rich interface, with an even lower temperature onset of the perovskite phase crystallization than in the case of (001SrTiO3. Our results demonstrate how the strain control in an epitaxial film can be accomplished via its crystallization from the amorphous state.

  4. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, A.L.; Verheijen, M.A.; Wunnicke, O.; Serafin, S.N.; Wondergem, H.J.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction

  5. Epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chaoliang; Chen, Junze; Wu, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Hua

    2018-02-01

    Hybrid nanostructures are a class of materials that are typically composed of two or more different components, in which each component has at least one dimension on the nanoscale. The rational design and controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures are of great importance in enabling the fine tuning of their properties and functions. Epitaxial growth is a promising approach to the controlled synthesis of hybrid nanostructures with desired structures, crystal phases, exposed facets and/or interfaces. This Review provides a critical summary of the state of the art in the field of epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures. We discuss the historical development, architectures and compositions, epitaxy methods, characterization techniques and advantages of epitaxial hybrid nanostructures. Finally, we provide insight into future research directions in this area, which include the epitaxial growth of hybrid nanostructures from a wider range of materials, the study of the underlying mechanism and determining the role of epitaxial growth in influencing the properties and application performance of hybrid nanostructures.

  6. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories, Professor Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-06-14

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires.

  7. Position-controlled epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roest, Aarnoud L; Verheijen, Marcel A; Wunnicke, Olaf; Serafin, Stacey; Wondergem, Harry; Bakkers, Erik P A M

    2006-01-01

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the VLS mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The hetero-epitaxial growth of the III-V nanowires on silicon was confirmed with x-ray diffraction pole figures and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. We show preliminary results of two-terminal electrical measurements of III-V nanowires grown on silicon. E-beam lithography was used to predefine the position of the nanowires

  8. Chirality-Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and Scalable Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0319 Chirality -Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Vapor Phase Epitaxy: Mechanistic Understanding and...TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. 15-06-2016 final Jun 2014 - Jun 2016 Chirality ...for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. In this report, we present our efforts in establishing a novel and effective approach for chirality

  9. Control growth of silicon nanocolumns' epitaxy on silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Su Kong, E-mail: sukong1985@yahoo.com.my [University of Malaya, Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics (Malaysia); Dee, Chang Fu [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN) (Malaysia); Yahya, Noorhana [Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Faculty of Science and Information Technology (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul [University of Malaya, Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics (Malaysia)

    2013-04-15

    The epitaxial growth of Si nanocolumns on Si nanowires was studied using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. A single-crystalline and surface oxide-free Si nanowire core (core radius {approx}21 {+-} 5 nm) induced by indium crystal seed was used as a substance for the vapor phase epitaxial growth. The growth process is initiated by sidewall facets, which then nucleate upon certain thickness to form Si islands and further grow to form nanocolumns. The Si nanocolumns with diameter of 10-20 nm and aspect ratio up to 10 can be epitaxially grown on the surface of nanowires. The results showed that the radial growth rate of the Si nanocolumns remains constant with the increase of deposition time. Meanwhile, the radial growth rates are controllable by manipulating the hydrogen to silane gas flow rate ratio. The optical antireflection properties of the Si nanocolumns' decorated SiNW arrays are discussed in the text.

  10. Adsorption-controlled growth of BiMnO3 films by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ke, X.; Misra, R.; Schiffer, P.; Ihlefeld, J. F.; Mei, Z. G.; Liu, Z. K.; Xu, X. S.; Musfeldt, J. L.; Heeg, T.; Schlom, D. G.; Roeckerath, M.; Schubert, J.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed the means to grow BiMnO 3 thin films with unparalleled structural perfection by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy and determined its band gap. Film growth occurs in an adsorption-controlled growth regime. Within this growth window bounded by oxygen pressure and substrate temperature at a fixed bismuth overpressure, single-phase films of the metastable perovskite BiMnO 3 may be grown by epitaxial stabilization. X-ray diffraction reveals phase-pure and epitaxial films with ω rocking curve full width at half maximum values as narrow as 11 arc sec (0.003 deg. ). Optical absorption measurements reveal that BiMnO 3 has a direct band gap of 1.1±0.1 eV.

  11. Control of chemical bonding of the ZnO surface grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, K.; Komuro, T.; Hama, K.; Koike, K.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Yano, M.

    2004-01-01

    Toward the fabrication of enzyme modified field effect transistors (EnFETs) as one of organic/inorganic hybridized structures, surface bonding of the ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy was controlled by ex situ treatments. Angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement revealed that O-H bonds exist at the surface of ZnO. It was found that the number of O-H bond could be changed with reversibility using plasma and thermal treatments

  12. In-situ TEM investigations of graphic-epitaxy and small particles. Final Report, 1 January-31 December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    Palladium was deposited inside a controlled-vacuum specimen chamber of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) onto MgO and alpha-alumina substrate surfaces. Annealing and various effects of gas exposure of the particulate Pd deposits were studied in-situ by high resolution TEM and electron diffraction. Whereas substrate temperatures of 500 C or annealing of room temperature (RT) deposits to 500 C were needed to obtain epitaxy on sapphire, RT deposits on MgO were perfectly epitaxial. For Pd/MgO a lattice expansion of 2 to 4% was noted the highest values of expansion were found for the smallest particles. The lattice expansion of small Pd particles on alumina substrates was less than 1%. Long-time RT exposure of Pd/MgO in a vacuum yielded some moblity and coalescence events, but notably fewer than for Pd on sapphire. Exposure to air or oxygen greatly enhanced the particle mobility and coalescence and also resulted in the flattening of Pd particles on MgO substrates. Electron-beam irradiation further enhanced this effect. Exposure to air for several tens of hours of Pd/MgO led to strong coalescence

  13. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Nasir [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  14. Laboratory Instrumentation Design Research for Scalable Next Generation Epitaxy: Non-Equilibrium Wide Application Epitaxial Patterning by Intelligent Control (NEW-EPIC). Volume 1. 3D Composition/Doping Control via Micromiror Patterned Deep UV Photodesorption: Revolutionary in situ Characterization/Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    34 (to be submitted to APL) " Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of Annealed and As-grown Be-doped GaN" (to be submitted to APL - delayed by the...WIDE APPLICATION EPITAXIAL PATTERNING BY INTELLIGENT CONTROL (NEW-EPIC) 6. AUTHOR(S) DRS DOOLITTILE, FRAZIER, BURNHAM, PRITCHETT, BILLINGSLEY...NEXT GENERATION EPITAXY: NON-EQUILIBRIUM WIDE APPLICATION EPITAXIAL PATTERNING BY INTELLIGENT CONTROL (NEW-EPIC) VOLUME I 3D COMPOSITION/DOPING

  15. The liquid phase epitaxy method for the construction of oriented ZIF-8 thin films with controlled growth on functionalized surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Highly-oriented ZIF-8 thin films with controllable thickness were grown on an -OH-functionalized Au substrate using the liquid phase epitaxy method at room temperature, as evidenced by SEM and PXRD. The adsorption-desorption properties of the resulting ZIF-8 thin film were investigated for various VOCs using the QCM technique. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  16. Controlling spin-dependent tunneling by bandgap tuning in epitaxial rocksalt MgZnO films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D L; Ma, Q L; Wang, S G; Ward, R C C; Hesjedal, T; Zhang, X-G; Kohn, A; Amsellem, E; Yang, G; Liu, J L; Jiang, J; Wei, H X; Han, X F

    2014-12-02

    Widespread application of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for information storage has so far been limited by the complicated interplay between tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio and the product of resistance and junction area (RA). An intricate connection exists between TMR ratio, RA value and the bandgap and crystal structure of the barrier, a connection that must be unravelled to optimise device performance and enable further applications to be developed. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to tailor the bandgap of an ultrathin, epitaxial Zn-doped MgO tunnel barrier with rocksalt structure. This structure is attractive due to its good Δ1 spin filtering effect, and we show that MTJs based on tunable MgZnO barriers allow effective balancing of TMR ratio and RA value. In this way spin-dependent transport properties can be controlled, a key challenge for the development of spintronic devices.

  17. Controllable factors affecting the epitaxial quality of LaCoO3 films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-03-23

    Mar 23, 2018 ... ... larger molecular weight contribute to the improvement of epitaxial quality of LaCoO3 epitaxial film. ..... Research Fund of Education Department of Sichuan Province. (grant nos. 16ZA0133 and 15ZB0108); and the Doctoral.

  18. Strain-Modulated Epitaxy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, April

    1999-01-01

    Strain-Modulated Epitaxy (SME) is a novel approach, invented at Georgia Tech, to utilize subsurface stressors to control strain and therefore material properties and growth kinetics in the material above the stressors...

  19. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  20. Controllable factors affecting the epitaxial quality of LaCoO 3 films ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    treatment temperature and a relatively rapid rate of heating can effectively preventnucleus from growing in other orientations, thereby improving the epitaxial quality of film. Besides, the choice of spin speed will directly affect the thickness and ...

  1. EDITORIAL: Epitaxial graphene Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire

    2012-04-01

    Graphene is widely regarded as an important new electronic material with interesting two-dimensional electron gas properties. Not only that, but graphene is widely considered to be an important new material for large-scale integrated electronic devices that may eventually even succeed silicon. In fact, there are countless publications that demonstrate the amazing applications potential of graphene. In order to realize graphene electronics, a platform is required that is compatible with large-scale electronics processing methods. It was clear from the outset that graphene grown epitaxially on silicon carbide substrates was exceptionally well suited as a platform for graphene-based electronics, not only because the graphene sheets are grown directly on electronics-grade silicon carbide (an important semiconductor in its own right), but also because these sheets are oriented with respect to the semiconductor. Moreover, the extremely high temperatures involved in production assure essentially defect-free and contamination-free materials with well-defined interfaces. Epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide is not a unique material, but actually a class of materials. It is a complex structure consisting of a reconstructed silicon carbide surface, which, for planar hexagonal silicon carbide, is either the silicon- or the carbon-terminated face, an interfacial carbon rich layer, followed by one or more graphene layers. Consequently, the structure of graphene films on silicon carbide turns out to be a rich surface-science puzzle that has been intensively studied and systematically unravelled with a wide variety of surface science probes. Moreover, the graphene films produced on the carbon-terminated face turn out to be rotationally stacked, resulting in unique and important structural and electronic properties. Finally, in contrast to essentially all other graphene production methods, epitaxial graphene can be grown on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce graphene

  2. Controllable Photovoltaic Effect of Microarray Derived from Epitaxial Tetragonal BiFeO3 Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zengxing; Li, Peilian; Wan, Jian-Guo; Huang, Zhifeng; Tian, Guo; Pan, Danfeng; Fan, Zhen; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2017-08-16

    Recently, the ferroelectric photovoltaic (FePV) effect has attracted great interest due to its potential in developing optoelectronic devices such as solar cell and electric-optical sensors. It is important for actual applications to realize a controllable photovoltaic process in ferroelectric-based materials. In this work, we prepared well-ordered microarrays based on epitaxially tetragonal BiFeO 3 (T-BFO) films by the pulsed laser deposition technique. The polarization-dependent photocurrent image was directly observed by a conductive atomic force microscope under ultraviolet illumination. By choosing a suitable buffer electrode layer and controlling the ferroelectric polarization in the T-BFO layer, we realized the manipulation of the photovoltaic process. Moreover, based on the analysis of the band structure, we revealed the mechanism of manipulating the photovoltaic process and attributed it to the competition between two key factors, i.e., the internal electric field caused by energy band alignments at interfaces and the depolarization field induced by the ferroelectric polarization in T-BFO. This work is very meaningful for deeply understanding the photovoltaic process of BiFeO 3 -based devices at the microscale and provides us a feasible avenue for developing data storage or logic switching microdevices based on the FePV effect.

  3. Advanced in-situ control for III-nitride RF power device epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, F.; Zettler, J.-T.; Weyers, M.

    2018-04-01

    In this contribution, the latest improvements regarding wafer temperature measurement on 4H-SiC substrates and, based on this, of film thickness and composition control of GaN and AlGaN layers in power electronic device structures are presented. Simultaneous pyrometry at different wavelengths (950 nm and 405 nm) reveal the advantages and limits of the different temperature measurement approaches. Near-UV pyrometry gives a very stable wafer temperature signal without oscillations during GaN growth since the semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate material becomes opaque at temperatures above 550 °C at the wavelength of 405 nm. A flat wafer temperature profile across the 100 mm substrate diameter is demonstrated despite a convex wafer shape at AlGaN growth conditions. Based on the precise assignment of wafer temperature during MOVPE we were able to improve the accuracy of the high-temperature n-k database for the materials involved. Consequently, the measurement accuracy of all film thicknesses grown under fixed temperature conditions improved. Comparison of in situ and ex situ determined layer thicknessess indicate an unintended etching of the topmost layer during cool-down. The details and limitations of real-time composition analysis for lower Al-content AlGaN barrier layers during transistor device epitaxy are shown.

  4. Controlling the growth of epitaxial graphene on metalized diamond (111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooil, S. P.; Wells, J. W.; Hu, D.; Evans, D. A.; Niu, Y. R.; Zakharov, A. A.; Bianchi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The 2-dimensional transformation of the diamond (111) surface to graphene has been demonstrated using ultrathin Fe films that catalytically reduce the reaction temperature needed for the conversion of sp 3 to sp 2 carbon. An epitaxial system is formed, which involves the re-crystallization of carbon at the Fe/vacuum interface and that enables the controlled growth of monolayer and multilayer graphene films. In order to study the initial stages of single and multilayer graphene growth, real time monitoring of the system was preformed within a photoemission and low energy electron microscope. It was found that the initial graphene growth occurred at temperatures as low as 500 °C, whilst increasing the temperature to 560 °C was required to produce multi-layer graphene of high structural quality. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the electronic properties of the grown material, where a graphene-like energy momentum dispersion was observed. The Dirac point for the first layer is located at 2.5 eV below the Fermi level, indicating an n-type doping of the graphene due to substrate interactions, while that of the second graphene layer lies close to the Fermi level

  5. Adsorption-controlled growth of La-doped BaSnO3 by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjong Paik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial La-doped BaSnO3 films were grown in an adsorption-controlled regime by molecular-beam epitaxy, where the excess volatile SnOx desorbs from the film surface. A film grown on a (001 DyScO3 substrate exhibited a mobility of 183 cm2 V−1 s−1 at room temperature and 400 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 10 K despite the high concentration (1.2 × 1011 cm−2 of threading dislocations present. In comparison to other reports, we observe a much lower concentration of (BaO2 Ruddlesden-Popper crystallographic shear faults. This suggests that in addition to threading dislocations, other defects—possibly (BaO2 crystallographic shear defects or point defects—significantly reduce the electron mobility.

  6. Epitaxy-enabled vapor-liquid-solid growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanowires with controlled orientations

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2014-08-13

    Controlling the morphology of nanowires in bottom-up synthesis and assembling them on planar substrates is of tremendous importance for device applications in electronics, photonics, sensing and energy conversion. To date, however, there remain challenges in reliably achieving these goals of orientation-controlled nanowire synthesis and assembly. Here we report that growth of planar, vertical and randomly oriented tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires can be realized on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates via the epitaxy-assisted vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, by simply regulating the growth conditions, in particular the growth temperature. This robust control on nanowire orientation is facilitated by the small lattice mismatch of 1.6% between ITO and YSZ. Further control of the orientation, symmetry and shape of the nanowires can be achieved by using YSZ substrates with (110) and (111), in addition to (100) surfaces. Based on these insights, we succeed in growing regular arrays of planar ITO nanowires from patterned catalyst nanoparticles. Overall, our discovery of unprecedented orientation control in ITO nanowires advances the general VLS synthesis, providing a robust epitaxy-based approach toward rational synthesis of nanowires. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Characteristics of threading dislocations in ZnO grown on facet-controlled epitaxial overgrown GaN templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H L; Chua, S J; Chow, S Y; Pan, H; Zhu, Y W; Feng, Y P; Wang, L S; Zang, K Y; Liu, W; Tripathy, S

    2007-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the authors have investigated the behavior of threading dislocations in ZnO selectively grown on a facet-controlled epitaxial overgrown GaN template. In this case, the ZnO is grown by a vapor transport method. The TEM study in the overgrown regions shows that all the pure-edge type dislocations in ZnO are parallel toward the mask area and vertical propagation of dislocation to the ZnO surface is minimized. Using such a selective growth technique on a faceted semi-polar GaN surface, a reduction of threading dislocation density in ZnO could be achieved

  8. Fluorination of an epitaxial YBaCuO thin film with controlled oxygen vacancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, C. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France)); Pena, O. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France)); Mokhtari, M. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France)); Thivet, C. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France)); Guilloux-Viry, M. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France)); Perrin, A. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France)); Sergent, M. (Lab. de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, Univ. de Rennes 1, 35 (France))

    1993-05-10

    An intentionally oxygen-deficient thin film, epitaxially grown in-situ on a (100) MgO substrate by laser ablation at 750 C under a low pressure oxygen atmosphere, has been treated under NF[sub 3] diluted in N[sub 2] at temperatures not exceeding 280 C. During the fluorination process the epitaxy of the thin film is maintained; its Tc onset progressively increases from 54 K up to 85.6 K and the width of the inductive transition is narrow at the end of treatment (1.2 K). These results are discussed and compared to those obtained during the fluorination of oxygen-deficient YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] ceramics. (orig.)

  9. Voltage-controlled inversion of tunnel magnetoresistance in epitaxial nickel/graphene/MgO/cobalt junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godel, F.; Doudin, B.; Henry, Y.; Halley, D., E-mail: halley@ipcms.unistra.fr, E-mail: dayen@ipcms.unistra.fr; Dayen, J.-F., E-mail: halley@ipcms.unistra.fr, E-mail: dayen@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS), UMR 7504 CNRS-UdS, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Venkata Kamalakar, M. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg (IPCMS), UMR 7504 CNRS-UdS, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2014-10-13

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of vertical spin-valve structures using a thick epitaxial MgO barrier as spacer layer and a graphene-passivated Ni film as bottom ferromagnetic electrode. The devices show robust and scalable tunnel magnetoresistance, with several changes of sign upon varying the applied bias voltage. These findings are explained by a model of phonon-assisted transport mechanisms that relies on the peculiarity of the band structure and spin density of states at the hybrid graphene|Ni interface.

  10. Epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.; Berger, Claire; Wu, Xiaosong; First, Phillip N.; Conrad, Edward H.; Li, Xuebin; Li, Tianbo; Sprinkle, Michael; Hass, Joanna; Sadowski, Marcin L.; Potemski, Marek; Martinez, Gérard

    2007-07-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long coherence lengths; properties that may persist above cryogenic temperatures. Paradoxically, in contrast to exfoliated graphene, the quantum Hall effect is not observed in high-mobility epitaxial graphene. It appears that the effect is suppressed due to the absence of localized states in the bulk of the material. Epitaxial graphene can be patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array of techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low-dissipation high-speed nanoelectronics.

  11. Nanosheet controlled epitaxial growth of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 thin films on glass substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayraktar, Muharrem; Chopra, A.; Bijkerk, Frederik; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Integration of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) films on glass substrates is of high importance for device applications. However, to make use of the superior ferro- and piezoelectric properties of PZT, well-oriented crystalline or epitaxial growth with control of the crystal orientation is a prerequisite. In

  12. Mobility-electron density relation probed via controlled oxygen vacancy doping in epitaxial BaSnO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koustav Ganguly

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently discovered high room temperature mobility in wide band gap semiconducting BaSnO3 is of exceptional interest for perovskite oxide heterostructures. Critical open issues with epitaxial films include determination of the optimal dopant and understanding the mobility-electron density (μ-n relation. These are addressed here through a transport study of BaSnO3(001 films with oxygen vacancy doping controlled via variable temperature vacuum annealing. Room temperature n can be tuned from 5 × 1019 cm−3 to as low as 2 × 1017 cm−3, which is shown to drive a weak- to strong-localization transition, a 104-fold increase in resistivity, and a factor of 28 change in μ. The data reveal μ ∝ n0.65 scaling over the entire n range probed, important information for understanding mobility-limiting scattering mechanisms.

  13. Epitaxial growth and control of the sodium content in Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Sandra; Komissinskiy, Philipp [Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Major, Marton [Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); WIGNER RCP, RMKI, H-1525 Budapest, P.O.B. 49 (Hungary); Donner, Wolfgang [Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Alff, Lambert, E-mail: alff@oxide.tu-darmstadt.de [Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-10-31

    Single-phase c-axis oriented Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films were grown on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} single-crystal substrates, using pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the epitaxial growth of Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films in two domains, rotated in-plane by 15 and 45 degrees relative to [100] SrTiO{sub 3}. The sodium stoichiometry x of the films can be controlled in a range of 0.38 < x < 0.84 by in-situ post-deposition annealing the Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} films at 720 – 760 °C in oxygen for 10 – 30 min. γ - Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} films are obtained with a full width at half maximum of the (002) Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} rocking curve below 0.2 degrees. The post-deposition annealing can substitute commonly used chemical deintercalation of Na which is typically associated with a loss in crystallinity. - Highlights: • Single phase Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition • Epitaxial relations of Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films on (001) SrTiO{sub 3} substrates • Multi-domain thin films • Control of sodium content by in-situ annealing of Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} thin films.

  14. Polarity control of GaN epitaxial films grown on LiGaO2(001) substrates and its mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yulin; Wang, Wenliang; Li, Xiaochan; Li, Yuan; Huang, Liegen; Li, Guoqiang

    2017-08-16

    The polarity of GaN epitaxial films grown on LiGaO 2 (001) substrates by pulsed laser deposition has been well controlled. It is experimentally proved that the GaN epitaxial films grown on nitrided LiGaO 2 (001) substrates reveal Ga-polarity, while the GaN epitaxial films grown on non-nitrided LiGaO 2 (001) substrates show N-polarity. The growth mechanisms for these two cases are systematically studied by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Theoretical calculation presents that the adsorption of a Ga atom preferentially occurs at the center of three N atoms stacked on the nitrided LiGaO 2 (001) substrates, which leads to the formation of Ga-polarity GaN. Whereas the adsorption of a Ga atom preferentially deposits at the top of a N atom stacked on the non-nitrided LiGaO 2 (001) substrates, which results in the formation of N-polarity GaN. This work of controlling the polarity of GaN epitaxial films is of paramount importance for the fabrication of group-III nitride devices for various applications.

  15. Orientation control and domain structure analysis of {100}-oriented epitaxial ferroelectric orthorhombic HfO{sub 2}-based thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Kiliha [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Shimizu, Takao [Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sakata, Osami [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takahisa; Nakamura, Shogo; Kiguchi, Takanori; Akama, Akihiro; Konno, Toyohiko J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Uchida, Hiroshi [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Funakubo, Hiroshi, E-mail: funakubo.h.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-04-07

    Orientation control of {100}-oriented epitaxial orthorhombic 0.07YO{sub 1.5}-0.93HfO{sub 2} films grown by pulsed laser deposition was investigated. To achieve in-plane lattice matching, indium tin oxide (ITO) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were selected as underlying layers. We obtained (100)- and (001)/(010)-oriented films on ITO and YSZ, respectively. Ferroelastic domain formation was confirmed for both films by X-ray diffraction using the superlattice diffraction that appeared only for the orthorhombic symmetry. The formation of ferroelastic domains is believed to be induced by the tetragonal–orthorhombic phase transition upon cooling the films after deposition. The present results demonstrate that the orientation of HfO{sub 2}-based ferroelectric films can be controlled in the same manner as that of ferroelectric films composed of conventional perovskite-type material such as Pb(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} and BiFeO{sub 3}.

  16. Synthesis and electronic properties of Ruddlesden-Popper strontium iridate epitaxial thin films stabilized by control of growth kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoran; Cao, Yanwei; Pal, B.; Middey, S.; Kareev, M.; Choi, Y.; Shafer, P.; Haskel, D.; Arenholz, E.; Chakhalian, J.

    2017-12-01

    We report on the selective fabrication of high-quality Sr2IrO4 and SrIrO3 epitaxial thin films from a single polycrystalline Sr2IrO4 target by pulsed laser deposition. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy characterizations, we discover that within a relatively narrow range of substrate temperature, the oxygen partial pressure plays a critical role in the cation stoichiometric ratio of the films, and triggers the stabilization of different Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases. Resonant x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements taken at the Ir L edge and the O K edge demonstrate the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling, and reveal the electronic and orbital structures of both compounds. These results suggest that in addition to the conventional thermodynamics consideration, higher members of the Srn+1IrnO3n+1 series can possibly be achieved by kinetic control away from the thermodynamic limit. These findings offer an approach to the synthesis of ultrathin films of the RP series of iridates and can be extended to other complex oxides with layered structure.

  17. Void Shapes Controlled by Using Interruption-Free Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth of GaN Films on Patterned SiO2 AlN/Sapphire Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GaN epitaxial layers with embedded air voids grown on patterned SiO2 AlN/sapphire templates were proposed. Using interruption-free epitaxial lateral overgrowth technology, we realized uninterrupted growth and controlled the shape of embedded air voids. These layers showed improved crystal quality using X-ray diffraction and measurement of etching pits density. Compared with conventional undoped-GaN film, the full width at half-maximum of the GaN (0 0 2 and (1 0 2 peaks decreased from 485 arcsec to 376 arcsec and from 600 arcsec to 322 arcsec, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy results showed that the coalesced GaN growth led to bending threading dislocation. We also proposed a growth model based on results of scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Semiconductors and semimetals epitaxial microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Gossard, Arthur C

    1994-01-01

    Newly developed semiconductor microstructures can now guide light and electrons resulting in important consequences for state-of-the-art electronic and photonic devices. This volume introduces a new generation of epitaxial microstructures. Special emphasis has been given to atomic control during growth and the interrelationship between the atomic arrangements and the properties of the structures.Key Features* Atomic-level control of semiconductor microstructures* Molecular beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition* Quantum wells and quantum wires* Lasers, photon(IR)detectors, heterostructure transistors

  19. Performance of Personal Workspace Controls Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila; Loffeld, John; Pettler,Pete; Snook, Joel

    2004-12-01

    One of the key deliverables for the DOE-funded controls research at LBNL for FY04 was the development of a prototype Personal Workspace Control system. The successful development of this system is a critical milestone for the LBNL Lighting Controls Research effort because this system demonstrates how IBECS can add value to today's Task Ambient lighting systems. LBNL has argued that by providing both the occupant and the facilities manager with the ability to precisely control the operation of overhead lighting and all task lighting in a coordinated manner, that task ambient lighting can optimize energy performance and occupant comfort simultaneously [Reference Task Ambient Foundation Document]. The Personal Workspace Control system is the application of IBECS to this important lighting problem. This report discusses the development of the Personal Workspace Control to date including descriptions of the different fixture types that have been converted to IBECS operation and a detailed description of the operation of PWC Scene Controller, which provides the end user with precise control of his task ambient lighting system. The objective, from the Annual Plan, is to demonstrate improvements in efficiency, lighting quality and occupant comfort realized using Personal Workspace Controls (PWC) designed to optimize the delivery of lighting to the individual's workstation regardless of which task-ambient lighting solution is chosen. The PWC will be capable of controlling floor-mounted, desk lamps, furniture-mounted and overhead lighting fixtures from a personal computer and handheld remote. The PWC will use an environmental sensor to automatically monitor illuminance, temperature and occupancy and to appropriately modulate ambient lighting according to daylight availability and to switch off task lighting according to local occupancy. [Adding occupancy control to the system would blunt the historical criticism of occupant-controlled lighting - the tendency of the

  20. Final report on the FMIT Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The computer control system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) prototype accelerator was designed using distributed intelligence driven by a distributed database. The system consists of two minicomputers in the central control room and four microcomputers residing in CAMAC crates located near appropriate subsystems of the accelerator. The system uses single vendor hardware as much as practical in an attempt to minimize the maintenance problems. Local control consoles are an integral part of each node computer to provide subsystem check-out. The main console is located in the central control room and permits one-point operation of the complete control system. Automatic surveillance is provided for each data channel by the node computer with out-of-bounds alarms sent to the main console. Report by exception is used for data logging. This control system has been operational for two years. The computers are too heavily loaded and the operator response is slower than desired. A system upgrade to a faster local-area network has been undertaken and is scheduled to be operational by conference time

  1. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan; Li, Ying; Aljarb, Areej; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Lain-Jong

    2017-01-01

    to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches

  2. Precision control of biogas plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.B.; Nielsen, Anders M.; Ward, A.J.

    2009-10-15

    The objective of the project has been to improve design and process stability in biogas plants. The results can be divided within the following main categories: 1) Pre-treatment, serial coupling of digesters and post digestion 2) Process inhibition 3) Process control Ad 1) This work has shown that extreme thermophilic pre-treatment of cattle manure and pig manure mixed with silage has a considerable effect on methane yield in a subsequent methanogenic reactor. Ad 2) The effect of ammonia inhibition was studied in a series of continuously stirred tank reactors co-digesting pig manure (40%) with the addition of solid fractions (60%) and increasing concentrations of ammonia caused by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl pulses. Ad 3) Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to predict liquid phase volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations in three experiments treating three different materials: pig slurry with maize silage, chicken manure and cattle slurry.

  3. Epitaxial Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides: Growth Mechanism, Controllability, and Scalability

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Henan

    2017-07-06

    Recently there have been many research breakthroughs in two-dimensional (2D) materials including graphene, boron nitride (h-BN), black phosphors (BPs), and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). The unique electrical, optical, and thermal properties in 2D materials are associated with their strictly defined low dimensionalities. These materials provide a wide range of basic building blocks for next-generation electronics. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has shown great promise to generate high-quality TMDC layers with scalable size, controllable thickness, and excellent electronic properties suitable for both technological applications and fundamental sciences. The capability to precisely engineer 2D materials by chemical approaches has also given rise to fascinating new physics, which could lead to exciting new applications. In this Review, we introduce the latest development of TMDC synthesis by CVD approaches and provide further insight for the controllable and reliable synthesis of atomically thin TMDCs. Understanding of the vapor-phase growth mechanism of 2D TMDCs could benefit the formation of complicated heterostructures and novel artificial 2D lattices.

  4. Controlled epitaxial growth of mesoporous silica/gold nanorod nanolollipops and nanodumb-bells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ching-Mao; Chung, Ming-Fang; Lo, Leu-Wei; Souris, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we describe the controlled synthesis of novel heterogeneous nanostructures comprised of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods (MSGNRs) in the form of core–shell nanolollipops and nanodumb-bells, using a seed-mediated sol–gel method. Although MSGNR core–shell (θ-MSGNR) structures have been reported previously by us and others, we herein discuss the first ever fabrication of MSGNR nanolollipops (φ-MSGNR) and nanodumb-bells (β-MSGNR), achieved by simply controlling the aging time of gold nanorods (GNRs), the residual cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) coating of GNRs, and the addition of dimethyl formamide during incubation, centrifugation, and sonication, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed two bare GNR isoforms, with aspect ratios of approximately 4 and 6, while scanning electron microscopy was used to further elucidate the morphology of φ-MSGNR and β-MSGNR heterostructures. In agreement with the smaller dielectric constants afforded by incomplete silica encasement, spectroscopic studies of φ-MSGNR and β-MSGNR, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands revealed 20-40 nm blue shifts relative to the SPR of θ-MSGNR. On the basis of the attributes and applications of more conventional θ-MSGNRs, φ-MSGNRs and β-MSGNRs are anticipated to provide most of the utility of θ-MSGNRs, but with the additional functionalities that accompany their incorporation of both bare gold and mesoporous silica encased tips; with significant/unique implications for biomedical and catalytic applications

  5. Development of in-situ control diagnostics for application of epitaxial superconductor and buffer layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.C. Winkleman; T.V. Giel; Jason Cunningham

    1999-07-30

    The recent achievements of critical currents in excess of 1 x 10{sup 6} amp/cm{sup 2} at 77 K in YBCO deposited over suitably textured buffer/substrate composites have stimulated interest in the potential fabrication of these coated conductors as wire. Numerous approaches and manufacturing schemes for producing coated conductor wire are currently being developed. Recently, under the US DOE's sponsorship, the University of Tennessee Space Institute performed an extensive evaluation of leading coated conductor processing options. In general, it is their feeling that the science and chemistry that are being developed in the coated conductor wire program now need proper engineering evaluation to define the most viable options for a commercial fabrication process. All fabrication processes will need process control measurements. This report provides a specific review of the needs and available technologies for process control for many of the coated conductor processing options. This report also addresses generic process monitoring areas in which additional research and development is needed. The concentration is on the two different approaches for obtaining the textured substrates that have been identified as viable candidates. These are the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ion-beam assisted deposition, called IBAD, to obtain a highly textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer on nickel alloy strips, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory's rolling assisted, bi-axially textured substrate option called RABiTS{trademark}.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF IN-SITU CONTROL DIAGNOSTICS FOR APPLICATION OF EPITAXIAL SUPERCONDUCTOR AND BUFFER LAYERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.C. Winkleman; T.V. Giel, Jr.; J. Cunningham

    1999-06-30

    The recent achievements of critical currents in excess of 1x10{sup 6}amp/cm{sup 2} at 77K in YBCO deposited over suitably textured buffer/substrate composites have stimulated interest in the potential fabrication of these coated conductors as wire. Numerous approaches and manufacturing schemes for producing coated conductor wire are currently being developed. Recently, under the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sponsorship, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) performed an extensive evaluation of leading coated conductor processing options. In general, it is our feeling that the science and chemistry that are being developed in the coated conductor wire program now need proper engineering evaluation to define the most viable options for a commercial fabrication process. All fabrication processes will need process control measurements. This report provides a specific review of the needs and available technologies for process control for many of the coated conductor processing options. This report also addresses generic process monitoring areas in which additional research and development is needed. The concentration is on the two different approaches for obtaining the textured substrates that have been identified as viable candidates. These are the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) ion-beam assisted deposition, called IBAD, to obtain a highly textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer on nickel alloy strips, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) rolling assisted, bi-axially textured substrate option called RABiTS{trademark}.

  7. VOC Control in Kraft Mills; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Y.; Chai, X.-S.; Edwards, L.L.; Gu, Y.; Teja, A.S.; Kirkman, A.G.; Pfromm, P.H.; Rezac, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as methanol, in kraft mills has been an environmental concern. Methanol is soluble in water and can increase the biochemical oxygen demand. Furthermore, it can also be released into atmosphere at the process temperatures of kraft mill-streams. The Cluster Rule of the EPA now requires the control of the release of methanol in pulp and paper mills. This research program was conducted to develop a computer simulation tool for mills to predict VOC air emissions. To achieve the objective of the research program, much effort was made in the development of analytical techniques for the analysis of VOC and determination of vapor liquid partitioning coefficient of VOCs in kraft mill-streams using headspace gas chromatography. With the developed analytical tool, methanol formation in alkaline pulping was studied in laboratory to provide benchmark data of the amount of methanol formation in pulping in kraft mills and for the validation of VOC formation and vapor-liquid equilibrium submodels. Several millwide air and liquid samplings were conducted using the analytical tools developed to validate the simulation tool. The VOC predictive simulation model was developed based on the basic chemical engineering concepts, i.e., reaction kinetics, vapor liquid equilibrium, combined with computerized mass and energy balances. Four kraft mill case studies (a continuous digester, two brownstock washing lines, and a pre-evaporator system) are presented and compared with mill measurements. These case studies provide valuable, technical information for issues related to MACT I and MACT II compliance, such as condensate collection and Clean-Condensate-Alternatives (CCA)

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE MITIGATION THROUGH CONTROLLED PHOTOSYNTHESIS; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    This research was undertaken to meet the need for a robust portfolio of carbon management options to ensure continued use of coal in electrical power generation. In response to this need, the Ohio Coal Research Center at Ohio University developed a novel technique to control the emissions of CO(sub 2) from fossil-fired power plants by growing organisms capable of converting CO(sub 2) to complex sugars through the process of photosynthesis. Once harvested, the organisms could be used in the production of fertilizer, as a biomass fuel, or fermented to produce alcohols. In this work, a mesophilic organism, Nostoc 86-3, was examined with respect to the use of thermophilic algae to recycle CO(sub 2) from scrubbed stack gases. The organisms were grown on stationary surfaces to facilitate algal stability and promote light distribution. The testing done throughout the year examined properties of CO(sub 2) concentration, temperature, light intensity, and light duration on process viability and the growth of the Nostoc. The results indicate that the Nostoc species is suitable only in a temperature range below 125 F, which may be practical given flue gas cooling. Further, results indicate that high lighting levels are not suitable for this organism, as bleaching occurs and growth rates are inhibited. Similarly, the organisms do not respond well to extended lighting durations, requiring a significant (greater than eight hour) dark cycle on a consistent basis. Other results indicate a relative insensitivity to CO(sub 2) levels between 7-12% and CO levels as high as 800 ppm. Other significant results alluded to previously, relate to the development of the overall process. Two processes developed during the year offer tremendous potential to enhance process viability. First, integration of solar collection and distribution technology from Oak Ridge laboratories could provide a significant space savings and enhanced use of solar energy. Second, the use of translating slug flow

  9. Control of metamorphic buffer structure and device performance of In(x)Ga(1-x)As epitaxial layers fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H Q; Yu, H W; Luc, Q H; Tang, Y Z; Phan, V T H; Hsu, C H; Chang, E Y; Tseng, Y C

    2014-12-05

    Using a step-graded (SG) buffer structure via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate a high suitability of In0.5Ga0.5As epitaxial layers on a GaAs substrate for electronic device application. Taking advantage of the technique's precise control, we were able to increase the number of SG layers to achieve a fairly low dislocation density (∼10(6) cm(-2)), while keeping each individual SG layer slightly exceeding the critical thickness (∼80 nm) for strain relaxation. This met the demanded but contradictory requirements, and even offered excellent scalability by lowering the whole buffer structure down to 2.3 μm. This scalability overwhelmingly excels the forefront studies. The effects of the SG misfit strain on the crystal quality and surface morphology of In0.5Ga0.5As epitaxial layers were carefully investigated, and were correlated to threading dislocation (TD) blocking mechanisms. From microstructural analyses, TDs can be blocked effectively through self-annihilation reactions, or hindered randomly by misfit dislocation mechanisms. Growth conditions for avoiding phase separation were also explored and identified. The buffer-improved, high-quality In0.5Ga0.5As epitaxial layers enabled a high-performance, metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor on a GaAs substrate. The devices displayed remarkable capacitance-voltage responses with small frequency dispersion. A promising interface trap density of 3 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2) in a conductance test was also obtained. These electrical performances are competitive to those using lattice-coherent but pricey InGaAs/InP systems.

  10. Growth and coalescence control of inclined c-axis polar and semipolar GaN multilayer structures grown on Si(111), Si(112), and Si(115) by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymański, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.szymanski@pwr.edu.pl; Wośko, Mateusz; Paszkiewicz, Bartłomiej; Paszkiewicz, Bogdan; Paszkiewicz, Regina [The Faculty of Microsystem Electronics and Photonics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Janiszewskiego 11/17, 50-372 Wroclaw (Poland); Sankowska, Iwona [The Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Herein, silicon substrates in alternative orientations from the commonly used Si(111) were used to enable the growth of polar and semipolar GaN-based structures by the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy method. Specifically, Si(112) and Si(115) substrates were used for the epitaxial growth of nitride multilayer structures, while the same layer schemes were also deposited on Si(111) for comparison purposes. Multiple approaches were studied to examine the influence of the seed layers and the growth process conditions upon the final properties of the GaN/Si(11x) templates. Scanning electron microscope images were acquired to examine the topography of the deposited samples. It was observed that the substrate orientation and the process conditions allow control to produce an isolated GaN block growth or a coalesced layer growth, resulting in inclined c-axis GaN structures under various forms. The angles of the GaN c-axis inclination were determined by x-ray diffraction measurements and compared with the results obtained from the analysis of the atomic force microscope (AFM) images. The AFM image analysis method to determine the structure tilt was found to be a viable method to estimate the c-axis inclination angles of the isolated blocks and the not-fully coalesced layers. The quality of the grown samples was characterized by the photoluminescence method conducted at a wide range of temperatures from 77 to 297 K, and was correlated with the sample degree of coalescence. Using the free-excitation peak positions plotted as a function of temperature, analytical Bose-Einstein model parameters were fitted to obtain further information about the grown structures.

  11. Emission control of InGaN nanocolumns grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.; Bengoechea-Encabo, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M. A.; Calleja, E.; Lefebvre, P.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work studies the effect of the growth temperature on the morphology and emission characteristics of self-assembled InGaN nanocolumns grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Morphology changes are assessed by scanning electron microscopy, while emission is measured by photoluminescence. Within the growth temperature range of 750 to 650 deg. C, an increase in In incorporation for decreasing temperature is observed. This effect allows tailoring the InGaN nanocolumns emission line shape by using temperature gradients during growth. Depending on the gradient rate, span, and sign, broad emission line shapes are obtained, covering the yellow to green range, even yielding white emission.

  12. Nanosheet controlled epitaxial growth of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 thin films on glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, M.; Chopra, A.; Bijkerk, F.; Rijnders, G.

    2014-09-01

    Integration of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) films on glass substrates is of high importance for device applications. However, to make use of the superior ferro- and piezoelectric properties of PZT, well-oriented crystalline or epitaxial growth with control of the crystal orientation is a prerequisite. In this article, we report on epitaxial growth of PZT films with (100)- and (110)-orientation achieved by utilizing Ca2Nb3O10 (CNO) and Ti0.87O2 (TO) nanosheets as crystalline buffer layers. Fatigue measurements demonstrated stable ferroelectric properties of these films up to 5 × 109 cycles. (100)-oriented PZT films on CNO nanosheets show a large remnant polarization of 21 μC/cm2 that is the highest remnant polarization value compared to (110)-oriented and polycrystalline films reported in this work. A piezoelectric response of 98 pm/V is observed for (100)-oriented PZT film which is higher than the values reported in the literature on Si substrates.

  13. FINAL IMPLEMENTATION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE LHC COLLIMATOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Masi, A; Losito, R

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 collimation system of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) included 80 movable collimators for a total of 316 degrees of freedom. Before beam operation, the final controls implementation was deployed and commissioned. The control system enabled remote control and appropriate diagnostics of the relevant parameters. The collimator motion is driven with time-functions, synchronized with other accelerator systems, which allows controlling the collimator jaw positions with a micrometer accuracy during all machine phases. The machine protection functionality of the system, which also relies on function-based tolerance windows, was also fully validated. The collimator control challenges are reviewed and the final system architecture is presented. The results of the remote system commissioning and the overall performance are discussed.

  14. The physics of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageshima, H; Hibino, H; Tanabe, S

    2012-01-01

    Various physical properties of epitaxial graphene grown on SiC(0001) are studied. First, the electronic transport in epitaxial bilayer graphene on SiC(0001) and quasi-free-standing bilayer graphene on SiC(0001) is investigated. The dependences of the resistance and the polarity of the Hall resistance at zero gate voltage on the top-gate voltage show that the carrier types are electron and hole, respectively. The mobility evaluated at various carrier densities indicates that the quasi-free-standing bilayer graphene shows higher mobility than the epitaxial bilayer graphene when they are compared at the same carrier density. The difference in mobility is thought to come from the domain size of the graphene sheet formed. To clarify a guiding principle for controlling graphene quality, the mechanism of epitaxial graphene growth is also studied theoretically. It is found that a new graphene sheet grows from the interface between the old graphene sheets and the SiC substrate. Further studies on the energetics reveal the importance of the role of the step on the SiC surface. A first-principles calculation unequivocally shows that the C prefers to release from the step edge and to aggregate as graphene nuclei along the step edge rather than be left on the terrace. It is also shown that the edges of the existing graphene more preferentially absorb the isolated C atoms. For some annealing conditions, experiments can also provide graphene islands on SiC(0001) surfaces. The atomic structures are studied theoretically together with their growth mechanism. The proposed embedded island structures actually act as a graphene island electronically, and those with zigzag edges have a magnetoelectric effect. Finally, the thermoelectric properties of graphene are theoretically examined. The results indicate that reducing the carrier scattering suppresses the thermoelectric power and enhances the thermoelectric figure of merit. The fine control of the Fermi energy position is thought to

  15. Controlling plasmonic properties of epitaxial thin films of indium tin oxide in the near-infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, R.; Fujita, K.; Murai, S.; Tanaka, K.

    2015-06-01

    Epitaxial thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) were grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia single-crystal substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition to examine their plasmonic properties. The dielectric function of ITO was characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Through the concentration of SnO2 in the target, the carrier concentration in the films was modified, which directly leads to the tuning of the dielectric function in the near-infrared region. Variable-angle reflectance spectroscopy in the Kretschmann geometry shows the dip in the reflection spectrum of p-polarized light corresponding to the excitation of surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) in the near-infrared region. The excitation wavelength of the SPPs was shifted with changing the dielectric functions of ITO, which is reproduced by the calculation using transfer matrix method.

  16. Epitaxial growth of hetero-Ln-MOF hierarchical single crystals for domain- and orientation-controlled multicolor luminescence 3D coding capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Mei; Zhu, Yi-Xuan; Wu, Kai; Chen, Ling; Hou, Ya-Jun; Yin, Shao-Yun; Wang, Hai-Ping; Fan, Ya-Nan [MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, Lehn Institute of Functional Materials, School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Su, Cheng-Yong [MOE Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, Lehn Institute of Functional Materials, School of Chemistry, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-11-13

    Core-shell or striped heteroatomic lanthanide metal-organic framework hierarchical single crystals were obtained by liquid-phase anisotropic epitaxial growth, maintaining identical periodic organization while simultaneously exhibiting spatially segregated structure. Different types of domain and orientation-controlled multicolor photophysical models are presented, which show either visually distinguishable or visible/near infrared (NIR) emissive colors. This provides a new bottom-up strategy toward the design of hierarchical molecular systems, offering high-throughput and multiplexed luminescence color tunability and readability. The unique capability of combining spectroscopic coding with 3D (three-dimensional) microscale spatial coding is established, providing potential applications in anti-counterfeiting, color barcoding, and other types of integrated and miniaturized optoelectronic materials and devices. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Epitaxial Growth of Hetero-Ln-MOF Hierarchical Single Crystals for Domain- and Orientation-Controlled Multicolor Luminescence 3D Coding Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mei; Zhu, Yi-Xuan; Wu, Kai; Chen, Ling; Hou, Ya-Jun; Yin, Shao-Yun; Wang, Hai-Ping; Fan, Ya-Nan; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2017-11-13

    Core-shell or striped heteroatomic lanthanide metal-organic framework hierarchical single crystals were obtained by liquid-phase anisotropic epitaxial growth, maintaining identical periodic organization while simultaneously exhibiting spatially segregated structure. Different types of domain and orientation-controlled multicolor photophysical models are presented, which show either visually distinguishable or visible/near infrared (NIR) emissive colors. This provides a new bottom-up strategy toward the design of hierarchical molecular systems, offering high-throughput and multiplexed luminescence color tunability and readability. The unique capability of combining spectroscopic coding with 3D (three-dimensional) microscale spatial coding is established, providing potential applications in anti-counterfeiting, color barcoding, and other types of integrated and miniaturized optoelectronic materials and devices. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Epitaxial growth of hetero-Ln-MOF hierarchical single crystals for domain- and orientation-controlled multicolor luminescence 3D coding capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Mei; Zhu, Yi-Xuan; Wu, Kai; Chen, Ling; Hou, Ya-Jun; Yin, Shao-Yun; Wang, Hai-Ping; Fan, Ya-Nan; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Core-shell or striped heteroatomic lanthanide metal-organic framework hierarchical single crystals were obtained by liquid-phase anisotropic epitaxial growth, maintaining identical periodic organization while simultaneously exhibiting spatially segregated structure. Different types of domain and orientation-controlled multicolor photophysical models are presented, which show either visually distinguishable or visible/near infrared (NIR) emissive colors. This provides a new bottom-up strategy toward the design of hierarchical molecular systems, offering high-throughput and multiplexed luminescence color tunability and readability. The unique capability of combining spectroscopic coding with 3D (three-dimensional) microscale spatial coding is established, providing potential applications in anti-counterfeiting, color barcoding, and other types of integrated and miniaturized optoelectronic materials and devices. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth of insulating AlN on surface-controlled 6H-SiC substrate by HCl gas etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onojima, Norio; Suda, Jun; Matsunami, Hiroyuki

    2002-01-01

    Insulating AlN layers were grown on surface-controlled 6H-SiC subtrates by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) using elemental Al and rf plasma-excited nitrogen (N*). HCl gas etching was introduced as an effective pretreatment method of substrate for MBE growth of AlN. 6H-SiC substrates pretreated by HCl gas etching had no surface polishing scratches and an atomically flat surface. In addition, evident ( 3 √x 3 √)R30 deg. surface reconstruction was observed even before thermal cleaning. AlN layers grown on this substrate had no defects related to surface polishing scratches and excellent insulating characteristics

  20. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth - a tool for dislocation blockade in multilayer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zytkiewicz, Z.R.

    1998-01-01

    Results on epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaAs layers are reported. The methods of controlling the growth anisotropy, the effect of substrate defects filtration in epitaxial lateral overgrowth procedure and influence of the mask on properties of epitaxial lateral overgrowth layers will be discussed. The case od GaAs epitaxial lateral overgrowth layers grown by liquid phase epitaxy on heavily dislocated GaAs substrates was chosen as an example to illustrate the processes discussed. The similarities between our results and those reported recently for GaN layers grown laterally by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy will be underlined. (author)

  1. The final word. OSHA's final ruling offers firm deadlines for infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, K

    1992-03-01

    Departments that have put off program development while waiting for the final ruling to be published have a lot of work to do. Many departments have been cited and fined by OSHA in the past year for failure to begin infection-control programs or provide hepatitis-B vaccines to personnel. Under the new budget, OSHA was granted permission to up its fine structure sevenfold--thus, a small fine is $7,000, and the highest fine for a single violation is $70,000. Fines can have a greater impact on a department's budget than implementation of the program over time. A key point to remember is that a strong infection-control program will reduce exposure follow-up costs and worker-compensation claims. Infection control is a win-win situation.

  2. Thin epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stab, L.

    1989-01-01

    Manufacturing procedures of thin epitaxial surface barriers will be given. Some improvements have been obtained: larger areas, lower leakage currents and better resolutions. New planar epitaxial dE/dX detectors, made in a collaboration work with ENERTEC-INTERTECHNIQUE, and a new application of these thin planar diodes to EXAFS measurements, made in a collaboration work with LURE (CNRS,CEA,MEN) will also be reported

  3. Controlling the physical parameters of crystalline CIGS nanowires for use in superstrate configuration using vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jeon, H. C.; Kang, T. W.; Kumar, Sunil

    2018-03-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a suitable candidate for smart windows and bifacial semi-transparent solar cell applications. In this study, highly crystalline CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) nanowires were successfully grown by horizontal-type vapor phase epitaxy on an ITO substrate. Length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were studied by varying the growth temperature (500, 520, and 560 °C), time (3.5, 6.5, and 9.5 h), and type of catalyst (In, Au, and Ga). Length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were found to be highly dependent on the growth conditions. At an optimized growth period and temperature of 3.5 h and 520 °C, respectively, the length and diameter of the nanowires were found to increase when grown in a catalyst-free environment. However, the density of the nanowires was found to be higher while using a catalyst during growth. Even in a catalyst-free environment, an Indium cluster formed at the bottom of the nanowires. The source of these nanowires is believed to be Indium from the ITO substrate which was observed in the EDS measurement. TEM-based EDS and line EDS indicated that the nanowires are made up of CIGS material with a very low Gallium content. XRD measurements also show the appearance of wurtzite CIS nanowires grown on ITO in addition to the chalcopyrite phase. PL spectroscopy was done to see the near-band-edge emission for finding band-to-band optical transition in this material. Optical response of the CIGS nanowire network was also studied to see the photovoltaic effect. This work creates opportunities for making real solar cell devices in superstrate configuration.

  4. Controlling the size of InAs quantum dots on Si1-xGex/Si(0 0 1) by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Ebe, Hiroji; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Sugama, Akio; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The formation of III-V InAs quantum dots (QDs) on group-IV Si 1-x Ge x /Si(0 0 1) was investigated by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. Two types of QDs, round-shaped QDs and giant QDs elongated in the [1 1 0] or [1,-1,0] direction, were observed in a growth condition of low V/III ratios. An increase in the V/III ratio and AsH 3 preflow during the cooling process was found to suppress the formation of giant QDs. It was considered that replacing the H-stabilized SiGe surface with the As-stabilized surface was necessary for increasing the QD nucleation. The size and density of InAs QDs on SiGe were controllable as well as that on III-V semiconductor buffer layers, and InAs QDs with a density as high as 5 x 10 10 cm -2 were obtained.

  5. Optical Epitaxial Growth of Gold Nanoparticle Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ningfeng; Martínez, Luis Javier; Jaquay, Eric; Nakano, Aiichiro; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-09-09

    We use an optical analogue of epitaxial growth to assemble gold nanoparticles into 2D arrays. Particles are attracted to a growth template via optical forces and interact through optical binding. Competition between effects determines the final particle arrangements. We use a Monte Carlo model to design a template that favors growth of hexagonal particle arrays. We experimentally demonstrate growth of a highly stable array of 50 gold particles with 200 nm diameter, spaced by 1.1 μm.

  6. Epitaxy-enabled vapor-liquid-solid growth of tin-doped indium oxide nanowires with controlled orientations

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde; Turner, Stuart G.; Yang, Ping; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Wu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    challenges in reliably achieving these goals of orientation-controlled nanowire synthesis and assembly. Here we report that growth of planar, vertical and randomly oriented tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires can be realized on yttria-stabilized zirconia

  7. Direct Measurements of Island Growth and Step-Edge Barriers in Colloidal Epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Ganapathy, R.

    2010-01-21

    Epitaxial growth, a bottom-up self-assembly process for creating surface nano- and microstructures, has been extensively studied in the context of atoms. This process, however, is also a promising route to self-assembly of nanometer- and micrometer-scale particles into microstructures that have numerous technological applications. To determine whether atomic epitaxial growth laws are applicable to the epitaxy of larger particles with attractive interactions, we investigated the nucleation and growth dynamics of colloidal crystal films with single-particle resolution. We show quantitatively that colloidal epitaxy obeys the same two-dimensional island nucleation and growth laws that govern atomic epitaxy. However, we found that in colloidal epitaxy, step-edge and corner barriers that are responsible for film morphology have a diffusive origin. This diffusive mechanism suggests new routes toward controlling film morphology during epitaxy.

  8. High-Quality GaN Epilayers Achieved by Facet-Controlled Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth on Sputtered AlN/PSS Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenguang; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Kang; He, Longfei; Wu, Hualong; Liu, Ningyang; Zhang, Shan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zhitao

    2017-12-13

    It is widely believed that the lack of high-quality GaN wafers severely hinders the progress in GaN-based devices, especially for defect-sensitive devices. Here, low-cost AlN buffer layers were sputtered on cone-shaped patterned sapphire substrates (PSSs) to obtain high-quality GaN epilayers. Without any mask or regrowth, facet-controlled epitaxial lateral overgrowth was realized by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The uniform coating of the sputtered AlN buffer layer and the optimized multiple modulation guaranteed high growth selectivity and uniformity of the GaN epilayer. As a result, an extremely smooth surface was achieved with an average roughness of 0.17 nm over 3 × 3 μm 2 . It was found that the sputtered AlN buffer layer could significantly suppress dislocations on the cones. Moreover, the optimized three-dimensional growth process could effectively promote dislocation bending. Therefore, the threading dislocation density (TDD) of the GaN epilayer was reduced to 4.6 × 10 7 cm -2 , which is about an order of magnitude lower than the case of two-step GaN on the PSS. In addition, contamination and crack in the light-emitting diode fabricated on the obtained GaN were also effectively suppressed by using the sputtered AlN buffer layer. All of these advantages led to a high output power of 116 mW at 500 mA with an emission wavelength of 375 nm. This simple, yet effective growth technique is believed to have great application prospects in high-performance TDD-sensitive optoelectronic and electronic devices.

  9. Controlled growth of epitaxial CeO2 thin films with self-organized nanostructure by chemical solution method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Chemical solution deposition is a versatile technique to grow oxide thin films with self-organized nanostructures. Morphology and crystallographic orientation control of CeO2 thin films grown on technical NiW substrates by a chemical solution deposition method are achieved in this work. Based...

  10. Selfsupported epitaxial silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarovici, D.; Popescu, A.

    1975-01-01

    The methods of removing the p or p + support of an n-type epitaxial silicon layer using electrochemical etching are described. So far, only n + -n junctions have been processed. The condition of anodic dissolution for some values of the support and layer resistivity are given. By this method very thin single crystal selfsupported targets of convenient areas can be obtained for channeling - blocking experiments

  11. Growth of epitaxial thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    High-quality, high-temperature superconductor (HTSc) films can be grown by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process. This article provides a detailed introduction to the advantages and curent limitations of PLA for epitaxial film growth. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods and on exploitation of PLA to control epitaxial growth at either the unit cell or the atomic-layer level. Examples are taken from recent HTSc film growth. 33 figs, 127 refs

  12. Control over the morphology of AlN during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen on Si (111) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizerov, A. M.; Kladko, P. N.; Nikitina, E. V.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The results of studies of the growth kinetics of AlN layers during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen using Si (111) substrates are presented. The possibility of the growth of individual AlN/Si (111) nanocolumns using growth conditions with enrichment of the surface with metal near the formation mode of Al drops, at a substrate temperature close to maximal, during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen (T s ≈ 850°C) is shown. The possibility of growing smooth AlN layers on a nanocolumnar AlN/Si (111) buffer with the use of T s ≈ 750°C and growth conditions providing enrichment with metal is shown

  13. Control over the morphology of AlN during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen on Si (111) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizerov, A. M., E-mail: mizerov@beam.ioffe.ru; Kladko, P. N.; Nikitina, E. V.; Egorov, A. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Academic University-Nanotechnology Research and Education Centre (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    The results of studies of the growth kinetics of AlN layers during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen using Si (111) substrates are presented. The possibility of the growth of individual AlN/Si (111) nanocolumns using growth conditions with enrichment of the surface with metal near the formation mode of Al drops, at a substrate temperature close to maximal, during molecular beam epitaxy with the plasma activation of nitrogen (T{sub s} ≈ 850°C) is shown. The possibility of growing smooth AlN layers on a nanocolumnar AlN/Si (111) buffer with the use of T{sub s} ≈ 750°C and growth conditions providing enrichment with metal is shown.

  14. Complex Nanostructures by Pulsed Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboyuki Koguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What makes three dimensional semiconductor quantum nanostructures so attractive is the possibility to tune their electronic properties by careful design of their size and composition. These parameters set the confinement potential of electrons and holes, thus determining the electronic and optical properties of the nanostructure. An often overlooked parameter, which has an even more relevant effect on the electronic properties of the nanostructure, is shape. Gaining a strong control over the electronic properties via shape tuning is the key to access subtle electronic design possibilities. The Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy is an innovative growth method for the fabrication of quantum nanostructures with highly designable shapes and complex morphologies. With Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy it is possible to combine different nanostructures, namely quantum dots, quantum rings and quantum disks, with tunable sizes and densities, into a single multi-function nanostructure, thus allowing an unprecedented control over electronic properties.

  15. Quality control of recycled asphaltic concrete : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    This study examined the variations found in recycled asphaltic concrete mix based upon plant quality control data and verification testing. The data was collected from four recycled hot-mix projects constructed in 1981. All plant control and acceptan...

  16. B-Plant Canyon Ventilation Control System Description; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    Project W-059 installed a new B Plant Canyon Ventilation System. Monitoring and control of the system is implemented by the Canyon Ventilation Control System (CVCS). This document describes the CVCS system components which include a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) coupled with an Operator Interface Unit (OIU) and application software. This document also includes an Alarm Index specifying the setpoints and technical basis for system analog and digital alarms

  17. Genetic control of nitrate assimilation in Klebsiella oxytoca. Final technical report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Valley J.

    2001-01-01

    Some microorganisms can use nitrate as the sole source of nitrogen for biosynthesis. This project focused on the bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, an enterobacterium found in soil and water. Mutagenesis and molecular cloning identified the nasFEDCBA operon encoding enzymes for the uptake and reduction of nitrate and nitrite to ammonium, and the adjacent nasR regulatory gene. Analysis of nasF operon expression revealed that transcription is activated by the Ntr (general nitrogen regulation ) system in response to nitrogen limitation. Transcription antitermination control in response to nitrate and nitrite is mediated by the NasR protein. Additional work established that the NasR protein is an RNA-binding protein that interacts with nasF operon leader RNA to control transcription readthrough

  18. Atomic layer deposition of perovskite oxides and their epitaxial integration with Si, Ge, and other semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G., E-mail: ekerdt@utexas.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a proven technique for the conformal deposition of oxide thin films with nanoscale thickness control. Most successful industrial applications have been with binary oxides, such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}. However, there has been much effort to deposit ternary oxides, such as perovskites (ABO{sub 3}), with desirable properties for advanced thin film applications. Distinct challenges are presented by the deposition of multi-component oxides using ALD. This review is intended to highlight the research of the many groups that have deposited perovskite oxides by ALD methods. Several commonalities between the studies are discussed. Special emphasis is put on precursor selection, deposition temperatures, and specific property performance (high-k, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, etc.). Finally, the monolithic integration of perovskite oxides with semiconductors by ALD is reviewed. High-quality epitaxial growth of oxide thin films has traditionally been limited to physical vapor deposition techniques (e.g., molecular beam epitaxy). However, recent studies have demonstrated that epitaxial oxide thin films may be deposited on semiconductor substrates using ALD. This presents an exciting opportunity to integrate functional perovskite oxides for advanced semiconductor applications in a process that is economical and scalable.

  19. Atomic layer deposition of perovskite oxides and their epitaxial integration with Si, Ge, and other semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, Martin D.; Ngo, Thong Q.; Hu, Shen; Ekerdt, John G.; Posadas, Agham; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a proven technique for the conformal deposition of oxide thin films with nanoscale thickness control. Most successful industrial applications have been with binary oxides, such as Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 . However, there has been much effort to deposit ternary oxides, such as perovskites (ABO 3 ), with desirable properties for advanced thin film applications. Distinct challenges are presented by the deposition of multi-component oxides using ALD. This review is intended to highlight the research of the many groups that have deposited perovskite oxides by ALD methods. Several commonalities between the studies are discussed. Special emphasis is put on precursor selection, deposition temperatures, and specific property performance (high-k, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, etc.). Finally, the monolithic integration of perovskite oxides with semiconductors by ALD is reviewed. High-quality epitaxial growth of oxide thin films has traditionally been limited to physical vapor deposition techniques (e.g., molecular beam epitaxy). However, recent studies have demonstrated that epitaxial oxide thin films may be deposited on semiconductor substrates using ALD. This presents an exciting opportunity to integrate functional perovskite oxides for advanced semiconductor applications in a process that is economical and scalable

  20. Epitaxy physical principles and technical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Herman, Marian A; Sitter, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Epitaxy provides readers with a comprehensive treatment of the modern models and modifications of epitaxy, together with the relevant experimental and technological framework. This advanced textbook describes all important aspects of the epitaxial growth processes of solid films on crystalline substrates, including a section on heteroepitaxy. It covers and discusses in details the most important epitaxial growth techniques, which are currently widely used in basic research as well as in manufacturing processes of devices, namely solid-phase epitaxy, liquid-phase epitaxy, vapor-phase epitaxy, including metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular-beam epitaxy. Epitaxy’s coverage of science and texhnology thin-film is intended to fill the need for a comprehensive reference and text examining the variety of problems related to the physical foundations and technical implementation of epitaxial crystallization. It is intended for undergraduate students, PhD students, research scientists, lecturers and practic...

  1. Epitaxial patterning of thin-films: conventional lithographies and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2014-01-01

    Thin-film based novel magnetic and electronic devices have entered a new era in which the film crystallography, structural coherence, and epitaxy play important roles in determining their functional properties. The capabilities of controlling such structural and functional properties are being continuously developed by various physical deposition technologies. Epitaxial patterning strategies further allow the miniaturization of such novel devices, which incorporates thin-film components into nanoscale architectures while keeping their functional properties unmodified from their ideal single-crystal values. In the past decade, epitaxial patterning methods on the laboratory scale have been reported to meet distinct scientific inquires, in which the techniques and processes used differ from one to the other. In this review we summarize many of these pioneering endeavors in epitaxial patterning of thin-film devices that use both conventional and novel lithography techniques. These methods demonstrate epitaxial patterning for a broad range of materials (metals, oxides, and semiconductors) and cover common device length scales from micrometer to sub-hundred nanometer. Whilst we have been motivated by magnetic materials and devices, we present our outlook on developing systematic-strategies for epitaxial patterning of functional materials which will pave the road for the design, discovery and industrialization of next-generation advanced magnetic and electronic nano-devices. (topical review)

  2. Drive reinforcement neural networks for reactor control. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.G.; Jouse, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    In view of the loss of the third year funding, the scope of the project goals has been revised. The revision in project scope no longer allows for the detailed modeling of the EBR-11 start-up task that was originally envisaged. The authors are continuing, however, to model the control of the rapid power ascent of the University of Arizona TRIGA reactor using a model-based controller and using a drive reinforcement neural network. These will be combined during the concluding period of the project into a hierarchical control architecture. In addition, the modeling of a PWR feedwater heater has continued, and an autonomous fault-tolerant software architecture for its control has been proposed

  3. Alternative control technology document for bakery oven emissions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, C.W.

    1992-12-01

    The document was produced in response to a request by the baking industry for Federal guidance to assist in providing a more uniform information base for State decision-making with regard to control of bakery oven emissions. The information in the document pertains to bakeries that produce yeast-leavened bread, rolls, buns, and similar products but not crackers, sweet goods, or baked foodstuffs that are not yeast leavened. Information on the baking processes, equipment, operating parameters, potential emissions from baking, and potential emission control options are presented. Catalytic and regenerative oxidation are identified as the most appropriate existing control technologies applicable to VOC emissions from bakery ovens. Cost analyses for catalytic and regenerative oxidation are included. A predictive formula for use in estimating oven emissions has been derived from source tests done in junction with the development of the document. Its use and applicability are described.

  4. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system.

  5. Buried waste integrated demonstration human engineered control station. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document describes the Human Engineered Control Station (HECS) project activities including the conceptual designs. The purpose of the HECS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of remote retrieval by providing an integrated remote control station. The HECS integrates human capabilities, limitations, and expectations into the design to reduce the potential for human error, provides an easy system to learn and operate, provides an increased productivity, and reduces the ultimate investment in training. The overall HECS consists of the technology interface stations, supporting engineering aids, platform (trailer), communications network (broadband system), and collision avoidance system

  6. Occupancy-counter-based control system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, G.; Hoagland, L. C.; Bowman, J. K.

    1979-07-01

    Excessive mechanical ventilation of commercial and institutional buildings can result in significant waste of energy required for space heating and cooling. Ventilation rates are typically set to satisfy building design occupancy levels, in accordance with local codes, even though the building may seldom or never experience design occupancy. A method of eliminating this waste to utilize an occupancy-based ventilation control system wherein a counting device records people entering and leaving the building, to maintain a continuous record of people inventory, and to regulate mechanical ventilation control dampers to supply only that amount of ventilation air required for current occupancy levels is described. A device of this type was installed and tested in a department store in Framingham, Massachusetts and fully instrumented and operated over a 14 month period. Test results on energy usage were correlated with weather severity in order to determine the savings resulting from use of the control system. This system provided a savings of 33% in gas usage during the winter period and a savings of 23% in electricity usage during the summer period. These savings would return the installed cost of the control system in about 1 1/2 years. Projections of the performance of this system in other climatic regions (Chicago, Los Angeles, Kansas City, Miami, Minneapolis) are also presented illustrating payback periods ranging from 1/3 year in Miami to 2 2/3 years in Los Angeles. Complete details of the occupancy based ventilation control system, the test site instrumentation and data gathering procedure, the test results and their interpretation are given. (MCW)

  7. Final Technical Report: Distributed Controls for High Penetrations of Renewables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Raymond H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neely, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rashkin, Lee J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Trudnowski, Daniel J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this effort was to apply four potential control analysis/design approaches to the design of distributed grid control systems to address the impact of latency and communications uncertainty with high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generation. The four techniques considered were: optimal fixed structure control; Nyquist stability criterion; vector Lyapunov analysis; and Hamiltonian design methods. A reduced order model of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) developed for the Matlab Power Systems Toolbox (PST) was employed for the study, as well as representative smaller systems (e.g., a two-area, three-area, and four-area power system). Excellent results were obtained with the optimal fixed structure approach, and the methodology we developed was published in a journal article. This approach is promising because it offers a method for designing optimal control systems with the feedback signals available from Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) data as opposed to full state feedback or the design of an observer. The Nyquist approach inherently handles time delay and incorporates performance guarantees (e.g., gain and phase margin). We developed a technique that works for moderate sized systems, but the approach does not scale well to extremely large system because of computational complexity. The vector Lyapunov approach was applied to a two area model to demonstrate the utility for modeling communications uncertainty. Application to large power systems requires a method to automatically expand/contract the state space and partition the system so that communications uncertainty can be considered. The Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) design methodology was selected to investigate grid systems for energy storage requirements to support high penetration of variable or stochastic generation (such as wind and PV) and loads. This method was applied to several small system models.

  8. Synchrotron radiation excited silicon epitaxy using disilane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Housei; Utsumi, Yuichi

    1995-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) excited chemical reactions provide new crystal growth methods suitable for low-temperature Si epitaxy. The growth kinetics and film properties were investigated by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and photochemical vapor deposition (CVD) modes using Si 2 H 6 . SR-ALE, isolating the surface growth channel mediated by photon stimulated hydrogen desorption, achieves digital growth independent of gas exposure time, SR irradiation time, and substrate temperature. On the other hand in SR-CVD, photolysis of Si 2 H 6 is predominant. In the nonirradiated region, Eley-Rideal type reaction between the photofragments and the surface deposit Si adatoms in a layer-by-layer fashion. In the irradiated region, however, multi-layer photolysis and rebounding occurs within the condensed Si 2 H 6 layer. The pertinent elementary processes were identified by using the high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. The SR-CVD can grow a uniform and epitaxial Si film down to 200degC. The surface morphology is controlled by the surfactant effect of hydrogen atoms. (author)

  9. Growth of pseudomorphic structures through organic epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaviyil, Sreejith Embekkat; Sassella, Adele; Borghesi, Alessandro; Campione, Marcello; Su Genbo; He Youping; Chen Chenjia

    2012-01-01

    The control of molecular orientation in thin solid film phases of organic semiconductors is a basic factor for the exploitation of their physical properties for optoelectronic devices. We compare structural and optical properties of thin films of the organic semiconductor α-quarterthiophene grown by molecular beam epitaxy on different organic substrates. We show how epitactic interactions, characteristic of the surface of organic crystals, can drive the orientation of the crystalline overlayer and the selection of specific polymorphs and new pseudomorphic phases. We identify a key role in this phenomenon played by the marked groove-like corrugations present in some organic crystal surfaces. Since different polymorphs possess rather different performance in terms of, e.g., charge carrier mobility, this strategy is demonstrated to allow for the growth of oriented phases with enhanced physical properties, while keeping the substrate at room temperature. These results provide useful guidelines for the design of technological substrates for organic epitaxy and they substantiate the adoption of an organic epitaxy approach for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices based on thin films of organic semiconductors.

  10. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration

  11. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Jeffrey A. [Rockfield Research Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  12. 242-A Campaign 99-1 process control plan; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LE, E.Q.

    1999-01-01

    242-A Evaporator 99-1 will process approximately one million gallons of waste from tank 102-AW in June 1999. The process control Plan provides a general description of activities, which will occur during 242-A Evaporator Campaign 99-1 and to document analyses conducted to demonstrate that 102-AW waste is acceptable for processing. Predict is a registered trademark of Risk Decisions England Corporation, United Kingdom

  13. Ga-assisted catalyst-free growth mechanism of GaAs nanowires by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, C.; Spirkoska, D.; Frimmer, M.; Abstreiter, G.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms of Ga-assisted GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy are addressed. The axial and radial growth rates as a function of the Ga rate and As pressure indicate that on the opposite of what is observed in thin film epitaxy, the growth rate of the nanowires is arsenic limited. As a consequence, the axial growth rate of the wires can be controlled by the As 4 pressure. Additionally, due to the small As 4 pressure leading to nanowire growth, the deposition on the facets is very slow, leading to a much lower radial growth rate. Finally, we present a model that is able to accurately describe the presented observations and predicts a maximum length of nontapered nanowires of 40 μm

  14. Communications and control for electric power systems: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, H.

    1998-04-01

    This report is a summary of some of the work done on the Communications and Control project, with particular emphasis on the achievements during the years 1986--1996. During those years, the project moved away from concern with dispersed storage and generation and its impact on power system operation (the team was responsible for studies in this area, and for making a power system simulator that included DSG), and became involved in more concrete work aimed at applying high-tech solutions to problems of power system communications and control. This report covers work done at JPL on the following topics: (1) the measurement of electric and magnetic fields, both ac and dc; (2) the use of optical power to supply low-power electronics; (3) the design of a fault-tolerant communication system designed for distribution automation; and (4) a digital phase locked loop that allows the use of low-power transmitting electronics to recreate a good-quality signal at the receiver. In a report of this kind, only the results and highlights of the work are described.

  15. Preventive arms control. Case study: plutonium disposition. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebert, W.

    2001-01-01

    Plutonium stored in separated form poses a severe threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. While options for the disposition of military plutonium stockpiles have been studied for several years, similar work has hardly been undertaken for plutonium stockpiles in the civilian sector. In the framework of this project, the various options to dispose of stockpiles of separated plutonium in the civilian sector were to be investigated. The project was embedded in the FONAS-project network on Preventive Arms Control, and the findings of this study were to be considered for the development of a concept of Preventive Arms Control. As a first step, the internationally available information on different options for plutonium disposition (MOX-use, immobilization together with radioactive wastes, elimination) were collected and compiled to allow further assessment of the different options. For some of the options, technical questions were examined in more detail. For this purpose, neutron transport and fuel burnup calculations were performed. In particular, the analysis focused on concepts for the elimination of plutonium by the use of uranium-free fuel in existing light-water reactors, since they are particularly attractive from the point of view of non-proliferation. The calculations were performed for a reference fuel based on yttrium-stabilized zirconia, with parameters like the initial plutonium content or the use of burnable neutron poisons varying. A systematic and complete analysis of the performed calculations, however, could not be undertaken due to project time restrictions. On the basis of assessment criteria for Preventive Arms Control developed by the project network, a specific set of criteria for the assessment of the pros and cons of different plutonium disposition methods has been defined. These criteria may then be used as part of a concept of prospective technology assessment. The project findings present a starting base for a comprehensive assessment of the

  16. Preventive maintenance basis: Volume 30 -- Relays -- control. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worledge, D.; Hinchcliffe, G.

    1998-07-01

    US nuclear power plants are implementing preventive maintenance (PM) tasks with little documented basis beyond fundamental vendor information to support the tasks or their intervals. The Preventive Maintenance Basis project provides utilities with the technical basis for PM tasks and task intervals associated with 40 specific components such as valves, electric motors, pumps, and HVAC equipment. This document provides a program of preventive maintenance tasks suitable for application to control relays. The PM tasks that are recommended provide a cost-effective way to intercept the causes and mechanisms that lead to degradation and failure. They can be used in conjunction with material from other sources, to develop a complete PM program or to improve an existing program

  17. The Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Epitaxial Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ning

    Understanding heat transport at nanometer and sub-nanometer lengthscales is critical to solving a wide range of technological challenges related to thermal management and energy conversion. In particular, finite Interfacial Thermal Conductance (ITC) often dominates transport whenever multiple interfaces are closely spaced together or when heat originates from sources that are highly confined by interfaces. Examples of the former include superlattices, thin films, quantum cascade lasers, and high density nanocomposites. Examples of the latter include FinFET transistors, phase-change memory, and the plasmonic transducer of a heat-assisted magnetic recording head. An understanding of the physics of such interfaces is still lacking, in part because experimental investigations to-date have not bothered to carefully control the structure of interfaces studied, and also because the most advanced theories have not been compared to the most robust experimental data. This thesis aims to resolve this by investigating ITC between a range of clean and structurally well-characterized metal-semiconductor interfaces using the Time-Domain Thermoreflectance (TDTR) experimental technique, and by providing theoretical/computational comparisons to the experimental data where possible. By studying the interfaces between a variety of materials systems, each with unique aspects to their tunability, I have been able to answer a number of outstanding questions regarding the importance of interfacial quality (epitaxial/non-epitaxial interfaces), semiconductor doping, matching of acoustic and optical phonon band structure, and the role of phonon transport mechanisms apart from direct elastic transmission on ITC. In particular, we are able to comment on the suitability of the diffuse mismatch model (DMM) to describe the transport across epitaxial interfaces. To accomplish this goal, I studied interfacial thermal transport across CoSi2, TiSi2, NiSi and PtSi - Si(100) and Si(111), (silicides

  18. Ion anomalous transport and feedback control. Final technical report, September 1, 1987 - August 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    This final report is comprised of the following six progress reports: Ion Temperature Gradient Instability and Anomalous Transport, July 1989; Ion Temperature Gradient Instability and Anomalous Transport, August 1991; Ion Temperature Gradient Instability and Anomalous Transport, July 1993; Ion Anomalous Transport and Feedback Control, May 1994; Ion Anomalous Transport and Feedback Control, April 1995; and Ion Anomalous Transport and Feedback Control, December 1997

  19. Molecular beam epitaxy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.

    1984-01-01

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is most commonly used to fabricate super-lattices, high electron mobility transistors, multi-quantum well lasers and other new semiconductor devices by utilizing its excellent controlability. MBE for the future is presumed to include techniques such as metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, photochemical reaction process using gas sources and ion implantation. A report on the crystal growth of GaAs using metalorganics, trimethylgallium and triethylgallium, which are usually used in chemical vapor deposition, as gaseous sources of gallium in an MBE system is made. (Author) [pt

  20. Seed layer technique for high quality epitaxial manganite films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Graziosi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an innovative approach to the simultaneous control of growth mode and magnetotransport properties of manganite thin films, based on an easy-to-implement film/substrate interface engineering. The deposition of a manganite seed layer and the optimization of the substrate temperature allows a persistent bi-dimensional epitaxy and robust ferromagnetic properties at the same time. Structural measurements confirm that in such interface-engineered films, the optimal properties are related to improved epitaxy. A new growth scenario is envisaged, compatible with a shift from heteroepitaxy towards pseudo-homoepitaxy. Relevant growth parameters such as formation energy, roughening temperature, strain profile and chemical states are derived.

  1. Self-Organized Ni Nanocrystal Embedded in BaTiO3 Epitaxial Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge FF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ni nanocrystals (NCs were embedded in BaTiO3 epitaxial films using the laser molecular beam epitaxy. The processes involving the self-organization of Ni NCs and the epitaxial growth of BaTiO3 were discussed. With the in situ monitoring of reflection high-energy electron diffraction, the nanocomposite films were engineered controllably by the fine alternation of the self-organization of Ni NCs and the epitaxial growth of BaTiO3. The transmission electron microscopy and the X-ray diffraction characterization confirmed that the composite film consists of the Ni NCs layers alternating with the (001/(100-oriented epitaxial BaTiO3 separation layers.

  2. FY 1997 report on the study on lamination control technology for functional multi-element oxide thin films by complex beam epitaxy (CxBE) process; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (sakutaisen epitaxy (CxBE) ho ni yoru kinosei tagenso sankabutsu usumaku no sekiso seigyo gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Complex beam epitaxy (CxBE) process was proposed and demonstrated as new deposition process of multi-element oxide thin films. This process radiates excimer laser onto a metal complex target of ethylenediamine-tetraacetate complex under reduced pressure oxygen atmosphere condition in a reaction vessel to supply raw material onto a heated substrate. This process allowed deposition of YBCO123 phase hetero-epitaxial film onto a single-crystalline SrTiO3 substrate. This process was proved to be promising through study on crystal orientation, composition transcription and surface smoothness of the obtained oxide thin films. In addition, epitaxial ZnO film was also deposited onto a single crystalline Al2O3 substrate by this process. The relation between the obtained film and substrate epitaxy was examined, and photoluminescence of specimens was measured by triple wave of Nd:YAG laser. As a result, it was clarified that the epitaxial ZnO film prepared by this process is useful as laser material. 60 refs., 48 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Quasi-two-dimensional electron gas at the epitaxial alumina/SrTiO{sub 3} interface: Control of oxygen vacancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kormondy, Kristy J.; Posadas, Agham B.; Demkov, Alexander A., E-mail: demkov@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Ngo, Thong Q.; Ekerdt, John G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Lu, Sirong; Smith, David J.; McCartney, Martha R. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Goble, Nicholas; Gao, Xuan P. A. [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    In this paper, we report on the highly conductive layer formed at the crystalline γ-alumina/SrTiO{sub 3} interface, which is attributed to oxygen vacancies. We describe the structure of thin γ-alumina layers deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) at growth temperatures in the range of 400–800 °C, as determined by reflection-high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and high-resolution electron microscopy. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of the oxygen-deficient layer. Electrical characterization indicates sheet carrier densities of ∼10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} at room temperature for the sample deposited at 700 °C, with a maximum electron Hall mobility of 3100 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} at 3.2 K and room temperature mobility of 22 cm{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1}. Annealing in oxygen is found to reduce the carrier density and turn a conductive sample into an insulator.

  4. A modular designed ultra-high-vacuum spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope with controllable magnetic fields for investigating epitaxial thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangkang; Lin, Wenzhi; Chinchore, Abhijit V; Liu, Yinghao; Smith, Arthur R

    2011-05-01

    A room-temperature ultra-high-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope for in situ scanning freshly grown epitaxial films has been developed. The core unit of the microscope, which consists of critical components including scanner and approach motors, is modular designed. This enables easy adaptation of the same microscope units to new growth systems with different sample-transfer geometries. Furthermore the core unit is designed to be fully compatible with cryogenic temperatures and high magnetic field operations. A double-stage spring suspension system with eddy current damping has been implemented to achieve ≤5 pm z stability in a noisy environment and in the presence of an interconnected growth chamber. Both tips and samples can be quickly exchanged in situ; also a tunable external magnetic field can be introduced using a transferable permanent magnet shuttle. This allows spin-polarized tunneling with magnetically coated tips. The performance of this microscope is demonstrated by atomic-resolution imaging of surface reconstructions on wide band-gap GaN surfaces and spin-resolved experiments on antiferromagnetic Mn(3)N(2)(010) surfaces.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  6. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  7. Solution-phase epitaxial growth of quasi-monocrystalline cuprous oxide on metal nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sciacca, Beniamino; Mann, Sander A.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Van Huis, Marijn A.; Garnett, Erik C.

    2014-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of monocrystalline semiconductors on metal nanostructures is interesting from both fundamental and applied perspectives. The realization of nanostructures with excellent interfaces and material properties that also have controlled optical resonances can be very challenging. Here

  8. Synthesis and characterization of a liquid Eu precursor (EuCp{sup pm}{sub 2}) allowing for valence control of Eu ions doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Brandon, E-mail: bmitchell@wcupa.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, PA, 19383 (United States); Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Koizumi, Atsushi; Nunokawa, Takumi; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Lee, Dong-gun; Saitoh, Yasuhisa; Timmerman, Dolf [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Kuboshima, Yoshinori; Mogi, Takayuki; Higashi, Shintaro; Kikukawa, Kaoru [Kojundo Chemical Laboratory Co., Ltd., 5-1-28 Chiyoda, Sakado, Saitama, 350-0284 (Japan); Ofuchi, Hironori; Honma, Tetsuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Fujiwara, Yasufumi, E-mail: fujiwara@mat.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    A liquid Eu precursor, bis(normal-propyl-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl)europium has been synthesized. This precursor exists as a liquid at temperatures higher than 49 °C, has a moderately high vapor pressure, contains no oxygen in its molecular structure, and can be distilled to high purity. These properties make it ideal for doping using a chemical vapor or atomic layer deposition method, and provide a degree of control previously unavailable. As a precursor the Eu exists in the divalent valance state, however, once doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, the room-temperature photoluminescence of the Eu-doped GaN exhibited the typical red emission due to the intra-4f shell transition of trivalent Eu. After variation of the growth temperature, it was found that divalent Eu could be stabilized in the GaN matrix. By tuning the Fermi level through donor doping, the ratio of Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} could be controlled. The change in valence state of the Eu ions was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure. - Highlights: • A liquid Eu precursor was synthesized and its properties were characterized. • Precursor has a low melting point and a moderately high vapor pressure. • Does not contain oxygen in its molecular structure. • Eu can changed its valance state when incorporated into GaN. • Valence state of Eu in GaN can be controlled by donor doping.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a liquid Eu precursor (EuCppm2) allowing for valence control of Eu ions doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Brandon; Koizumi, Atsushi; Nunokawa, Takumi; Wakamatsu, Ryuta; Lee, Dong-gun; Saitoh, Yasuhisa; Timmerman, Dolf; Kuboshima, Yoshinori; Mogi, Takayuki; Higashi, Shintaro; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Ofuchi, Hironori; Honma, Tetsuo; Fujiwara, Yasufumi

    2017-01-01

    A liquid Eu precursor, bis(normal-propyl-tetramethylcyclopentadienyl)europium has been synthesized. This precursor exists as a liquid at temperatures higher than 49 °C, has a moderately high vapor pressure, contains no oxygen in its molecular structure, and can be distilled to high purity. These properties make it ideal for doping using a chemical vapor or atomic layer deposition method, and provide a degree of control previously unavailable. As a precursor the Eu exists in the divalent valance state, however, once doped into GaN by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy, the room-temperature photoluminescence of the Eu-doped GaN exhibited the typical red emission due to the intra-4f shell transition of trivalent Eu. After variation of the growth temperature, it was found that divalent Eu could be stabilized in the GaN matrix. By tuning the Fermi level through donor doping, the ratio of Eu 2+ to Eu 3+ could be controlled. The change in valence state of the Eu ions was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure. - Highlights: • A liquid Eu precursor was synthesized and its properties were characterized. • Precursor has a low melting point and a moderately high vapor pressure. • Does not contain oxygen in its molecular structure. • Eu can changed its valance state when incorporated into GaN. • Valence state of Eu in GaN can be controlled by donor doping.

  10. Reversible Polarization Rotation in Epitaxial Ferroelectric Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Guangqing; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Hsin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Polarization rotation engineering is a promising path to giant dielectric and electromechanical responses in ferroelectric materials and devices. This work demonstrates robust and reversible in- to out-of-plane polarization rotation in ultrathin (nanoscale) epitaxial (001) tetragonal PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3...... large-scale polarization rotation switching (≈60 μC cm−2) and an effective d 33 response 500% (≈250 pm V−1) larger than the PZT-R layer alone. Furthermore, this enhancement is stable for more than 107 electrical switching cycles. These bilayers present a simple and highly controllable means to design...... and optimize rotational polar systems as an alternate to traditional composition-based approaches. The precise control of the subtle interface-driven interactions between the lattice and the external factors that control polarization opens a new door to enhanced—or completely new—functional properties....

  11. Epitaxy of advanced nanowire quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibegovic, Sasa; Car, Diana; Zhang, Hao; Balk, Stijn C.; Logan, John A.; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Schmits, Rudi; Xu, Di; Wang, Guanzhong; Krogstrup, Peter; Op Het Veld, Roy L. M.; Zuo, Kun; Vos, Yoram; Shen, Jie; Bouman, Daniël; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; Pennachio, Daniel; Lee, Joon Sue; van Veldhoven, Petrus J.; Koelling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Palmstrøm, Chris J.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are ideal for realizing various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasiparticles (such as anyons) can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought into contact with a superconductor. To exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons—which are key elements of topological quantum computing—fully, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks with a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire ‘hashtags’ reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase-coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap (with vanishing sub-gap conductance) is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens up new avenues for the realization of epitaxial three-dimensional quantum architectures which have the potential to become key components of various quantum devices.

  12. Design of a braze alloy for fast epitaxial brazing of superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegert, S.; Laux, B.; Rösier, J.

    2012-07-01

    For the repair of directionally solidified turbine components made of nickel-based superalloys, a new high-temperature brazing method has been developed. Utilising heterogeneous nucleation on the crack surface, the microstructure of the base material can be reproduced, i.e. single crystallinity can be maintained. In contrast to commonly used eutectic braze alloys, such as nickel-boron or nickel-silicon systems, the process is not diffusion controlled but works with a consolute binary base system. The currently applied epitaxial brazing methods rely on isothermal solidification diffusing the melting point depressants into the base material until their concentration is reduced so that the liquid braze solidifies. Contrary, the identified Ni-Mn consolute system enables a temperature driven epitaxial solidification resulting in substantially reduced process duration. The development of the braze alloys was assisted using the CALPHAD software Thermo-Calc. The solidification behaviour was estimated by kinetic calculations with realistic boundary conditions. Finally, the complete system, including braze alloy as well as substrate material, was modelled by means of DICTRA. Subsequently, the thermodynamic properties of the braze alloys were experimentally analysed by DSC measurements. For brazing experiments 300 μm wide parallel gaps were used. Complete epitaxial solidification, i.e. the absence of high-angle grain boundaries, could be achieved within brazing times being up to two orders of magnitude shorter compared to diffusion brazing processes. Theoretically and experimentally evaluated process windows reveal similar shapes. However, a distinct shift has to be stated which can be ascribed to the limited accuracy of the underlying thermodynamic databases.

  13. Macrodefect-free, large, and thick GaN bulk crystals for high-quality 2–6 in. GaN substrates by hydride vapor phase epitaxy with hardness control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Hajime; Konno, Taichiro; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kitamura, Toshio; Fujimoto, Tetsuji; Yoshida, Takehiro

    2018-06-01

    On the basis of a novel crystal hardness control, we successfully realized macrodefect-free, large (2–6 in.) and thick +c-oriented GaN bulk crystals by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. Without the hardness control, the introduction of macrodefects including inversion domains and/or basal-plane dislocations seemed to be indispensable to avoid crystal fracture in GaN growth with millimeter thickness. However, the presence of these macrodefects tended to limit the applicability of the GaN substrate to practical devices. The present technology markedly increased the GaN crystal hardness from below 20 to 22 GPa, thus increasing the available growth thickness from below 1 mm to over 6 mm even without macrodefect introduction. The 2 and 4 in. GaN wafers fabricated from these crystals had extremely low dislocation densities in the low- to mid-105 cm‑2 range and low off-angle variations (2 in.: <0.1° 4 in.: ∼0.2°). The realization of such high-quality 6 in. wafers is also expected.

  14. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-20

    guide growth of the epitaxial YIG films. Aluminum or gallium substitu- tions for iron were used in combination with lanthanum substitutions for yttrium... gallate spinel sub- strates. There was no difficulty with nucleation in the melt and film quality appeared to be similar to that observed previously...hexagonal ferrites. We succeeded in growing the M-type lead hexaferrite (magnetoplumbite) on gallate spinel substrates. We found that the PbO-based

  15. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-01-01

    Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C). Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic...

  16. Epitaxial rare-earth superlattices and films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, M.B.; Beach, R.S.; Flynn, C.P.; Matheny, A.; Tsui, F.; Rhyne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on epitaxial growth of rare-earth superlattices which is demonstrated to have opened important new areas of research on magnetic materials. The propagation magnetic order through non-magnetic elements, including its range and anisotropy, has been studied. The importance of magnetostriction in determining the phase diagram is demonstrated by the changes induced by epitaxial clamping. The cyrstallinity of epitaxial superlattices provides the opportunity to study interfacial magnetism by conventional x-ray and neutron scattering methods

  17. Removable polytetrafluoroethylene template based epitaxy of ferroelectric copolymer thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Chen, Qiusong; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Hui; Cheng, Qian; Jiang, Yulong; Zhu, Guodong

    2018-04-01

    In recent years ferroelectric polymers have shown their great potentials in organic and flexible electronics. To meet the requirements of high-performance and low energy consumption of novel electronic devices and systems, structural and electrical properties of ferroelectric polymer thin films are expected to be further optimized. One possible way is to realize epitaxial growth of ferroelectric thin films via removable high-ordered polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) templates. Here two key parameters in epitaxy process, annealing temperature and applied pressure, are systematically studied and thus optimized through structural and electrical measurements of ferroelectric copolymer thin films. Experimental results indicate that controlled epitaxial growth is realized via suitable combination of both parameters. Annealing temperature above the melting point of ferroelectric copolymer films is required, and simultaneously moderate pressure (around 2.0 MPa here) should be applied. Over-low pressure (around 1.0 MPa here) usually results in the failure of epitaxy process, while over-high pressure (around 3.0 MPa here) often results in residual of PTFE templates on ferroelectric thin films.

  18. Manipulation of Dirac cones in metal-intercalated epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kim, Minsung; Tringides, Michael; Ho, Kai-Ming

    Graphene is one of the most attractive materials from both fundamental and practical points of view due to its characteristic Dirac cones. The electronic property of graphene can be modified through the interaction with substrate or another graphene layer as illustrated in few-layer epitaxial graphene. Recently, metal intercalation became an effective method to manipulate the electronic structure of graphene by modifying the coupling between the constituent layers. In this work, we show that the Dirac cones of epitaxial graphene can be manipulated by intercalating rare-earth metals. We demonstrate that rare-earth metal intercalated epitaxial graphene has tunable band structures and the energy levels of Dirac cones as well as the linear or quadratic band dispersion can be controlled depending on the location of the intercalation layer and density. Our results could be important for applications and characterizations of the intercalated epitaxial graphene. Supported by the U.S. DOE-BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  19. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  20. Microwave impedance of epitaxial high-temperature superconductor films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkov, G.A.; Malyshev, V.Yu.; Bagada, A.V.

    1995-01-01

    In the 3 cm band dependences of the epitaxial HTS film surface resistance on the magnitude of ac and dc magnetic fields have been measured. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-σ films on sapphire were investigated. It was established that alternating magnetic field produces a stronger impact on the surface resistance than dc field. To explain experimental results the assumption is made that a HTS film is not an ideal superconductor and consists of series-connected sections of various types: sections of an ideal superconductor, sections of low and large resistance intragranular Josephson junctions, shunted by the ideal superconductor, and finally, sections of intergranular Josephson junctions few for epitaxial films. In these conditions the dependences of the surface resistance on dc magnetic field are caused by Abrikosov's vortices moving in ideal superconductive sections, and dependences on the amplitude of ac magnetic field are caused by switching of large resistance junctions to a low resistance state

  1. On-Demand Final State Control of a Surface-Bound Bistable Single Molecule Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Torres, José A; Simpson, Grant J; Adams, Christopher J; Früchtl, Herbert A; Schaub, Renald

    2018-04-12

    Modern electronic devices perform their defined action because of the complete reliability of their individual active components (transistors, switches, diodes, and so forth). For instance, to encode basic computer units (bits) an electrical switch can be used. The reliability of the switch ensures that the desired outcome (the component's final state, 0 or 1) can be selected with certainty. No practical data storage device would otherwise exist. This reliability criterion will necessarily need to hold true for future molecular electronics to have the opportunity to emerge as a viable miniaturization alternative to our current silicon-based technology. Molecular electronics target the use of single-molecules to perform the actions of individual electronic components. On-demand final state control over a bistable unimolecular component has therefore been one of the main challenges in the past decade (1-5) but has yet to be achieved. In this Letter, we demonstrate how control of the final state of a surface-supported bistable single molecule switch can be realized. On the basis of the observations and deductions presented here, we further suggest an alternative strategy to achieve final state control in unimolecular bistable switches.

  2. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    OpenAIRE

    Hyoungjeen Jeen; Ho Nyung Lee

    2015-01-01

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model syste...

  3. Epitaxial growth by monolayer restricted galvanic displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilić Rastko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a new method for epitaxial growth of metals in solution by galvanic displacement of layers pre-deposited by underpotential deposition (UPD was discussed and experimentally illustrated throughout the lecture. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM are employed to carry out and monitor a “quasi-perfect”, two-dimensional growth of Ag on Au(111, Cu on Ag(111, and Cu on Au(111 by repetitive galvanic displacement of underpotentially deposited monolayers. A comparative study emphasizes the displacement stoichiometry as an efficient tool for thickness control during the deposition process and as a key parameter that affects the deposit morphology. The excellent quality of layers deposited by monolayer-restricted galvanic displacement is manifested by a steady UPD voltammetry and ascertained by a flat and uniform surface morphology maintained during the entire growth process.

  4. Sensor guided control and navigation with intelligent machines. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Bijoy K.

    2001-03-26

    This item constitutes the final report on ''Visionics: An integrated approach to analysis and design of intelligent machines.'' The report discusses dynamical systems approach to problems in robust control of possibly time-varying linear systems, problems in vision and visually guided control, and, finally, applications of these control techniques to intelligent navigation with a mobile platform. Robust design of a controller for a time-varying system essentially deals with the problem of synthesizing a controller that can adapt to sudden changes in the parameters of the plant and can maintain stability. The approach presented is to design a compensator that simultaneously stabilizes each and every possible mode of the plant as the parameters undergo sudden and unexpected changes. Such changes can in fact be detected by a visual sensor and, hence, visually guided control problems are studied as a natural consequence. The problem here is to detect parameters of the plant and maintain st ability in the closed loop using a ccd camera as a sensor. The main result discussed in the report is the role of perspective systems theory that was developed in order to analyze such a detection and control problem. The robust control algorithms and the visually guided control algorithms are applied in the context of a PUMA 560 robot arm control where the goal is to visually locate a moving part on a mobile turntable. Such problems are of paramount importance in manufacturing with a certain lack of structure. Sensor guided control problems are extended to problems in robot navigation using a NOMADIC mobile platform with a ccd and a laser range finder as sensors. The localization and map building problems are studied with the objective of navigation in an unstructured terrain.

  5. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

    1991-05-01

    The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

  6. Procedures for identifying reasonably available control technology for stationary sources of PM-10. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.J.; Ellefson, R.

    1992-09-01

    The guidance document sets forth procedures and identifies sources of information that will assist State and local air pollution control agencies in determining Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) for PM-10 (particulate matter having a nominal aerometric diameter of 10 microns or less) emission from existing stationary sources on a case-by-case basis. It provides an annotated bibliography of documents to aid in identifying the activities that cause PM-10 emissions as well as applicable air pollution control measures and their effectiveness in reducing emissions. The most stringent state total particulate matter (PM) emission limits are identified for several categories of PM-10 sources and compared to available emission test data. Finally, guidance is provided on procedures for estimating total capital investment and total annual cost of the control measures which are generally used to control PM-10 emissions

  7. Epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Gershon, Talia S.; Guha, Supratik; Shin, Byungha; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Techniques for epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) materials on Si are provided. In one aspect, a method of forming an epitaxial kesterite material is provided which includes the steps of: selecting a Si substrate based on a crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate; forming an epitaxial oxide interlayer on the Si substrate to enhance wettability of the epitaxial kesterite material on the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial oxide interlayer is formed from a material that is lattice-matched to Si; and forming the epitaxial kesterite material on a side of the epitaxial oxide interlayer opposite the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, and wherein a crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial kesterite material is based on the crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate. A method of forming an epitaxial kesterite-based photovoltaic device and an epitaxial kesterite-based device are also provided.

  8. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Prater, John Thomas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin

  9. 78 FR 894 - Interim Final Determination To Stay Sanctions, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ...EPA is making an interim final determination to stay imposition of sanctions based on a proposed approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP) published elsewhere in this Federal Register. The revisions concern local rules that regulate inhalable particulate matter (PM10) emissions from sources of fugitive dust such as unpaved roads and disturbed soils in open and agricultural areas in Imperial County.

  10. Lattice-Symmetry-Driven Epitaxy of Hierarchical GaN Nanotripods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Ping

    2017-01-18

    Lattice-symmetry-driven epitaxy of hierarchical GaN nanotripods is demonstrated. The nanotripods emerge on the top of hexagonal GaN nanowires, which are selectively grown on pillar-patterned GaN templates using molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirms that two kinds of lattice-symmetry, wurtzite (wz) and zinc-blende (zb), coexist in the GaN nanotripods. Periodical transformation between wz and zb drives the epitaxy of the hierarchical nanotripods with N-polarity. The zb-GaN is formed by the poor diffusion of adatoms, and it can be suppressed by improving the ability of the Ga adatoms to migrate as the growth temperature increased. This controllable epitaxy of hierarchical GaN nanotripods allows quantum dots to be located at the phase junctions of the nanotripods and nanowires, suggesting a new recipe for multichannel quantum devices.

  11. MgO monolayer epitaxy on Ni (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpi, B.; Putero, M.; Hemeryck, A.; Vizzini, S.

    2017-11-01

    The growth of two-dimensional oxide films with accurate control of their structural and electronic properties is considered challenging for engineering nanotechnological applications. We address here the particular case of MgO ultrathin films grown on Ni (100), a system for which neither crystallization nor extended surface ordering has been established previously in the monolayer range. Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Auger Electron Spectroscopy, we report on experiments showing MgO monolayer (ML) epitaxy on a ferromagnetic nickel surface, down to the limit of atomic thickness. Alternate steps of Mg ML deposition, O2 gas exposure, and ultrahigh vacuum thermal treatment enable the production of a textured film of ordered MgO nano-domains. This study could open interesting prospects for controlled epitaxy of ultrathin oxide films with a high magneto-resistance ratio on ferromagnetic substrates, enabling improvement in high-efficiency spintronics and magnetic tunnel junction devices.

  12. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  13. Liquid phase epitaxial growth of heterostructured hierarchical MOF thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Chernikova, Valeriya; Shekhah, Osama; Spanopoulos, Ioannis; Trikalitis, Pantelis N.; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Precise control of epitaxial growth of MOF-on-MOF thin films, for ordered hierarchical tbo-type structures is demonstrated. The heterostructured MOF thin film was fabricated by successful sequential deposition of layers from two different MOFs. The 2-periodic layers, edge-transitive 4,4-square lattices regarded as supermolecular building layers, were commendably cross-linked using a combination of inorganic/organic and organic pillars.

  14. Liquid phase epitaxial growth of heterostructured hierarchical MOF thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Chernikova, Valeriya

    2017-05-10

    Precise control of epitaxial growth of MOF-on-MOF thin films, for ordered hierarchical tbo-type structures is demonstrated. The heterostructured MOF thin film was fabricated by successful sequential deposition of layers from two different MOFs. The 2-periodic layers, edge-transitive 4,4-square lattices regarded as supermolecular building layers, were commendably cross-linked using a combination of inorganic/organic and organic pillars.

  15. Coupled quantum dot-ring structures by droplet epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somaschini, C; Bietti, S; Koguchi, N; Sanguinetti, S

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication, by pure self-assembly, of GaAs/AlGaAs dot-ring quantum nanostructures is presented. The growth is performed via droplet epitaxy, which allows for the fine control, through As flux and substrate temperature, of the crystallization kinetics of nanometer scale metallic Ga reservoirs deposited on the surface. Such a procedure permits the combination of quantum dots and quantum rings into a single, multi-functional, complex quantum nanostructure.

  16. Twenty years of molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, A. Y.

    1995-05-01

    The term "molecular beam epitaxy" (MBE) was first used in one of our crystal growth papers in 1970, after having conducted extensive surface physics studies in the late 1960's of the interaction of atomic and molecular beams with solid surfaces. The unique feature of MBE is the ability to prepare single crystal layers with atomic dimensional precision. MBE sets the standard for epitaxial growth and has made possible semiconductor structures that could not be fabricated with either naturally existing materials or by other crystal growth techniques. MBE led the crystal growth technologies when it prepared the first semiconductor quantum well and superlattice structures that gave unexpected and exciting electrical and optical properties. For example, the discovery of the fractional quantized Hall effect. It brought experimental quantum physics to the classroom, and practically all major universities throughout the world are now equipped with MBE systems. The fundamental principles demonstrated by the MBE growth of III-V compound semiconductors have also been applied to the growth of group IV, II-VI, metal, and insulating materials. For manufacturing, the most important criteria are uniformity, precise control of the device structure, and reproducibility. MBE has produced more lasers (3 to 5 million per month for compact disc application) than any other crystal growth technique in the world. New directions for MBE are to incorporate in-situ, real-time monitoring capabilities so that complex structures can be precisely "engineered". In the future, as environmental concerns increase, the use of toxic arsine and phosphine may be limited. Successful use of valved cracker cells for solid arsenic and phosphorus has already produced InP based injection lasers.

  17. Structural and magentic characterization of rare earth and transition metal films grown on epitaxial buffer films on semiconductor substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrow, R.F.C.; Parkin, S.S.P.; Speriosu, V.S.; Bezinge, A.; Segmuller, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Structural and magnetic data are presented and discussed for epitaxial films of rare earth metals (Dy, Ho, Er) on LaF 3 films on the GaAs(TTT) surface and Fe on Ag films on the GaAs(001) surface. Both systems exhibit unusual structural characteristics which influence the magnetic properties of the metal films. In the case of rare earth epitaxy on LaF 3 the authors present evidence for epitaxy across an incommensurate or discommensurate interface. Coherency strain is not transmitted into the metal which behaves much like bulk crystals of the rare earths. In the case of Fe films, tilted epitaxy and long-range coherency strain are confirmed by X- ray diffractometry. Methods of controlling some of these structural effects by modifying the epitaxial structures are presented

  18. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au)

  19. Epitaxy, thin films and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagd Christensen, Morten

    1997-05-01

    This report is the result of structural investigations of 3d transition metal superlattices consisting of Fe/V, Cr/Mn, V/Mn and Fe/Mn, and a structural and magnetic study of a series of Ho/Pr alloys. The work includes preparation and characterization of substrates as well as growth of thin films and Fe/V superlattices by molecular beam epitaxy, including in-situ characterization by reflection high energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Structural characterization has been done by x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction. The x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on the rotating copper anode at Risoe, and at synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Brookhaven, and the neutron scattering was done at the Danish research reactor DR3 at Risoe. In addition to longitudinal scans, giving information about the structural parameters in the modulation direction, non-specular scans were also performed. This type of scans gives information about in-plane orientation and lattice parameters. From the analysis, structural information is obtained about lattice parameters, epitaxial strain, coherence lengths and crystallographic orientation for the superlattice systems, except Fe/Mn superlattices, which could not be modelled. For the Ho/Pr alloys, x-ray magnetic scattering was performed, and the crystal and magnetic structure was investigated. (au) 14 tabs.; 58 ills., 96 refs.

  20. Gravity packaging final waste recovery based on gravity separation and chemical imaging control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia; Potenza, Fabio; Luciani, Valentina; Di Maio, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Plastic polymers are characterized by a high calorific value. Post-consumer plastic waste can be thus considered, in many cases, as a typical secondary solid fuels according to the European Commission directive on End of Waste (EoW). In Europe the practice of incineration is considered one of the solutions for waste disposal waste, for energy recovery and, as a consequence, for the reduction of waste sent to landfill. A full characterization of these products represents the first step to profitably and correctly utilize them. Several techniques have been investigated in this paper in order to separate and characterize post-consumer plastic packaging waste fulfilling the previous goals, that is: gravity separation (i.e. Reflux Classifier), FT-IR spectroscopy, NIR HyperSpectralImaging (HSI) based techniques and calorimetric test. The study demonstrated as the proposed separation technique and the HyperSpectral NIR Imaging approach allow to separate and recognize the different polymers (i.e. PolyVinyl Chloride (PVC), PolyStyrene (PS), PolyEthylene (PE), PoliEtilene Tereftalato (PET), PolyPropylene (PP)) in order to maximize the removal of the PVC fraction from plastic waste and to perform the full quality control of the resulting products, can be profitably utilized to set up analytical/control strategies finalized to obtain a low content of PVC in the final Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF), thus enhancing SRF quality, increasing its value and reducing the "final waste". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The first stage of BFS integrated system for nuclear materials control and accounting. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The BFS computerized accounting system is a network-based one. It runs in a client/server mode. The equipment used in the system includes a computer network consisting of: One server computer system, including peripheral hardware and three client computer systems. The server is located near the control room of the BFS-2 facility outside of the 'stone sack' to ensure access during operation of the critical assemblies. Two of the client computer systems are located near the assembly tables of the BFS-1 and BFS-2 facilities while the third one being the Fissile Material Storage. This final report details the following topics: Computerized nuclear material accounting methods; The portal monitoring system; Test and evaluation of item control technology; Test and evaluation of radiation based nuclear material measurement equipment; and The integrated demonstration of nuclear material control and accounting methods

  2. The slightly-enriched spectral shift control reactor. Final report, September 30, 1988--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, W.R.; Lee, J.C.; Larsen, E.W. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Edlund, M.C. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering

    1991-11-01

    An advanced converter reactor design utilizing mechanical spectral shift control rods in a conventional pressurized water reactor configuration is under investigation. The design is based on the principle that a harder spectrum during the early part of the fuel cycle will result in large neutron captures in fertile {sup 238}U, which can then be burned in situ in a softer spectrum later in the cycle. Preliminary design calculations performed during FY 89 showed that the slightly-enriched spectral shift reactor design offers the benefit of substantially increased fuel resource utilization with the proven safety characteristics of the pressurized water reactor technology retained. Optimization of the fuel design and development of fuel management strategies were carried out in FY 90, along with effort to develop and validate neutronic methodology for tight-lattice configurations with hard spectra. During FY 91, the final year of the grant, the final Slightly-Enriched Spectral Shift Reactor (SESSR) design was determined, and reference design analyses were performed for the assemblies as well as the global core configuration, both at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and with depletion. The final SESSR design results in approximately a 20% increase in the utilization of uranium resources, based on equilibrium fuel cycle analyses. Acceptable pin power peaking is obtained with the final core design, with assembly peaking factors equal to less than 1.04 for spectral shift control rods both inserted and withdrawn, and global peaking factors at BOC predicted to be 1.4. In addition, a negative Moderation Temperature Coefficient (MTC) is maintained for BOC, which is difficult to achieve with conventional advanced converter designs based on a closed fuel cycle. The SESSR design avoids the need for burnable poison absorber, although they could be added if desired to increase the cycle length while maintaining a negative MTC.

  3. NERI PROJECT 99-119. TASK 1. ADVANCED CONTROL TOOLS AND METHODS. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March-Leuba, J.A.

    2002-09-09

    Nuclear plants of the 21st century will employ higher levels of automation and fault tolerance to increase availability, reduce accident risk, and lower operating costs. Key developments in control algorithms, fault diagnostics, fault tolerance, and communication in a distributed system are needed to implement the fully automated plant. Equally challenging will be integrating developments in separate information and control fields into a cohesive system, which collectively achieves the overall goals of improved performance, safety, reliability, maintainability, and cost-effectiveness. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), the U. S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a project to address some of the technical issues involved in meeting the long-range goal of 21st century reactor control systems. This project, ''A New Paradigm for Automated Development Of Highly Reliable Control Architectures For Future Nuclear Plants,'' involves researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Tennessee, and North Carolina State University. This paper documents a research effort to develop methods for automated generation of control systems that can be traced directly to the design requirements. Our final goal is to allow the designer to specify only high-level requirements and stress factors that the control system must survive (e.g. a list of transients, or a requirement to withstand a single failure.) To this end, the ''control engine'' automatically selects and validates control algorithms and parameters that are optimized to the current state of the plant, and that have been tested under the prescribed stress factors. The control engine then automatically generates the control software from validated algorithms. Examples of stress factors that the control system must ''survive'' are: transient events (e.g., set-point changes, or expected occurrences such a load rejection,) and postulated

  4. 78 FR 12243 - Interim Final Determination To Stay and Defer Sanctions, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ...EPA is making an interim final determination to stay the imposition of offset sanctions and to defer the imposition of highway sanctions based on a proposed approval of a revision to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Feather River Air Quality Management District (FRAQMD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP) published elsewhere in this Federal Register. The SIP revision concerns two permitting rules submitted by the PCAPCD and FRAQMD, respectively: Rule 502, New Source Review, and Rule 10.1, New Source Review.

  5. Pumping requirements and options for molecular beam epitaxy and gas source molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCollum, M.J.; Plano, M.A.; Haase, M.A.; Robbins, V.M.; Jackson, S.L.; Cheng, K.Y.; Stillman, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of gas sources in growth by MBE as a result of current interest in growth of InP/InGaAsP/InGaAs lattice matched to InP. For gas flows greater than a few sccm, pumping speed requirements dictate the use of turbomolecular or diffusion pumps. GaAs samples with high p-type mobilities have been grown with diffusion pumped molecular beam epitaxial system. According to the authors, this demonstration of the inherent cleanliness of a properly designed diffusion pumping system indicates that a diffusion pump is an excellent inexpensive and reliable choice for growth by molecular beam epitaxy and gas source molecular beam epitaxy/chemical beam epitaxy

  6. Quantum Nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Droplet epitaxy is an alternative growth technique for several quantum nanostructures. Indium droplets are distributed randomly on GaAs substrates at low temperatures (120-350'C. Under background pressure of group V elements, Arsenic and Phosphorous, InAs and InP nanostructures are created. Quantum rings with isotropic shape are obtained at low temperature range. When the growth thickness is increased, quantum rings are transformed to quantum dot rings. At high temperature range, anisotropic strain gives rise to quantum rings with square holes and non-uniform ring stripe. Regrowth of quantum dots on these anisotropic quantum rings, Quadra-Quantum Dots (QQDs could be realized. Potential applications of these quantum nanostructures are also discussed.

  7. Final Test of the W7-X Control Coils Power Supply and its Integration into the Overall Control Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuellenbach, F.; Rummel, T.; Pingel, S.; Laqua, H.; Mueller, I.; Jauregi, E.

    2006-01-01

    In order to be able to vary the magnetic configuration of WENDELSTEIN 7-X (W7-X) at the plasma edge and allow sweeping of the power across the divertor target plates 10 '' control coils '' are installed inside the plasma vessel behind the baffle plates of the divertor. The coils are made of a hollow copper profile with eight turns each. The dimensions of the coils are 2,05 m x 0,35 m x 0,35 m with a three dimensional shape to fit into the narrow space between the baffles and the wall of the plasma vessel. Each of the ten coils is supplied by independent power supplies each providing bi-directionally a direct current of 2500 A with high accuracy and low ripple. To allow sweeping the power deposition from the plasma across the target plates the power supplies provide an alternating current of up to 625 A with frequencies up to 20 Hz which is synchronised between the ten supplies in order to maintain the symmetry of the magnetic field. The total output current of a power supply is a superposition of a direct current and an alternating current, where both parts have to be independently adjustable. JEMA, Spain provided the complete set of power supplies which are based on 10 independent four-quadrant power supplies with a link rectifier and includes a cooling water unit, a dedicated distribution and a central control and visualization system. All ten power supply units and auxiliary systems have meanwhile been installed and finally tested at the W7-X site in Greifswald. The paper focuses on the results of the final tests and measures to integrate the power supply system to the overall control system including the central PLC and PC's for experiment control, data acquisition- and security systems. (author)

  8. Growth Interruption Effect on the Fabrication of GaAs Concentric Multiple Rings by Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorov A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the molecular beam epitaxy fabrication and optical properties of complex GaAs nanostructures by droplet epitaxy: concentric triple quantum rings. A significant difference was found between the volumes of the original droplets and the final GaAs structures. By means of atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, we found that a thin GaAs quantum well-like layer is developed all over the substrate during the growth interruption times, caused by the migration of Ga in a low As background.

  9. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ruoyu

    The exponential growth of Si-based technology has finally reached its limit, and a new generation of devices must be developed to continue scaling. A unique class of materials, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), have attracted great attention due to their remarkable optical and electronic properties at the atomic thickness scale. Over the past decade, enormous efforts have been put into TMD research for application in low-power devices. Among these studies, a high-quality TMD synthesis method is essential. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) can enable high-quality TMD growth by combining high purity elemental sources and an ultra-high vacuum growth environment, together with the back-end-of-line compatible growth temperatures. Although many TMD candidates have been grown by MBE with promising microstructure, the limited grain size (improvement in grain size was achieved through this study. Results from both experiment and simulation showed that reducing the growth rate, enabled by high growth temperature and low metal flux, is vital to nucleation density control. Meanwhile, providing a chalcogen-rich growth environment will promote larger grain lateral growth by suppressing vertical growth. Applying the knowledge learned from the nucleation study, we sucessfully integrated the MBE-grown WSe2 into Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible field-effect transistors (FETs). Excellent transport properties, such as field effect hole mobilities (40 cm 2/V·s) with orders of magnitude improvement over the reported values of MBE-grown TMDs, are shown. These studies provide a comprehensive understanding of the MBE synthesis of TMDs and devices, indicating the great potential of integrating TMDs into CMOS process flows for the future electronics.

  10. Epitaxial growth of silicon for layer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplin, Charles; Branz, Howard M

    2015-03-24

    Methods of preparing a thin crystalline silicon film for transfer and devices utilizing a transferred crystalline silicon film are disclosed. The methods include preparing a silicon growth substrate which has an interface defining substance associated with an exterior surface. The methods further include depositing an epitaxial layer of silicon on the silicon growth substrate at the surface and separating the epitaxial layer from the substrate substantially along the plane or other surface defined by the interface defining substance. The epitaxial layer may be utilized as a thin film of crystalline silicon in any type of semiconductor device which requires a crystalline silicon layer. In use, the epitaxial transfer layer may be associated with a secondary substrate.

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy a short history

    CERN Document Server

    Orton, J W

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the development of molecular beam epitaxy from its origins in the 1960s through to the present day. It begins with a short historical account of other methods of crystal growth, both bulk and epitaxial, to set the subject in context, emphasising the wide range of semiconductor materials employed. This is followed by an introduction to molecular beams and their use in the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the development of the microwave MASER.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy basis sets for epitaxial (110) and (111) REFe2 nanofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G J; Martin, K N; Fox, A; Rainford, B D; Groot, P A J de

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic anisotropy basis sets for the cubic Laves phase rare earth intermetallic REFe 2 compounds are discussed in some detail. Such compounds can be either free standing, or thin films grown in either (110) or (111) mode using molecular beam epitaxy. For the latter, it is useful to rotate to a new coordinate system where the z-axis coincides with the growth axes of the film. In this paper, three symmetry adapted basis sets are given, for multi-pole moments up to n = 12. These sets can be used for free-standing compounds and for (110) and (111) epitaxial films. In addition, the distortion of REFe 2 films, grown on sapphire substrates, is also considered. The distortions are different for the (110) and (111) films. Strain-induced harmonic sets are given for both specific and general distortions. Finally, some predictions are made concerning the preferred direction of easy magnetization in (111) molecular beam epitaxy grown REFe 2 films

  13. ADVANCED BIOMASS REBURNING FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY NOx CONTROL AND BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES JOINT FINAL REPORT; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir M Zamansky; Mark S. Sheldon; Vitali V. Lissianski; Peter M. Maly; David K. Moyeda; Antonio Marquez; W. Randall Seeker

    2000-01-01

    This report presents results of studies under a Phase II SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and a closely coordinated project sponsored by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL, formerly FETC). The overall Phase II objective of the SBIR project is to experimentally optimize the biomass reburning technologies and conduct engineering design studies needed for process demonstration at full scale. The DOE project addresses supporting issues for the process design including modeling activities, economic studies of biomass handling, and experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling. The performance of biomass has been examined in a 300 kW (1 x 10(sup 6) Btu/hr) Boiler Simulator Facility under different experimental conditions. Fuels under investigation include furniture waste, willow wood and walnut shells. Tests showed that furniture pellets and walnut shells provided similar NO(sub x) control as that of natural gas in basic reburning at low heat inputs. Maximum NO(sub x) reduction achieved with walnut shell and furniture pellets was 65% and 58% respectively. Willow wood provided a maximum NO(sub x) reduction of 50% and was no better than natural gas at any condition tested. The efficiency of biomass increases when N-agent is injected into reburning and/or burnout zones, or along with OFA (Advanced Reburning). Co-injection of Na(sub 2)CO(sub 3) with N-agent further increases efficiency of NO(sub x) reduction. Maximum NO(sub x) reduction achieved with furniture pellets and willow wood in Advanced Reburning was 83% and 78% respectively. All combustion experiments of the Phase II project have been completed. All objectives of the experimental tasks were successfully met. The kinetic model of biomass reburning has been developed. Model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus correctly represents main features of the reburning process. Modeling suggests that the most important factors that provide

  14. Photoenhanced atomic layer epitaxy. Hikari reiki genshiso epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashita, M.; Kawakyu, Y. (Toshiba corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    The growth temperature range was greatly expanded of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) expected as the growth process of ultra-thin stacks. Ga layers and As layers were formed one after the other on a GaAs substrate in the atmosphere of trimethylgallium (TMG) or AsH{sub 2} supplied alternately, by KrF excimer laser irradiation normal to the substrate. As a result, the growth temperature range was 460-540{degree}C nearly 10 times that of 500 {plus minus} several degrees centigrade in conventional thermal growth method. Based on the experimental result where light absorption of source molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface was larger than that under gaseous phase condition, new adsorbed layer enhancement model was proposed to explain above irradiation effect verifying it by experiments. As this photoenhancement technique is applied to other materials, possible fabrication of new crystal structures as a super lattice with ultra-thin stacks of single atomic layers is expected because of a larger freedom in material combination for hetero-ALE. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Control of communicable disease; foreign--requirements for importers of nonhuman primates (NHP). Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), located within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is amending regulations for the importation of live nonhuman primates (NHPs) by extending existing requirements for the importation of Macaca fascicularis (cynomolgus), Chlorocebus aethiops (African green), and Macaca mulatta (rhesus) monkeys to all NHPs with the exception of the filovirus testing requirement. Filovirus testing will only be required for Old World NHPs in quarantine that have illness consistent with filovirus infection or that die for any reason other than trauma during quarantine. HHS/CDC is also finalizing a provision to reduce the frequency at which importers of cynomolgus, African green, and rhesus monkeys are required to renew their special permits (from every 180 days to every 2 years). HHS/CDC is incorporating existing guidelines into the regulations and adding new provisions to address the following: NHPs imported as part of an animal act; NHPs imported or transferred by zoological societies; the transfer of NHPs from approved laboratories; and non-live imported NHP products. Finally, HHS/CDC is also requiring that all NHPs be imported only through ports of entry where a HHS/CDC quarantine station is located.

  16. System composition and operation of exposure dose registration and control system (Final report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Since November, 1976, the committee concerning the investigation of exposure dose registration and control system for employees in nuclear industries has discussed on the exposure dose registration and control system, issued the interim report (outline) in April, 1977, and continued to investigate the details organizing the working group. Here, the final report is presented. It describes first on the definition of the terms used and the basic concept of the exposure dose registration and control system, in which the name of that organization is decided as ''Central Registration Office for Radiation Works'', Radiation Influence Association, the foundational juridical person. Next, the works to be performed in the Center and nuclear energy enterprises are explained. The items concerning the business management at the time of practical execution are the major part of the report, and are over 22 items. These include the registration business, the official reporting business, inquiry and answer business about career, change and revision, and computer processing system. As the temporary measures for transfer ring to the new system, 10 items are also provided. Supplementary explanation of 9 important items is given in the appendix. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Schedules of controlled substances: temporary placement of three synthetic cannabinoids into Schedule I. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    The Deputy Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is issuing this final order to temporarily schedule three synthetic cannabinoids under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) pursuant to the temporary scheduling provisions of 21 U.S.C. 811(h). The substances are (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (UR-144), [1-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (5-fluoro-UR-144, XLR11) and N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (APINACA, AKB48). This action is based on a finding by the Deputy Administrator that the placement of these synthetic cannabinoids and their salts, isomers and salts of isomers into Schedule I of the CSA is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety. As a result of this order, the full effect of the CSA and the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (CSIEA) and their implementing regulations including criminal, civil and administrative penalties, sanctions and regulatory controls of Schedule I substances will be imposed on the manufacture, distribution, possession, importation, and exportation of these synthetic cannabinoids.

  18. Spin transport in epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tbd, -

    2014-03-01

    Spintronics is a paradigm focusing on spin as the information vector in fast and ultra-low-power non volatile devices such as the new STT-MRAM. Beyond its widely distributed application in data storage it aims at providing more complex architectures and a powerful beyond CMOS solution for information processing. The recent discovery of graphene has opened novel exciting opportunities in terms of functionalities and performances for spintronics devices. We will present experimental results allowing us to assess the potential of graphene for spintronics. We will show that unprecedented highly efficient spin information transport can occur in epitaxial graphene leading to large spin signals and macroscopic spin diffusion lengths (~ 100 microns), a key enabler for the advent of envisioned beyond-CMOS spin-based logic architectures. We will also show that how the device behavior is well explained within the framework of the Valet-Fert drift-diffusion equations. Furthermore, we will show that a thin graphene passivation layer can prevent the oxidation of a ferromagnet, enabling its use in novel humide/ambient low-cost processes for spintronics devices, while keeping its highly surface sensitive spin current polarizer/analyzer behavior and adding new enhanced spin filtering property. These different experiments unveil promising uses of graphene for spintronics.

  19. Control of final moisture content of food products baked in continuous tunnel ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Ian

    2006-02-01

    There are well-known difficulties in making measurements of the moisture content of baked goods (such as bread, buns, biscuits, crackers and cake) during baking or at the oven exit; in this paper several sensing methods are discussed, but none of them are able to provide direct measurement with sufficient precision. An alternative is to use indirect inferential methods. Some of these methods involve dynamic modelling, with incorporation of thermal properties and using techniques familiar in computational fluid dynamics (CFD); a method of this class that has been used for the modelling of heat and mass transfer in one direction during baking is summarized, which may be extended to model transport of moisture within the product and also within the surrounding atmosphere. The concept of injecting heat during the baking process proportional to the calculated heat load on the oven has been implemented in a control scheme based on heat balance zone by zone through a continuous baking oven, taking advantage of the high latent heat of evaporation of water. Tests on biscuit production ovens are reported, with results that support a claim that the scheme gives more reproducible water distribution in the final product than conventional closed loop control of zone ambient temperatures, thus enabling water content to be held more closely within tolerance.

  20. Active vibration control testing of the SPICES program: final demonstration article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, James P.; Jacobs, Jack H.

    1996-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) Program is a partnership program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The mission of the program is to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products employing active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. The two year program came to fruition in 1995 through the fabrication of the final smart components and testing of an active plate combined with two trapezoidal rails, forming an active mount. Testing of the SPICES combined active mount took place at McDonnell Douglas facilities in St. Louis, MO, in October-December 1995. Approximately 15 dB reduction in overall response of a motor mounted on the active structure was achieved. Further details and results of the SPICES combined active mount demonstration testing are outlined. Results of numerous damping and control strategies that were developed and employed in the testing are presented, as well as aspects of the design and fabrication of the SPICES active mount components.

  1. Epitaxial growth of rhenium with sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seongshik [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States) and Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)]. E-mail: soh@boulder.nist.gov; Hite, Dustin A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Cicak, K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Osborn, Kevin D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Simmonds, Raymond W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); McDermott, Robert [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Cooper, Ken B. [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Steffen, Matthias [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Martinis, John M. [University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Pappas, David P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2006-02-21

    We have grown epitaxial Rhenium (Re) (0001) films on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrates using sputter deposition in an ultra high vacuum system. We find that better epitaxy is achieved with DC rather than with RF sputtering. With DC sputtering, epitaxy is obtained with the substrate temperatures above 700 deg. C and deposition rates below 0.1 nm/s. The epitaxial Re films are typically composed of terraced hexagonal islands with screw dislocations, and island size gets larger with high temperature post-deposition annealing. The growth starts in a three dimensional mode but transforms into two dimensional mode as the film gets thicker. With a thin ({approx}2 nm) seed layer deposited at room temperature and annealed at a high temperature, the initial three dimensional growth can be suppressed. This results in larger islands when a thick film is grown at 850 deg. C on the seed layer. We also find that when a room temperature deposited Re film is annealed to higher temperatures, epitaxial features start to show up above {approx}600 deg. C, but the film tends to be disordered.

  2. Quasi van der Waals epitaxy of copper thin film on single-crystal graphene monolayer buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Sun, Xin; Washington, Morris A.; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2018-03-01

    Quasi van der Waals epitaxial growth of face-centered cubic Cu (~100 nm) thin films on single-crystal monolayer graphene is demonstrated using thermal evaporation at an elevated substrate temperature of 250 °C. The single-crystal graphene was transferred to amorphous (glass) and crystalline (quartz) SiO2 substrates for epitaxy study. Raman analysis showed that the thermal evaporation method had minimal damage to the graphene lattice during the Cu deposition. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction analyses revealed that both Cu films are single-crystal with (1 1 1) out-of-plane orientation and in-plane Σ3 twin domains of 60° rotation. The crystallinity of the SiO2 substrates has a negligible effect on the Cu crystal orientation during the epitaxial growth, implying the strong screening effect of graphene. We also demonstrate the epitaxial growth of polycrystalline Cu on a commercial polycrystalline monolayer graphene consisting of two orientation domains offset 30° to each other. It confirms that the crystal orientation of the epitaxial Cu film follows that of graphene, i.e. the Cu film consists of two orientation domains offset 30° to each other when deposited on polycrystalline graphene. Finally, on the contrary to the report in the literature, we show that the direct current and radio frequency flip sputtering method causes significant damage to the graphene lattice during the Cu deposition process, and therefore neither is a suitable method for Cu epitaxial growth on graphene.

  3. Preliminary design for hot dirty-gas control-valve test facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary design and cost estimating effort for a facility for the testing of control valves in Hot Dirty Gas (HDGCV) service. This design was performed by Mittelhauser Corporation for the United States Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The objective of this effort was to provide METC with a feasible preliminary design for a test facility which could be used to evaluate valve designs under simulated service conditions and provide a technology data base for DOE and industry. In addition to the actual preliminary design of the test facility, final design/construction/operating schedules and a facility cost estimate were prepared to provide METC sufficient information with which to evaluate this design. The bases, assumptions, and limitations of this study effort are given. The tasks carried out were as follows: METC Facility Review, Environmental Control Study, Gas Generation Study, Metallurgy Review, Safety Review, Facility Process Design, Facility Conceptual Layout, Instrumentation Design, Cost Estimates, and Schedules. The report provides information regarding the methods of approach used in the various tasks involved in the completion of this study. Section 5.0 of this report presents the results of the study effort. The results obtained from the above-defined tasks are described briefly. The turnkey cost of the test facility is estimated to be $9,774,700 in fourth quarter 1979 dollars, and the annual operating cost is estimated to be $960,000 plus utilities costs which are not included because unit costs per utility were not available from METC.

  4. Integration and control of wind farms in the Danish electricity system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak-Jensen, B. (ed.); Suwannarat, A.; Chen, Z. (Aalborg Univ.. Dept. of Energy Technology, Aalborg (Denmark)) (and others)

    2009-07-01

    due to too high wind speed. First simulations, where only the central power plants and the decentralized combined heat and power plants participate in the balancing is performed, then the simulations are extended with the usage of the Great Belt Link and the links to Norway and Sweden, and finally also the usage of delta control in the wind farm and the ability to include planned power for the power plants is used. .From these simulations one can see the importance of using planned power, different control methods for the wind farms and being able to use the connections to our neighboring countries. It is found that this is decisive for the balancing situation in Denmark, and for the possibility to cope with large wind power penetration in the future. (LN)

  5. Concentric Multiple Rings by Droplet Epitaxy: Fabrication and Study of the Morphological Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaschini C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the Molecular Beam Epitaxy fabrication of complex GaAs/AlGaAs nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy, characterized by the presence of concentric multiple rings. We propose an innovative experimental procedure that allows the fabrication of individual portions of the structure, controlling their diameter by only changing the substrate temperature. The obtained nanocrystals show a significant anisotropy between [110] and [1–10] crystallographic directions, which can be ascribed to different activation energies for the Ga atoms migration processes.

  6. Epitaxial thin film growth and properties of unconventional oxide superconductors. Cuprates and cobaltates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krockenberger, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductors has strongly driven the development of suited thin film fabrication methods of complex oxides. One way is the adaptation of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for the growth of oxide materials. Another approach is the use of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) which has the advantage of good stoichiometry transfer from target to the substrate. Both techniques are used within this thesis. Epitaxial thin films of new materials are of course needed for future applications. In addition, the controlled synthesis of thin film matter which can be formed far away from thermal equilibrium allows for the investigation of fundamental physical materials properties. (orig.)

  7. Epitaxial thin film growth and properties of unconventional oxide superconductors. Cuprates and cobaltates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krockenberger, Y.

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductors has strongly driven the development of suited thin film fabrication methods of complex oxides. One way is the adaptation of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for the growth of oxide materials. Another approach is the use of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) which has the advantage of good stoichiometry transfer from target to the substrate. Both techniques are used within this thesis. Epitaxial thin films of new materials are of course needed for future applications. In addition, the controlled synthesis of thin film matter which can be formed far away from thermal equilibrium allows for the investigation of fundamental physical materials properties. (orig.)

  8. Classification of two steroids, prostanozol and methasterone, as Schedule III anabolic steroids under the Controlled Substance Act. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    With the issuance of this Final Rule, the Administrator of the DEA classifies the following two steroids as "anabolic steroids'' under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA): prostanozol (17[beta]-hydroxy-5[alpha]-androstano[3,2-c]pyrazole) and methasterone (2[alpha],17[alpha]-dimethyl-5[alpha]-androstan-17[beta]-ol-3-one). These steroids and their salts, esters, and ethers are Schedule III controlled substances subject to the regulatory control provisions of the CSA.

  9. SisterTalk: final results of a culturally tailored cable television delivered weight control program for Black women

    OpenAIRE

    Risica, Patricia Markham; Gans, Kim M; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Kirtania, Usree; Lasater, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity among Black women continues to exceed that of other women. Most weight loss programs created without reference to specific cultural contexts are less effective for Black than White women. Weight control approaches accessible to Black women and adapted to relevant cultural contexts are important for addressing this problem. This paper reports the final results of SisterTalk, the randomized controlled trial of a cable TV weight control program oriented toward Black women. Met...

  10. The effects of practice on movement distance and final position reproduction: implications for the equilibrium-point control of movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaric, S; Corcos, D M; Gottlieb, G L; Ilic, D B; Latash, M L

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of two views on single-joint motor control, namely programming of muscle force patterns and equilibrium-point control, were compared with the results of experiments with reproduction of movement distance and final location during fast unidirectional elbow flexions. Two groups of subjects were tested. The first group practiced movements over a fixed distance (36 degrees), starting from seven different initial positions (distance group, DG). The second group practiced movements from the same seven initial positions to a fixed final location (location group, LG). Later, all the subjects were tested at the practiced task with their eyes closed, and then, unexpectedly for the subjects, they were tested at the other, unpracticed task. In both groups, the task to reproduce final position had lower indices of final position variability than the task to reproduce movement distance. Analysis of the linear regression lines between initial position and final position (or movement distance) also demonstrated a better (more accurate) performance during final position reproduction than during distance reproduction. The data are in a good correspondence with the predictions of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, but not with the predictions of the force-pattern control approach.

  11. Electrode interface controlled electrical properties in epitaxial Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} films grown on Si substrates with SrTiO{sub 3} buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boni, Andra Georgia, E-mail: andra.boni@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, Magurele, Ilfov 77125 (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, Magurele 077125 (Romania); Chirila, Cristina; Pasuk, Iuliana; Negrea, Raluca; Trupina, Lucian [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, Magurele, Ilfov 77125 (Romania); Le Rhun, Gwenael [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Vilquin, Bertrand [Université de Lyon, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, INL, CNRS UMR5270, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, F-69134 Ecully cedex (France); Pintilie, Ioana; Pintilie, Lucian [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, Magurele, Ilfov 77125 (Romania)

    2015-10-30

    Electrical properties of ferroelectric capacitors based on PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on silicon substrate with SrTiO{sub 3} buffer layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy were studied. A SrRuO{sub 3} layer was deposited as bottom electrode also by pulse laser deposition and Pt, Ir, Ru, SrRuO{sub 3} were used as top contacts. Electrical characterization comprised hysteresis and capacitance–voltage measurements in the temperature range from 150 K to 400 K. It was found that the macroscopic electrical properties are affected by the electrode interface, by the choice of the top electrode. However, even for metals with very different work functions (e.g. Pt and SrRuO{sub 3}) the properties of the top and bottom electrode interfaces remain fairly symmetric suggesting a strong influence from the bound polarization charges located near the interface. - Highlights: • Ferroelectric capacitors based on PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3} were deposited on Si substrate. • The structural characterization proved the epitaxial growth of the layers. • Macroscopic electrical properties are affected by the choice of the top electrode. • The difference on imprint field, dielectric constant are analyzed depending on the electrode-ferroelectric interface.

  12. Epitaxial silicon semiconductor detectors, past developments, future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the main physical characteristics of epitaxial silicon as it relates to detector development is presented. As examples of applications results are presented on (1) epitaxial silicon avalanche diodes (ESAD); signal-to-noise, non-linear aspects of the avalanche gain mechanism, gain-bandwidth product, (2) ultrathin epitaxial silicon surface barrier (ESSB) detectors, response to heavy ions, (3) an all-epitaxial silicon diode (ESD), response to heavy ions, charge transport and charge defect. Future prospects of epitaxial silicon as it relates to new detector designs are summarized

  13. Surface control alloy substrates and methods of manufacture therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Mendon, MA); Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Rupich, Martin W. (Framingham, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA); Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans (Westborough, MA); Annavarapu, Suresh (Brookline, MA); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-05-04

    Methods and articles for controlling the surface of an alloy substrate for deposition of an epitaxial layer. The invention includes the use of an intermediate layer to stabilize the substrate surface against oxidation for subsequent deposition of an epitaxial layer.

  14. Nanoselective area growth of GaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on 4H-SiC using epitaxial graphene as a mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puybaret, Renaud; Jordan, Matthew B.; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah; Patriarche, Gilles; Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef; Salvestrini, Jean-Paul; Heer, Walt A. de; Berger, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We report the growth of high-quality triangular GaN nanomesas, 30-nm thick, on the C-face of 4H-SiC using nanoselective area growth (NSAG) with patterned epitaxial graphene grown on SiC as an embedded mask. NSAG alleviates the problems of defects in heteroepitaxy, and the high mobility graphene film could readily provide the back low-dissipative electrode in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. A 5–8 graphene-layer film is first grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by confinement-controlled sublimation of silicon carbide. Graphene is then patterned and arrays of 75-nm-wide openings are etched in graphene revealing the SiC substrate. A 30-nm-thick GaN is subsequently grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. GaN nanomesas grow epitaxially with perfect selectivity on SiC, in the openings patterned through graphene. The up-or-down orientation of the mesas on SiC, their triangular faceting, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that they are biphasic. The core is a zinc blende monocrystal surrounded with single-crystal wurtzite. The GaN crystalline nanomesas have no threading dislocations or V-pits. This NSAG process potentially leads to integration of high-quality III-nitrides on the wafer scalable epitaxial graphene/silicon carbide platform.

  15. Nanoselective area growth of GaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on 4H-SiC using epitaxial graphene as a mask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puybaret, Renaud; Jordan, Matthew B.; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah, E-mail: aougazza@georgiatech-metz.fr [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); CNRS UMI 2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Patriarche, Gilles [CNRS, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef [CNRS UMI 2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean-Paul [Université de Lorraine, CentraleSupélec, LMOPS, EA4423, 57070 Metz (France); Heer, Walt A. de [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Berger, Claire [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); CNRS, Institut Néel, BP166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-03-07

    We report the growth of high-quality triangular GaN nanomesas, 30-nm thick, on the C-face of 4H-SiC using nanoselective area growth (NSAG) with patterned epitaxial graphene grown on SiC as an embedded mask. NSAG alleviates the problems of defects in heteroepitaxy, and the high mobility graphene film could readily provide the back low-dissipative electrode in GaN-based optoelectronic devices. A 5–8 graphene-layer film is first grown on the C-face of 4H-SiC by confinement-controlled sublimation of silicon carbide. Graphene is then patterned and arrays of 75-nm-wide openings are etched in graphene revealing the SiC substrate. A 30-nm-thick GaN is subsequently grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. GaN nanomesas grow epitaxially with perfect selectivity on SiC, in the openings patterned through graphene. The up-or-down orientation of the mesas on SiC, their triangular faceting, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy show that they are biphasic. The core is a zinc blende monocrystal surrounded with single-crystal wurtzite. The GaN crystalline nanomesas have no threading dislocations or V-pits. This NSAG process potentially leads to integration of high-quality III-nitrides on the wafer scalable epitaxial graphene/silicon carbide platform.

  16. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unknown

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report

  17. Epitaxial Graphene: A New Material for Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A.

    2007-10-01

    Graphene multilayers are grown epitaxially on single crystal silicon carbide. This system is composed of several graphene layers of which the first layer is electron doped due to the built-in electric field and the other layers are essentially undoped. Unlike graphite the charge carriers show Dirac particle properties (i.e. an anomalous Berry's phase, weak anti-localization and square root field dependence of the Landau level energies). Epitaxial graphene shows quasi-ballistic transport and long coherence lengths; properties that may persists above cryogenic temperatures. Paradoxically, in contrast to exfoliated graphene, the quantum Hall effect is not observed in high mobility epitaxial graphene. It appears that the effect is suppressed due to absence of localized states in the bulk of the material. Epitaxial graphene can be patterned using standard lithography methods and characterized using a wide array of techniques. These favorable features indicate that interconnected room temperature ballistic devices may be feasible for low dissipation high-speed nano-electronics.

  18. Deposition of O atomic layers on Si(100) substrates for epitaxial Si-O superlattices: investigation of the surface chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayachandran, Suseendran, E-mail: suseendran.jayachandran@imec.be [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Castle Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Delabie, Annelies; Billen, Arne [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200F, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Dekkers, Harold; Douhard, Bastien; Conard, Thierry; Meersschaut, Johan; Caymax, Matty [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandervorst, Wilfried [KU Leuven, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Heyns, Marc [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Castle Arenberg 44, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Atomic layer is deposited by O{sub 3} chemisorption reaction on H-terminated Si(100). • O-content has critical impact on the epitaxial thickness of the above-deposited Si. • Oxygen atoms at dimer/back bond configurations enable epitaxial Si on O atomic layer. • Oxygen atoms at hydroxyl and more back bonds, disable epitaxial Si on O atomic layer. - Abstract: Epitaxial Si-O superlattices consist of alternating periods of crystalline Si layers and atomic layers of oxygen (O) with interesting electronic and optical properties. To understand the fundamentals of Si epitaxy on O atomic layers, we investigate the O surface species that can allow epitaxial Si chemical vapor deposition using silane. The surface reaction of ozone on H-terminated Si(100) is used for the O deposition. The oxygen content is controlled precisely at and near the atomic layer level and has a critical impact on the subsequent Si deposition. There exists only a small window of O-contents, i.e. 0.7–0.9 atomic layers, for which the epitaxial deposition of Si can be realized. At these low O-contents, the O atoms are incorporated in the Si-Si dimers or back bonds (-OSiH), with the surface Si atoms mainly in the 1+ oxidation state, as indicated by infrared spectroscopy. This surface enables epitaxial seeding of Si. For O-contents higher than one atomic layer, the additional O atoms are incorporated in the Si-Si back bonds as well as in the Si-H bonds, where hydroxyl groups (-Si-OH) are created. In this case, the Si deposition thereon becomes completely amorphous.

  19. Zirconia thin films from aqueous precursors: Processing, microstructural development, and epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.T.

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of ZrO 2 (Y 2 O 3 ) were prepared from aqueous salt precursors by spin coating. Films were pyrolyzed to produce porous polycrystalline thin films of 5-10 nm grain size. Subsequent microstructural development depends greatly upon the nature of the substrate. Upon randomly oriented sapphire, the films initially sintered to full density; further heat treatment and grain growth causes these films to break into interconnected islands and finally isolated particles. Thermodynamic calculations predict that breakup is energetically favorable when the grain-size film-thickness ratio exceeds a critical value. Upon basal-plane-oriented sapphire, grain growth and breakup prefer the (100) oriented grains, presumably because this orientation is a special interface of low energy. The isolated, oriented grains produced by film breakup act as seeds for the growth of newly deposited material. Upon (100) cubic zirconia, true epitaxial films develop. Epitaxial growth was observed for lattice mismatches up to 1.59%. Growth proceeds from a fine epitaxial layer which is produced during the initial stages of heat treatment, consuming the porous polycrystalline material and producing a dense epitaxial thin film whose misfit is accommodated by a combination of film strain and misfit dislocations

  20. Effects of Interfaces on the Structure and Novel Physical Properties in Epitaxial Multiferroic BiFeO3 Ultrathin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanwei Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In functional oxide films, different electrical/mechanical boundaries near film surfaces induce rich phase diagrams and exotic phenomena. In this paper, we review some key points which underpin structure, phase transition and related properties in BiFeO3 ultrathin films. Compared with the bulk counterparts, we survey the recent results of epitaxial BiFeO3 ultrathin films to illustrate how the atomic structure and phase are markedly influenced by the interface between the film and the substrate, and to emphasize the roles of misfit strain and depolarization field on determining the domain patterns, phase transformation and associated physical properties of BiFeO3 ultrathin films, such as polarization, piezoelectricity, and magnetism. One of the obvious consequences of the misfit strain on BiFeO3 ultrathin films is the emergence of a sequence of phase transition from tetragonal to mixed tetragonal & rhombohedral, the rhombohedral, mixed rhombohedral & orthorhombic, and finally orthorhombic phases. Other striking features of this system are the stable domain patterns and the crossover of 71° and 109° domains with different electrical boundary conditions on the film surface, which can be controlled and manipulated through the depolarization field. The external field-sensitive enhancements of properties for BiFeO3 ultrathin films, including the polarization, magnetism and morphotropic phase boundary-relevant piezoelectric response, offer us deeper insights into the investigations of the emergent properties and phenomena of epitaxial ultrathin films under various mechanical/electrical constraints. Finally, we briefly summarize the recent progress and list open questions for future study on BiFeO3 ultrathin films.

  1. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westervelt, Robert; Klein, William; Kroupa, Michael; Olsson, Eric; Rothrock, Rick

    1999-01-01

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms

  2. Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This is the final report of National Black Health Providers Task Force (NBHPTF) on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The first chapter of the report recounts the history of the NBHPTF and its objectives. In the second chapter epidemiological evidence is presented to demonstrate the need for a suggested 20 year plan aimed at controlling…

  3. Wafer-scale controlled exfoliation of metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown InGaN/GaN multi quantum well structures using low-tack two-dimensional layered h-BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayari, Taha; Li, Xin; Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah, E-mail: aougazza@georgiatech-metz.fr [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Sundaram, Suresh; El Gmili, Youssef [Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean Paul [Georgia Tech Lorraine, UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Université de Lorraine, LMOPS, EA 4423, 57070 Metz (France)

    2016-04-25

    Recent advances in epitaxial growth have led to the growth of III-nitride devices on 2D layered h-BN. This advance has the potential for wafer-scale transfer to arbitrary substrates, which could improve the thermal management and would allow III-N devices to be used more flexibly in a broader range of applications. We report wafer scale exfoliation of a metal organic vapor phase epitaxy grown InGaN/GaN Multi Quantum Well (MQW) structure from a 5 nm thick h-BN layer that was grown on a 2-inch sapphire substrate. The weak van der Waals bonds between h-BN atomic layers break easily, allowing the MQW structure to be mechanically lifted off from the sapphire substrate using a commercial adhesive tape. This results in the surface roughness of only 1.14 nm on the separated surface. Structural characterizations performed before and after the lift-off confirm the conservation of structural properties after lift-off. Cathodoluminescence at 454 nm was present before lift-off and 458 nm was present after. Electroluminescence near 450 nm from the lifted-off structure has also been observed. These results show that the high crystalline quality ultrathin h-BN serves as an effective sacrificial layer—it maintains performance, while also reducing the GaN buffer thickness and temperature ramps as compared to a conventional two-step growth method. These results support the use of h-BN as a low-tack sacrificial underlying layer for GaN-based device structures and demonstrate the feasibility of large area lift-off and transfer to any template, which is important for industrial scale production.

  4. Boron, arsenic and phosphorus dopant incorporation during low temperature low pressure silicon epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borland, J.O.; Thompson, T.; Tagle, V.; Benzing, W.

    1987-01-01

    Submicron silicon epitaxial structures with very abrupt epi/substrate transition widths have been realized through the use of low temperature silicon epitaxial growth techniques. At these low temperature and low pressure epitaxial growth conditions there is minimal, if any, dopant diffusion from the substrate into the epilayer during deposition. The reincorporation of autodoped dopant as well as the incorporation of intentional dopant can be a trade-off at low temperatures and low pressures. For advanced CMOS and Bi-CMOS technologies, five to six orders of magnitude change in concentration levels are desirable. In this investigation, all of the epitaxial depositions were carried out in an AMC-7810 epi-reactor with standard jets for a turbulent mixing system, and using a modified center inject configuration to achieve a single pass laminar flow system. To simulate the reincorporation of various autodoped dopant, the authors ran a controlled dopant flow of 100 sccm for each of the three dopants (boron, phosphorus and arsenic) to achieve the controlled background dopant level in the reactor gas stream

  5. New synthesis method for the growth of epitaxial graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, X.Z. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Laboratory of Condensed Matter Spectroscopy and Opto-Electronic Physics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Hwang, C.G.; Jozwiak, C.M.; Koehl, A. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmid, A.K. [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Lanzara, A., E-mail: ALanzara@lbl.gov [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} We report a new straightforward method for the synthesis of micrometer scale graphene sheets. {yields} The process is based on a face to face mehtod in which two SiC substrates are placed one on top of the other and are heated simultaneously, leading to highly homogeneous samples. {yields} The number of graphene layers is determined by the annealing temperature. - Abstract: As a viable candidate for an all-carbon post-CMOS electronics revolution, epitaxial graphene has attracted significant attention. To realize its application potential, reliable methods for fabricating large-area single-crystalline graphene domains are required. A new way to synthesize high quality epitaxial graphene, namely 'face-to-face' method, has been reported in this paper. The structure and morphologies of the samples are characterized by low-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The grown samples show better quality and larger length scales than samples grown through conventional thermal desorption. Moreover, the graphene thickness can be easily controlled by changing annealing temperature.

  6. Fusion reactor control study. Volume 3. Tandem mirror reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, F.R.; DeCanio, F.; Fisher, J.L.; Madden, P.A.

    1982-03-01

    A study of the control requirements of the Tandem Mirror Reactor concept is reported. The study describes the development of a control simulator that is based upon a spatially averaged physics code of the reactor concept. The simulator portrays the evolution of the plasma through the complete reactor operating cycle; it includes models of the control and measurement system, thus allowing the exploration of various strategies for reactor control. Startup, shutdown, and control during the quasi-steady-state power producing phase were explored. Configurations are described which use a variety of control effectors including modulation of the refueling rate, beam current, and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Multivariable design techniques were used to design the control laws and compensators for the feedback controllers and presume the practical measurement of only a subset of the plasma and machine variables. Performance of the various controllers is explored using the nonlinear control simulator. Derivative control strategies using new or developed sensors and effectors appropriate to a power reactor environment are postulated, based upon the results of the control configurations tested. Research and development requirements for these controls are delineated

  7. Study of the application of advanced control systems to fusion experiments and reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-05-01

    The work accomplished to date toward the formulation of an advanced control system concept for large-scale magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion devices is summarized. The work was concentrated in three major areas: (1) general control studies and identification of control issues, (2) exploration of possible direct interactions with AEC National Laboratories, and (3) identification of simulation requirements to support control studies. (U.S.)

  8. 75 FR 37453 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Dimmer and Fan Speed Switch Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... Determination Concerning Dimmer and Fan Speed Switch Controls AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... country of origin of certain dimmer and fan speed switch controls which may be offered to the United... determination CBP concluded that Mexico is the country of origin of the dimmer and fan speed switch controls for...

  9. Integrated environmental control and monitoring in the intelligent workplace. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project involved the design and engineering of the control and monitoring of environmental quality - visual, thermal, air - in the Intelligent Workplace. The research objectives were to study the performance of the individual systems, to study the integration issues related to each system, to develop a control plan, and to implement and test the integrated systems in a real setting. In this project, a control strategy with related algorithms for distributed sensors, actuators, and controllers for negotiating central and individual control of HVAC, lighting, and enclosure was developed in order to maximize user comfort, and energy and environmental effectiveness. The goal of the control system design in the Intelligent Workplace is the integration of building systems for optimization of occupant satisfaction, organizational flexibility, energy efficiency and environmental effectiveness. The task of designing this control system involves not only the research, development and demonstration of state-of-the-art mechanical and electrical systems, but also their integration. The ABSIC research team developed functional requirements for the environmental systems considering the needs of both facility manager and the user. There are three levels of control for the environmental systems: scheduled control, sensor control, and user control. The challenges are to achieve the highest possible levels of energy effectiveness simultaneously with the highest levels of user satisfaction. The report describes the components of each system, their implementation in the Intelligent Workplace and related control and monitoring issues.

  10. Cost-effective control systems for solar heating and cooling applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejsa, J. H.; Bassett, W. W.; Wenzler, S. A.; Nguyen, K. H.; Olson, T. J.

    1978-09-01

    A methodology has been defined to arrive at control recommendations for a variety of climate control system designs, applications and regions, and the results are presented in two parts. Part I consists of a literature and market-place survey, involving control strategies, functions, sensors, actuators, and the controllers themselves. Part II represents the bulk of the study effort - an attempt to simulate and evaluate system performance for several representative residential and commercial heating and cooling designs and thus to derive improved performance techniques within cost-effective control systems. (MHR)

  11. Human factors methods for nuclear control room design. Volume I. Human factors enhancement of existing nuclear control rooms. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Seidenstein, S.; Eckert, S.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1979-11-01

    Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary specialty concerned with influencing the design of equipment systems, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable operator performance. Human factors approaches were applied in the design of representative nuclear power plant control panels. First, methods for upgrading existing operational control panels were examined. Then, based on detailed human factors analyses of operator information and control requirements, designs of reactor, feedwater, and turbine-generator control panels were developed to improve the operator-control board interface, thereby reducing the potential for operator errors. In addition to examining present-generation concepts, human factors aspects of advanced systems and of hybrid combinations of advanced and conventional designs were investigated. Special attention was given to warning system designs. Also, a survey was conducted among control board designers to (1) develop an overview of design practices in the industry, and (2) establish appropriate measures leading to a more systematic concern for human factors in control board design

  12. Ion Beam Assisted Deposition of Thin Epitaxial GaN Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, Bernd; Lotnyk, Andriy; Neumann, Lena; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W

    2017-06-23

    The assistance of thin film deposition with low-energy ion bombardment influences their final properties significantly. Especially, the application of so-called hyperthermal ions (energy GaN thin films on (0001)-oriented 6H-SiC substrates at 700 °C. The films are studied in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction, ex situ by X-ray diffraction, scanning tunnelling microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that the film growth mode can be controlled by varying the ion to atom ratio, where 2D films are characterized by a smooth topography, a high crystalline quality, low biaxial stress, and low defect density. Typical structural defects in the GaN thin films were identified as basal plane stacking faults, low-angle grain boundaries forming between w-GaN and z-GaN and twin boundaries. The misfit strain between the GaN thin films and substrates is relieved by the generation of edge dislocations in the first and second monolayers of GaN thin films and of misfit interfacial dislocations. It can be demonstrated that the low-energy nitrogen ion assisted molecular beam epitaxy is a technique to produce thin GaN films of high crystalline quality.

  13. Implementation considerations for digital control systems in power plants: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.C.; Lehman, L.L.; Sarchet, M.M.

    1988-09-01

    Conversion of nuclear power plants fron analog to digital control systems will require careful design, testing, and integration of the control algorithms, the software which implements the algorithms, the digital instrumentation, the digital communications network, and analog/digital device interfaces. Digital control systems are more flexible than their analog counterparts, and therefore greater attention must be paid by the customer to all stages of the control system design process. This flexibility also provides the framework for development of significant safety and reliability are inherant aspects of the chosen design processes. Digital control algorithms are capable of improving their performance by on-line self-tuning of the control parameters. It is therefore incumbant on system designers to choose self-tuning algorithms for power plant control. Implementation of these algorithms in software required a careful software design and development process to minimize errors in interpretation of the engineering design and prevent the inclusion of programming errors during software production. Digital control system and communications software must exhibit sufficient ''fault tolerance'' to maintain some level of safe plant operation or execute a safe plant shutdown in the event of both hard equipment failures and the appearance of software design faults. A number of standardized digital communications protocols are available to designers of digital control systems. These standardized digital communications protocols provide reliable fault tolerant communication between all digital elements of the plant control system and can be implemented redundantly to further enhance power plant operational safety. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  14. Development of a modular integrated control architecture for flexible manipulators. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; Battiston, G.

    1994-01-01

    In April 1994, ORNL and SPAR completed the joint development of a manipulator controls architecture for flexible structure controls under a CRADA between the two organizations. The CRADA project entailed design and development of a new architecture based upon the Modular Integrated Control Architecture (MICA) previously developed by ORNL. The new architecture, dubbed MICA-II, uses an object-oriented coding philosophy to provide a highly modular and expandable architecture for robotic manipulator control. This architecture can be readily ported to control of many different manipulator systems. The controller also provides a user friendly graphical operator interface and display of many forms of data including system diagnostics. The capabilities of MICA-II were demonstrated during oscillation damping experiments using the Flexible Beam Experimental Test Bed at Hanford

  15. Junction Transport in Epitaxial Film Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D. L.; Li, J. V.; Teplin, C. W.; Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.

    2011-07-01

    We report our progress toward low-temperature HWCVD epitaxial film silicon solar cells on inexpensive seed layers, with a focus on the junction transport physics exhibited by our devices. Heterojunctions of i/p hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si) on our n-type epitaxial crystal Si on n++ Si wafers show space-charge-region recombination, tunneling or diffusive transport depending on both epitaxial Si quality and the applied forward voltage.

  16. Magnetization reversal of in-plane uniaxial Co films and its dependence on epitaxial alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idigoras, O., E-mail: o.idigoras@nanogune.eu; Suszka, A. K.; Berger, A. [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, E-20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Vavassori, P. [CIC nanoGUNE Consolider, Tolosa Hiribidea 76, E-20018 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, The Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain); Obry, B.; Hillebrands, B. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungzentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße 56, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Landeros, P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, 2390123 Valparaíso (Chile)

    2014-02-28

    This work studies the influence of crystallographic alignment onto magnetization reversal in partially epitaxial Co films. A reproducible growth sequence was devised that allows for the continuous tuning of grain orientation disorder in Co films with uniaxial in-plane anisotropy by the controlled partial suppression of epitaxy. While all stable or meta-stable magnetization states occurring during a magnetic field cycle exhibit a uniform magnetization for fully epitaxial samples, non-uniform states appear for samples with sufficiently high grain orientation disorder. Simultaneously with the occurrence of stable domain states during the magnetization reversal, we observe a qualitative change of the applied field angle dependence of the coercive field. Upon increasing the grain orientation disorder, we observe a disappearance of transient domain wall propagation as the dominating reversal process, which is characterized by an increase of the coercive field for applied field angles away from the easy axis for well-ordered epitaxial samples. Upon reaching a certain disorder threshold level, we also find an anomalous magnetization reversal, which is characterized by a non-monotonic behavior of the remanent magnetization and coercive field as a function of the applied field angle in the vicinity of the nominal hard axis. This anomaly is a collective reversal mode that is caused by disorder-induced frustration and it can be qualitatively and even quantitatively explained by means of a two Stoner-Wohlfarth particle model. Its predictions are furthermore corroborated by Kerr microscopy and by Brillouin light scattering measurements.

  17. Powder free PECVD epitaxial silicon by plasma pulsing or increasing the growth temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Vanel, Jean-Charles; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.

    2018-06-01

    Crystalline silicon thin films are promising candidates for low cost and flexible photovoltaics. Among various synthesis techniques, epitaxial growth via low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is an interesting choice because of two low temperature related benefits: low thermal budget and better doping profile control. However, increasing the growth rate is a tricky issue because the agglomeration of clusters required for epitaxy leads to powder formation in the plasma. In this work, we have measured precisely the time evolution of the self-bias voltage in silane/hydrogen plasmas at millisecond time scale, for different values of the direct-current bias voltage applied to the radio frequency (RF) electrode and growth temperatures. We demonstrate that the decisive factor to increase the epitaxial growth rate, i.e. the inhibition of the agglomeration of plasma-born clusters, can be obtained by decreasing the RF OFF time or increasing the growth temperature. The influence of these two parameters on the growth rate and epitaxial film quality is also presented.

  18. The origin of local strain in highly epitaxial oxide thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunrui; Liu, Ming; Chen, Chonglin; Lin, Yuan; Li, Yanrong; Horwitz, J S; Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, E I; Zhang, Qingyu

    2013-10-31

    The ability to control the microstructures and physical properties of hetero-epitaxial functional oxide thin films and artificial structures is a long-sought goal in functional materials research. Normally, only the lattice misfit between the film and the substrate is considered to govern the physical properties of the epitaxial films. In fact, the mismatch of film unit cell arrangement and the Surface-Step-Terrace (SST) dimension of the substrate, named as "SST residual matching", is another key factor that significantly influence the properties of the epitaxial film. The nature of strong local strain induced from both lattice mismatch and the SST residual matching on ferroelectric (Ba,Sr)TiO3 and ferromagnetic (La,Ca)MnO3 thin films are systematically investigated and it is demonstrated that this combined effect has a dramatic impact on the physical properties of highly epitaxial oxide thin films. A giant anomalous magnetoresistance effect (~10(10)) was achieved from the as-designed vicinal surfaces.

  19. Ion beam deposited epitaxial thin silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orrman-Rossiter, K.G.; Al-Bayati, A.H.; Armour, D.G.; Donnelly, S.E.; Berg, J.A. van den

    1991-01-01

    Deposition of thin films using low energy, mass-separated ion beams is a potentially important low temperature method of producing epitaxial layers. In these experiments silicon films were grown on Si (001) substrates using 10-200 eV 28 Si + and 30 Si + ions at substrate temperatures in the range 273-1073 K, under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions (deposition pressure -7 Pa). The film crystallinity was assessed in situ using medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). Films of crystallinity comparable to bulk samples were grown using 10-40 eV 28 Si + and 30 Si + ions at deposition temperatures in the range 623-823 K. These experiments confirmed the role of key experimental parameters such as ion energy, substrate temperature during deposition, and the surface treatment prior to deposition. It was found that a high temperature in situ anneal (1350-1450 K) gave the best results for epitaxial nucleation, whereas low energy (20-40 eV) Cl + ion bombardment resulted in amorphous film growth. The deposition energy for good epitaxial growth indicates that it is necessary to provide enough energy to induce local mobility but not to cause atomic displacements leading to the buildup of stable defects, e.g. divacancies, below the surface layer of the growing film. (orig.)

  20. Tuning piezoelectric properties through epitaxy of La2Ti2O7 and related thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C; Hong, Seungbum; Bowden, Mark E; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chongmin; Spurgeon, Steven R; Comes, Ryan B; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H

    2018-02-14

    Current piezoelectric sensors and actuators are limited to operating temperatures less than ~200 °C due to the low Curie temperature of the piezoelectric material. Strengthening the piezoelectric coupling of high-temperature piezoelectric materials, such as La 2 Ti 2 O 7 (LTO), would allow sensors to operate across a broad temperature range. The crystalline orientation and piezoelectric coupling direction of LTO thin films can be controlled by epitaxial matching to SrTiO 3 (001), SrTiO 3 (110), and rutile TiO 2 (110) substrates via pulsed laser deposition. The structure and phase purity of the films are investigated by x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Piezoresponse force microscopy is used to measure the in-plane and out-of-plane piezoelectric coupling in the films. The strength of the out-of-plane piezoelectric coupling can be increased when the piezoelectric direction is rotated partially out-of-plane via epitaxy. The strongest out-of-plane coupling is observed for LTO/STO(001). Deposition on TiO 2 (110) results in epitaxial La 2/3 TiO 3 , an orthorhombic perovskite of interest as a microwave dielectric material and an ion conductor. La 2/3 TiO 3 can be difficult to stabilize in bulk form, and epitaxial stabilization on TiO 2 (110) is a promising route to realize La 2/3 TiO 3 for both fundamental studies and device applications. Overall, these results confirm that control of the crystalline orientation of epitaxial LTO-based materials can govern the resulting functional properties.

  1. Tuning piezoelectric properties through epitaxy of La2Ti2O7 and related thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Hong, Seungbum; Bowden, Mark E.; Varga, Tamas; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chongmin; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Comes, Ryan B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.

    2018-02-14

    Current piezoelectric sensors and actuators are limited to operating temperatures less than ~200°C due to the low Curie temperature of the piezoelectric material. High temperature piezoelectric materials such as La2Ti2O7 (LTO) would facilitate the development of high-temperature sensors if the piezoelectric coupling coefficient could be maximized. We have deposited epitaxial LTO films on SrTiO3(001), SrTiO3(110), and rutile TiO2(110) substrates by pulsed laser deposition, and show that the crystalline orientation of the LTO film, and thus its piezoelectric coupling direction, can be controlled by epitaxial matching to the substrate. The structure and phase purity of the films were investigated by x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy. To characterize the piezoelectric properties, piezoresponse force microscopy was used to measure the in-plane and out-of-plane piezoelectric coupling in the films. We find that the strength of the out-of-plane piezoelectric coupling can be increased when the piezoelectric crystalline direction is rotated partially out-of-plane via epitaxy. The strongest out-of-plane coupling is observed for LTO/STO(001). Deposition on TiO2(110) results in epitaxial La2/3TiO3, an orthorhombic perovskite of interest as a microwave dielectric material. La2/3TiO3 can be difficult to stabilize in bulk form, and epitaxial deposition has not been previously reported. These results confirm that control of the crystalline orientation of LTO-based materials can increase the out-of-plane strength of its piezoelectric coupling, which can be exploited in piezoelectric devices.

  2. Technical appendix for the special safeguards study on material control and accounting systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The appendixes contain information on alarm levels for detection of theft, computer simulation of theft detection capabilities, benefits and liabilities related to real-time material control, cost analysis, and impact of collocated facilities on the real-time material control concept

  3. Human Factors Analysis of Pipeline Monitoring and Control Operations: Final Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-26

    The purpose of the Human Factors Analysis of Pipeline Monitoring and Control Operations project was to develop procedures that could be used by liquid pipeline operators to assess and manage the human factors risks in their control rooms that may adv...

  4. HTR 500: Final report of the project '' uniaxial creep tests at controlled temperature''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The report presents the results of creep trials with HTR-concrete, which were carried out in the scope of development of prestressed concrete - reactor pressure vessels at the ETH Lausanne Institute for Steel and Prestressed Concrete. With temperature, an increase of creep and shrinkage was observed, a lesser dependence on exhaustion and type of concrete. The point in time of reaching the final value is not dependent on temperature for creep, but is for shrinkage. The modulus of elasticity depends on the temperature pre-treatment, but only insignificantly on the test temperature. figs., tabs

  5. Epitaxial-graphene/graphene-oxide junction: an essential step towards epitaxial graphene electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Ming, Fan; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A

    2008-07-11

    Graphene-oxide (GO) flakes have been deposited to bridge the gap between two epitaxial-graphene electrodes to produce all-graphene devices. Electrical measurements indicate the presence of Schottky barriers at the graphene/graphene-oxide junctions, as a consequence of the band gap in GO. The barrier height is found to be about 0.7 eV, and is reduced after annealing at 180 degrees C, implying that the gap can be tuned by changing the degree of oxidation. A lower limit of the GO mobility was found to be 850 cm2/V s, rivaling silicon. In situ local oxidation of patterned epitaxial graphene has been achieved.

  6. Epitaxial growth and new phase of single crystal Dy by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Yueh; Homma, Hitoshi; Schuller, I.K.

    1987-09-01

    We have grown two novel epitaxial phases of dysprosium (Dy) on vanadium (V) by molecular beam epitaxy technique. Surface and bulk structures are studied by in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray diffraction techniques. The new hcp phases are ∼4% expanded uniformly in-plane (0001), and ∼9% and ∼4% expanded out of plane along the c-axes for non-interrupted and interrupted deposition case, respectively. We also observed (2 x 2), (3 x 3), and (4 x 4) Dy surface reconstruction patterns and a series of transitions as the Dy film thickness increases. 12 refs., 3 figs

  7. National Spill Control School. A pilot program in environmental training. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberholtzer, G.R.; Acuff, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness and the amended Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 required an increased level of expertise by the American Public in the field of oil spill prevention and control. The National Spill Control School was created at Corpus Christi State University to help meet this need. Drawing on the talents of a nationwide sample of experts in this field, the project team created a unique management oriented course. A review of the origination and experiences of two years of classes of this pilot program is provided in this report.

  8. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowsell, David Leon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  9. Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-13

    Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

  10. Innovative Distributed Power Grid Interconnection and Control Systems: Final Report, December 11, 2000 - August 30, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePodesta, K.; Birlingmair, D.; West, R.

    2006-03-01

    The contract goal was to further advance distributed generation in the marketplace by making installations more cost-effective and compatible with existing systems. This was achieved by developing innovative grid interconnection and control systems.

  11. Human factors review of electric power dispatch control centers. Volume 4. Operator information needs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.J.; Najaf-Zadeh, K.; Darlington, H.T.; McNair, H.D.; Seidenstein, S.; Williams, A.R.

    1982-10-01

    Human factors is a systems-oriented interdisciplinary specialty concerned with the design of systems, equipment, facilities and the operational environment. An important aspect leading to the design requirements is the determination of the information requirements for electric power dispatch control centers. There are significant differences between the system operator's actions during normal and degraded states of power system operation, and power system restoration. This project evaluated the information the operator requires for normal power system and control system operations and investigates the changes of information required by the operator as the power system and/or the control system degrades from a normal operating state. The Phase II study, published in two volumes, defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related. This volume presents detailed data concerning operator information needs that identify the needs for and the uses of power system information by a system operator in conditions ranging from normal through degraded operation. The study defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related, and it identifies the requisite information as consistent with current industry practice so as to aid control system designers. Training requirements are also included for planning entry-level and follow-on training for operators.

  12. Artificial epitaxy of indium antimonide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, V.I.; Givargizov, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the experiments on recrystallization of thin InSb films deposited on oxidized silicon by flash evaporation with ionized beams are given. Artificial microreliefs (topographic and thermal ones) were used for controlling the growth process. An orientation mechanism of the growing film by the microrelief is discussed. The experiments on preparation of regular single-crystal islands are described

  13. Study of epitaxial YBa2Cu3Ox films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.G.; Chi, C.C.; Koren, G.; Gupta, A.; Segmuller, A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present a systematic study of epitaxial YBa 2 Cu 3 O x films laser ablated on Y-cut LiNbO 3 substrates. X-ray diffraction pattern indicates that the c-axis is perpendicular to the substrate plane and the (110) direction of the film is parallel to the (110) of the substrate with two domains with the (110) as a mirror plane. Resistivity of the film shows a typical metallic behavior in the normal state with a sharp transition at 92K. The effects of oxygen deficiency on the resistivity are also studied. Oxygen content is controlled by annealing the sample either in low oxygen pressure or in vacuum and estimated from the c-axis lattice parameter determined by X-ray diffraction. As oxygen is depleted gradually, the film resistivity shows metallic, semiconducting, and eventually insulating behaviors. Superconducting percolation phenomenon is observed for the semiconducting sample at low temperatures

  14. Tracking instrument and control for solar concentrators. Final technical report, October 1979-January 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J; Kuhlman, J

    1981-01-31

    The tracker uses a single photo sensor, and a rotating aperature to obtain tracking accuracies better than 1.5 mrads (0.1 degs). Peak signal detection is used to eliminate tracking of false sources, i.e., clouds, etc. A prism is employed to obtain an extended field of view (150 degs axially - 360 degs radially). The tracker digitally measures the Suns displacement angle relative to the concentrator axis, and repositions it incrementally. This arrangement permits the use of low cost non-servo motors. The local controller contains microprocessor based electronics, incorporating digital signal processing. A single controller may be time shared by a maximum of sixteen trackers, providing a high performance, cost effective solar tracking system, suitable for both line and point focus concentrators. An installation may have the local controller programmed as a standalone unit or slaved to a central controller. When used with a central controller, dynamic data monitoring and logging is available, together with the ability to change system modes and parameters, as desired.

  15. Surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene on SiC by ion irradiation for gas sensing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Lin, Pin-Cheng; Kaur, Gurpreet; Eriksson, Jens; Lakshmi, G.B.V.S.; Avasthi, D.K.; Gupta, Vinay; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M.; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Yazdi, G. Reza

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For the first time the gas sensing application of SHI irradiated epitaxial graphene on SiC is explored. • Surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles. • Existence of an optimal fluence which maximize the gas sensing response towards NO_2 and NH_3 gases. - Abstract: In this work, surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide was performed by ion irradiation to investigate their gas sensing capabilities. Swift heavy ion irradiation using 100 MeV silver ions at four varying fluences was implemented on epitaxial graphene to investigate morphological and structural changes and their effects on the gas sensing capabilities of graphene. Sensing devices are expected as one of the first electronic applications using graphene and most of them use functionalized surfaces to tailor a certain function. In our case, we have studied irradiation as a tool to achieve functionalization. Morphological and structural changes on epitaxial graphene layers were investigated by atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Raman mapping and reflectance mapping. The surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles at highest fluence (2 × 10"1"3 ions/cm"2). Raman spectra analysis shows that the graphene defect density is increased with increasing fluence, while Raman mapping and reflectance mapping show that there is also a reduction of monolayer graphene coverage. The samples were investigated for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing applications. Sensors fabricated on pristine and irradiated samples showed highest gas sensing response at an optimal fluence. Our work provides new pathways for introducing defects in controlled manner in epitaxial graphene, which can be used not only for gas sensing application but also for other applications, such as electrochemical, biosensing, magnetosensing and spintronic

  16. Surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene on SiC by ion irradiation for gas sensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Priya Darshni, E-mail: kaushik.priyadarshni@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, 110025 (India); Ivanov, Ivan G.; Lin, Pin-Cheng [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Kaur, Gurpreet [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Eriksson, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Lakshmi, G.B.V.S. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, 110067 (India); Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Noida 201313 (India); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110007 (India); Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M. [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, 110025 (India); Syväjärvi, Mikael [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Yazdi, G. Reza, E-mail: yazdi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • For the first time the gas sensing application of SHI irradiated epitaxial graphene on SiC is explored. • Surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles. • Existence of an optimal fluence which maximize the gas sensing response towards NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases. - Abstract: In this work, surface functionalization of epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide was performed by ion irradiation to investigate their gas sensing capabilities. Swift heavy ion irradiation using 100 MeV silver ions at four varying fluences was implemented on epitaxial graphene to investigate morphological and structural changes and their effects on the gas sensing capabilities of graphene. Sensing devices are expected as one of the first electronic applications using graphene and most of them use functionalized surfaces to tailor a certain function. In our case, we have studied irradiation as a tool to achieve functionalization. Morphological and structural changes on epitaxial graphene layers were investigated by atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Raman mapping and reflectance mapping. The surface morphology of irradiated graphene layers showed graphene folding, hillocks, and formation of wrinkles at highest fluence (2 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}). Raman spectra analysis shows that the graphene defect density is increased with increasing fluence, while Raman mapping and reflectance mapping show that there is also a reduction of monolayer graphene coverage. The samples were investigated for ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing applications. Sensors fabricated on pristine and irradiated samples showed highest gas sensing response at an optimal fluence. Our work provides new pathways for introducing defects in controlled manner in epitaxial graphene, which can be used not only for gas sensing application but also for other applications, such as electrochemical, biosensing, magnetosensing and

  17. WTEC panel report on European nuclear instrumentation and controls. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.D.; Lanning, D.D.; Johnson, P.M.H. [eds.] [World Technology Evaluation Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Shelton, R.D. [World Technology Evaluation Center, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1991-12-01

    A study of instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology used in nuclear power plants in Europe was conducted by a panel of US specialists. This study plants in Europe was conducted by a panel of US specialists. This study included a review of the literature on the subject, followed by a visit to some of the leading organizations in Europe in the field nuclear I and C. Areas covered are: (1) role of the operator and control room design; (2) transition from analog to digital technology; (3) computerized operator support systems for fault management; (4) control strategies and techniques; (5) Nuclear power plant I and C architecture; (6) instrumentation and (7) computer standards and tools. The finding relate to poor reactions.

  18. Operation and control of large wind turbines and wind farms. Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Thomsen, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    good power quality and limit mechanical loads and life time consumption. The projectdeveloped models for 3 different concepts for wind farms. Two of the concepts use active stall controlled wind turbines, one with AC connection and one with modern HVDC/VSC connection of the wind farm. The third concept...... is based on pitch controlled windturbines using doubly fed induction generators. The models were applied to simulate the behaviour of the wind farm control when they were connected to a strong grid, and some initial simulations were performed to study the behaviour of the wind farms whenit was isolated...... concepts. The potentials of optimising the lifetime/energy production ratio by means of using revised operational strategies for the individual wind turbines are investigated. Different strategies have beensimulated, where the power production is decreased to an optimum when taking loads and actual price...

  19. WTEC panel report on European nuclear instrumentation and controls. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.D.; Lanning, D.D.; Beltracchi, L.; Best, F.R.; Easter, J.R.

    1991-12-01

    A study of instrumentation and controls (I and C) technology used in nuclear power plants in Europe was conducted by a panel of American specialists. The study included a review of the literature on the subject, followed by a visit to some of the leading organizations in Europe in the field of nuclear I and C. The findings of the study are presented in the report. The scope is limited to pressurized water reactors in Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Norway and Russia. Specific topics include: The role of the operator and control room design; the transition from analog to digital technology; computerized operator support systems for fault management; control strategies and techniques; an investigation of nuclear power plant I and C architecture; instrumentation; computer standards and tools. A companion study is JTEC Panel Report on Nuclear Power in Japan (PB90-215724)

  20. Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal: Final Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Conference on Plenipotentiaries on the Global Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes was convened by the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) pursuant to decision 14/30, adopted by the Governing Council of UNEP on 17 June 1987. The Conference adopted the Global Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal. In the 29 articles of this Convention the definitions of hazardous wastes, the scope of the Convention, general obligations of the signatory parties, transboundary waste movement between Parties as well as through states which are not parties, illegal traffic, international control, liabilities, financial aspects, verification, accession and withdrawal of the Parties are defined in detail. There are 6 Annexes, including specifications of hazardous wastes, information requirements, notification rules, etc

  1. Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-03-01

    Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

  2. Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girolami, Davide [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-17

    The report describes hypotheses, aims, methods and results of the project 20170675PRD2, “Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations”, which has been run from July 31, 2017 to January 7, 2018. The technical work has been performed by Director’s Fellow Davide Girolami of the T-4 Division, Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, under the supervision of Wojciech Zurek (T-4), Lukasz Cincio (T-4), and Marcus Daniels (CCS-7). The project ended as Davide Girolami has been converted to J. R. Oppenheimer Fellow to work on the project 20180702PRD1, “Optimal Control of Quantum Machines”, started on January 8, 2018.

  3. Some safety considerations in laser-controlled thermonuclear reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botts, T.E.; Breton, D.; Chan, C.K.; Levy, S.I.; Sehnert, M.; Ullman, A.Z.

    1978-07-01

    A major objective of this study was to identify potential safety questions for laser controlled thermonuclear reactors. From the safety viewpoint, it does not appear that the actual laser controlled thermonuclear reactor conceptual designs present hazards very different than those of magnetically confined fusion reactors. Some aspects seem beneficial, such as small lithium inventories, and the absence of cryogenic devices, while other aspects are new, for example the explosion of pressure vessels and laser hazards themselves. Major aspects considered in this report include: (a) general safety considerations, (b) tritium inventories, (c) system behavior during loss of flow accidents, and (d) safety considerations of laser related penetrations

  4. Final Technical Report: Commercial Advanced Lighting Control (ALC) Demonstration and Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Gabe [Efficiency Forward, Inc. / DesignLights Consortium

    2018-02-05

    This three-year demonstration and deployment project sought to address market barriers to accelerating the adoption of Advanced Lighting Controls (ALCs), an underutilized technology with low market penetration. ALCs are defined as networked, addressable lighting control systems that utilize software or intelligent controllers to combine multiple energy-saving lighting control strategies in a single space (e.g., smart-time scheduling, daylight harvesting, task tuning, occupancy control, personal control, variable load-shedding, and plug-load control). The networked intelligent aspect of these systems allows applicable lighting control strategies to be combined in a single space, layered over one another, maximizing overall energy-savings. The project included five real building demonstrations of ALCs across the Northeast US region. The demonstrations provided valuable data and experience to support deployment tasks that are necessary to overcome market barriers. These deployment tasks included development of training resources for building designers, installers, and trades, as well as development of new energy efficiency rebates for the technology from Efficiency Forward’s utility partners. Educating designers, installers, and trades on ALCs is a critical task for reducing the cost of the technology that is currently inflated due to perceived complexity and unfamiliarity with how to design and install the systems. Further, utility and non-utility energy efficiency programs continue to relegate the technology to custom or ill-suited prescriptive program designs that do not effectively deploy the technology at scale. This project developed new, scalable rebate approaches for the technology. Efficiency Forward utilized their DesignLights Consortium® (DLC) brand and network of 81 DLC member utilities to develop and deploy the results of the project. The outputs of the project have included five published case studies, a six-hour ALC technology training curriculum

  5. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-30

    A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  6. Executive summary of the special safeguards study on material control and accounting systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This report assesses the feasibility of real-time systems applied to mixed-oxide fuel rod fabrication. Their interaction with other material control and accounting measures are considered. Economics, effectiveness, and acceptance factors are discussed. A cost-benefit evaluation is made and recommendations given for safeguards improvements

  7. Vehicle Lateral Control Under Fault in Front and/or Rear Sensors: Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Guang; Huang, Jihua; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the research results of Task Order 4204(TO4204), "Vehicle Lateral Control under Fault in Front and/or Rear Sensors". This project is a continuing effort of the Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH) on the research of passenger vehicles for Automated Highway Systems (AHS).

  8. Impact of cruise control on traffic safety, energy consumption and environmental pollution : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaeker, D.M.; Brouwer, R.F.T.; Malone, K.; Klunder, G.; et al

    2006-01-01

    In this subproject, the impact of Cruise Control (CC) was analysed with respect to traffic safety, energy consumption, and environmental pollution. In order to work on this topic from a European perspective, a team of European experts in the fields of driver assistance systems, human factors,

  9. Amphetamines, Barbiturates and Hallucinogens; An Analysis of Use, Distribution, and Control. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, William H.

    This report is the third of three monographs to provide perspectives on the use, distribution, and control of illicit drugs. The first, conducted in 1971, described the prevalence, use patterns, sources, distribution, and economics of the marihuana market. The second (1972) estimated the cost, benefits, and potential of approaches to narcotic…

  10. Control of a long reach manipulator with suspension cables for waste storage tank remediation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    A long reach manipulator will be used for waste remediation in large underground storage tanks. The manipulator's slenderness makes it flexible and difficult to control. A low-cost and effective method to enhance the manipulator's stiffness is proposed in this research by using suspension cables. These cables can also be used to accurately measure the position of the manipulator's wrist

  11. Final Environmental Assessment of Mosquito Control at Joint Base Charleston - Weapons Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    fermentation solids and solubles . 11.6 1% 88.39% 100.00% Other Ingredients ........ ... .. ...... . Total . . . •.......•........ .... Potency...public pes t control programs sponsored by governmental entities): It is not necessary to avoid farm buildings. dairy barns, and feed or forage areas

  12. Integrated computer control system CORBA-based simulator FY98 LDRD project final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R M; Holloway, F W; Van Arsdall, P J.

    1999-01-01

    The CORBA-based Simulator was a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that applied simulation techniques to explore critical questions about distributed control architecture. The simulator project used a three-prong approach comprised of a study of object-oriented distribution tools, computer network modeling, and simulation of key control system scenarios. This summary report highlights the findings of the team and provides the architectural context of the study. For the last several years LLNL has been developing the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is an abstract object-oriented software framework for constructing distributed systems. The framework is capable of implementing large event-driven control systems for mission-critical facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Tools developed in this project were applied to the NIF example architecture in order to gain experience with a complex system and derive immediate benefits from this LDRD. The ICCS integrates data acquisition and control hardware with a supervisory system, and reduces the amount of new coding and testing necessary by providing prebuilt components that can be reused and extended to accommodate specific additional requirements. The framework integrates control point hardware with a supervisory system by providing the services needed for distributed control such as database persistence, system start-up and configuration, graphical user interface, status monitoring, event logging, scripting language, alert management, and access control. The design is interoperable among computers of different kinds and provides plug-in software connections by leveraging a common object request brokering architecture (CORBA) to transparently distribute software objects across the network of computers. Because object broker distribution applied to control systems is relatively new and its inherent performance is roughly threefold less than traditional point

  13. Development of controlled solid-state alignment for alnico permanent magnets in near-final shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver E. Anderson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The 2011 price shock in the rare earth (RE permanent magnet (PM marketplace precipitated realization of extremely poor RE supply diversity and drove renewed research in RE-free permanent magnets such as “alnico.” Essentially, alnico is an Al-Ni-Co-Fe alloy with high magnetic saturation and TC, but low coercivity. It also was last researched extensively in the 1970’s. Currently alnico “9” magnets with the highest energy product (10MGOe are manufactured by directional solidification to make highly aligned anisotropic magnets. This work developed novel powder processing techniques to improve on unaligned anisotropic alnico “8H” with elevated coercivity. Gas atomization was used to produce pre-alloyed powder for binder-assisted compression molding of near-final shape magnets that were vacuum sintered to full density (250g showed reduced overall loop squareness compared to unaligned (equiaxed 8H due to grain rotation-induced misalignment, while low stresses improved squareness and greatly improved alignment compared to equiaxed magnets, with squareness approaching 0.30 and remanence ratio as high as 0.79.

  14. Epitaxial III-V nanowires on silicon for vertical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Borgström, M.T.; Einden, Van Den W.; Weert, van M.H.M.; Helman, A.; Verheijen, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    We show the epitaxial integration of III-V semiconductor nanowires with silicon technology. The wires are grown by the Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism with laser ablation as well as metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The VLS growth enables the fabrication of complex axial and radial

  15. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix E: Flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The Corps of Engineers, Bonneville Power Administration, and Bureau of Reclamation conducted a scoping process consisting of a series of regionwide public meetings and solicitation of written comments in the summer of 1990. Comments on flood control issues were received from all parts of the Columbia river basin. This appendix includes issues raised in the public scoping process, as well as those brought for consideration by members of the Flood Control Work Group

  16. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C. (Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  17. Role of dual-laser ablation in controlling the Pb depletion in epitaxial growth of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 thin films with enhanced surface quality and ferroelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Devajyoti; Hyde, Robert; Mukherjee, Pritish; Srikanth, Hariharan; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2012-03-01

    Pb depletion in Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) thin films has remained as a major setback in the growth of defect-free PZT thin films by pulsed laser ablation techniques. At low excimer (KrF) laser fluences, the high volatility of Pb in PZT leads to non-congruent target ablation and, consequently, non-stoichiometric films, whereas, at high laser fluences, the inherent ejection of molten droplets from the target leads to particulate laden films, which is undesirable in heterostructure growth. To overcome these issues, a dual-laser ablation (PLDDL) process that combines an excimer (KrF) laser and CO2 laser pulses was used to grow epitaxial PZT films on SrTiO3 (100) and MgO (100) substrates. Intensified-charge-coupled-detector (ICCD) images and optical emission spectroscopy of the laser-ablated plumes in PLDDL revealed a broader angular expansion and enhanced excitation of the ablated species as compared to those for single-laser ablation (PLDSL). This led to the growth of particulate-free PZT films with higher Pb content, better crystallinity, and lower surface roughness as compared to those deposited using PLDSL. For FE measurements, PZT capacitors were fabricated in situ using the latticed-matched metallic oxide, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3, as the top and bottom electrodes. PZT films deposited using PLDDL exhibited enhanced polarization for all driving voltages as compared to those deposited using PLDSL. A highest remanent polarization (Pr) of ˜91 μC/cm2 and low coercive field of ˜40 kV/cm was recorded at 9 V driving voltage. Fatigue characterization revealed that PZT films deposited using PLDDL showed unchanging polarization, even after 109 switching cycles.

  18. An economic analysis of BWR control rod blade management strategies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, J.

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear power plants have available a number of alternative courses of action that can contribute to the reduction of personnel exposure to radiation. Possible actions at boiling water reactor (BWR) plants include accelerating the replacement of high-cobalt control rod blades (CRB) or the blades' high-cobalt pins and rollers with low or non-cobalt substitutes. To help utilities understand the exposure reduction and the economic costs and benefits associated with management alternatives, such as accelerated replacement of blades, pins and rollers, EPRI has initiated a project called Cost/Benefit Software for Analyses of Radiation Control Measures (RP1935-32). Through this project EPRI will incorporate engineering-economic techniques into a series of analytical tools that will provide useful insights about alternative exposure reduction options. Prototype software has been developed in an Excel worksheet to analyze issues associated with BWR control rod blade management options. The CRB replacement problem framework and analysis methodology incorporated into the software tool will help plant managers consider explicitly key engineering and economic issues that are relevant to exposure reduction decisions. This tool generates results that can help plant managers make decisions that are fiscally wise by showing all the cost and benefit implications associated with a management action under consideration. This report describes the general analytical approach for evaluating exposure reduction alternatives. The methodology used to analyze blade and pin and roller replacement alternatives, and the results of a case study application of the methodology and the software prototype at Commonwealth Edison

  19. Interface relaxation and band gap shift in epitaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziming Zhu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that the interface relaxation plays the crucial role for the electronic properties in semiconductor epitaxial layers, there is lack of a clear definition of relationship between interfacial bond-energy variation and interface bond-nature-factor (IBNF in epitaxial layers before and after relaxation. Here we establish an analytical method to shed light on the relationship between the IBNF and the bond-energy change, as well as the relation with band offset in epitaxial layers from the perspective of atomic-bond-relaxation consideration and continuum mechanics. The theoretical predictions are consistent with the available evidences, which provide an atomistic understanding on underlying mechanism of interface effect in epitaxial nanostructures. Thus, it will be helpful for opening up to tailor physical-chemical properties of the epitaxial nanostructures to the desired specifications.

  20. SERDP ER-1421 Abiotic and Biotic Mechanisms Controlling In Situ Remediation of NDMA: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; McKinley, James P.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.

    2009-09-30

    This laboratory-scale project was initiated to investigate in situ abiotic/biotic mineralization of NDMA. Under iron-reducing conditions, aquifer sediments showed rapid abiotic NDMA degradation to dimethylamine (DMA), nitrate, formate, and finally, CO2. These are the first reported experiments of abiotic NDMA mineralization. The NDMA reactivity of these different iron phases showed that adsorbed ferrous iron was the dominant reactive phase that promoted NDMA reduction, and other ferrous phases present (siderite, iron sulfide, magnetite, structural ferrous iron in 2:1 clays) did not promote NDMA degradation. In contrast, oxic sediments that were biostimulated with propane promoted biomineralization of NDMA by a cometabolic monooxygenase enzyme process. Other monooxygenase enzyme processes were not stimulated with methane or toluene additions, and acetylene addition did not block mineralization. Although NDMA mineralization extent was the highest in oxic, biostimulated sediments (30 to 82%, compared to 10 to 26% for abiotic mineralization in reduced sediments), large 1-D column studies (high sediment/water ratio of aquifers) showed 5.6 times higher NDMA mineralization rates in reduced sediment (half-life 410 ± 147 h) than oxic biomineralization (half life 2293 ± 1866 h). Sequential reduced/oxic biostimulated sediment mineralization (half-life 3180 ± 1094 h) was also inefficient compared to reduced sediment. These promising laboratory-scale results for NDMA mineralization should be investigated at field scale. Future studies of NDMA remediation should focus on the comparison of this in situ abiotic NDMA mineralization (iron-reducing environments) to ex situ biomineralization, which has been shown successful in other studies.

  1. Multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the (SiC 000 1-bar ) surface; structure and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, M; Hicks, J; Tinkey, H; Clark, M C; Hass, J; Conrad, E H; Tejeda, A; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Le Fevre, P; Bertran, F; Soukiassian, P; Martinotti, D

    2010-01-01

    We review the progress towards developing epitaxial graphene as a material for carbon electronics. In particular, we discuss improvements in epitaxial graphene growth, interface control and the understanding of multilayer epitaxial graphene's (MEG's) electronic properties. Although graphene grown on both polar faces of SiC will be discussed, our discussions will focus on graphene grown on the (0 0 0 1-bar ) C-face of SiC. The unique properties of C-face MEG have become apparent. These films behave electronically like a stack of nearly independent graphene sheets rather than a thin Bernal stacked graphite sample. The origins of multilayer graphene's electronic behaviour are its unique highly ordered stacking of non-Bernal rotated graphene planes. While these rotations do not significantly affect the inter-layer interactions, they do break the stacking symmetry of graphite. It is this broken symmetry that leads to each sheet behaving like isolated graphene planes.

  2. Defect distribution in low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy grown Si/Si(100), improved depth profiling with monoenergetic positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeles, C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G.; Gossmann, H.; Unterwald, F.C.; Boone, T.

    1995-01-01

    The depth distribution of open-volume defects has been studied in Si(100) crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 300 degree C by the variable-energy monoenergetic positron beam technique combined with well-controlled chemical etching. This procedure gave a 10 nm depth resolution which is a significant improvement over the inherent depth resolving power of the positron beam technique. The epitaxial layer was found to grow defect-free up to 80 nm, from the interface, where small vacancy clusters, larger than divacancies, appear. The defect density then sharply increases toward the film surface. The result clearly shows that the nucleation of small open-volume defects is a precursor state to the breakdown of epitaxy and to the evolution of an amorphous film

  3. Abnormal growth kinetics of h-BN epitaxial monolayer on Ru(0001) enhanced by subsurface Ar species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Meng, Jie; Meng, Caixia; Ning, Yanxiao; Li, Qunxiang; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2018-04-01

    Growth kinetics of epitaxial films often follows the diffusion-limited aggregation mechanism, which shows a "fractal-to-compact" morphological transition with increasing growth temperature or decreasing deposition flux. Here, we observe an abnormal "compact-to-fractal" morphological transition with increasing growth temperature for hexagonal boron nitride growth on the Ru(0001) surface. The unusual growth process can be explained by a reaction-limited aggregation (RLA) mechanism. Moreover, introduction of the subsurface Ar atoms has enhanced this RLA growth behavior by decreasing both reaction and diffusion barriers. Our work may shed light on the epitaxial growth of two-dimensional atomic crystals and help to control their morphology.

  4. Human factors review of nuclear power plant control room design. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Gonzalez, W.R.; Parsons, S.O.

    1976-11-01

    The human factors aspects of five representative nuclear power plant control rooms were evaluated using such methods as a checklist guided observation system, structured interviews with operators and trainers, direct observations of operator behavior, task analyses and procedure evaluation, and historical error analyses. The human factors aspects of design practices are illustrated, and many improvements in current practices are suggested. The study recommends that a detailed set of applicable human factors standards be developed to stimulate a uniform and systematic concern for human factors in design considerations

  5. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  6. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-01-01

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons[tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional

  7. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  8. Improved control rod drive handling equipment for BWRs [boiling-water reactors]: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.P.L.; Gorman, J.A.

    1987-08-01

    Improved equipment for removing and replacing control rod drives (CRDs) in BWR plants has been designed, built and tested. Control rod drives must be removed from the reactor periodically for servicing. Removal and replacement of CRDs using equipment originally supplied with the plant has long been recognized as one of the more difficult and highest radiation exposure maintenance operations that must be performed at BWR plants. The improved equipment was used for the first time at Quad Cities, Unit 2, during a Fall 1986 outage. The trial of the equipment was highly successful, and it was shown that the new equipment significantly improves CRD handling operations. The new equipment significantly simplifies the sequence of operations required to lower a CRD from its housing, upend it to a horizontal orientation, and transport it out of the reactor containment. All operations of the new equipment are performed from the undervessel equipment handling platform, thus, eliminating the requirement for a person to work on the lower level of the undervessel gallery which is often highly contaminated. Typically, one less person is required to operate the equipment than were used with the older equipment. The new equipment incorporates a number of redundant and fail safe features that improve operations and reduce the chances for accidents

  9. Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning of Hazardous Sites - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalkoff, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes work after 4 years of a 3-year project (no-cost extension of the above-referenced project for a period of 12 months granted). The fourth generation of a vision sensing head for geometric and photometric scene sensing has been built and tested. Estimation algorithms for automatic sensor calibration updating under robot motion have been developed and tested. We have modified the geometry extraction component of the rendering pipeline. Laser scanning now produces highly accurate points on segmented curves. These point-curves are input to a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-spline) skinning procedure to produce interpolating surface segments. The NURBS formulation includes quadrics as a sub-class, thus this formulation allows much greater flexibility without the attendant instability of generating an entire quadric surface. We have also implemented correction for diffuse lighting and specular effects. The QRobot joint level control was extended to a complete semi-autonomous robot control system for D and D operations. The imaging and VR subsystems have been integrated and tested

  10. Coherent control of photoabsorption processes and calculation of nonlinear optical processes. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambropoulos, P.

    1998-01-01

    The work on the grant for the entire period of its duration concentrated on two different but related areas, namely coherent control of photoabsorption processes and the calculation of non linear optical processes with short wavelength radiation. On the first topic, the work dealt with the problem of controlling the population transfer from one to another bound state of a system in a route that passes through a continuum. This question is most important in the context of transferring populations between vibrational states of a molecule through a sequence of two pulses taking the system via the dissociation continuum. On the second topic, their work was motivated by the availability of XUV and soft X-ray coherent radiation sources obtained through high order harmonic generation. In addition, a few other techniques based on schemes of photo-pumped X-ray lasers promise to provide in the near-future similarly coherent sources. It is thus important to have an assessment of the possibility of extending non-linear optical processes to this range of wavelengths. This means assessing the relevant magnitude of the susceptibilities for third harmonic generation, stimulated Raman scattering, two-photon absorption, etc

  11. Advanced Sensing and Control Techniques to Facilitate Semi-Autonomous Decommissioning of Hazardous Sites - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalkoff, R.J.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes work after 4 years of a 3-year project (no-cost extension of the above-referenced project for a period of 12 months granted). The fourth generation of a vision sensing head for geometric and photometric scene sensing has been built and tested. Estimation algorithms for automatic sensor calibration updating under robot motion have been developed and tested. We have modified the geometry extraction component of the rendering pipeline. Laser scanning now produces highly accurate points on segmented curves. These point-curves are input to a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-spline) skinning procedure to produce interpolating surface segments. The NURBS formulation includes quadrics as a sub-class, thus this formulation allows much greater flexibility without the attendant instability of generating an entire quadric surface. We have also implemented correction for diffuse lighting and specular effects. The QRobot joint level control was extended to a complete semi-autonomous robot control system for D and D operations. The imaging and VR subsystems have been integrated and tested.

  12. Final Report: MaRSPlus Sensor System Electrical Cable Management and Distributed Motor Control Computer Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, Robin

    2011-01-01

    The success of JPL's Next Generation Imaging Spectrometer (NGIS) in Earth remote sensing has inspired a follow-on instrument project, the MaRSPlus Sensor System (MSS). One of JPL's responsibilities in the MSS project involves updating the documentation from the previous JPL airborne imagers to provide all the information necessary for an outside customer to operate the instrument independently. As part of this documentation update, I created detailed electrical cabling diagrams to provide JPL technicians with clear and concise build instructions and a database to track the status of cables from order to build to delivery. Simultaneously, a distributed motor control system is being developed for potential use on the proposed 2018 Mars rover mission. This system would significantly reduce the mass necessary for rover motor control, making more mass space available to other important spacecraft systems. The current stage of the project consists of a desktop computer talking to a single "cold box" unit containing the electronics to drive a motor. In order to test the electronics, I developed a graphical user interface (GUI) using MATLAB to allow a user to send simple commands to the cold box and display the responses received in a user-friendly format.

  13. Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Grasman

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan

  14. Thin film evolution equations from (evaporating) dewetting liquid layers to epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, U

    2010-01-01

    In the present contribution we review basic mathematical results for three physical systems involving self-organizing solid or liquid films at solid surfaces. The films may undergo a structuring process by dewetting, evaporation/condensation or epitaxial growth, respectively. We highlight similarities and differences of the three systems based on the observation that in certain limits all of them may be described using models of similar form, i.e. time evolution equations for the film thickness profile. Those equations represent gradient dynamics characterized by mobility functions and an underlying energy functional. Two basic steps of mathematical analysis are used to compare the different systems. First, we discuss the linear stability of homogeneous steady states, i.e. flat films, and second the systematics of non-trivial steady states, i.e. drop/hole states for dewetting films and quantum-dot states in epitaxial growth, respectively. Our aim is to illustrate that the underlying solution structure might be very complex as in the case of epitaxial growth but can be better understood when comparing the much simpler results for the dewetting liquid film. We furthermore show that the numerical continuation techniques employed can shed some light on this structure in a more convenient way than time-stepping methods. Finally we discuss that the usage of the employed general formulation does not only relate seemingly unrelated physical systems mathematically, but does allow as well for discussing model extensions in a more unified way.

  15. Raman investigation of GaP–Si interfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondi, A.; Cornet, C.; Boyer, S.; Nguyen Thanh, T.; Létoublon, A.; Pedesseau, L.; Durand, O. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Moreac, A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR-CNRS n°6251, Université Rennes1, Campus de Beaulieu — 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Ponchet, A. [CEMES, UPR CNRS 8011, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Le Corre, A. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Even, J., E-mail: jacky.even@insa.rennes.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France)

    2013-08-31

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the residual strain in thin GaP layers deposited on Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. Different growth conditions were used to obtain a clean GaP–Si interface, including migration enhanced epitaxy. The strain induced Raman shifts of the longitudinal and the transverse optical GaP lattice modes were analyzed. The effects of crystalline defects are discussed, supported by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering studies. Finally, Raman Spectroscopy reveals the presence of disorder (or surface)-activated optical phonons. This result is discussed in the light of surface morphology analyses. - Highlights: ► GaP thin layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si substrates. ► Strain-induced Raman shifts of the optical GaP modes are analyzed. ► Simulation of optical GaP modes by density functional perturbation theory. ► Comparison with X-ray diffraction and electron and scanning probe microscopy data.

  16. BiFeO3 epitaxial thin films and devices: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, D.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.

    2014-11-01

    The celebrated renaissance of the multiferroics family over the past ten years has also been that of its most paradigmatic member, bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3). Known since the 1960s to be a high temperature antiferromagnet and since the 1970s to be ferroelectric, BiFeO3 only had its bulk ferroic properties clarified in the mid-2000s. It is however the fabrication of BiFeO3 thin films and their integration into epitaxial oxide heterostructures that have fully revealed its extraordinarily broad palette of functionalities. Here we review the first decade of research on BiFeO3 films, restricting ourselves to epitaxial structures. We discuss how thickness and epitaxial strain influence not only the unit cell parameters, but also the crystal structure, illustrated for instance by the discovery of the so-called T-like phase of BiFeO3. We then present its ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties and their evolution near morphotropic phase boundaries. Magnetic properties and their modification by thickness and strain effects, as well as optical parameters, are covered. Finally, we highlight various types of devices based on BiFeO3 in electronics, spintronics, and optics, and provide perspectives for the development of further multifunctional devices for information technology and energy harvesting.

  17. Instrumentation and control upgrade evaluation methodology. Volume 1: Manual. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, M.; Brown, E.; Florio, F.; Stofko, M.

    1996-07-01

    This methodology manual describes how to develop an Upgrade Evaluation Report (UER) for an I and C system that has been identified as an upgrade candidate in the I and C Life Cycle Management Plan (LCMP). A UER can be developed by a nuclear power plant to determine the cost-effectiveness and feasibility of upgrading an aging or obsolete Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System. A separate UER is developed for each upgrade candidate system. A UER will determine if a given system requires an upgrade or if it is more cost-effective to maintain the present system. If an upgrade is unnecessary, the system will be reclassified as a retained system and a system maintenance plan will be developed for it. This manual is accompanied by a workbook (EPRI TR-104963-V2) which contains various worksheets, outlines, and generic interview questions that aid in the UER development process

  18. Instrumentation and Control Life Cycle Management Plan Methodology. Volume 1, Manual: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, D.S.; Murray, S.; Florio, F.; Bliss, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    This methodology manual describes how to develop a Life Cycle Management Plan (LCMP). An LCMP is a long-term strategic plan that can be developed for a nuclear power plant to cost-effectively maintain and upgrade its aging or obsolete Instrumentation and Control (I ampersand C) systems. An LCMP defines the utility's mission and objectives in regards to long range I ampersand C planning, as well as the plant's present configuration (I ampersand C systems, networks, man machine interfaces, etc.), its desired future I ampersand C systems, a long term I ampersand C maintenance strategy, and initial upgrade priorities and schedules to cost-effectively implement system upgrades. This manual is accompanied by a workbook (EPRI TR-105555-V2) which contains various worksheets, outlines, and generic interview questions that aid in the LCNW development process

  19. Experience with the use of programmable logic controllers in nuclear safety applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.M.; Stofko, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes the implementation and experience with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) for nuclear safety applications. Two applications are described. The first is an Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) mitigation system provided as a Diverse Auxiliary Feedwater Actuation System (DAFAS). It was implemented at Arizona Public Service's Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and has been in commercial operation since early 1992. The second system described is an Emergency Diesel Generator Bus Load Sequencer installed at Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant. This system was installed as part of an upgrade to the emergency power system in 1988. The experience gained in the design, development, implementation and qualification of these systems will be beneficial to utilities that are considering the utilization of PLCs for their plant applications

  20. Quality control in diagnostic mammography: myths, realities and their importance in the final image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora Rodriguez, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Mammography is the most used tool for early detection of breast cancer and reduce mortality from this cause. Studies with ionizing radiation it is important that be justified and provide a quality image to make the diagnosis, to get more benefits and fewer risks. The problem is the difficult to obtain an image of the breast. Therefore, the commitment to quality mammography is to maximize the contrast, definition, resolution and reliability, thus minimizing noise and dose. A mammogram performed without quality don't detect early breast cancer and the study doesn't have sense. Quality mammography requires trained and experienced staff, modern equipment and in good conditions, correct positioning, right technical factors and appropriate viewing conditions. In addition, quality programs are required to reach to ensure quality, control in testing techniques and image quality. (author) [es

  1. Stability and Control of Burning Tokamak Plasmas with Resistive Walls: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, George [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Brennan, Dylan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Cole, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Finn, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This project is focused on theoretical and computational development for quantitative prediction of the stability and control of the equilibrium state evolution in toroidal burning plasmas, including its interaction with the surrounding resistive wall. The stability of long pulse burning plasmas is highly sensitive to the physics of resonant layers in the plasma, sources of momentum and flow, kinetic effects of energetic particles, and boundary conditions at the wall, including feedback control and error fields. In ITER in particular, the low toroidal flow equilibrium state, sustained primarily by energetic alpha particles from fusion reactions, will require the consideration of all of these key elements to predict quantitatively the stability and evolution. The principal investigators on this project have performed theoretical and computational analyses, guided by analytic modeling, to address this physics in realistic configurations. The overall goal has been to understand the key physics mechanisms that describe stable toroidal burning plasmas under active feedback control. Several relevant achievements have occurred during this project, leading to publications and invited conference presentations. In theoretical efforts, with the physics of the resonant layers, resistive wall, and toroidal momentum transport included, this study has extended from cylindrical resistive plasma - resistive wall models with feedback control to toroidal geometry with strong shaping to study mode coupling effects on the stability. These results have given insight into combined tearing and resistive wall mode behavior in simulations and experiment, while enabling a rapid exploration of plasma parameter space, to identify possible domains of interest for large plasma codes to investigate in more detail. Resonant field amplification and quasilinear torques in the presence of error fields and velocity shear have also been investigated. Here it was found, surprisingly, that the Maxwell

  2. Development of monitoring and control technology based on trace gas monitoring. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebowitz, B.

    1997-07-01

    Trace gases are generated by many biological reactions. During anaerobic decomposition, trace levels of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) gases are produced. It was shown previously that these trace gases are intrinsically related to the biochemical reactions occurring and, therefore, offer promise for on-line process monitoring and control. This work was designed to test how effectively hydrogen and CO could be to monitor high-rate anaerobic systems that has significant mass transfer and complex hydraulics. An experimental program was designed to examine the behavior of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system under steady state and in response to organic loading perturbations. The responses of trace gases CO and H{sub 2} were tracked using an on-line, real-time gas-monitoring system linked to a computer-controlled data acquisition package. Data on conventional process parameters such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were concurrently collected. Monitoring of conventional process indicators (i.e., pH, VFA, gas production) and trace gas (H{sub 2} and CO) indicators was conducted using a matrix of nine different steady-state OLRs (4-23 kg COD/m{sup 3} -d) and system HRTs (0.5 to 2.5 days) was performed to determine any correlation among the indicators. Of OLR, HRT, and influent COD, only OLR had any significant influence on the process indicators examined. All parameters except methane increased with increases in OLR; methane decreased with increased OLR. The OLR and gas production rate (GP) were observed to be linearly correlated.

  3. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-12-31

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  4. Graphene nanoribbons epitaxy on boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaobo; Wang, Shuopei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Meng, Jianling; Xie, Guibai; Wang, Duoming; Wang, Guole; Zhang, Ting Ting; Yang, Rong; Shi, Dongxia [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang, Wei [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, ENS-CNRS UMR 8551, Universités Pierre et Marie Curie and Paris-Diderot, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Zhang, Guangyu, E-mail: gyzhang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-14

    In this letter, we report a pilot study on epitaxy of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). We found that GNRs grow preferentially from the atomic steps of h-BN, forming in-plane heterostructures. GNRs with well-defined widths ranging from ∼15 nm to ∼150 nm can be obtained reliably. As-grown GNRs on h-BN have high quality with a carrier mobility of ∼20 000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for ∼100-nm-wide GNRs at a temperature of 1.7 K. Besides, a moiré pattern induced quasi-one-dimensional superlattice with a periodicity of ∼15 nm for GNR/h-BN was also observed, indicating zero crystallographic twisting angle between GNRs and h-BN substrate. The superlattice induced band structure modification is confirmed by our transport results. These epitaxial GNRs/h-BN with clean surfaces/interfaces and tailored widths provide an ideal platform for high-performance GNR devices.

  5. High sensitive quasi freestanding epitaxial graphene gas sensor on 6H-SiC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iezhokin, I.; Offermans, P.; Brongersma, S.H.; Giesbers, A.J.M.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the electrical response to NO2, N2, NH3, and CO for epitaxial graphene and quasi freestanding epitaxial graphene on 6H-SiC substrates. Quasi freestanding epitaxial graphene shows a 6 fold increase in NO2 sensitivity compared to epitaxial graphene. Both samples show a sensitivity

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Technology Control Center, report to the Steering committee. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report describes test for air pollution control of flue gas and mercury as a result of coal combustion. The NYSEG Kintigh Station provided flue gas to the Center 100% of the time during this performance period. As the Kintigh Station operated with a variety of coals, fluctuations in the Center`s inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations were experienced. Safety training for the month was conducted by the O&M Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisor and Shift Supervisors. {open_quotes}Personal Protective Equipment{close_quotes} was the topic of the month. Inspections of the ECTC Facility and safety equipment (SCR air-packs, fire extinguishers, etc.) were completed and recorded this month. All systems were found to be in good condition. By continuing to emphasize safe work habits at the Center, we have raised the total number of days without a lost time injury to 1426 as of 4/30/96. The monthly safety meeting with the NYSEG Kintigh Station was held on April 30, 1996 with both NYSEG and ECTC representatives. The topics of discussion included an overview of NYSEG`s upcoming alternate fuel burn, an update on plant staffing changes, and a discussion of future safety training activities.

  7. FY98 Final Report Initial Interfacial Chemical Control for Enhancement of Composite Material Strength; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GE Fryxell; KL Alford; KL Simmons; RD Voise; WD Samuels

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) sponsored this research project to support the development of new self-assembled monolayer fiber coatings. These coatings can greatly increase the bond strength between the fiber and the resin matrix of a composite material. Composite ammunition components molded from such materials will exhibit higher strength than current materials, and will provide a major improvement in the performance of composites in military applications. Use of composite materials in military applications is desirable because of the lighter weight of the materials and their high strengths. The FY97 project investigated initial interfacial chemical control for enhancement of composite material strength. The core of the project was to modify the covalent interface of glass fibers (or other reinforcing fibers) to induce strong, uniform, defect-free adhesion between the fibers' surfaces and the polymer matrix. Installing a self-assembled monolayer tailored to the specific matrix resin accomplished this. Simply, the self-assembled monolayer modifies the fiber to make it appear to have the same chemical composition as the resin matrix. The self-assembled monolayer creates a receptive, hydrophobic interface that the thermoset resin (or polymer precursors) would wet more effectively, leading to a higher contact surface area and more efficient adhesion. The FY97 work phase demonstrated that it is possible to increase the adhesive strength, as well as increase the heat deflection temperature through the use of self-assembled monolayer

  8. End-System Network Interface Controller for 100 Gb/s Wide Area Networks: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jesse [Acadia Optronics LLC, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2013-08-30

    In recent years, network bandwidth requirements have scaled multiple folds, pushing the need for the development of data exchange mechanisms at 100 Gb/s and beyond. High performance computing, climate modeling, large-scale storage, and collaborative scientific research are examples of applications that can greatly benefit by leveraging high bandwidth capabilities of the order of 100 Gb/s. Such requirements and advances in IEEE Ethernet standards, Optical Transport Unit4 (OTU4), and host-system interconnects demand a network infrastructure supporting throughput rates of the order of 100 Gb/s with a single wavelength. To address such a demand Acadia Optronics in collaboration with the University of New Mexico, proposed and developed a end-system Network Interface Controller (NIC) for the 100Gbps WANs. Acadia’s 100G NIC employs an FPGA based system with a high-performance processor interconnect (PCIe 3.0) and a high capacity optical transmission link (CXP) to provide data transmission at the rate of 100 Gbps.

  9. Evaluation of spectral shift controlled reactors operating on the uranium fuel cycle. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Sider, F.M.

    1979-08-01

    The performance of the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) operating on uranium fuel cycles was evaluated and compared with the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to analyze the SSCR, the PSR design methodology was extended to include systems moderated by mixtures of light water and heavy water and these methods were validated by comparison with experimental results. Once the design methods had been formulated, the resouce requirements and power costs were determined for the uranium-fueled SSCR. The ore requirements of the UO 2 once-through fuel cycle and the UO 2 fuel cycle with self-generated recycle (SGR) of plutonium were found to be 10% and 19% less than those of similarly fueled PWRs, respectively. A fuel cycle optimization study was performed for the UO 2 once-through SSCR and the SGR SSCR. By individually altering lattice parameters, discharge exposure or number of in-core batches, savings of less than 8% in resource requirements and less than 1% in power costs were obtained

  10. Micronized Coal Reburning Demonstration for NOx Control: A DOE Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Micronized Coal Reburning (MCR) Demonstration for NO(sub x) Control, as described in a report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1999). The need to meet strict emissions requirements at a minimum cost prompted the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), in conjunction with Fuller Company, Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), and Fluor Daniel, to submit the proposal for this project to be sited at TVA's Shawnee Fossil Plant. In July 1992, TVA entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct the study. However, because of operational and environmental compliance strategy changes, the Shawnee site became unavailable

  11. Surface Reaction Kinetics of Ga(1-x)In(x)P Growth During Pulsed Chemical Beam Epitaxy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dietz, N; Beeler, S. C; Schmidt, J. W; Tran, H. T

    2000-01-01

    ... into the surface reaction kinetics during an organometallic deposition process. These insights will allow us to move the control point closer to the point where the growth occurs, which in a chemical been epitaxy process is a surface reaction layer (SRL...

  12. Interface manipulation in GaxIn1-xAs/InP multiple layer structures grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, R.T.H.; van Rijswijk, A.J.C.; Leijs, M.R.; Es, van C.M.; Vonk, H.; Wolter, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this study the control of interfacial layers in nanometre thin heterostructures is demonstrated by variation of the growth interruption sequence (GIS) at the binary - ternary interfaces. All samples have been prepared by chemical beam epitaxy simultaneously growing the structures on exact (100)

  13. Control of ion content and nitrogen species using a mixed chemistry plasma for GaN grown at extremely high growth rates >9 μm/h by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Clinton, Evan A.; Merola, Joseph J.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Bresnahan, Rich C.

    2015-10-01

    Utilizing a modified nitrogen plasma source, plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been used to achieve higher growth rates in GaN. A higher conductance aperture plate, combined with higher nitrogen flow and added pumping capacity, resulted in dramatically increased growth rates up to 8.4 μm/h using 34 sccm of N2 while still maintaining acceptably low operating pressure. It was further discovered that argon could be added to the plasma gas to enhance growth rates up to 9.8 μm/h, which was achieved using 20 sccm of N2 and 7.7 sccm Ar flows at 600 W radio frequency power, for which the standard deviation of thickness was just 2% over a full 2 in. diameter wafer. A remote Langmuir style probe employing the flux gauge was used to indirectly measure the relative ion content in the plasma. The use of argon dilution at low plasma pressures resulted in a dramatic reduction of the plasma ion current by more than half, while high plasma pressures suppressed ion content regardless of plasma gas chemistry. Moreover, different trends are apparent for the molecular and atomic nitrogen species generated by varying pressure and nitrogen composition in the plasma. Argon dilution resulted in nearly an order of magnitude achievable growth rate range from 1 μm/h to nearly 10 μm/h. Even for films grown at more than 6 μm/h, the surface morphology remained smooth showing clear atomic steps with root mean square roughness less than 1 nm. Due to the low vapor pressure of Si, Ge was explored as an alternative n-type dopant for high growth rate applications. Electron concentrations from 2.2 × 1016 to 3.8 × 1019 cm-3 were achieved in GaN using Ge doping, and unintentionally doped GaN films exhibited low background electron concentrations of just 1-2 × 1015 cm-3. The highest growth rates resulted in macroscopic surface features due to Ga cell spitting, which is an engineering challenge still to be addressed. Nonetheless, the dramatically enhanced growth rates demonstrate

  14. Control of ion content and nitrogen species using a mixed chemistry plasma for GaN grown at extremely high growth rates >9 μm/h by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Clinton, Evan A.; Merola, Joseph J.; Doolittle, W. Alan, E-mail: alan.doolittle@ece.gatech.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Bresnahan, Rich C. [Veeco Instruments, St. Paul, Minnesota 55127 (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Utilizing a modified nitrogen plasma source, plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been used to achieve higher growth rates in GaN. A higher conductance aperture plate, combined with higher nitrogen flow and added pumping capacity, resulted in dramatically increased growth rates up to 8.4 μm/h using 34 sccm of N{sub 2} while still maintaining acceptably low operating pressure. It was further discovered that argon could be added to the plasma gas to enhance growth rates up to 9.8 μm/h, which was achieved using 20 sccm of N{sub 2} and 7.7 sccm Ar flows at 600 W radio frequency power, for which the standard deviation of thickness was just 2% over a full 2 in. diameter wafer. A remote Langmuir style probe employing the flux gauge was used to indirectly measure the relative ion content in the plasma. The use of argon dilution at low plasma pressures resulted in a dramatic reduction of the plasma ion current by more than half, while high plasma pressures suppressed ion content regardless of plasma gas chemistry. Moreover, different trends are apparent for the molecular and atomic nitrogen species generated by varying pressure and nitrogen composition in the plasma. Argon dilution resulted in nearly an order of magnitude achievable growth rate range from 1 μm/h to nearly 10 μm/h. Even for films grown at more than 6 μm/h, the surface morphology remained smooth showing clear atomic steps with root mean square roughness less than 1 nm. Due to the low vapor pressure of Si, Ge was explored as an alternative n-type dopant for high growth rate applications. Electron concentrations from 2.2 × 10{sup 16} to 3.8 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} were achieved in GaN using Ge doping, and unintentionally doped GaN films exhibited low background electron concentrations of just 1–2 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3}. The highest growth rates resulted in macroscopic surface features due to Ga cell spitting, which is an engineering challenge still to be

  15. Control of ion content and nitrogen species using a mixed chemistry plasma for GaN grown at extremely high growth rates >9 μm/h by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunning, Brendan P.; Clinton, Evan A.; Merola, Joseph J.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Bresnahan, Rich C.

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing a modified nitrogen plasma source, plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) has been used to achieve higher growth rates in GaN. A higher conductance aperture plate, combined with higher nitrogen flow and added pumping capacity, resulted in dramatically increased growth rates up to 8.4 μm/h using 34 sccm of N 2 while still maintaining acceptably low operating pressure. It was further discovered that argon could be added to the plasma gas to enhance growth rates up to 9.8 μm/h, which was achieved using 20 sccm of N 2 and 7.7 sccm Ar flows at 600 W radio frequency power, for which the standard deviation of thickness was just 2% over a full 2 in. diameter wafer. A remote Langmuir style probe employing the flux gauge was used to indirectly measure the relative ion content in the plasma. The use of argon dilution at low plasma pressures resulted in a dramatic reduction of the plasma ion current by more than half, while high plasma pressures suppressed ion content regardless of plasma gas chemistry. Moreover, different trends are apparent for the molecular and atomic nitrogen species generated by varying pressure and nitrogen composition in the plasma. Argon dilution resulted in nearly an order of magnitude achievable growth rate range from 1 μm/h to nearly 10 μm/h. Even for films grown at more than 6 μm/h, the surface morphology remained smooth showing clear atomic steps with root mean square roughness less than 1 nm. Due to the low vapor pressure of Si, Ge was explored as an alternative n-type dopant for high growth rate applications. Electron concentrations from 2.2 × 10 16 to 3.8 × 10 19 cm −3 were achieved in GaN using Ge doping, and unintentionally doped GaN films exhibited low background electron concentrations of just 1–2 × 10 15 cm −3 . The highest growth rates resulted in macroscopic surface features due to Ga cell spitting, which is an engineering challenge still to be addressed. Nonetheless, the

  16. Investigation of the Process for Registration of Squoxin for Squawfish Control, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rulifson, Robert L.

    1984-12-01

    Squawfish are a predator on downstream migrant salmon and steelhead. Squoxin, 1,1'-methylenedi-2-naphthol, is a specific toxin for squawfish. This report addresses the requirements and deficiencies in data necessary for squoxin registration as a pesticide. It includes an annotated bibliography, keyword index from published and unpublished sources covering information on squawfish, squoxin, state and federal regulations for pesticide registration. Squoxin is 100% lethal to squawfish at concentrations as low as 10 ppB for at least 2 hours. The recommended rate for field application is 100 ppB for 12 hours. At 100 ppB, the maximum LC/sub 0/ for the least squoxin tolerant salmonids is 7 to 17 times greater than the minimum LC/sub 100/ for northern squawfish. Squoxin is excreted in aquatic biota and mammals primarily via the bile. Squoxin shows little tendency to accumulate in animal tissues. A petition to register squoxin was submitted to EPA in 1977. EPA noted deficiencies in data including testing for residues in meat, milk, poultry, eggs, potable water, and irrigated crops; aquatic metabolism; mutagenicity; avian oral LC/sub 50/; acute LD/sub 50/ for freshwater invertebrates; freshwater fish LC/sub 50/; and acute LC/sub 50/ for marine organisms. Cost estimates for conducting the squoxin data research range from $436,600 to $2,070,000. Squawfish control with squoxin would represent an annual savings to the commercial and sports fishing industry of $20 to 25 million based on the value of the Columbia River salmon and steelhead lost to predation. The cost for registration of squoxin and initial treatment of the Columbia is far less than the value of returning adults from the smolts lost to predation in one year. 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Integrated Dry NOx/SO2 Emissions Control System, A DOE Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round III, the Integrated Dry NO(sub x)/SO(sub 2) Emissions Control System (IDECS), as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1991). The desire to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO, nitric oxide, and NO(sub 2), nitrogen dioxide, collectively referred to as NO(sub x)) and sulfur dioxide (SO(sub 2)) by up to 70 percent at a minimum capital expenditure, while limiting waste production to dry solids that can be handled by conventional ash-removal equipment, prompted Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) to submit the proposal for the IDECS project. In March 1991, PSCC entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct the study. The project was sited at PSCC's Arapahoe Steam Electric Generating Station in Denver, Colorado. The purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate the reduction of NO(sub x) and SO(sub 2) emissions by installing a combination of existing and emerging technologies, which were expected to work synergistically to reduce emissions. The technologies were low-NO(sub x) burners (LNBS), overfire air (OFA), and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) for NO(sub x) reduction; and dry sorbent injection (DSI), both with and without flue-gas humidification (FGH), for SO(sub 2) reduction. DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding of$26.2 million

  18. Enhanced control and sensing for the REMOTEC ANDROS Mk VI robot. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Harvey, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., and REMOTEC, Inc., explored methods of providing operator feedback for various work actions of the ANDROS Mk VI teleoperated robot. In a hazardous environment, an extremely heavy workload seriously degrades the productivity of teleoperated robot operators. This CRADA involved the addition of computer power to the robot along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robot's performance in and relationship to its environment. Software was developed to integrate the sensor and encoder information and provide control input to the robot. ANDROS Mk VI robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as in a variety of other hazardous environments. Further, this platform has potential for use in a number of environmental restoration tasks, such as site survey and detection of hazardous waste materials. The addition of sensors and encoders serves to make the robot easier to manage and permits tasks to be done more safely and inexpensively (due to time saved in the completion of complex remote tasks). Prior research on the automation of mobile platforms with manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR, B ampersand R code KC0401030) Laboratory, a BES-supported facility, indicated that this type of enhancement is effective. This CRADA provided such enhancements to a successful working teleoperated robot for the first time. Performance of this CRADA used the CESAR laboratory facilities and expertise developed under BES funding

  19. High quality atomically thin PtSe2 films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingzhe; Wang, Eryin; Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Guangqi; Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Kenan; Yao, Wei; Lu, Nianpeng; Yang, Shuzhen; Wu, Shilong; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Wu, Yang; Yu, Pu; Duan, Wenhui; Zhou, Shuyun

    2017-12-01

    Atomically thin PtSe2 films have attracted extensive research interests for potential applications in high-speed electronics, spintronics and photodetectors. Obtaining high quality thin films with large size and controlled thickness is critical. Here we report the first successful epitaxial growth of high quality PtSe2 films by molecular beam epitaxy. Atomically thin films from 1 ML to 22 ML have been grown and characterized by low-energy electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Moreover, a systematic thickness dependent study of the electronic structure is revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and helical spin texture is revealed by spin-ARPES. Our work provides new opportunities for growing large size single crystalline films to investigate the physical properties and potential applications of PtSe2.

  20. Intercalation of metals and silicon at the interface of epitaxial graphene and its substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Li; Xu Wen-Yan; Que Yan-De; Mao Jin-Hai; Meng Lei; Pan Li-Da; Li Geng; Wang Ye-Liang; Du Shi-Xuan; Gao Hong-Jun; Liu Yun-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Intercalations of metals and silicon between epitaxial graphene and its substrates are reviewed. For metal intercalation, seven different metals have been successfully intercalated at the interface of graphene/Ru(0001) and form different intercalated structures. Meanwhile, graphene maintains its original high quality after the intercalation and shows features of weakened interaction with the substrate. For silicon intercalation, two systems, graphene on Ru(0001) and on Ir(111), have been investigated. In both cases, graphene preserves its high quality and regains its original superlative properties after the silicon intercalation. More importantly, we demonstrate that thicker silicon layers can be intercalated at the interface, which allows the atomic control of the distance between graphene and the metal substrates. These results show the great potential of the intercalation method as a non-damaging approach to decouple epitaxial graphene from its substrates and even form a dielectric layer for future electronic applications. (topical review - low-dimensional nanostructures and devices)

  1. Superconductivity of Rock-Salt Structure LaO Epitaxial Thin Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminaga, Kenichi; Oka, Daichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Fukumura, Tomoteru

    2018-06-06

    We report a superconducting transition in a LaO epitaxial thin film with the superconducting transition onset temperature ( T c ) at around 5 K. This T c is higher than those of other lanthanum monochalcogenides and opposite to their chemical trend: T c = 0.84, 1.02, and 1.48 K for LaX (X = S, Se, Te), respectively. The carrier control resulted in a dome-shaped T c as a function of electron carrier density. In addition, the T c was significantly sensitive to epitaxial strain in spite of the highly symmetric crystal structure. This rock-salt superconducting LaO could be a building block to design novel superlattice superconductors.

  2. Precision calibration of the silicon doping level in gallium arsenide epitaxial layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhov, D. V.; Berezovskaya, T. N.; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Maleev, N. A.; Timoshnev, S. N.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    An approach to precision calibration of the silicon doping level in gallium arsenide epitaxial layers is discussed that is based on studying the dependence of the carrier density in the test GaAs layer on the silicon- source temperature using the Hall-effect and CV profiling techniques. The parameters are measured by standard or certified measuring techniques and approved measuring instruments. It is demonstrated that the use of CV profiling for controlling the carrier density in the test GaAs layer at the thorough optimization of the measuring procedure ensures the highest accuracy and reliability of doping level calibration in the epitaxial layers with a relative error of no larger than 2.5%.

  3. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 into Schedule I. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Drug Enforcement Administration places (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (UR-144), [1-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (5-fluoro-UR-144, XLR11), and N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (APINACA, AKB48), including their salts, isomers, and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. This scheduling action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. This action imposes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to schedule I controlled substances on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, import, export, engage in research, conduct instructional activities or chemical analysis, or possess), or propose to handle UR-144, XLR11, or AKB48.

  4. Reclamation of a molecular beam epitaxy system and conversion for oxide epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, Alexander G.; Henderson, Walter; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2008-01-01

    An early 1980s vintage molecular beam epitaxy system, a Varian Gen II system, originally used for HgCdTe epitaxy, was converted into a system capable of growing thin-film complex metal oxides. The nature of some of the alternative oxides requires a thorough cleaning and, in some cases, complete replacement of system components. Details are provided regarding the chemistry of the etchants used, safety requirements for properly handling, and disposal of large quantities of etchants and etch by-products, and components that can be reused versus components that require replacement are given. Following the given procedures, an ultimate base pressure of 2x10 -10 Torr was obtained. Films grown in the system after reclamation contained no evidence of previously present materials down to the detection limit of secondary ion mass spectrometry

  5. Self-assembled epitaxial NiSi2 nanowires on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Chen, L.J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial NiSi 2 nanowires have been fabricated on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE). The RDE method promoted nanowire growth since it provides deposited atoms sufficient kinetic energy for movement on the Si surface during the growth of silicide islands. The twin-related interface between NiSi 2 and Si is directly related to the nanowire formation since it breaks the symmetry of the surface and leads to the asymmetric growth. The temperature of RDE was found to greatly influence the formation of nanowires. By RDE at 750 deg. C, a high density of NiSi 2 nanowires was formed with an average aspect ratio of 30

  6. Study of epitaxial lateral overgrowth of GaN for application in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry Ann, N. J.; Rodak, L. E.; Kasarla, Kalyan; Yang, Nanying; Korakakis, D.

    2005-10-01

    In this research effort, epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) of GaN on sapphire was performed by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor. All ELOG growths were stopped prior to complete coalescence, and the resulting cross-sections were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both vertical {1120} and inclined sidewalls were observed. Inclined {112n}sidewalls of various angles (n 2-2.2) were found as previously reported in the literature1. Both one-step and two-step ELOG processes were used to control the overgrowth geometry. It was confirmed that sidewall formation and growth rates are closely correlated with multiple parameters including temperature and V/III ratio1. It was also found that substrate rotation greatly influences sidewall evolution and vertical growth rate. A conceptual model was begun to completely describe the ELOG process in a horizontal reactor. It is speculated that the different sidewalls observed as a function of substrate orientation result from variation in the local V/III ratio. Once developed, the final model will be used to control the sidewalls in the growth of ELOG structures for the fabrication of novel optoelectronic devices.

  7. New process modeling[sic], design, and control strategies for energy efficiency, high product quality, and improved productivity in the process industries. Final project report; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, W. Harmon

    2002-01-01

    This project was concerned with the development of process design and control strategies for improving energy efficiency, product quality, and productivity in the process industries. In particular, (i) the resilient design and control of chemical reactors, and (ii) the operation of complex processing systems, was investigated. Specific topics studied included new process modeling procedures, nonlinear controller designs, and control strategies for multiunit integrated processes. Both fundamental and immediately applicable results were obtained. The new design and operation results from this project were incorporated into computer-aided design software and disseminated to industry. The principles and design procedures have found their way into industrial practice

  8. Point defect balance in epitaxial GaSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segercrantz, N.; Slotte, J.; Makkonen, I.; Kujala, J.; Tuomisto, F.; Song, Y.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy in both conventional and coincidence Doppler broadening mode is used for studying the effect of growth conditions on the point defect balance in GaSb:Bi epitaxial layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Positron annihilation characteristics in GaSb are also calculated using density functional theory and compared to experimental results. We conclude that while the main positron trapping defect in bulk samples is the Ga antisite, the Ga vacancy is the most prominent trap in the samples grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results suggest that the p–type conductivity is caused by different defects in GaSb grown with different methods.

  9. One-step Ge/Si epitaxial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Chi; Lin, Bi-Hsuan; Chen, Huang-Chin; Chen, Po-Chin; Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn; Lin, I-Nan; Chiu, Hsin-Tien; Lee, Chi-Young

    2011-07-01

    Fabricating a low-cost virtual germanium (Ge) template by epitaxial growth of Ge films on silicon wafer with a Ge(x)Si(1-x) (0 deposition method in one step by decomposing a hazardousless GeO(2) powder under hydrogen atmosphere without ultra-high vacuum condition and then depositing in a low-temperature region. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the Ge film with an epitaxial relationship is along the in-plane direction of Si. The successful growth of epitaxial Ge films on Si substrate demonstrates the feasibility of integrating various functional devices on the Ge/Si substrates.

  10. Droplet Epitaxy Image Contrast in Mirror Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Jesson, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation methods are applied to interpret mirror electron microscopy (MEM) images obtained from a movie of GaAs droplet epitaxy. Cylindrical symmetry of structures grown by droplet epitaxy is assumed in the simulations which reproduce the main features of the experimental MEM image contrast, demonstrating that droplet epitaxy can be studied in real-time. It is therefore confirmed that an inner ring forms at the droplet contact line and an outer ring (or skirt) occurs outside the droplet periphery. We believe that MEM combined with image simulations will be increasingly used to study the formation and growth of quantum structures.

  11. Organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Stringfellow, Gerald B

    1989-01-01

    Here is one of the first single-author treatments of organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)--a leading technique for the fabrication of semiconductor materials and devices. Also included are metal-organic molecular-beam epitaxy (MOMBE) and chemical-beam epitaxy (CBE) ultra-high-vacuum deposition techniques using organometallic source molecules. Of interest to researchers, students, and people in the semiconductor industry, this book provides a basic foundation for understanding the technique and the application of OMVPE for the growth of both III-V and II-VI semiconductor materials and the

  12. Schedules of controlled substances: extension of temporary placement of UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 in schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is issuing this final order to extend the temporary placement of (1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (UR-144), [1-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (5-fluoro-UR-144, XLR11) and N-(1-adamantyl)-1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (APINACA, AKB48), including their salts, isomers, and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, in schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act. The current final order temporarily placing UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 in schedule I is due to expire on May 15, 2015. This final order will extend the temporary scheduling of UR-144, XLR11, and AKB48 to May 15, 2016, or until the permanent scheduling action for these three substances is completed, whichever occurs first.

  13. Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Ping

    2015-12-22

    Lattice-polarity-driven epitaxy of hexagonal semiconductor nanowires (NWs) is demonstrated on InN NWs. In-polarity InN NWs form typical hexagonal structure with pyramidal growth front, whereas N-polarity InN NWs slowly turn to the shape of hexagonal pyramid and then convert to an inverted pyramid growth, forming diagonal pyramids with flat surfaces and finally coalescence with each other. This contrary growth behavior driven by lattice-polarity is most likely due to the relatively lower growth rate of the (0001 ̅) plane, which results from the fact that the diffusion barriers of In and N adatoms on the (0001) plane (0.18 and 1.0 eV, respectively) are about two-fold larger in magnitude than those on the (0001 ̅) plane (0.07 and 0.52 eV), as calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). The formation of diagonal pyramids for the N-polarity hexagonal NWs affords a novel way to locate quantum dot in the kink position, suggesting a new recipe for the fabrication of dot-based devices.

  14. Molecular beam epitaxy of InN nanowires on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golam Sarwar, A. T. M.; Carnevale, Santino D.; Kent, Thomas F.; Laskar, Masihhur R.; May, Brelon J.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a systematic growth study of the nucleation process of InN nanowires on Si(1 1 1) substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Samples are grown with various substrate temperatures and III/V ratios. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoluminescence are carried out to map out the variation in structural and optical properties versus growth conditions. Statistical averages of areal density, height, and radius are mapped as a function of substrate temperature and III/V ratio. Three different morphological phases are identified on the growth surface: InN, α-In and β-In. Based on SEM image analysis of samples grown at different conditions, the formation mechanism of these phases is proposed. Finally, the growth phase diagram of PAMBE grown InN on Si under N-rich condition is presented, and tapered versus non-tapered growth conditions are identified. It is found that high growth temperature and low III/V ratio plays a critical role in the growth of non-tapered InN nanowires.

  15. Magnetic properties of novel epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, S.D.; Moog, E.R.

    1986-09-01

    The surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE) is used to explore the magnetism of ultra-thin Fe Films extending into the monolayer regime. Both bcc α-Fe and fcc γ-Fe single-crystalline, multilayer films are prepared on the bulk-terminated (1 x 1) structures of Au(100) and Cu(100), respectively. The characterizations of epitaxy and growth mode are performed using low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy. Monolayer-range Fe/Au(100) is ferromagnetic with a lower Curie temperature than bulk α-Fe. The controversial γ-Fe/Cu(100) system exhibits a striking, metastable, surface magnetic phase at temperatures above room temperature, but does not exhibit bulk ferromagnetism

  16. Selenium implantation in epitaxial gallium arsenide layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, T.; Tokunaga, K.; Taka, S.; Yuge, Y.; Kohzu, H.

    1981-01-01

    Selenium implantation at room temperature in S-doped epitaxial GaAs layers as a means of the formation of n + layers has been investigated. Doping profiles for Se-implanted layers have been examined by a C-V technique and/or a differential Hall effect method. It has been shown that n + layers with a maximum carrier concentration of approx. equal to1.5 x 10 18 cm -3 can be formed by implantation followed by a 15 min annealing at 950 0 C. Contact resistance of ohmic electrodes is reduced by use of the Se-implanted n + layers, resulting in the improvement on GaAs FET performance. Measured minimum noise figure of the Se-implanted GaAs FETs is 0.74 dB at 4 GHz. (orig.)

  17. Fluorine incorporation during Si solid phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impellizzeri, G.; Mirabella, S.; Romano, L.; Napolitani, E.; Carnera, A.; Grimaldi, M.G.; Priolo, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the F incorporation and segregation in preamorphized Si during solid phase epitaxy (SPE) at different temperatures and for several implanted-F energies and fluences. The Si samples were amorphized to a depth of 550 nm by implanting Si at liquid nitrogen temperature and then enriched with F at different energies (65-150 keV) and fluences (0.07-5 x 10 14 F/cm 2 ). Subsequently, the samples were regrown by SPE at different temperatures: 580, 700 and 800 deg. C. We have found that the amount of F incorporated after SPE strongly depends on the SPE temperature and on the energy and fluence of the implanted-F, opening the possibility to tailor the F profile during SPE

  18. Strain quantification in epitaxial thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushley, M

    2008-01-01

    Strain arising in epitaxial thin films can be beneficial in some cases but devastating in others. By altering the lattice parameters, strain may give a thin film properties hitherto unseen in the bulk material. On the other hand, heavily strained systems are prone to develop lattice defects in order to relieve the strain, which can cause device failure or, at least, a decrease in functionality. Using convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), it is possible to determine local strains within a material. By comparing the results from CBED and HRTEM experiments, it is possible to gain a complete view of a material, including the strain and any lattice defects present. As well as looking at how the two experimental techniques differ from each other, I will also look at how results from different image analysis algorithms compare. Strain in Si/SiGe samples and BST/SRO/MgO capacitor structures will be discussed.

  19. Optical characterization of epitaxial semiconductor layers

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosive development in the growth of expitaxial layers and structures with atomic-scale dimensions. This progress has created new demands for the characterization of those stuctures. Various methods have been refined and new ones developed with the main emphasis on non-destructive in-situ characterization. Among those, methods which rely on the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter are particularly valuable. In this book standard methods such as far-infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, Raman scattering, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction are presented, as well as new advanced techniques which provide the potential for better in-situ characterization of epitaxial structures (such as reflection anistropy spectroscopy, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, second-harmonic generation, and others). This volume is intended for researchers working at universities or in industry, as well as for graduate students who are interested in the characterization of ...

  20. Molecular beam epitaxy applications to key materials

    CERN Document Server

    Farrow, Robin F C

    1995-01-01

    In this volume, the editor and contributors describe the use of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) for a range of key materials systems that are of interest for both technological and fundamental reasons. Prior books on MBE have provided an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of MBE and emphasize growth and characterization of GaAs-based structures. The aim in this book is somewhat different; it is to demonstrate the versatility of the technique by showing how it can be utilized to prepare and explore a range of distinct and diverse materials. For each of these materials systems MBE has played a key role both in their development and application to devices.

  1. Scalable solution-phase epitaxial growth of symmetry-mismatched heterostructures on two-dimensional crystal soft template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyang; Yin, Anxiang; Mao, Jun; Xia, Yi; Kempf, Nicholas; He, Qiyuan; Wang, Yiliu; Chen, Chih-Yen; Zhang, Yanliang; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Ren, Zhifeng; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Epitaxial heterostructures with precisely controlled composition and electronic modulation are of central importance for electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. In general, epitaxial material growth requires identical or nearly identical crystal structures with small misfit in lattice symmetry and parameters and is typically achieved by vapor-phase depositions in vacuum. We report a scalable solution-phase growth of symmetry-mismatched PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 epitaxial heterostructures by using two-dimensional (2D) Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates as soft templates. The dangling bond-free surface of 2D Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates guides the growth of PbSe crystal without requiring a one-to-one match in the atomic structure, which exerts minimal restriction on the epitaxial layer. With a layered structure and weak van der Waals interlayer interaction, the interface layer in the 2D Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates can deform to accommodate incoming layer, thus functioning as a soft template for symmetry-mismatched epitaxial growth of cubic PbSe crystal on rhombohedral Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates. We show that a solution chemistry approach can be readily used for the synthesis of gram-scale PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 epitaxial heterostructures, in which the square PbSe (001) layer forms on the trigonal/hexagonal (0001) plane of Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates. We further show that the resulted PbSe/Bi 2 Se 3 heterostructures can be readily processed into bulk pellet with considerably suppressed thermal conductivity (0.30 W/m·K at room temperature) while retaining respectable electrical conductivity, together delivering a thermoelectric figure of merit ZT three times higher than that of the pristine Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates at 575 K. Our study demonstrates a unique epitaxy mode enabled by the 2D nanocrystal soft template via an affordable and scalable solution chemistry approach. It opens up new opportunities for the creation of diverse epitaxial heterostructures with highly disparate structures and functions.

  2. Synthesis of Si epitaxial layers from technical silicon by liquid-phase epitaxy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimov, Sh.I.; Saidov, A.S.; Sapaev, B.; Horvat, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For today silicon is one of the most suitable materials because it is investigated, cheap and several its parameters are even just as good as those of connections A III B V . Disintegration of the USSR has led to the must difficult position of the industry of silicon instrument manufacture because of all industry of semiconductor silicon manufacture had generally concentrated in Ukraine. The importance of semiconductor silicon is rather great, because of, in opinion of expects, the nearest decade this material will dominate over not only on microelectronics but also in the majority of basic researches. Research of obtain of semiconductor silicon, power electronics and solar conversion, is topical interest of the science. In the work research of technological conditions of obtain and measurement of parameters of epitaxial layers obtained from technical silicon + stannum is resulted. Growth of silicon epitaxial layer with suitable parameters on thickness, cleanliness uniformity and structural perfection depends on the correct choice of condition of the growth and temperature. It is shown that in this case the growth occurring without preliminary clearing of materials (mix materials and substrates) at crystallization of epitaxial layer from technical silicon is accompanied by clearing of silicon film from majority of impurities order-of-magnitude. As starting raw material technical silicon of mark Kr.3 has been taken. By means of X-ray microanalyzer 'Jeol' JSM 5910 LV - Japan the quantitative analysis from the different points has been and from the different sides and from different points has been carried out. After corresponding chemical and mechanical processing the quantitative analysis of layer on chip has been carried out. Results of the quantitative analysis are shown. More effective clearing occurs that of the impurity atoms such as Al, P, Ca, Ti and Fe. The obtained material (epitaxial layer) has the parameters: specific resistance ρ∼0.1-4.0

  3. Impact of GaN transition layers in the growth of GaN epitaxial layer on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Danmei; Zhao Degang; Jiang Desheng; Liu Zongshun; Zhu Jianjun; Chen Ping; Liu Wei; Li Xiang; Shi Ming

    2015-01-01

    A method for growing GaN epitaxial layer on Si (111) substrate is investigated. Due to the large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN, GaN grown directly above an AlN buffer layer on the Si substrate turns out to be of poor quality. In this study, a GaN transition layer is grown additionally on the AlN buffer before the GaN epitaxial growth. By changing the growth conditions of the GaN transition layer, we can control the growth and merging of islands and control the transfer time from 3D to 2D growth mode. With this method, the crystalline quality of the GaN epitaxial layer can be improved and the crack density is reduced. Here, we have investigated the impact of a transition layer on the crystalline quality and stress evolution of a GaN epitaxial layer with methods of X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and in situ reflectivity trace. With the increasing thickness of transition layer, the crack decreases and the crystalline quality is improved. But when the transition layer exceeds a critical thickness, the crystalline quality of the epilayer becomes lower and the crack density increases. (paper)

  4. Deposition and characterisation of epitaxial oxide thin films for SOFCs

    KAUST Repository

    Santiso, José ; Burriel, Mó nica

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent advances in the use of thin films, mostly epitaxial, for fundamental studies of materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. These studies include the influence of film microstructure, crystal orientation

  5. Epitaxial Growth and Cracking Mechanisms of Thermally Sprayed Ceramic Splats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-jun

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, the epitaxial growth and cracking mechanisms of thermally sprayed ceramic splats were explored. We report, for the first time, the epitaxial growth of various splat/substrate combinations at low substrate temperatures (100 °C) and large lattice mismatch (- 11.26%). Our results suggest that thermal spray deposition was essentially a liquid-phase epitaxy, readily forming chemical bonding. The interface temperature was also estimated. The results convincingly demonstrated that atoms only need to diffuse and rearrange over a sufficiently short range during extremely rapid solidification. Concurrently, severe cracking occurred in the epitaxial splat/substrate systems, which indicated high tensile stress was produced during splat deposition. The origin of the tensile stress was attributed to the strong constraint of the locally heated substrate by its cold surroundings.

  6. SiGe epitaxial memory for neuromorphic computing with reproducible high performance based on engineered dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Shinhyun; Tan, Scott H.; Li, Zefan; Kim, Yunjo; Choi, Chanyeol; Chen, Pai-Yu; Yeon, Hanwool; Yu, Shimeng; Kim, Jeehwan

    2018-01-01

    Although several types of architecture combining memory cells and transistors have been used to demonstrate artificial synaptic arrays, they usually present limited scalability and high power consumption. Transistor-free analog switching devices may overcome these limitations, yet the typical switching process they rely on—formation of filaments in an amorphous medium—is not easily controlled and hence hampers the spatial and temporal reproducibility of the performance. Here, we demonstrate analog resistive switching devices that possess desired characteristics for neuromorphic computing networks with minimal performance variations using a single-crystalline SiGe layer epitaxially grown on Si as a switching medium. Such epitaxial random access memories utilize threading dislocations in SiGe to confine metal filaments in a defined, one-dimensional channel. This confinement results in drastically enhanced switching uniformity and long retention/high endurance with a high analog on/off ratio. Simulations using the MNIST handwritten recognition data set prove that epitaxial random access memories can operate with an online learning accuracy of 95.1%.

  7. Molecular-beam epitaxy growth of high-performance midinfrared diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.W.; Choi, H.K.; Calawa, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in the performance of GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum-well diode lasers have been directly related to improvements in the quality of the molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown epitaxial layers. These improvements have been based on careful measurement and control of lattice matching and intentional strain, changes in shutter sequencing at interfaces, and a generally better understanding of the growth of Sb-based epitaxial materials. By using this improved MBE-grown material, significantly enhanced performance has been obtained for midinfrared lasers. These lasers, which are capable of ∼2-μm emission at room temperature, presently exhibit threshold current densities of 143 A/cm 2 , continuous wave powers of 1.3 W, and diffraction-limited powers of 120 mW. Such high-performance midinfrared diode lasers are of interest for a wide variety of applications, including eye-safe laser radar, remote sensing of atmospheric contaminants and wind turbulence, laser surgery, and pumping of solid-state laser media. 12 refs., 3 figs

  8. Epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, Karthick

    2013-07-30

    Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials are considered as a prime candidate for optical and electrical data storage applications. With the application of an optical or electrical pulse, they can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline state, thereby exhibiting large optical and electrical contrast between the two phases, which are then stored as information in the form of binary digits. Single crystalline growth is interesting from both the academic and industrial perspective, as ordered Ge-Sb-Te based metamaterials are known to exhibit switching at reduced energies. The present study deals with the epitaxial growth and analysis of Ge-Sb-Te based thin films. The first part of the thesis deals with the epitaxial growth of GeTe. Thin films of GeTe were grown on highly mismatched Si(111) and (001) substrates. On both the substrate orientations the film grows along [111] direction with an amorphous-to-crystalline transition observed during the initial stages of growth. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied in-vivo using azimuthal reflection high-energy electron diffraction scans and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. In the second part of the thesis epitaxy and characterization of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films are presented. The third part of the thesis deals with the epitaxy of ternary Ge-Sb-Te alloys. The composition of the films are shown to be highly dependent on growth temperatures and vary along the pseudobinary line from Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} to GeTe with increase in growth temperatures. A line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to reliably control the GeSbTe growth temperature. Growth was performed at different Ge, Sb, Te fluxes to study the compositional variation of the films. Incommensurate peaks are observed along the [111] direction by X-ray diffraction. The possibility of superstructural vacancy ordering along the [111] direction is discussed.

  9. Epitaxial growth of Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perumal, Karthick

    2013-01-01

    Ge-Sb-Te based phase change materials are considered as a prime candidate for optical and electrical data storage applications. With the application of an optical or electrical pulse, they can be reversibly switched between amorphous and crystalline state, thereby exhibiting large optical and electrical contrast between the two phases, which are then stored as information in the form of binary digits. Single crystalline growth is interesting from both the academic and industrial perspective, as ordered Ge-Sb-Te based metamaterials are known to exhibit switching at reduced energies. The present study deals with the epitaxial growth and analysis of Ge-Sb-Te based thin films. The first part of the thesis deals with the epitaxial growth of GeTe. Thin films of GeTe were grown on highly mismatched Si(111) and (001) substrates. On both the substrate orientations the film grows along [111] direction with an amorphous-to-crystalline transition observed during the initial stages of growth. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition was studied in-vivo using azimuthal reflection high-energy electron diffraction scans and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. In the second part of the thesis epitaxy and characterization of Sb 2 Te 3 thin films are presented. The third part of the thesis deals with the epitaxy of ternary Ge-Sb-Te alloys. The composition of the films are shown to be highly dependent on growth temperatures and vary along the pseudobinary line from Sb 2 Te 3 to GeTe with increase in growth temperatures. A line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to reliably control the GeSbTe growth temperature. Growth was performed at different Ge, Sb, Te fluxes to study the compositional variation of the films. Incommensurate peaks are observed along the [111] direction by X-ray diffraction. The possibility of superstructural vacancy ordering along the [111] direction is discussed.

  10. Association between microcephaly, Zika virus infection, and other risk factors in Brazil: final report of a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Thalia Velho Barreto; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; Souza, Wayner Vieira; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; de Melo, Ana Paula Lopes; Valongueiro, Sandra; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão; Braga, Cynthia; Filho, Sinval Pinto Brandão; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Vazquez, Enrique; Cruz, Danielle di Cavalcanti Souza; Henriques, Claudio Maierovitch Pessanha; Bezerra, Luciana Caroline Albuquerque; Castanha, Priscila Mayrelle da Silva; Dhalia, Rafael; Marques-Júnior, Ernesto Torres Azevedo; Martelli, Celina Maria Turchi; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha

    2018-03-01

    A Zika virus epidemic emerged in northeast Brazil in 2015 and was followed by a striking increase in congenital microcephaly cases, triggering a declaration of an international public health emergency. This is the final report of the first case-control study evaluating the potential causes of microcephaly: congenital Zika virus infection, vaccines, and larvicides. The published preliminary report suggested a strong association between microcephaly and congenital Zika virus infection. We did a case-control study in eight public maternity hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Cases were neonates born with microcephaly, defined as a head circumference of 2 SD below the mean. Two controls without microcephaly were matched to each case by expected date of delivery and area of residence. We tested the serum of cases and controls and the CSF of cases for detection of Zika virus genomes with quantitative RT-PCR and for detection of IgM antibodies with capture-IgM ELISA. We also tested maternal serum with plaque reduction neutralisation assays for Zika and dengue viruses. We estimated matched crude and adjusted odds ratios with exact conditional logistic regression to determine the association between microcephaly and Zika virus infection. We screened neonates born between Jan 15 and Nov 30, 2016, and prospectively recruited 91 cases and 173 controls. In 32 (35%) cases, congenital Zika virus infection was confirmed by laboratory tests and no controls had confirmed Zika virus infections. 69 (83%) of 83 cases with known birthweight were small for gestational age, compared with eight (5%) of 173 controls. The overall matched odds ratio was 73·1 (95% CI 13·0-∞) for microcephaly and Zika virus infection after adjustments. Neither vaccination during pregnancy or use of the larvicide pyriproxyfen was associated with microcephaly. Results of laboratory tests for Zika virus and brain imaging results were available for 79 (87%) cases; within these cases, ten were positive for Zika virus

  11. Microwave dynamics of YBCO bi-epitaxial Josephson structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Constantinian, K. Y.; Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Mashtakov, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    The processes of interaction of microwaves (frequency View the MathML source) with a single high-Tc superconducting YBa2Cu3Ox (YBCO) bi-epitaxial grain-boundary junction and with an array of two junctions connected in series, have been investigated experimentally at temperatures T = 4.2− 77 K......, as well as the subharmonic detector response at weak magnetic fields φ microwave field induced frequency synchronization of two series connected bi-epitaxial YBCO junctions....

  12. Electrodeposition of epitaxial CdSe on (111) gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachet, H.; Cortes, R.; Froment, M. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France). Phys. des Liquides et Electrochimie; Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier (IREM) UMR CNRS C0173, Universite de Versailles- St Quentin en Yvelynes, 45 Avenue des Etats Unis, 78035, Versailles (France)

    2000-02-21

    Epitaxial growth of CdSe has been achieved on GaAs(111) by electrodeposition from an aqueous electrolyte. The structure of the film corresponds to the cubic modification of CdSe. The quality of epitaxy has been investigated by reflection high energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. By XPS measurements the chemistry of the CdSe/GaAs interface and the composition of CdSe are determined. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of deep level defects in epitaxial semiconducting zinc sulpho-selenide. Progress report, 15 June 1979-14 June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    In an effort to understand the defect structure of the ternary II-VI compound zinc sulpho-selenide, the binary compound zinc selenide was investigated. Thin single crystalline films of zinc selenide were heteroepitaxially grown on (100) GaAs. Epitaxial layers from 5 to 50 microns thick could be readily grown using a chemical vapor transport technique. The layers had an excellent morphology with few stacking faults and hillocks. Detailed epitaxial growth kinetics were examined as a function of temperature and reactant concentration. It was found that hydrogen flow rate, source and substrate temperature affect the growth rate of the epitaxial films. Au - ZnSe Schottky barrier diodes and ZnSe - GaAs n-p heterojunctions were prepared from the epitaxial layers. Current-voltage characteristics were measured on both types of diodes. From capacitance-voltage measurements the residual doping density of the epitaxial layers were found to be of the order of 10 14 - 10 15 cm -3 . Finally, we have begun to measure the deep level spectrum of both the Schottky barrier diodes and the heterojunctions. Deep level transient spectroscopy appears to be well suited for determining trapping states in ZnSe provided the material has a low enough resistivity

  14. Epitaxy of Polar Oxides and Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Christopher Tyrel

    Integrating polar oxide materials with wide-bandgap nitride semiconductors offers the possibility of a tunable 2D carrier gas (2DCG) - provided defect densities are low and interfaces are abrupt. This dissertation investigates a portion of the synthesis science necessary to produce a "semiconductor-grade" interface between these highly dissimilar materials. A significant portion of this work is aligned with efforts to engineer a step-free GaN substrate to produce single in-plane oriented rocksalt oxide films. Initially, we explore the homoepitaxial MOCVD growth conditions necessary to produce highquality GaN films on ammonothermally grown substrates. Ammono substrates are only recently available for purchase and are the market leader in low-dislocation density material. Their novelty requires development of an understanding of morphology trade-offs in processing space. This includes preservation of the epi-polished surface in aggressive MOCVD environments and an understanding of the kinetic barriers affecting growth morphologies. Based on several factors, it was determined that GaN exhibits an 'uphill' diffusion bias that may likely be ascribed to a positive Ehrlich-Schwoebel (ES) barrier. This barrier should have a stabilizing effect against step-bunching but, for many growth conditions, regular step bunching was observed. One possible explanation for the step-bunching instability is the presence of impurities. Experimentally, conditions which incorporate more carbon into GaN homoepitaxial layers are correlated with step-bunching while conditions that suppress carbon produce bilayer stepped morphologies. These observations lead us to the conclusion that GaN homoepitaxial morphology is a competition between impurity induced step-bunching and a stabilizing diffusion bias due to a positive ES barrier. Application of the aforementioned homoepitaxial growth techniques to discrete substrate regions using selected- and confined area epitaxy (SAE,CAE) produces some

  15. Chemical gating of epitaxial graphene through ultrathin oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larciprete, Rosanna; Lacovig, Paolo; Orlando, Fabrizio; Dalmiglio, Matteo; Omiciuolo, Luca; Baraldi, Alessandro; Lizzit, Silvano

    2015-08-07

    We achieved a controllable chemical gating of epitaxial graphene grown on metal substrates by exploiting the electrostatic polarization of ultrathin SiO2 layers synthesized below it. Intercalated oxygen diffusing through the SiO2 layer modifies the metal-oxide work function and hole dopes graphene. The graphene/oxide/metal heterostructure behaves as a gated plane capacitor with the in situ grown SiO2 layer acting as a homogeneous dielectric spacer, whose high capacity allows the Fermi level of graphene to be shifted by a few hundreds of meV when the oxygen coverage at the metal substrate is of the order of 0.5 monolayers. The hole doping can be finely tuned by controlling the amount of interfacial oxygen, as well as by adjusting the thickness of the oxide layer. After complete thermal desorption of oxygen the intrinsic doping of SiO2 supported graphene is evaluated in the absence of contaminants and adventitious adsorbates. The demonstration that the charge state of graphene can be changed by chemically modifying the buried oxide/metal interface hints at the possibility of tuning the level and sign of doping by the use of other intercalants capable of diffusing through the ultrathin porous dielectric and reach the interface with the metal.

  16. GaN/NbN epitaxial semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rusen; Khalsa, Guru; Vishwanath, Suresh; Han, Yimo; Wright, John; Rouvimov, Sergei; Katzer, D. Scott; Nepal, Neeraj; Downey, Brian P.; Muller, David A.; Xing, Huili G.; Meyer, David J.; Jena, Debdeep

    2018-03-01

    Epitaxy is a process by which a thin layer of one crystal is deposited in an ordered fashion onto a substrate crystal. The direct epitaxial growth of semiconductor heterostructures on top of crystalline superconductors has proved challenging. Here, however, we report the successful use of molecular beam epitaxy to grow and integrate niobium nitride (NbN)-based superconductors with the wide-bandgap family of semiconductors—silicon carbide, gallium nitride (GaN) and aluminium gallium nitride (AlGaN). We apply molecular beam epitaxy to grow an AlGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure directly on top of an ultrathin crystalline NbN superconductor. The resulting high-mobility, two-dimensional electron gas in the semiconductor exhibits quantum oscillations, and thus enables a semiconductor transistor—an electronic gain element—to be grown and fabricated directly on a crystalline superconductor. Using the epitaxial superconductor as the source load of the transistor, we observe in the transistor output characteristics a negative differential resistance—a feature often used in amplifiers and oscillators. Our demonstration of the direct epitaxial growth of high-quality semiconductor heterostructures and devices on crystalline nitride superconductors opens up the possibility of combining the macroscopic quantum effects of superconductors with the electronic, photonic and piezoelectric properties of the group III/nitride semiconductor family.

  17. TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) integrated control decision team (ICDT) meetings January 22 - 31,1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saladin, V.L.

    1997-01-01

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) letter 97-MSD-163 dated January 15, 1997, directed the Project Hanford Management Contractor (Contractor), Fluor Daniel Hanford, inc., to form a joint RL-Contractor Integrated Control Decision Team (ICDT) to evaluate the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) accident scenarios that were identified to be above the risk evaluation guidelines (radiological and/or toxicological) defined by the April 8, 1996, letter from J. Kinzer, RL-TWRS (96-MSO-069) to Dr. A. L. Trego, Westinghouse Hanford Company. The ICDT evaluated six postulated accidents from the draft FSAR which had analyzed consequences above the DOE directed risk evaluation guidelines after controls were applied. The accidents were: (1) Organic Solvent Fires; (2) Organic Salt-Nitrate Fire; (3) Spray Leak; (4) Flammable Gas; (5) Steam Intrusion; and (6) Seismic Event. Five of the postulated accidents exceed radiological risk guidelines. Although the postulated steam intrusion accident does not exceed the radiological risk guidelines, it was considered in the ICDT evaluation because its calculated consequences exceed toxicological risk evaluation guidelines. Figure 1 delineates the mitigated and unmitigated risk evaluations performed for the FSAR

  18. Surface chemistry and growth mechanisms studies of homo epitaxial (1 0 0) GaAs by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Dawei; Wu Weidong; Zhang Hong; Wang Xuemin; Zhang Hongliang; Zhang Weibin; Xiong Zhengwei; Wang Yuying; Shen Changle; Peng Liping; Han Shangjun; Zhou Minjie

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, GaAs thin film has been deposited on thermally desorbed (1 0 0) GaAs substrate using laser molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning electron microscopy, in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are applied for evaluation of the surface morphology and chemistry during growth process. The results show that a high density of pits is formed on the surface of GaAs substrate after thermal treatment and the epitaxial thin film heals itself by a step flow growth, resulting in a smoother surface morphology. Moreover, it is found that the incorporation of As species into GaAs epilayer is more efficient in laser molecular beam epitaxy than conventional molecular beam epitaxy. We suggest the growth process is impacted by surface chemistry and morphology of GaAs substrate after thermal treatment and the growth mechanisms are discussed in details.

  19. Epitaxial growth and magnetic properties of Fe4-xMnxN thin films grown on MgO(0 0 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Akihito; Takata, Fumiya; Gushi, Toshiki; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi

    2018-05-01

    Epitaxial Fe4-xMnxN (x = 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4) thin films were successfully grown on MgO(0 0 1) single-crystal substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, and their crystalline qualities and magnetic properties were investigated. It was found that the lattice constants of Fe4-xMnxN obtained from X-ray diffraction measurement increased with the Mn content. The ratio of the perpendicular lattice constant c to the in-plane lattice constant a of Fe4-xMnxN was found to be about 0.99 at x ⩾ 2. The magnetic properties evaluated using a vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature revealed that all of the Fe4-xMnxN films exhibited ferromagnetic behavior regardless of the value of x. In addition, the saturation magnetization decreased non-linearly as the Mn content increased. Finally, FeMn3N and Mn4N exhibited perpendicular anisotropy and their uniaxial magnetic anisotropy energies were 2.2 × 105 and 7.5 × 105 erg/cm3, respectively.

  20. Strain in epitaxial high-index Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}(221) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin [Physics Department, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Chen, Weiguang [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Guo, Xin; Ho, Wingkin [Physics Department, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Dai, Xianqi [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Zhengzhou Normal University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450044 (China); Jia, Jinfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xie, Maohai, E-mail: mhxie@hku.hk [Physics Department, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • High-index, off c-axis, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. • A retarded strain relaxation process in such high-index Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is observed, enabling experimentally probe strain effect on topological insulators. • It has been shown by calculation that the Dirac electrons participate in chemical bonding at the heterointerface. - Abstract: High-index Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}(221) film has been grown on In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}-buffered GaAs(001), in which a much retarded strain relaxation dynamics is recorded. The slow strain-relaxation process of in epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}(221) can be attributed to the layered structure of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystal, where the epifilm grown along [221] is like a pile of weakly-coupled quintuple layer slabs stacked side-by-side on substrate. Finally, we reveal strong chemical bonding at the interface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} by plotting differential charge contour calculated by first-principle method. This study points to the feasibility of achieving strained TIs for manipulating the properties of topological systems.

  1. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.

  2. Selective epitaxial growth of Ge1-xSnx on Si by using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washizu, Tomoya; Ike, Shinichi; Inuzuka, Yuki; Takeuchi, Wakana; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2017-06-01

    Selective epitaxial growth of Ge and Ge1-xSnx layers on Si substrates was performed by using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with precursors of tertiary-butyl-germane (t-BGe) and tri-butyl-vinyl-tin (TBVSn). We investigated the effects of growth temperature and total pressure during growth on the selectivity and the crystallinity of the Ge and Ge1-xSnx epitaxial layers. Under low total pressure growth conditions, the dominant mechanism of the selective growth of Ge epitaxial layers is the desorption of the Ge precursors. At a high total pressure case, it is needed to control the surface migration of precursors to realize the selectivity because the desorption of Ge precursors was suppressed. The selectivity of Ge growth was improved by diffusion of the Ge precursors on the SiO2 surfaces when patterned substrates were used at a high total pressure. The selective epitaxial growth of Ge1-xSnx layer was also realized using MOCVD. We found that the Sn precursors less likely to desorb from the SiO2 surfaces than the Ge precursors.

  3. Problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shorikov, A. F.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of a set a controllable objects (region and forming it municipalities). The dynamics each of these is described by the corresponding vector nonlinear discrete-time recurrent vector equations and its control system consist from two levels: basic (control level I) that is dominating and subordinate level (control level II). Both levels have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. In this paper we study the problem of optimization of guaranteed result for program control by the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks. For this problem we proposed in this work an economical and mathematical model of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks and the general scheme for its solving

  4. Problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorikov, A. F., E-mail: afshorikov@mail.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002, Russia Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 16 S. Kovalevskaya, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    This article discusses a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of a set a controllable objects (region and forming it municipalities). The dynamics each of these is described by the corresponding vector nonlinear discrete-time recurrent vector equations and its control system consist from two levels: basic (control level I) that is dominating and subordinate level (control level II). Both levels have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. In this paper we study the problem of optimization of guaranteed result for program control by the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks. For this problem we proposed in this work an economical and mathematical model of two-level hierarchical minimax program control the final state of regional social and economic system in the presence of risks and the general scheme for its solving.

  5. Croissance epitaxiale de GaAs sur substrats de Ge par epitaxie par faisceaux chimiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Simon

    de confirmer l'efficacite du procede de preparation de surface et d'identifier les conditions de croissance optimales. Les resultats de caracterisation indiquent que les materiaux obtenus presentent une tres faible rugosite de surface, une bonne qualite cristalline et un dopage residuel relativement important. De plus, l'interface GaAs/Ge possede une faible densite de defauts. Finalement, la diffusion d'arsenic dans le substrat de germanium est comparable aux valeurs trouvees dans la litterature pour la croissance a basse temperature avec les autres procedes d'epitaxie courants. Ces resultats confirment que la technique d'epitaxie par faisceaux chimiques (CBE) permet de produire des couches de GaAs sur Ge de qualite adequate pour la fabrication de cellules solaires a haute performance. L'apport a la communaute scientifique a ete maximise par le biais de la redaction d'un article soumis a la revue Journal of Crystal Growth et la presentation des travaux a la conference Photovoltaics Canada 2010 . Mots-cles : Epitaxie par jets chimiques, Chemical beam epitaxy, CBE, MOMBE, Germanium, GaAs, Ge

  6. General Top-Down Ion Exchange Process for the Growth of Epitaxial Chalcogenide Thin Films and Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2016-12-30

    We demonstrate a versatile top-down ion exchange process, done at ambient temperature, to form epitaxial chalcogenide films and devices, with nanometer scale thickness control. To demonstrate the versatility of our process we have synthesized (1) epitaxial chalcogenide metallic and semiconducting films and (2) free-standing chalcogenide films and (3) completed in situ formation of atomically sharp heterojunctions by selective ion exchange. Epitaxial NiCo2S4 thin films prepared by our process show 115 times higher mobility than NiCo2S4 pellets (23 vs 0.2 cm(2) V-1 s(-1)) prepared by previous reports. By controlling the ion exchange process time, we made free-standing epitaxial films of NiCo2S4 and transferred them onto different substrates. We also demonstrate in situ formation of atomically sharp, lateral Schottky diodes based on NiCo2O4/NiCo2S4 heterojunction, using a single ion exchange step. Additionally, we show that our approach can be easily extended to other chalcogenide semiconductors. Specifically, we used our process to prepare Cu1.8S thin films with mobility that matches single crystal Cu1.8S (25 cm(2) V-1 s(-1)), which is ca. 28 times higher than the previously reported Cu1.8S thin film mobility (0.58 cm(2) V-1 s(-1)), thus demonstrating the universal nature of our process. This is the first report in which chalcogenide thin films retain the epitaxial nature of the precursor oxide films, an approach that will be useful in many applications.

  7. Magnetic and electrical properties of epitaxial GeMn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlers, Stefan

    2009-01-15

    In this work, GeMn magnetic semiconductors will be investigated. The fabrication of GeMn thin films with Mn contents up to 11.7% was realised with molecular beam epitaxy. At a fabrication temperature of 60 C, the suppression of Mn{sub x}Ge{sub y} phases could reproducibly be obtained. Dislocation free epitaxy of diamond-lattice type GeMn thin films was observed. In all fabrication conditions where Mn{sub x}Ge{sub y} suppression was feasible, an inhomogeneous dispersion of Mn was observed in form of a self-assembly of nanometre sized, Mn rich regions in a Ge rich matrix. Each Mn rich region exhibits ferromagnetic coupling with high Curie temperatures exceeding, in part, room temperature. The local ferromagnetic ordering leads to the formation of large, spatially separated magnetic moments, which induce a superparamagnetic behaviour of the GeMn thin films. At low temperatures {<=} 20 K, remanent behaviour was found to emerge. X-ray absorption experiments revealed a similarity of the Mn incorporation in diamond-lattice type GeMn thin films and in the hexagonal lattice of the intermetallic Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} phase, respectively. These tetrahedra represent building blocks of the Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} unit cell. The incorporation of Mn{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} building blocks was found to be accompanied by local structural disorder. The electrical properties of GeMn thin films were addressed by transport measurements. It was shown that by using a n-type Ge substrate, a pn energy barrier between epilayers and substrate to suppress parallel substrate conduction paths can be introduced. With the pn barrier concept, first results on the magnetotransport behaviour of GeMn thin films were obtained. GeMn was found to be p-type, but of high resistivity. a series of GeMn thin films was fabricated, where intermetallic Mn{sub x}Ge{sub y} phase separation was supported in a controlled manner. Phase separation was found to result in the formation of partially coherent, nanometre sized Mn{sub 5

  8. Epitaxial Integration of Nanowires in Microsystems by Local Micrometer Scale Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Wacaser, Brent A.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2008-01-01

    deposition (CVD) or metal organic VPE (MOVPE). However, VPE of semiconducting nanowires is not compatible with several microfabrication processes due to the high synthesis temperatures and issues such as cross-contamination interfering with the intended microsystem or the VPE process. By selectively heating...... a small microfabricated heater, growth of nanowires can be achieved locally without heating the entire microsystem, thereby reducing the compatibility problems. The first demonstration of epitaxial growth of silicon nanowires by this method is presented and shows that the microsystem can be used for rapid...

  9. Advanced Experimental Analysis of Controls on Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction - Final Report - 09/16/1996 - 03/16/2001; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2001-01-01

    Considering the broad influence that microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction can have on subsurface metal/organic contaminant biogeochemistry, understanding the mechanisms that control this process is critical for predicting the behavior and fate of these contaminants in anaerobic subsurface environments. Knowledge of the factors that influence the rates of growth and activity of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria is critical for predicting (i.e., modeling) the long-term influence of these organisms on the fate of contaminants in the subsurface, and for effectively utilizing Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated geochemical affects for the purpose of subsurface metal/organic contamination bioremediation. This research project will refine existing models for microbiological and geochemical controls on Fe(III) oxide reduction, using laboratory reactor systems that mimic, to varying degrees, the physical and chemical conditions of the subsurface. Novel experimental methods for studying the kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and measuring growth rates of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria will be developed. These new methodologies will be directly applicable to studies on subsurface contaminant transformations directly coupled to or influenced by microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction

  10. The epitaxial growth and interfacial strain study of VO{sub 2}/MgF{sub 2} (001) films by synchrotron based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.L. [Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection of Jiangsu Province, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051 (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Chen, S. [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Liu, Q.H. [Science and Technology on Electro-optical Information Security Control Laboratory, Tianjin 300300 (China); Liao, G.M.; Chen, Y.L.; Ren, H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Zou, C.W., E-mail: czou@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

    2016-09-05

    High quality VO{sub 2} films with different thickness were epitaxially grown on MgF{sub 2} (001) substrates by oxide molecular beam epitaxy method. The evolution of interfacial strain was investigated by synchrotron based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. By adjusting the incidence angles, the penetration depth of X-ray in VO{sub 2} film could be controlled and the thickness-depend lattice distortion in the epitaxial VO{sub 2} film was investigated. Due to the lattice mismatching, the pronounced tensile strain was observed in ultra-thin VO{sub 2} film. As the film thickness increasing, the interfacial strain relaxed gradually and became fully relaxed for thick VO{sub 2} films. Combined with the electric transport measurement, it was revealed that the phase transition temperature of ultra-thin VO{sub 2} film decreased greatly. The effect of interfacial strain induced phase transition modulation and the intrinsic mechanism was systematically discussed. - Highlights: • We prepared high quality VO{sub 2} epitaxial films on MgF{sub 2} (001) substrates by oxide molecular beam epitaxy method. • Synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was employed to detect evolution of strain along depth profile. • Based on a classic band structure model, the mechanism of strain controlled phase transition of VO{sub 2} was discussed.

  11. SisterTalk: final results of a culturally tailored cable television delivered weight control program for Black women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risica, Patricia Markham; Gans, Kim M; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Kirtania, Usree; Lasater, Thomas M

    2013-12-27

    Obesity among Black women continues to exceed that of other women. Most weight loss programs created without reference to specific cultural contexts are less effective for Black than White women. Weight control approaches accessible to Black women and adapted to relevant cultural contexts are important for addressing this problem. This paper reports the final results of SisterTalk, the randomized controlled trial of a cable TV weight control program oriented toward Black women. A five group design included a comparison group and a 2 × 2 factorial comparison of a) interactive vs. passive programming and b) telephone social support vs no telephone support, with 12 weekly initial cable TV programs followed by 4 monthly booster videos. At baseline, 3, 8, and 12 months post randomization, telephone and in person surveys were administered on diet, physical activity, and physical measurements of height and weight were taken to calculate body mass index (BMI). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine differences over time, and between treatment and comparison groups. Dose variables reflecting use of the TV/video and written materials were also assessed. At 3 months, BMI, weight, and dietary fat were significantly lower and physical activity significantly higher among women exposed to the Cable TV intervention compared to the wait-list comparison group. Significant dietary fat differences were still observed at 8 and 12 month evaluations, but not BMI or physical activity differences. Main effects were not observed for interactive programming or enhanced social support at any time point. Within the intervention group, higher watching of the TV series and higher reading of educational materials were both (separately) associated with significantly lower dietary fat. Cable TV was an effective delivery channel to assist Black women with weight control, increasing physical activity and decreasing dietary fat during an initial intervention period, but only dietary

  12. Oriented epitaxial TiO2 nanowires for water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wenting; Cortez, Pablo; Wuhrer, Richard; Macartney, Sam; Bozhilov, Krassimir N.; Liu, Rong; Sheppard, Leigh R.; Kisailus, David

    2017-06-01

    Highly oriented epitaxial rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanowire arrays have been hydrothermally grown on polycrystalline TiO2 templates with their orientation dependent on the underlying TiO2 grain. Both the diameter and areal density of the nanowires were tuned by controlling the precursor concentration, and the template surface energy and roughness. Nanowire tip sharpness was influenced by precursor solubility and diffusivity. A new secondary ion mass spectrometer technique has been developed to install additional nucleation sites in single crystal TiO2 templates and the effect on nanowire growth was probed. Using the acquired TiO2 nanowire synthesis knowhow, an assortment of nanowire arrays were installed upon the surface of undoped TiO2 photo-electrodes and assessed for their photo-electrochemical water splitting performance. The key result obtained was that the presence of short and dispersed nanowire arrays significantly improved the photocurrent when the illumination intensity was increased from 100 to 200 mW cm-2. This is attributed to the alignment of the homoepitaxially grown nanowires to the [001] direction, which provides the fastest charge transport in TiO2 and an improved pathway for photo-holes to find water molecules and undertake oxidation. This result lays a foundation for achieving efficient water splitting under conditions of concentrated solar illumination.

  13. Deposition of yttrium oxysulfide thin films by atomic layer epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukli, K.; University of Tartu, Tartu,; Johansson, L-S.; Nykaenen, E.; Peussa, M.; Ninistoe, L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Yttrium oxysulfide is a highly interesting material for optoelectronic applications. It is industrially exploited in the form of doped powder in catholuminescent phosphors, e.g. Y 2 O 2 S: Eu 3+ for colour TV. Attempts to grow thin films of Y 2 O 2 S have not been frequent and only partially successful due to the difficulties in obtaining crystalline films at a reasonable temperature. Furthermore, sputtering easily leads to a sulphur deficiency. Evaporation of the elements from a multi-source offers a better control of the stoichiometry resulting in hexagonal (0002) oriented films at 580 deg C. In this paper we present the first successful thin film growth experiments using a chemical process with molecular precursors. Atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) allows the use of a relatively low deposition temperature and thus compatibility with other technologies. Already at 425 deg C the reaction between H 2 S and Y(thd) 3 (thd = 2,2,6,6 - tetramethyl-heptane-3,5- dione) yields a crystalline Y 2 O 2 S thin film which was characterized by XRD, XRF and XPS

  14. Epitaxially grown strained pentacene thin film on graphene membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanpyo; Santos, Elton J G; Lee, Tae Hoon; Nishi, Yoshio; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-05-06

    Organic-graphene system has emerged as a new platform for various applications such as flexible organic photovoltaics and organic light emitting diodes. Due to its important implication in charge transport, the study and reliable control of molecular packing structures at the graphene-molecule interface are of great importance for successful incorporation of graphene in related organic devices. Here, an ideal membrane of suspended graphene as a molecular assembly template is utilized to investigate thin-film epitaxial behaviors. Using transmission electron microscopy, two distinct molecular packing structures of pentacene on graphene are found. One observed packing structure is similar to the well-known bulk-phase, which adapts a face-on molecular orientation on graphene substrate. On the other hand, a rare polymorph of pentacene crystal, which shows significant strain along the c-axis, is identified. In particular, the strained film exhibits a specific molecular orientation and a strong azimuthal correlation with underlying graphene. Through ab initio electronic structure calculations, including van der Waals interactions, the unusual polymorph is attributed to the strong graphene-pentacene interaction. The observed strained organic film growth on graphene demonstrates the possibility to tune molecular packing via graphene-molecule interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy of graphene on mica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, G.; Dabrowski, J.; Yamamoto, Y.; Mehr, W.; Lupina, G.; Herziger, F.; Maultzsch, J.; Baringhaus, J.; Tegenkamp, C.; Lemme, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Realization of graphene devices is often hindered by the fact that the known layer growth methods do not meet the requirements of the device fabrication in silicon mainstream technology. For example, the relatively straightforward method of decomposition of hexagonal SiC is not CMOS-compatible due to the high-thermal budget it requires [Moon et al., IEEE Electron Device Lett. 31, 260 (2010)]. Techniques based on layer transfer are restricted because of the uncertainty of residual metal contaminants, particles, and structural defects. Of interest is thus a method that would allow one to grow a graphene film directly in the device area where graphene is needed. Production of large area graphene is not necessarily required in this case, but high quality of the film and metal-free growth on an insulating substrate at temperatures below 1000 C are important requirements. We demonstrate direct growth of defect-free graphene on insulators at moderate temperatures by molecular beam epitaxy. The quality of the graphene was probed by high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, indicating a negligible density of defects. The spectra are compared with those from graphene flakes mechanically exfoliated from native graphite onto mica. These results are combined with insights from density functional theory calculations. A model of graphene growth on mica and similar substrates is proposed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. State memory in solution gated epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butko, A. V.; Butko, V. Y.; Lebedev, S. P.; Lebedev, A. A.; Davydov, V. Y.; Smirnov, A. N.; Eliseyev, I. A.; Dunaevskiy, M. S.; Kumzerov, Y. A.

    2018-06-01

    We studied electrical transport in transistors fabricated on a surface of high quality epitaxial graphene with density of defects as low as 5·1010 cm-2 and observed quasistatic hysteresis with a time constant in a scale of hours. This constant is in a few orders of magnitude greater than the constant previously reported in CVD graphene. The hysteresis observed here can be described as a shift of ∼+2V of the Dirac point measured during a gate voltage increase from the position of the Dirac point measured during a gate voltage decrease. This hysteresis can be characterized as a nonvolatile quasistatic state memory effect in which the state of the gated graphene is determined by its initial state prior to entering the hysteretic region. Due to this effect the difference in resistance of the gated graphene measured in the hysteretic region at the same applied voltages can be as high as 70%. The observed effect can be explained by assuming that charge carriers in graphene and oppositely charged molecular ions from the solution form quasistable interfacial complexes at the graphene interface. These complexes likely preserve the initial state by preventing charge carriers in graphene from discharging in the hysteretic region.

  18. Reliability analysis and computation of computer-based safety instrumentation and control used in German nuclear power plant. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yongjian; Krause, Ulrich; Gu, Chunlei

    2014-01-01

    The trend of technological advancement in the field of safety instrumentation and control (I and C) leads to increasingly frequent use of computer-based (digital) control systems which consisting of distributed, connected bus communications computers and their functionalities are freely programmable by qualified software. The advantages of the new I and C system over the old I and C system with hard-wired technology are e.g. in the higher flexibility, cost-effective procurement of spare parts, higher hardware reliability (through higher integration density, intelligent self-monitoring mechanisms, etc.). On the other hand, skeptics see the new technology with the computer-based I and C a higher potential by influences of common cause failures (CCF), and the easier manipulation by sabotage (IT Security). In this joint research project funded by the Federal Ministry for Economical Affaires and Energy (BMWi) (2011-2014, FJZ 1501405) the Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg and Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences are therefore trying to develop suitable methods for the demonstration of the reliability of the new instrumentation and control systems with the focus on the investigation of CCF. This expertise of both houses shall be extended to this area and a scientific contribution to the sound reliability judgments of the digital safety I and C in domestic and foreign nuclear power plants. First, the state of science and technology will be worked out through the study of national and international standards in the field of functional safety of electrical and I and C systems and accompanying literature. On the basis of the existing nuclear Standards the deterministic requirements on the structure of the new digital I and C system will be determined. The possible methods of reliability modeling will be analyzed and compared. A suitable method called multi class binomial failure rate (MCFBR) which was successfully used in safety valve applications will be

  19. Investigation of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on 3C–SiC(100/Si(100 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogneau N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Noelle Gogneau,1 Amira Ben Gouider Trabelsi,2 Mathieu G Silly,3 Mohamed Ridene,1 Marc Portail,4 Adrien Michon,4 Mehrezi Oueslati,2 Rachid Belkhou,3 Fausto Sirotti,3 Abdelkarim Ouerghi1 1Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marcoussis, France; 2Unité des Nanomatériaux et Photonique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar Campus Universitaire, Tunis, Tunisia; 3Synchrotron-SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin, BP48, F91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France; 4Centre de Recherche sur l'HétéroEpitaxie et Ses Application, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Valbonne, France Abstract: Graphene has been intensively studied in recent years in order to take advantage of its unique properties. Its synthesis on SiC substrates by solid-state graphitization appears a suitable option for graphene-based electronics. However, before developing devices based on epitaxial graphene, it is desirable to understand and finely control the synthesis of material with the most promising properties. To achieve these prerequisites, many studies are being conducted on various SiC substrates. Here, we review 3C–SiC(100 epilayers grown by chemical vapor deposition on Si(100 substrates for producing graphene by solid state graphitization under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Based on various characterization techniques, the structural and electrical properties of epitaxial graphene layer grown on 3C–SiC(100/Si(100 are discussed. We establish that epitaxial graphene presents properties similar to those obtained using hexagonal SiC substrates, with the advantage of being compatible with current Si-processing technology. Keywords: epitaxial graphene, electronic properties, structural properties, silicon carbide 

  20. An InP/Si heterojunction photodiode fabricated by self-aligned corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y. T.; Omanakuttan, G.; Lourdudoss, S.

    2015-01-01

    An n-InP/p-Si heterojunction photodiode fabricated by corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth (CELOG) method is presented. N-InP/p-Si heterojunction has been achieved from a suitable pattern containing circular shaped openings in a triangular lattice on the InP seed layer on p-Si substrate and subsequent CELOG of completely coalesced n-InP. To avoid current path through the seed layer in the final photodiode, semi-insulating InP:Fe was grown with adequate thickness prior to n-InP growth in a low pressure hydride vapor phase epitaxy reactor. The n-InP/p-Si heterointerface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature cross-sectional photoluminescence (PL) mapping illustrates the defect reduction effect in InP grown on Si by CELOG method. The InP PL intensity measured above the InP/Si heterojunction is comparable to that of InP grown on a native planar substrate indicating low interface defect density of CELOG InP despite of 8% lattice mismatch with Si. The processed n-InP/p-Si heterojunction photodiodes show diode characteristics from the current-voltage (I-V) measurements with a dark current density of 0.324 mA/cm 2 at a reverse voltage of −1 V. Under the illumination of AM1.5 conditions, the InP/Si heterojunction photodiode exhibited photovoltaic effect with an open circuit voltage of 180 mV, a short circuit current density of 1.89 mA/cm 2 , an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%, and an internal quantum efficiency of 6.4%. This demonstration of epitaxially grown InP/Si heterojunction photodiode will open the door for low cost and high efficiency solar cells and photonic integration of III-Vs on silicon

  1. Direct Measurements of Island Growth and Step-Edge Barriers in Colloidal Epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Ganapathy, R.; Buckley, M. R.; Gerbode, S. J.; Cohen, I.

    2010-01-01

    -scale particles into microstructures that have numerous technological applications. To determine whether atomic epitaxial growth laws are applicable to the epitaxy of larger particles with attractive interactions, we investigated the nucleation and growth dynamics

  2. Selective growth of Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer on patterned SiO2/Si substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Wakana; Washizu, Tomoya; Ike, Shinichi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the selective growth of a Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer on a line/space-patterned SiO2/Si substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. We examined the behavior of a Sn precursor of tributyl(vinyl)tin (TBVSn) during the growth on Si and SiO2 substrates and investigated the effect of the Sn precursor on the selective growth. The selective growth of the Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer was performed under various total pressures and growth temperatures of 300 and 350 °C. The selective growth of the Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer on the patterned Si region is achieved at a low total pressure without Ge1- x Sn x growth on the SiO2 region. In addition, we found that the Sn content in the Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer increases with width of the SiO2 region for a fixed Si width even with low total pressure. To control the Sn content in the selective growth of the Ge1- x Sn x epitaxial layer, it is important to suppress the decomposition and migration of Sn and Ge precursors.

  3. Epitaxial Ni films, e-beam nano-patterning and BMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszew, R. Alejandra; Zhang, Zhengdong; Pearson, Dave; Zambano, Antonio

    2004-05-01

    We have attempted to clarify possible domain-wall processes present in the recently reported large ballistic magnetoresistance effects in nano-contacts. To that effect we have used e-beam lithography applied to epitaxial Ni films to fabricate nano-bridges in more controlled geometry than electrochemical deposition. Our preliminary results indicate that magnetic domains do play a role in the magneto-resistance of these nano-bridges but the order of magnitude of the observed effect is considerably smaller than the reported observations in electrochemically prepared nano-contacts.

  4. Epitaxial Ni films, e-beam nano-patterning and BMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszew, R.A.; Zhang Zhengdong; Pearson, Dave; Zambano, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    We have attempted to clarify possible domain-wall processes present in the recently reported large ballistic magnetoresistance effects in nano-contacts. To that effect we have used e-beam lithography applied to epitaxial Ni films to fabricate nano-bridges in more controlled geometry than electrochemical deposition. Our preliminary results indicate that magnetic domains do play a role in the magneto-resistance of these nano-bridges but the order of magnitude of the observed effect is considerably smaller than the reported observations in electrochemically prepared nano-contacts

  5. Interface termination and band alignment of epitaxially grown alumina films on Cu-Al alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Michiko; Song, Weijie; Libra, Jiří; Mašek, Karel; Šutara, František; Matolín, Vladimír; Prince, Kevin C.

    2008-02-01

    Epitaxial ultrathin alumina films were grown on a Cu-9 at. % Al(111) substrate by selective oxidation of Al in the alloy in ultrahigh vacuum. The photoelectron spectra of Al 2p and valence band were measured in situ during oxidation. By analyzing multiple peaks of Al 2p, the interface atomic structure was discussed. The energy difference between the Fermi level of the substrate and the valence band maximum of alumina (band offset) was obtained. The relation between the interface atomic structure and the band offset was compared with the reported first-principles calculations. A novel method for controlling the band offset was proposed.

  6. Epitaxial growth of quantum rods with high aspect ratio and compositional contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L. H.; Patriarche, G.; Fiore, A.

    2008-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of quantum rods (QRs) on GaAs was investigated. It was found that GaAs thickness in the GaAs/InAs superlattice used for QR formation plays a key role in improving the QR structural properties. Increasing the GaAs thickness results in both an increased In compositional contrast between the QRs and surrounding layer, and an increased QR length. QRs with an aspect ratio of up to 10 were obtained, representing quasiquantum wires in a GaAs matrix. Due to modified confinement and strain potential, such nanostructure is promising for controlling gain polarization

  7. Lateral epitaxial overgrowth of GaN on a patterned GaN-on-silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongjin; Hu, Fangren; Hane, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We report here the lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of GaN on a patterned GaN-on-silicon substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth with radio frequency nitrogen plasma as a gas source. Two kinds of GaN nanostructures are defined by electron beam lithography and realized on a GaN substrate by fast atom beam etching. The epitaxial growth of GaN by MBE is performed on the prepared GaN template, and the selective growth of GaN takes place with the assistance of GaN nanostructures. The LEO of GaN produces novel GaN epitaxial structures which are dependent on the shape and the size of the processed GaN nanostructures. Periodic GaN hexagonal pyramids are generated inside the air holes, and GaN epitaxial strips with triangular section are formed in the grating region. This work provides a promising way for producing novel GaN-based devices by the LEO of GaN using the MBE technique

  8. Growth and characterization of Hg 1– Cd Te epitaxial films by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Growth of Hg1–CdTe epitaxial films by a new technique called asymmetric vapour phase epitaxy (ASVPE) has been carried out on CdTe and CZT substrates. The critical problems faced in normal vapour phase epitaxy technique like poor surface morphology, composition gradient and dislocation multiplication have ...

  9. Growth and characterization of Hg1–xCdxTe epitaxial films by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Growth of Hg1–xCdxTe epitaxial films by a new technique called asymmetric vapour phase epitaxy. (ASVPE) has been carried out on CdTe and CZT substrates. The critical problems faced in normal vapour phase epitaxy technique like poor surface morphology, composition gradient and dislocation multiplication.

  10. Ion beam induced epitaxy in Ge- and B- coimplanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Tanoue, H.; Takahashi, H.; Shimoyama, K.; Kuriyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    The epitaxial regrowth of amorphous surface layers in and Si substrate has been studied under irradiation with 400 keV Ar + ions at the temperature range from 300 to 435degC. The amorphous layers were obtained by Ge + implantation, followed by B + implantation. The ion beam assisted epitaxy was found to be sensitive to both the substrate orientation and the implanted Ge concentration, and the layer-by-layer epitaxial regrowth seemed to be precluded in Si layers with high doses of Ge implants, e.g., 2.5 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Electrical activation of implanted dopant B was also measured in the recrystallized Si layer. (author)

  11. Preparation and structure characterization of SmCo5(0001) epitaxial thin films grown on Cu(111) underlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nukaga, Yuri; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    SmCo 5 (0001) epitaxial films were prepared on Cu(111) single-crystal underlayers formed on Al 2 O 3 (0001) substrates at 500 deg. C. The nucleation and growth mechanism of (0001)-oriented SmCo 5 crystal on Cu(111) underlayer is investigated and a method to control the nucleation is proposed. The SmCo 5 epitaxial thin film formed directly on Cu underlayer consists of two types of domains whose orientations are rotated around the film normal by 30 deg. each other. By introducing a thin Co seed layer on the Cu underlayer, a SmCo 5 (0001) single-crystal thin film is successfully obtained. Nucleation of SmCo 5 crystal on Cu underlayer seems controllable by varying the interaction between the Cu underlayer and the SmCo 5 layer

  12. Structure and Properties of Epitaxial Dielectrics on gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Virginia Danielle

    GaN is recognized as a possible material for metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) used in high temperature, high power and high speed electronic applications. However, high gate leakage and low device breakdown voltages limit their use in these applications. The use of high-kappa dielectrics, which have both a high permittivity (ε) and high band gap energy (Eg), can reduce the leakage current density that adversely affects MOS devices. La2O3 and Sc2O 3 are rare earth oxides with a large Eg (6.18 eV and 6.3 eV respectively) and a relatively high ε (27 and 14.1 respectively), which make them good candidates for enhancing MOSFET performance. Epitaxial growth of oxides is a possible approach to reducing leakage current and Fermi level pinning related to a high density of interface states for dielectrics on compound semiconductors. In this work, La2O3 and Sc2O 3 were characterized structurally and electronically as potential epitaxial gate dielectrics for use in GaN based MOSFETs. GaN surface treatments were examined as a means for additional interface passivation and influencing subsequent oxide formation. Potassium persulfate (K2(SO4)2) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) were explored as a way to achieve improved passivation and desired surface termination for GaN films deposited on sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that KOH left a nitrogen-rich interface, while K2(SO 4)2 left a gallium-rich interface, which provides a way to control surface oxide formation. K2(SO4)2 exhibited a shift in the O1s peak indicating the formation of a gallium-rich GaOx at the surface with decreased carbon contaminants. GaO x acts as a passivating layer prior to dielectric deposition, which resulted in an order of magnitude reduction in leakage current, a reduced hysteresis window, and an overall improvement in device performance. Furthermore, K2(SO4)2 resulted in an additional 0.4 eV of

  13. Final Research Performance Report - Small Molecular Associative Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Thickeners for Improved Mobility Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enick, Robert M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-12-31

    polymers can serve as a CO2-soluble conformance control agent for CO2-EOR, especially in sandstone formations. This injection of a single phase solution of CO2-PFA for permeability reduction is (to the best of our knowledge) the first report of a CO2-soluble conformance control additive. We also demonstrated that the optimal strategy for using CO2-PFA solutions for conformance control is analogous to the application of water-based polymeric gels; the CO2-PFA solution should first be injected only in an isolated thief zone to induce dramatic reductions in permeability only in that thief zone, and then CO2 should be injected into all of the zones. Finally, it was noted that given the propensity of PFA to adsorb onto sandstone, the adsorption of PFA from CO2-PFA solutions onto cement surfaces promote the sealing of extremely fine cracks in casing cement.

  14. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R., E-mail: smitha2@ohio.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    breaking vacuum, and convenient visual access to the sample and tip inside a superconducting magnet cryostat. A sample/tip handling system is optimized for both the molecular beam epitaxy growth system and the scanning tunneling microscope system. The sample/tip handing system enables in situ STM studies on epitaxially grown samples, and tip exchange in the superconducting magnet cryostat. The hybrid molecular beam epitaxy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy system is capable of growing semiconductor-based hetero-structures with controlled accuracy down to a single atomic-layer and imaging them down to atomic resolution.

  15. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    breaking vacuum, and convenient visual access to the sample and tip inside a superconducting magnet cryostat. A sample/tip handling system is optimized for both the molecular beam epitaxy growth system and the scanning tunneling microscope system. The sample/tip handing system enables in situ STM studies on epitaxially grown samples, and tip exchange in the superconducting magnet cryostat. The hybrid molecular beam epitaxy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy system is capable of growing semiconductor-based hetero-structures with controlled accuracy down to a single atomic-layer and imaging them down to atomic resolution.

  16. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-01-01

    breaking vacuum, and convenient visual access to the sample and tip inside a superconducting magnet cryostat. A sample/tip handling system is optimized for both the molecular beam epitaxy growth system and the scanning tunneling microscope system. The sample/tip handing system enables in situ STM studies on epitaxially grown samples, and tip exchange in the superconducting magnet cryostat. The hybrid molecular beam epitaxy and low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy system is capable of growing semiconductor-based hetero-structures with controlled accuracy down to a single atomic-layer and imaging them down to atomic resolution

  17. Epitaxial growth of a monolayer WSe2-MoS2 lateral p-n junction with an atomically sharp interface

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ming Yang

    2015-07-30

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as molybdenum sulfide MoS2 and tungsten sulfide WSe2 have potential applications in electronics because they exhibit high on-off current ratios and distinctive electro-optical properties. Spatially connected TMDC lateral heterojunctions are key components for constructing monolayer p-n rectifying diodes, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic devices, and bipolar junction transistors. However, such structures are not readily prepared via the layer-stacking techniques, and direct growth favors the thermodynamically preferred TMDC alloys. We report the two-step epitaxial growth of lateral WSe2-MoS2 heterojunction, where the edge of WSe2 induces the epitaxial MoS2 growth despite a large lattice mismatch. The epitaxial growth process offers a controllable method to obtain lateral heterojunction with an atomically sharp interface.

  18. Defect formation and carrier doping in epitaxial films of the ''parent'' compound SrCuO2: Synthesis of two superconductors descendants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, R.; Norton, D.P.; Budai, J.D.; Jones, E.C.; Christen, D.K.; Kawai, T.

    1995-04-01

    The infinite layer or parent compounds ACuO 2 (A: Ca-Sr-Ba) constitute the simplest copper oxygen perovskites that contain the CuO 2 sheets essential for superconductivity. The stabilization of these basic ''building blocks'' as epitaxial films, therefore, provides alluring opportunities towards the search for new superconducting compounds and elucidation of the underlying mechanisms. In this work, general trends of the defect formation and carrier doping for epitaxial films of the intermediate endmember SrCuO 2 are reviewed. First results are presented from successful attempts to induce hole-doped superconductivity via the processing-controlled incorporation of charge reservoir layers

  19. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  20. Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration. Final Report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hines, J. Wesley; Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Doster, J. Michael; Edwards, Robert M.; Lewis, Kenneth D.; Turinsky, Paul; Coble, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    on meeting two of the eight needs outlined in the recently published 'Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs' which was created 'to provide a systematic path forward for the integration of new ICHMI technologies in both near-term and future nuclear power plants and the reinvigoration of the U.S. nuclear ICHMI community and capabilities.' The research consortium is led by The University of Tennessee (UT) and is focused on three interrelated topics: Topic 1 (simulator development and measurement sensitivity analysis) is led by Dr. Mike Doster with Dr. Paul Turinsky of North Carolina State University (NCSU). Topic 2 (multivariate autonomous control of modular reactors) is led by Dr. Belle Upadhyaya of the University of Tennessee (UT) and Dr. Robert Edwards of Penn State University (PSU). Topic 3 (monitoring, diagnostics, and prognostics system development) is led by Dr. Wes Hines of UT. Additionally, South Carolina State University (SCSU, Dr. Ken Lewis) participated in this research through summer interns, visiting faculty, and on-campus research projects identified throughout the grant period. Lastly, Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (Dr. Mario Carelli) was a no-cost collaborator and provided design information related to the IRIS demonstration platform and defining needs that may be common to other SMR designs. The results of this research are reported in a six-volume Final Report (including the Executive Summary, Volume 1). Volumes 2 through 6 of the report describe in detail the research and development under the topical areas. This volume serves to introduce the overall NERI-C project and to summarize the key results. Section 2 provides a summary of the significant contributions of this project. A list of all the publications under this project is also given in Section 2. Section 3 provides a brief summary of each of the five volumes (2-6) of the report. The

  1. Epitaxial graphene-encapsulated surface reconstruction of Ge(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gavin P.; Kiraly, Brian; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mannix, Andrew J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Hersam, Mark C.; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding and engineering the properties of crystalline surfaces has been critical in achieving functional electronics at the nanoscale. Employing scanning tunneling microscopy, surface x-ray diffraction, and high-resolution x-ray reflectivity experiments, we present a thorough study of epitaxial graphene (EG)/Ge(110) and report a Ge(110) "6 × 2" reconstruction stabilized by the presence of epitaxial graphene unseen in group-IV semiconductor surfaces. X-ray studies reveal that graphene resides atop the surface reconstruction with a 0.34 nm van der Waals (vdW) gap and provides protection from ambient degradation.

  2. Fabrication and orientation control of highly cation-ordered epitaxial PbSc{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} thin films on Si (100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, Anuj, E-mail: anujchopraiitm@gmail.com [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Faculty of Science and Technology, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Alexe, Marin [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Hesse, Dietrich [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Highly cation-ordered (100) and (110)-oriented PbSc{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (PST) films were deposited on buffered Si (100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Switching of crystal orientation from (100) to (110) was achieved by replacing the Si (100)/ZrO2:Y2O3 (100)/CeO2 (100)/LaNiO3 (100)/PST (100) heterostructure with Si (100)/ZrO2:Y2O3 (YSZ) (100)/SrRuO3 (110)/PST (110). The out-of-plane and in-plane crystal orientation and internal microstructure of (001) and (110) PST films were analyzed in detail by X-ray diffraction, pole figure measurements, and transmission electron microscopy. XRD superstructure reflections indicate that both (100) and (110) PST films are highly cation-ordered and transmission electron microscopy measurements show nano-domains of 15 nm size. The electrical measurements show that the PST films are ferroelectric and that the ferroelectric properties are linked to the microstructure. We have demonstrated the successful integration of PST films on Si substrates with control on growth orientation; this approach can be extended to other oxides to be integrated on silicon substrates for future device applications.

  3. From epitaxial growth of ferrite thin films to spin-polarized tunnelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussy, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the research which is focused on ferrite thin films for spintronics. First, I will describe the potential of ferrite layers for the generation of spin-polarized currents. In the second step, the structural and chemical properties of epitaxial thin films and ferrite-based tunnel junctions will be presented. Particular attention will be given to ferrite systems grown by oxygen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The analysis of the structure and chemistry close to the interfaces, a key-point for understanding the spin-polarized tunnelling measurements, will be detailed. In the third part, the magnetic and magneto-transport properties of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) thin films as a function of structural defects such as the antiphase boundaries will be explained. The spin-polarization measurements (spin-resolved photoemission, tunnel magnetoresistance) on this oxide predicted to be half-metallic will be discussed. Fourth, the potential of magnetic tunnel barriers, such as CoFe 2 O 4 , NiFe 2 O 4 or MnFe 2 O 4 , whose insulating behaviour and the high Curie temperatures make it exciting candidates for spin filtering at room temperature will be described. Spin-polarized tunnelling experiments, involving either Meservey–Tedrow or tunnel magnetoresistance measurements, will reveal significant spin-polarizations of the tunnelling current at low temperatures but also at room temperatures. Finally, I will mention a few perspectives with ferrite-based heterostructures. (topical review)

  4. Growth, structural, and electrical properties of germanium-on-silicon heterostructure by molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aheli Ghosh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth, morphological, and electrical properties of thin-film Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si using a two-step growth process were investigated. High-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated ∼0.10% tensile-strained Ge epilayer, owing to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ge and Si, and negligible epilayer lattice tilt. Micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis corroborated the strain-state of the Ge thin-film. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of 90  ° Lomer dislocation network at Ge/Si heterointerface, suggesting the rapid and complete relaxation of Ge epilayer during growth. Atomic force micrographs exhibited smooth surface morphology with surface roughness < 2 nm. Temperature dependent Hall mobility measurements and the modelling thereof indicated that ionized impurity scattering limited carrier mobility in Ge layer. Capacitance- and conductance-voltage measurements were performed to determine the effect of epilayer dislocation density on interfacial defect states (Dit and their energy distribution. Finally, extracted Dit values were benchmarked against published Dit data for Ge MOS devices, as a function of threading dislocation density within the Ge layer. The results obtained were comparable with Ge MOS devices integrated on Si via alternative buffer schemes. This comprehensive study of directly-grown epitaxial Ge-on-Si provides a pathway for the development of Ge-based electronic devices on Si.

  5. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Hyoungjeen; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-12-01

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5 thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  6. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoOx films near topotactic phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoungjeen Jeen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoOx epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO2.5 thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO3-δ. We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  7. Structural evolution of epitaxial SrCoO{sub x} films near topotactic phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeen, Hyoungjeen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan, 609735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Nyung, E-mail: hnlee@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Control of oxygen stoichiometry in complex oxides via topotactic phase transition is an interesting avenue to not only modifying the physical properties, but utilizing in many energy technologies, such as energy storage and catalysts. However, detailed structural evolution in the close proximity of the topotactic phase transition in multivalent oxides has not been much studied. In this work, we used strontium cobaltites (SrCoO{sub x}) epitaxially grown by pulsed laser epitaxy (PLE) as a model system to study the oxidation-driven evolution of the structure, electronic, and magnetic properties. We grew coherently strained SrCoO{sub 2.5} thin films and performed post-annealing at various temperatures for topotactic conversion into the perovskite phase (SrCoO{sub 3-δ}). We clearly observed significant changes in electronic transport, magnetism, and microstructure near the critical temperature for the topotactic transformation from the brownmillerite to the perovskite phase. Nevertheless, the overall crystallinity was well maintained without much structural degradation, indicating that topotactic phase control can be a useful tool to control the physical properties repeatedly via redox reactions.

  8. Review and Response to the Final Report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    This report presents the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's (NHLBI) review of and response to the final report of the National Black Health Providers Task Force on High Blood Pressure Education and Control. The response includes a statement of NHLBI's involvement in health research, and descriptions of what steps can be taken to solve the…

  9. Final PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC3-DPWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    This report contains the final results of PANTHER calculations for the 'NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power'. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.)

  10. Final PANTHER solution to the NEA-NSC3-DPWR core transient benchmark. Uncontrolled withdrawal of control rods at zero power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    This report contains the final results of PANTHER calculations for the `NEA-NSC 3-D PWR Core Transient Benchmark: Uncontrolled Withdrawal of Control Rods at Zero Power`. PANTHER was able to model the benchmark problems without modifications to the code. All the calculations were performed in 3-D. (orig.).

  11. Abstracts of 4. International Workshop on Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Vapour Phase Epitaxy Growth Physics and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    4. International Workshop on Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Vapour Phase Epitaxy Growth Physics and Technology is the periodically held forum for discussion the problems connected with manufacturing of different nanostructures (thin films, quantum wells, quantum dots) needed in microelectronics. Preparation of such materials with desirable optical, electrical and magnetic properties being determined by their chemical composition and crystal structure has been discussed in detail during the workshop sessions. Optimization of crystal growth methods such as VPE and MBE from the view point of obtained material properties has also been extensively discussed

  12. Epitaxial growth and characterization of CuGa2O4 films by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Hongling Wei; Zhengwei Chen; Zhenping Wu; Wei Cui; Yuanqi Huang; Weihua Tang

    2017-01-01

    Ga2O3 with a wide bandgap of ∼ 4.9 eV can crystalize in five crystalline phases. Among those phases, the most stable monoclinic β-Ga2O3 has been studied most, however, it is hard to find materials lattice matching with β-Ga2O3 to grown epitaxial thin films for optoelectronic applications. In this work, CuGa2O4 bulk were prepared by solid state reaction as target, and the films were deposited on sapphire substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy (L-MBE) at different substrate temperatures. Th...

  13. Epitaxial growth of SrTiO3 thin film on Si by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X. Y.; Miao, J.; Dai, J. Y.; Chan, H. L. W.; Choy, C. L.; Wang, Y.; Li, Q.

    2007-01-01

    SrTiO 3 thin films have been deposited on Si (001) wafers by laser molecular beam epitaxy using an ultrathin Sr layer as the template. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that SrTiO 3 was well crystallized and epitaxially aligned with Si. Cross-sectional observations in a transmission electron microscope revealed that the SrTiO 3 /Si interface was sharp, smooth, and fully crystallized. The thickness of the Sr template was found to be a critical factor that influenced the quality of SrTiO 3 and the interfacial structure. Electrical measurements revealed that the SrTiO 3 film was highly resistive

  14. Shallow Levels Characterization in Epitaxial GaAs by Acousto-Optic Reflectance Shallow Levels Characterization in Epitaxial GaAs by Acousto-Optic Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Ibarra-Manzano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Optical spectra of light reflection are detected under an influence of ultrasonic wave (UWon a GaAs wafer. The differential spectrum is calculated as a difference between those taken under UW and without that influence on a sample. This acousto-optic differential reflectance(AODR spectrum contains some bands that represent the energetic levels of the shallow centers in a sample. A physical basis of this technique is related to a perturbation of local states by UW. Here, a method is developed for characterization of local states at the surfaces and interfaces in crystals and low-dimensional epitaxial structures based on microelectronics materials. A theoretical model is presented to explain AODR spectra. Also, experiments using epitaxial GaAs structures doped by Te were made. Finally, theoretical and experimental results show that acousto-optic reflectance is an effective tool for characterization of shallow trapping centers in epitaxial semiconductor structures.En este trabajo, utilizamos el espectro de la luz reflejada en una muestra de Arsenuro de Galio (GaAs bajo la influencia de una onda ultrasónica. El diferencial espectral es calculado como una diferencia entre el espectro del material obtenido bajo la influencia del ultrasonido y aquél obtenido sin dicha influencia. Este diferencial de reflectancia espectral acusto-óptico (AODR contiene algunas bandas que representan los niveles energéticos de los centros en la superficie de la muestra. Esta técnica está basada en la perturbación de los estados locales generada por el ultrasonido. Particularmente, este trabajo presenta un método para caracterizar los estados locales en la superficie y las interfaces en los cristales, así como estructuras epiteliales de baja dimensión basadas en materiales semiconductores. Para ello, se presenta un modelo teórico para explicar dicho espectro de reflectancia diferencial (AODR. También se realizaron experimentos con estructuras de GaAs epitelial

  15. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  16. Implementation of a digital feedwater control system at Dresden Nuclear Power Plant, Units 2 and 3: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapotocky, A.; Popovic, J.R.; Fournier, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the Digital Feedwater Control System Implementation at the Dresden 2 or 3 Units of the BWR Nuclear Power Plant owned by the Commonwealth Edison Company. The digital system has been operational in Unit 3 since August 1986, and in Unit 2 since April 1987. The Bailey Control's Network 90 based digital control system replaced the obsolete GE/MAC 5000 analog control system in the reactor feedwater control loop as a ''like-for-like'' replacement. Operational experience from the Digital Feedwater Control installations has been good and the system demonstrated better performance than the old analog systems. 14 refs., 15 figs., 17 tabs

  17. Growth of high purity semiconductor epitaxial layers by liquid phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    semiconductor materials in high purity form by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique. Various possible sources of impurities in such ... reference to the growth of GaAs layers. The technique of growing very high purity layers ... the inner walls of the gas lines and (e) the containers for storing, handling and cleaning of the mate-.

  18. Hard gap in epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, W.; Albrecht, S. M.; Jespersen, T. S.

    2015-01-01

    a continuum of subgap states---a situation that nullifies topological protection. Here, we report a hard superconducting gap induced by proximity effect in a semiconductor, using epitaxial Al-InAs superconductor-semiconductor nanowires. The hard gap, along with favorable material properties and gate...

  19. Selenidation of epitaxial silicene on ZrB2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, F. B.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.; Kovalgin, A. Y.; de Jong, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    The deposition of elemental Se on epitaxial silicene on ZrB2 thin films was investigated with synchrotron-based core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The deposition of Se at room temperature caused the appearance of Si 2p peaks with chemical shifts of n × 0.51 ±

  20. Electrical properties of epitaxially grown VOx thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rata, A.D.; Chezan, A.R; Presura, C.N.; Hibma, T

    2003-01-01

    High quality VOx thin films on MgO(100) substrates were prepared and studied from the structural and electronic point of view. Epitaxial growth was confirmed by RHEED and XRD techniques. The oxygen content of VOx thin films as a function of oxygen flux was determined using RBS. The upper and lower

  1. High purity liquid phase epitaxial gallium arsenide nuclear radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiev, D.; Butcher, K.S.A.

    1991-11-01

    Surface barrier radiation detector made from high purity liquid phase epitaxial gallium arsenide wafers have been operated as X- and γ-ray detectors at various operating temperatures. Low energy isotopes are resolved including 241 Am at 40 deg C. and the higher gamma energies of 235 U at -80 deg C. 15 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  2. GaN:Co epitaxial layers grown by MOVPE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Klímová, K.; Mikulics, M.; Maryško, Miroslav; Veselý, M.; Jurek, Karel; Sofer, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 44, Mar (2015), 62-68 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20507S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : doping * metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy * cobalt * gallium compounds * nitrides * magnetic materials spintronics Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.462, year: 2015

  3. Single-event burnout of epitaxial bipolar transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuboyama, S.; Sugimoto, K.; Shugyo, S.; Matsuda, S. [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hirao, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    Single-Event Burnout (SEB) of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) has been observed nondestructively. It was revealed that all the NPN BJTs, including small signal transistors, with thinner epitaxial layers were inherently susceptible to the SEB phenomenon. It was demonstrated that several design parameters of BJTs were responsible for SEB susceptibility. Additionally, destructive and nondestructive modes of SEB were identified.

  4. Single-event burnout of epitaxial bipolar transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuboyama, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Ysukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hirao, Toshio

    1998-10-01

    Single-event burnout (SEB) of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) has been observed nondestructively. It was revealed that all the NPN BJTs including small signal transistors with thinner epitaxial layer were inherently susceptible to the SEB phenomenon. It was demonstrated that several design parameters of BJTs were responsible for SEB susceptibility. Additionally, destructive and nondestructive modes of SEB were identified. (author)

  5. Concurrent bandgap narrowing and polarization enhancement in epitaxial ferroelectric nanofilms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyunina, Marina; Yao, L.; Chvostová, Dagmar; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav; Trepakov, Vladimír; van Dijken, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2015), 026002 ISSN 1468-6996 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : epitaxial growth * ferroelectric nanofilms Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.433, year: 2015

  6. Giant inelastic tunneling in epitaxial graphene mediated by localized states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervenka, J.; Ruit, van de K.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Local electronic structures of nanometer-sized patches of epitaxial graphene and its interface layer with SiC(0001) have been studied by atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. Localized states belonging to the interface layer of a graphene/SiC system show to have

  7. Strain-induced properties of epitaxial VOx thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rata, AD; Hibma, T

    We have grown VOx thin films on different substrates in order to investigate the influence of epitaxial strain on the transport properties. We found that the electric conductivity is much larger for films grown under compressive strain on SrTiO3 substrates, as compared to bulk material and VOx films

  8. Growth and properties of epitaxial iron oxide layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, F.C; Fujii, T; Hibma, T; Zhang, G.L.; Smulders, P.J M

    1996-01-01

    Epitaxial layers of iron oxides have been grown on a MgO(001) substrate by evaporating natural Fe or Fe-57 from Knudsen cells in the presence of a NO2 flow directed to the substrate. The resulting layers have been investigated in situ with LEED, RHEED, AES and XPS and ex situ with GEMS and ion beam

  9. Conductivity of epitaxial and CVD graphene with correlated line defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radchenko, T. M.; Shylau, Artsem; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2014-01-01

    Transport properties of single-layer graphene with correlated one-dimensional defects are studied theoretically using the computational model within the time-dependent real-space Kubo-Greenwood formalism. Such defects are present in epitaxial graphene, comprising atomic terraces and steps due...

  10. Epitaxial growth with pulsed deposition: Submonolayer scaling and Villain instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinnemann, Berit; Hinrichsen, H.; Wolf, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed experimentally that under certain conditions, pulsed laser deposition (PLD) produces smoother surfaces than ordinary molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). So far, the mechanism leading to the improved quality of surfaces in PLD is not yet fully understood. In the present work, we...

  11. Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2018-0012 Nano Electronics on Atomically Controlled van der Waals Quantum Heterostructures PHILIP Kim HARVARD COLLEGE PRESIDENT...21-02-2018 2.  REPORT TYPE      Final 3.  DATES COVERED (From - To)      15 Aug 2015 to 14 Feb 2017 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nano Electronics on...NOTES 14.  ABSTRACT We report molecular beam epitaxial growth and electronic transport properties of high quality topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films

  12. Investigation of the fabrication mechanism of self-assembled GaAs quantum rings grown by droplet epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, C Z; Yoon, S F

    2008-09-10

    We have directly imaged the formation of a GaAs quantum ring (QR) using droplet epitaxy followed by annealing in arsenic ambient. Based on the atomic force micrograph measurement and the analysis of surface energy, we determine that the formation of self-assembled GaAs QRs is due to the gallium atom's diffusion and crystallization driven by the gradient of surface energy. The phenomenon that GaAs is etched by the gallium droplets is reported and analyzed. It has been demonstrated that the epitaxy layers, such as AlAs and InGaP, can be used as the etching stop layer and hence can be used to control the shape and height of the QRs.

  13. Direct growth of hexagonal boron nitride/graphene heterostructures on cobalt foil substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhongguang; Khanaki, Alireza; Tian, Hao; Zheng, Renjing; Suja, Mohammad; Liu, Jianlin, E-mail: jianlin@ece.ucr.edu [Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Zheng, Jian-Guo [Irvine Materials Research Institute, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2800 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (G/h-BN) heterostructures have attracted a great deal of attention because of their exceptional properties and wide variety of potential applications in nanoelectronics. However, direct growth of large-area, high-quality, and stacked structures in a controllable and scalable way remains challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of h-BN/graphene (h-BN/G) heterostructures on cobalt (Co) foil by sequential deposition of graphene and h-BN layers using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that the coverage of h-BN layers can be readily controlled on the epitaxial graphene by growth time. Large-area, uniform-quality, and multi-layer h-BN films on thin graphite layers were achieved. Based on an h-BN (5–6 nm)/G (26–27 nm) heterostructure, capacitor devices with Co(foil)/G/h-BN/Co(contact) configuration were fabricated to evaluate the dielectric properties of h-BN. The measured breakdown electric field showed a high value of ∼2.5–3.2 MV/cm. Both I-V and C-V characteristics indicate that the epitaxial h-BN film has good insulating characteristics.

  14. Classification Order of Surface-Confined Intermixing at Epitaxial Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailov, M.

    The self-organization phenomena at epitaxial interface hold special attention in contemporary material science. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing, long-range and short-range atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena have found exacting academic interest. They are also of great technological importance for their ability to bring spontaneous formation of regular nanoscale surface patterns and superlattices with exotic properties. The basic phenomenon involved in this process is surface diffusion. That is the motivation behind the present study which deals with important details of diffusion scenarios that control the fine atomic structure of epitaxial interface. Consisting surface imperfections (terraces, steps, kinks, and vacancies), the interface offers variety of barriers for surface diffusion. Therefore, the adatoms and clusters need a certain critical energy to overcome the corresponding diffusion barriers. In the most general case the critical energies can be attained by variation of the system temperature. Hence, their values define temperature limits of system energy gaps associated with different diffusion scenarios. This systematization imply classification order of surface alloying: blocked, incomplete, and complete. On that background, two diffusion problems, related to the atomic-scale surface morphology, will be discussed. The first problem deals with diffusion of atomic clusters on atomically smooth interface. On flat domains, far from terraces and steps, we analyzed the impact of size, shape, and cluster/substrate lattice misfit on the diffusion behavior of atomic clusters (islands). We found that the lattice constant of small clusters depends on the number N of building atoms at 1 < N ≤ 10. In heteroepitaxy, this effect of variable lattice constant originates from the enhanced charge transfer and the strong influence of the surface potential on cluster atomic arrangement. At constant

  15. DIMEC - Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    1997-01-01

    Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF.......Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF....

  16. On the density of states of disordered epitaxial graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The study is concerned with two types of disordered epitaxial graphene: (i) graphene with randomly located carbon vacancies and (ii) structurally amorphous graphene. The former type is considered in the coherent potential approximation, and for the latter type, a model of the density of states is proposed. The effects of two types of substrates, specifically, metal and semiconductor substrates are taken into account. The specific features of the density of states of epitaxial graphene at the Dirac point and the edges of the continuous spectrum are analyzed. It is shown that vacancies in epitaxial graphene formed on the metal substrate bring about logarithmic nulling of the density of states of graphene at the Dirac point and the edges of the continuous spectrum. If the Dirac point corresponds to the middle of the band gap of the semiconductor substrate, the linear trend of the density of states to zero in the vicinity of the Dirac point in defect-free graphene transforms into a logarithmic decrease in the presence of vacancies. In both cases, the graphene-substrate interaction is assumed to be weak (quasi-free graphene). In the study of amorphous epitaxial graphene, a simple model of free amorphous graphene is proposed as the initial model, in which account is taken of the nonzero density of states at the Dirac point, and then the interaction of the graphene sheet with the substrate is taken into consideration. It is shown that, near the Dirac point, the quadratic behavior of the density of states of free amorphous graphene transforms into a linear dependence for amorphous epitaxial graphene. In the study, the density of states of free graphene corresponds to the low-energy approximation of the electron spectrum

  17. Reaction limited aggregation in surfactant-mediated epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Bang-Gui; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, E. G.

    2000-05-01

    that the adatoms stuck to a stable island edge are still active and are surrounded by the surfactant atoms. Therefore, these stuck atoms cannot capture incoming adatoms before they join the island through aided exchange. As a result, an incoming adatom must on average hit the island many times before it finally finds a free edge site to stick to. This search is effectively equivalent to edge diffusion in DLA theory. The stuck adatoms thus act as shields which prevent other mobile adatoms from sticking to the stable islands. This shielding effect, determined by the aided exchange barrier and the density of the mobile adatoms, plays an essential role in inducing the above shape transition in surfactant-mediated epitaxial growth.

  18. A study of strain in thin epitaxial films of yttrium silicide on Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michelle F.; Martínez-Miranda, L. J.; Santiago-Avilés, J. J.; Graham, W. R.; Siegal, M. P.

    1994-02-01

    We present the results of an x-ray diffraction analysis of epitaxial yttrium silicide films grown on Si(111), with thicknesses ranging from 14 to 100 Å. The macroscopic strain along the out-of-plane direction for films containing pits or pinholes follows the trend observed previously in films of thicknesses up to 510 Å. The out-of-plane lattice parameter decreases linearly with film thickness. We show preliminary evidence that pinhole-free films do not follow the above trend, and that strain in these films has the opposite sign than in films with pinholes. Finally, our results also indicate that the mode of growth, coupled to the interfacial thermal properties of the films, affects the observed value for the strain in the films.

  19. A study of strain in thin epitaxial films of yttrium silicide on Si(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.F.; Martinez-Miranda, L.J.; Santiago-Aviles, J.J.; Graham, W.R.; Siegal, M.P.

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of an x-ray diffraction analysis of epitaxial yttrium silicide films grown on Si(111), with thicknesses ranging from 14 to 100 A. The macroscopic strain along the out-of-plane direction for films containing pits or pinholes follows the trend observed previously in films of thicknesses up to 510 A. The out-of-plane lattice parameter decreases linearly with film thickness. We show preliminary evidence that pinhole-free films do not follow the above trend, and that strain in these films has the opposite sign than in films with pinholes. Finally, our results also indicate that the mode of growth, coupled to the interfacial thermal properties of the films, affects the observed value for the strain in the films

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of trimethylgallium decomposition during GaN metal organic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kazuki; Shirakawa, Hiroki; Chokawa, Kenta; Araidai, Masaaki; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2018-04-01

    We analyzed the decomposition of Ga(CH3)3 (TMG) during the metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN on the basis of first-principles calculations and thermodynamic analysis. We performed activation energy calculations of TMG decomposition and determined the main reaction processes of TMG during GaN MOVPE. We found that TMG reacts with the H2 carrier gas and that (CH3)2GaH is generated after the desorption of the methyl group. Next, (CH3)2GaH decomposes into (CH3)GaH2 and this decomposes into GaH3. Finally, GaH3 becomes GaH. In the MOVPE growth of GaN, TMG decomposes into GaH by the successive desorption of its methyl groups. The results presented here concur with recent high-resolution mass spectroscopy results.

  1. MnSi nanostructures obtained from epitaxially grown thin films: magnetotransport and Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, D.; Steinki, N.; Schilling, M.; Fernández Scarioni, A.; Krzysteczko, P.; Dziomba, T.; Schumacher, H. W.; Menzel, D.; Süllow, S.

    2018-06-01

    We present a comparative study of the (magneto)transport properties, including Hall effect, of bulk, epitaxially grown thin film and nanostructured MnSi. In order to set our results in relation to published data we extensively characterize our materials, this way establishing a comparatively good sample quality. Our analysis reveals that in particular for thin film and nanostructured material, there are extrinsic and intrinsic contributions to the electronic transport properties, which by modeling the data we separate out. Finally, we discuss our Hall effect data of nanostructured MnSi under consideration of the extrinsic contributions and with respect to the question of the detection of a topological Hall effect in a skyrmionic lattice.

  2. Preparation of freestanding GaN wafer by hydride vapor phase epitaxy on porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian; Li, Peng; Liang, Renrong; Xiao, Lei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jing

    2018-05-01

    A freestanding GaN wafer was prepared on porous Si (111) substrate using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). To avoid undesirable effects of the porous surface on the crystallinity of the GaN, a GaN seed layer was first grown on the Si (111) bare wafer. A pattern with many apertures was fabricated in the GaN seed layer using lithography and etching processes. A porous layer was formed in the Si substrate immediately adjacent to the GaN seed layer by an anodic etching process. A 500-μm-thick GaN film was then grown on the patterned GaN seed layer using HVPE. The GaN film was separated from the Si substrate through the formation of cracks in the porous layer caused by thermal mismatch stress during the cooling stage of the HVPE. Finally, the GaN film was polished to obtain a freestanding GaN wafer.

  3. Development of High Quality 4H-SiC Thick Epitaxy for Reliable High Power Electronics Using Halogenated Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    defects :=()llowed by a second buffer epilayer gro\\\\ th with ~: urn thickness with high n-type dopi:1g (- 5£17 cm-3) for the same C/Si ratio of ~1.4 at...gradient, pressure , etc.) can further reduce the parasitic deposition, especially in TFS-growth. • Thick epitaxy on-axis 4H-SiC Growth at High Growth...From - To) 08/02/2016 Final Technical Report 01-Apr-10 Through 31-Mar-14 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Development of High Quality 4H

  4. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  5. In-situ TEM investigations of graphic-epitaxy and small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    Palladium was deposited inside a controlled-vacuum specimen chamber of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) onto MgO and alpha-alumina substrate surfaces. Annealing and various effects of gas exposure of the particulate Pd deposits were studied in-situ by high resolution TEM and electron diffraction. Whereas substrate temperatures of 500 C or annealing of room temperature (RT) deposits to 500 C were needed to obtain epitaxy on sapphire, RT deposits on MgO were perfectly epitaxial. For Pd/MgO a lattice expansion of 2 to 4% was noted; the highest values of expansion were found for the smallest particles. The lattice expansion of small Pd particles on alumina substrates was less than 1%. Long-time RT exposure of Pd/MgO in a vacuum yielded some moblity and coalescence events, but notably fewer than for Pd on sapphire. Exposure to air or oxygen greatly enhanced the particle mobility and coalescence and also resulted in the flattening of Pd particles on MgO substrates. Electron-beam irradiation further enhanced this effect. Exposure to air for several tens of hours of Pd/MgO led to strong coalescence.

  6. Preparation and characterization of epitaxially grown unsupported yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Götsch, Thomas; Mayr, Lukas [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Stöger-Pollach, Michael [University Service Center for Transmission Electron Microscopy (USTEM), Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Klötzer, Bernhard [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Penner, Simon, E-mail: simon.penner@uibk.ac.at [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Preparation of unsupported yttrium-stabilized zirconia films. • Control of ordering and epitaxy by temperature of deposition template. • Adjustment of film defectivity by deposition and post-oxidation temperature. • Reproducibility of target stoichiometry in the deposited films. • Lateral and vertical chemical homogeneity. - Abstract: Epitaxially grown, chemically homogeneous yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films (“YSZ”, 8 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) are prepared by direct-current sputtering onto a single-crystalline NaCl(0 0 1) template at substrate temperatures ≥493 K, resulting in unsupported YSZ films after floating off NaCl in water. A combined methodological approach by dedicated (surface science) analytical characterization tools (transmission electron microscopy and diffraction, atomic force microscopy, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) reveals that the film grows mainly in a [0 0 1] zone axis and no Y-enrichment in surface or bulk regions takes place. In fact, the Y-content of the sputter target is preserved in the thin films. Analysis of the plasmon region in EEL spectra indicates a defective nature of the as-deposited films, which can be suppressed by post-deposition oxidation at 1073 K. This, however, induces considerable sintering, as deduced from surface morphology measurements by AFM. In due course, the so-prepared unsupported YSZ films might act as well-defined model systems also for technological applications.

  7. Radical-source molecular beam epitaxy of ZnO-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadofiev, Sergey

    2009-10-27

    This work focuses on the development of the novel growth approaches for the fabrication of Group II-oxide materials in the form of epitaxial films and heterostructures. It is shown that molecular-beam epitaxial growth far from thermal equilibrium allows one to overcome the standard solubility limit and to alloy ZnO with MgO or CdO in strict wurtzite phase up to mole fractions of several 10 %. In this way, a band-gap range from 2.2 to 4.4 eV can be covered. A clear layer-by-layer growth mode controlled by oscillations in reflection high-energy electron diffraction makes it possible to fabricate atomically smooth heterointerfaces and well-defined quantum well structures exhibiting prominent band-gap related light emission in the whole composition range. On appropriately designed structures, laser action from the ultraviolet down to green wavelengths and up to room temperature is achieved. The properties and potential of the ''state-of-the-art'' materials are discussed in relation to the advantages for their applications in various optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  8. Self-regulated growth of LaVO3 thin films by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hai-Tian; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.

    2015-01-01

    LaVO 3 thin films were grown on SrTiO 3 (001) by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy. A volatile metalorganic precursor, vanadium oxytriisopropoxide (VTIP), and elemental La were co-supplied in the presence of a molecular oxygen flux. By keeping the La flux fixed and varying the VTIP flux, stoichiometric LaVO 3 films were obtained for a range of cation flux ratios, indicating the presence of a self-regulated growth window. Films grown under stoichiometric conditions were found to have the largest lattice parameter, which decreased monotonically with increasing amounts of excess La or V. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering measurements were carried out to confirm film compositions. Stoichiometric growth of complex vanadate thin films independent of cation flux ratios expands upon the previously reported self-regulated growth of perovskite titanates using hybrid molecular beam epitaxy, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this growth approach to other complex oxide materials, where a precise control over film stoichiometry is demanded by the application

  9. The Final Count Down: A Review of Three Decades of Flight Controller Training Methods for Space Shuttle Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittermore, Gary; Bertels, Christie

    2011-01-01

    Operations of human spaceflight systems is extremely complex; therefore, the training and certification of operations personnel is a critical piece of ensuring mission success. Mission Control Center (MCC-H), at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, manages mission operations for the Space Shuttle Program, including the training and certification of the astronauts and flight control teams. An overview of a flight control team s makeup and responsibilities during a flight, and details on how those teams are trained and certified, reveals that while the training methodology for developing flight controllers has evolved significantly over the last thirty years the core goals and competencies have remained the same. In addition, the facilities and tools used in the control center have evolved. Changes in methodology and tools have been driven by many factors, including lessons learned, technology, shuttle accidents, shifts in risk posture, and generational differences. Flight controllers share their experiences in training and operating the space shuttle. The primary training method throughout the program has been mission simulations of the orbit, ascent, and entry phases, to truly train like you fly. A review of lessons learned from flight controller training suggests how they could be applied to future human spaceflight endeavors, including missions to the moon or to Mars. The lessons learned from operating the space shuttle for over thirty years will help the space industry build the next human transport space vehicle.

  10. Guide to improving the performance of a manipulator system for nuclear fuel handling through computer controls. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.M. Jr.; Albus, J.S.; Barbera, A.J.; Rosenthal, R.; Truitt, W.B.

    1975-11-01

    The Office of Developmental Automation and Control Technology of the Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology of the National Bureau of Standards provides advising services, standards and guidelines on interface and computer control systems, and performance specifications for the procurement and use of computer controlled manipulators and other computer based automation systems. These outputs help other agencies and industry apply this technology to increase productivity and improve work quality by removing men from hazardous environments. In FY 74 personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory visited NBS to discuss the feasibility of using computer control techniques to improve the operation of remote control manipulators in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Subsequent discussions led to an agreement for NBS to develop a conceptual design for such a computer control system for the PaR Model 3000 manipulator in the Thorium Uranium Recycle Facility (TURF) at ORNL. This report provides the required analysis and conceptual design. Complete computer programs are included for testing of computer interfaces and for actual robot control in both point-to-point and continuous path modes

  11. Environmental impacts of oil and gas brine applications for dust and ice control in New York : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Transportation agencies are required to treat roads for dust and ice control to ensure adequate safety for travelers. This is commonly achieved through application of solid and liquid chemicals. These materials can be conventional rock salt, brine fr...

  12. Decentralized control of large transient in power systems: theory and application. Final report, January 1981-August 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeCarlo, R.; Hawley, P.; Sebok, D.

    1983-08-01

    Chapter 1 describes a continuation algorithm to construct decentralized state feedback gains which place the natural frequencies (natural modes of vibration or eigenvalues) of a linearized power system at desired locations. Chapter 2 and 3 address the problem of designing a decentralized dither control for linearly interconnected synchronous machines, each of which is nonlinear. In Chapter 2, the theory finds application to the nonlinear third order model of a single machine infinite bus system where the primary control is via an ac-dc converter. Similarly Chapter 3 considers a two machine system with individual machine converters acting as the primary control. Computer simulations of the control action given various system perturbations are found in both Chapters 2 and 3.

  13. Controlling Initial and Final Radii to Achieve a Low-Complexity Sphere Decoding Technique in MIMO Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Eshagh Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to apply sphere decoding algorithm in multiple-input multiple-output communication systems and to make it feasible for real-time applications, its computational complexity should be decreased. To achieve this goal, this paper provides some useful insights into the effect of initial and the final sphere radii and estimating them effortlessly. It also discusses practical ways of initiating the algorithm properly and terminating it before the normal end of the process as well as the cost of these methods. Besides, a novel algorithm is introduced which utilizes the presented techniques according to a threshold factor which is defined in terms of the number of transmit antennas and the noise variance. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm offers a desirable performance and reasonable complexity satisfying practical constraints.

  14. Tailoring of magnetic properties of ultrathin epitaxial Fe films by Dy doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the controlled modification of relaxation parameters and magnetic moments of epitaxial Fe thin films through Dy doping. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements show that an increase of Dy doping from 0.1% to 5% gives a tripling in Gilbert damping, and more importantly a strongly enhanced anisotropic damping that can be qualitatively understood through the slow-relaxing impurity model. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements show a pronounced suppression of the orbital moment of the Fe with Dy doping, leading to an almost threefold drop in the orbital to spin moment ratio, ml/ms. Doping with Dy can therefore be used to control both dynamic and static properties of thin ferromagnetic films for improved performance in spintronics device applications, mediated through the antiferromagnetic interaction of the 4f and 3d states.

  15. Tailoring of magnetic properties of ultrathin epitaxial Fe films by Dy doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, A. A. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Figueroa, A. I.; Laan, G. van der [Magnetic Spectroscopy Group, Diamond Light Source, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Hesjedal, T. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    We report on the controlled modification of relaxation parameters and magnetic moments of epitaxial Fe thin films through Dy doping. Ferromagnetic resonance measurements show that an increase of Dy doping from 0.1% to 5% gives a tripling in Gilbert damping, and more importantly a strongly enhanced anisotropic damping that can be qualitatively understood through the slow-relaxing impurity model. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements show a pronounced suppression of the orbital moment of the Fe with Dy doping, leading to an almost threefold drop in the orbital to spin moment ratio, m{sub l}/m{sub s}. Doping with Dy can therefore be used to control both dynamic and static properties of thin ferromagnetic films for improved performance in spintronics device applications, mediated through the antiferromagnetic interaction of the 4f and 3d states.

  16. III-nitride integration on ferroelectric materials of lithium niobate by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkoong, Gon; Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Madison, Shannon M.; Henderson, Walter; Ralph, Stephen E.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2005-01-01

    Integration of III-nitride electrical devices on the ferroelectric material lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) has been demonstrated. As a ferroelectric material, lithium niobate has a polarization which may provide excellent control of the polarity of III-nitrides. However, while high temperature, 1000 deg. C, thermal treatments produce atomically smooth surfaces, improving adhesion of GaN epitaxial layers on lithium niobate, repolarization of the substrate in local domains occurs. These effects result in multi domains of mixed polarization in LiNbO 3 , producing inversion domains in subsequent GaN epilayers. However, it is found that AlN buffer layers suppress inversion domains of III-nitrides. Therefore, two-dimensional electron gases in AlGaN/GaN heterojunction structures are obtained. Herein, the demonstration of the monolithic integration of high power devices with ferroelectric materials presents possibilities to control LiNbO 3 modulators on compact optoelectronic/electronic chips

  17. Deposition and characterisation of epitaxial oxide thin films for SOFCs

    KAUST Repository

    Santiso, José

    2010-10-24

    This paper reviews the recent advances in the use of thin films, mostly epitaxial, for fundamental studies of materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. These studies include the influence of film microstructure, crystal orientation and strain in oxide ionic conducting materials used as electrolytes, such as fluorites, and in mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials used as electrodes, typically oxides with perovskite or perovskite-related layered structures. The recent effort towards the enhancement of the electrochemical performance of SOFC materials through the deposition of artificial film heterostructures is also presented. These thin films have been engineered at a nanoscale level, such as the case of epitaxial multilayers or nanocomposite cermet materials. The recent progress in the implementation of thin films in SOFC devices is also reported. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Charge collection properties of heavily irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2005-01-01

    Detectors processed on epitaxial silicon seem to be a viable solution for the extreme radiation levels in the innermost layers of tracking detectors at upgraded LHC (SLHC). A set of epitaxial pad detectors of 50 and 75μm thicknesses (ρ=50Ωcm) was irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and reactor neutrons up to equivalent fluences of 10 16 cm -2 . Charge collection for minimum ionizing electrons from a 90 Sr source was measured using a charge sensitive preamplifier and a 25ns shaping circuit. The dependence of collected charge on annealing time and operation temperature was studied. Results were used to predict the performance of fine pitch pixel detectors proposed for SLHC

  19. Charge collection properties of heavily irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.si; Cindro, V. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dolenc, I. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fretwurst, E. [University of Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Lindstroem, G. [University of Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Mandic, I. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mikuz, M. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, M. [Institute Jozef Stefan, Jamova 39, SI-1111 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-12-01

    Detectors processed on epitaxial silicon seem to be a viable solution for the extreme radiation levels in the innermost layers of tracking detectors at upgraded LHC (SLHC). A set of epitaxial pad detectors of 50 and 75{mu}m thicknesses ({rho}=50{omega}cm) was irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and reactor neutrons up to equivalent fluences of 10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}. Charge collection for minimum ionizing electrons from a {sup 90}Sr source was measured using a charge sensitive preamplifier and a 25ns shaping circuit. The dependence of collected charge on annealing time and operation temperature was studied. Results were used to predict the performance of fine pitch pixel detectors proposed for SLHC.

  20. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, F D; Cazimajou, T; Sekine, Y; Hibino, H; Irie, H; Glattli, D C; Kumada, N; Roulleau, P

    2016-12-06

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  1. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Cazimajou, T.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Irie, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  2. On the kinetic barriers of graphene homo-epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xinke; Xie, Ya-Hong; Cahyadi, Erica; Ratsch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The diffusion processes and kinetic barriers of individual carbon adatoms and clusters on graphene surfaces are investigated to provide fundamental understanding of the physics governing epitaxial growth of multilayer graphene. It is found that individual carbon adatoms form bonds with the underlying graphene whereas the interaction between graphene and carbon clusters, consisting of 6 atoms or more, is very weak being van der Waals in nature. Therefore, small carbon clusters are quite mobile on the graphene surfaces and the diffusion barrier is negligibly small (∼6 meV). This suggests the feasibility of high-quality graphene epitaxial growth at very low growth temperatures with small carbon clusters (e.g., hexagons) as carbon source. We propose that the growth mode is totally different from 3-dimensional bulk materials with the surface mobility of carbon hexagons being the highest over graphene surfaces that gradually decreases with further increase in cluster size

  3. Magnetic Field Enhanced Superconductivity in Epitaxial Thin Film WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaba, Tomoya; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Gang; Xiang, Ziji; Tinsman, Colin; Chen, Lu; Zhou, Shangnan; Zhao, Songrui; Laleyan, David; Li, Yi; Mi, Zetian; Li, Lu

    2018-04-25

    In conventional superconductors an external magnetic field generally suppresses superconductivity. This results from a simple thermodynamic competition of the superconducting and magnetic free energies. In this study, we report the unconventional features in the superconducting epitaxial thin film tungsten telluride (WTe 2 ). Measuring the electrical transport properties of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) grown WTe 2 thin films with a high precision rotation stage, we map the upper critical field H c2 at different temperatures T. We observe the superconducting transition temperature T c is enhanced by in-plane magnetic fields. The upper critical field H c2 is observed to establish an unconventional non-monotonic dependence on temperature. We suggest that this unconventional feature is due to the lifting of inversion symmetry, which leads to the enhancement of H c2 in Ising superconductors.

  4. Current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, processing, packing, or holding of drugs; revision of certain labeling controls. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the packaging and labeling control provisions of the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for human and veterinary drug products by limiting the application of special control procedures for the use of cut labeling to immediate container labels, individual unit cartons, or multiunit cartons containing immediate containers that are not packaged in individual unit cartons. FDA is also permitting the use of any automated technique, including differentiation by labeling size and shape, that physically prevents incorrect labeling from being processed by labeling and packaging equipment when cut labeling is used. This action is intended to protect consumers from labeling errors more likely to cause adverse health consequences, while eliminating the regulatory burden of applying the rule to labeling unlikely to reach or adversely affect consumers. This action is also intended to permit manufacturers to use a broader range of error prevention and labeling control techniques than permitted by current CGMPs.

  5. Novel Dilute Bismide, Epitaxy, Physical Properties and Device Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dilute bismide in which a small amount of bismuth is incorporated to host III-Vs is the least studied III-V compound semiconductor and has received steadily increasing attention since 2000. In this paper, we review theoretical predictions of physical properties of bismide alloys, epitaxial growth of bismide thin films and nanostructures, surface, structural, electric, transport and optic properties of various binaries and bismide alloys, and device applications.

  6. Misfit dislocations in (001) Cu/(111) Ag epitaxial bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vook, R W; Chao, S S

    1979-01-01

    Two sets of elongated epitaxial (111) Ag islands rotated by 90/sup 0/ with respect to each other were observed to grow on (001) Cu substrates. In addition, two sets of edge misfit dislocations lay parallel to (110) Cu and (110) Cu or equivalently along (110) Ag and (112) Ag. Their Burgers vectors were determined, together with the elastic strains in these two directions. The island elongation was interpreted as arising from a lower strain energy in the preferred direction of growth.

  7. Optical effects induced by epitaxial tension in lead titanate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejneka, Alexandr; Chvostová, Dagmar; Pacherová, Oliva; Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav; Tyunina, Marina

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 3 (2018), s. 1-5, č. článku 031111. ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13778S; GA ČR GA15-15123S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : epitaxy * inorganic compounds * optical properties * ferroelectric materials * optical metrology Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics , supercond.) Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  8. Epitaxial growth mechanisms of graphene and effects of substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Özçelik, V. Ongun; Cahangirov, S.; Ciraci, S.

    2012-01-01

    The growth process of single layer graphene with and without substrate is investigated using ab initio, finite temperature molecular dynamic calculations within density functional theory. An understanding of the epitaxial graphene growth mechanisms in the atomic level is provided by exploring the transient stages which occur at the growing edges of graphene. These stages are formation and collapse of large carbon rings together with the formation and healing of Stone-Wales like pentagon-hepta...

  9. Epitaxial growth on porous GaAs substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grym, Jan; Nohavica, Dušan; Gladkov, Petar; Hulicius, Eduard; Pangrác, Jiří; Piksová, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2013), s. 59-64 ISSN 1631-0748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1201; GA ČR GAP108/10/0253 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Electrochemical etching * Porous semiconductors * Epitaxial growth * GaAs Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers; JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2013

  10. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations

  11. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  12. The Assessment of Postural Control, Reflex Integration, and Bilateral Motor Coordination of Young Handicapped Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGangi, Georgia; Larsen, Lawrence A.

    A measurement device, Assessment of Sensorimotor Integration in Preschool Children, was developed to assess postural control, reflex integration and bilateral motor integration in developmentally delayed children (3 to 5 years old). The test was administered to 113 normal children and results were compared with data collected on 23 developmentally…

  13. The Use of Probability Theory as a Basis for Planning and Controlling Overhead Costs in Education and Industry. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, R. B.

    In this report, the author suggests changes in the treatment of overhead costs by hypothesizing that "the effectiveness of standard costing in planning and controlling overhead costs can be increased through the use of probability theory and associated statistical techniques." To test the hypothesis, the author (1) presents an overview of the…

  14. Human factors review of electric power dispatch control centers. Volume 3. Operator information needs summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.J.; Najaf-Zadeh, K.; Darlington, H.T.; McNair, H.D.; Seidenstein, S.; Williams, A.R.

    1982-10-01

    Human factors is a systems-oriented interdisciplinary specialty concerned with the design of systems, equipment, facilities and the operational environment. An important aspect leading to the design requirements is the determination of the information requirements for electric power dispatch control centers. There are significant differences between the system operator's actions during normal and degraded states of power system operation, and power system restoration. This project evaluated the information the operator requires for normal power system and control system operations and investigates the changes of information required by the operator as the power system and/or the control system degrades from a normal operating state. The Phase II study, published in two volumes, defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related. This volume presents a summary of operator information needs, identifying the needs for and the uses of power system information by a system operator in conditions ranging from normal through degraded operation. Training requirements are also included for planning entry-level and follow-on training for operators.

  15. Epitaxial growth of indium oxyfluoride thin films by reactive pulsed laser deposition: Structural change induced by fluorine insertion into vacancy sites in bixbyite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Sohei [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirose, Yasushi, E-mail: hirose@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakao, Shoichiro [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yang, Chang [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harayama, Isao; Sekiba, Daiichiro [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), 3-2-1 Sakado, Takatsu-ku, Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-05-30

    InO{sub x}F{sub y} thin films were epitaxially grown on Y-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (111) substrates by reactive pulsed laser deposition. By changing the substrate temperature (T{sub S}), we were able to control the fluorine content of the film. Phase-pure epitaxial thin films with bixbyite-like ordering in the anion-site occupancy were obtained at high T{sub S} (≥ 240 °C), where fluorine was inserted into the vacancy sites in the bixbyite lattice up to y / (x + y) ∼ 0.3. By decreasing T{sub S}, y / (x + y) increased and the bixbyite-like ordering disappeared; simultaneously, fluorine-rich and fluorine-poor subphases emerged. The films grown at T{sub S} ≤ 150 °C were amorphous and exhibited higher optical absorbance and electrical resistivity than the epitaxial films. - Highlights: • InO{sub x}F{sub y} epitaxial thin films with high fluorine concentration were grown on Y:ZrO{sub 2}. • Anion composition and structural, optical and transport properties were studied. • Fluorine is topotactically inserted into the oxygen vacancy sites in bixbyite cell. • Bixbyite-like ordering of the anion site occupancy was conserved in y / (x + y) ≤ ∼ 0.3.

  16. Epitaxial growth of indium oxyfluoride thin films by reactive pulsed laser deposition: Structural change induced by fluorine insertion into vacancy sites in bixbyite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Sohei; Hirose, Yasushi; Nakao, Shoichiro; Yang, Chang; Harayama, Isao; Sekiba, Daiichiro; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    InO x F y thin films were epitaxially grown on Y-stabilized ZrO 2 (111) substrates by reactive pulsed laser deposition. By changing the substrate temperature (T S ), we were able to control the fluorine content of the film. Phase-pure epitaxial thin films with bixbyite-like ordering in the anion-site occupancy were obtained at high T S (≥ 240 °C), where fluorine was inserted into the vacancy sites in the bixbyite lattice up to y / (x + y) ∼ 0.3. By decreasing T S , y / (x + y) increased and the bixbyite-like ordering disappeared; simultaneously, fluorine-rich and fluorine-poor subphases emerged. The films grown at T S ≤ 150 °C were amorphous and exhibited higher optical absorbance and electrical resistivity than the epitaxial films. - Highlights: • InO x F y epitaxial thin films with high fluorine concentration were grown on Y:ZrO 2 . • Anion composition and structural, optical and transport properties were studied. • Fluorine is topotactically inserted into the oxygen vacancy sites in bixbyite cell. • Bixbyite-like ordering of the anion site occupancy was conserved in y / (x + y) ≤ ∼ 0.3

  17. Interaction of GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S

    2004-08-15

    GaN surface passivation processes are still under development and among others hydrogen treatments are investigated. In this study, we use non-destructive optical and electrical probes such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and surface potential Kelvin probe microscopy (SP-KPM) in conjunction with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the study of the different reactivity of Ga-polar and N-polar GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen. The GaN epitaxial layers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates, and GaN and AlN buffer layers are used to grow N-polar and Ga-polar films, respectively. The atomic hydrogen is produced by a remote rf (13.56 MHz) H{sub 2} plasma in order to rule out any ion bombardment of the GaN surface and make the interaction chemical. It is found that the interaction of GaN surfaces with atomic hydrogen depends on polarity, with N-polar GaN exhibiting greater reactivity. Furthermore, it is found that atomic hydrogen is effective in the passivation of grain boundaries and surface defects states.

  18. Interaction of GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G.; Namkoong, G.; Doolittle, W.A.; Brown, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    GaN surface passivation processes are still under development and among others hydrogen treatments are investigated. In this study, we use non-destructive optical and electrical probes such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and surface potential Kelvin probe microscopy (SP-KPM) in conjunction with non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the study of the different reactivity of Ga-polar and N-polar GaN epitaxial layers with atomic hydrogen. The GaN epitaxial layers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy on sapphire (0 0 0 1) substrates, and GaN and AlN buffer layers are used to grow N-polar and Ga-polar films, respectively. The atomic hydrogen is produced by a remote rf (13.56 MHz) H 2 plasma in order to rule out any ion bombardment of the GaN surface and make the interaction chemical. It is found that the interaction of GaN surfaces with atomic hydrogen depends on polarity, with N-polar GaN exhibiting greater reactivity. Furthermore, it is found that atomic hydrogen is effective in the passivation of grain boundaries and surface defects states

  19. Electronic properties of epitaxial 6H silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessels, B.W.; Gatos, H.C.

    1977-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured in the temperature range from 78 to 900 K for n-type epitaxially grown 6H silicon carbide. A many-valley model of the conduction band was used in the analysis of electron concentration as a function of temperature. From this analysis, the density of states mass to the free electron mass ratio per ellipsoid was calculated to be 0.45. It was estimated that the constant energy surface of the conduction band consists of three ellipsoids. The ionization energy of the shallowest nitrogen donor was found to be 105 meV, when the valley-orbit interaction was taken into account. The electron scattering mechanisms in the epitaxial layers were analyzed and it was shown that the dominant mechanism limiting electron mobility at high temperatures is inter-valley scattering and at low temperatures (200K), impurity and space charge scattering. A value of 360 cm 2 /V sec was calculated for the maximum room temperature Hall mobility expected for electrons in pure 6H SiC. The effect of epitaxial growth temperature on room temperature Hall mobility was also investigated. (author)

  20. Silicon epitaxy on textured double layer porous silicon by LPCVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Hong; Shen Honglie; Zhang Lei; Huang Haibin; Lu Linfeng; Tang Zhengxia; Shen Jiancang

    2010-01-01

    Epitaxial silicon thin film on textured double layer porous silicon (DLPS) was demonstrated. The textured DLPS was formed by electrochemical etching using two different current densities on the silicon wafer that are randomly textured with upright pyramids. Silicon thin films were then grown on the annealed DLPS, using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). The reflectance of the DLPS and the grown silicon thin films were studied by a spectrophotometer. The crystallinity and topography of the grown silicon thin films were studied by Raman spectroscopy and SEM. The reflectance results show that the reflectance of the silicon wafer decreases from 24.7% to 11.7% after texturing, and after the deposition of silicon thin film the surface reflectance is about 13.8%. SEM images show that the epitaxial silicon film on textured DLPS exhibits random pyramids. The Raman spectrum peaks near 521 cm -1 have a width of 7.8 cm -1 , which reveals the high crystalline quality of the silicon epitaxy.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1): a review of growth, characterization, transfer doping and hydrogen intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedl, C; Coletti, C; Starke, U

    2010-01-01

    Graphene, a monoatomic layer of graphite, hosts a two-dimensional electron gas system with large electron mobilities which makes it a prospective candidate for future carbon nanodevices. Grown epitaxially on silicon carbide (SiC) wafers, large area graphene samples appear feasible and integration in existing device technology can be envisioned. This paper reviews the controlled growth of epitaxial graphene layers on SiC(0 0 0 1) and the manipulation of their electronic structure. We show that epitaxial graphene on SiC grows on top of a carbon interface layer that-although it has a graphite-like atomic structure-does not display the linear π-bands typical for graphene due to a strong covalent bonding to the substrate. Only the second carbon layer on top of this interface acts like monolayer graphene. With a further carbon layer, a graphene bilayer system develops. During the growth of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) the number of graphene layers can be precisely controlled by monitoring the π-band structure. Experimental fingerprints for in situ growth control could be established. However, due to the influence of the interface layer, epitaxial graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) is intrinsically n-doped and the layers have a long-range corrugation in their density of states. As a result, the Dirac point energy where the π-bands cross is shifted away from the Fermi energy, so that the ambipolar properties of graphene cannot be exploited. We demonstrate methods to compensate and eliminate this structural and electronic influence of the interface. We show that the band structure of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1) can be precisely tailored by functionalizing the graphene surface with tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) molecules. Charge neutrality can be achieved for mono- and bilayer graphene. On epitaxial bilayer graphene, where a band gap opens due to the asymmetric electric field across the layers imposed by the interface, the magnitude of this band gap

  2. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  3. Epitaxial growth of ZnO layers on (111) GaAs substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jian; Zhang Di; Konomi, Takaharu; Saito, Katsuhiko; Guo Qixin

    2012-01-01

    ZnO layers were grown on (111) GaAs substrates by laser molecular epitaxy at substrate temperatures between 200 and 550 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that c-axis of ZnO epilayer with a wurtzite structure is perpendicular to the substrate surface. X-ray rocking curves and Raman spectroscopy showed that the crystal quality of ZnO epilayers depends on the substrate temperature during the growth. Strong near-band-edge emission in the UV region without any deep-level emissions was observed from the ZnO epilayers at room temperature. The results indicate that laser molecular beam epitaxy is a promising growth method for obtaining high-quality ZnO layers on (111) GaAs substrates.

  4. Food irradiation with emphasis on process control and acceptance in Asia. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The third phase of the Asian Regional Cooperative Project on Food Irradiation RPFI (Phase III) emphasized process control of pilot- and commercial scale irradiation of food according to the principle of the Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foods, and on gaining the acceptance of the process by governments, food industry and consumers. Phase III of the RPFI was funded by UNDP and was in operation from 1989-1993. Fifteen institutions in Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Viet Nam participated. Proper process control of irradiation with emphasis on dosimetry techniques was emphasized. A number of market testing, transportation trials and consumer acceptance studies was carried out during this period. Refs, figs, tabs.

  5. GAE detection for mass measurement for plasma density control. JET article 14 contract no 950104. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Ridder, G. de; Villard, L.

    1997-01-01

    In view of the interest in obtaining a direct mass measurement in JET D-T plasmas, ultimately for D/T ratio control, the CRPP has performed numerical simulation work to verify the underlying method. The work undertaken is described and the conclusions are presented. The use of the GAE in JET is concluded to be less interesting than initially hoped. The reasons are discussed. Such a method, however, provide useful additional information. (author) figs., tabs., 5 refs

  6. Control of spiking in partial penetration of electron beam welds. Final report, 1 October 1969--1 October 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of the penetration mechanism of high energy density electron beams and an evaluation of electron beam deflection as a method of penetration control are presented. A discussion of electron beam mechanics including several penetration theories is presented in the introduction and background. Slur radiographs made using a pinhole x-ray camera are evaluated to determine velocity and acceleration of the point of beam impingement. Methods of cavity closure are discussed with possible causes of surface sealing of the beam cavity. A method of penetration, after the cavity has closed, based on the curves relating velocity and acceleration to penetration distance is considered. An estimate of cavity pressure is made from the maximum acceleration of the beam-metal interface. A system using an x-ray detector coupled with a beam deflecting device is detailed and evaluated. As this is the first attempt at penetration control by beam deflection the investigation seeks only to determine the feasibility of the idea without attempting a thorough analysis of range of abilities or quality of welds made by such devices. Based on several specimens which are presented beam deflection appears capable of controlling penetration depth. It is hoped that the ideas presented here will inspire future research along these lines

  7. Epitaxially influenced boundary layer model for size effect in thin metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Zdenek P.; Guo Zaoyang; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Zhu Yong; Peng Bei

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the size effect recently observed by Espinosa et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids51, 47 (2003)] in pure tension tests on free thin metallic films can be explained by the existence of a boundary layer of fixed thickness, located at the surface of the film that was attached onto the substrate during deposition. The boundary layer is influenced by the epitaxial effects of crystal growth on the dislocation density and texture (manifested by prevalent crystal plane orientations). This influence is assumed to cause significantly elevated yield strength. Furthermore, the observed gradual postpeak softening, along with its size independence, which is observed in short film strips subjected to pure tension, is explained by slip localization, originating at notch-like defects, and by damage, which can propagate in a stable manner when the film strip under pure tension is sufficiently thin and short. For general applications, the present epitaxially influenced boundary layer model may be combined with the classical strain-gradient plasticity proposed by Gao et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47, 1239 (1999)], and it is shown that this combination is necessary to fit the test data on both pure tension and bending of thin films by one and the same theory. To deal with films having different crystal grain sizes, the Hall-Petch relation for the yield strength dependence on the grain size needs to be incorporated into the combined theory. For very thin films, in which a flattened grain fills the whole film thickness, the Hall-Petch relation needs a cutoff, and the asymptotic increase of yield strength with diminishing film thickness is then described by the extension of Nix's model of misfit dislocations by Zhang and Zhou [J. Adv. Mater. 38, 51 (2002)]. The final result is a proposal of a general theory for strength, size effect, hardening, and softening of thin metallic films

  8. Epitaxially influenced boundary layer model for size effect in thin metallic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Guo, Zaoyang; Espinosa, Horacio D.; Zhu, Yong; Peng, Bei

    2005-04-01

    It is shown that the size effect recently observed by Espinosa et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids51, 47 (2003)] in pure tension tests on free thin metallic films can be explained by the existence of a boundary layer of fixed thickness, located at the surface of the film that was attached onto the substrate during deposition. The boundary layer is influenced by the epitaxial effects of crystal growth on the dislocation density and texture (manifested by prevalent crystal plane orientations). This influence is assumed to cause significantly elevated yield strength. Furthermore, the observed gradual postpeak softening, along with its size independence, which is observed in short film strips subjected to pure tension, is explained by slip localization, originating at notch-like defects, and by damage, which can propagate in a stable manner when the film strip under pure tension is sufficiently thin and short. For general applications, the present epitaxially influenced boundary layer model may be combined with the classical strain-gradient plasticity proposed by Gao et al., [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47, 1239 (1999)], and it is shown that this combination is necessary to fit the test data on both pure tension and bending of thin films by one and the same theory. To deal with films having different crystal grain sizes, the Hall-Petch relation for the yield strength dependence on the grain size needs to be incorporated into the combined theory. For very thin films, in which a flattened grain fills the whole film thickness, the Hall-Petch relation needs a cutoff, and the asymptotic increase of yield strength with diminishing film thickness is then described by the extension of Nix's model of misfit dislocations by Zhang and Zhou [J. Adv. Mater. 38, 51 (2002)]. The final result is a proposal of a general theory for strength, size effect, hardening, and softening of thin metallic films.

  9. Final focus test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  10. Effect of growth temperature on defects in epitaxial GaN film grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kushvaha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of growth temperature on defect states of GaN epitaxial layers grown on 3.5 μm thick GaN epi-layer on sapphire (0001 substrates using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN samples grown at three different substrate temperatures at 730, 740 and 750 °C were characterized using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy images of these samples show the presence of small surface and large hexagonal pits on the GaN film surfaces. The surface defect density of high temperature grown sample is smaller (4.0 × 108 cm−2 at 750 °C than that of the low temperature grown sample (1.1 × 109 cm−2 at 730 °C. A correlation between growth temperature and concentration of deep centre defect states from photoluminescence spectra is also presented. The GaN film grown at 750 °C exhibits the lowest defect concentration which confirms that the growth temperature strongly influences the surface morphology and affects the optical properties of the GaN epitaxial films.

  11. Final report to the Atomic Energy Control Board on project management capabilities using NAOP as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, P.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify practices of the Atomic Energy Control Board that support or detract from the implementation of collaborative cross-functional project management and to recommend ways and means of increasing the Board's ability to respond to projects. Ontario Hydro's Nuclear Asset Optimization Program (NAOP) and the Board's response to that program form the basis of a case study for the purposes of this report. Issues examined include: Whether the Board follows a logical project management framework when it addresses projects such as the NAOP; where the Board exhibits good practices in addressing project such as the NAOP; and where the Board needs to develop better practices

  12. Demonstration/Validation of the TC-60 Controlled Detonation Chamber, Porton Down, UK: Final Demonstration Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    8217 Av.-l R Ave Ave Fl O e---_ 7_ Run Time Total Volume Metered Delta P Delta H Gas Temp. Temp. Page I od gsnanne re/Date) Team ’ure/DýC- C-86 Isokinetic ...process equipment. When the ball valves are open, gaseous oxygen is controlled by a regulator and automatically metered into the detonation chamber by a...compounds emitted to the atmosphere "• The dioxin/furan toxic equivalent concentration was in the low femtogram (fg) per normal cubic meter concentration

  13. Development of process control capability through the Browns Ferry Integrated Computer System using Reactor Water Clanup System as an example. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Mowrey, J.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the design, development and testing of process controls for selected system operations in the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFNP) Reactor Water Cleanup System (RWCU) using a Computer Simulation Platform which simulates the RWCU System and the BFNP Integrated Computer System (ICS). This system was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the soft control (video touch screen) of nuclear plant systems through an operator console. The BFNP Integrated Computer System, which has recently. been installed at BFNP Unit 2, was simulated to allow for operator control functions of the modeled RWCU system. The BFNP Unit 2 RWCU system was simulated using the RELAP5 Thermal/Hydraulic Simulation Model, which provided the steady-state and transient RWCU process variables and simulated the response of the system to control system inputs. Descriptions of the hardware and software developed are also included in this report. The testing and acceptance program and results are also detailed in this report. A discussion of potential installation of an actual RWCU process control system in BFNP Unit 2 is included. Finally, this report contains a section on industry issues associated with installation of process control systems in nuclear power plants

  14. Epitaxial effects in thin films of high-Tc cuprates with the K2NiF4 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Michio; Sato, Hisashi; Tsukada, Akio; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) and La2-xBaxCuO4 (LBCO) have been recognized as the archetype materials of "hole-doped" high-Tc superconductors. Their crystal structures are relatively simple with a small number of constituent cation elements. In addition, the doping level can be varied by the chemical substitution over a wide range enough to obtain the full spectrum of doping-dependent electronic and magnetic properties. These attractive features have dedicated many researchers to thin-film growth of LSCO and LBCO. The critical temperature (Tc) of LSCO and LBCO is sensitive to strain as manifested by a positive pressure coefficient of Tc in bulk samples. In general, films are strained if they are grown on lattice-mismatched substrates (epitaxial strain). Early attempts (before 1997) at the growth of LSCO and LBCO films resulted in depressed Tc below 30 K as they were grown on a commonly used SrTiO3 substrate (in-plane lattice parameter asub = 3.905 Å): the in-plane lattice parameters of LSCO and LBCO are ≤3.80 Å, and hence tensile epitaxial strain is introduced. The situation was changed by the use of LaSrAlO4 substrates with a slightly shorter in-plane lattice constant (asub = 3.756 Å). On LaSrAlO4 substrates, the Tc reaches 45 K in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4, 47 K in La1.85Ba0.15CuO4, and 56 K in ozone-oxidized La2CuO4+δ films, substantially higher than the Tc's of the bulk compounds. The Tc increase in La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 films on LaSrAlO4 and decrease on SrTiO3 are semi-quantitatively in accord with the phenomenological estimations based on the anisotropic strain coefficients of Tc (dTc/dεi). In this review article, we describe the growth and properties of films of cuprates having the K2NiF4 structure, mainly focusing on the increase/decrease of Tc by epitaxial strain and quasi-stable phase formation by epitaxial stabilization. We further extract the structural and/or physical parameters controlling Tc toward microscopic understanding of the variation of Tc by epitaxial strain.

  15. X-ray diffraction study of InAlAs-InGaAs on InP high electron mobility transistor structure prepared by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.Y.; Kao, Y.C.; Kim, T.S.

    1990-01-01

    High-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) can be prepared by growing alternating epitaxial layers of InAlAs and InGaAs on InP substrates. Lattice matched HEMTs are obtained by growing layers of IN x Al (1-x) As and In y Ga (1-y) As with x ≅ 0.5227 and y ≅ 0.5324. Varying the values of x and y by controlling the individual flux during molecular-beam epitaxial (MBE) growth, one can obtain pseudomorphic HEMTs. Pseudomorphic HEMTs may have superior electronic transport properties and larger conduction band discontinuity when compared to an unstrained one. The precise control of the composition is thus important to the properties of HEMTs. This control is however very difficult and the values of x and y may vary from run to run. The authors demonstrate in this paper the capability of a double crystal rocking curve (DCRC) on the structure characterization

  16. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff's suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification

  17. Final report of the NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate control and accountability of licensed devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    US NRC staff acknowledged that licensees were having problems maintaining control over and accountability for devices containing radioactive material. In June 1995, NRC approved the staff`s suggestion to form a joint NRC-Agreement State Working Group to evaluate the problem and propose solutions. The staff indicated that the Working Group was necessary to address the concerns from a national perspective, allow for a broad level of Agreement State input, and to reflect their experience. Agreement State participation in the process was essential since some Agreement States have implemented effective programs for oversight of device users. This report includes the 5 recommendations proposed by the Working Group to increase regulatory oversight, increase control and accountability of devices, ensure proper disposal, and ensure disposal of orphaned devices. Specifically, the Working Group recommends that: (1) NRC and Agreement States increase regulatory oversight for users of certain devices; (2) NRC and Agreement State impose penalties on persons losing devices; (3) NRC and Agreement States ensure proper disposal of orphaned devices; (4) NRC encourage States to implement similar oversight programs for users of Naturally-Occurring or Accelerator- Produced Material; and (5) NRC encourage non-licensed stakeholders to take appropriate actions, such as instituting programs for material identification.

  18. Simulation-based diagnostics and control for nuclear power plants. Final report, April 15, 1992--April 14, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of the project was to develop and test a simulation-based diagnostics and control guidance system that can be used to diagnose and manage off-normal transient events in nuclear power plants. The research has focused on developing two diagnostic approaches suitable for detection and identification of faults involving multiple components, subject to uncertainties in system modeling and observations. The first approach is based on a fuzzy logic framework that can diagnose binary failures using a single-failure diagnostic knowledge base. Construction of the binary-failure knowledge base is accomplished through the use of macroscopic conservation relationships and a fuzzy inference structure is developed to determine the magnitude of faults and the associated certainty. In the second diagnostic approach, an adaptive Kalman filter algorithm is derived to yield information on the type and magnitude of feasible component transitions that can account for system observations. To obtain the likelihood of feasible component failures or degradations, a general probabilistic formulation is developed where statistical distributions associated with component reliability data are explicitly represented. Testing of the diagnostic algorithms has been performed through the analysis of simulated transient events for light water reactor systems. Preliminary studies have been conducted to develop Monte Carlo algorithms for flexible control of transient events

  19. Dislocations limited electronic transport in hydride vapour phase epitaxy grown GaN templates: A word of caution for the epitaxial growers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek, E-mail: cabhishek@rrcat.gov.in; Khamari, Shailesh K.; Kumar, R.; Dixit, V. K.; Oak, S. M.; Sharma, T. K., E-mail: tarun@rrcat.gov.in [Semiconductor Physics and Devices Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2015-01-12

    GaN templates grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy (HVPE) and metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) techniques are compared through electronic transport measurements. Carrier concentration measured by Hall technique is about two orders larger than the values estimated by capacitance voltage method for HVPE templates. It is learnt that there exists a critical thickness of HVPE templates below which the transport properties of epitaxial layers grown on top of them are going to be severely limited by the density of charged dislocations lying at layer-substrate interface. On the contrary MOVPE grown templates are found to be free from such limitations.

  20. Epitaxy of semiconductor-superconductor nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogstrup, P.; Ziino, N.L.B.; Chang, W.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the properties of semiconductor/metal interfaces is a powerful method for designing functionality and improving the performance of electrical devices. Recently semiconductor/superconductor hybrids have appeared as an important example where the atomic scale uniformity of the interface...

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  2. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, March 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with various impinger capture solutions. Also, the installation of the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit was completed in March. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD Unit and were utilized in the HAP test configuration this month. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold- standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  4. Radon-222 emissions and control practices for licensed uranium mills and their associated tailings piles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The report is organized into five main sections. The conclusions of the effort are summarized in Chapter 2. A general description of current milling and tailings management practices and a summary of the site-specific characteristics of operating and standby uranium mills are contained in Chapter-3. The sources and emission rates of radon-222 at licensed mills and their associated tailings piles are contained in Chapter 4 along with the results of an effort to develop generic procedures to estimate radon-222 emissions for milling operations and tailings disposal. Control practices that are being or could be applied to the milling operation and tailings disposal areas and their estimated cost and effectiveness in reducing radon-222 emissions are presented in Chapter 5. The appendices contain detailed information on mill site data and emission estimates

  5. Compliant ferroelastic domains in epitaxial Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feigl, L.; McGilly, L. J.; Sandu, C. S.; Setter, N. [Ceramics Laboratory, EPFL - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland)

    2014-04-28

    Ordered patterns of highly compliant ferroelastic domains have been created by use of tensile strained epitaxial Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} thin films, of very low defect density, grown on DyScO{sub 3} substrates. The effect of 180° switching on well-ordered a/c 90° domain patterns is investigated by a combination of transmission electron microscopy, piezoelectric force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It is shown that ferroelastic a-domains, having an in-plane polarization, can be created and completely removed on a local level by an out-of-plane electric field. The modifications of the ferroelastic domain pattern can be controlled by varying the parameters used during switching with a piezoresponse force microscope to produce the desired arrangement.

  6. Synthesis and electronic properties of Fe2TiO5 epitaxial thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Motoki; Nishio, Kazunori; Hwang, Harold Y.; Hikita, Yasuyuki

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the growth phase diagram of pseudobrookite Fe2TiO5 epitaxial thin films on LaAlO3 (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Control of the oxygen partial pressure and temperature during deposition enabled selective stabilization of (100)- and (230)-oriented films. In this regime, we find an optical gap of 2.1 eV and room temperature resistivity in the range of 20-80 Ω cm, which are significantly lower than α-Fe2O3, making Fe2TiO5 potentially an ideal inexpensive visible-light harvesting semiconductor. These results provide a basis to incorporate Fe2TiO5 in oxide heterostructures for photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical applications.

  7. Carbon dioxide and water adsorption on highly epitaxial Delafossite CuFeO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, S.; Joshi, T.; Borisov, P.; Sarabia, M.; Lederman, D.; Cabrera, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    Thermal programmed desorption (TPD) of CO2 and H2O from a 200 nm thick CuFeO2 Delafossite surface was performed in a standard UHV chamber, The CuFeO2 thin film grown using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) over an Al2O3 (0001) substrate with controlled O2 atmosphere resulted with highly epitaxial crystal structure. The adsorption/desorption of CO2 and H2O process was also monitored with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Our results revealed that carbon dioxide interacts with CuFeO2 forming Fe carbonates compounds on its surface. Hydroxides were also formed on the surface due to water presence. Using TPD data, Arrhenius plots for CO2 and water desorption were done and activation energy for desorption was obtained. Funds FONDECyT 1130372; Thanks to P. Ferrari.

  8. Molecular-beam epitaxial growth and characterization of quaternary III-nitride compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monroy, E.; Gogneau, N.; Enjalbert, F.; Fossard, F.; Jalabert, D.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Dang, Le Si; Daudin, B.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the controlled growth and characterization of quaternary AlGaInN compounds by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Two-dimensional growth is achieved with a monolayer of In segregating at the growth front. In incorporation is hindered by increasing growth temperature and Al mole fraction, which is explained by the lower binding energy of InN compared to GaN and AlN. The mosaicity of the layers is determined by the substrate quality, whereas the alloy disorder increases with the Al content, independent of the In mole fraction. Room temperature photoluminescence is dominated by a narrow band-edge emission, whose Stokes shift and activation energy increase with the In content. This behavior is interpreted in terms of carrier localization in self-formed alloy inhomogeneities. An In-related band bowing parameter of 2.5 eV has been estimated

  9. Strain Induced Magnetism in SrRuO3 Epitaxial Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grutter, A.; Wong, F.; Arenholz, E.; Liberati, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-01-10

    Epitaxial SrRuO{sub 3} thin films were grown on SrTiO{sub 3}, (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(SrAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.7} and LaAlO{sub 3} substrates inducing different biaxial compressive strains. Coherently strained SrRuO{sub 3} films exhibit enhanced magnetization compared to previously reported bulk and thin film values of 1.1-1.6 {micro}{sub B} per formula unit. A comparison of (001) and (110) SrRuO{sub 3} films on each substrate indicates that films on (110) oriented have consistently higher saturated moments than corresponding (001) films. These observations indicate the importance of lattice distortions in controlling the magnetic ground state in this transitional metal oxide.

  10. Step driven competitive epitaxial and self-limited growth of graphene on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Fan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The existence of surface steps was found to have significant function and influence on the growth of graphene on copper via chemical vapor deposition. The two typical growth modes involved were found to be influenced by the step morphologies on copper surface, which led to our proposed step driven competitive growth mechanism. We also discovered a protective role of graphene in preserving steps on copper surface. Our results showed that wide and high steps promoted epitaxial growth and yielded multilayer graphene domains with regular shape, while dense and low steps favored self-limited growth and led to large-area monolayer graphene films. We have demonstrated that controllable growth of graphene domains of specific shape and large-area continuous graphene films are feasible.

  11. Tuning of Transport and Magnetic Properties in Epitaxial LaMnO3+δ Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of compressive strain on the transport and magnetic properties of epitaxial LaMnO3+δ thin films has been investigated. It is found that the transport and magnetic properties of the LaMnO3+δ thin films grown on the LaAlO3 substrates can be tuned by the compressive strain through varying film thickness. And the insulator-metal transition, charge/orbital ordering transition, and paramagnetic-ferromagnetic transition are suppressed by the compressive strain. Consequently, the related electronic and magnetic transition temperatures decrease with an increase in the compressive strain. The present results can be explained by the strain-controlled lattice deformation and the consequent orbital occupation. It indicates that the lattice degree of freedom is crucial for understanding the transport and magnetic properties of the strongly correlated LaMnO3+δ.

  12. Effects of anharmonic strain on the phase stability of epitaxial films and superlattices: Applications to noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozolins, V.; Wolverton, C.; Zunger, A.

    1998-01-01

    Epitaxial strain energies of epitaxial films and bulk superlattices are studied via first-principles total-energy calculations using the local-density approximation. Anharmonic effects due to large lattice mismatch, beyond the reach of the harmonic elasticity theory, are found to be very important in Cu/Au (lattice mismatch 12%), Cu/Ag (12%), and Ni/Au (15%). We find that left-angle 001 right-angle is the elastically soft direction for biaxial expansion of Cu and Ni, but it is left-angle 201 right-angle for large biaxial compression of Cu, Ag, and Au. The stability of superlattices is discussed in terms of the coherency strain and interfacial energies. We find that in phase separating systems such as Cu-Ag the superlattice formation energies decrease with superlattice period, and the interfacial energy is positive. Superlattices are formed easiest on (001) and hardest on (111) substrates. For ordering systems, such as Cu-Au and Ag-Au, the formation energy of superlattices increases with period, and interfacial energies are negative. These superlattices are formed easiest on (001) or (110) and hardest on (111) substrates. For Ni-Au we find a hybrid behavior: superlattices along left-angle 111 right-angle and left-angle 001 right-angle behave like phase separating systems, while for left-angle 110 right-angle they behave like ordering systems. Finally, recent experimental results on epitaxial stabilization of disordered Ni-Au and Cu-Ag alloys, immiscible in the bulk form, are explained in terms of destabilization of the phase separated state due to lattice mismatch between the substrate and constituents. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  13. Microstructure of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-x thin films grown on LaAlO3 (001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Y.; Siegal, M.P.; Hull, R.; Phillips, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    We report a microstructural investigation of the epitaxial growth of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) thin films on LaAlO 3 (001) substrates using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Epitaxial films grow with two distinct modes: c epitaxy (YBCO) single crystal with the c (axis normal to the surface and a epitaxy (YBCO) single crystal with the c axis in the interfacial plane), where c epitaxy is the dominant mode grown in all samples 35--200 nm thick. In 35 nm YBCO films annealed at 850 degree C, 97±1% of the surface area is covered by c epitaxy with embedded anisotropic a-epitaxial grains. Quantitative analysis reveals the effect of film thickness and annealing temperature on the density, grain sizes, areal coverages, and anisotropic growth of a epitaxy

  14. Strain induced ionic conductivity enhancement in epitaxial Ce0.9Gd0.1O22d

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant, K. Mohan; Esposito, Vincenzo; Pryds, Nini

    2012-01-01

    -plane ionic conductivity in CGO epitaxial thin films. The ionic conductivity is found to increase with decrease in buffer layer thickness. The tailored ionic conductivity enhancement is explained in terms of close relationships among epitaxy, strain, and ionic conductivity....

  15. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, November 1995. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Pilot High Velocity (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurement studies involving the EPA Draft Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber system was utilized in the TER test configuration this month while the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber unit remained in a state of cold-standby. A monthly inspection was conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems in the SCR building. These inspections will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff each month.

  16. Final Technical Report on Quantifying Dependability Attributes of Software Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidts, Carol; Huang, Fuqun; Li, Boyuan; Li, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    With the current transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, the number and variety of software-based systems have significantly increased. The sophisticated nature and increasing complexity of software raises trust in these systems as a significant challenge. The trust placed in a software system is typically termed software dependability. Software dependability analysis faces uncommon challenges since software systems' characteristics differ from those of hardware systems. The lack of systematic science-based methods for quantifying the dependability attributes in software-based instrumentation as well as control systems in safety critical applications has proved itself to be a significant inhibitor to the expanded use of modern digital technology in the nuclear industry. Dependability refers to the ability of a system to deliver a service that can be trusted. Dependability is commonly considered as a general concept that encompasses different attributes, e.g., reliability, safety, security, availability and maintainability. Dependability research has progressed significantly over the last few decades. For example, various assessment models and/or design approaches have been proposed for software reliability, software availability and software maintainability. Advances have also been made to integrate multiple dependability attributes, e.g., integrating security with other dependability attributes, measuring availability and maintainability, modeling reliability and availability, quantifying reliability and security, exploring the dependencies between security and safety and developing integrated analysis models. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the dependencies between various dependability attributes as a whole and of how such dependencies are formed. To address the need for quantification and give a more objective basis to the review process -- therefore reducing regulatory uncertainty

  17. Sensor failure and multivariable control for airbreathing propulsion systems. Ph.D. Thesis - Dec. 1979 Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbehani, K.

    1980-01-01

    A new sensor/actuator failure analysis technique for turbofan jet engines was developed. Three phases of failure analysis, namely detection, isolation, and accommodation are considered. Failure detection and isolation techniques are developed by utilizing the concept of Generalized Likelihood Ratio (GLR) tests. These techniques are applicable to both time varying and time invariant systems. Three GLR detectors are developed for: (1) hard-over sensor failure; (2) hard-over actuator failure; and (3) brief disturbances in the actuators. The probability distribution of the GLR detectors and the detectability of sensor/actuator failures are established. Failure type is determined by the maximum of the GLR detectors. Failure accommodation is accomplished by extending the Multivariable Nyquest Array (MNA) control design techniques to nonsquare system designs. The performance and effectiveness of the failure analysis technique are studied by applying the technique to a turbofan jet engine, namely the Quiet Clean Short Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Single and multiple sensor/actuator failures in the QCSEE are simulated and analyzed and the effects of model degradation are studied.

  18. Instrumentation and control strategies for power plants. Volume 2: Problem definition and recommendations. Final report, December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The I and C systems now in service are largely based on process technology from the 50s and 60s. Replacement parts are becoming unavailable and the infrastructure of designers, engineers and manufacturers to support the existing obsolete I and C technology is disappearing. Without the stimulus of new plant orders, there has been little incentive to develop new nuclear plant I and C technology. State-of-the-art I and C systems can provide highly analyzed status information, can control complex functions in a more refined way, are more reliable, and more economical. Modern I and C technology takes full advantage of both analog and digital capabilities, using each to its best advantage. EPRI is expanding its efforts to bridge the gap that had developed between the U.S. power industry and state-of-the-art I and C technology. In March of 1990 EPRI sponsored an I and C workshop to solicit utility industry views as to how this effort could most productively proceed. The material of the workshop, which is described in this report (Volumes 1 and 2), covered where we are in I and C technology, where we need to go, and provided input toward defining a strategy for I and C research and development. (author)

  19. Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Stork; R. Poola

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO(sub x)) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM(sub 2.5)). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO(sub x) and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles

  20. Stability of cracked pipe under seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.2 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, G.; Veith, P.; Marschall, C.

    1997-06-01

    Results of displacement-controlled pipe fracture experiments, analyses, and material characterization efforts performed within the International Piping Integrity Research Group, IPIRG, Program Subtask 1.2 are discussed. Effects of dynamic versus quasi-static and monotonic versus cyclic loading were evaluated for ductile tearing of two materials, A106 Grade B ferritic steel and TP304 austenitic steel. Twelve through-wall-cracked pipe experiments were conducted on 6-inch diameter Schedule 120 pipe at 288 C (550 F). The results indicated dynamic loading at seismic strain rates marginally increased the load-carrying capacity of austenitic steel. The ferritic steel tested was sensitive to dynamic strain-aging, and consequently, its load-carrying capacity decreased at dynamic strain rates. Two parameters were found to affect the apparent ductile crack growth resistance during cyclic loading, load ratio (R) and incremental plastic displacement that occurs in a cycle. Cyclic (R = 0) loading had minimal effect on ductile tearing for both materials. However, fully reversed loading decreased the load-carrying capacity and toughness for both materials. The incremental plastic displacement can be as important as the load ratio; however, it is harder to quantify from design stress reports. Large plastic displacements will minimize the effect of negative load ratios

  1. Factors affecting geographic market definition and merger control for the Dutch electricity sector. Final report. Non-confidential version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moselle, B.; Newbery, D.; Harris, D.

    2006-06-01

    The NMA (Netherlands Competition Authority NMa) asked The Brattle Group to analyse: (1) Factors that would affect geographic market definition for the purpose of merger control in the Dutch electric power industry; and (2) The competitive effects of some specific (hypothetical) mergers in that industry. This study does not refer to any actual merger proceedings, and the NMa have not asked to analyse any mergers of which they have been notified. All mergers analysed are hypothetical. This study is performed using both statistical analysis of historical data, and results from a comprehensive model of the European power market, the Brattle Annual Model (BAM). Standard tools of competitive analysis are used, including the so-called SSNIP test (Small but Significant and Non-transitory Increase in Price) for geographic market definition, and measures of concentration (market shares, Hirschmann-Herfindahl Indices (HHIs), which are used to examine horizontal issues in competitive analysis, and Pivotal Supply Index) for merger analysis, as well as more sophisticated economic modelling (e.g., Cournot model)

  2. Final Technical Report on Quantifying Dependability Attributes of Software Based Safety Critical Instrumentation and Control Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smidts, Carol [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huang, Funqun [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Li, Boyuan [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Li, Xiang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-03-25

    With the current transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants, the number and variety of software-based systems have significantly increased. The sophisticated nature and increasing complexity of software raises trust in these systems as a significant challenge. The trust placed in a software system is typically termed software dependability. Software dependability analysis faces uncommon challenges since software systems’ characteristics differ from those of hardware systems. The lack of systematic science-based methods for quantifying the dependability attributes in software-based instrumentation as well as control systems in safety critical applications has proved itself to be a significant inhibitor to the expanded use of modern digital technology in the nuclear industry. Dependability refers to the ability of a system to deliver a service that can be trusted. Dependability is commonly considered as a general concept that encompasses different attributes, e.g., reliability, safety, security, availability and maintainability. Dependability research has progressed significantly over the last few decades. For example, various assessment models and/or design approaches have been proposed for software reliability, software availability and software maintainability. Advances have also been made to integrate multiple dependability attributes, e.g., integrating security with other dependability attributes, measuring availability and maintainability, modeling reliability and availability, quantifying reliability and security, exploring the dependencies between security and safety and developing integrated analysis models. However, there is still a lack of understanding of the dependencies between various dependability attributes as a whole and of how such dependencies are formed. To address the need for quantification and give a more objective basis to the review process -- therefore reducing regulatory uncertainty

  3. VIP Project - Visual based intelligent process control. Final report; VIP Projekt - Visuell basierte intelligente Prozessfuehrung. Fachlicher Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno Rueda, R.

    2001-09-01

    This BMBF project comprised the development and testing of new process control strategies involving local resolution sensors and efficient simulation models. A system comprising a video section and a spectroscopic section is presented here. Further data can be processed in the master PC if desired. By analyzing every single burner, it is possible to analyze and optimize the complete combustion process. [German] Im Rahmen des BMBF-Projektes 'Visuell basierte Intelligente Prozessfuehrung fuer grosstechnische Feuerungsprozesse' wurden neuartige Prozessfuehrungsstrategien durch die Verbindung von ortsaufloesender Sensorik und leistungsfaehige Simulationsmodellen entwickelt und erprobt. Zur Loesung der gestellten Aufgaben wurde das hier dargestellte Gesamtsystem, bestehend aus Video- und Spektroskopie entwickelt. Ueber die Darstellung hinaus koennen im Master-PC auch die Daten weiterer Lanzen/Brenner verarbeitet werden. Die Vorortschraenke wie Kuehlmedien-Steuerschrank und Elektro-Steuerschrank koennen je nach Kesselabmassen auch fuer mehr als 2 Lanzen zusammengafasst werden. Durch die Betrachtung jedes einzelnen Brenners, wird es moeglich die Feuerung ganzheitlich und zeitgleich zu erfassen, zu beurteilen und zu optimieren. (orig.)

  4. Trial for the Prevention of Depression (TriPoD) in final-year secondary students: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Yael; Calear, Alison L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Batterham, Philip J; Licinio, Julio; King, Catherine; Thomsen, Noel; Scott, Jan; Donker, Tara; Merry, Sally; Fleming, Theresa; Stasiak, Karolina; Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Christensen, Helen

    2015-10-12

    Evidence suggests that current treatments cannot fully alleviate the burden of disease associated with depression but that prevention approaches offer a promising opportunity to further reduce this burden. Adolescence is a critical period in the development of mental illness, and final school examinations are a significant and nearly universal stressor that may act as a trigger for mental health difficulties such as depression. The aim of the present trial is to investigate the impact of SPARX-R, an online, gamified intervention based on cognitive behavioural principles, on the prevention of depression in secondary school students before their final examinations. Government, independent and Catholic secondary schools in New South Wales, Australia, will be recruited to participate in the trial. All students enrolled in their final year of high school (year 12) in participating schools will be invited to participate. To account for possible attrition, the target sample size was set at 1600 participants across 30 schools. Participating schools will be cluster randomised at the school level to receive either SPARX-R or lifeSTYLE, an attention-controlled placebo comparator. The control intervention is an online program aimed at maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The primary outcome will be symptoms of depression, and secondary outcomes will include symptoms of anxiety, suicidal ideation and behaviours, stigma and academic performance. Additional measures of cost-effectiveness, as well as process variables (e.g., adherence, acceptability) and potential predictors of response to treatment, will be collected. Consenting parents will be invited to complete measures regarding their own mental health and expectations for their child. Assessments will be conducted pre- and post-intervention and at 6- and 18-month follow-up. Primary analyses will compare changes in levels of depressive symptomatology for the intervention group relative to the attention control condition using

  5. ADVANCED BIOMASS REBURNING FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY NOx CONTROL AND BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES JOINT FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir M. Zamansky; Mark S. Sheldon; Vitali V. Lissianski; Peter M. Maly; David K. Moyeda; Antonio Marquez; W. Randall Seeker

    2000-10-01

    This report presents results of studies under a Phase II SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and a closely coordinated project sponsored by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL, formerly FETC). The overall Phase II objective of the SBIR project is to experimentally optimize the biomass reburning technologies and conduct engineering design studies needed for process demonstration at full scale. The DOE project addresses supporting issues for the process design including modeling activities, economic studies of biomass handling, and experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling. The performance of biomass has been examined in a 300 kW (1 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr) Boiler Simulator Facility under different experimental conditions. Fuels under investigation include furniture waste, willow wood and walnut shells. Tests showed that furniture pellets and walnut shells provided similar NO{sub x} control as that of natural gas in basic reburning at low heat inputs. Maximum NO{sub x} reduction achieved with walnut shell and furniture pellets was 65% and 58% respectively. Willow wood provided a maximum NO{sub x} reduction of 50% and was no better than natural gas at any condition tested. The efficiency of biomass increases when N-agent is injected into reburning and/or burnout zones, or along with OFA (Advanced Reburning). Co-injection of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} with N-agent further increases efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction. Maximum NO{sub x} reduction achieved with furniture pellets and willow wood in Advanced Reburning was 83% and 78% respectively. All combustion experiments of the Phase II project have been completed. All objectives of the experimental tasks were successfully met. The kinetic model of biomass reburning has been developed. Model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus correctly represents main features of the reburning process. Modeling suggests that the most important factors that provide

  6. Growth kinetics and properties of ZnO/ZnMgO heterostructures grown by radical-source molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, S.V. [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya Street 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); El-Shaer, A.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A. [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Technical University Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Str. 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Shubina, T.V.; Listoshin, S.B. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya Street 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    A phenomenological approach to quantitative description of Zn(Mg)O growth by radical-source molecular beam epitaxy, based on the experimental studies of RHEED intensity oscillations, has been developed. It allows a precise control of growth rate, composition and stoichiometry at any growth temperature, Along with optimization of a growth initiation procedure on a c-sapphire, it is necessary condition for fabrication of high quality ZnO epilayers and ZnO/ZnMgO heterostructures in a wide Mg composition range. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. InAs nanocrystals on SiO2/Si by molecular beam epitaxy for memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocevar, Moiera; Regreny, Philippe; Descamps, Armel; Albertini, David; Saint-Girons, Guillaume; Souifi, Abdelkader; Gendry, Michel; Patriarche, Gilles

    2007-01-01

    We studied a memory structure based on InAs nanocrystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy directly on thermal SiO 2 on silicon. Both nanocrystal diameter and density can be controlled by growth parameters. Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows high crystallinity and low size dispersion. In an electrical test structure with a 3.5 nm tunnel oxide, we observed that 80% of the initial injected electrons remain stored in the InAs nanocrystals after 3 months and that the retention time for electrons in InAs nanocrystals is four orders of magnitude higher than in silicon nanocrystals

  8. Narrative Finality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  9. Exercise and fractures in postmenopausal women. Final results of the controlled Erlangen Fitness and Osteoporosis Prevention Study (EFOPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, W; Bebenek, M; Kohl, M; von Stengel, S

    2015-10-01

    The EFOPS trial clearly established the positive effect of long-term exercise on clinical low-trauma fractures in postmenopausal women at risk. Bearing in mind that the complex anti-fracture exercise protocols also affect a large variety of diseases of increased age, we strongly encourage older adults to perform multipurpose exercise programs. Physical exercise may be an efficient option for autonomous fracture prevention during increasing age. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of exercise on clinical overall fracture incidence and bone mineral density (BMD) in elderly subjects at risk. In 1998 initially, 137 early-postmenopausal, osteopenic women living in Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany, were included in the EFOPS trial. Subjects of the exercise group (EG; n = 86) conducted two supervised group and two home exercise sessions/week while the control group (CG; n = 51) was requested to maintain their physical activity. Primary study endpoints were clinical overall low-trauma fractures determined by questionnaires, structured interviews, and BMD at the lumbar spine and femoral neck assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In 2014, 105 subjects (EG: n = 59 vs. CG: n = 46) representing 1680 participant-years were included in the 16-year follow-up analysis. Risk ratio in the EG for overall low-trauma fractures was 0.51 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.23 to 0.97, p = .046), rate ratio was 0.42 (95% CI 0.20 to 0.86, p = .018). Based on comparable baseline values, lumbar spine (MV -1.5%, 95% CI -0.1 to -2.8 vs. -5.8%, -3.3 to -7.2%) and femoral neck (-6.5%, -5.2 to -7.7 vs. -9.6%, -8.2 to 11.1%) BMD decreased in both groups; however, the reduction was more pronounced in the CG (p ≤ .001). This study clearly evidenced the high anti-fracture efficiency of multipurpose exercise programs. Considering furthermore the favorable effect of exercise on most other risk factors of increasing age, we strongly encourage older adults to perform multipurpose

  10. Running Head: Control and Adjustment of the Rate of Photosynthesis Above Present CO(sub 2) Levels; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J. Timothy

    1996-01-01

    The adjustment of photosynthesis to different environmental conditions and especially to elevated CO(sub 2) is often characterized in terms of changes in the processes that establish (limit) the net CO(sub 2) assimilation rate. At slightly above present ambient pCO(sub 2) light-saturated photosynthetic responses to CO(sub 2) depart limitation by the catalytic capacity of tissue rubisco content. An hypothesis attributing this departure to limited thylakoid reaction/electron transport capacity is widely accepted, although we find no experimental evidence in the literature supporting this proposition.. The results of several tests point to the conclusion that the capacity of the thyiakoid reactions cannot be generally responsible for the deviation from rubisco limitation. This conclusion leaves a significant gap in the interpretation of gas exchange responses to CO(sub 2). Since the inputs to the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (CO(sub 2) and photon-capture/electron-transport products) do not limit photosynthesis on the shoulder of the A=f(c(sub i)) curve, the control of photosynthesis can be characterized as: due to feedback. Several characteristics of gas exchange and fluorescence that occur when steady-states in this region are perturbed by changes in CO(sub 2) or O(sub 2) suggest significant regulation by conditions other than directly by substrate RuBP levels. A strong candidate to explain these responses is the triose-phosphate flux/ inorganic phosphate regulatory sequence, although not all of the gas exchange characteristics expected with ''TPU-limitation'' are present (e.g. oxygen-insensitive photosynthesis). Interest in nitrogen allocation between rubisco and light capture/electron transport as the basis for photosynthetic adjustment to elevated CO(sub 2) may need to be reconsidered as a result of these findings. Contributors to the feedback regulation of photosynthesis (which may include sucrose phosphate synthase and fructose bisphosphatase activities

  11. Epitaxial ternary nitride thin films prepared by a chemical solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hongmei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feldmann, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Haiyan [TEXAS A& M; Bi, Zhenxing [TEXAS A& M

    2008-01-01

    It is indispensable to use thin films for many technological applications. This is the first report of epitaxial growth of ternary nitride AMN2 films. Epitaxial tetragonal SrTiN2 films have been successfully prepared by a chemical solution approach, polymer-assisted deposition. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the films are also investigated.

  12. Ge-on-Si : Single-Crystal Selective Epitaxial Growth in a CVD Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammak, A.; De Boer, W.B.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    A standard Si/SiGe ASM CVD reactor that was recently modified for merging GaAs and Si epitaxial growth in one system is utilized to achieve intrinsic and doped epitaxial Ge-on-Si with low threading dislocation and defect densities. For this purpose, the system is equipped with 2% diluted GeH4 as the

  13. Deposition of HgTe by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkatasamy, V

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the first instance of HgTe growth by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE). EC-ALE is the electrochemical analog of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD), all of which are based on the growth...

  14. Characterization of GaN/AlGaN epitaxial layers grown

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GaN and AlGaN epitaxial layers are grown by a metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) system. The crystalline quality of these epitaxially grown layers is studied by different characterization techniques. PL measurements indicate band edge emission peak at 363.8 nm and 312 nm for GaN and AlGaN layers ...

  15. A critical discussion of the vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heera, V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple vacancy diffusion model of ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization of silicon including divacancy formation is developed. The model reproduces some of the experimental findings, as e.g. the dose rate dependence of the crystallization rate. However, the measured activation energy of the ion beam induced epitaxial crystallization cannot be accounted for by vacancy diffusion alone. (author)

  16. All-epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeSi/Ge/Co{sub 2}FeSi trilayers fabricated by Sn-induced low-temperature epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, M.; Ikawa, M.; Arima, K.; Yamada, S.; Kanashima, T.; Hamaya, K., E-mail: hamaya@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    We demonstrate low-temperature growth of all-epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeSi/Ge/Co{sub 2}FeSi trilayer structures by developing Sn-induced surfactant-mediated molecular beam epitaxy (SMBE) of Ge on Co{sub 2}FeSi. Despite the growth of a semiconductor on a metal, we verify that the inserted Sn monolayers between Ge and Co{sub 2}FeSi enable to promote the 2D epitaxial growth of Ge up to 5 nm at a T{sub G} of 250 °C. An understanding of the mechanism of the Sn-induced SMBE leads to the achievement of all-epitaxial Co{sub 2}FeSi/Ge/Co{sub 2}FeSi trilayer structures with spin-valve-like magnetization reversals. This study will open a way for vertical-type and high-performance Ge-based spintronics devices.

  17. Improved radiation tolerance of MAPS using a depleted epitaxial layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorokhov, A., E-mail: Andrei.Dorokhov@IReS.in2p3.f [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Bertolone, G.; Baudot, J.; Brogna, A.S.; Colledani, C.; Claus, G.; De Masi, R. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Deveaux, M. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Senckenberganlage 31, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Doziere, G.; Dulinski, W. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.-C. [Groupe de Recherche en Physique des Hautes Energies (GRPHE), Universite de Haute Alsace, 61, rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse (France); Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Santos, C.; Specht, M.; Valin, I. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien (IPHC), 23 rue du loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-12-11

    Tracking performance of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) developed at IPHC (Turchetta, et al., 2001) have been extensively studied (Winter, et al., 2001; Gornushkin, et al., 2002) . Numerous sensor prototypes, called MIMOSA, were fabricated and tested since 1999 in order to optimise the charge collection efficiency and power dissipation, to minimise the noise and to increase the readout speed. The radiation tolerance was also investigated. The highest fluence tolerable for a 10{mu}m pitch device was found to be {approx}10{sup 13}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, while it was only 2x10{sup 12}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} for a 20{mu}m pitch device. The purpose of this paper is to show that the tolerance to non-ionising radiation may be extended up to O(10{sup 14}) n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. This goal relies on a fabrication process featuring a 15{mu}m thin, high resistivity ({approx}1k{Omega}cm) epitaxial layer. A sensor prototype (MIMOSA-25) was fabricated in this process to explore its detection performance. The depletion depth of the epitaxial layer at standard CMOS voltages (<5V) is similar to the layer thickness. Measurements with m.i.p.s show that the charge collected in the seed pixel is at least twice larger for the depleted epitaxial layer than for the undepleted one, translating into a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of {approx}50. Tests after irradiation have shown that this excellent performance is maintained up to the highest fluence considered (3x10{sup 13}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}), making evidence of a significant extension of the radiation tolerance limits of MAPS.

  18. Final Report: Vapor Transport Deposition for Thin Film III-V Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boettcher, Shannon [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Greenaway, Ann [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Boucher, Jason [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Aloni, Shaul [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Silicon, the dominant photovoltaic (PV) technology, is reaching its fundamental performance limits as a single absorber/junction technology. Higher efficiency devices are needed to reduce cost further because the balance of systems account for about two-thirds of the overall cost of the solar electricity. III-V semiconductors such as GaAs are used to make the highest-efficiency photovoltaic devices, but the costs of manufacture are much too high for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. The cost of III-V’s is driven by two factors: (1) metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the dominant growth technology, employs expensive, toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors, and (2) the growth substrates conventionally required for high-performance devices are monocrystalline III-V wafers. The primary goal of this project was to show that close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT), using water vapor as a transport agent, is a scalable deposition technology for growing low-cost epitaxial III-V photovoltaic devices. The secondary goal was to integrate those devices on Si substrates for high-efficiency tandem applications using interface nanopatterning to address the lattice mismatch. In the first task, we developed a CSVT process that used only safe solid-source powder precursors to grow epitaxial GaAs with controlled n and p doping and mobilities/lifetimes similar to that obtainable via MOCVD. Using photoelectrochemical characterization, we showed that the best material had near unity internal quantum efficiency for carrier collection and minority carrier diffusions lengths in of ~ 8 μm, suitable for PV devices with >25% efficiency. In the second task we developed the first pn junction photovoltaics using CSVT and showed unpassivated structures with open circuit photovoltages > 915 mV and internal quantum efficiencies >0.9. We also characterized morphological and electrical defects and identified routes to reduce those defects. In task three we grew epitaxial

  19. Single-domain epitaxial silicene on diboride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurence, A., E-mail: antoine@jaist.ac.jp; Friedlein, R.; Aoyagi, K.; Yamada-Takamura, Y. [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Gill, T. G. [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (UCL), London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, UCL, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Sadowski, J. T. [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Copel, M.; Tromp, R. M. [IBM Research Division, Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Hirjibehedin, C. F. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (UCL), London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, UCL, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-11

    Epitaxial silicene, which forms spontaneously on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films grown on Si(111) wafers, has a periodic stripe domain structure. By adsorbing additional Si atoms on this surface, we find that the domain boundaries vanish, and a single-domain silicene sheet can be prepared without altering its buckled honeycomb structure. The amount of Si required to induce this change suggests that the domain boundaries are made of a local distortion of the silicene honeycomb lattice. The realization of a single domain sheet with structural and electronic properties close to those of the original striped state demonstrates the high structural flexibility of silicene.

  20. Large-area, laterally-grown epitaxial semiconductor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Song, Jie; Chen, Danti

    2017-07-18

    Structures and methods for confined lateral-guided growth of a large-area semiconductor layer on an insulating layer are described. The semiconductor layer may be formed by heteroepitaxial growth from a selective growth area in a vertically-confined, lateral-growth guiding structure. Lateral-growth guiding structures may be formed in arrays over a region of a substrate, so as to cover a majority of the substrate region with laterally-grown epitaxial semiconductor tiles. Quality regions of low-defect, stress-free GaN may be grown on silicon.