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Sample records for controlled dietary intervention

  1. The challenges of control groups, placebos and blinding in clinical trials of dietary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Irving, Peter M; Lomer, Miranda C E; Whelan, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    High-quality placebo-controlled evidence for food, nutrient or dietary advice interventions is vital for verifying the role of diet in optimising health or for the management of disease. This could be argued to be especially important where the benefits of dietary intervention are coupled with potential risks such as compromising nutrient intake, particularly in the case of exclusion diets. The objective of the present paper is to explore the challenges associated with clinical trials in dietary research, review the types of controls used and present the advantages and disadvantages of each, including issues regarding placebos and blinding. Placebo-controlled trials in nutrient interventions are relatively straightforward, as in general placebos can be easily produced. However, the challenges associated with conducting placebo-controlled food interventions and dietary advice interventions are protean, and this has led to a paucity of placebo-controlled food and dietary advice trials compared with drug trials. This review appraises the types of controls used in dietary intervention trials and provides recommendations and nine essential criteria for the design and development of sham diets for use in studies evaluating the effect of dietary advice, along with practical guidance regarding their evaluation. The rationale for these criteria predominantly relate to avoiding altering the outcome of interest in those delivered the sham intervention in these types of studies, while not compromising blinding.

  2. The effect of complex workplace dietary interventions on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status: a cluster controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geaney, Fiona; Kelly, Clare; Di Marrazzo, Jessica Scotto; Harrington, Janas M; Fitzgerald, Anthony P; Greiner, Birgit A; Perry, Ivan J

    2016-08-01

    Evidence on effective workplace dietary interventions is limited. The comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification and an educational intervention both alone and in combination was assessed versus a control workplace on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status. In the Food Choice at Work cluster controlled trial, four large, purposively selected manufacturing workplaces in Ireland were allocated to control (N=111), nutrition education (Education) (N=226), environmental dietary modification (Environment) (N=113) and nutrition education and environmental dietary modification (Combined) (N=400) in 2013. Nutrition education included group presentations, individual consultations and detailed nutrition information. Environmental dietary modification included menu modification, fruit price discounts, strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and portion size control. Data on dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status were obtained at baseline and follow-up at 7-9months. Multivariate analysis of covariance compared changes across the four groups with adjustment for age, gender, educational status and other baseline characteristics. Follow-up data at 7-9months were obtained for 541 employees (64% of 850 recruited) aged 18-64years: control: 70 (63%), Education: 113 (50%), 74 (65%) and Combined: 284 (71%). There were significant positive changes in intakes of saturated fat (p=0.013), salt (p=0.010) and nutrition knowledge (p=0.034) between baseline and follow-up in the combined intervention versus the control. Small but significant changes in BMI (-1.2kg/m(2) (95% CI -2.385, -0.018, p=0.047) were observed in the combined intervention. Effects in the education and environment alone workplaces were smaller and generally non-significant. Combining nutrition education and environmental dietary modification may be an effective approach for promoting a healthy diet and weight loss at work. Copyright © 2016

  3. Molecular biomarkers for weight control in obese individuals subjected to a multi-phase dietary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolton, Jennifer L; Montastier, Emilie; Carayol, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Context: While calorie restriction has proven beneficial for weight loss, long-term weight control is variable between individuals. Objective: To identify biomarkers of successful weight control during a dietary intervention (DI). Design, Setting, and Participants: Adipose tissue (AT) transcripto......-controllers. Interestingly, ASPN is a TGFβ1 inhibitor. Conclusions: We found circulating biomarkers associated with weight control, which could influence weight management strategies, and genes that may be prognostic for successful weight control.......Context: While calorie restriction has proven beneficial for weight loss, long-term weight control is variable between individuals. Objective: To identify biomarkers of successful weight control during a dietary intervention (DI). Design, Setting, and Participants: Adipose tissue (AT......) transcriptomes were compared between 21 obese individuals that either maintained weight loss or regained weight during the DI. Results were validated on 310 individuals from the same study using RT-qPCR, and protein levels of potential circulating biomarkers measured by ELISA. Intervention: Individuals underwent...

  4. Barriers to and facilitators of implementing complex workplace dietary interventions: process evaluation results of a cluster controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Geaney, Fiona; Kelly, Clare; McHugh, Sheena; Perry, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ambiguity exists regarding the effectiveness of workplace dietary interventions. Rigorous process evaluation is vital to understand this uncertainty. This study was conducted as part of the Food Choice at Work trial which assessed the comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification intervention and an educational intervention both alone and in combination versus a control workplace. Effectiveness was assessed in terms of employees? dietary intakes, nutri...

  5. Combined dietary and exercise intervention for control of serum cholesterol in the workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotti, C. M.; Chan, W. T.; Sample, C. J.; Levine, M. S.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elucidate a potential combined dietary and exercise intervention affect on cardiovascular risk reduction of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters employees. DESIGN: A nonexperimental, longitudinal, clinical-chart review study (1987 to 1996) of an identified intervention group and a reference (not a control) group. SETTING: The study group worked in an office environment and participated in the annual medical examinations. SUBJECTS: An intervention group of 858 people with initially elevated serum cholesterol, and a reference group of 963 people randomly sampled from 10% of the study group. MEASURES: Serum cholesterol data were obtained for both groups, respectively, from pre- and postintervention and annual examinations. The reference group was adjusted by statistical exclusion of potential intervention participants. Regression equations (cholesterol vs. study years) for the unadjusted/adjusted reference groups were tested for statistical significance. INTERVENTION: An 8-week individualized, combined dietary and exercise program was instituted with annual follow-ups and was repeated where warranted. RESULTS: Only the unadjusted (but not the adjusted) reference group with initial mean total serum cholesterol levels above 200 mg/dL shows a significant 9-year decline trend and significant beta coefficient tests. An intervention effect is suggested. Mean high density lipoprotein cholesterol rose slightly in the intervention group but was maintained in the reference group. CONCLUSION: With potential design limitations, the NASA intervention program focusing on a high risk group may be associated to some degree, if not fully, with an overall cardiovascular risk profile improvement.

  6. Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder—A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Adams

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study involved a randomized, controlled, single-blind 12-month treatment study of a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention. Participants were 67 children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD ages 3–58 years from Arizona and 50 non-sibling neurotypical controls of similar age and gender. Treatment began with a special vitamin/mineral supplement, and additional treatments were added sequentially, including essential fatty acids, Epsom salt baths, carnitine, digestive enzymes, and a healthy gluten-free, casein-free, soy-free (HGCSF diet. There was a significant improvement in nonverbal intellectual ability in the treatment group compared to the non-treatment group (+6.7 ± 11 IQ points vs. −0.6 ± 11 IQ points, p = 0.009 based on a blinded clinical assessment. Based on semi-blinded assessment, the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group, had significantly greater improvement in autism symptoms and developmental age. The treatment group had significantly greater increases in EPA, DHA, carnitine, and vitamins A, B2, B5, B6, B12, folic acid, and Coenzyme Q10. The positive results of this study suggest that a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention is effective at improving nutritional status, non-verbal IQ, autism symptoms, and other symptoms in most individuals with ASD. Parents reported that the vitamin/mineral supplements, essential fatty acids, and HGCSF diet were the most beneficial.

  7. Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder-A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James B; Audhya, Tapan; Geis, Elizabeth; Gehn, Eva; Fimbres, Valeria; Pollard, Elena L; Mitchell, Jessica; Ingram, Julie; Hellmers, Robert; Laake, Dana; Matthews, Julie S; Li, Kefeng; Naviaux, Jane C; Naviaux, Robert K; Adams, Rebecca L; Coleman, Devon M; Quig, David W

    2018-03-17

    This study involved a randomized, controlled, single-blind 12-month treatment study of a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention. Participants were 67 children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ages 3-58 years from Arizona and 50 non-sibling neurotypical controls of similar age and gender. Treatment began with a special vitamin/mineral supplement, and additional treatments were added sequentially, including essential fatty acids, Epsom salt baths, carnitine, digestive enzymes, and a healthy gluten-free, casein-free, soy-free (HGCSF) diet. There was a significant improvement in nonverbal intellectual ability in the treatment group compared to the non-treatment group (+6.7 ± 11 IQ points vs. -0.6 ± 11 IQ points, p = 0.009) based on a blinded clinical assessment. Based on semi-blinded assessment, the treatment group, compared to the non-treatment group, had significantly greater improvement in autism symptoms and developmental age. The treatment group had significantly greater increases in EPA, DHA, carnitine, and vitamins A, B2, B5, B6, B12, folic acid, and Coenzyme Q10. The positive results of this study suggest that a comprehensive nutritional and dietary intervention is effective at improving nutritional status, non-verbal IQ, autism symptoms, and other symptoms in most individuals with ASD. Parents reported that the vitamin/mineral supplements, essential fatty acids, and HGCSF diet were the most beneficial.

  8. Fighting cancer with fitness: dietary outcomes of a randomized, controlled lifestyle change intervention in healthy African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, William J; Yancey, Antronette K; Harrison, Gail G; Leslie, Joanne; Siegel, Judith M

    2007-03-01

    This study tested the efficacy of an 8-week, culturally targeted community-based nutrition and physical activity promotion intervention, Fight Cancer with Fitness! (FCF). A randomized, controlled trial was conducted in a black-owned commercial gym in a sample of 366 predominantly overweight or obese, healthy African-American women. Dietary quality as indexed by fruit and vegetable intake improved significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group at 12-month follow-up, and proportion of calories consumed as fat decreased in both groups. This individually targeted cancer prevention intervention produced beneficial effects on dietary quality that were sustained for at least 12 months.

  9. A 10-Week Multimodal Nutrition Education Intervention Improves Dietary Intake among University Students: Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Razif Shahril

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing multimodal nutrition education intervention (NEI to improve dietary intake among university students. The design of study used was cluster randomised controlled design at four public universities in East Coast of Malaysia. A total of 417 university students participated in the study. They were randomly selected and assigned into two arms, that is, intervention group (IG or control group (CG according to their cluster. The IG received 10-week multimodal intervention using three modes (conventional lecture, brochures, and text messages while CG did not receive any intervention. Dietary intake was assessed before and after intervention and outcomes reported as nutrient intakes as well as average daily servings of food intake. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA and adjusted effect size were used to determine difference in dietary changes between groups and time. Results showed that, compared to CG, participants in IG significantly improved their dietary intake by increasing their energy intake, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin C and thiamine, fruits and 100% fruit juice, fish, egg, milk, and dairy products while at the same time significantly decreased their processed food intake. In conclusion, multimodal NEI focusing on healthy eating promotion is an effective approach to improve dietary intakes among university students.

  10. The food choice at work study: effectiveness of complex workplace dietary interventions on dietary behaviours and diet-related disease risk - study protocol for a clustered controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary behaviour interventions have the potential to reduce diet-related disease. Ample opportunity exists to implement these interventions in the workplace. The overall aim is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of complex dietary interventions focused on environmental dietary modification alone or in combination with nutrition education in large manufacturing workplace settings. Methods/design A clustered controlled trial involving four large multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork will be conducted. The complex intervention design has been developed using the Medical Research Council’s framework and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines and will be reported using the TREND statement for the transparent reporting of evaluations with non-randomized designs. It will draw on a soft paternalistic “nudge” theoretical perspective. Nutrition education will include three elements: group presentations, individual nutrition consultations and detailed nutrition information. Environmental dietary modification will consist of five elements: (a) restriction of fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt, (b) increase in fibre, fruit and vegetables, (c) price discounts for whole fresh fruit, (d) strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and (e) portion size control. No intervention will be offered in workplace A (control). Workplace B will receive nutrition education. Workplace C will receive nutrition education and environmental dietary modification. Workplace D will receive environmental dietary modification alone. A total of 448 participants aged 18 to 64 years will be selected randomly. All permanent, full-time employees, purchasing at least one main meal in the workplace daily, will be eligible. Changes in dietary behaviours, nutrition knowledge, health status with measurements obtained at baseline and at intervals of 3 to 4 months, 7 to 9 months and 13 to 16 months will be recorded. A process

  11. The food choice at work study: effectiveness of complex workplace dietary interventions on dietary behaviours and diet-related disease risk - study protocol for a clustered controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geaney, Fiona; Scotto Di Marrazzo, Jessica; Kelly, Clare; Fitzgerald, Anthony P; Harrington, Janas M; Kirby, Ann; McKenzie, Ken; Greiner, Birgit; Perry, Ivan J

    2013-11-06

    Dietary behaviour interventions have the potential to reduce diet-related disease. Ample opportunity exists to implement these interventions in the workplace. The overall aim is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of complex dietary interventions focused on environmental dietary modification alone or in combination with nutrition education in large manufacturing workplace settings. A clustered controlled trial involving four large multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork will be conducted. The complex intervention design has been developed using the Medical Research Council's framework and the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines and will be reported using the TREND statement for the transparent reporting of evaluations with non-randomized designs. It will draw on a soft paternalistic 'nudge' theoretical perspective. It will draw on a soft paternalistic "nudge" theoretical perspective. Nutrition education will include three elements: group presentations, individual nutrition consultations and detailed nutrition information. Environmental dietary modification will consist of five elements: (a) restriction of fat, saturated fat, sugar and salt, (b) increase in fibre, fruit and vegetables, (c) price discounts for whole fresh fruit, (d) strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and (e) portion size control. No intervention will be offered in workplace A (control). Workplace B will receive nutrition education. Workplace C will receive nutrition education and environmental dietary modification. Workplace D will receive environmental dietary modification alone. A total of 448 participants aged 18 to 64 years will be selected randomly. All permanent, full-time employees, purchasing at least one main meal in the workplace daily, will be eligible. Changes in dietary behaviours, nutrition knowledge, health status with measurements obtained at baseline and at intervals of 3 to 4 months, 7 to 9 months and 13 to 16

  12. Dietary strategies for patients with type 2 diabetes in the era of multi-approaches; review and results from the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Avraham, Sivan; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Shai, Iris

    2009-12-01

    Dietary intervention is recognized as a key component in prevention and management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and the debate persists: which dietary strategy is most effective. In the Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT) 322 moderately obese participants were randomized for 2 years to one of three diet groups: low-fat, Mediterranean and low-carbohydrate. Differential effects were observed in the sub-group of patients with T2DM at 24 months: participants randomized to the Mediterranean diet, which had the highest intake of dietary fibers and unsaturated to saturated fat ratio, achieved greater significant improvements in fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels. Patients who were randomized to the low-carbohydrate diet, which had the minimal intake of carbohydrates, achieved a significant reduction of hemoglobin A1C. Although improvements were observed in all groups, the low-fat diet was likely to be less beneficial in terms of glycemic control and lipid metabolism. Interpretation of results from different studies on dietary strategies may be complex since there is often no consistency in diet compositions, calorie restriction, intensity of intervention, dietary assessment or extent of adherence in the trial. Nevertheless, it seems that low fat restricted calorie diets are effective for weight loss and are associated with some metabolic benefits; however, some recent trials have shown that low carbohydrate diets are as efficient in inducing weight loss and in some metabolic measures such as serum triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol may be even superior to low fat diets. When addressing the issue of diet quality rather than quantity applying the glycemic index may have some added benefits. Furthermore special features of the Mediterranean diet have apparent additional favorable effects for patients with T2DM. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary intervention in acne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  14. Barriers to and facilitators of implementing complex workplace dietary interventions: process evaluation results of a cluster controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Geaney, Fiona; Kelly, Clare; McHugh, Sheena; Perry, Ivan J

    2016-04-21

    Ambiguity exists regarding the effectiveness of workplace dietary interventions. Rigorous process evaluation is vital to understand this uncertainty. This study was conducted as part of the Food Choice at Work trial which assessed the comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification intervention and an educational intervention both alone and in combination versus a control workplace. Effectiveness was assessed in terms of employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status in four large manufacturing workplaces. The study aimed to examine barriers to and facilitators of implementing complex workplace interventions, from the perspectives of key workplace stakeholders and researchers involved in implementation. A detailed process evaluation monitored and evaluated intervention implementation. Interviews were conducted at baseline (27 interviews) and at 7-9 month follow-up (27 interviews) with a purposive sample of workplace stakeholders (managers and participating employees). Topic guides explored factors which facilitated or impeded implementation. Researchers involved in recruitment and data collection participated in focus groups at baseline and at 7-9 month follow-up to explore their perceptions of intervention implementation. Data were imported into NVivo software and analysed using a thematic framework approach. Four major themes emerged; perceived benefits of participation, negotiation and flexibility of the implementation team, viability and intensity of interventions and workplace structures and cultures. The latter three themes either positively or negatively affected implementation, depending on context. The implementation team included managers involved in coordinating and delivering the interventions and the researchers who collected data and delivered intervention elements. Stakeholders' perceptions of the benefits of participating, which facilitated implementation, included managers' desire to improve company

  15. Dietary interventions for phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poustie, Vanessa J; Wildgoose, Joanne

    2010-01-20

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease treated with dietary restriction of the amino acid phenylalanine. The diet is initiated in the neonatal period to prevent mental handicap; however, it is restrictive and can be difficult to follow. Whether the diet can be relaxed or discontinued during adolescence or should be continued for life remains a controversial issue, which we aim to address in this review. To assess the effects of a low-phenylalanine diet commenced early in life for people with phenylketonuria. To assess the possible effects of relaxation or termination of the diet on intelligence, neuropsychological outcomes and mortality, growth, nutritional status, eating behaviour and quality of life. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search of the Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register: 05 March 2009. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing a low-phenylalanine diet to relaxation or termination of dietary restrictions in people with phenylketonuria. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility and methodological quality, and subsequently extracted the data. We included four studies in this review (251 participants), and found few significant differences between treatment and comparison groups for the outcomes of interest. Blood phenylalanine levels were significantly lower in participants with phenylketonuria following a low-phenylalanine diet compared to those on a less restricted diet, mean difference (MD) at three months -698.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -869.44 to -527.89). Intelligence quotient was significantly higher in participants who continued the diet than in those who stopped the diet, MD after 12 months 5.00 (95% CI 0.40 to 9.60). However, these results came from a single study. The results

  16. Randomised-controlled trial of a web-based dietary intervention for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Study protocol of myDIDeA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Brian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of web-based interventions in dietary behaviour modification of the diabetics has not been fully explored. We describe the protocol of a 12-month match-design randomised controlled trial of a web-based dietary intervention for type 2 diabetic patients with primary aim to evaluate the effect of the intervention on their dietary knowledge, attitude and behaviour (KAB. The secondary objective of this study is to improve the participants' dietary practices, physical measurements and biomarkers. Methods/Design A minimum total sample of 82 Type 2 diabetics will be randomised, either to the control group, who will receive the standard diabetes care or the e-intervention group, who will participate in a 6-month web-based dietary intervention in addition to the standard care. The dietary recommendations are based on existing guidelines, but personalised according to the patients' Stages of Change (SOC. The participants will be followed up for 6 months post-intervention with data collection scheduled at baseline, 6-month and 12-month. Discussion We are aiming for a net improvement in the KAB score in participants of the e-intervention group, besides investigating the impact of the e-intervention on the dietary practices, physical measurements and blood biomarkers of those patients. The successful outcome of this study can be a precursor for policy makers to initiate more rigorous promotion of such web-based programmes in the country. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01246687

  17. Low-Fat Dietary Pattern Intervention and Health-Related Quality of Life: The Women's Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Dietary Modification Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Annlouise R; Beresford, Shirley A A; Risica, Patricia Markham; Aragaki, Aaron; Brunner, Robert L; Bowen, Deborah J; Naughton, Michelle; Rosal, Milagros C; Snetselaar, Linda; Wenger, Nanette

    2016-02-01

    Intensive dietary intervention programs may lead to benefits in vitality and other components of health quality. The Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification (DM) intervention includes a large randomized controlled trial of an intensive intervention. To evaluate whether the intervention is associated with improved health-related quality of life (HRQoL) subscales, overall self-reported health, depression symptoms, cognitive functioning, and sleep quality. This randomized controlled trial was analyzed as intent to treat. Between 1993 and 1998, 48,835 women aged 50 to 79 years were recruited by 40 clinical centers across the United States. Eligibility included having fat intake at baseline ≥32% of total calories, and excluded women with any prior colorectal or breast cancer, recent other cancers, type 1 diabetes, or medical conditions with predicted survival <3 years. Goals were to reduce calories from fat to 20%, increase vegetables and fruit to 5+ servings, and increase grain servings to 6+ servings a day. During the first year, 18 group sessions were held, with quarterly sessions thereafter. The RAND 36-Item Health Survey was used to assess HRQoL at baseline, Year 1, and close-out (about 8 years postrandomization), and estimate differential HRQoL subscale change scores. Mean change in HRQoL scores (Year 1 minus baseline) were compared by randomization group using linear models. At 1 year, there was a differential change between intervention and comparison group of 1.7 units (95% CI 1.5, 2.0) in general health associated with the intervention. DM intervention improved physical functioning by 2.0 units (95% CI 1.7, 2.3), vitality by 1.9 units (95% CI 1.6, 2.2), and global quality of life by 0.09 units (95% CI 0.07, 0.12). With the exception of global quality of life, these effects were significantly modified by body mass index at baseline. DM intervention was associated with small, but significant improvements in three HRQoL subscales: general health

  18. A dietary intervention for chronic diabetic neuropathy pain: a randomized controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bunner, A E; Wells, C L; Gonzales, J; Agarwal, U; Bayat, E; Barnard, N D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy is a common and often debilitating condition for which available treatments are limited. Because a low-fat plant-based diet has been shown to improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that such a diet would reduce painful symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Methods: In this 20-week pilot study, individuals with type 2 diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group was asked ...

  19. Dietary intervention modulates the gut microbiome and improves insulin resistance - a randomized controlled trial in obese postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K. Brahe, Lena; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Prifti, Edi

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been implicated in obesity and its progression towards metabolic disease. Dietary interventions that target the gut microbiota have been suggested to improve metabolic health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interventions with Lactobacillus par...

  20. ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Culturally Based Dietary Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Crew, Katherine; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-05-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant nutrition programs targeted to underserved cancer survivors. Our aim was to examine the effect of a culturally based approach to dietary change on increasing fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake and decreasing fat intake among Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Participants were randomized to Intervention and Control groups. Diet recalls, detailed interviews, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Hispanic women (n=70) with stage 0 to III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and lived in New York City were randomized between April 2011 and March 2012. The Intervention group (n=34) participated in ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!, a culturally based nine-session (24 hours over 12 weeks) intervention including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips. The Control group (n=36) received written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors. Change at 6 months in daily F/V servings and percent calories from total fat were the main outcome measures. Linear regression models adjusted for stratification factors and estimated marginal means were used to compare changes in diet from baseline to 3 and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were the following: mean age 56.6 years (standard deviation 9.7 years), mean time since diagnosis 3.4 years (standard deviation 2.7 years), mean body mass index (calculated as kg/m²) 30.9 (standard deviation 6.0), 62.9% with annual household income ≤$15,000, mean daily servings of all F/V was 5.3 (targeted F/V 3.7 servings excluding legumes/juices/starchy vegetables/fried foods), and 27.7% of daily calories from fat. More than 60% in the Intervention group attended seven or more of nine classes, with overall study retention of 87% retention at 6 months. At month 6, the Intervention group compared with Control group reported an increase in mean servings of F/V from baseline (all F/V: +2.0 vs -0.1; P=0.005; targeted F/V: +2

  1. Dietary patterns in obese pregnant women; influence of a behavioral intervention of diet and physical activity in the UPBEAT randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Angela C; Seed, Paul T; Patel, Nashita; Barr, Suzanne; Bell, Ruth; Briley, Annette L; Godfrey, Keith M; Nelson, Scott M; Oteng-Ntim, Eugene; Robinson, Sian M; Sanders, Thomas A; Sattar, Naveed; Wardle, Jane; Poston, Lucilla; Goff, Louise M

    2016-11-29

    Understanding dietary patterns in obese pregnant women will inform future intervention strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes and the health of the child. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a behavioral intervention of diet and physical activity advice on dietary patterns in obese pregnant woman participating in the UPBEAT study, and to explore associations of dietary patterns with pregnancy outcomes. In the UPBEAT randomized controlled trial, pregnant obese women from eight UK multi-ethnic, inner-city populations were randomly assigned to receive a diet/physical activity intervention or standard antenatal care. The dietary intervention aimed to reduce glycemic load and saturated fat intake. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) at baseline (15 +0 -18 +6 weeks' gestation), post intervention (27 +0 -28 +6 weeks) and in late pregnancy (34 +0 -36 +0 weeks). Dietary patterns were characterized using factor analysis of the baseline FFQ data, and changes compared in the control and intervention arms. Patterns were related to pregnancy outcomes in the combined control/intervention cohort (n = 1023). Four distinct baseline dietary patterns were defined; Fruit and vegetables, African/Caribbean, Processed, and Snacks, which were differently associated with social and demographic factors. The UPBEAT intervention significantly reduced the Processed (-0.14; 95% CI -0.19, -0.08, P pattern scores. In the adjusted model, baseline scores for the African/Caribbean (quartile 4 compared with quartile 1: OR = 2.46; 95% CI 1.41, 4.30) and Processed (quartile 4 compared with quartile 1: OR = 2.05; 95% CI 1.23, 3.41) patterns in the entire cohort were associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes. In a diverse cohort of obese pregnant women an intensive dietary intervention improved Processed and Snack dietary pattern scores. African/Caribbean and Processed patterns were associated with an increased risk of gestational

  2. Nutrient intake and dietary changes during a 2-year multi-domain lifestyle intervention among older adults: secondary analysis of the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtisalo, Jenni; Ngandu, Tiia; Valve, Päivi; Antikainen, Riitta; Laatikainen, Tiina; Strandberg, Timo; Soininen, Hilkka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Kivipelto, Miia; Lindström, Jaana

    2017-08-01

    Advancing age increases the risk for diseases and health concerns like cognitive decline, constituting a major public health challenge. Lifestyle, especially healthy diet, affects many risk factors related to chronic diseases, and thus lifestyle interventions among older adults may be beneficial in promoting successful ageing. We completed a randomised 2-year multi-domain lifestyle intervention trial aiming at prevention of cognitive decline among 631 participants in the intervention and 629 in the control group, aged 60-77 years at baseline. Dietary counselling was one of the intervention domains together with strength exercise, cognitive training and management of CVD risk factors. The aim of this paper was to describe success of the intervention - that is, how an intervention based on national dietary recommendations affected dietary habits as a part of multi-intervention. Composite dietary intervention adherence score comprising nine distinct goals (range 0-9 points from none to achieving all goals) was 5·0 at baseline, and increased in the intervention group after the 1st (Pintervention group during the 2 years. Well-targeted dietary counselling may prevent age-related decline in diet quality and help in preventing cognitive decline.

  3. ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Culturally Based Dietary Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Crew, Katherine; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-05-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant nutrition programs targeted to underserved cancer survivors. Our aim was to examine the effect of a culturally based approach to dietary change on increasing fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake and decreasing fat intake among Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Participants were randomized to Intervention and Control groups. Diet recalls, detailed interviews, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Hispanic women (n=70) with stage 0 to III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and lived in New York City were randomized between April 2011 and March 2012. The Intervention group (n=34) participated in ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!, a culturally based nine-session (24 hours over 12 weeks) intervention including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips. The Control group (n=36) received written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors. Change at 6 months in daily F/V servings and percent calories from total fat were the main outcome measures. Linear regression models adjusted for stratification factors and estimated marginal means were used to compare changes in diet from baseline to 3 and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were the following: mean age 56.6 years (standard deviation 9.7 years), mean time since diagnosis 3.4 years (standard deviation 2.7 years), mean body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) 30.9 (standard deviation 6.0), 62.9% with annual household income ≤$15,000, mean daily servings of all F/V was 5.3 (targeted F/V 3.7 servings excluding legumes/juices/starchy vegetables/fried foods), and 27.7% of daily calories from fat. More than 60% in the Intervention group attended seven or more of nine classes, with overall study retention of 87% retention at 6 months. At month 6, the Intervention group compared with Control group reported an increase in mean servings of F/V from baseline (all F/V: +2.0 vs -0.1; P=0.005; targeted F

  4. A randomised controlled trial of a Mediterranean Dietary Intervention for Adults with Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (MEDINA): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamiltiadous, Elena S; Roberts, Stuart K; Nicoll, Amanda J; Ryan, Marno C; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Salim, Agus; Tierney, Audrey C

    2016-02-02

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the most prevalent liver disease in developed countries, remains difficult to manage with no proven safe and effective pharmacotherapy available. While weight reduction is the most commonly practiced treatment strategy, this is difficult to both achieve and/or maintain in the majority. Furthermore evidence-based dietary recommendations to guide the nutritional management of these patients are lacking. Using a randomised controlled trial design, this study compares the effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet to a standard low fat diet in terms of differences in insulin sensitivity, hepatic steatosis and metabolic outcomes in participants with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Ninety four eligible patients who have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and who are insulin resistant, will be randomised into either a Mediterranean or low fat diet group for a 3 month intervention period. Insulin sensitivity will be measured on peripheral blood using Homeostatic Model Assessment and liver fat content quantified using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Both arms will consist of three face to face and three telephone call follow up consultations delivered by an Accredited Practicing Dietitian. The intervention arm focuses on recommendations from the traditional Mediterranean diet which have been tailored for use in the Australian population The standard arm uses the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating and the Australian National Heart Foundation dietary guidelines. Study recruitment will take place at four major metropolitan hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Data collection will occur at all face to face reviews including baseline, 6, and 12 weeks. A follow up assessment to measure sustainability will take place at 6 and 12 months. The primary end point is improved insulin sensitivity scores at the 12 week time point. This trial aims to demonstrate in a large cohort of participants with NALFD that a Mediterranean diet independent of weight

  5. Walnuts improve semen quality in men consuming a Western-style diet: randomized control dietary intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Wendie A; Xun, Lin; FitzGerald, Leah Z; Esguerra, Samantha; Henning, Susanne M; Carpenter, Catherine L

    2012-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 75 g of whole-shelled walnuts/day added to the Western-style diet of healthy young men would beneficially affect semen quality. A randomized, parallel two-group dietary intervention trial with single-blind masking of outcome assessors was conducted with 117 healthy men, age 21-35 yr old, who routinely consumed a Western-style diet. The primary outcome was improvement in conventional semen parameters and sperm aneuploidy from baseline to 12 wk. Secondary endpoints included blood serum and sperm fatty acid (FA) profiles, sex hormones, and serum folate. The group consuming walnuts (n = 59) experienced improvement in sperm vitality, motility, and morphology, but no change was seen in the group continuing their usual diet but avoiding tree nuts (n = 58). Comparing differences between the groups from baseline, significance was found for vitality (P = 0.003), motility (P = 0.009), and morphology (normal forms; P = 0.04). Serum FA profiles improved in the walnut group with increases in omega-6 (P = 0.0004) and omega-3 (P = 0.0007) but not in the control group. The plant source of omega-3, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) increased (P = 0.0001). Sperm aneuploidy was inversely correlated with sperm ALA, particularly sex chromosome nullisomy (Spearman correlation, -0.41, P = 0.002). Findings demonstrated that walnuts added to a Western-style diet improved sperm vitality, motility, and morphology.

  6. Impact of food supplementation on weight loss in randomised-controlled dietary intervention trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibisono, Cinthya; Probst, Yasmine; Neale, Elizabeth; Tapsell, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Dietary trials provide evidence for practice and policy guidelines, but poor adherence may confound results. Food supplementation may improve adherence to dietary interventions, but the impact of supplementation on study outcomes is not known. The aim of this review was to examine the impact of food supplementation on weight loss in dietary intervention trials. The databases Scopus, PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for dietary intervention trials published between January 2004 and March 2015 using the following keyword combinations: 'trial' OR 'intervention', 'food' OR 'diet', 'weight loss' and 'adherence' OR 'adherence'. Studies were included if food was provided to at least one study group and both 'weight change' and 'adherence' were reported. Random effects meta-analyses were conducted to assess weighted mean differences (WMD) in body weight (change or final mean values). The included studies formed two groups: trials involving an intervention group supplemented with a food and a control without food supplementation (food v. no food), and trials in which food was provided to all subjects (food v. food) (PROSPERO registration: CRD42015017563). In total, sixteen studies were included. Significant weight reduction was reported in the food v. no food studies (WMD -0·74 kg; 95 % CI -1·40, -0·08; P=0·03, I 2=63 %). A non-significant increase in weight was found among the food v. food studies (WMD 0·84 kg; 95 % CI -0·60, 2·27; P=0·25, I 2=0 %). Food supplementation appeared to result in greater weight loss in dietary trials. Energy restrictions and intensity of interventions were other significant factors influencing weight loss.

  7. Influence of a nutritional intervention on dietary intake and quality of life in cancer patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uster, Alexandra; Ruefenacht, Ursula; Ruehlin, Maya; Pless, Miklos; Siano, Marco; Haefner, Mark; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Ballmer, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    Weight loss is common in patients with malignant tumors and it can adversely affect quality of life and survival. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a nutritional intervention in cancer patients in an outpatient setting. Cancer outpatients (N = 58) who were classified as undernourished or at high risk for undernutrition by the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 tool were randomized into two groups. One group (n = 30) received standardized individual nutritional therapy, including counseling by a dietitian, food fortification, and oral nutritional supplements if required. The second group (n = 28) received standard care. The nutritional intervention lasted 3 mo. Dietary intake (3-d dietary record), nutritional status (body weight), physical functioning (performance status, hand-grip strength) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire version 3.0) were assessed at baseline and after 6 wk and 3 mo. An additional follow-up assessment was carried out 3 mo post-intervention. Nutritional intervention led to a significantly higher average energy and protein intake in the nutritional therapy group (+379 kcal; 95% confidence interval [CI], 117-642; P = 0.007, respectively; +10.4 g; 95% CI, 2.3-18.5; P = 0.016). However, the increased dietary intake was not associated with improvements in nutritional status, physical functioning, or quality of life. Individual nutritional counseling significantly and positively influenced energy and protein intake, but did not improve nutritional or physical outcome or quality of life. These results indicate that nutritional therapy alone is of limited efficacy in cancer patients whose nutritional status has already deteriorated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of dietary intervention on paraffin-stimulated saliva and dental health of children participating in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M A; Tolvanen, M; Pienihäkkinen, K; Söderling, E; Niinikoski, H; Simell, O; Karjalainen, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to study the impact of dietary intervention on the properties of paraffin-stimulated saliva, and on dental caries. At 7 months of age 1062 infants (540 intervention; 522 controls) started in the prospective, randomized Special Turku Intervention Project (STRIP) aimed at restricting the child's saturated fat and cholesterol intake to prevent atherosclerosis of adult age (www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT 00223600). At 3 years of age, every fifth child was invited to an oral sub-study, and 148 (78 boys) children attended. At 6, 9, 12 and 16 years of age 135, 127, 114 and 88 children were restudied, respectively. Dietary intakes of carbohydrates, protein, saturated fat, calcium, phosphate, and fibre were regularly recorded using 4-day food records. Height and weight were regularly monitored. Paraffin-stimulated saliva samples were collected at 6, 9, 12 and 16 years of age, and analyzed for flow rate, buffer capacity, calcium, phosphate and proteins. Dental health was recorded and expressed as d3mft/D3MFT, and as time of caries onset. Dietary intakes of calcium, phosphate and fibre, and salivary flow rate increased with time in both groups (pparaffin-stimulated salivary flow rate. The concentration of salivary calcium was directly correlated to dental health. Higher salivary flow rate in the intervention group is believed to be due to higher fibre intake in the intervention group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Adherence and success in long-term weight loss diets: the dietary intervention randomized controlled trial (DIRECT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Ilana; Stampfer, Meir J; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Shai, Iris

    2009-04-01

    Data are limited as to whether participants in diet trials truly adhere to their assigned diet and the factors that affect their adherence. We evaluated success and adherence in a two-year dietary intervention randomized controlled trial (DIRECT) in which 322 moderately obese participants (mean age 52 yrs, mean body-mass-index (BMI) 31 kg/m(2), 86% men) were randomized to one of three groups: low-fat, Mediterranean, or low-carbohydrate diets. Overall compliance at month-24 was 85%, with 90% in low-fat, 85% in Mediterranean, and 78% in low-carbohydrate diet (p = .042 between groups). Attrition was higher in women (29% vs. 14% men, p = .001) and current smokers (25% vs. 14% among maintainers, p = 0.04). In a multivariate model, independent predictors of dropping-out were: higher baseline BMI (OR = 1.11; CI: 1.03-1.21) and less weight loss at month-6 (OR = 1.20; CI: 1.1-1.3). In a multivariate model, greater weight loss achieved at month-6 was the main predictor associated with success in weight loss (> 5%) over 2 years (OR = 1.5; CI: 1.35-1.67). Self-reported complete adherence score to diet was greater on low-carbohydrate diet (p low-fat) until month-6, but dropped overall from 81% at month-1 to 57% at month-24. Holidays were a trigger to a significant decrease in adherence followed by a partial rebound. Changes in diet composition from month-1 to month-12 were more pronounced in the multi-stage low-carbohydrate diet-group (p weight is the main predictor of both long-term retention and success in weight loss. Special attention is needed for women, current smokers, and during holidays. Physical activity is associated with subsequent reduction in energy intake.

  10. The effect of nutritional intervention on the lipid profile and dietary intake of adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, S G L; Terreri, M T; Abad, T T O; Machado, D; Fonseca, F L A; Hix, S; Suano-Souza, F I; Sarni, R O S; Len, C A

    2018-04-01

    Objective This study sought to evaluate the effects of a nutritional intervention on the lipid metabolism biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk, and their variation over time, in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) patients. This study also investigated the relationships between these biomarkers and dietary intake, nutritional status, disease variables, and medication used. Methods A total of 31 10- to 19-year-old female adolescents with JSLE for at least six months were analyzed. The participants were randomly allocated to two groups: nutritional intervention or control. The intervention group received verbal and printed nutritional instructions once per month over nine months. Before and after the intervention, the participants underwent assessments of anthropometry; dietary intake; physical activity; socioeconomic status; total cholesterol and fractions; triglycerides; apolipoprotein A (Apo A-I); apolipoprotein B (Apo B); paraoxonase (PON) activity (a) and amount (q); myeloperoxidase (MPO); and small, dense LDL-c (sdLDL) particles. Results After nine months, we found significant reductions in the calorie, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat, and trans fat intakes in the intervention compared with the control group over time. The PONa/HDL-c ratio increased by 3.18 U/ml/mg/dl in the intervention group and by 0.63 U/ml/mg/dl in the control group ( p = 0.037). Unlike the intervention group, the sdLDL levels of the control group worsened over time ( p = 0.018). Conclusion The present study detected a reduction in calorie and fat intake, which indicates an improvement of HDL-c function and possible protection against cardiovascular risk for the intervention group.

  11. A chan dietary intervention enhances executive functions and anterior cingulate activity in autism spectrum disorders: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes S; Sze, Sophia L; Han, Yvonne M Y; Cheung, Mei-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Executive dysfunctions have been found to be related to repetitive/disinhibited behaviors and social deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study aims to investigate the potential effect of a Shaolin-medicine-based dietary modification on improving executive functions and behavioral symptoms of ASD and exploring the possible underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. Twenty-four children with ASD were randomly assigned into the experimental (receiving dietary modification for one month) and the control (no modification) groups. Each child was assessed on his/her executive functions, behavioral problems based on parental ratings, and event-related electroencephalography (EEG) activity during a response-monitoring task before and after the one month. The experimental group demonstrated significantly improved mental flexibility and inhibitory control after the diet modification, which continued to have a large effect size within the low-functioning subgroup. Such improvements coincided with positive evaluations by their parents on social communication abilities and flexible inhibitory control of daily behaviors and significantly enhanced event-related EEG activity at the rostral and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, the control group did not show any significant improvements. These positive outcomes of a one-month dietary modification on children with ASD have implicated its potential clinical applicability for patients with executive function deficits.

  12. A Chan Dietary Intervention Enhances Executive Functions and Anterior Cingulate Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Chan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Executive dysfunctions have been found to be related to repetitive/disinhibited behaviors and social deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. This study aims to investigate the potential effect of a Shaolin-medicine-based dietary modification on improving executive functions and behavioral symptoms of ASD and exploring the possible underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. Twenty-four children with ASD were randomly assigned into the experimental (receiving dietary modification for one month and the control (no modification groups. Each child was assessed on his/her executive functions, behavioral problems based on parental ratings, and event-related electroencephalography (EEG activity during a response-monitoring task before and after the one month. The experimental group demonstrated significantly improved mental flexibility and inhibitory control after the diet modification, which continued to have a large effect size within the low-functioning subgroup. Such improvements coincided with positive evaluations by their parents on social communication abilities and flexible inhibitory control of daily behaviors and significantly enhanced event-related EEG activity at the rostral and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, the control group did not show any significant improvements. These positive outcomes of a one-month dietary modification on children with ASD have implicated its potential clinical applicability for patients with executive function deficits.

  13. A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of fetal macrosomia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 1 2 . Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3 . Methods\\/Design We propose a randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet vs. no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of fetal macrosomia. Secundigravid women whose first baby was macrosomic, defined as a birth weight greater than 4000 g will be recruited at their first antenatal visit. Patients will be randomised into two arms, a control arm which will receive no dietary intervention and a diet arm which will be commenced on a low glycaemic index diet. The primary outcome measure will be the mean birth weight centiles and ponderal indices in each group. Discussion Altering the source of maternal dietary carbohydrate may prove to be valuable in the management of pregnancies where there has been a history of fetal macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women. This randomised control trial will investigate whether or not a low glycaemic index diet can affect this recurrence risk. Current Controlled Trials Registration Number ISRCTN54392969

  14. Study protocol of a parent-focused child feeding and dietary intake intervention: the feeding healthy food to kids randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncanson Kerith

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor childhood nutrition is a more pervasive and insidious risk factor for lifestyle-related chronic disease than childhood obesity. Parents find it difficult to address the reported barriers to optimal child feeding, and to improve child dietary patterns. To impact at the population level, nutrition interventions need to be easy to disseminate, have a broad reach and appeal to parents while overcoming the barriers parents face when trying to improve child feeding behaviours. The Feeding Healthy Food to Kids (FHFK Randomised Control Trial (RCT examines the impact of providing low cost, self-directed nutrition and parenting resources to rural parents, on child dietary intake and parent–child feeding practices. Methods/Design Up to 150 parents of two-to-five year old children will be recruited in five rural Australian towns. Eligible, consenting parents will be randomly allocated to intervention or 12-month wait-list control groups. Intervention group parents will receive an interactive nutrition CD and parenting DVD, and be provided with instructions for optimal resource utilisation. Intervention and control group participants will also receive a generic nutrition and physical activity brochure and a physical activity resource to blind participants to group allocation. Primary outcome measures are dietary intake of vegetables (serves/day, fruit and energy dense nutrient poor foods (serves/day and %Energy. Secondary outcome measures are total energy (kCal, other food groups (serves/day and %Energy, key nutrients (mg/day, child feeding domains and parenting style domains. Analysis of dietary outcome measures, child feeding and parenting domains will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis and compared at baseline, three and 12 months using the random effects model, using STATA software. Details of the methodological aspects of recruitment, inclusion criteria, randomisation and statistical analysis are described

  15. Dietary weight loss and exercise interventions effects on quality of life in overweight/obese postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Yun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although lifestyle interventions targeting multiple lifestyle behaviors are more effective in preventing unhealthy weight gain and chronic diseases than intervening on a single behavior, few studies have compared individual and combined effects of diet and/or exercise interventions on health-related quality of life (HRQOL. In addition, the mechanisms of how these lifestyle interventions affect HRQOL are unknown. The primary aim of this study was to examine the individual and combined effects of dietary weight loss and/or exercise interventions on HRQOL and psychosocial factors (depression, anxiety, stress, social support. The secondary aim was to investigate predictors of changes in HRQOL. Methods This study was a randomized controlled trial. Overweight/obese postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to 12 months of dietary weight loss (n = 118, moderate-to-vigorous aerobic exercise (225 minutes/week, n = 117, combined diet and exercise (n = 117, or control (n = 87. Demographic, health and anthropometric information, aerobic fitness, HRQOL (SF-36, stress (Perceived Stress Scale, depression [Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18], anxiety (BSI-18 and social support (Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey were assessed at baseline and 12 months. The 12-month changes in HRQOL and psychosocial factors were compared using analysis of covariance, adjusting for baseline scores. Multiple regression was used to assess predictors of changes in HRQOL. Results Twelve-month changes in HRQOL and psychosocial factors differed by intervention group. The combined diet + exercise group improved 4 aspects of HRQOL (physical functioning, role-physical, vitality, and mental health, and stress (p ≤ 0.01 vs. controls. The diet group increased vitality score (p Conclusions A combined diet and exercise intervention has positive effects on HRQOL and psychological health, which may be greater than that from exercise or diet alone. Improvements in

  16. The effects of a controlled worksite environmental intervention on determinants of dietary behavior and self-reported fruit, vegetable and fat intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin A Paw Marijke

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating patterns in Western industrialized countries are characterized by a high energy intake and an overconsumption of (saturated fat, cholesterol, sugar and salt. Many chronic diseases are associated with unhealthy eating patterns. On the other hand, a healthy diet (low saturated fat intake and high fruit and vegetable intake has been found important in the prevention of health problems, such as cancer and cardio-vascular disease (CVD. The worksite seems an ideal intervention setting to influence dietary behavior. The purpose of this study is to present the effects of a worksite environmental intervention on fruit, vegetable and fat intake and determinants of behavior. Methods A controlled trial that included two different governmental companies (n = 515: one intervention and one control company. Outcome measurements (short-fat list and fruit and vegetable questionnaire took place at baseline and 3 and 12 months after baseline. The relatively modest environmental intervention consisted of product information to facilitate healthier food choices (i.e., the caloric (kcal value of foods in groups of products was translated into the number of minutes to perform a certain (occupational activity to burn these calories. Results Significant changes in psychosocial determinants of dietary behavior were found; subjects at the intervention worksite perceived more social support from their colleagues in eating less fat. But also counter intuitive effects were found: at 12 months the attitude and self-efficacy towards eating less fat became less positive in the intervention group. No effects were found on self-reported fat, fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusion This environmental intervention was modestly effective in changing behavioral determinant towards eating less fat (social support, self-efficacy and attitude, but ineffective in positively changing actual fat, fruit and vegetable intake of office workers.

  17. Comparison of two theory-based, fully automated telephone interventions designed to maintain dietary change in healthy adults: study protocol of a three-arm randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Julie A; Quintiliani, Lisa M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Migneault, Jeffrey P; Heeren, Timothy; Friedman, Robert H

    2014-11-10

    Health behavior change interventions have focused on obtaining short-term intervention effects; few studies have evaluated mid-term and long-term outcomes, and even fewer have evaluated interventions that are designed to maintain and enhance initial intervention effects. Moreover, behavior theory has not been developed for maintenance or applied to maintenance intervention design to the degree that it has for behavior change initiation. The objective of this paper is to describe a study that compared two theory-based interventions (social cognitive theory [SCT] vs goal systems theory [GST]) designed to maintain previously achieved improvements in fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption. The interventions used tailored, interactive conversations delivered by a fully automated telephony system (Telephone-Linked Care [TLC]) over a 6-month period. TLC maintenance intervention based on SCT used a skills-based approach to build self-efficacy. It assessed confidence in and barriers to eating F&V, provided feedback on how to overcome barriers, plan ahead, and set goals. The TLC maintenance intervention based on GST used a cognitive-based approach. Conversations trained participants in goal management to help them integrate their newly acquired dietary behavior into their hierarchical system of goals. Content included goal facilitation, conflict, shielding, and redundancy, and reflection on personal goals and priorities. To evaluate and compare the two approaches, a sample of adults whose F&V consumption was below public health goal levels were recruited from a large urban area to participate in a fully automated telephony intervention (TLC-EAT) for 3-6 months. Participants who increase their daily intake of F&V by ≥1 serving/day will be eligible for the three-arm randomized controlled trial. A sample of 405 participants will be randomized to one of three arms: (1) an assessment-only control, (2) TLC-SCT, and (3) TLC-GST. The maintenance interventions are 6 months. All 405

  18. Effects of a dietary intervention on gastrointestinal symptoms after prostate cancer radiotherapy: Long-term results from a randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Anna; Nygren, Peter; Persson, Christina; Berglund, Anders; Turesson, Ingela; Johansson, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the long-term effects of dietary intervention on gastrointestinal symptoms after highly dose-escalated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, using boost with protons or high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Materials and methods: Patients were randomized to an intervention group (n = 64) advised to reduce insoluble dietary fiber and lactose intake, or to a standard care group (n = 66) advised to continue their usual diet. Gastrointestinal symptoms, other domains of health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and dietary intake were evaluated for ⩽24 months post-radiotherapy with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25, Gastrointestinal Side Effects Questionnaire, and Food Frequency Questionnaire. The effect of the intervention on gastrointestinal symptoms was evaluated using generalized estimating equations. Results: Dietary intervention had no obvious effect on long-term gastrointestinal symptoms or HRQOL. The intervention group markedly reduced their dietary fiber and lactose intake during radiotherapy, but adherence tended to decline over time. The vast majority of long-term gastrointestinal symptoms were reported as ‘a little’, with a noticeable difference from pre-treatment only for unintentional stool leakage, limitations on daily activities, and mucus discharge. Conclusion: Long-term gastrointestinal symptoms were predominantly mild, and dietary intervention was not superior to a usual diet in preventing these symptoms

  19. A cluster-randomised, controlled trial to assess the impact of a workplace osteoporosis prevention intervention on the dietary and physical activity behaviours of working women: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ai May; Lamontagne, Anthony D; Sarmugam, Rani; Howard, Peter

    2013-04-29

    Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease and its risk can be reduced through adequate calcium consumption and physical activity. This protocol paper describes a workplace-based intervention targeting behaviour change in premenopausal women working in sedentary occupations. A cluster-randomised design was used, comparing the efficacy of a tailored intervention to standard care. Workplaces were the clusters and units of randomisation and intervention. Sample size calculations incorporated the cluster design. Final number of clusters was determined to be 16, based on a cluster size of 20 and calcium intake parameters (effect size 250 mg, ICC 0.5 and standard deviation 290 mg) as it required the highest number of clusters.Sixteen workplaces were recruited from a pool of 97 workplaces and randomly assigned to intervention and control arms (eight in each). Women meeting specified inclusion criteria were then recruited to participate. Workplaces in the intervention arm received three participatory workshops and organisation wide educational activities. Workplaces in the control/standard care arm received print resources. Intervention workshops were guided by self-efficacy theory and included participatory activities such as goal setting, problem solving, local food sampling, exercise trials, group discussion and behaviour feedback.Outcomes measures were calcium intake (milligrams/day) and physical activity level (duration: minutes/week), measured at baseline, four weeks and six months post intervention. This study addresses the current lack of evidence for behaviour change interventions focussing on osteoporosis prevention. It addresses missed opportunities of using workplaces as a platform to target high-risk individuals with sedentary occupations. The intervention was designed to modify behaviour levels to bring about risk reduction. It is the first to address dietary and physical activity components each with unique intervention strategies in the context of osteoporosis

  20. [Importance of nutritional counseling and dietary fiber content on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients under intensive educational intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernanda Sanches; Pimazoni Netto, Augusto; Zach, Patrícia; Sachs, Anita; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the importance of nutritional counseling within a set of multidisciplinary interventions. Forty-seven patients with type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia (A1C ≥ 8%), treated conventionally (n = 19, GC) or intensively in six weekly visits (n = 28, GI) were analyzed. We evaluated mean weekly blood glucose (MWG) at baseline and after 6 weeks in both groups. GI reduced caloric (p = 0.001), carbohydrate (p = 0.004), and fat (p = 0.001) intake, and increased fiber consumption, while GC reduced fiber intake (p = 0.018). Glycemic control (MWG ≤ 150 mg/dL) occurred in 75% of GI patients and in 31.6% of CG patients (p = 0.003), with negative correlation between changes in fiber intake and MWG values (r =-0.309; P = 0.035). Results were maintained after 12 weeks. Educational short-term intensive intervention was more effective than conventional treatment to achieve glycemic control. Our results also indicate that a more appropriate fiber content in the diet contributes for better blood glucose control in these patients.

  1. Comparing the sustainability of an Islamic dietary intervention to maintain weight loss 6 months after Ramadan between intervention and control groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriani Ismail

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining weight loss after the initial phases of any weight loss intervention is a challenge. Rationally, it depends on how well the adherence is to the prescribed treatment. This study is to test the sustainability of an intervention in maintaining weight lost during Ramadan by using voluntary fasting. Methods: Two groups of respondents (Muslim women with body mass index (BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2 were randomly recruited from two states in Malaysia. One group received the Islamic based intervention (Group A and the other received the standard intervention (Group B. The intervention consisted of three phases. The first phase was the intensive phase which was the control of food quantity intake during the fasting month of Ramadan. The second phase was the maintenance phase where the respondents were assisted to continue monitoring their food consumption using the food diary for 3 months and the third phase was the following 3 months without any assistance. The variables studied were BMI, blood pressure (systolic and diastolic pressure and selected blood biochemical (i.e. total cholesterol (TC and high density lipoprotein (HDL-C. Variables were measured at baseline, at the end of Ramadan and at 6 months post Ramadan. Results: At 6 months post Ramadan the BMI, diastolic pressure, TC, HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio changes were different between the two groups (except for BMI changes where P=0.02, all others P

  2. A Chan Dietary Intervention Enhances Executive Functions and Anterior Cingulate Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Agnes S.; Sze, Sophia L.; Han, Yvonne M. Y.; Cheung, Mei-chun

    2012-01-01

    Executive dysfunctions have been found to be related to repetitive/disinhibited behaviors and social deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study aims to investigate the potential effect of a Shaolin-medicine-based dietary modification on improving executive functions and behavioral symptoms of ASD and exploring the possible underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. Twenty-four children with ASD were randomly assigned into the experimental (receiving dietary modification for one m...

  3. Dietary intervention to reverse carotid atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shai, Iris; Spence, J David; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Henkin, Yaakov; Parraga, Grace; Rudich, Assaf; Fenster, Aaron; Mallett, Christiane; Liel-Cohen, Noah; Tirosh, Amir; Bolotin, Arkady; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Stampfer, Meir J

    2010-03-16

    It is currently unknown whether dietary weight loss interventions can induce regression of carotid atherosclerosis. In a 2-year Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial-Carotid (DIRECT-Carotid) study, participants were randomized to low-fat, Mediterranean, or low-carbohydrate diets and were followed for changes in carotid artery intima-media thickness, measured with standard B-mode ultrasound, and carotid vessel wall volume (VWV), measured with carotid 3D ultrasound. Of 140 complete images of participants (aged 51 years; body mass index, 30 kg/m(2); 88% men), higher baseline carotid VWV was associated with increased intima-media thickness, age, male sex, baseline weight, blood pressure, and insulin levels (Plow-fat, Mediterranean, or low-carbohydrate groups (-60.69 mm(3), -37.69 mm(3), -84.33 mm(3), respectively; P=0.28). Mean change in intima-media thickness was -1.1% (P=0.18). A reduction in the ratio of apolipoprotein B(100) to apolipoprotein A1 was observed in the low-carbohydrate compared with the low-fat group (P=0.001). Participants who exhibited carotid VWV regression (mean decrease, -128.0 mm(3); 95% confidence interval, -148.1 to -107.9 mm(3)) compared with participants who exhibited progression (mean increase, +89.6 mm(3); 95% confidence interval, +66.6 to +112.6 mm(3)) had achieved greater weight loss (-5.3 versus -3.2 kg; P=0.03), greater decreases in systolic blood pressure (-6.8 versus -1.1 mm Hg; P=0.009) and total homocysteine (-0.06 versus +1.44 mumol/L; P=0.04), and a higher increase of apolipoprotein A1 (+0.05 versus -0.00 g/L; P=0.06). In multivariate regression models, only the decrease in systolic blood pressure remained a significant independent modifiable predictor of subsequent greater regression in both carotid VWV (beta=0.23; P=0.01) and intima-media thickness (beta=0.28; P=0.008) levels. Two-year weight loss diets can induce a significant regression of measurable carotid VWV. The effect is similar in low-fat, Mediterranean, or

  4. Targeting Cancer Metabolism: Dietary and Pharmacologic Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieri, Claudio; Casola, Stefano; Foiani, Marco; Pietrantonio, Filippo; de Braud, Filippo; Longo, Valter

    2016-12-01

    Most tumors display oncogene-driven reprogramming of several metabolic pathways, which are crucial to sustain their growth and proliferation. In recent years, both dietary and pharmacologic approaches that target deregulated tumor metabolism are beginning to be considered for clinical applications. Dietary interventions exploit the ability of nutrient-restricted conditions to exert broad biological effects, protecting normal cells, organs, and systems, while sensitizing a wide variety of cancer cells to cytotoxic therapies. On the other hand, drugs targeting enzymes or metabolites of crucial metabolic pathways can be highly specific and effective, but must be matched with a responsive tumor, which might rapidly adapt. In this review, we illustrate how dietary and pharmacologic therapies differ in their effect on tumor growth, proliferation, and metabolism and discuss the available preclinical and clinical evidence in favor of or against each of them. We also indicate, when appropriate, how to optimize future investigations on metabolic therapies on the basis of tumor- and patient-related characteristics. To our knowledge, this is the first review article that comprehensively analyzes the preclinical and preliminary clinical experimental foundations of both dietary and pharmacologic metabolic interventions in cancer therapy. Among several promising therapies, we propose treatment personalization on the basis of tumor genetics, tumor metabolism, and patient systemic metabolism.Cancer Discov; 6(12); 1315-33. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Impact of two policy interventions on dietary diversity in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Juan; Ramos-Martin, Jesus

    2017-06-01

    To differentiate the effects of food vouchers and training in health and nutrition on consumption and dietary diversity in Ecuador by using an experimental design. Interventions involved enrolling three groups of approximately 200 randomly selected households per group in three provinces in Ecuador. Power estimates and sample size were computed using the Optimal Design software, with a power of 80 %, at 5 % of significance and with a minimum detectable effect of 0·25 (sd). The first group was assigned to receive a monthly food voucher of $US 40. The second group was assigned to receive the same $US 40 voucher, plus training on health and nutrition issues. The third group served as the control. Weekly household values of food consumption were converted into energy intake per person per day. A simple proxy indicator was constructed for dietary diversity, based on the Food Consumption Score. Finally, an econometric model with three specifications was used for analysing the differential effect of the interventions. Three provinces in Ecuador, two from the Sierra region (Carchi and Chimborazo) and one from the Coastal region (Santa Elena). Members of 773 households randomly selected (n 4343). No significant impact on consumption for any of the interventions was found. However, there was evidence that voucher systems had a positive impact on dietary diversity. No differentiated effects were found for the training intervention. The most cost-effective intervention to improve dietary diversity in Ecuador is the use of vouchers to support family choice in food options.

  6. Designing equitable workplace dietary interventions: perceptions of intervention deliverers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah A; Visram, Shelina; O'Malley, Claire; Summerbell, Carolyn; Araujo-Soares, Vera; Hillier-Brown, Frances; Lake, Amelia A

    2017-10-16

    Workplaces are a good setting for interventions that aim to support workers in achieving a healthier diet and body weight. However, little is known about the factors that impact on the feasibility and implementation of these interventions, and how these might vary by type of workplace and type of worker. The aim of this study was to explore the views of those involved in commissioning and delivering the Better Health at Work Award, an established and evidence-based workplace health improvement programme. One-to-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 individuals in North East England who had some level of responsibility for delivering workplace dietary interventions. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic framework analysis. A number of factors were felt to promote the feasibility and implementation of interventions. These included interventions that were cost-neutral (to employee and employer), unstructured, involved colleagues for support, took place at lunchtimes, and were well-advertised and communicated via a variety of media. Offering incentives, not necessarily monetary, was perceived to increase recruitment rates. Factors that militate against feasibility and implementation of interventions included worksites that were large in size and remote, working patterns including shifts and working outside of normal working hours that were not conducive to workers being able to access intervention sessions, workplaces without appropriate provision for healthy food on site, and a lack of support from management. Intervention deliverers perceived that workplace dietary interventions should be equally and easily accessible (in terms of cost and timing of sessions) for all staff, regardless of their job role. Additional effort should be taken to ensure those staff working outside normal working hours, and those working off-site, can easily engage with any intervention, to avoid the risk of intervention-generated inequalities (IGIs).

  7. A randomized controlled trial on early physiotherapy intervention versus usual care in acute care unit for elderly: potential benefits in light of dietary intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Bisson, C; Dechamps, A; Gouspillou, G; Dehail, P; Bourdel-Marchasson, I

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate effects of early intensive physiotherapy during acute illness on post hospitalization activity daily living autonomy (ADL). Prospective randomized controlled trial of intensive physiotherapy rehabilitation on day 1 to 2 after admission until clinical stability or usual care. acute care geriatric medicine ward. A total of 76 acutely ill patients, acutely bedridden or with reduced mobility but who were autonomous for mobility within the previous 3 months. Patients in palliative care or with limiting mobility pathology were excluded. Mean age was 85.4 (SD 6.6) years. At admission, at clinical stability and one month later: anthropometry, energy and protein intakes, hand grip strength, ADL scores, and baseline inflammatory parameters. An exploratory principal axis analysis was performed on the baseline characteristics and general linear models were used to explore the course of ADL and nutritional variables. A 4-factor solution was found explaining 71.7% of variance with a factor "nutrition", a factor "function" (18.8% of variance) for ADL, handgrip strength, bedridden state, energy and protein intakes, serum albumin and C-reactive protein concentrations; a factor "strength" and a fourth factor . During follow-up, dietary intakes, handgrip strength, and ADL scores improved but no changes occurred for anthropometric variables. Intervention was associated only with an increase in protein intake. Better improvement in ADL was found in intervention group when model was adjusted on "function" factor items. Physical intervention programs should be proposed according to nutritional intakes with the aim of preventing illness induced disability.

  8. Managing Rheumatoid Arthritis with Dietary Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Khanna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Self-help by means of dietary interventions can help in management of various disorders including rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a debilitating autoimmune disease. Dietary interventions necessitate a widespread appeal for both patients as well as clinicians due to factors including affordability, accessibility, and presence of scientific evidences that demonstrate substantial benefits in reducing disease symptoms such as pain, joint stiffness, swelling, tenderness and associated disability with disease progression. However, there is still an uncertainty among the community about the therapeutic benefits of dietary manipulations for RA. In the present review, we provide an account of different diets and their possible molecular mechanism of actions inducing observed therapeutic benefits for remission and management of RA. We further indicate food that can be a potential aggravating factor for the disease or may help in symptomatic relief. We thereafter summarize and thereby discuss various diets and food which help in reducing levels of inflammatory cytokines in RA patients that may play an effective role in management of RA following proper patient awareness. We thus would like to promote diet management as a tool that can both supplement and complement present treatment strategies for a better patient health and recovery.

  9. Dietary interventions among university students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Van Crombruggen, Rob; Verbruggen, Sofie; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte; Clarys, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to provide an overview of available literature on interventions aiming to improve dietary intake among university students. A systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO and SPORTDiscus were searched for relevant articles. Risk of bias was assessed using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. Twenty studies were identified, consisting of 12 randomised controlled trials, 1 quasi-experiment and 7 pre-experiments. Six studies were conducted outside the US. Risk of bias assessment revealed an average quality score of 5.8/10. Of the 13 interventions which were effective in improving students' dietary intake, 8 used an intrapersonal approach, with 6 of them using the web or some kind of media to facilitate the intervention. The 5 remaining studies used an environmental (point-of-purchase) approach. Only 1 intervention, using 10 web-based lessons, based on non-diet principles and focused on eating competence and size acceptance to promote healthy eating, was found to be effective in the long term. Nutrition education, enhancing self-regulation components towards dietary intake (often facilitated by the worldwide web or other media devices), and point-of-purchase messaging strategies may improve university or college students' dietary intake. Future high quality randomised controlled trials should evaluate sustainability of intervention effects, as well as further investigate the effectiveness of realistic and low-cost environmental (preferably combined with intrapersonal) interventions which can easily and instantly reach a great part of the university population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting cancer metabolism: dietary and pharmacological interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieri, Claudio; Casola, Stefano; Foiani, Marco; Pietrantonio, Filippo; de Braud, Filippo; Longo, Valter

    2016-01-01

    Most tumors display oncogene-driven reprogramming of several metabolic pathways, which are crucial to sustain their growth and proliferation. In recent years, both dietary and pharmacological approaches that target deregulated tumor metabolism are beginning to be considered for clinical applications. Dietary interventions exploit the ability of nutrient-restricted conditions to exert broad biological effects, protecting normal cells, organs and systems, while sensitizing a wide variety of cancer cells to cytotoxic therapies. On the other hand, drugs targeting enzymes or metabolites of crucial metabolic pathways can be highly specific and effective, but must be matched with a responsive tumor, which might rapidly adapt. In this Review, we illustrate how dietary and pharmacological therapies differ in their effect on tumor growth, proliferation and metabolism, and discuss the available preclinical and clinical evidence in favor or against each of them. We also indicate, when appropriate, how to optimize future investigations on metabolic therapies on the basis of tumor- and patient-related characteristics. PMID:27872127

  11. Strategies to Improve Adherence to Dietary Weight Loss Interventions in Research and Real-World Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Gibson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Dietary interventions are the cornerstone of obesity treatment. The optimal dietary approach to weight loss is a hotly debated topic among health professionals and the lay public alike. An emerging body of evidence suggests that a higher level of adherence to a diet, regardless of the type of diet, is an important factor in weight loss success over the short and long term. Key strategies to improve adherence include designing dietary weight loss interventions (such as ketogenic diets that help to control the increased drive to eat that accompanies weight loss, tailoring dietary interventions to a person’s dietary preferences (and nutritional requirements, and promoting self-monitoring of food intake. The aim of this paper is to examine these strategies, which can be used to improve adherence and thereby increase the success of dietary weight loss interventions.

  12. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure and arterial stiffness : a fully controlled dietary intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, L.; Dower, J. I.; Mensink, M.; Siebelink, E.; Bakker, S. J. L.; Geleijnse, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness in untreated (pre) hypertensive individuals. During the study, subjects were on a fully controlled diet that was relatively low

  13. Modeling Dynamic Food Choice Processes to Understand Dietary Intervention Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcum, Christopher Steven; Goldring, Megan R; McBride, Colleen M; Persky, Susan

    2018-02-17

    Meal construction is largely governed by nonconscious and habit-based processes that can be represented as a collection of in dividual, micro-level food choices that eventually give rise to a final plate. Despite this, dietary behavior intervention research rarely captures these micro-level food choice processes, instead measuring outcomes at aggregated levels. This is due in part to a dearth of analytic techniques to model these dynamic time-series events. The current article addresses this limitation by applying a generalization of the relational event framework to model micro-level food choice behavior following an educational intervention. Relational event modeling was used to model the food choices that 221 mothers made for their child following receipt of an information-based intervention. Participants were randomized to receive either (a) control information; (b) childhood obesity risk information; (c) childhood obesity risk information plus a personalized family history-based risk estimate for their child. Participants then made food choices for their child in a virtual reality-based food buffet simulation. Micro-level aspects of the built environment, such as the ordering of each food in the buffet, were influential. Other dynamic processes such as choice inertia also influenced food selection. Among participants receiving the strongest intervention condition, choice inertia decreased and the overall rate of food selection increased. Modeling food selection processes can elucidate the points at which interventions exert their influence. Researchers can leverage these findings to gain insight into nonconscious and uncontrollable aspects of food selection that influence dietary outcomes, which can ultimately improve the design of dietary interventions.

  14. Habitual dietary fibre intake influences gut microbiota response to an inulin-type fructan prebiotic: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, human intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Genelle; Murphy, Rinki; Butts, Christine; Brough, Louise; Whelan, Kevin; Coad, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Dysbiotic gut microbiota have been implicated in human disease. Diet-based therapeutic strategies have been used to manipulate the gut microbiota towards a more favourable profile. However, it has been demonstrated that large inter-individual variability exists in gut microbiota response to a dietary intervention. The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether habitually low dietary fibre (LDF) v. high dietary fibre (HDF) intakes influence gut microbiota response to an inulin-type fructan prebiotic. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, thirty-four healthy participants were classified as LDF or HDF consumers. Gut microbiota composition (16S rRNA bacterial gene sequencing) and SCFA concentrations were assessed following 3 weeks of daily prebiotic supplementation (Orafti® Synergy 1; 16 g/d) or placebo (Glucidex® 29 Premium; 16 g/d), as well as after 3 weeks of the alternative intervention, following a 3-week washout period. In the LDF group, the prebiotic intervention led to an increase in Bifidobacterium (P=0·001). In the HDF group, the prebiotic intervention led to an increase in Bifidobacterium (Pinulin-type fructan prebiotic than those with LDF intakes. Future studies aiming to modulate the gut microbiota and improve host health, using an inulin-type fructan prebiotic, should take habitual dietary fibre intake into account.

  15. A cost-analysis of complex workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Kirby, Ann; Murphy, Aileen; Geaney, Fiona; Perry, Ivan J

    2017-01-09

    The workplace has been identified as a priority setting to positively influence individuals' dietary behaviours. However, a dearth of evidence exists regarding the costs of implementing and delivering workplace dietary interventions. This study aimed to conduct a cost-analysis of workplace nutrition education and environmental dietary modification interventions from an employer's perspective. Cost data were obtained from a workplace dietary intervention trial, the Food Choice at Work Study. Micro-costing methods estimated costs associated with implementing and delivering the interventions for 1 year in four multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork, Ireland. The workplaces were allocated to one of the following groups: control, nutrition education alone, environmental dietary modification alone and nutrition education and environmental dietary modification combined. A total of 850 employees were recruited across the four workplaces. For comparison purposes, total costs were standardised for 500 employees per workplace. The combined intervention reported the highest total costs of €31,108. The nutrition education intervention reported total costs of €28,529. Total costs for the environmental dietary modification intervention were €3689. Total costs for the control workplace were zero. The average annual cost per employee was; combined intervention: €62, nutrition education: €57, environmental modification: €7 and control: €0. Nutritionist's time was the main cost contributor across all interventions, (ranging from 53 to 75% of total costs). Within multi-component interventions, the relative cost of implementing and delivering nutrition education elements is high compared to environmental modification strategies. A workplace environmental modification strategy added marginal additional cost, relative to the control. Findings will inform employers and public health policy-makers regarding the economic feasibility of implementing and scaling dietary

  16. A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a 6 month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haseen Farhana

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT for prostate cancer is associated with changes in body composition including increased fat and decreased lean mass; increased fatigue, and a reduction in quality of life. No study to date has evaluated the effect of dietary and physical activity modification on the side-effects related to ADT. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a 6-month dietary and physical activity intervention for prostate cancer survivors receiving ADT to minimise the changes in body composition, fatigue and quality of life, typically associated with ADT. Methods Men are recruited to this study if their treatment plan is to receive ADT for at least 6 months. Men who are randomised to the intervention arm receive a home-based tailored intervention to meet the following guidelines a ≥ 5 servings vegetables and fruits/day; b 30%-35% of total energy from fat, and Discussion The results of this study will provide detailed information on diet and physical activity levels in prostate cancer patients treated with ADT and will test the feasibility and efficacy of a diet and physical activity intervention which could provide essential information to develop guidelines for prostate cancer patients to minimise the side effects related to ADT. Trial registration ISRCTN trial number ISCRTN75282423

  17. A school-based intervention to promote dietary change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prell, Hillevi C; Berg, M Christina; Jonsson, Lena M; Lissner, Lauren

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 2 school-based interventions on adolescents' consumption and knowledge of fish with the hypothesis that home economics education would enhance the effect of modifications in the school canteen. The school lunch intervention (SL) focused on changes in the school canteen, and the school lunch + home economics intervention (SL + HE) in addition consisted of changes in the home economics syllabus. Pupils in the 8th grade (n = 228) from 3 schools in Göteborg, Sweden, participated (control, n = 83; SL group, n = 58; SL + HE group, n = 87). A controlled design was used in which behavior and knowledge were assessed before and after the intervention. In contrast to much previous research of this type, measurement of behavior was based primarily on direct observation as opposed to self-reported intakes. Behavior (fish consumption) was measured individually by structured observations in the school canteen 5 times (once a week) when fish was served. Nutritional knowledge was measured by means of 10 items in a questionnaire. To analyze changes in behavior, a nonparametric statistical method assessing systematic change in paired ordered categoric variables was used. At follow-up evaluation, consumption had increased significantly in the SL + HE group, a change that also differed from the control group. In addition, significant positive changes in knowledge were observed in both intervention groups, but not in controls. The results suggest that dietary change was achieved by modifying conditions in the school canteen together with changing the home economics syllabus. This study shows the importance of the school in the promotion of dietary change among adolescents.

  18. Organisation of Dietary Control for Nutrition-Training Intervention Involving Periodized Carbohydrate (CHO) Availability and Ketogenic Low CHO High Fat (LCHF) Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtschin, Joanne G; Forbes, Sara F; Cato, Louise E; Heikura, Ida A; Strobel, Nicki; Hall, Rebecca; Burke, Louise M

    2018-02-12

    We describe the implementation of a 3-week dietary intervention in elite race walkers at the Australian Institute of Sport, with a focus on the resources and strategies needed to accomplish a complex study of this scale. Interventions involved: traditional guidelines of high carbohydrate (CHO) availability for all training sessions (HCHO); a periodized CHO diet which integrated sessions with low CHO and high CHO availability within the same total CHO intake, and a ketogenic low-CHO high-fat diet (LCHF). 7-day menus and recipes were constructed for a communal eating setting to meet nutritional goals as well as individualized food preferences and special needs. Menus also included nutrition support pre, during and post-exercise. Daily monitoring, via observation and food checklists, showed that energy and macronutrient targets were achieved: diets were matched for energy (~14.8 MJ/d) and protein (~2.1 g.kg/d), and achieved desired differences for fat and CHO: HCHO and PCHO: CHO = 8.5 g/kg/d, 60% energy; fat = 20% of energy; LCHF: 0.5 g/kg/d CHO, fat = 78% energy. There were no differences in micronutrient intakes or density between HCHO and PCHO diets; however, the micronutrient density of LCHF was significantly lower. Daily food costs per athlete were similar for each diet (~AUDS$27 ± 10). Successful implementation and monitoring of dietary interventions in sports nutrition research of the scale of the present study require meticulous planning and the expertise of chefs and sports dietitians. Different approaches to sports nutrition support raise practical challenges around cost, micronutrient density, accommodation of special needs and sustainability.

  19. Dietary interventions in overweight and obese pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flynn, Angela C; Dalrymple, Kathryn; Barr, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Interventions targeting maternal obesity are a healthcare and public health priority. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to evaluate the adequacy and effectiveness of the methodological designs implemented in dietary intervention trials for obesity in pregnancy. DATA SOURCES: A ...

  20. Effect of a Mediterranean Diet Intervention on Dietary Glycemic Load and Dietary Glycemic Index: The PREDIMED Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Rodríguez-Rejón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the one year effect of two dietary interventions with MeDiet on GL and GI in the PREDIMED trial. Methods. Participants were older subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease. This analysis included 2866 nondiabetic subjects. Diet was assessed with a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. The GI of each FFQ item was assigned by a 5-step methodology using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess the relationship between the intervention group and dietary GL and GI at one year of follow-up, using control group as reference. Results. Multivariate-adjusted models showed an inverse association between GL and MeDiet + extra virgin olive oil (EVOO group: β = −8.52 (95% CI: −10.83 to −6.20 and MeDiet + Nuts group: β = −10.34 (95% CI: −12.69 to −8.00, when comparing with control group. Regarding GI, β = −0.93 (95% CI: −1.38 to −0.49 for MeDiet + EVOO, β = −1.06 (95% CI: −1.51 to −0.62 for MeDiet + Nuts when comparing with control group. Conclusion. Dietary intervention with MeDiet supplemented with EVOO or nuts lowers dietary GL and GI.

  1. Effect of a Mediterranean Diet Intervention on Dietary Glycemic Load and Dietary Glycemic Index: The PREDIMED Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rejón, Ana Isabel; Ruano-Rodríguez, Cristina; Ruiz-López, María Dolores; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Toledo, Estefanía; Estruch, Ramón; Covas, María Isabel; Corella, Dolores; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Pintó, Xavier; Arós, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Valentina; Schröder, Helmut; Ros, Emilio; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluis

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To compare the one year effect of two dietary interventions with MeDiet on GL and GI in the PREDIMED trial. Methods. Participants were older subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease. This analysis included 2866 nondiabetic subjects. Diet was assessed with a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The GI of each FFQ item was assigned by a 5-step methodology using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Generalized linear models were fitted to assess the relationship between the intervention group and dietary GL and GI at one year of follow-up, using control group as reference. Results. Multivariate-adjusted models showed an inverse association between GL and MeDiet + extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) group: β = −8.52 (95% CI: −10.83 to −6.20) and MeDiet + Nuts group: β = −10.34 (95% CI: −12.69 to −8.00), when comparing with control group. Regarding GI, β = −0.93 (95% CI: −1.38 to −0.49) for MeDiet + EVOO, β = −1.06 (95% CI: −1.51 to −0.62) for MeDiet + Nuts when comparing with control group. Conclusion. Dietary intervention with MeDiet supplemented with EVOO or nuts lowers dietary GL and GI. PMID:25295183

  2. Effects of a combined dietary, exercise and behavioral intervention and sympathetic system on body weight maintenance after intended weight loss: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Knut; Brachs, Maria; Leupelt, Verena; Schwartzenberg, Reiner Jumpertz-von; Maurer, Lukas; Grüters-Kieslich, Annette; Ernert, Andrea; Bobbert, Thomas; Krude, Heiko; Spranger, Joachim

    2018-01-19

    Lifestyle based weight loss interventions are hampered by long-term inefficacy. Prediction of individuals successfully reducing body weight would be highly desirable. Although sympathetic activity is known to contribute to energy homeostasis, its predictive role in body weight maintenance has not yet been addressed. We investigated, whether weight regain could be modified by a weight maintenance intervention and analyzed the predictive role of weight loss-induced changes of the sympathetic system on long-term weight regain. 156 subjects (age > 18; BMI ≥ 27 kg/m 2 ) participated in a 12-week weight reduction program. After weight loss (T0), 143 subjects (weight loss >8%) were randomized to a 12-month lifestyle intervention or a control group. After 12 months (T12) no further intervention was performed until month 18 (T18). Weight regain at T18 (regain BMI ) was the primary outcome. Evaluation of systemic and tissue specific estimates of sympathetic system was a pre-defined secondary outcome. BMI was reduced by 4.67 ± 1.47 kg/m 2 during the initial weight loss period. BMI maintained low in subjects of the intervention group until T12 (+0.07 ± 2.98 kg/m 2 ; p = 0.58 compared to T0), while control subjects regained +0.98 ± 1.93 kg/m 2 (p predicted regain BMI (R 2  = 0.138; p Predictive sympathetic activity was not persistently modified by the intervention, which may partially explain the lack of long-term success of such interventions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Effect of a high protein meat diet on muscle and cognitive functions: A randomised controlled dietary intervention trial in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lene H.; Kondrup, Jens; Zellner, Maria

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundRecommendations to use other criteria than N-balance for defining protein requirements have been proposed. However, little evidence to support other measures such as physiological functions is available. ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of a usual (UP) versus a high protein (HP) diet...... on muscle function, cognitive function, quality of life and biochemical regulators of protein metabolism. DesignA randomised intervention study was conducted with 23 healthy males (aged 19–31 yrs). All subjects consumed a Usual Protein (UP) diet (1.5 g protein/kg BW) for a 1-wk run-in period before...... the intervention period where they were assigned to either a UP or a High Protein (HP) diet (3.0 g protein/kg BW) for 3-wks with controlled intake of food and beverages. Blood and urine samples were taken along with measurements of physiological functions at baseline and at the end of the intervention period...

  4. Habitual dietary fibre intake influences gut microbiota response to an inulin-type fructan prebiotic:a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, human intervention study

    OpenAIRE

    Healey, Genelle; Murphy, Rinki; Butts, Chrissie; Brough, Louise; Whelan, Kevin; Coad, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Dysbiotic gut microbiota have been implicated in human disease. Diet-based therapeutic strategies have been used to manipulate the gut microbiota towards a more favourable profile. However, it has been demonstrated that large inter-individual variability exists in gut microbiota response to a dietary intervention. The primary objective of this study was to investigate whether habitually low dietary fibre (LDF) v. high dietary fibre (HDF) intakes influence gut microbiota response to an inulin-...

  5. Multilevel Approach of a 1-Year Program of Dietary and Exercise Interventions on Bone Mineral Content and Density in Metabolic Syndrome--the RESOLVE Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Courteix

    Full Text Available Weight loss is a public health concern in obesity-related diseases such as metabolic syndrome (MetS. However, restrictive diets might induce bone loss. The nature of exercise and whether exercise with weight loss programs can protect against potential bone mass deficits remains unclear. Moreover, compliance is essential in intervention programs. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects that modality and exercise compliance have on bone mineral content (BMC and density (BMD.We investigated 90 individuals with MetS who were recruited for the 1-year RESOLVE trial. Community-dwelling seniors with MetS were randomly assigned into three different modalities of exercise (intensive resistance, intensive endurance, moderate mixed combined with a restrictive diet. They were compared to 44 healthy controls who did not undergo the intervention.This intensive lifestyle intervention (15-20 hours of training/week + restrictive diet resulted in weight loss, body composition changes and health improvements. Baseline BMC and BMD for total body, lumbar spine and femoral neck did not differ between MetS groups and between MetS and controls. Despite changes over time, BMC or BMD did not differ between the three modalities of exercise and when compared with the controls. However, independent of exercise modality, compliant participants increased their BMC and BMD compared with their less compliant peers. Decreases in total body lean mass and negative energy balance significantly and independently contributed to decreases in lumbar spine BMC.After the one year intervention, differences relating to exercise modalities were not evident. However, compliance with an intensive exercise program resulted in a significantly higher bone mass during energy restriction than non-compliance. Exercise is therefore beneficial to bone in the context of a weight loss program.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00917917.

  6. Elimination diets and dietary interventions for the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Milk: high-quality protein, calcium and riboflavin. • Eggs: high-quality protein, vitamins A, B12, D, and E, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, iron, selenium, biotin, lutein and iodine. ARTICLE. Elimination diets and dietary interventions for the management of food allergies. A C Lang, D A van der Spuy, E Goddard, A J Terblanche, ...

  7. Elimination diets and dietary interventions for the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elimination diets and dietary interventions for the management of food allergies. ... risk of co-reactivity between CMPA and soya allergy in non- IgE-mediated conditions. Other mammalian milks and plant-based milks, including rice and oat milks, are not suitable as sole nutrition for cow's milk protein allergic individuals.

  8. A metabolomics study on human dietary intervention with apples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, L. O.; Kristensen, M.; Ravn-Haren, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics is a promising tool for searching out new biomarkers and the development of hypotheses in nutrition research. This chapter will describe the design of human dietary intervention studies where samples are collected for metabolomics analyses as well as the analytical issues and data...

  9. Effect of a high protein meat diet on muscle and cognitive functions: a randomised controlled dietary intervention trial in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Lene H; Kondrup, Jens; Zellner, Maria; Tetens, Inge; Roth, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Recommendations to use other criteria than N-balance for defining protein requirements have been proposed. However, little evidence to support other measures such as physiological functions is available. To investigate the effects of a usual (UP) versus a high protein (HP) diet on muscle function, cognitive function, quality of life and biochemical regulators of protein metabolism. A randomised intervention study was conducted with 23 healthy males (aged 19-31 yrs). All subjects consumed a Usual Protein (UP) diet (1.5 g protein/kg BW) for a 1-wk run-in period before the intervention period where they were assigned to either a UP or a High Protein (HP) diet (3.0 g protein/kg BW) for 3-wks with controlled intake of food and beverages. Blood and urine samples were taken along with measurements of physiological functions at baseline and at the end of the intervention period. The HP group improved their reaction time significantly compared with the UP group. Branched chain amino acids and phenylalanine in plasma were significantly increased following the HP diet, which may explain the improved reaction time. Healthy young males fed a HP diet improved reaction time. No adverse effects of the HP diet were observed. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00621231. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. No short-term effects of calorie-controlled Mediterranean or fast food dietary interventions on established biomarkers of vascular or metabolic risk in healthy individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Parcina, Marijo; Brune, Maik; Kaese, Vareska; Zorn, Markus; Spiegel, Rainer; Vojvoda, Valerija; Fleming, Thomas; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Paul Nawroth, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study addressed the question whether the composition of supposedly 'healthy' or 'unhealthy' dietary regimes has a calorie-independent short-term effect on biomarkers of metabolic stress and vascular risk in healthy individuals. SUBJECTS/METHODS Healthy male volunteers (age 29.5 ? 5.9 years, n = 39) were given a standardized baseline diet for two weeks before randomization into three groups of different dietary regimes: fast food, Mediterranean and German cooking sty...

  11. Systematic Review of School-based Interventions to Modify Dietary Behavior: Does Intervention Intensity Impact Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racey, Megan; O'Brien, Charlene; Douglas, Sabrina; Marquez, Olivia; Hendrie, Gilly; Newton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to the associations between diet and health, it is important that effective health promotion strategies establish healthful eating behaviors from an early age. We reviewed the intensity of school-based interventions aimed to modify dietary behavior in preadolescent and adolescents and related intervention characteristics to…

  12. Effects of a dietary intervention on acute gastrointestinal side effects and other aspects of health-related quality of life: A randomized controlled trial in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Anna; Johansson, Birgitta; Persson, Christina; Berglund, Anders; Turesson, Ingela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of a dietary intervention on acute gastrointestinal side effects and other aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in prostate cancer patients referred to radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A total of 130 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an intervention group (IG, n = 64), instructed to reduce their intake of insoluble dietary fibres and lactose, a standard care group (SC, n = 66), instructed to continue their normal diet. Gastrointestinal side effects and other aspects of HRQOL were evaluated from baseline up to 2 months after completed radiotherapy, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PR25 and the study-specific Gastrointestinal Side Effects Questionnaire (GISEQ). A scale indicating adherence to dietary instructions was developed from a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), with lower scores representing better compliance. Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were conducted. Results: There was an interaction effect between randomization and time in the FFQ Scores (p < 0.001), indicating that both groups followed their assigned dietary instructions. The dietary intervention had no effect on gastrointestinal side effects or other aspects of HRQOL. During radiotherapy, the percentage of patients with bowel symptoms and bloated abdomen was lower in IG compared to SC, but the between-group differences were not statistically significant. During radiotherapy, the percentage of patients with bowel symptoms, urinary symptoms, pain, fatigue and diminished physical and role functioning increased in both groups. Conclusions: The dietary intervention had no effect on gastrointestinal side effects or other aspects of HRQOL. The tendency towards lower prevalence of bowel symptoms in IG may indicate some positive effect of the dietary intervention, but methodological refinements, clearer results and longer follow-up are needed before the value of diet change can be established with certainty.

  13. Effect of polymorphisms in the CD36 and STAT3 genes on different dietary interventions among patients with coronary artery disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Vera Lucia; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros; Quadros, Alexandre Schaan de; Garofallo, Sílvia; Santos, Julia Lorenzon Dos; Oliveira, Aline; Wechenfelder, Camila; Campos, Viviane Paiva de; Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes de; Machado, Luana; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-09-05

    Cardiovascular disease has become a major health problem, and it has been associated with both environmental and genetic factors. Studies have shown that the Mediterranean Diet (MeDiet), or its components such as nuts and olive oil, may be strongly associated with the improvement of cardiovascular risk factors in specific populations. The purpose of the GENUTRI study is to investigate the interaction of genetics with cardiovascular risk factors in a non-Mediterranean population with coronary artery disease (CAD) according to three different diets: rich in pecan nuts, in extra-virgin olive oil or a control diet. The GENUTRI study is a single-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, 12-week pragmatic clinical trial conducted in patients aged 40 to 80 years and diagnosed with CAD. A standardized questionnaire will be applied to data collection and a blood sample will be obtained for lipid, glycemic and inflammatory profile evaluation. Polymorphisms in the CD36 and STAT3 genes will be detected using the TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. Patients will be allocated in three groups: group 1: 30 g/day of pecan nuts; group 2: 30 ml/day of olive oil; and group 3: control diet. The primary outcome will consist of changes in LDL-cholesterol (in mg/dl) after 12 weeks of intervention. Studies have shown the beneficial effects of diets rich in nuts and olive oil mainly in the Mediterranean population. GENUTRI is a clinical trial focusing on the effects of nuts or olive oil supplementation in Brazilian individuals. Additionally, we will try to demonstrate that genetic polymorphisms linked to cardiovascular disease may modulate the effects of different diets on biochemical and inflammatory markers among these subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02202265 (registered on 18 July 2014: first version).

  14. Pharmacological Intervention through Dietary Nutraceuticals in Gastrointestinal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Bhat, Showket H; Husain, Eram; Abu-Duhier, Faisel; Hadi, S M; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-07-03

    Neoplastic conditions associated with gastrointestinal (GI) tract are common worldwide with colorectal cancer alone accounting for the third leading rate of cancer incidence. Other GI malignancies such as esophageal carcinoma have shown an increasing trend in the last few years. The poor survival statistics of these fatal cancer diseases highlight the need for multiple alternative treatment options along with effective prophylactic strategies. Worldwide geographical variation in cancer incidence indicates a correlation between dietary habits and cancer risk. Epidemiological studies have suggested that populations with high intake of certain dietary agents in their regular meals have lower cancer rates. Thus, an impressive embodiment of evidence supports the concept that dietary factors are key modulators of cancer including those of GI origin. Preclinical studies on animal models of carcinogenesis have reflected the pharmacological significance of certain dietary agents called as nutraceuticals in the chemoprevention of GI neoplasia. These include stilbenes (from red grapes and red wine), isoflavones (from soy), carotenoids (from tomatoes), curcuminoids (from spice turmeric), catechins (from green tea), and various other small plant metabolites (from fruits, vegetables, and cereals). Pleiotropic action mechanisms have been reported for these diet-derived chemopreventive agents to retard, block, or reverse carcinogenesis. This review presents a prophylactic approach to primary prevention of GI cancers by highlighting the translational potential of plant-derived nutraceuticals from epidemiological, laboratory, and clinical studies, for the better management of these cancers through consumption of nutraceutical rich diets and their intervention in cancer therapeutics.

  15. Dietary intervention strategies to modulate prostate cancer risk and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Stephen J; Aronson, William J

    2009-05-01

    There is increasing interest in complementary and holistic approaches for cancer prevention and management. We sought to review the latest literature regarding dietary interventions for prostate cancer with a special emphasis on dietary fat and carbohydrate intake for modulating prognosis among men with prostate cancer. Several recent prospective trials have investigated various dietary and lifestyle investigations on malignant prostate tissue biology. These interventions included a very low-fat (12% fat kcals) vegan diet with various supplements and lifestyle changes, a more traditional low-fat diet (25% fat kcals) with flaxseed supplementation, and a low-glycemic index diet. Low-glycemic index and very low-fat vegan diets (with supplements and lifestyle changes) alter tumor biology as assessed by tumor gene expression changes, with a common mechanism perhaps being weight loss whereas no effects were seen with a traditional low-fat diet. In mice, either very low-fat or low-carbohydrate diets significantly slow tumor growth independent of weight loss. Epidemiologic and preclinical data also suggest cholesterol intake and serum cholesterol levels may be linked with the development and progression of prostate cancer. Small clinical trials suggest that tumor biology can be altered by either a vegan low-fat diet or eliminating simple carbohydrates accompanied by weight loss. Larger and longer term studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of these findings.

  16. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. The effects of the HEALTHY study intervention on middle school student dietary intakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volpe Stella L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HEALTHY study was designed to respond to the alarming trends in increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in youth. The objective of this analysis was to examine the effects of the HEALTHY study on student self-reported dietary intakes (energy, macronutrients and grams consumed of selected food groups. Methods HEALTHY was a cluster-randomized study in 42 public middle schools. Students, n = 3908, self-reported dietary intake using the Block Kids Questionnaire. General linear mixed models were used to analyze differences in dietary intake at the end of the study between intervention and control schools. Results The reported average daily fruit consumption was 10% higher at the end of the study in the intervention schools than in the control schools (138 g or approximately 2 servings versus 122 g, respectively, p = 0.0016. The reported water intake was approximately 2 fluid ounces higher in the intervention schools than in the control (483 g versus 429 g respectively; p = 0.008. There were no significant differences between intervention and control for mean intakes of energy, macronutrients, fiber, grains, vegetables, legumes, sweets, sweetened beverages, and higher- or lower-fat milk consumption. Conclusion The HEALTHY study, a five-semester middle school-based intervention program that integrated multiple components in nutrition, physical education, behavior change, and social marketing-based communications, resulted in significant changes to student's reported fruit and water intake. Subsequent interventions need to go beyond the school environment to change diet behaviors that may affect weight status of children. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00458029

  18. Dietary Interventions and Blood Pressure in Latin America - Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzaro, Caroline Cantalejo; Klostermann, Flávia Caroline; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski [Faculdade Evangélica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César; Olandoski, Marcia; Faria-Neto, José Rocha, E-mail: jrochafaria@cardiol.br; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná (PUC-PR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    High blood pressure is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Low blood pressure control rates in Latin American populations emphasize the need for gathering evidence on effective therapies. To evaluate the effects of dietary interventions on blood pressure in Latin American populations. Systematic review. Electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS and VHL) were searched and manual search for studies published up to April 2013 was performed. Parallel studies about dietary interventions in Latin American adult populations assessing arterial blood pressure (mm Hg) before and after intervention were included. Of the 405 studies identified, 10 randomized controlled trials were included and divided into 3 subgroups according to the proposed dietary intervention. There was a non-significant reduction in systolic blood pressure in the subgroups of mineral replacement (-4.82; 95% CI: -11.36 to 1.73) and complex pattern diets (-3.17; 95% CI: -7.62 to 1.28). Regarding diastolic blood pressure, except for the hyperproteic diet subgroup, all subgroups showed a significant reduction in blood pressure: -4.66 mmHg (95% CI: -9.21 to -0.12) and -4.55 mmHg (95% CI: -7.04 to -2.06) for mineral replacement and complex pattern diets, respectively. Available evidence on the effects of dietary changes on blood pressure in Latin American populations indicates a homogeneous effect of those interventions, although not significant for systolic blood pressure. Samples were small and the quality of the studies was generally low. Larger studies are required to build robust evidence.

  19. Dietary Interventions and Blood Pressure in Latin America - Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzaro, Caroline Cantalejo; Klostermann, Flávia Caroline; Erbano, Bruna Olandoski; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César; Olandoski, Marcia; Faria-Neto, José Rocha; Baena, Cristina Pellegrino

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Low blood pressure control rates in Latin American populations emphasize the need for gathering evidence on effective therapies. To evaluate the effects of dietary interventions on blood pressure in Latin American populations. Systematic review. Electronic databases (MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS and VHL) were searched and manual search for studies published up to April 2013 was performed. Parallel studies about dietary interventions in Latin American adult populations assessing arterial blood pressure (mm Hg) before and after intervention were included. Of the 405 studies identified, 10 randomized controlled trials were included and divided into 3 subgroups according to the proposed dietary intervention. There was a non-significant reduction in systolic blood pressure in the subgroups of mineral replacement (-4.82; 95% CI: -11.36 to 1.73) and complex pattern diets (-3.17; 95% CI: -7.62 to 1.28). Regarding diastolic blood pressure, except for the hyperproteic diet subgroup, all subgroups showed a significant reduction in blood pressure: -4.66 mmHg (95% CI: -9.21 to -0.12) and -4.55 mmHg (95% CI: -7.04 to -2.06) for mineral replacement and complex pattern diets, respectively. Available evidence on the effects of dietary changes on blood pressure in Latin American populations indicates a homogeneous effect of those interventions, although not significant for systolic blood pressure. Samples were small and the quality of the studies was generally low. Larger studies are required to build robust evidence

  20. Dietary intervention rescues myopathy associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Matthew A; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Vasiljevski, Emily R; Evesson, Frances J; Mikulec, Kathy; Peacock, Lauren; Quinlan, Kate GR; Cooper, Sandra T; Roessner, Ute; Stevenson, David A; Little, David G; Schindeler, Aaron

    2018-02-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder with complex symptomology. In addition to a predisposition to tumors, children with NF1 can present with reduced muscle mass, global muscle weakness, and impaired motor skills, which can have a significant impact on quality of life. Genetic mouse models have shown a lipid storage disease phenotype may underlie muscle weakness in NF1. Herein we confirm that biopsy specimens from six individuals with NF1 similarly manifest features of a lipid storage myopathy, with marked accumulation of intramyocellular lipid, fibrosis, and mononuclear cell infiltrates. Intramyocellular lipid was also correlated with reductions in neurofibromin protein expression by western analysis. An RNASeq profile of Nf1null muscle from a muscle-specific Nf1 knockout mouse (Nf1MyoD-/-) revealed alterations in genes associated with glucose regulation and cell signaling. Comparison by lipid mass spectrometry demonstrated that Nf1null muscle specimens were enriched for long chain fatty acid (LCFA) containing neutral lipids, such as cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides, suggesting fundamentally impaired LCFA metabolism. The subsequent generation of a limb-specific Nf1 knockout mouse (Nf1Prx1-/-) recapitulated all observed features of human NF1 myopathy, including lipid storage, fibrosis, and muscle weakness. Collectively, these insights led to the evaluation of a dietary intervention of reduced LCFAs, and enrichment of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) with L-carnitine. Following 8-weeks of dietary treatment, Nf1Prx1-/- mice showed a 45% increase in maximal grip strength, and a 71% reduction in intramyocellular lipid staining compared with littermates fed standard chow. These data link NF1 deficiency to fundamental shifts in muscle metabolism, and provide strong proof of principal that a dietary intervention can ameliorate symptoms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  1. Evaluation of a Theory-Based Intervention Aimed at Reducing Intention to Use Restrictive Dietary Behaviors Among Adolescent Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramée, Catherine; Drapeau, Vicky; Valois, Pierre; Goulet, Claude; Jacob, Raphaëlle; Provencher, Véronique; Lamarche, Benoît

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a theory-based intervention to reduce the intention to use restrictive dietary behaviors for losing weight among adolescent female athletes involved in aesthetic sports. Cluster-randomized controlled trial. Aesthetic sport teams of adolescent female athletes aged 12-17 years. Two teams (n = 37 athletes) in the intervention group and 3 teams (n = 33) in the comparison group. The 2 groups received nutrition education during 3 weekly 60-minute sessions. The intervention group was further exposed to a theory-based intervention targeting the specific determinant of intention to use restrictive dietary behaviors for losing weight, namely attitude. Difference over time between groups in intention to use restrictive dietary behaviors for losing weight and in nutrition knowledge. Mixed models for repeated measures. The theory-based intervention contributed to maintaining a low intention of using restrictive dietary behaviors for losing weight over time in the intervention group compared with the comparison group (P theory-based behavior change intervention may help maintain a low intention of using restrictive dietary behaviors for losing weight among female high school athletes involved in aesthetic sports. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Evaluation of an Online "Teachable Moment" Dietary Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leah; Ogden, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate an online "teachable moment" intervention to promote healthy eating for overweight and food intolerance symptoms. Design/methodology/approach: The study involves a 2×2 factorial design with two conditions: group (weight loss vs food intolerance) and condition (intervention vs control).…

  3. Technology-supported dietary and lifestyle interventions in healthy pregnant women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, O A; McCarthy, M; Gibney, E R; McAuliffe, F M

    2014-07-01

    Overweight and obesity are associated with increased risk of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. However, the actuality of delivering effective lifestyle interventions in clinical practice is hampered by a high demand for resources. The use of technology to assist lifestyle interventions needs to be explored as a valid method of reducing strain on resources, and enhancing the effectiveness and population reach of interventions. The aim was to systematically review the literature on the use of technology-supported lifestyle interventions for healthy pregnant women and their impact on maternal outcomes. Online databases and registries were searched in March 2013. Primary outcomes of selected English language studies were fasting maternal glucose, incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and maternal gestational weight gain. Secondary outcomes were intervention uptake and acceptance, and dietary or physical activity modification. Studies whose subjects were diagnosed with GDM prior to intervention were excluded. The minimal number of eligible studies and varying outcomes precluded formal meta-analysis of the data. Initially, 203 articles were identified and screened. Seven articles, including five randomised controlled trials, met inclusion criteria for the current review. Results demonstrate several potential benefits associated with technology-supported interventions in pregnancy, despite minimal search results. Although communication technology holds potential as a safe therapeutic tool for the support of lifestyle interventions in pregnancy, there is a paucity of data on its effectiveness. Further RCTs examining the effectiveness of communication technology are required, particularly among those most likely to benefit from lifestyle interventions, such as overweight and obese pregnant women.

  4. Does a population-based multi-factorial lifestyle intervention increase social inequality in dietary habits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Ulla; Jakobsen, Iris Marie; Aadahl, Mette

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether the effect of an individualised multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on dietary habits differs across socioeconomic groups.......To investigate whether the effect of an individualised multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on dietary habits differs across socioeconomic groups....

  5. Coffee: A Dietary Intervention on Type 2 Diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebelo, Irene; Casal, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Coffee beverages, prepared in a multitude of ways around the world, are increasingly part of our daily lives. Although considered an unhealthy beverage for decades, coffee is increasingly the headline of medical journals in association with a reduced risk for several diseases. What if this beverage could give us pleasure, while modulating mood and lowering the risk for several diseases of the modern society, including type 2 diabetes (T2D)? Based on the most recent epidemiological and research data, long-term consumption of coffee beverages is associated with a lower risk of developing T2D in healthy individuals, probably involving multiple mechanisms, with interventions on glucose homeostasis, antioxidant activity, and inflammatory biomarkers. Several coffee constituents potentially responsible for these effects are described, as well as the factors that make their presence highly variable, with interesting effects associated with chlorogenic acids, trigonelline and norharman. Due to the high number of compounds contained in coffee, we explore the potential synergic effect within the coffee matrix. Moreover, acute coffee consumption shows different health effects from those achieved on a long-term daily consumption, and not all coffee beverages are similar. Still, despite the huge amount or work developed in the last decade, the substances and mechanisms behind these protective effects on T2D are still to be fully elucidated, being therefore soon for dietary interventions based on coffee. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Structured Dietary Interventions in the Treatment of Severe Pediatric Obesity: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Levine, Michele D; Marcus, Marsha D

    2013-06-01

    Structured dietary interventions have been associated with improved outcomes in adult weight-control programs, but virtually no research has focused on children. Thus, we conducted an uncontrolled pilot study to determine the potential utility of structured approaches to enhance the dietary component of family-based treatment of severe pediatric obesity (body mass index [BMI] >97th percentile for age and sex). Children aged 8-12 years participated with a parent or guardian. Individualized menu plans were provided (MENU, n =12) alone, or along with meals and snacks for the child (MENU+MEAL, n =6). All families received up to $30/week reimbursement for foods included in the menus. Median BMI change was -1.2 kg/m 2 for MENU ( n =12), and -1.8 kg/m 2 for MENU+MEAL ( n =6). Both approaches were associated with significant reductions in BMI ( p obesity are acceptable to families and warrant further development.

  7. Targeting children's dietary behaviors in a family intervention: 'Entre familia: reflejos de salud'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Lucy A; Parada, Humberto; Slymen, Donald J; Arredondo, Elva; Ibarra, Leticia; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2013-01-01

    This intervention sought to promote healthy eating with the ultimate goal of reducing childhood obesity risk. Three hundred and sixty-one Latino families living on the US-Mexico border with at least one child between 7-13 years of age were eligible to participate. Families randomly assigned to the four-month intervention received 14 contacts with a promotora (community health worker), consisting of 11 home visits and three telephone calls; the control condition was a delayed treatment intervention. Children reported on their dietary intake at baseline, immediately post-intervention and at the six month follow-up visit. The intervention reduced weekly consumption of fast food (p<0.05). A dose-response relationship was observed such that for every seven hours of promotora contact, monthly variety of fruits (p<0.01) and vegetables (p<0.01) increased by one. No other intervention effects were observed. Family-based interventions can improve children's eating habits, with the amount of contact with the promotora being key to success.

  8. Intervention Engagement Moderates the Dose–Response Relationships in a Dietary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Lippke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral interventions could lead to changes in behavior through changes in a mediator. This dose–response relationship might only hold true for those participants who are actively engaged in interventions. This Internet study investigated the role of engagement in a planning intervention to promote fruit and vegetable consumption in addition to testing the intervention effect on planning and behavior. A sample of 701 adults (mean = 38.71 years, 81% women were randomly assigned either to a planning intervention (experimental group or to one of 2 control conditions (untreated waiting list control group or placebo active control group. Moderated mediation analyses were carried out. Significant changes over time and time × group effects revealed the effectiveness of the intervention. The effect of the intervention (time 1 on changes in behavior (time 3; 1 month after the personal deadline study participants set for themselves to start implementing their plans was mediated by changes in planning (time 2; 1 week the personal deadline. Effects of planning on behavior were documented only at a moderate level of intervention engagement. This indicates an inverse U-shaped dose–response effect. Thus, examining participants’ intervention engagement allows for a more careful evaluation of why some interventions work and others do not.

  9. Low-fat dietary pattern and risk of colorectal cancer: the Women's Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Dietary Modification Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, Shirley A A; Johnson, Karen C; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Lasser, Norman L; Snetselaar, Linda G; Black, Henry R; Anderson, Garnet L; Assaf, Annlouise R; Bassford, Tamsen; Bowen, Deborah; Brunner, Robert L; Brzyski, Robert G; Caan, Bette; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Gass, Margery; Harrigan, Rosanne C; Hays, Jennifer; Heber, David; Heiss, Gerardo; Hendrix, Susan L; Howard, Barbara V; Hsia, Judith; Hubbell, F Allan; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Kuller, Lewis H; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Lane, Dorothy S; Langer, Robert D; Lewis, Cora E; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolis, Karen L; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Ockene, Judith K; Parker, Linda M; Perri, Michael G; Phillips, Lawrence; Prentice, Ross L; Robbins, John; Rossouw, Jacques E; Sarto, Gloria E; Stefanick, Marcia L; Van Horn, Linda; Vitolins, Mara Z; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wallace, Robert B; Whitlock, Evelyn

    2006-02-08

    Observational studies and polyp recurrence trials are not conclusive regarding the effects of a low-fat dietary pattern on risk of colorectal cancer, necessitating a primary prevention trial. To evaluate the effects of a low-fat eating pattern on risk of colorectal cancer in postmenopausal women. The Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial, a randomized controlled trial conducted in 48,835 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years recruited between 1993 and 1998 from 40 clinical centers throughout the United States. Participants were randomly assigned to the dietary modification intervention (n = 19,541; 40%) or the comparison group (n = 29,294; 60%). The intensive behavioral modification program aimed to motivate and support reductions in dietary fat, to increase consumption of vegetables and fruits, and to increase grain servings by using group sessions, self-monitoring techniques, and other tailored and targeted strategies. Women in the comparison group continued their usual eating pattern. Invasive colorectal cancer incidence. A total of 480 incident cases of invasive colorectal cancer occurred during a mean follow-up of 8.1 (SD, 1.7) years. Intervention group participants significantly reduced their percentage of energy from fat by 10.7% more than did the comparison group at 1 year, and this difference between groups was mostly maintained (8.1% at year 6). Statistically significant increases in vegetable, fruit, and grain servings were also made. Despite these dietary changes, there was no evidence that the intervention reduced the risk of invasive colorectal cancer during the follow-up period. There were 201 women with invasive colorectal cancer (0.13% per year) in the intervention group and 279 (0.12% per year) in the comparison group (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.90-1.29). Secondary analyses suggested potential interactions with baseline aspirin use and combined estrogen-progestin use status (P = .01 for each). Colorectal

  10. Breast cancer survivors' experience of making weight, dietary and physical activity changes during participation in a weight loss intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Caroline O; Lawler, Sheleigh P; Spathonis, Kym; Eakin, Elizabeth G; Reeves, Marina M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore breast cancer survivors' experience of a weight loss intervention and identify potential facilitators and barriers of initiating and maintaining weight, dietary or physical activity changes. Fourteen women randomised to and completing the 12-month weight loss intervention completed semi-structured interviews 7.5 ± 0.5 months after intervention completion. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted whereby interviews were independently coded and themes identified. Women were (mean ± SD) 55.6 ± 8.5 years, 30.2 ± 4.6 kg/m 2 and 17.1 ± 3.4 months post-diagnosis at study baseline. Four themes emerged: (1) perceived motivation to participate in the intervention, (2) facilitators, (3) challenges and (4) maintenance of weight loss and behaviour changes. All women noted the impact of social/family environments, either to facilitate (e.g., support from family members) or impede (e.g., major family event) changes. The structure and support of the intervention, particularly accountability to their coach, was also seen as facilitating. Formation of habitual physical activity facilitated dietary changes. Dietary change strategies most perceived to facilitate weight loss were reducing energy intake by dietary self-monitoring, increasing vegetable intake and portion control. Challenges included breast cancer-specific issues such as post-diagnosis weight gain, treatment-related side effects and psychological issues around readiness to change and self-regulation. Diminished accountability following intervention completion impacted the maintenance of weight loss and behaviour changes, notably dietary self-monitoring. Results suggest that formal involvement of a support person (e.g. family member/friend) and referring women to ongoing, community-based services to maintain patient-perceived accountability may be particularly useful strategies for future weight loss intervention trials targeting women with breast cancer.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of a complex workplace dietary intervention: an economic evaluation of the Food Choice at Work study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Murphy, Aileen; Kirby, Ann; Geaney, Fiona; Perry, Ivan J

    2018-03-03

    To evaluate the costs, benefits and cost-effectiveness of complex workplace dietary interventions, involving nutrition education and system-level dietary modification, from the perspective of healthcare providers and employers. Single-study economic evaluation of a cluster-controlled trial (Food Choice at Work (FCW) study) with 1-year follow-up. Four multinational manufacturing workplaces in Cork, Ireland. 517 randomly selected employees (18-65 years) from four workplaces. Cost data were obtained from the FCW study. Nutrition education included individual nutrition consultations, nutrition information (traffic light menu labelling, posters, leaflets and emails) and presentations. System-level dietary modification included menu modification (restriction of fat, sugar and salt), increase in fibre, fruit discounts, strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and portion size control. The combined intervention included nutrition education and system-level dietary modification. No intervention was implemented in the control. The primary outcome was an improvement in health-related quality of life, measured using the EuroQoL 5 Dimensions 5 Levels questionnaire. The secondary outcome measure was reduction in absenteeism, which is measured in monetary amounts. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis (Monte Carlo simulation) assessed parameter uncertainty. The system-level intervention dominated the education and combined interventions. When compared with the control, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (€101.37/quality-adjusted life-year) is less than the nationally accepted ceiling ratio, so the system-level intervention can be considered cost-effective. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curve indicates there is some decision uncertainty surrounding this, arising from uncertainty surrounding the differences in effectiveness. These results are reiterated when the secondary outcome measure is considered in a cost-benefit analysis, whereby the system

  12. Intensive dietary intervention promoting the Mediterranean diet in people with high cardiometabolic risk: a non-randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, M; Ciano, O; Manzo, M; Rispoli, M; Guglielmi, M; Limardi, A; Calatola, P; Lucibello, M; Pardo, S; Capaldo, B; Riccardi, G

    2017-12-07

    Mediterranean diet (MD) is acknowledged to exert a number of beneficial health effects. We assessed the efficacy and the durability of a 3-month intensive dietary intervention aimed at implementing the MD on body weight and cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects at high risk. One hundred and sixteen subjects participated in the study (71 assigned to the intensive intervention and 45 to the conventional intervention). The intensive intervention consisted of 12 weekly group educational meetings and a free-of-charge supply of meals prepared according to the MD model. The conventional intervention consisted of an individual education session along with monthly reinforcements of nutritional messages by the general practitioner. All participants were followed up for 9 months. The two groups had similar pre-intervention characteristics. After the intervention, mean body weight decreased significantly in both groups (p intervention group lost more weight (6.8 ± 4.0 vs. 0.7 ± 1.3, p intervention. At follow-up, weight loss still persisted in the intervention group (p interventions significantly reduced blood pressure in the long term (p intervention than in the control group (p intervention inspired to the traditional MD produced greater and more durable weight loss and improvement in cardiometabolic risk profile than the conventional intervention.

  13. Changes in nitrosative stress biomarkers in swine intestine following dietary intervention with verbascoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Rossi, Raffaella; Vitari, Francesca; Carollo, Valentina; Deponti, Daniela; Corino, Carlo; Domeneghini, Cinzia

    2013-06-01

    In farm animals, oxidative stress can be involved in several intestinal pathological disorders, and many antioxidant molecules, especially those of plant origin, can counteract free radicals, thus stabilizing the gut environment and enhancing health. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the use of verbascoside (VB), a polyphenol plant compound, in pig feeding could modulate oxidative and/or nitrosative stress in the gut. Eighteen male piglets (Dalland) were assigned to two groups, which were fed with either a control diet (CON) or a diet supplemented with 5 mg/kg of verbascoside (VB) for 166 days. At slaughter, duodenum and jejunum specimens were collected. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses were performed on the samples to evaluate free radical adducts, including acrolein (ACR), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdg) and nitrotyrosine (NT). A KRL test was also used to assess the total blood antioxidant activity, and no difference was observed. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot showed that dietary treatment decreased the levels of nitrotyrosine in enteroendocrine cell populations(P<0.05). Characterization of the enteroendocrine cell typology was then performed, and serotonin-immunoreactive cells were revealed to be directly involved in decreasing the nitrosative stress status. This preliminary study demonstrates the important role of dietary VB in decreasing stress biomarkers in swine gut, thus highlighting a possible intervention aimed at building a large prospective for antioxidant dietary supplementation in food animal species.

  14. Low-fat dietary pattern and cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Ross L; Thomson, Cynthia A; Caan, Bette; Hubbell, F Allan; Anderson, Garnet L; Beresford, Shirley A A; Pettinger, Mary; Lane, Dorothy S; Lessin, Lawrence; Yasmeen, Shagufta; Singh, Baljinder; Khandekar, Janardan; Shikany, James M; Satterfield, Suzanne; Chlebowski, Rowan T

    2007-10-17

    The Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification (DM) Randomized Controlled Trial evaluated the effects of a low-fat dietary pattern on chronic disease incidence, with breast cancer and colorectal cancer as primary outcomes. The trial protocol also listed ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer as outcomes that may be favorably affected by the intervention. A total of 48,835 postmenopausal women were randomly assigned during 1993-1998 to a DM intervention (n = 19,541) or comparison (usual diet; n = 29,294) group and followed up for an average of 8.1 years. The intervention goal was to reduce total fat intake to 20% of energy and to increase consumption of vegetables, fruits, and grains. Cancer outcomes were verified by pathology report review. We used weighted log-rank tests to compare incidence of invasive cancers of the ovary and endometrium, total invasive cancer, and invasive cancers at other sites between the groups. All statistical tests were two-sided. Ovarian cancer risk was lower in the intervention than in the comparison group (P = .03). Although the overall ovarian cancer hazard ratio (HR) was not statistically significantly less than 1.0, the hazard ratio decreased with increasing intervention duration (P(trend) = .01). For the first 4 years, the risk for ovarian cancer was similar in the intervention and control groups (0.52 cases per 1000 person-years in the intervention group versus 0.45 per 1000 person-years in the comparison group; HR = 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73 to 1.84); over the next 4.1 years, the risk was lower in the intervention group (0.38 cases per 1000 person-years in the intervention group versus 0.64 per 1000 person-years in the comparison group; HR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.96). Risk of cancer of the endometrium did not differ between the groups (P = .18). The estimated risk of total invasive cancer was slightly lower in the intervention group than in the control group (HR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.89 to 1.01; P = .10). A low

  15. [Effects of the nutritional education and dietary intervention on nutritional status and bone mineral density of middle-aged and senile patients with osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunyan; Zhou, Ruihua; Tian, Yongzhi; Tang, Yongmei; Ning, Hongzhen; Liu, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    To study the effect of the nutritional education and dietary intervention on nutritional status and bone mineral density (BMD) of middle-aged and senile patients with osteoporosis. Ninty middle-aged and senile osteoporosis patients were enrolled. They were randomly divided into two groups (intervention and control group) with 45 cases each. The control group was received conventional therapy and the intervention group added with nutritional education and dietary intervention for six months on the basis of conventional therapy. The methods of education and intervention included seminars, brochures distribution, dietary survey and individual guidance. The nutritional status and BMD were analyzed at the beginning and the end of the intervention respectively. After the intervention, the ratios of subjects whose intake of grain, vegetables, fruits, eggs, milk and beans in line with recommended intake of the intervention group were higher than those of the control group (P nutritional education and dietary intervention could promote middle-aged and senile patients' reasonable diet, improve their nutritional status, enhance bone mineral density and improve the effect of conventional therapy for osteoporosis.

  16. Dietary and behavioral interventions protect against age related activation of caspase cascades in the canine brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Snigdha

    Full Text Available Lifestyle interventions such as diet, exercise, and cognitive training represent a quietly emerging revolution in the modern approach to counteracting age-related declines in brain health. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that long-term dietary supplementation with antioxidants and mitochondrial cofactors (AOX or behavioral enrichment with social, cognitive, and exercise components (ENR, can effectively improve cognitive performance and reduce brain pathology of aged canines, including oxidative damage and Aβ accumulation. In this study, we build on and extend our previous findings by investigating if the interventions reduce caspase activation and ceramide accumulation in the aged frontal cortex, since caspase activation and ceramide accumulation are common convergence points for oxidative damage and Aβ, among other factors associated with the aged and AD brain. Aged beagles were placed into one of four treatment groups: CON--control environment/control diet, AOX--control environment/antioxidant diet, ENR--enriched environment/control diet, AOX/ENR--enriched environment/antioxidant diet for 2.8 years. Following behavioral testing, brains were removed and frontal cortices were analyzed to monitor levels of active caspase 3, active caspase 9 and their respective cleavage products such as tau and semaphorin7a, and ceramides. Our results show that levels of activated caspase-3 were reduced by ENR and AOX interventions with the largest reduction occurring with combined AOX/ENR group. Further, reductions in caspase-3 correlated with reduced errors in a reversal learning task, which depends on frontal cortex function. In addition, animals treated with an AOX arm showed reduced numbers of cells expressing active caspase 9 or its cleavage product semaphorin 7A, while ENR (but not AOX reduced ceramide levels. Overall, these data demonstrate that lifestyle interventions curtail activation of pro-degenerative pathways to improve cellular

  17. Dietary and behavioral interventions protect against age related activation of caspase cascades in the canine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigdha, Shikha; Berchtold, Nicole; Astarita, Giuseppe; Saing, Tommy; Piomelli, Daniele; Cotman, Carl W

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle interventions such as diet, exercise, and cognitive training represent a quietly emerging revolution in the modern approach to counteracting age-related declines in brain health. Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that long-term dietary supplementation with antioxidants and mitochondrial cofactors (AOX) or behavioral enrichment with social, cognitive, and exercise components (ENR), can effectively improve cognitive performance and reduce brain pathology of aged canines, including oxidative damage and Aβ accumulation. In this study, we build on and extend our previous findings by investigating if the interventions reduce caspase activation and ceramide accumulation in the aged frontal cortex, since caspase activation and ceramide accumulation are common convergence points for oxidative damage and Aβ, among other factors associated with the aged and AD brain. Aged beagles were placed into one of four treatment groups: CON--control environment/control diet, AOX--control environment/antioxidant diet, ENR--enriched environment/control diet, AOX/ENR--enriched environment/antioxidant diet for 2.8 years. Following behavioral testing, brains were removed and frontal cortices were analyzed to monitor levels of active caspase 3, active caspase 9 and their respective cleavage products such as tau and semaphorin7a, and ceramides. Our results show that levels of activated caspase-3 were reduced by ENR and AOX interventions with the largest reduction occurring with combined AOX/ENR group. Further, reductions in caspase-3 correlated with reduced errors in a reversal learning task, which depends on frontal cortex function. In addition, animals treated with an AOX arm showed reduced numbers of cells expressing active caspase 9 or its cleavage product semaphorin 7A, while ENR (but not AOX) reduced ceramide levels. Overall, these data demonstrate that lifestyle interventions curtail activation of pro-degenerative pathways to improve cellular health and are the

  18. Effect of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods given at 2 levels of intensity of dietary advice on serum lipids in hyperlipidemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David J A; Jones, Peter J H; Lamarche, Benoit; Kendall, Cyril W C; Faulkner, Dorothea; Cermakova, Luba; Gigleux, Iris; Ramprasath, Vanu; de Souza, Russell; Ireland, Chris; Patel, Darshna; Srichaikul, Korbua; Abdulnour, Shahad; Bashyam, Balachandran; Collier, Cheryl; Hoshizaki, Sandy; Josse, Robert G; Leiter, Lawrence A; Connelly, Philip W; Frohlich, Jiri

    2011-08-24

    Combining foods with recognized cholesterol-lowering properties (dietary portfolio) has proven highly effective in lowering serum cholesterol under metabolically controlled conditions. To assess the effect of a dietary portfolio administered at 2 levels of intensity on percentage change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) among participants following self-selected diets. A parallel-design study of 351 participants with hyperlipidemia from 4 participating academic centers across Canada (Quebec City, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Vancouver) randomized between June 25, 2007, and February 19, 2009, to 1 of 3 treatments lasting 6 months. Participants received dietary advice for 6 months on either a low-saturated fat therapeutic diet (control) or a dietary portfolio, for which counseling was delivered at different frequencies, that emphasized dietary incorporation of plant sterols, soy protein, viscous fibers, and nuts. Routine dietary portfolio involved 2 clinic visits over 6 months and intensive dietary portfolio involved 7 clinic visits over 6 months. Percentage change in serum LDL-C. In the modified intention-to-treat analysis of 345 participants, the overall attrition rate was not significantly different between treatments (18% for intensive dietary portfolio, 23% for routine dietary portfolio, and 26% for control; Fisher exact test, P = .33). The LDL-C reductions from an overall mean of 171 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], 168-174 mg/dL) were -13.8% (95% CI, -17.2% to -10.3%; P portfolio; -13.1% (95% CI, -16.7% to -9.5%; P portfolio; and -3.0% (95% CI, -6.1% to 0.1%; P = .06) or -8 mg/dL (95% CI, -13 to -3 mg/dL; P = .002) for the control diet. Percentage LDL-C reductions for each dietary portfolio were significantly more than the control diet (P portfolio interventions did not differ significantly (P = .66). Among participants randomized to one of the dietary portfolio interventions, percentage reduction in LDL-C on the dietary portfolio was associated

  19. Changes in dietary pattern in 15 year old adolescents following a 4 month dietary intervention with school breakfast--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, Anne S; Hernes, Sigrunn; Aarek, Ingebjørg; Johannessen, Gaute; Haugen, Margaretha

    2006-12-07

    Few studies on impact of meals served in school have been published. However, implications of school meals are an actual issue of both public and political concern in several countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate if breakfast served in a lower secondary school could improve dietary habits and school performance among the students. All students in 10th grade in a lower secondary school, consisting of two school classes, were invited to participate in a controlled study. The students in one class were offered a free breakfast at the beginning of each school day for 4 months, while the students in the second class were controls. Both classes were educated in the importance of healthy eating, and a data program enabling them to evaluate dietary intake was introduced. The students answered two questionnaires, one on school performance and one short food frequency questionnaire, four weeks before study start and one week after. Body weight and height were measured by the school nurse at the beginning and end of the study. Because of few students in each group, non-parametrical statistic analyses were used. All students in the intervention group had breakfast at school during the intervention. One week after the intervention the students in the class who received breakfast had returned to their normal breakfast pattern. In the control group the frequency of a lunch intake had increase, as compared to before study start (p school performance following school breakfast was not found, but the males in the intervention group reported a significant increase in school contentment (p school class served breakfast for 4 months, dietary intake changed to a more healthy profile and weight gain was reduced.

  20. Evidence mapping: dietary fiber interventions and bone health outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone mass is expected to increase as the United States population ages. High dietary fiber intake has previously been implicated as a risk factor for bone health by binding calcium and thereby reducing its intestinal absorption; however, more recently, interven...

  1. Lifelong dietary intervention does not affect hematopoietic stem cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazare, Seka; Ausema, Albertina; Reijne, Aaffien C; van Dijk, Gertjan; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a profound functional decline during normal aging. Because caloric or dietary restriction has been shown to delay multiple aspects of the aging process in many species, we explored the consequences of lifelong caloric restriction, or conversely, lifelong

  2. [Effects of an intervention program for community-dwelling elderly to improve frailty and dietary habits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Teruko; Takemi, Yukari; Murayama, Hiroshi; Nishi, Mariko; Shimizu, Yumiko; Narita, Miki; Kim, Mi-Ji; Shinkai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a comprehensive intervention program for community-dwelling elderly on frailty and dietary habits were examined. We conducted randomized control trials to examine the efficacy of the intervention. To examine lasting changes, we made paired comparisons between pre- and post- intervention and at a three-month follow-up. The subjects were recruited in Hatoyama town, Saitama prefecture. The program was composed of exercise, nutritional education, and social participation and was held from October to December 2011. The exercise program aimed at fall prevention and took place twice per week for 60 min. The nutritional education aimed at prevention of malnutrition, and the social participation program aimed at prevention of "homeboundness"; both were held once per week for 30 min. Questionnaires inquired about frailty and dietary variety. A blood test was conducted to ascertain nutritional state, and a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire was used to estimate food and nutrient intake. To examine the efficacy of the intervention, 22 control subjects (CR) and 21 subjects in the intervention group (IV) were analyzed with intention to treat. To examine lasting changes, 16 subjects in IV who correctly completed surveys at each of the three time points were analyzed, using repeated ANOVA and a multiple comparison procedure. 1. Men comprised 70-80% of subjects, and the average age was 75.7±5.4 and 74.7±5.4 years in IV and CR, respectively. 2. There was no significant difference in pre- and post-intervention changes between IV and CR in frailty, which was the main outcome of the study. 3. A significant difference in pre- and post-intervention values was noted in ① "homeboundness", one of the components of frailty (median [25-75%tile]): IV 0 [0-0] and CR 0 [0-1] (P=0.023); ② nutrient intake (mean±standard deviation [SD], energy ratio [%E]): protein, IV 2.3±0.7 and CR -0.3±2.0 (P=0.002); animal protein, IV 2.4±1.5 and CR -0.5±1.5 (P=0

  3. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, peducation program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS.

  4. Dietary and medication adjustments to improve seizure control in patients treated with the ketogenic diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selter, Jessica H.; Turner, Zahava; Doerrer, Sarah C.; Kossoff, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike anticonvulsant drugs and vagus nerve stimulation, there are no guidelines regarding adjustments to ketogenic diet regimens to improve seizure efficacy once the diet has been started. A retrospective chart review was performed of 200 consecutive patients treated with the ketogenic diet at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2007-2013. Ten dietary and supplement changes were identified, along with anticonvulsant adjustments. A total of 391 distinct interventions occurred, of which 265 were made specifically to improve seizure control. Adjustments lead to >50% further seizure reduction in-18%, but only 3% became seizure-free. The benefits of interventions did not decrease over time. There was a trend towards medication adjustments being more successful than dietary modifications (24% vs. 15%, p = 0.08). No single dietary change stood out as the most effective, but calorie changes were largely unhelpful (10% with additional benefit). PMID:24859788

  5. Diet and Dermatology: The Role of Dietary Intervention in Skin Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Katta, Rajani; Desai, Samir P.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was thought that many common dermatological conditions had no relationship to diet. Studies from recent years, however, have made it clear that diet may influence outcome. In this review, the authors focus on conditions for which the role of diet has traditionally been an underappreciated aspect of therapy. In some cases, dietary interventions may influence the course of the skin disease, as in acne. In others, dietary change may serve as one aspect of prevention, such as in s...

  6. Changes in dietary pattern in 15 year old adolescents following a 4 month dietary intervention with school breakfast – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarek Ingebjørg

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies on impact of meals served in school have been published. However, implications of school meals are an actual issue of both public and political concern in several countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate if breakfast served in a lower secondary school could improve dietary habits and school performance among the students. Methods All students in 10th grade in a lower secondary school, consisting of two school classes, were invited to participate in a controlled study. The students in one class were offered a free breakfast at the beginning of each school day for 4 months, while the students in the second class were controls. Both classes were educated in the importance of healthy eating, and a data program enabling them to evaluate dietary intake was introduced. The students answered two questionnaires, one on school performance and one short food frequency questionnaire, four weeks before study start and one week after. Body weight and height were measured by the school nurse at the beginning and end of the study. Because of few students in each group, non-parametrical statistic analyses were used. Results All students in the intervention group had breakfast at school during the intervention. One week after the intervention the students in the class who received breakfast had returned to their normal breakfast pattern. In the control group the frequency of a lunch intake had increase, as compared to before study start (p Conclusion In a lower secondary school class served breakfast for 4 months, dietary intake changed to a more healthy profile and weight gain was reduced.

  7. Omega-3 Supplementation as a Dietary Intervention to Reduce Aggressive and Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Olivia; Raine, Adrian

    2018-04-05

    Although there is an increasing body of literature on the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and aggressive/antisocial behavior, evidence to date suggests that there are mixed findings on the efficacy of omega-3 supplementation as a dietary intervention to reduce such behaviors. This article describes the current state of the research regarding omega-3 supplementation and aggressive/antisocial behavior from intervention studies, with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials. The current evidence base indicates a small effect size (approximately d = .20) for the efficacy of increased omega-3 intake in reducing aggressive and antisocial behavior in children and adults. How precisely omega-3 supplementation results in such behavioral improvement is an open question, although upregulation of dysfunctional prefrontal regions is one candidate mediator. Directions for further research include understanding the more basic mechanisms that may underlie any intervention effects, delineating dose-response relationships, ascertaining optimal treatment duration and composition, conducting follow-ups post-treatment, and testing the provisional hypothesis that more impulsive, reactive forms of aggression may be particularly amenable to omega-3 supplementation.

  8. Dietary patterns and risk of colorectal cancer in Tehran Province: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Akram; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Rashidkhani, Bahram; Fereidooni, Foroozandeh

    2013-03-12

    Colorectal cancer is the third and fourth leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality among men and women, respectively in Iran. However, the role of dietary factors that could contribute to this high cancer incidence remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine major dietary patterns and its relationship with colorectal cancer. This case-control study was conducted in four hospitals in Tehran city of Iran. A total of 71 patients (35 men and 36 women, aged 40-75 years) with incident clinically confirmed colorectal cancer (CRC) and 142 controls (70 men and 72 women, aged 40-75 years) admitted to hospital for acute, non-neoplastic diseases were recruited and interviewed. Dietary data were assessed by 125-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between dietary patterns and risk of colorectal cancer. Two major dietary patterns (Healthy pattern and Western pattern) were derived using principal component analysis. Each dietary pattern explained 11.9% (Healthy pattern) and 10.3% (Western pattern) of the variation in food intake, respectively. After adjusting for confounding factors, the Healthy dietary pattern was significantly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (OR= 0.227; 95% CI=0.108-0.478) while an increased risk of colorectal cancer was observed with the Western dietary pattern (OR=2.616; 95% CI= 1.361-5.030). Specific dietary patterns, which include healthy and western patterns, may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. This diet-disease relationship can be used for developing interventions that aim to promote healthy eating for the prevention of chronic disease, particularly colorectal cancer in the Iranian population.

  9. Genomic Microdiversity of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum Underlying Differential Strain-Level Responses to Dietary Carbohydrate Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The genomic basis of the response to dietary intervention of human gut beneficial bacteria remains elusive, which hinders precise manipulation of the microbiota for human health. After receiving a dietary intervention enriched with nondigestible carbohydrates for 105 days, a genetically obese child with Prader-Willi syndrome lost 18.4% of his body weight and showed significant improvement in his bioclinical parameters. We obtained five isolates (C1, C15, C55, C62, and C95 of one of the most abundantly promoted beneficial species, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, from a postintervention fecal sample. Intriguingly, these five B. pseudocatenulatum strains showed differential responses during the dietary intervention. Two strains were largely unaffected, while the other three were promoted to different extents by the changes in dietary carbohydrate resources. The differential responses of these strains were consistent with their functional clustering based on the COGs (Clusters of Orthologous Groups, including those involved with the ABC-type sugar transport systems, suggesting that the strain-specific genomic variations may have contributed to the niche adaption. Particularly, B. pseudocatenulatum C15, which had the most diverse types and highest gene copy numbers of carbohydrate-active enzymes targeting plant polysaccharides, had the highest abundance after the dietary intervention. These studies show the importance of understanding genomic diversity of specific members of the gut microbiota if precise nutrition approaches are to be realized.

  10. A study of a culturally enhanced EatRight dietary intervention in a predominately African American workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Jamy D; Cox, Tiffany L; Zunker, Christie; Wingo, Brooks C; Jefferson, Wendy K; Brakhage, Cora

    2010-01-01

    The workplace may be an ideal venue for engaging African American women in behavioral interventions for weight reduction. To examine the effectiveness of a culturally enhanced EatRight dietary intervention among a group of predominately African American women in a workplace setting. Crossover design study. Workplace. A total of 39 women volunteered for this study, of whom 27 completed it. The control period involved observation of participants for 22 weeks after receiving standard counseling on lifestyle methods to achieve a healthy weight; following the control period, participants crossed over to the 22-week intervention period. The intervention was culturally enhanced using feedback derived from formative assessment and delivered as 15 group sessions. The primary outcome measure was the difference in weight change between the control and intervention periods; changes in waist circumference and quality of life were secondary outcomes. Most participants were obese, with a mean baseline body mass index of 36 kg/m², weight of 97.9 kg, and waist circumference of 111 cm. Weight increased during the control period by 0.7 kg but decreased by 2.6 kg during the intervention (net difference = -3.4 kg, P intervention in a predominately African American workplace setting. The workplace may be conducive for targeting African American women who are disproportionately affected by obesity.

  11. A randomised controlled trial of dietary improvement for adults with major depression (the 'SMILES' trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacka, Felice N; O'Neil, Adrienne; Opie, Rachelle; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Cotton, Sue; Mohebbi, Mohammedreza; Castle, David; Dash, Sarah; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Chatterton, Mary Lou; Brazionis, Laima; Dean, Olivia M; Hodge, Allison M; Berk, Michael

    2017-01-30

    The possible therapeutic impact of dietary changes on existing mental illness is largely unknown. Using a randomised controlled trial design, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of a dietary improvement program for the treatment of major depressive episodes. 'SMILES' was a 12-week, parallel-group, single blind, randomised controlled trial of an adjunctive dietary intervention in the treatment of moderate to severe depression. The intervention consisted of seven individual nutritional consulting sessions delivered by a clinical dietician. The control condition comprised a social support protocol to the same visit schedule and length. Depression symptomatology was the primary endpoint, assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included remission and change of symptoms, mood and anxiety. Analyses utilised a likelihood-based mixed-effects model repeated measures (MMRM) approach. The robustness of estimates was investigated through sensitivity analyses. We assessed 166 individuals for eligibility, of whom 67 were enrolled (diet intervention, n = 33; control, n = 34). Of these, 55 were utilising some form of therapy: 21 were using psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy combined; 9 were using exclusively psychotherapy; and 25 were using only pharmacotherapy. There were 31 in the diet support group and 25 in the social support control group who had complete data at 12 weeks. The dietary support group demonstrated significantly greater improvement between baseline and 12 weeks on the MADRS than the social support control group, t(60.7) = 4.38, p robust to violations of MAR assumptions. These results indicate that dietary improvement may provide an efficacious and accessible treatment strategy for the management of this highly prevalent mental disorder, the benefits of which could extend to the management of common co-morbidities. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN

  12. Dietary salt reduction for control of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In developed as well as developing countries, the four main factors affecting blood pressure are high salt intake, low potassium intake, overweight, and low physical activity level. This is also true for the increase in blood pressure with advancing age, occurring in all societies. It is now accepted that excess dietary salt raises blood pressure levels, whereas dietary salt reduction reduces blood pressure and prevents vascular complications.(1 The effect of salt on blood pressure is presumably due to the inability of the kidneys to excrete large amounts of salt, as humans are evolutionary adapted to ingest and excrete less than 1 gram of salt per day.(2 In this connection it should be noted that the more important element in common salt (sodium chloride is the sodium ion, and any restrictions applying to common salt also apply to all food items that contain sodium ions, such as sodium glutamate and baking soda.

  13. A gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention for amelioration of chronic inflammation underlying metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuiming; Fei, Na; Pang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Jian; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Baorang; Zhang, Menghui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chenhong; Li, Min; Sun, Lifeng; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Jingjing; Feng, Jie; Yan, Feiyan; Zhao, Naisi; Liu, Jiaqi; Long, Wenmin; Zhao, Liping

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥ 28 kg m(-2) ) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9-week intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14-week maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79 ± 4.64 kg (6.62 ± 4.94%), in addition to improvement in insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared with the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. © 2013 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology pubished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. The effectiveness of a primary care nursing-led dietary intervention for prediabetes: a mixed methods pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppell, Kirsten J; Abel, Sally L; Freer, Trish; Gray, Andrew; Sharp, Kiri; Norton, Joanna K; Spedding, Terrie; Ward, Lillian; Whitehead, Lisa C

    2017-12-21

    Primary care nurse-led prediabetes interventions are seldom reported. We examined the implementation and feasibility of a 6-month multilevel primary care nurse-led prediabetes lifestyle intervention compared with current practice in patients with prediabetes, with weight and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) as outcomes. This study used a convergent mixed methods design involving a 6-month pragmatic non-randomised pilot study with a qualitative process evaluation, and was conducted in two neighbouring provincial cities in New Zealand, with indigenous Māori populations comprising 18.2% and 23.0%, respectively. Participants were non-pregnant adults aged ≤ 70 years with newly diagnosed prediabetes (HbA1c 41-49 mmol/mol), body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m 2 and not prescribed Metformin. A structured dietary intervention tool delivered by primary care nurses with visits at baseline, 2-3 weeks, 3 months and 6 months was implemented in four intervention practices. Four control practices continued to provide usual care. Primary quantitative outcome measures were weight and HbA1c. Linear and quantile regression models were used to compare each outcome between the two groups at follow-up. Qualitative data included: observations of nurse training sessions and steering group meetings; document review; semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of key informants (n = 17) and intervention patients (n = 20). Thematic analysis was used. One hundred fifty-seven patients with prediabetes enrolled (85 intervention, 72 control), 47.8% female and 31.2% Māori. Co-morbidities were common, particularly hypertension (49.7%), dyslipidaemia (40.1%) and gout (15.9%). Baseline and 6 month measures were available for 91% control and 79% intervention participants. After adjustment, the intervention group lost a mean 1.3 kg more than the control group (p < 0.001). Mean HbA1c, BMI and waist circumference decreased in the intervention group and increased in the

  15. A review of clinical trials in dietary interventions to decrease the incidence of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miettinen Tatu A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Of the associations between dietary elements and coronary artery disease (CAD, the greatest body of evidence deals with the beneficial effect of reducing the dietary intake of saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Furthermore, it is well established, on the basis of convincing evidence, that reduction in serum total cholesterol results in reduction in coronary morbidity and mortality, as well as in regression of other atherosclerotic manifestations.In fact, dietary intervention studies revealed that it is possible to reduce the incidence of coronary death and nonfatal myocardial infarction, as well as manifestations of atherosclerosis in cerebral and peripheral arteries, by reducing dietary intake of saturated fat and cholesterol. In two recently reported dietary interventions the incidence of coronary events, especially coronary mortality, and total mortality were reduced by increased intake of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and by a modification of the diet toward a Mediterranean-type diet (rich in α-linolenic acid. In addition to those findings, the potential efficacy of the dietary newcomers phytostanol and phytosterol esters on reducing coronary incidence is discussed in the present review.

  16. A Goal Setting Intervention Positively Impacts Adolescents’ Dietary Behaviors and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mical Kay Shilts

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of a youth development intervention on improving eating and physical activity(PA self-efficacy, goal attainment scaling, goal effort, and behaviors was examined in a repeated measures, quasi-experimental field trial. Ethnically diverse students (n=64 from a low-income middle school participated in the 10-session intervention driven by the Social Cognitive Theory with a Goal Setting Theory emphasis. Participants, 13-14 years old, made significant changes in dietary behaviors (P=0.03 and PA self-efficacy (P=0.02 after receiving the intervention. Self-efficacy did not mediate dietary behavior change but did mediate the small changes made in PA. Goal effort was not a mediator of behavior change. After the intervention, more participants rated themselves as making one lasting improvement in eating (P

  17. Dietary outcomes of overweight fathers and their children in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids community randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A; de Vlieger, N; Young, M; Jensen, M E; Burrows, T L; Morgan, P J; Collins, C E

    2018-02-23

    Few studies have examined dietary intake changes following a weight loss intervention in fathers and the association between father-child dietary intakes. The present study aimed to: (i) evaluate the change in dietary intake in overweight fathers randomised to a family-based lifestyle intervention [Healthy Dads Healthy Kids (HDHK)] versus controls and (ii) investigate whether an association exists between father-child dietary intakes. A secondary analysis was conducted of father-child baseline and 3-month post-intervention data (n = 93) collected in the HDHK community randomised controlled trial. Intention-to-treat linear mixed models were used to assess dietary changes by group, time (baseline and 3-month) and the group-by-time interaction. Cohens d was used to determine effect sizes. Significant group-by-time effects (all P eating patterns also correlated with those of their children for several dietary variables. These novel data suggest that fathers can be targeted as agents of dietary change within obesity prevention and treatment programmes. © 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  18. Dietary Interventions to Modulate the Gut Microbiome-How Far Away Are We From Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; Vitaglione, Paola; Cuomo, Rosario; Berni Canani, Roberto; Ercolini, Danilo

    2018-04-13

    The importance of the gut microbiome in human health and disease is fully acknowledged. A perturbation in the equilibrium among the different microbial populations living in the gut (dysbiosis) has been associated with the development of several types of diseases. Modulation of the gut microbiome through dietary intervention is an emerging therapeutic and preventive strategy for many conditions. Nevertheless, interpersonal differences in response to therapeutic treatments or dietary regimens are often observed during clinical trials, and recent research has suggested that subject-specific features of the gut microbiota may be responsible. In this review, we summarize recent findings in personalized nutrition, highlighting how individualized characterization of the microbiome may assist in designing ad hoc tailored dietary intervention for disease treatment and prevention. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and challenges encountered in integrating patient-specific microbial data into clinical practice.

  19. Meta-analyses of workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions on weight outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, L.M.; Coffeng, J.; Mechelen, W. van; Proper, K.I.

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analytic review critically examines the effectiveness of workplace interventions targeting physical activity, dietary behaviour or both on weight outcomes. Data could be extracted from 22 studies published between 1980 and November 2009 for meta-analyses. The GRADE approach was used to

  20. Beyond Sodium, Phosphate and Potassium: Potential Dietary Interventions in Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jaimon T; Rossi, Megan; Johnson, David W; Campbell, Katrina L

    2017-05-01

    People with kidney disease are advised to restrict individual nutrients, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate, in line with current best practice guidelines. However, there is limited evidence to support the efficacy of single nutrient strategies, and compliance remains a challenge for clinicians to overcome. Many factors contribute to poor compliance with dietary prescriptions, including conflicting priorities for single nutrient restriction, the arduous self-monitoring required, and the health-related knock-on effects resulting from targeting these nutrients in isolation. This paper reviews the evidence base for the overall pattern of eating as a potential tool to deliver a diet intervention in which all the nutrients and foods work cumulatively and synergistically to improve clinical outcomes. These interventions may assist in kidney disease management and overcome these innate challenges that single nutrient interventions possess. Healthy dietary patterns are typically plant-based and lower in sodium and animal proteins. These patterns may have numerous mechanistic benefits for cardiovascular health in kidney disease, most notably through the increase in fruit, vegetables, and plant-based protein, as well as improved gut health through the increase in dietary fiber. The evidence to date on optimal dietary patterns points toward use of a predominantly plant-based diet, and suggests its adoption may improve clinical outcomes in dialysis patients. However, clinical trials are needed to determine whether these diet interventions are feasible, safe, and effective in this patient population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A randomised, family-focused dietary intervention to evaluate the Atlantic diet: the GALIAT study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Malvar, Maria Del Mar; Leis, Rosaura; Benítez-Estévez, Alfonso Javier; Sánchez-Castro, Juan; Gude, Francisco

    2016-08-18

    The traditional diet of northwestern Spain and northern Portugal follows an 'Atlantic diet' pattern. Adherence to the Atlantic diet has been related to the good metabolic health and low coronary mortality recorded for these regions. The GALIAT (Galicia Alimentación Atlántica [Galicia Atlantic Diet]) study is a randomised, controlled, dietary intervention clinical trial designed to examine the effect of the Atlantic diet on the lipid profile, glucose metabolism, inflammation makers and adiposity of the general population. The trial involved 250 randomly selected families (715 adults and children over 3 years of age) from a town in Spain's northwest, randomly allocated to follow either a control diet (C group) or the Atlantic diet (AD group) for a period of 6 months. The families of the AD group received educational sessions on food, diet and gastronomy and were provided written supporting material with nutritional recommendations and recipes for the preparation of menus. They also attended cooking classes. Throughout the study period, these families were provided a range of foods (free of charge) that form part of the traditional Atlantic diet. The C group families took part in none of the above activities, nor were they provided with any food. Lipid profile variables (primary variables), and anthropometric, inflammation marker and glucose metabolism status (secondary variables), were measured at baseline, three and six months. The GALIAT study is the first clinical trial to examine the effects of the Atlantic diet on metabolic and cardiovascular health and adiposity. If the study hypothesis is confirmed, this dietary pattern could be included in strategies to promote health. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02391701 on March 18, 2015.

  2. A randomised, family-focused dietary intervention to evaluate the Atlantic diet: the GALIAT study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Calvo-Malvar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The traditional diet of northwestern Spain and northern Portugal follows an ‘Atlantic diet’ pattern. Adherence to the Atlantic diet has been related to the good metabolic health and low coronary mortality recorded for these regions. Methods The GALIAT (Galicia Alimentación Atlántica [Galicia Atlantic Diet] study is a randomised, controlled, dietary intervention clinical trial designed to examine the effect of the Atlantic diet on the lipid profile, glucose metabolism, inflammation makers and adiposity of the general population. The trial involved 250 randomly selected families (715 adults and children over 3 years of age from a town in Spain’s northwest, randomly allocated to follow either a control diet (C group or the Atlantic diet (AD group for a period of 6 months. The families of the AD group received educational sessions on food, diet and gastronomy and were provided written supporting material with nutritional recommendations and recipes for the preparation of menus. They also attended cooking classes. Throughout the study period, these families were provided a range of foods (free of charge that form part of the traditional Atlantic diet. The C group families took part in none of the above activities, nor were they provided with any food. Lipid profile variables (primary variables, and anthropometric, inflammation marker and glucose metabolism status (secondary variables, were measured at baseline, three and six months. Discussion The GALIAT study is the first clinical trial to examine the effects of the Atlantic diet on metabolic and cardiovascular health and adiposity. If the study hypothesis is confirmed, this dietary pattern could be included in strategies to promote health. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02391701 on March 18, 2015.

  3. Low-fat Dietary Pattern and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li; Chen, Liang; White, Donna L; Tinker, Lesley; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Van Horn, Linda V; Richardson, Peter; Lane, Dorothy; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; El-Serag, Hashem B

    2018-01-01

    Observational studies suggest that diet may influence pancreatic cancer risk. We investigated the effect of a low-fat dietary intervention on pancreatic cancer incidence. The Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification (WHI-DM) trial is a randomized controlled trial conducted in 48 835 postmenopausal women age 50 to 79 years in the United States between 1993 and 1998. Women were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 19 541), with the goal of reducing total fat intake and increasing intake of vegetables, fruits, and grains, or to the usual diet comparison group (n = 29 294). The intervention concluded in March 2005. We evaluated the effect of the intervention on pancreatic cancer incidence with the follow-up through 2014 using the log-rank test and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. All statistical tests were two-sided. In intention-to-treat analyses including 46 200 women, 92 vs 165 pancreatic cancer cases were ascertained in the intervention vs the comparison group (P = .23). The multivariable hazard ratio (HR) of pancreatic cancer was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.67 to 1.11). Risk was statistically significantly reduced among women with baseline body mass indexes (BMIs) of 25 kg/m2 or higher (HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.96), but not among women with BMIs of less than 25 kg/m2 (HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 0.97 to 2.71, Pinteraction = .01). A low-fat dietary intervention was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer incidence in women who were overweight or obese in the WHI-DM trial. Caution needs to be taken in interpreting the findings based on subgroup analyses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Community-based intervention to improve dietary habits and promote physical activity among older adults: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mika; Moriyasu, Ai; Kumagai, Shu; Furuna, Taketo; Akita, Shigeko; Kimura, Shuichi; Suzuki, Takao

    2013-01-23

    The fastest growing age group globally is older adults, and preventing the need for long-term nursing care in this group is important for social and financial reasons. A population approach to diet and physical activity through the use of social services can play an important role in prevention. This study examined the effectiveness of a social health program for community-dwelling older adults aimed at introducing and promoting physical activity in the home at each individual's pace, helping participants maintain good dietary habits by keeping self-check sheets, and determining whether long-standing unhealthy or less-than-ideal physical and dietary habits can be changed. This cluster randomized trial conducted at 6 community centers in an urban community involved 92 community-dwelling older adults aged 65-90 years. The intervention group (3 community centers; n = 57) participated in the social health program "Sumida TAKE10!" which is an educational program incorporating the "TAKE10!® for Older Adults" program, once every 2 weeks for 3 months. The control group (3 community centers; n=35) was subsequently provided with the same program as a crossover intervention group. The main outcome measures were changes in food intake frequency, food frequency score (FFS), dietary variety score (DVS), and frequency of walking and exercise. The secondary outcome measures were changes in self-rated health, appetite, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology (TMIG) Index of Competence score. Compared to baseline, post-intervention food intake frequency for 6 of 10 food groups (meat, fish/shellfish, eggs, potatoes, fruits, and seaweed), FFS, and DVS were significantly increased in the intervention group, and interaction effects of FFS and DVS were seen between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between baseline and post-intervention in the control group. Frequency of walking and exercise remained unchanged in both groups, and no

  5. Community-based intervention to improve dietary habits and promote physical activity among older adults: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Mika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fastest growing age group globally is older adults, and preventing the need for long-term nursing care in this group is important for social and financial reasons. A population approach to diet and physical activity through the use of social services can play an important role in prevention. This study examined the effectiveness of a social health program for community-dwelling older adults aimed at introducing and promoting physical activity in the home at each individual’s pace, helping participants maintain good dietary habits by keeping self-check sheets, and determining whether long-standing unhealthy or less-than-ideal physical and dietary habits can be changed. Method This cluster randomized trial conducted at 6 community centers in an urban community involved 92 community-dwelling older adults aged 65–90 years. The intervention group (3 community centers; n = 57 participated in the social health program “Sumida TAKE10!” which is an educational program incorporating the “TAKE10!® for Older Adults” program, once every 2 weeks for 3 months. The control group (3 community centers; n=35 was subsequently provided with the same program as a crossover intervention group. The main outcome measures were changes in food intake frequency, food frequency score (FFS, dietary variety score (DVS, and frequency of walking and exercise. The secondary outcome measures were changes in self-rated health, appetite, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology (TMIG Index of Competence score. Results Compared to baseline, post-intervention food intake frequency for 6 of 10 food groups (meat, fish/shellfish, eggs, potatoes, fruits, and seaweed, FFS, and DVS were significantly increased in the intervention group, and interaction effects of FFS and DVS were seen between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between baseline and post-intervention in the control group. Frequency of walking and

  6. The impact of a population-based multi-factorial lifestyle intervention on changes in long-term dietary habits The Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, U.; Kristoffersen, L.; Ladelund, S.

    2008-01-01

    group (n=3 324) was followed by questionnaires. Dietary habits were measured by a validated 48-item food frequency questionnaire and changes were analyzed by multilevel analyses. RESULTS: At the 5-year follow-up the intervention group compared to the control group had significantly increased...

  7. Dietary PUFA Intervention Affects Fatty Acid- and Micronutrient Profiles of Beef and Related Beef Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberger, Dirk; Nuernberg, Karin; Herdmann, Andrea; Nuernberg, Gerd; Hagemann, Elke; Kienast, Walter

    2013-07-09

    The study investigated the dietary impact of 18:3 n -3 vs. 18:2 n -6 on fatty acid- and micronutrient concentration of beef muscle and the extent of diet- and processing-induced changes of lipid- and micronutrient concentrations of beef products made thereof (German Corned beef (GCB), tea sausage spread (TSS), scalded sausage (SS)). Beef and beef products were obtained from German Holstein bulls which either received a control diet consisting of maize silage and concentrate with soybean meal (41%), or an experimental diet of grass silage and concentrate plus rapeseed cake (12%) and linseed oil (3%). The study revealed that upon an 18:3 n -3 vs. 18:2 n -6 intervention the amounts of 18:3 n -3, EPA and Σ n -3 LC-PUFA were significantly increased by 2.6, 2.3 and 1.7 fold, respectively. Experimental diet significantly increased β-carotene contents, and the γ-tocopherol contents were decreased. During beef processing, n -3 PUFA from beef were found to be product-specifically transferred into the corresponding beef products. 18:3 n -3 and Σ n -3 LC-PUFA contents were found to be 1.4 and 1.5 times higher in GCB from grass silage- than maize silage-fed bulls. The trace element contents in GCB (iron, copper, zinc, selenium) were not affected by the diet; however γ-tocopherol contents were decreased by experimental diet. In conclusion, dietary n -3 PUFA were completely transferred into beef products unaffected by beef processing conditions.

  8. Dietary PUFA Intervention Affects Fatty Acid- and Micronutrient Profiles of Beef and Related Beef Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Dannenberger

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the dietary impact of 18:3n-3 vs. 18:2n-6 on fatty acid- and micronutrient concentration of beef muscle and the extent of diet- and processing-induced changes of lipid- and micronutrient concentrations of beef products made thereof (German Corned beef (GCB, tea sausage spread (TSS, scalded sausage (SS. Beef and beef products were obtained from German Holstein bulls which either received a control diet consisting of maize silage and concentrate with soybean meal (41%, or an experimental diet of grass silage and concentrate plus rapeseed cake (12% and linseed oil (3%. The study revealed that upon an 18:3n-3 vs. 18:2n-6 intervention the amounts of 18:3n-3, EPA and Σn-3 LC-PUFA were significantly increased by 2.6, 2.3 and 1.7 fold, respectively. Experimental diet significantly increased β-carotene contents, and the γ-tocopherol contents were decreased. During beef processing, n-3 PUFA from beef were found to be product-specifically transferred into the corresponding beef products. 18:3n-3 and Σn-3 LC-PUFA contents were found to be 1.4 and 1.5 times higher in GCB from grass silage- than maize silage-fed bulls. The trace element contents in GCB (iron, copper, zinc, selenium were not affected by the diet; however γ-tocopherol contents were decreased by experimental diet. In conclusion, dietary n-3 PUFA were completely transferred into beef products unaffected by beef processing conditions.

  9. Rationale, development, and design of the Altering Intake, Managing Symptoms (AIMS) dietary intervention for bowel dysfunction in rectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Virginia; Crane, Tracy E; Slack, Samantha D; Yung, Angela; Wright, Sarah; Sentovich, Stephen; Melstrom, Kurt; Fakih, Marwan; Krouse, Robert S; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2018-03-19

    Bowel dysfunction is a common, persistent long-term effect of treatment for rectal cancer survivors. Survivors often use dietary modifications to maintain bowel control. There are few evidence-based interventions to guide survivors on appropriate diet modifications for bowel symptom management. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and design of the Altering Intake, Managing Symptoms (AIMS) intervention to support bowel dysfunction management in rectal cancer survivors. The AIMS intervention is a ten-session, telephone-based diet behavior change intervention delivered by trained health coaches. It uses dietary recall, participant-completed food and symptom diaries, and health coaching guided by motivational interviewing to promote bowel symptom management and improved diet quality. Based on the Chronic Care Self-Management Model (CCM), the AIMS Intervention is designed to improve self-efficacy and self-management of bowel symptoms by coaching survivors to appropriately modify their diets through goal setting, self-monitoring, and problem-solving. The intervention targets survivors with stage I-III rectosigmoid colon/rectum cancer who are 6 months post-treatment, 21 years and older, and English-speaking. The design and development process described in this paper provides an overview and underscores the potential of the AIMS intervention to positively impact the quality of long-term survivorship for rectal cancer survivors. An ongoing pilot study will inform the design and development of future multi-site Phase II and III randomized trials. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Dietary intervention in the management of phenylketonuria: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha JC

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Júlio César Rocha,1-3 Anita MacDonald4 1Centro de Genética Médica, Centro Hospitalar do Porto – CHP, 2Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, 3Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS, Porto, Portugal; 4The Children’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Phenylketonuria (PKU is a well-described inborn error of amino acid metabolism that has been treated for >60 years. Enzyme deficiency causes accumulation of phenylalanine (Phe and if left untreated will lead to profound and irreversible intellectual disability in most children. Traditionally, it has been managed with a low-Phe diet supplemented with a Phe-free protein substitute although newer treatment options mainly in combination with diet are available for some subgroups of patients with PKU, for example, sapropterin, large neutral amino acids, and glycomacropeptide. The diet consists of three parts: 1 severe restriction of dietary Phe; 2 replacement of non-Phe L-amino acids with a protein substitute commonly supplemented with essential fatty acids and other micronutrients; and 3 low-protein foods from fruits, some vegetables, sugars, fats and oil, and special low-protein foods (SLPF. The prescription of diet is challenging for health professionals. The high-carbohydrate diet supplied by a limited range of foods may program food preferences and contribute to obesity in later life. Abnormal tasting and satiety-promoting protein substitutes are administered to coincide with peak appetite times to ensure their consumption, but this practice may impede appetite for other important foods. Intermittent dosing of micronutrients when combined with L-amino acid supplements may lead to their poor bioavailability. Much work is required on the ideal nutritional profiling for special SLPF and Phe-free L-amino acid supplements. Although non-diet treatments are being studied, it is important to continue to fully understand all the consequences of diet

  11. Low Glycaemic Index Dietary Interventions in Youth with Cystic Fibrosis: A Systematic Review and Discussion of the Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate S. Steinbeck

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review was conducted to assess what is known about the effect of low glycaemic index (GI diets on glycaemic control, weight and quality of life in youth with cystic fibrosis (CF. Eligibility criteria were systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised trials of low GI dietary interventions in CF. Outcomes examined were glycaemic control, quality of life, anthropometry and respiratory function. Reference lists were manually searched and experts in the field were consulted. Four studies met the eligibility criteria; two were excluded because they did not include data on any of the outcomes. The remaining two were studies that examined GI secondary to any other intervention: one used GI as a factor in enteral feeds and the other incorporated low GI dietary education into its treatment methodology. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of low GI diets in CF. Since there is evidence to support use of low GI diets in type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes, low GI diets should be tested as an intervention for CF. The potential risks and benefits of a low GI diet in CF are discussed.

  12. A dietary intervention for recurrent prostate cancer after definitive primary treatment: results of a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, James; Olendzki, Barbara; Reed, George; Andersen, Victoria; Rosenzweig, Penny

    2008-12-01

    Considerable evidence has shown that diet can affect both the incidence and the progression of prostate cancer. The objective of this study was to determine whether men in this situation could make a change to a diet emphasizing plant-based foods and fish and to examine the effect on quality of life (QOL) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity. A total of 36 men and their partners were randomly assigned to attend a series of 11 dietary and cooking classes that also integrated mindfulness practice as a support in making the change or a wait-list control group. Assessments were made of dietary intake, QOL, and PSA at baseline, after intervention (11 weeks), and 3 months after intervention. The intervention group showed significant reductions in the consumption of saturated fat and increased consumption of vegetable proteins with accompanying reductions in animal proteins, including dairy products. They also showed increased QOL. Although no significant change was found in the rate of PSA increase between the two groups, the mean PSA doubling time for the intervention group was substantially longer at the 3-month follow-up visit than that of the controls. Men with a increasing PSA level after primary treatment were able to make a change to a prostate-healthy diet, accompanied by increases in QOL. No significant difference was found in the log PSA slope between the two groups; however, the PSA doubling time increased substantially in the intervention group compared with that in the controls. Future trials should examine the effect of the prostate-healthy diet with a larger sample of men for a longer period.

  13. Nutritional support and dietary interventions following esophagectomy: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melanie Paul, Melanie Baker, Robert N Williams, David J Bowrey Department of Surgery, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, UK Background and aims: Provision of adequate nutrition after esophagectomy remains a major challenge. The aims of this review were to describe the challenges facing this patient population and to determine the evidence base underpinning current nutritional and dietetic interventions after esophagectomy. Methods: Medline, Embase and CINAHL databases were searched for English language publications of the period 1990–2016 reporting on the outcome of nutritional or dietetic interventions after esophagectomy or patient-related symptoms. Results: Four studies demonstrated that early reintroduction of oral fluids was safe and was associated with a shorter hospital stay and ileus duration. One of three studies comparing in-hospital enteral nutrition against usual care showed that enteral feeding was well tolerated and was associated with a shorter hospital stay. Eight studies comparing enteral with parenteral nutrition showed similar surgical complication rates. Enteral feeding was associated with a shorter duration of ileus and lower health care costs. In hospital, all types of enteral access (nasoenteral, jejunostomy were equivalent in their safety profiles. Cohort studies indicate that technical (tube dysfunction and feed (diarrhea, distention problems were common with jejunostomies but are easily managed. The mortality risk associated with jejunostomy in hospital is 0.2% (reported range 0%–1%, principally due to small bowel ischemia. There have been no reports of serious jejunostomy complications in patients receiving home feeding. One study demonstrated the advantages of home feeding in weight, muscle and fat preservation. Studies reporting 12 months or more after esophagectomy indicate a high frequency of persistent symptoms, dumping syndrome 15%–75% (median 46%, dysphagia 11%–38% (median 27%, early satiety 40%–90

  14. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rui; Xu, Meihong; Wang, Junbo; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Chen, Qihe; Li, Ye; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Guo, Qianying; Bao, Lei; Li, Yong

    2016-09-13

    Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were "Healthy", "Monotonous", "Vegetarian", "Japanese", "Low energy", and "Traditional" diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the "Japanese diet" decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, "Japanese" and "Healthy" diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

  15. Sustaining Effect of Intensive Nutritional Intervention Combined with Health Education on Dietary Behavior and Plasma Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Fan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is very common in elderly Chinese individuals. Although nutritional intervention can provide a balanced diet, the sustaining effect on at-home dietary behavior and long-term plasma glucose control is not clear. Consequently, we conducted a long-term survey following one month of experiential nutritional intervention combined with health education. Based on the Dietary Guidelines for a Chinese Resident, we found that the food items met the recommended values, the percentages of energy provided from fat, protein, and carbohydrate were more reasonable after one year. The newly formed dietary patterns were “Healthy”, “Monotonous”, “Vegetarian”, “Japanese”, “Low energy”, and “Traditional” diets. The 2h-PG of female participants as well as those favoring the “Japanese diet” decreased above 12 mmol/L. Participants who selected “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets showed an obvious reduction in FPG while the FPG of participants from Group A declined slightly. “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets also obtained the highest DDP scores, and thus can be considered suitable for T2DM treatment in China. The results of the newly formed dietary patterns, “Japanese” and “Healthy” diets, confirmed the profound efficacy of nutritional intervention combined with health education for improving dietary behavior and glycemic control although health education played a more important role. The present study is encouraging with regard to further exploration of comprehensive diabetes care.

  16. Dietary fiber mixture in pediatric patients with controlled chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thabata K; Toporovski, Mauro S; Tahan, Soraia; Neufeld, Clarice B; de Morais, Mauro B

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to test the clinical efficacy and effect on colonic transit time (CTT) of a dietary fiber mixture given to children with controlled chronic constipation (CC) after the withdrawal of stool softeners and enemas. This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial involved 54 patients aged 4 to 12 years and had CC that was controlled by the use of low-dose stool softeners. The use of these softeners was discontinued when the patients were admitted to the clinical trial. The patients were randomized into 2 groups for the 4-week study period. One group received a dietary fiber mixture and the other group received a placebo (maltodextrin). The primary outcome was therapeutic failure (oral stool softeners or enemas was required to prescribe during the trial). Secondary outcomes included defecation frequency, stool consistency (measured using the Bristol Stool Form Scale), and CTT. Therapeutic failure was observed in 34.6% (9/26) of the patients in the dietary fiber mixture group and in 35.7% (10/28) in the control group (P = 0.933). The mean increase in daily bowel movements was 0.53 in the dietary fiber mixture group and 0.23 in the control group (P = 0.014). The patients in the dietary fiber mixture group (60.0%) passed nonhardened stools more frequently than did those in the control group (16.7%, P = 0.003). The CTT was similar for both groups. The fiber mixture did not prevent the suspension of stool softeners or lead to reduced CTT; however, the mixture promoted an increased frequency of defecation and an improvement in the stool consistency.

  17. Dietary interventions for mineral and bone disorder in people with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuangzhu; Su, Guobin; Guo, Xinfeng; Wu, Yifan; Liu, Xusheng; Zou, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Qianchun; Xu, Yuan; Ma, Weizhong

    2015-09-16

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic dysfunction of mineral and bone metabolism in people with CKD. Recent research shows that phosphate retention plays a significant role in the development of CKD-MBD. Compared with drug therapies, dietary interventions may be simple, inexpensive and feasible for phosphate retention. However, there is little evidence to support these interventions. Our objective was to assess the benefits and harms of any dietary intervention for preventing and treating CKD-MBD. We searched Cochrane Kidney and Transplant's Specialised Register to 27 August 2015 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. We also searched the Chinese Biomedicine Database (CBM) (1976 to August 2015), China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database (CNKI) (1979 to August 2015), and VIP (1989 to August 2015). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs looking at dietary interventions for prevention or treatment of CKD-MBD were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently assessed the eligibility, methodological quality, and extracted data. Continuous outcomes (serum calcium level, serum phosphorus level, calcium × phosphate product, parathyroid hormone (PTH), fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) and alkaline phosphatase) were expressed as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Dichotomous outcomes (mortality) were expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% CI. We used a random-effects model to meta-analyse studies. Nine studies were included in this review which analysed 634 participants. Study duration ranged from 4 to 24 weeks. The interventions included calcium-enriched bread, low phosphorus intake, low protein intake, very low protein intake, post haemodialysis supplements and hypolipaemic diet. Only one study reported death; none of the included studies reported cardiovascular events or fractures. There was insufficient reporting of design and

  18. Nutritional support and dietary interventions for women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavasiliou K

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kleopatra Papavasiliou, Emilia Papakonstantinou Unit of Human Nutrition, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common endocrine disorder in reproductive-aged women, which leads to reproductive, metabolic and hormonal abnormalities. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, polycystic ovaries, gonadotropin abnormalities, obesity, adipose tissue dysfunction, difficulty to conceive and high-risk pregnancy are the most common PCOS-associated complications. The aim of this review was to describe and evaluate the effects of dietary interventions on PCOS-associated outcomes and to provide some evidence-based dietary advice for use in clinical practice. There is no optimal diet or macronutrient composition for PCOS. However, lifestyle modification, including a small-to-moderate weight loss of 5–10% (combined diet with regular physical activity with any dietary pattern of choice, depending on the individuals’ preferences, culture, habits and metabolic needs (ie, Mediterranean diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet or moderately low-carbohydrate diets [30–45% of energy], as well as alternative dietary interventions, including small, frequent meal (five to six meals daily consumption at regular times, with the majority of carbohydrates consumed at lunch time or equally distributed throughout the day, seems to offer the evidence-based first-line strategy for the management of PCOS symptoms and insulin resistance. No conclusions can be drawn at this time for high protein diets, polyunsaturated fatty acids or micronutrient supplementation. Keywords: nutrition, meal frequency, dietary strategies, insulin resistance 

  19. Effect of a prescriptive dietary intervention on psychological dimensions of eating behavior in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mandy; Gow, Megan; Halim, Jocelyn; Chisholm, Kerryn; Baur, Louise A; Noakes, Manny; Steinbeck, Katherine; Kohn, Michael R; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2013-10-24

    Overweight adolescents are more likely to have dysfunctional eating behaviours compared to normal weight adolescents. Little is known about the effects of obesity treatment on the psychological dimensions of eating behavior in this population. To examine the effects of a prescriptive dietary intervention on external eating (eating in response to food cues, regardless of hunger and satiety), emotional eating and dietary restraint and their relation to weight loss. Parental acceptability was also examined. This is a secondary study of a 12-month randomized trial, the RESIST study, which examined the effects of two diets on insulin sensitivity. Participants were 109 obese 10- to 17-year-olds with clinical features of insulin resistance. The program commenced with a 3-month dietary intervention using a structured meal plan, with the addition of an exercise intervention in the next 3 months and followed by a 6 month maintenance period.This paper presents changes in eating behaviors measured by the Eating Pattern Inventory for Children and parent rated diet acceptability during the first 6 months of the trial. As there was no difference between the diets on outcome of interest, both diet groups were combined for analyses. After 6 months, the proportion of participants who reported consuming more in response to external eating cues decreased from 17% to 5% (P = 0.003), whereas non- emotional eating increased from 48% to 65% (p = 0.014). Dietary restraint and parental pressure to eat remained unchanged. A reduction in external eating (rho = 0.36, P emotional eating, led to modest weight loss and did not cause any adverse effect on dietary restraint. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration Number (ACTRN) 12608000416392 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=83071.

  20. Effect of a prescriptive dietary intervention on psychological dimensions of eating behavior in obese adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Overweight adolescents are more likely to have dysfunctional eating behaviours compared to normal weight adolescents. Little is known about the effects of obesity treatment on the psychological dimensions of eating behavior in this population. Objective To examine the effects of a prescriptive dietary intervention on external eating (eating in response to food cues, regardless of hunger and satiety), emotional eating and dietary restraint and their relation to weight loss. Parental acceptability was also examined. Method This is a secondary study of a 12-month randomized trial, the RESIST study, which examined the effects of two diets on insulin sensitivity. Participants were 109 obese 10- to 17-year-olds with clinical features of insulin resistance. The program commenced with a 3-month dietary intervention using a structured meal plan, with the addition of an exercise intervention in the next 3 months and followed by a 6 month maintenance period.This paper presents changes in eating behaviors measured by the Eating Pattern Inventory for Children and parent rated diet acceptability during the first 6 months of the trial. As there was no difference between the diets on outcome of interest, both diet groups were combined for analyses. Results After 6 months, the proportion of participants who reported consuming more in response to external eating cues decreased from 17% to 5% (P = 0.003), whereas non- emotional eating increased from 48% to 65% (p = 0.014). Dietary restraint and parental pressure to eat remained unchanged. A reduction in external eating (rho = 0.36, P obese adolescents with clinical features of insulin resistance. It may reduce external and emotional eating, led to modest weight loss and did not cause any adverse effect on dietary restraint. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registration Number (ACTRN) 12608000416392 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=83071 PMID:24156290

  1. Gender differences in the long-term effects of a nutritional intervention program promoting the Mediterranean diet: changes in dietary intakes, eating behaviors, anthropometric and metabolic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Vicky; Bégin, Catherine; Hudon, Anne-Marie; Royer, Marie-Michelle; Corneau, Louise; Dodin, Sylvie; Lemieux, Simone

    2014-11-22

    Long-term adherence to principles of the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) following a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern in Canadian men and women is not known. Moreover, gender differences in dietary and metabolic profile in such an intervention context has never been addressed. Objective was to determine gender differences in long-term effects of a 12-week nutritional intervention program promoting the adoption of the MedDiet and based on the Self-Determination Theory (SDT) on dietary intakes, eating behaviors, anthropometric and metabolic variables, in men and women presenting cardiovascular risk factors. Sixty-four men and 59 premenopausal women were recruited. The 12-week nutritional program used a motivational interviewing approach and included individual and group sessions. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to evaluate dietary intakes from which a Mediterranean score (Medscore) was derived and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire allowed assessment of eating behaviors. Measurements were performed at baseline and after the 12-week nutritional intervention, and then at 3 and 6-month post intervention. No gender difference was observed in changes in the Medscore during the nutritional intervention and follow-up. However, the Medscore returned towards baseline values during follow-up in men and women (P intervention as well as at follow-up than at baseline while women's waist circumference decreased in response to the intervention only (P = 0.05). As for metabolic variables, changes observed in total-cholesterol (C) to HDL-C ratio, triglyceride levels and triglycerides to HDL-C ratio were more pronounced in men than in women after the intervention as well as at follow-up (P ≤ 0.03). Our results indicate that the 12-week nutritional intervention based on the SDT leads to more pronounced beneficial changes in long-term dietary intakes in men than in women and to greater improvements in metabolic profile in men. Current

  2. Dietary interventions for type 2 diabetes: How millet comes to help

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Kam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has become a highly problematic and increasingly prevalent disease world-wide. It has contributed towards 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Management techniques for diabetes prevention in high-risk as well as in affected individuals, beside medication, are mainly through changes in lifestyle and dietary regulation. Particularly, diet can have a great influence on life quality for those that suffer from, as well as those at risk of, diabetes. As such, considerations on nutritional aspects are required to be made to include in dietary intervention. This review aims to give an overview on the general consensus of current dietary and nutritional recommendation for diabetics. In light of such recommendation, the use of plant breeding, conventional as well as more recently developed molecular marker-based breeding and biofortification, are discussed in designing crops with desired characteristics. While there are various recommendations available, dietary choices are restricted by availability due to geo-, political- or economical- considerations. This particularly holds true for countries such as India, where 65 million people (up from 50 million in 2010 are currently diabetic and their numbers are rising at an alarming rate. Millets are one of the most abundant crops grown in India as well as in Africa, providing a staple food source for many poorest of the poor communities in these countries. The potentials of millets as a dietary component to combat the increasing prevalence of global diabetes are highlighted in this review.

  3. Metabolic control by S6 kinases depends on dietary lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R Castañeda

    Full Text Available Targeted deletion of S6 kinase (S6K 1 in mice leads to higher energy expenditure and improved glucose metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling these effects remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we analyze the potential role of dietary lipids in regulating the mTORC1/S6K system. Analysis of S6K phosphorylation in vivo and in vitro showed that dietary lipids activate S6K, and this effect is not dependent upon amino acids. Comparison of male mice lacking S6K1 and 2 (S6K-dko with wt controls showed that S6K-dko mice are protected against obesity and glucose intolerance induced by a high-fat diet. S6K-dko mice fed a high-fat diet had increased energy expenditure, improved glucose tolerance, lower fat mass gain, and changes in markers of lipid metabolism. Importantly, however, these metabolic phenotypes were dependent upon dietary lipids, with no such effects observed in S6K-dko mice fed a fat-free diet. These changes appear to be mediated via modulation of cellular metabolism in skeletal muscle, as shown by the expression of genes involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that the metabolic functions of S6K in vivo play a key role as a molecular interface connecting dietary lipids to the endogenous control of energy metabolism.

  4. Effect of a low fat versus a low carbohydrate weight loss dietary intervention on biomarkers of long term survival in breast cancer patients ('CHOICE': study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeninck Elizabeth A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight loss in overweight or obese breast cancer patients is associated with an improved prognosis for long term survival. However, it is not clear whether the macronutrient composition of the chosen weight loss dietary plan imparts further prognostic benefit. A study protocol is presented for a dietary intervention to investigate the effects of weight loss dietary patterns that vary markedly in fat and carbohydrate contents on biomarkers of exposure to metabolic processes that may promote tumorigenesis and that are predictive of long term survival. The study will also determine how much weight must be lost for biomarkers to change in a favorable direction. Methods/Design Approximately 370 overweight or obese postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (body mass index: 25.0 to 34.9 kg/m2 will be accrued and assigned to one of two weight loss intervention programs or a non-intervention control group. The dietary intervention is implemented in a free living population to test the two extremes of popular weight loss dietary patterns: a high carbohydrate, low fat diet versus a low carbohydrate, high fat diet. The effects of these dietary patterns on biomarkers for glucose homeostasis, chronic inflammation, cellular oxidation, and steroid sex hormone metabolism will be measured. Participants will attend 3 screening and dietary education visits, and 7 monthly one-on-one dietary counseling and clinical data measurement visits in addition to 5 group visits in the intervention arms. Participants in the control arm will attend two clinical data measurement visits at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome is high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Secondary outcomes include interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF, IGF binding protein-3, 8-isoprostane-F2-alpha, estrone, estradiol, progesterone, sex hormone binding globulin, adiponectin, and leptin. Discussion While clinical data indicate that excess weight

  5. Skeletal muscle structural lipids improve during weight-maintenance after a very low calorie dietary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaag Allan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to investigate in a group of obese subjects the course in skeletal muscle phospholipid (SMPL fatty acids (FA during a 24-weeks weight maintenance program, which was preceded by a successful very low calorie dietary intervention (VLCD. Special focus was addressed to SMPL omega-3 FA, which is a lipid entity that influences insulin action. Methods Nine obese subjects (BMI = 35.7 ± 1.0 kg/m2, who had completed an 8 weeks VLCD (weight-loss = -9.7 ± 1.6 kg, P Results HOMA-IR and HbA1c stabilized and SMPL total omega-3 FA, docosahexaenoic acid and ratio of n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated FA increased by 24% (P Conclusion The data are consistent with the notion that greater SMPL omega-3 FA obtained during a weight-maintenance program may play a role for preserving insulin sensitivity and glycemic control being generated during a preceding VLCD.

  6. Food Environment Interventions to Improve the Dietary Behavior of Young Adults in Tertiary Education Settings: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rajshri; Kelly, Bridget; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    The current obesity-promoting food environment, typified by highly accessible unhealthy foods and drinks, may lead to an increased risk of chronic disease, particularly within young adults. A number of university-based intervention trials have been conducted in the United States and Europe to improve the food environment in this setting. However, there are no systematic reviews focusing on these interventions conducted exclusively in tertiary education settings. Our objective was to conduct a systematic literature review evaluating food environment interventions targeting dietary behavior in young adults in college and university settings. Eight databases were searched for randomized controlled trials, pre- and postintervention studies, quasiexperimental studies, cross-sectional studies, and other nonexperimental studies from 1998 to December 2014 that were conducted in tertiary education settings (ie, colleges and universities). Studies that evaluated a food environment intervention and reported healthier food choices, reductions in unhealthy food choices, nutrition knowledge, and/or food and drink sales as primary outcomes were included. Fifteen studies of high (n=5), medium (n=7), and poor quality (n=3) met the inclusion criteria, 13 of which showed positive improvements in outcome measures. Information relating to healthy foods through signage and nutrition labels (n=10) showed improvements in outcomes of interest. Increasing the availability of healthy foods (n=1) and decreasing the portion size of unhealthy foods (n=2) improved dietary intake. Price incentives and increased availability of healthy foods combined with nutrition information to increase purchases of healthy foods (n=2) were identified as having a positive effect on nutrition-related outcomes. Potentially useful interventions in tertiary education settings were nutrition messages/nutrient labeling, providing healthy options, and portion size control of unhealthy foods. Price decreases for and

  7. The Effect on Selenium Concentrations of a Randomized Intervention with Fish and Mussels in a Population with Relatively Low Habitual Dietary Selenium Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Outzen, Malene; Tjønneland, Anne; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2015-01-01

    /week for 26 weeks (similar to 50 mu g selenium/day). Controls received no intervention. Non-fasting blood samples were taken and whole blood selenium was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and plasma selenoprotein P (SelP) was determined by high performance liquid......Selenium status of the Danish population is below that assumed optimal for the suggested protective effects against chronic diseases, including certain cancers. Fish and shellfish are important dietary sources of selenium in Denmark. We investigated the effect of increased fish and mussel intake...... on selenium blood concentrations in a population with relatively low habitual dietary selenium intake. We randomly assigned 102 healthy men and women (all non-smokers) aged 48-76 years to an intervention group (n = 51) or a control group (n = 51). Intervention participants received 1000 g fish and mussels...

  8. Theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior-based dietary interventions in adolescents and young adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, Christine L; Knowlden, Adam P

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many nations around the world. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the theory of reasoned action (TRA) have been used to successfully plan and evaluate numerous interventions for many different behaviors. The aim of this study was to systematically review and synthesize TPB and TRA-based dietary behavior interventions targeting adolescents and young adults. THE FOLLOWING DATABASES WERE SYSTEMATICALLY SEARCHED TO FIND ARTICLES FOR THIS REVIEW: Academic Search Premier; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL); Education Resources Information Center (ERIC); Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); and MEDLINE. Inclusion criteria for articles were: 1) primary or secondary interventions, 2) with any quantitative design, 3) published in the English language, 4) between January 2003 and March 2014, 5) that targeted adolescents or young adults, 6) which included dietary change behavior as the outcome, and 7) utilized TPB or TRA. Of the eleven intervention studies evaluated, nine resulted in dietary behavior change that was attributed to the treatment. Additionally, all but one study found there to be a change in at least one construct of TRA or TPB, while one study did not measure constructs. All of the studies utilized some type of quantitative design, with two employing quasi-experimental, and eight employing randomized control trial design. Among the studies, four utilized technology including emails, social media posts, information on school websites, web-based activities, audio messages in classrooms, interactive DVDs, and health-related websites. Two studies incorporated goal setting and four employed persuasive communication. Interventions directed toward changing dietary behaviors in adolescents should aim to incorporate multi-faceted, theory-based approaches. Future studies should consider utilizing randomized control trial design and

  9. Understanding Nutrition: A Study of Greek Primary School Children Dietary Habits, before and after Classroom Nutrition Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperakis, Stylianos M.; Sotiriou, Apostolos; Georgiou, Evanthia; Thanou, Ageliki; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to assess and then to improve the diet of Greek primary school children teaching them healthy dietary habits and instructing them to face critically advertisements and media projected dietary models using a program which included intervention on cognitive, emotional, and social level. The results show that our…

  10. Metabolic benefits of dietary prebiotics in human subjects: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellow, Nicole J; Coughlan, Melinda T; Reid, Christopher M

    2014-04-14

    Complex relationships exist between the gut microflora and their human hosts. Emerging evidence suggests that bacterial dysbiosis within the colon may be involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and CVD. The use of dietary prebiotic supplements to restore an optimal balance of intestinal flora may positively affect host metabolism, representing a potential treatment strategy for individuals with cardiometabolic disorders. The present review aimed to examine the current evidence supporting that dietary prebiotic supplementation in adults has beneficial effects on biochemical parameters associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities including obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia, hepatic steatosis and low-grade chronic inflammation. Between January 2000 and September 2013, eight computer databases were searched for randomised controlled trials published in English. Human trials were included if at least one group received a dietary prebiotic intervention. In the present review, twenty-six randomised controlled trials involving 831 participants were included. Evidence indicated that dietary prebiotic supplementation increased self-reported feelings of satiety in healthy adults (standardised mean difference -0.57, 95% CI -1.13, -0.01). Prebiotic supplementation also significantly reduced postprandial glucose (-0.76, 95% CI -1.41, -0.12) and insulin (-0.77, 95% CI -1.50, -0.04) concentrations. The effects of dietary prebiotics on total energy intake, body weight, peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 concentrations, gastric emptying times, insulin sensitivity, lipids, inflammatory markers and immune function were contradictory. Dietary prebiotic consumption was found to be associated with subjective improvements in satiety and reductions in postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. Additional evidence is required before recommending prebiotic supplements to individuals with metabolic abnormalities. Large

  11. Behavior theory for dietary interventions for cancer prevention: a systematic review of utilization and effectiveness in creating behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Kerry N L; Donovan, Jenny L; Horwood, Jeremy; Lane, J Athene

    2013-03-01

    Theory-based approaches are now recommended to design and enact dietary interventions, but their use in cancer trials is unknown. This systematic review examined application of behavior theory to dietary interventions aimed at preventing cancer to improve the design and interpretation of trials. Electronic databases were searched (inception-July 2011). Data were synthesized and a theory coding scheme (TCS) used to describe and assess how behavior theory informed interventions. Studies not reporting a dietary behavior intervention informed by a specified behavior change model(s) were excluded. Of 237 potentially eligible studies, only 40 (16.9 %) were relevant, mostly RCTs (34, 85.0 %). Twenty-one interventions targeted diet alone (52.5 %) or integrated diet into a lifestyle intervention (19, 47.5 %). Most (24, 60.0 %) invoked several behavior change models, but only 10 (25.0 %) interventions were reported as explicitly theory-informed and none comprehensively targeted or measured theoretical constructs or tested theoretical assumptions. The 10 theory-informed interventions were more effective at improving diet. Dietary interventions for cancer prevention improved diet more effectively if they were informed by behavior theory. While behavior theory was often applied to these dietary interventions, they were rarely implemented or described thoroughly. Accurate intervention reporting is essential to assess theoretical quality and facilitate implementation effective behavior change techniques. Guidelines regarding the application and reporting of behavior theory for complex interventions, for example, proposed by the National Institutes of Health and Medical Research Council, should be revised accordingly. Failure to adequately ground dietary interventions in behavior theory may hinder establishing their effectiveness and relationships between diet and cancer.

  12. Multi-profile hidden Markov model for mood, dietary intake, and physical activity in an intervention study of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, E H; Zhang, Q; Schwartz, R; Tooze, J; Leng, X; Han, H; Williamson, D A

    2013-08-30

    Motivated by an application to childhood obesity data in a clinical trial, this paper describes a multi-profile hidden Markov model (HMM) that uses several temporal chains of measures respectively related to psychosocial attributes, dietary intake, and energy expenditure behaviors of adolescents in a school setting. Using these psychological and behavioral profiles, the model delineates health states from the longitudinal data set. Furthermore, a two-level regression model that takes into account the clustering effects of students within school is used to assess the effects of school-based and community-based interventions and other risk factors on the transition between health states over time. The results from our study suggest that female students tend to decrease their physical activities despite a high level of anxiety about weight. The finding is consistent across intervention and control arms. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Meta-analyses of workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions on weight outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, L M; Coffeng, J; van Mechelen, W; Proper, K I

    2011-06-01

    This meta-analytic review critically examines the effectiveness of workplace interventions targeting physical activity, dietary behaviour or both on weight outcomes. Data could be extracted from 22 studies published between 1980 and November 2009 for meta-analyses. The GRADE approach was used to determine the level of evidence for each pooled outcome measure. Results show moderate quality of evidence that workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions significantly reduce body weight (nine studies; mean difference [MD]-1.19 kg [95% CI -1.64 to -0.74]), body mass index (BMI) (11 studies; MD -0.34 kg m⁻² [95% CI -0.46 to -0.22]) and body fat percentage calculated from sum of skin-folds (three studies; MD -1.12% [95% CI -1.86 to -0.38]). There is low quality of evidence that workplace physical activity interventions significantly reduce body weight and BMI. Effects on percentage body fat calculated from bioelectrical impedance or hydrostatic weighing, waist circumference, sum of skin-folds and waist-hip ratio could not be investigated properly because of a lack of studies. Subgroup analyses showed a greater reduction in body weight of physical activity and diet interventions containing an environmental component. As the clinical relevance of the pooled effects may be substantial on a population level, we recommend workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions, including an environment component, in order to prevent weight gain. © 2010 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2010 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  14. Gut Microbiota Signatures Predict Host and Microbiota Responses to Dietary Interventions in Obese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Katri; Flint, Harry J.; Johnstone, Alexandra M.; Lappi, Jenni; Poutanen, Kaisa; Dewulf, Evelyne; Delzenne, Nathalie; de Vos, Willem M.; Salonen, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Interactions between the diet and intestinal microbiota play a role in health and disease, including obesity and related metabolic complications. There is great interest to use dietary means to manipulate the microbiota to promote health. Currently, the impact of dietary change on the microbiota and the host metabolism is poorly predictable and highly individual. We propose that the responsiveness of the gut microbiota may depend on its composition, and associate with metabolic changes in the host. Methodology Our study involved three independent cohorts of obese adults (n = 78) from Belgium, Finland, and Britain, participating in different dietary interventions aiming to improve metabolic health. We used a phylogenetic microarray for comprehensive fecal microbiota analysis at baseline and after the intervention. Blood cholesterol, insulin and inflammation markers were analyzed as indicators of host response. The data were divided into four training set – test set pairs; each intervention acted both as a part of a training set and as an independent test set. We used linear models to predict the responsiveness of the microbiota and the host, and logistic regression to predict responder vs. non-responder status, or increase vs. decrease of the health parameters. Principal Findings Our models, based on the abundance of several, mainly Firmicute species at baseline, predicted the responsiveness of the microbiota (AUC  =  0.77–1; predicted vs. observed correlation  =  0.67–0.88). Many of the predictive taxa showed a non-linear relationship with the responsiveness. The microbiota response associated with the change in serum cholesterol levels with an AUC of 0.96, highlighting the involvement of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic health. Conclusion This proof-of-principle study introduces the first potential microbial biomarkers for dietary responsiveness in obese individuals with impaired metabolic health, and reveals the potential of

  15. Bioelectronic Intervention in Cardiovascular Control

    OpenAIRE

    Chui, Ray

    2017-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a profound influence on cardiac function. Alterations in ANS balance has tremendous impact on the initiation and progression of cardiac pathology. Current standards of care (pharmacology, surgery, devices) have proven efficacy, but well-known limitations as well. Bioelectronic therapy has the potential to provide a reversible, on demand, scalable approach to cardiac control. The hypothesis of this thesis is that imbalances in information processing betwe...

  16. Longitudinal child-oriented dietary intervention: Association with parental diet and cardio-metabolic risk factors. The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Johanna M; Pahkala, Katja; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Viikari, Jorma; Niinikoski, Harri; Jokinen, Eero; Lagström, Hanna; Jula, Antti; Raitakari, Olli

    2017-11-01

    Background The child-oriented dietary intervention given in the prospective Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project (STRIP) has decreased the intake of saturated fat and lowered serum cholesterol concentration in children from infancy until early adulthood. In this study, we investigated whether the uniquely long-term child-oriented intervention has affected also secondarily parental diet and cardio-metabolic risk factors. Methods The STRIP study is a longitudinal, randomized infancy-onset atherosclerosis prevention trial continued from the child's age of 8 months to 20 years. The main aim was to modify the child's diet towards reduced intake of saturated fat. Parental dietary intake assessed by a one-day food record and cardio-metabolic risk factors were analysed between the child's ages of 9-19 years. Results Saturated fat intake of parents in the intervention group was lower [mothers: 12.0 versus 13.9 daily energy (E%), p cardio-metabolic risk factors were similar in the study groups. Conclusions Child-oriented dietary intervention shifted the dietary fat intakes of parents closer to the recommendations and tended to decrease total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intervention mothers. Dietary intervention directed to children benefits also parents.

  17. Dietary Intake and Eating Behaviours of Obese New Zealand Children and Adolescents Enrolled in a Community-Based Intervention Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Yvonne C; Wynter, Lisa E; Butler, Michelle S; Grant, Cameron C; Stewart, Joanna M; Cave, Tami L; Wild, Cervantée E K; Derraik, José G B; Cutfield, Wayne S; Hofman, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe dietary intake and eating behaviours of obese children and adolescents, and also to determine how these differ in Indigenous versus non-Indigenous children at enrolment in an obesity programme. Baseline dietary intake and eating behaviour records were assessed from those enrolled in a clinical unblinded randomised controlled trial of a multi-disciplinary intervention. The setting was a community-based obesity programme in Taranaki, New Zealand. Children or adolescents who were enrolled from January 2012 to August 2014, with a BMI ≥98th percentile or >91st centile with weight-related comorbidities were eligible. 239 participants (45% Māori, 45% NZ Europeans, 10% other ethnicities), aged 5-17 years were assessed. Two-thirds of participants experienced hyperphagia and half were not satiated after a meal. Comfort eating was reported by 62% of participants, and daily energy intake was above the recommended guidelines for 54%. Fruit and vegetable intake was suboptimal compared with the recommended 5 servings per day (mean 3.5 [SD = 1.9] servings per day), and the mean weekly breakfasts were less than the national average (5.9 vs 6.5; peating behaviours and significant differences in dietary intake between obese participants and their national counterparts. Ethnic differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants were also present, especially in relation to sweet drink consumption. Eating behaviours, especially sweet drink consumption and fruit/vegetable intake need to be addressed.

  18. Secretos de la Buena Vida: processes of dietary change via a tailored nutrition communication intervention for Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Barbara; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Arredondo, Elva M; Campbell, Nadia R; Slymen, Donald J; Gallo, Linda; Elder, John P

    2009-10-01

    Secretos de la Buena Vida was a successful tailored nutrition communication intervention delivered to Latinas living along the US-Mexico border in California. The intervention was delivered over a 14-week period and consisted of three intervention conditions: weekly home visits with promotoras + weekly tailored mailed newsletters in the first condition, weekly tailored mailed newsletters in the second condition and targeted materials in the attention control condition. The current study examined what elements of the promotora + tailored newsletter and tailored newsletter-only conditions were most effective for behavioral adoption and maintenance in a sample of 238 Latina women. Process evaluation measures assessed the implementation, fidelity and dose of these two intervention conditions. Results indicate that there was high fidelity to program implementation and delivery. Perceived effort, perceived support and intervention length predicted adoption of a lower fat diet at the 15-month follow-up. In the promotora + tailored newsletter condition, married women were four times more likely to be adopters of dietary fat changes than single women. These findings highlight the importance of process evaluation measures and help us understand the mechanism by which tailored print materials and interpersonal health communication via promotoras can facilitate health behavior change.

  19. A Dietary Intervention in Urban African Americans: Results of the "Five Plus Nuts and Beans" Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edgar R; Cooper, Lisa A; Carson, Kathryn A; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Appel, Lawrence J; Gayles, Debra; Charleston, Jeanne; White, Karen; You, Na; Weng, Yingjie; Martin-Daniels, Michelle; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Robb, Inez; Franz, Whitney K; Brown, Emily L; Halbert, Jennifer P; Albert, Michael C; Dalcin, Arlene T; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Unhealthy diets, often low in potassium, likely contribute to racial disparities in blood pressure. We tested the effectiveness of providing weekly dietary advice, assistance with selection of higher potassium grocery items, and a $30 per week food allowance on blood pressure and other outcomes in African American adults with hypertension. We conducted an 8-week RCT with two parallel arms between May 2012 and November 2013. We randomized 123 African Americans with controlled hypertension from an urban primary care clinic in Baltimore, Maryland, and implemented the trial in partnership with a community supermarket and the Baltimore City Health Department. Mean (SD) age was 58.6 (9.5) years; 71% were female; blood pressure was 131.3 (14.7)/77.2 (10.5) mmHg; BMI was 34.5 (8.2); and 28% had diabetes. Participants randomized to the active intervention group (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH]-Plus) received coach-directed dietary advice and assistance with weekly online ordering and purchasing of high-potassium foods ($30/week) delivered by a community supermarket to a neighborhood library. Participants in the control group received a printed DASH diet brochure along with a debit account of equivalent value to that of the DASH-Plus group. The primary outcome was blood pressure change. Analyses were conducted in January to October 2014. Compared with the control group, the DASH-Plus group increased self-reported consumption of fruits and vegetables (mean=1.4, 95% CI=0.7, 2.1 servings/day); estimated intake of potassium (mean=0.4, 95% CI=0.1, 0.7 grams/day); and urine potassium excretion (mean=19%, 95% CI=1%, 38%). There was no significant effect on blood pressure. A program providing dietary advice, assistance with grocery ordering, and $30/week of high-potassium foods in African American patients with controlled hypertension in a community-based clinic did not reduce BP. However, the intervention increased consumption of fruits, vegetables, and urinary

  20. Nutritional support and dietary interventions for patients with ulcerative colitis: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill RJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca J Hill Children's Nutrition Research Centre, Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, Australia Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC demonstrates a remitting and relapsing course, and patients have long believed diet plays a role in their symptoms. Ad hoc removal of foods and food groups from the diet without strong evidence for therapeutic benefit places patients at risk for nutritional deficiencies. This review discusses the need for nutritional support in UC and the role of dietary modification in its management in humans. Current evidence suggests patients with UC are not nutritionally compromised during remission, but with increasing disease activity, nutritional status is worth monitoring, in particular through body composition assessment and investigation for anemia. There is no clear evidence for dietary modulation to relieve symptoms in UC. Neither enteral nutrition nor parenteral nutrition is efficacious for symptom control or mucosal healing. While early studies suggested avoidance of dairy foods, no recent work has replicated these results. A low intake of insoluble fiber is recommended during acute disease flares; however, the role of fiber in modulating the gut microbiota and their metabolites warrants further attention. Several studies have investigated polyunsaturated fatty acids for UC; however, current evidence is not supportive for either inactive or active disease. There is emerging evidence that curcumin supplementation may be a new dietary treatment option. Often, evidence for therapeutic diets is difficult to interpret due to the reporting of combined results for both Crohn's disease and UC. In general, there is no evidenced specific dietary advice for patients with UC other than to follow healthy eating guidelines. Further work should determine if diet as treatment efficacy lies in modification of dietary patterns, thereby investigating the synergistic relationship between foods and

  1. Systematic review of reviews of intervention components associated with increased effectiveness in dietary and physical activity interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Philip H

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop more efficient programmes for promoting dietary and/or physical activity change (in order to prevent type 2 diabetes it is critical to ensure that the intervention components and characteristics most strongly associated with effectiveness are included. The aim of this systematic review of reviews was to identify intervention components that are associated with increased change in diet and/or physical activity in individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library were searched for systematic reviews of interventions targeting diet and/or physical activity in adults at risk of developing type 2 diabetes from 1998 to 2008. Two reviewers independently selected reviews and rated methodological quality. Individual analyses from reviews relating effectiveness to intervention components were extracted, graded for evidence quality and summarised. Results Of 3856 identified articles, 30 met the inclusion criteria and 129 analyses related intervention components to effectiveness. These included causal analyses (based on randomisation of participants to different intervention conditions and associative analyses (e.g. meta-regression. Overall, interventions produced clinically meaningful weight loss (3-5 kg at 12 months; 2-3 kg at 36 months and increased physical activity (30-60 mins/week of moderate activity at 12-18 months. Based on causal analyses, intervention effectiveness was increased by engaging social support, targeting both diet and physical activity, and using well-defined/established behaviour change techniques. Increased effectiveness was also associated with increased contact frequency and using a specific cluster of "self-regulatory" behaviour change techniques (e.g. goal-setting, self-monitoring. No clear relationships were found between effectiveness and intervention setting, delivery mode, study population or delivery provider. Evidence on long

  2. Can urinary indolylacroylglycine levels be used to determine whether children with autism will benefit from dietary intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Julie; Wright, Barry; Jost, Sandra; Smith, Robert; Pearce, Helen; Richardson, Sally

    2017-04-01

    An increase in urinary indolyl-3-acryloylglycine (IAG) has been reported in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who suffer with bowel problems in comparison to ASD children without gastrointestinal (GI) problems. The case for dietary intervention for ASD children with GI symptoms might be strengthened were such a difference to be autism-specific. Quantitative analysis of urinary IAG levels was performed for 53 children on the autism spectrum and 146 age-matched controls. The parents of each child were asked to provide information on bowel symptoms experienced by the child and their eating habits over a period of 2 wk. We find no significant difference in urinary IAG levels between the ASD children with GI problems and ASD children without GI problems. Although we see some difference between ASD children with GI problems and controls in mainstream schools with GI problems, the difference between non-autistic children with other developmental disorders and controls in mainstream schools is more significant so that any difference is not autism-specific. We find a strong correlation between bowel symptoms and diet problems in ASD children, especially idiosyncratic feeding behavior and we show that ASD children suffering from multiple bowel symptoms tend to be those who also have dietary problems. We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that children with ASD who suffer with bowel problems have increased levels of urinary IAG in comparison to children with ASD who do not have gastrointestinal problems.

  3. Nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients: Effect on dietary intake and the occupational groups' perspectives of intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lillian

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients do not eat and drink sufficiently during hospitalisation. The clinical consequences of this under nutrition include lassitude, an increased risk of complications and prolonged convalescence. The aim of the study was 1 to introduce intervention targeting nutritional care for medical inpatients, 2 to investigate the effect of this intervention, and 3 to investigate the occupational groups' attitudes towards nutritional intervention and nutritional care in general. Methods The design was to determinate the extent to which the protein and energy requirements of medical inpatients were met before and after intervention. Dietary protein and energy intakes were assessed by 72-hour weighed food records. A total number of 108 medical patients at four bed sections and occupational groups in the two intervention bed sections, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark participated. The intervention included introduction and implementation of nursing procedures targeting nutritional care during a five-month investigation period using standard food produced at the hospital. The effect of intervention for independent groups of patients were tested by one-way analysis of variance. After the intervention occupational groups were interviewed in focus groups. Results Before the intervention hospital food on average met 72% of the patients' protein requirement and 85% of their energy requirement. After intervention hospital food satisfied 85% of the protein and 103% of the energy requirements of 14 patients in one intervention section and 56% of the protein and 76% of the energy requirement of 17 patients in the other intervention section. Hospital food satisfied 61% of the protein and 75% of the energy requirement in a total of 29 controls. From the occupational groups' point of view lack of time, lack of access to food, and lack of knowledge of nutritional care for patients were identified as barriers to better integration of

  4. A model of phone call intervention in sensitizing the change of dietary pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Corrêa Chaves

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a model of phone call intervention for changing dietary patterns and to assess its effectiveness. Method: A study carried out at the Health Promotion School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, with 27 subjects, 3-5 phone calls contacts per user, by means of which were given orientations and interventions on the principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Transtheoretical Model on healthy eating. We analyzed the variables weight and body mass index, dietary patterns and overall stage of motivation to change. The data were submitted to analysis of variance with repeated measures at different stages of evaluation: pre-contact, 3rd and 5th phone calls. Results: After intervention, users showed a change in eating behavior in the third contact, and change occurred in weight and BMI in one patient. All findings were not statistically significant. There was improvement in the motivation to acquire new eating habits, also not significant. Conclusion: There was a slight change in feeding behavior, the motivation to change improved for all participants, without, however, have been effective in this type of approach.

  5. Timing of allergy-preventive and immunomodulatory dietary interventions - are prenatal, perinatal or postnatal strategies optimal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenmalm, M C; Duchén, K

    2013-03-01

    The increasing allergy prevalence in affluent countries may be caused by reduced microbial stimulation and a decreased dietary ω-3/ω-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) ratio, resulting in an abnormal postnatal immune maturation. The timing of allergy-preventive probiotic and ω-3 LCPUFA interventions is critical, as early-life events occurring during critical windows of immune vulnerability can have long-term impact on immune development. The maternal dietary and microbial environment during pregnancy may programme the immune development of the child. Prenatal environmental exposures may alter gene expression via epigenetic mechanisms, aiming to induce physiological adaptations to the anticipated postnatal environment, but potentially also increasing disease susceptibility in the offspring if exposures are mismatched. Although the importance of fetal programming mostly has been studied in cardiovascular and metabolic disease, this hypothesis is also very attractive in the context of environmentally influenced immune-mediated diseases. This review focuses on how prenatal, perinatal or postnatal ω-3 LCPUFA interventions regulate childhood immune and allergy development, and if synergistic effects may be obtained by simultaneous probiotic supplementation. We propose that combined pre- and postnatal preventive measures may be most efficacious. Increasing knowledge on the immunomodulatory effects of prenatal, perinatal and postnatal interventions will help to direct future strategies to combat the allergy epidemic. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Effects of trans- and n-3 unsaturated fatty acids on cardiovascular risk markers in healthy males. An 8 weeks dietary intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyerberg, J; Eskesen, D C; Andersen, P W

    2004-01-01

    of dietary enrichment with TFA or n-3 PUFA. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, parallel intervention trial. SETTING: Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University. SUBJECTS: In all, 87 healthy males included, 79 completed. INTERVENTION: Subjects were randomly assigned to 8...... weeks of a daily intake of 33 g of experimental fats from either partially hydrogenated soy oil containing 20 g of TFA, 12 g of fish oil with approximately 4 g of n-3 PUFA and 21 g of control fat, or 33 g of control fat. The experimental fats were incorporated into bakery products. Plasma lipids, blood...

  7. Design and methodology of a community-based cluster-randomized controlled trial for dietary behaviour change in rural Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Daivadanam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interventions targeting lifestyle-related risk factors and non-communicable diseases have contributed to the mainstream knowledge necessary for action. However, there are gaps in how this knowledge can be translated for practical day-to-day use in complex multicultural settings like that in India. Here, we describe the design of the Behavioural Intervention for Diet study, which was developed as a community-based intervention to change dietary behaviour among middle-income households in rural Kerala. Methods: This was a cluster-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a sequential stage-matched intervention to bring about dietary behaviour change by targeting the procurement and consumption of five dietary components: fruits, vegetables, salt, sugar, and oil. Following a step-wise process of pairing and exclusion of outliers, six out of 22 administrative units in the northern part of Trivandrum district, Kerala state were randomly selected and allocated to intervention or control arms. Trained community volunteers carried out the data collection and intervention delivery. An innovative tool was developed to assess household readiness-to-change, and a household measurement kit and easy formulas were introduced to facilitate the practical side of behaviour change. The 1-year intervention included a household component with sequential stage-matched intervention strategies at 0, 6, and 12 months along with counselling sessions, telephonic reminders, and home visits and a community component with general awareness sessions in the intervention arm. Households in the control arm received information on recommended levels of intake of the five dietary components and general dietary information leaflets. Discussion: Formative research provided the knowledge to contextualise the design of the study in accordance with socio-cultural aspects, felt needs of the community, and the ground realities associated with existing dietary

  8. Design and methodology of a community-based cluster-randomized controlled trial for dietary behaviour change in rural Kerala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daivadanam, Meena; Wahlstrom, Rolf; Sundari Ravindran, T K; Sarma, P S; Sivasankaran, S; Thankappan, K R

    2013-07-17

    Interventions targeting lifestyle-related risk factors and non-communicable diseases have contributed to the mainstream knowledge necessary for action. However, there are gaps in how this knowledge can be translated for practical day-to-day use in complex multicultural settings like that in India. Here, we describe the design of the Behavioural Intervention for Diet study, which was developed as a community-based intervention to change dietary behaviour among middle-income households in rural Kerala. This was a cluster-randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a sequential stage-matched intervention to bring about dietary behaviour change by targeting the procurement and consumption of five dietary components: fruits, vegetables, salt, sugar, and oil. Following a step-wise process of pairing and exclusion of outliers, six out of 22 administrative units in the northern part of Trivandrum district, Kerala state were randomly selected and allocated to intervention or control arms. Trained community volunteers carried out the data collection and intervention delivery. An innovative tool was developed to assess household readiness-to-change, and a household measurement kit and easy formulas were introduced to facilitate the practical side of behaviour change. The 1-year intervention included a household component with sequential stage-matched intervention strategies at 0, 6, and 12 months along with counselling sessions, telephonic reminders, and home visits and a community component with general awareness sessions in the intervention arm. Households in the control arm received information on recommended levels of intake of the five dietary components and general dietary information leaflets. Formative research provided the knowledge to contextualise the design of the study in accordance with socio-cultural aspects, felt needs of the community, and the ground realities associated with existing dietary procurement, preparation, and consumption patterns

  9. Emerging science in the dietary control and prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dajani, Mahmoud; Limeback, Hardy

    2012-10-01

    The key environmental factor involved in caries incidence is fermentable carbohydrates. Because of the high costs of caries treatment, researchers continue to explore dietary control as a promising preventive method. While dietary change has been demonstrated to reduce Streptococcus mutans, a preventive role is expected for "functional foods" and dietary habit alterations. The authors consider how recent advances in the understanding of caries pathology can reveal dietary control as a valuable method in promoting a healthy dentition.

  10. Does dietary calcium interact with dietary fiber against colorectal cancer? A case-control study in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galas, Aleksander; Augustyniak, Malgorzata; Sochacka-Tatara, Elzbieta

    2013-10-04

    An unfavorable trend of increasing rates of colorectal cancer has been observed across modern societies. In general, dietary factors are understood to be responsible for up to 70% of the disease's incidence, though there are still many inconsistencies regarding the impact of specific dietary items. Among the dietary minerals, calcium intake may play a crucial role in the prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of intake of higher levels of dietary calcium on the risk of developing of colorectal cancer, and to evaluate dose dependent effect and to investigate possible effect modification. A hospital based case-control study of 1556 patients (703 histologically confirmed colon and rectal incident cases and 853 hospital-based controls) was performed between 2000-2012 in Krakow, Poland. The 148-item semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire to assess dietary habits and level of nutrients intake was used. Data regarding possible covariates was also collected. After adjustment for age, gender, education, consumption of fruits, raw and cooked vegetables, fish, and alcohol, as well as for intake of fiber, vitamin C, dietary iron, lifetime recreational physical activity, BMI, smoking status, and taking mineral supplements, an increase in the consumption of calcium was associated with the decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98 for every 100 mg Ca/day increase). Subjects consumed >1000 mg/day showed 46% decrease of colon cancer risk (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.83). The effect of dietary calcium was modified by dietary fiber (p for interaction =0.015). Finally, consistent decrease of colon cancer risk was observed across increasing levels of dietary calcium and fiber intake. These relationships were not proved for rectal cancer. The study confirmed the effect of high doses of dietary calcium against the risk of colon cancer development. This relationship was observed across different levels of dietary fiber, and the

  11. Clinical correlates of weight loss and attrition during a 10-week dietary intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Holst, Claus; Grau, Katrine

    2012-01-01

    clinical centres in 7 European countries, who underwent a 10-week dietary intervention study comparing two hypo-energetic (-600 kcal/day) diets varying in fat content. Results: The multiple regression model showed that weight loss at week 10 was predicted by: 6.55 + 1.27 × early weight loss (kg) at week 1...... kg weight loss at week 5 emerged as an optimal predictor for reaching at least 10% weight loss at week 10. Greater attrition likelihood was predicted by high-fat diet, decreased early and half-way weight losses. Conclusion: Early and half-way weight losses are associated with and could contribute......Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the pre-treatment subject characteristics and weight loss changes as determinants of weight loss and attrition during a 10-week dietary intervention study. Methods: A total of 771 obese subjects (BMI 35.6 kg/m(2)) of both genders were included from 8...

  12. Body image and self-esteem among adolescents undergoing an intervention targeting dietary and physical activity behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S; Norman, Gregory J; Zabinski, Marion F; Calfas, Karen; Patrick, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    To determine the effect of a one-year intervention targeting physical activity, sedentary, and diet behaviors among adolescents on self-reported body image and self-esteem. Health promotion interventions can lead to awareness of health risk and subsequent adoption of beneficial changes in behavior. However, it is possible that interventions targeting behaviors associated with childhood obesity may also increase the likelihood of unhealthy eating and physical activity obsessions and behaviors. Body image and self-esteem were assessed for adolescents participating in the PACE+ study, a randomized controlled trial of a 1-year behavioral intervention targeting physical activity, sedentary, and dietary behaviors. The Body Dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory and Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale were used to assess body image and self-esteem, respectively, and measurements were performed at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. Demographic characteristics and weight status of participants were also ascertained. Analysis of responses was performed via both between-group and within-group repeated measure analyses. There were 657 adolescents who completed all measurements. Body image differences were found for age, gender, and weight status at baseline, whereas self-esteem differences were demonstrated for gender, ethnicity, and weight status. There were no intervention effects on body image or self-esteem for either girls or boys. Self-esteem and body satisfaction did not worsen as a result of participating in the PACE+ intervention for either boys or girls whether or not they lost or maintained their weight or gained weight. Girls assigned to the PACE intervention who experienced weight reduction or weight maintenance at either 6 or 12 months reported improvements in body image satisfaction (p = .02) over time compared with subjects who had experienced weight gain during the 12-month study period. Adverse effects on body satisfaction and self-esteem were not

  13. Dietary intake and metabolic control of children aged six to ten with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    six to ten with type 1 diabetes mellitus in KwaZulu-Natal. Introduction. In South Africa the leading ... the ages of six and ten years. Abstract. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the dietary intake and metabolic control of children with type 1 diabetes. ... three snacks in between. Dietary intake. Dietary data were ...

  14. A Mediation Analysis of Mothers' Dietary Intake: The Entre Familia: Reflejos de Salud Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Lucy A; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Slymen, Donald J; Ibarra, Leticia; Hernandez, Erika; Parada, Humberto; Rock, Cheryl L; Arredondo, Elva M; Elder, John P

    2017-12-01

    Examine intervention effects among mothers involved in a healthy eating randomized controlled trial. Furthermore, examine the mediating roles of individual and familial influences on observed outcomes. Between 2009 and 2011, 361 families were recruited; half were assigned to an 11-session community health worker-delivered family-based intervention targeting Spanish-speaking Latino families in Imperial County, California. The intervention was delivered over a 4-month period. Home visits and telephone calls were delivered approximately weekly, with tapering near the end of the intervention to promote independence from the promotora. In this article, mothers' self-reported dietary intake was the primary outcome. Evaluation measures were taken at baseline, 4 months, and 10 months. Daily servings of fruits were higher among intervention versus control mothers (mean = 1.86 vs. mean = 1.47; effect size [ES] = 0.22) at 10 months post-baseline. Mothers in the intervention versus control condition also reported consuming a lower percent energy from fat (mean = 30.0% vs. 31.0%; ES = 0.30) and a higher diet quality (mean = 2.93 vs. mean = 2.67; ES = 0.29). Mediators of improvements were behavioral strategies to increase fiber and lower fat intake, family support for vegetable purchasing, and decreased unhealthy eating behaviors and perceived family barriers to healthy eating. Family-based behavioral interventions are effective for changing the skills and family system needed to improve diet among Latina mothers. Health care providers and other practitioners are encouraged to target skill development and fostering a socially supportive environment.

  15. Intervention Based Exclusively on Stage-Matched Printed Educational Materials Regarding Healthy Eating Does Not Result in Changes to Adolescents’ Dietary Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Toral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the impact of a six-month stage-based intervention on fruit and vegetable intake, regarding perceived benefits and barriers, and self-efficacy among adolescents. Design. Randomized treatment-control, pre-post design. Subjects/Setting. Schools were randomized between control and experimental groups. 860 adolescents from ten public schools in Brasília, Federal District, Brazil were evaluated at baseline; 771 (81% completed the study. Intervention. Experimental group received monthly magazines and newsletters aimed at promotion of healthy eating. Measures. Self-reported fruit and vegetable intake, stages of change, self-efficacy and decisional balance scores were evaluated at baseline and post-intervention in both groups. Analysis. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using the analysis of covariance model (ANCOVA and repeated measurement analysis by means of weighted least squares. Comparison between the proportions of adolescents who advanced through the stages during the intervention was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results. After adjusting for sex and age, study variables showed no modifications through the proposed intervention. There was no statistical difference in participant mobility in the intervention and control groups between the stages of change, throughout the study. Conclusion. A nutritional intervention based exclusively on distribution of stage-matched printed educational materials was insufficient to change adolescents’ dietary behavior.

  16. Effects of a 2-y dietary weight-loss intervention on cholesterol metabolism in moderately obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtle, Alexander B; Helmschrodt, Christin; Ceglarek, Uta; Shai, Iris; Henkin, Yaakov; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Golan, Rachel; Gepner, Yftach; Stampfer, Meir J; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg M

    2011-11-01

    Long-term dietary weight loss results in complex metabolic changes. However, its effect on cholesterol metabolism in obese subjects is still unclear. We assessed the effects of 2 y of weight loss achieved with various diet regimens on phytosterols (markers of intestinal cholesterol absorption), lanosterol (marker of de novo cholesterol synthesis), and changes in apolipoprotein concentrations. We conducted the 2-y Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT-a study of low-fat, Mediterranean, and low-carbohydrate diets). We assessed circulating phytosterol and lanosterol concentrations and their ratios to cholesterol and apolipoproteins A-I and B-100 in 90 DIRECT participants at 0, 6, and 24 mo. We observed a significant upregulation of the markers of cholesterol absorption (campesterol: +16.8%, P weight-loss phase (first 6 mo, weight loss of 5%, 6%, and 10% in the 3 diet groups, respectively), followed by a rebound (campesterol: -6.2%, P = 0.045; lanosterol: +43.7%, P weight gain of 1%, 1%, and 2% in the 3 diet groups, respectively). HDL cholesterol continuously increased during the study (17.0%, P weight loss is related to a characteristic response suggestive of altered cholesterol and apolipoprotein metabolism. Various diets have a similar effect on these effects. DIRECT is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00160108.

  17. Dietary intervention with serum-derived bovine immunoglobulins protects barrier function in a mouse model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Miró, Lluïsa; Maijó, Mònica; Polo, Javier; Campbell, Joy; Russell, Louis; Crenshaw, Joe; Weaver, Eric; Moretó, Miquel

    2015-06-15

    Dietary supplementation with immunoglobulins from animal plasma has anti-inflammatory effects on intestinal and lung models of acute inflammation. Here, we aimed to establish whether dietary intervention with serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin (SBI) can prevent alterations in intestinal barrier function in a mouse model with a genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking the mdr1a gene (KO) were fed diets supplemented with either SBI (2% wt/wt) or milk proteins (control diet), from day 21 (weaning) until day 56. The epithelial permeability of distal colon crypts was measured by confocal microscopy using a fluorescent marker. The expression of junctional epithelial E-cadherin and β-catenin proteins were determined by Western blot and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) by immunofluorescence. Mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC4), TFF3, cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase RNA expression were quantified by real-time PCR. SBI blocked the increase in colon crypt permeability and partially prevented the reduction in E-cadherin and ZO-1 expression that characterize the KO mouse model (both P genetic model of IBD.

  18. Dietary Intake and Eating Behaviours of Obese New Zealand Children and Adolescents Enrolled in a Community-Based Intervention Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne C Anderson

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe dietary intake and eating behaviours of obese children and adolescents, and also to determine how these differ in Indigenous versus non-Indigenous children at enrolment in an obesity programme.Baseline dietary intake and eating behaviour records were assessed from those enrolled in a clinical unblinded randomised controlled trial of a multi-disciplinary intervention. The setting was a community-based obesity programme in Taranaki, New Zealand. Children or adolescents who were enrolled from January 2012 to August 2014, with a BMI ≥98th percentile or >91st centile with weight-related comorbidities were eligible.239 participants (45% Māori, 45% NZ Europeans, 10% other ethnicities, aged 5-17 years were assessed. Two-thirds of participants experienced hyperphagia and half were not satiated after a meal. Comfort eating was reported by 62% of participants, and daily energy intake was above the recommended guidelines for 54%. Fruit and vegetable intake was suboptimal compared with the recommended 5 servings per day (mean 3.5 [SD = 1.9] servings per day, and the mean weekly breakfasts were less than the national average (5.9 vs 6.5; p<0.0001. Median sweet drink intake amongst Māori was twice that of NZ Europeans (250 vs 125 ml per day; p = 0.0002.There was a concerning prevalence of abnormal eating behaviours and significant differences in dietary intake between obese participants and their national counterparts. Ethnic differences between Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants were also present, especially in relation to sweet drink consumption. Eating behaviours, especially sweet drink consumption and fruit/vegetable intake need to be addressed.

  19. Accuracy of self-reported intake of signature foods in a school meal intervention study: comparison between control and intervention period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Andersen, Rikke

    2015-01-01

    the NND. Children, assisted by parents, self-reported their diet in a Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children during the intervention and control (packed lunch) periods. The reported fish intake by children was compared with their ranking according to fasting whole-blood EPA and DHA...

  20. Barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle and acceptability of a dietary and physical activity intervention among African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors in the UK: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Vanessa; Lane, J Athene; Martin, Richard M; Persad, Raj; Chinegwundoh, Frank; Njoku, Victoria; Sutton, Eileen

    2017-10-15

    Diet and lifestyle may have a role in delaying prostate cancer progression, but little is known about the health behaviours of Black British prostate cancer survivors despite this group having a higher prostate cancer mortality rate than their White counterparts. We explored the barriers and facilitators to dietary and lifestyle changes and the acceptability of a diet and physical activity intervention in African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors. We conducted semistructured in-depth interviews and used thematic analysis to code and group the data. We recruited 14 African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors via letter or at oncology follow-up appointments using purposive and convenience sampling. A prostate cancer diagnosis did not trigger dietary and lifestyle changes in most men. This lack of change was underpinned by five themes: precancer diet and lifestyle, evidence, coping with prostate cancer, ageing, and autonomy. Men perceived their diet and lifestyle to be healthy and were uncertain about the therapeutic benefits of these factors on prostate cancer recurrence. They considered a lifestyle intervention as unnecessary because their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was kept under control by the treatments they had received. They believed dietary and lifestyle changes should be self-initiated and motivated, but were willing to make additional changes if they were perceived to be beneficial to health. Nonetheless, some men cited advice from health professionals and social support in coping with prostate cancer as facilitators to positive dietary and lifestyle changes. A prostate cancer diagnosis and ageing also heightened men's awareness of their health, particularly in regards to their body weight. A dietary and physical activity intervention framed as helping men to regain fitness and aid post-treatment recovery aimed at men with elevated PSA may be appealing and acceptable to African Caribbean prostate cancer survivors. © Article author(s) (or their

  1. Efficacy of dietary interventions in end-stage renal disease patients; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar Chaudhary Muhamamd Juniad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD are common comorbid conditions. Life style, particularly diet is a critical component of treatment for these conditions. Register dietitians play a key role in bridging the gap between the science of nutrition and the empowerment of individuals to alter their lifestyles in a healthy manner. A range of dietary manipulations has been reported to reduce risk factors and decrease risk of CVD and CKD outcomes. However, many studies provided food to participants or were limited to adjustment of few specific nutrients. Diet intervention in relation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD is really complicated topic. As multiple co morbid conditions such as hypertension, CVD, CKD, and diabetes mellitus (DM are associated with ESRD, which made the scenario really worse while fixing the dose of any diet. Still a lot of research work is required to understand this topic.

  2. Intervention based exclusively on stage-matched printed educational materials regarding healthy eating does not result in changes to adolescents' dietary behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, Natacha; Slater, Betzabeth

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of a six-month stage-based intervention on fruit and vegetable intake, regarding perceived benefits and barriers, and self-efficacy among adolescents. Randomized treatment-control, pre-post design. Schools were randomized between control and experimental groups. 860 adolescents from ten public schools in Brasília, Federal District, Brazil were evaluated at baseline; 771 (81%) completed the study. Experimental group received monthly magazines and newsletters aimed at promotion of healthy eating. Self-reported fruit and vegetable intake, stages of change, self-efficacy and decisional balance scores were evaluated at baseline and post-intervention in both groups. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using the analysis of covariance model (ANCOVA) and repeated measurement analysis by means of weighted least squares. Comparison between the proportions of adolescents who advanced through the stages during the intervention was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. After adjusting for sex and age, study variables showed no modifications through the proposed intervention. There was no statistical difference in participant mobility in the intervention and control groups between the stages of change, throughout the study. A nutritional intervention based exclusively on distribution of stage-matched printed educational materials was insufficient to change adolescents' dietary behavior.

  3. Effects of Different Dietary Interventions on Calcitriol, Parathyroid Hormone, Calcium, and Phosphorus: Results from the DASH Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hassoon

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” (DASH diet, rich in fiber and low-fat dairy, effectively lowers blood pressure. DASH’s effect on calcitriol and other markers of bone-mineral metabolism is unknown. This secondary analysis of the DASH trial aimed to determine the effect of dietary patterns on blood concentrations of calcitriol, parathyroid hormone (PTH, ionized calcium, and urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus. Outcomes were available in 334 participants in the trial. After a 3-week run-in on the control diet, participants were randomized to control, fruits and vegetables (F&V, or DASH diets. Outcomes were assessed at the end of run-in, and during the last week of the intervention period. Mean age of participants was 45.7 ± 10.7 years, 46% female, and 57% African-American. Mean ± Standard Deviation(SD baseline serum concentrations of calcitriol, PTH, and ionized calcium were 37.8 ± 9.2 pg/mL, 46.1 ± 18.5 pg/mL and 5.2 ± 0.23 mg/dL, respectively. Mean (±SD urinary calcium and phosphorus excretions were 150.1 ± 77.8 and 708.0 ± 251.8 mg/24 h, respectively. Compared with control, DASH reduced calcitriol −3.32 pg/mL (p = 0.004. Otherwise, there was no significant effect on other biomarkers. DASH lowered serum calcitriol perhaps more among African-Americans. These results raise important questions about the interpretation and clinical significance of low calcitriol concentrations in the setting of recommended diets.

  4. Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk Factors for Chronic Disease: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Clarke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs form during heating and processing of food products and are widely prevalent in the modern Western diet. Recent systematic reviews indicate that consumption of dietary AGEs may promote inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Experimental evidence indicates that dietary AGEs may also induce renal damage, however, this outcome has not been considered in previous systematic reviews. The purpose of this review was to examine the effect of consumption of a high AGE diet on biomarkers of chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD, in human randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Six databases (SCOPUS, CINHAL, EMBASE, Medline, Biological abstracts and Web of Science were searched for randomised controlled dietary trials that compared high AGE intake to low AGE intake in adults with and without obesity, diabetes or CKD. Twelve dietary AGE interventions were identified with a total of 293 participants. A high AGE diet increased circulating tumour necrosis factor-alpha and AGEs in all populations. A high AGE diet increased 8-isoprostanes in healthy adults, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 in patients with diabetes. Markers of CKD were not widely assessed. The evidence presented indicates that a high AGE diet may contribute to risk factors associated with chronic disease, such as inflammation and oxidative stress, however, due to a lack of high quality randomised trials, more research is required.

  5. Theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior-based dietary interventions in adolescents and young adults: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackman CL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Christine L Hackman, Adam P KnowldenDepartment of Health Science, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USABackground: Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many nations around the world. The theory of planned behavior (TPB and the theory of reasoned action (TRA have been used to successfully plan and evaluate numerous interventions for many different behaviors. The aim of this study was to systematically review and synthesize TPB and TRA-based dietary behavior interventions targeting adolescents and young adults.Methods: The following databases were systematically searched to find articles for this review: Academic Search Premier; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL; Education Resources Information Center (ERIC; Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; and MEDLINE. Inclusion criteria for articles were: 1 primary or secondary interventions, 2 with any quantitative design, 3 published in the English language, 4 between January 2003 and March 2014, 5 that targeted adolescents or young adults, 6 which included dietary change behavior as the outcome, and 7 utilized TPB or TRA.Results: Of the eleven intervention studies evaluated, nine resulted in dietary behavior change that was attributed to the treatment. Additionally, all but one study found there to be a change in at least one construct of TRA or TPB, while one study did not measure constructs. All of the studies utilized some type of quantitative design, with two employing quasi-experimental, and eight employing randomized control trial design. Among the studies, four utilized technology including emails, social media posts, information on school websites, web-based activities, audio messages in classrooms, interactive DVDs, and health-related websites. Two studies incorporated goal setting and four employed persuasive communication.Conclusion: Interventions directed toward changing dietary behaviors

  6. Dietary calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Changwoo; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jeonghee; Lee, Jeeyoo; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-01-01

    Background High intake of dietary calcium has been thought to be a protective factor against colorectal cancer. To explore the dose-response relationship in the associations between dietary calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk by cancer location, we conducted a case-control study among Korean population, whose dietary calcium intake levels are relatively low. Methods The colorectal cancer cases and controls were recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea between August 2010 and A...

  7. Dietary fibre: influence on body weight, glycemic control and plasma cholesterol profile

    OpenAIRE

    N. Babio; R. Balanza; J. Basulto; M. Bulló; J. Salas-Salvadó

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fibre: influence on body weight, glycemic control and plasma cholesterol profile FIBRA DIETÉTICA: INFLUENCIA SOBRE EL PESO CORPORAL, EL CONTROL GLICÉMICO Y EL PERFIL DEL COLESTEROL PLASMÁTICO There have been several studies on the effects of dietary fibre on the metabolism. Epidemiologic studies have consistently reported an inverse relationship between dietary fibre and type 2 diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular mortality. This review focuses on observational and experimental s...

  8. Effects of the Healthy Start randomized intervention on dietary intake among obesity-prone normal-weight children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Jeanett F.; Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the impact of a 15-month intervention on dietary intake conducted among obesity-prone normal-weight pre-school children. Design: Information on dietary intake was obtained using a 4 d diet record. A diet quality index was adapted to assess how well children’s...... Start study was conducted during 2009–2011, focusing on changing diet, physical activity, sleep and stress management to prevent excessive weight gain among Danish children. Subjects: From a population of 635 Danish pre-school children, who had a high birth weight (≥4000 g), high maternal pre...... and added sugar after 15 months of intervention, suggesting that dietary intake can be changed in a healthier direction in children predisposed to obesity....

  9. Impact of a school-based intervention to promote fruit intake: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, R; Araújo, A; Padrão, P; Lopes, O; Moreira, A; Abreu, S; Vale, S; Pereira, B; Moreira, P

    2016-07-01

    There is evidence that fruit consumption among school children is below the recommended levels. This study aims to examine the effects of a dietary education intervention program me, held by teachers previously trained in nutrition, on the consumption of fruit as a dessert at lunch and dinner, among children 6-12 years old. This is a randomized trial with the schools as the unit of randomisation. A total of 464 children (239 female, 6-12years) from seven elementary schools participated in this cluster randomized controlled trial. Three schools were allocated to the intervention and four to the control group. For the intervention schools, we delivered professional development training to school teachers (12 sessions of 3 h each). The training provided information about nutrition, healthy eating, the importance of drinking water and healthy cooking activities. After each session, teachers were encouraged to develop classroom activities focused on the learned topics. Sociodemographic was assessed at baseline and anthropometric, dietary intake and physical activity assessments were performed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Dietary intake was evaluated by a 24-h dietary recall and fruit consumption as a dessert was gathered at lunch and dinner. Intervened children reported a significant higher intake in the consumption of fruit compared to the controlled children at lunch (P = 0.001) and at dinner (P = 0.012), after adjusting for confounders. Our study provides further support for the success of intervention programmes aimed at improving the consumption of fruit as a dessert in children. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bifidogenic effect of whole-grain wheat during a 12-week energy-restricted dietary intervention in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Licht, Tine Rask; Kristensen, M.

    2013-01-01

    composition after consumption of whole-grain (WW) or refined wheat (RW) and further study effects on gut wall integrity.Subjects/Methods:Quantitative PCR was used to determine changes in the gut bacterial composition in postmenopausal women following a 12-week energy-restricted dietary intervention with WW (N...

  11. Effects of dietary counselling on food habits and dietary intake of Finnish pregnant women at increased risk for gestational diabetes - a secondary analysis of a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Tarja I; Puhkala, Jatta; Raitanen, Jani; Ahonen, Suvi; Aittasalo, Minna; Virtanen, Suvi M; Luoto, Riitta

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing and GDM might be prevented by improving diet. Few interventions have assessed the effects of dietary counselling on dietary intake of pregnant women. This study examined the effects of dietary counselling on food habits and dietary intake of Finnish pregnant women as secondary outcomes of a trial primarily aiming at preventing GDM. A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 14 municipalities in Finland, including 399 pregnant women at increased risk for developing GDM. The intervention consisted of dietary counselling focusing on dietary fat, fibre and saccharose intake at four routine maternity clinic visits. Usual counselling practices were continued in the usual care municipalities. A validated 181-item food frequency questionnaire was used to assess changes in diet from baseline to 26-28 and 36-37 weeks gestation. The data were analysed using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression models. By 36-37 weeks gestation, the intervention had beneficial effects on total intake of vegetables, fruits and berries (coefficient for between-group difference in change 61.6 g day(-1), 95% confidence interval 25.7-97.6), the proportions of high-fibre bread of all bread (7.2% units, 2.5-11.9), low-fat cheeses of all cheeses (10.7% units, 2.6-18.9) and vegetable fats of all dietary fats (6.1% -units, 2.0-10.3), and the intake of saturated fatty acids (-0.67 energy-%-units, -1.16 to -0.19), polyunsaturated fatty acids (0.38 energy-%-units, 0.18-0.58), linoleic acid (764 mg day(-1), 173-1354) and fibre (2.07 g day(-1) , 0.39-3.75). The intervention improved diet towards the recommendations in pregnant women at increased risk for GDM suggesting the counselling methods could be implemented in maternity care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Defective Insulin Signalling, Mediated by Inflammation, Connects Obesity to Alzheimer Disease; Relevant Pharmacological Therapies and Preventive Dietary Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Toledano-Díaz, Adolfo; Toledano, Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that obesity, besides being a risk factor for cardiovascular events, also increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Insulin resistance is common in all cases of obesity and appears to be the linkage between both diseases. Obesity, often associated with excessive fat and sugar intake, represents a preclinical stage toward insulin resistance during which nutrition intervention is likely to have maximum effect. In this way, healthy lifestyles lifetime to prevent obesity-related modifiable risk factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress and metabolic disorders could be simultaneously beneficial for preserving cognition and controlling the Alzheimer's disease. This review relates extensive research literature on facts linking nutrients and dietary patterns to obesity and Alzheimer's disease. In addition briefly presents molecular mechanisms involved in obesity- induced insulin resistance and the contribution of peripheral inflammatory and defective insulin signalling pathways, as well as ectopic lipids accumulation to Alzheimer's development through brain inflammation, neuronal insulin resistance, and cognitive dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease. The work relates current and emerging pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies for the management of obesity, insulin resistance and Alzheimer's considering them as disorders with common molecular features. The findings of this review validate the importance of some nutritional interventions as possible approach to prevent or delay simultaneously progression of Alzheimer's disease and obesity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Pilot Dietary Intervention with Heat-Stabilized Rice Bran Modulates Stool Microbiota and Metabolites in Healthy Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Sheflin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Heat-stabilized rice bran (SRB has been shown to regulate blood lipids and glucose, modulate gut mucosal immunity and inhibit colorectal cancer in animal and human studies. However, SRB’s effects on gut microbial composition and metabolism and the resulting implications for health remain largely unknown. A pilot, randomized-controlled trial was developed to investigate the effects of eating 30 g/day SRB on the stool microbiome and metabolome. Seven healthy participants consumed a study meal and snack daily for 28 days. The microbiome and metabolome were characterized using 454 pyrosequencing and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS at baseline, two and four weeks post-intervention. Increases in eight operational taxonomic units (OTUs, including three from Bifidobacterium and Ruminococcus genera, were observed after two and four weeks of SRB consumption (p < 0.01. Branched chain fatty acids, secondary bile acids and eleven other putative microbial metabolites were significantly elevated in the SRB group after four weeks. The largest metabolite change was a rice bran component, indole-2-carboxylic acid, which showed a mean 12% increase with SRB consumption. These data support the feasibility of dietary SRB intervention in adults and support that SRB consumption can affect gut microbial metabolism. These findings warrant future investigations of larger cohorts evaluating SRB’s effects on intestinal health.

  14. Intervention to reduce PCBs: learnings from a controlled study of Anniston residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandacek, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    Nonabsorbable dietary lipid reduces the absorption of dietary PCBs and increases the excretion of previously absorbed stored PCBs. Absorption of all PCB congeners will presumably be interrupted by nonabsorbable lipid; however excretion will be enhanced only for PCBs that have not been metabolized and also for their lipophilic metabolites. Our study with the nonabsorbable lipid, olestra, in a controlled trial in Anniston residents with elevated PCB levels demonstrated that it is possible to enhance removal of PCBs from the body in the clinically meaningful time frame of 1 year. The rate of disappearance of PCBs in participants who ate 15 g/day of olestra was significantly faster than the rate determined during the 5 years prior to intervention. The rate of disappearance was not changed from the pretrial rate in participants who ingested vegetable oil. Consideration of the role of body weight and fat is an important factor in the design of intervention trials of this kind, and the results of this trial suggest that the level of body fat in individuals will influence the rate of removal from the body. Previously reported data from animals and from a case report indicate that weight loss combined with nonabsorbable dietary lipid will maximize removal of PCBs and presumably other stored organochlorine compounds. The design of future intervention trials should include a focus on body fat levels and changes. Future trials should also include the testing of dietary compounds other than olestra that have affinity for PCBs, such as plant-derived polyphenols.

  15. Taste sensitivity, nutritional status and metabolic syndrome: Implication in weight loss dietary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Simona; Laureati, Monica; Battezzati, Alberto; Bergamaschi, Valentina; Cereda, Emanuele; Spadafranca, Angela; Vignati, Laila; Pagliarini, Ella

    2014-10-15

    We investigated the relationship between taste sensitivity, nutritional status and metabolic syndrome and possible implications on weight loss dietary program. Sensitivity for bitter, sweet, salty and sour tastes was assessed by the three-Alternative-Forced-Choice method in 41 overweight (OW), 52 obese (OB) patients and 56 normal-weight matched controls. OW and OB were assessed also for body composition (by impedence), resting energy expenditure (by indirect calorimetry) and presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and were prescribed a weight loss diet. Compliance to the weight loss dietary program was defined as adherence to control visits and weight loss ≥ 5% in 3 mo. Sex and age-adjusted multiple regression models revealed a significant association between body mass index (BMI) and both sour taste (P nutritional (OW and OB) or metabolic status (MetS+ and MetS-). There is no cause-effect relationship between overweight and metabolic derangements. Taste thresholds assessment is not useful in predicting the outcome of a diet-induced weight loss program.

  16. Dietary interventions in children with autism spectrum disorders - an updated review of the research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is a group of life-long neurodevelopmental disorders, with onset before 3 years of age. They are characterized by qualitative impairmentin social interactions, absent or impaired language and communication skills, and present with a wide range of stereotyped, repetitive behaviors. Function and outcome are affected not only by core deficits but by associated behaviors such as hyperactivity, aggression, anxiety, and depression. Increasing evidence indicates that autism is a complex, multifactorial disorder involving the brain and the body, a result of genetic vulnerabilities interacting with environmental factors. Although genetics plays a role, the fact, that the incidence of autism in identical twins is not 100% points to external or environmental factors as contributors. No etiology - based treatment has yet been developed. During the last two decades many educational, psychosocial and pharmacological interventions had been utilized and claimed to be effective and even "curative". The word treatment should be used with caution, and should stand for interventions that are aimed to help people with ASD to adjust more effectively to their environment. Many studies have indicated that behavioral therapy and medication may be at least partially helpful in the treatment of children with ASD particularly on the symptoms of aggression, hyperactivity and attention. In the light of an approved and well established treatment for ASD, over the past two decades research on the effect of diet and nutrition on autism has been increasing. Particular attention has focused on the role of food additives, refined sugar, food allergies, and fatty acid metabolism. However, the results are conflicting and not conclusive. We present here anupdated review summarizing the potentials and limits of the most frequent nutritional and dietary interventions in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

  17. A Mediterranean Diet to Improve Cardiovascular and Cognitive Health: Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T.; Davis, Courtney R.; Dyer, Kathryn A.; Hodgson, Jonathan M.; Woodman, Richard J.; Keage, Hannah A. D.; Murphy, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet has demonstrated efficacy for improving cardiovascular and cognitive health. However, a traditional Mediterranean diet delivers fewer serves of dairy and less dietary calcium than is currently recommended in Australia, which may limit long-term sustainability. The present study aims to evaluate whether a Mediterranean diet with adequate dairy and calcium can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function in an at-risk population, and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive decline. A randomised, controlled, parallel, crossover design trial will compare a Mediterranean diet supplemented with dairy foods against a low-fat control diet. Forty participants with systolic blood pressure above 120 mmHg and at least two other risk factors of CVD will undertake each dietary intervention for eight weeks, with an eight-week washout period between interventions. Systolic blood pressure will be the primary measure of interest. Secondary outcomes will include measures of cardiometabolic health, dietary compliance, cognitive function, assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), psychological well-being and dementia risk. This research will provide empirical evidence as to whether the Mediterranean diet can be modified to provide recommended dairy and calcium intakes while continuing to deliver positive effects for cardiovascular and cognitive health. The findings will hold relevance for the field of preventative healthcare and may contribute to revisions of national dietary guidelines. PMID:28212320

  18. A Mediterranean Diet to Improve Cardiovascular and Cognitive Health: Protocol for a Randomised Controlled Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Alexandra T; Davis, Courtney R; Dyer, Kathryn A; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Woodman, Richard J; Keage, Hannah A D; Murphy, Karen J

    2017-02-16

    The Mediterranean diet has demonstrated efficacy for improving cardiovascular and cognitive health. However, a traditional Mediterranean diet delivers fewer serves of dairy and less dietary calcium than is currently recommended in Australia, which may limit long-term sustainability. The present study aims to evaluate whether a Mediterranean diet with adequate dairy and calcium can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function in an at-risk population, and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive decline. A randomised, controlled, parallel, crossover design trial will compare a Mediterranean diet supplemented with dairy foods against a low-fat control diet. Forty participants with systolic blood pressure above 120 mmHg and at least two other risk factors of CVD will undertake each dietary intervention for eight weeks, with an eight-week washout period between interventions. Systolic blood pressure will be the primary measure of interest. Secondary outcomes will include measures of cardiometabolic health, dietary compliance, cognitive function, assessed using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB), psychological well-being and dementia risk. This research will provide empirical evidence as to whether the Mediterranean diet can be modified to provide recommended dairy and calcium intakes while continuing to deliver positive effects for cardiovascular and cognitive health. The findings will hold relevance for the field of preventative healthcare and may contribute to revisions of national dietary guidelines.

  19. Dietary intervention in acne: Attenuation of increased mTORC1 signaling promoted by Western diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  20. Identification of those most likely to benefit from a low-glycaemic index dietary intervention in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2014-08-28

    The present study is a secondary analysis of the ROLO study, a randomised control trial of a low-glycaemic index (GI) diet in pregnancy to prevent the recurrence of fetal macrosomia. The objectives of the present study were to identify which women are most likely to respond to a low-GI dietary intervention in pregnancy with respect to three outcome measures: birth weight; maternal glucose intolerance; gestational weight gain (GWG). In early pregnancy, 372 women had their mid-upper arm circumference recorded and BMI calculated. Concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. At delivery, infant birth weight was recorded and fetal glucose, C-peptide and leptin concentrations were measured in the cord blood. Women who benefited in terms of infant birth weight were shorter, with a lower education level. Those who maintained weight gain within the GWG guidelines were less overweight in both their first and second pregnancies, with no difference being observed in maternal height. Women who at 28 weeks of gestation developed glucose intolerance, despite the low-GI diet, had a higher BMI and higher glucose concentrations in early pregnancy with more insulin resistance. They also had significantly higher-interval pregnancy weight gain. For each analysis, women who responded to the intervention had lower leptin concentrations in early pregnancy than those who did not. These findings suggest that the maternal metabolic environment in early pregnancy is important in determining later risks of excessive weight gain and metabolic disturbance, whereas birth weight is mediated more by genetic factors. It highlights key areas, which warrant further interrogation before future pregnancy intervention studies, in particular, maternal education level and inter-pregnancy weight gain.

  1. Does diet intervention in line with nutrition recommendations affect dietary carbon footprint? Results from a weight loss trial among lactating women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseinovic, E; Ohlin, M; Winkvist, A; Bertz, F; Sonesson, U; Brekke, H K

    2017-10-01

    Results from studies evaluating the sustainability of diets combining environmental and nutritional aspects have been diverse; thus, greenhouse gas emissions (that is, carbon footprint (CF)) of diets in line with dietary recommendations in free-living individuals warrants further examination. Here, changes in dietary CF related to changes in food choice during a weight loss trial among lactating women who received a 12-week diet intervention based on the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) 2004 were analyzed. The objective of this study was to examine if a diet intervention based on NNR 2004 results in reduced dietary CF. Changes in dietary CF were analyzed among 61 lactating women participating in a weight loss trial. Food intake data from 4-day weighed diet records and results from life cycle analyses were used to examine changes in dietary CF across eight food groups during the intervention, specified in the unit carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 eq/day). Differences in changes in dietary CF between women receiving diet treatment (D-group) and women not receiving it (ND-group) were compared. There was no difference in change in dietary CF of the overall diet between D- and ND-group (P>0.05). As for the eight food groups, D-group increased their dietary CF from fruit and vegetables (+0.06±0.13 kg CO 2 eq/day) compared with a decrease in ND-group (-0.01±0.01 kg CO 2 eq/day) during the intervention, P=0.01. A diet intervention in line with NNR 2004 produced clinically relevant weight loss, but did not reduce dietary CF among lactating women with overweight and obesity. Dietary interventions especially designed to decrease dietary CF and their coherence with dietary recommendations need further exploration.

  2. Dietary patterns and odds of Type 2 diabetes in Beirut, Lebanon: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naja Farah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Lebanon, Type 2 diabetes (T2D has a major public health impact through high disease prevalence, significant downstream pathophysiologic effects, and enormous financial liabilities. Diet is an important environmental factor in the development and prevention of T2D. Dietary patterns may exert greater effects on health than individual foods, nutrients, or food groups. The objective of this study is to examine the association between dietary patterns and the odds of T2D among Lebanese adults. Methods Fifty-eight recently diagnosed cases of T2D and 116 population-based age, sex, and place of residence matched control participants were interviewed. Data collection included a standard socio-demographic and lifestyle questionnaire. Dietary intake was evaluated by a semi-quantitative 97-item food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements including weight, height, waist circumference, and percent body fat were also obtained. Dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of extracted patterns with T2D. Pearson correlations between these patterns and obesity markers, energy, and nutrient intakes were also examined. Results Four dietary patterns were identified: Refined Grains & Desserts, Traditional Lebanese, Fast Food and Meat & Alcohol. While scores of the “Refined Grains & Desserts” had the highest correlations with energy (r = 0.74 and carbohydrates (r = 0.22, those of the “Fast Food” had the highest correlation with fat intake (r = 0.34. After adjustment for socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics, scores of the Refined Grains & Desserts and Fast Food patterns were associated with higher odds of T2D (OR: 3.85, CI: 1.13-11.23 and OR: 2.80, CI: 1.14-5.59; respectively and scores of the Traditional Lebanese pattern were inversely associated with the odds of T2D (OR: 0.46, CI: 0.22-0.97. Conclusions The

  3. Who benefits from a dietary online intervention? Evidence from Italy, Spain and Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Ralf; Fleig, Lena; Warner, Lisa M; Gholami, Maryam; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Ngo, Joy; Roman-Viñas, Blanca; Ribas-Barba, Lourdes; Distante, Alessandro; Ntzani, Evangelia; Giannakis, George; Brandi, Maria L

    2017-04-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet includes high consumption of fruits, vegetables, olive oil, legumes, cereals and nuts, moderate to high intake of fish and dairy products, and low consumption of meat products. Intervention effects to improve adoption of this diet may vary in terms of individuals' motivational or volitional prerequisites. In the context of a three-country research collaboration, intervention effects on these psychological constructs for increasing adoption of the Mediterranean diet were examined. An intervention was conducted to improve Mediterranean diet consumption with a two-month follow-up. Linear multiple-level models examined which psychological constructs (outcome expectancies, planning, action control and stage of change) were associated with changes in diet scores. Web-based intervention in Italy, Spain and Greece. Adults (n 454; mean age 42·2 (sd 10·4) years, range 18-65 years; n 112 at follow-up). Analyses yielded an overall increase in the Mediterranean diet scores. Moreover, there were interactions between time and all four psychological constructs on these changes. Participants with lower levels of baseline outcome expectancies, planning, action control and stage of change were found to show steeper slopes, thus greater behavioural adoption, than those who started out with higher levels. The intervention produced overall improvements in Mediterranean diet consumption, with outcome expectancies, planning, action control and stage of change operating as moderators, indicating that those with lower motivational or volitional prerequisites gained more from the online intervention. Individual differences in participants' readiness for change need to be taken into account to gauge who would benefit most from the given treatment.

  4. The effect of adding group-based counselling to individual lifestyle counselling on changes in dietary intake. The Inter99 study--a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Ulla; Kristoffersen, Lis; Ladelund, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the specific effect of single intervention components in randomized controlled trials. The purpose was to investigate the effect of adding group-based diet and exercise counselling to individual life-style counselling on long-term changes in dietary habits....

  5. Protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial on information technology-enabled nutrition intervention among urban adults in Chandigarh (India): SMART eating trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasvir; Kaur, Manmeet; Webster, Jacqui; Kumar, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    Nutrition is an important determinant of health. At present, nutrition programs in India mainly emphasize improving maternal and child nutrition. Adult nutrition has not received due attention, though diseases like hypertension and diabetes are largely preventable through changes in dietary and physical activity behaviour. Little is known about the best approaches to improve dietary behaviours, especially the role of modern information technology (IT) in health education. We describe the protocol of the SMART Eating (Small, Measurable and Achievable dietary changes by Reducing fat, sugar and salt consumption and Trying different fruits and vegetables) health promotion intervention. A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial will evaluate the effect of an IT-enabled intervention on nutrition behaviour among urban adults of Chandigarh, India. Formative research using a qualitative exploratory approach was undertaken to inform the intervention. The IT-enabled intervention programme includes website development, Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail reminders and interactive help by mobile and landline phones. The IT-enabled intervention will be compared to the traditional nutrition education program of distributing pamphlets in the control group. The primary outcome will be the percentage of study participants meeting the dietary intake guidelines of the National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, India and the change in intake of fat, sugar, salt, fruit and vegetables after the intervention. The difference in differences method will be used to determine the net change in dietary intakes resulting from the interventions. Measurements will be made at baseline and at 6 months post-intervention, using a food frequency questionnaire. The formative research led to the development of a comprehensive intervention, focusing on five dietary components and using multi-channel communication approach including the use of IT to target urban North Indians from diverse socio

  6. Effects of a randomized intervention promoting healthy children's meals on children's ordering and dietary intake in a quick-service restaurant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Braun, Abbey C; Ehrenberg, Sarah; Epstein, Leonard H; Gampp, April; Leone, Lucia A; Singh, Anita; Tauriello, Sara

    2018-01-31

    Children's consumption of restaurant foods is associated with higher energy intake and lower nutritional quality compared to foods prepared at home. The aim of this pilot study was to test whether an in-restaurant intervention promoting healthy children's meals (i.e. two meals that met nutrition recommendations and were thus healthier than typical children's meal offerings across leading restaurants) affected children's meal selection and intake. Families with 4-to-8-year-old children were recruited from one location of Anderson's Frozen Custard, a regional quick-service restaurant chain. Families were randomly assigned to return to the restaurant during an intervention or control period and were blinded to group assignment. All families received free meals. During the intervention period families also received placemats featuring two healthy "Kids' Meals of the Day" upon restaurant entry. After families finished dining, researchers recorded children's orders and collected leftovers for quantifying dietary intake via weighed plate waste. Poisson regression and chi-square tests were used to compare children's orders between study groups, and t-tests were used to test for differences in dietary intake among children ordering a promoted healthy entrée (main dish) versus those who did not. Fifty-eight families participated. Children who were exposed to the study placemats prior to ordering ordered a significantly greater number of healthy food components compared to controls (p = 0.03). Overall, in the intervention group, 21% of children ordered a healthy entrée or side dish, versus 7% of controls. Children who ordered one of the promoted healthy entrées consumed less saturated fat across the total meal compared to those who did not (p = 0.04). Manipulating the prominence of healthy choices in restaurants may shift children's meal selections. Future research should build on these initial promising results, aiming to increase the potency of the intervention

  7. Glycemic control in the infectious diseases ward; role of clinical pharmacist interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsaei, Shadi; Karimzadeh, Iman; Elyasi, Sepideh; Hatamkhani, Shima; Khalili, Hossein

    2014-04-15

    Hyperglycemia is one of the most frequent metabolic complications in hospitalized patients. Increased risk of infection following hyperglycemia has been reported in hospitalized patients and infections may also cause insulin resistance which complicates the control of blood glucose level. In this study the impact of the clinical pharmacist interventions on the glycemic control in patients admitted to infectious diseases ward has been evaluated. We conducted a prospective, pre-post interventional study among patients with hyperglycemia. The clinical pharmacist-led multidisciplinary team managed the glycemic profile of patients according to an established insulin protocol commonly used in internal wards. Clinical pharmacists reviewed patients' medical charts for proper insulin administration, evaluated nurses' technique for insulin injection and blood glucose measurement, and educated patients about symptoms of hypoglycemia and the importance of adherence to different aspects of their glycemic management. The percentage of controlled random blood sugar increased from 13.8% in the pre-intervention to 22.3% in the post-intervention group (p value percentage of controlled fasting blood sugars in the post-intervention group was non-significantly higher than in the pre-intervention group. Pharmacists and additional health care providers from other departments such as nursing and dietary departments need to be devoted to glycemic control service. Collaborative practice agreement between physicians is necessary to promote this service and help to increase the use of such services in different settings for diabetes control.

  8. DIETARY EGG WHITES FOR PHOSPHORUS CONTROL IN MAINTENANCE HAEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS: A PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynn M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Markewich, Theodore; Colman, Sara; Benner, Debbie; Sim, John J.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background High dietary protein intake is associated with greater survival in maintenance haemodialysis (MHD) patients. High-protein foods may increase dietary phosphorus burden, which is associated with increased mortality in these patients. Hypothesis is: an egg white based diet with low phosphorus to protein ratio (phosphorus without deteriorating the nutritional status in MHD patients. Objective We assessed serum phosphorus and albumin levels in MHD patients who agreed to ingest one meal per day with pasteurised liquid egg whites without phosphorus additives, as principal protein source. Methods Thirteen otherwise stable MHD patients with serum phosphorus >4.0 mg/dl agreed to consume eight ounces (225 g) of pasteurised liquid egg whites one meal per day for six weeks. Recipes were suggested to improve diet variety. Results Thirteen participating patients included seven women, three African Americans and five diabetics. Twelve patients exhibited drop in serum phosphorus. Mean population fall in serum phosphorus was 0.94 mg/dl, i.e. from 5.58 ± 1.34 (mean ± SD) to 4.63 ± 1.18 (p = 0.003). Serum albumin showed an increase by 0.19 g/dl, i.e. from 4.02 ± 0.29 to 4.21 ± 0.36 g/dl (p = 0.014). Changes in phosphorus pill count were not statistically significant (p = 0.88). The egg white diet was well tolerated, and recipe variety appreciated. Conclusion Pasteurised liquid egg whites may be an effective diet component lowering serum phosphorus without risking malnutrition. Controlled trials are indicated to examine egg white based dietary interventions in MHD patients at home or during haemodialysis treatment. PMID:21288313

  9. A dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep: a randomized placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustrat Bruno

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of a dietary supplement containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, in association with Humulus lupulus extract, on the quality of sleep using the Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ in subjects with moderate to severe sleep disorders. Methods Randomized placebo-controlled trial, in a Population-based setting. Participants were adult patients 25 to 65 years old with a chronic primary insomnia who volunteered for the study. The tested intervention consisted of two soft gelatine capsules per day, containing either the dietary supplement (active group or olive oil (placebo group for a month. Subjects could also volunteer for two ancillary studies on melatonin and actigraphy. Evaluation criteria included i perception of the quality of sleep at the end of treatment using the LSEQ questionnaire, ii sleep efficiency measured by one-week actigraphic movement measurement performed before and during the treatment in a subsample of subjects, iii night melatonin and 6 sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6S urine rates in a subsample of subjects. Results The average of Leeds score was similar in both groups (p = 0.95. A marked improvement in the quality of sleep was observed in both placebo (62% and active (65% group (p = 0.52. The evolution of urinary melatonin, aMT6S, and of the Mel/aMT6S ratio showed no differences between the two groups. Sleep efficiency, as measured by actigraphy, improved similarly in both groups during the treatment period, from 72% to 76% and 75% in the active and placebo group respectively (p = 0.91. Conclusions The dietary supplement had neither effect on the perceived quality of sleep, nor on the melatonin metabolism and sleep-wake cycle. Trial registration: clinical trials.gov:NCT00484497

  10. Desire to eat high- and low-fat foods following a low-fat dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Frederick G; Vander Weg, Mark W

    2003-01-01

    This study examined changes in desires to eat high-fat and low-fat foods across an obesity treatment program. The hypotheses under examination were (1) preferences for low-fat foods would increase across time and (2) preferences for high-fat foods would decrease across time. Single-group, prospective examination of desires to eat 48 foods, categorized according to fat content, before and after the 16-week treatment program. University clinic, Memphis, Tennessee. 118 obese (mean weight = 194.4 lbs) women (mean age = 45.24 years) participating in an obesity treatment program. A 16-week cognitive-behavioral program for obesity. Desires to eat 48 foods varying in fat content and whether or not participants actually ate these foods. Analysis of variance, multiple regression, and paired t tests. The results indicate that during the program, preferences for low-fat foods increased, whereas preferences for high-fat foods decreased. These changes mirrored the changes in consumption of both low-fat and high-fat foods. Within a behavioral economic perspective, the reinforcement value of low-fat foods may increase following a low-fat dietary intervention, whereas the reinforcing properties of high-fat foods may decline. This is desirable as low-fat foods hold many advantages over high-fat foods in terms of weight maintenance.

  11. Pre‐operative oral nutritional supplementation with dietary advice versus dietary advice alone in weight‐losing patients with colorectal cancer: single‐blind randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Debra J.; Lal, Simon; Hill, James; Pilling, Mark; Soop, Mattias; Ramesh, Aswatha; Todd, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Pre‐operative weight loss has been consistently associated with increased post‐operative morbidity. The study aims to determine if pre‐operative oral nutritional supplements (ONSs) with dietary advice reduce post‐operative complications. Methods Single‐blinded randomized controlled trial. People with colorectal cancer scheduled for surgery with pre‐operative weight loss >1 kg/3–6 months were randomized by using stratified blocks (1:1 ratio) in six hospitals (1 November 2013–28 February 2015). Intervention group was given 250 mL/day ONS (10.1 KJ and 0.096 g protein per mL) and dietary advice. Control group received dietary advice alone. Oral nutritional supplements were administered from diagnosis to the day preceding surgery. Research team was masked to group allocation. Primary outcome was patients with one or more surgical site infection (SSI) or chest infection; secondary outcomes included percentage weight loss, total complications, and body composition measurements. Intention‐to‐treat analysis was performed with both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. A sample size of 88 was required. Results Of 101 participants, (55 ONS, 46 controls) 97 had surgery. In intention‐to‐treat analysis, there were 21/45 (47%) patients with an infection—either an SSI or chest infection in the control group vs. 17/55 (30%) in the ONS group. The odds ratio of a patient incurring either an SSI or chest infection was 0.532 (P = 0.135 confidence interval 0.232 to 1.218) in the unadjusted analysis and when adjusted for random differences at baseline (age, gender, percentage weight loss, and cancer staging) was 0.341 (P = 0.031, confidence interval 0.128 to 0.909). Pre‐operative percentage weight loss at the first time point after randomization was 4.1% [interquartile range (IQR) 1.7–7.0] in ONS group vs. 6.7% (IQR 2.6–10.8) in controls (Mann–Whitney U P = 0.021) and post‐operatively was 7.4% (IQR 4.3–10.0) in

  12. Effect of a low fat versus a low carbohydrate weight loss dietary intervention on biomarkers of long term survival in breast cancer patients ('CHOICE'): study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, Scot M; Playdon, Mary C; Wolfe, Pamela; McGinley, John N; Wisthoff, Mark R; Daeninck, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Weiqin; Zhu, Zongjian; Thompson, Henry J

    2011-01-01

    Weight loss in overweight or obese breast cancer patients is associated with an improved prognosis for long term survival. However, it is not clear whether the macronutrient composition of the chosen weight loss dietary plan imparts further prognostic benefit. A study protocol is presented for a dietary intervention to investigate the effects of weight loss dietary patterns that vary markedly in fat and carbohydrate contents on biomarkers of exposure to metabolic processes that may promote tumorigenesis and that are predictive of long term survival. The study will also determine how much weight must be lost for biomarkers to change in a favorable direction. Approximately 370 overweight or obese postmenopausal breast cancer survivors (body mass index: 25.0 to 34.9 kg/m 2 ) will be accrued and assigned to one of two weight loss intervention programs or a non-intervention control group. The dietary intervention is implemented in a free living population to test the two extremes of popular weight loss dietary patterns: a high carbohydrate, low fat diet versus a low carbohydrate, high fat diet. The effects of these dietary patterns on biomarkers for glucose homeostasis, chronic inflammation, cellular oxidation, and steroid sex hormone metabolism will be measured. Participants will attend 3 screening and dietary education visits, and 7 monthly one-on-one dietary counseling and clinical data measurement visits in addition to 5 group visits in the intervention arms. Participants in the control arm will attend two clinical data measurement visits at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome is high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Secondary outcomes include interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF), IGF binding protein-3, 8-isoprostane-F2-alpha, estrone, estradiol, progesterone, sex hormone binding globulin, adiponectin, and leptin. While clinical data indicate that excess weight for height is associated with poor prognosis for long term

  13. A workplace email-linked website intervention for modifying cancer-related dietary and lifestyle risk factors: rationale, design and baseline findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Y K; Mirnalini, K; Zalilah, M S

    2013-04-01

    The use of email and website as channels for workplace health information delivery is not fully explored. This study aims to describe the rationale, design, and baseline findings of an email-linked website intervention to improve modifiable cancer risk factors. Employees of a Malaysian public university were recruited by systematic random sampling and randomised into an intervention (n = 174) or control group (n = 165). A website was developed for the intervention and educational modules were uploaded onto the website. The intervention group received ten consecutive weekly emails with hypertext links to the website for downloading the modules and two individual phone calls as motivational support whilst the control group received none. Diet, lifestyle, anthropometric measurements, psychosocial factors and stages of change related to dietary fat, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity were assessed. Participants were predominantly female and in non-academic positions. Obesity was prevalent in 15% and 37% were at risk of co-morbidities. Mean intake of fats was 31%, fruit was -1 serving/day and vegetable was < 1 serving/day. Less than 20% smoked and drank alcohol and about 40% were physically inactive. The majority of the participants fell into the Preparation stage for decreasing fat intake, eating more fruit and vegetables, and increasing physical activity. Self-efficacy and perceived benefits were lowest among participants in the Precontemplation/Contemplation stage compared to the Preparation and Action/Maintenance stages. Baseline data show that dietary and lifestyle practices among the employees did not meet the international guidelines for cancer prevention. Hence the findings warrant the intervention planned.

  14. Comparing the Effectiveness of Dietary Vitamin C and Exercise Interventions on Fertility Parameters in Normal Obese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Bahare; Morowvat, Mohammad Hossein; Rahimi-Ghalati, Nasrin

    2016-04-16

    Comparing the effectiveness of dietary vitamin C and weight loss exercises interventions for weight loss on semen characteristics in normal obese man. A total number of 200 men were randomly allocated into two groups based on body mass index, exercise and vitamin C groups. Also, 50 men with normal spermogram were placed in a control group. In exercise group, a 6 months intensive exercise program was designed under a coach's supervision to reduce the body weight. In vitamin C group, 1,000 mg of vitamin C were given every other day as supplement. Weight loss increased the volume of semen in participants with 25-30 (P = .02) and more than 30 body mass index (P = .001). The increased concentration of sperm per mL of semen in body mass index (BMI) 25-30 group (P = .01) and more than 30 (P = .003) BMI was significant. Improving sperm motility after two hours in participants with more than 30 (P = .01) BMI was significant. In vitamin C group, the improvement of sperm concentration in participants who had less than 25 (P = .01), between 25 and 30 (P = .01), more than 30 (P = .02) BMI was significant. Sperm motility improved in all three groups (P = .001, P = .02 and P = .003, respectively). Weight loss can significantly increase semen volume, its concentration, its mobility and percentage of normal morphology. Consuming vitamin C significantly improves sperm concentration and mobility, but the semen volume and the percentage of normal morphology will not change significantly.

  15. Childhood obesity prevention interventions in childcare settings: systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan E; Emerson, Janice S; Levine, Robert S; Kihlberg, Courtney J; Hull, Pamela C

    2014-01-01

    Childcare settings are an opportune location for early intervention programs seeking to prevent childhood obesity. This article reports on a systematic review of controlled trials of obesity prevention interventions in childcare settings. The review was limited to English language articles published in PubMed, Web of Science, and Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) between January 2000 and April 2012. childhood obesity prevention interventions in childcare settings using controlled designs that reported adiposity and behavior outcomes. no interventions, non-childcare settings, clinical weight loss programs, non-English publications. Publications were identified by key word search. Two authors reviewed eligible studies to extract study information and study results. Qualitative synthesis was conducted, including tabulation of information and a narrative summary. Fifteen studies met the eligibility criteria. Seven studies reported improvements in adiposity. Six of the 13 interventions with dietary components reported improved intake or eating behaviors. Eight of the 12 interventions with physical activity components reported improved activity levels or physical fitness. Evidence was mixed for all outcomes. Results should be interpreted cautiously given the high variability in study designs and interventions. Further research needs long-term follow-up, multistrategy interventions that include changes in the nutrition and physical activity environment, reporting of cost data, and consideration of sustainability.

  16. Effects of individual dietary counseling as part of a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) on nutritional status: a population-based intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, I; Rissanen, T H; Sulkava, R; Hartikainen, S

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional risk is relatively common in community-dwelling older people. To objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of individual dietary counseling as part of a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment on nutritional status among community-dwelling people aged 75 years or older. Data were obtained from a subpopulation of participants in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) intervention study in 2004 to 2007. In the present study, the population consist 173 persons at risk of malnutrition in the year 2005 in an intervention (n=84) and control group (n=89). Nutritional status, body weight, body mass index, serum albumin were performed at the beginning of the study and at a two-year follow-up. The nutritional screening was performed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) test. A increase in MNA scores (1.8 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7 to 2.0) and in serum albumin (0.8 g/L, 95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9 g/L) were a significant difference between the groups. Nutritional intervention, even dietary counseling without nutritional supplements, may improve nutritional status.

  17. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Lee

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day (intervention to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control. At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P <0.0001 or control diets (775 mg/d, P = 0.0001 periods. Furthermore, the addition of 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily for the 3 week intervention did not significantly increase total energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  18. Effects of dietary interventions on 24-hour urine parameters in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kıraç

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dietary factors on 24-hour urine parameters in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones. A total of 108 of idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones were included in the study. A 24-hour urinalysis was performed and metabolic abnormalities were measured for all of the patients. All of the patients were given specialized diets for their 24-hour urine abnormalities. At the end of first month, the same parameters were examined in another 24-hour urinalysis. Hyperoxaluria, hypernatruria, and hypercalciuria were found in 84 (77%, 43 (39.8%, and 38 (35.5% of the patients, respectively. The differences between the oxalate, sodium, volume, uric acid, and citrate parameters before and after the dietary intervention were significant (p < 0.05. The calcium parameters were not significantly different before and after the intervention. We found that oxalate, sodium, volume, uric acid, and citrate—but not calcium—abnormalities in patients with recurrent calcium oxalate stones can be corrected by diet. The metabolic profiles of idiopathic calcium oxalate stone patients should be evaluated and the appropriate dietary interventions should be implemented to decrease stone recurrence.

  19. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Gut Microbiota Signatures Predict Host and Microbiota Responses to Dietary Interventions in Obese Individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korpela, K.; Flint, H.J.; Johnstone, A.M.; Lappi, J.; Poutanen, K.; Dewulf, E.; Delzenne, N.; Vos, de W.M.; Salonen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Interactions between the diet and intestinal microbiota play a role in health and disease, including obesity and related metabolic complications. There is great interest to use dietary means to manipulate the microbiota to promote health. Currently, the impact of dietary change on the

  1. A healthy school start - Parental support to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity in children: Design and evaluation of a cluster-randomised intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinder Liselotte

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity is multi-factorial and determined to a large extent by dietary habits, physical activity and sedentary behaviours. Previous research has shown that school-based programmes are effective but that their effectiveness can be improved by including a parental component. At present, there is a lack of effective parental support programmes for improvement of diet and physical activity and prevention of obesity in children. Methods/Design This paper describes the rationale and design of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity in six-year-old children starting school. The study is performed in close collaboration with the school health care and is designed as a cluster-randomised controlled trial with a mixed methods approach. In total, 14 pre-school classes are included from a municipality in Stockholm county where there is large variation in socio-economic status between the families. The school classes are randomised to intervention (n = 7 and control (n = 7 groups including a total of 242 children. The intervention is based on social cognitive theory and consists of three main components: 1 a health information brochure; 2 two motivational interviewing sessions with the parents; and 3 teacher-led classroom activities with the children. The primary outcomes are physical activity in the children measured objectively by accelerometry, children's dietary and physical activity habits measured with a parent-proxy questionnaire and parents' self-efficacy measured by a questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are height, weight and waist circumference in the children. The duration of the intervention is six months and includes baseline, post intervention and six months follow-up measurements. Linear and logistic regression models will be used to analyse differences between intervention and control groups in the outcome variables. Mediator and moderator analysis will be performed

  2. A healthy school start - parental support to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity in children: design and evaluation of a cluster-randomised intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Gisela; Sundblom, Elinor; Norman, Asa; Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer

    2011-03-25

    Childhood obesity is multi-factorial and determined to a large extent by dietary habits, physical activity and sedentary behaviours. Previous research has shown that school-based programmes are effective but that their effectiveness can be improved by including a parental component. At present, there is a lack of effective parental support programmes for improvement of diet and physical activity and prevention of obesity in children. This paper describes the rationale and design of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity in six-year-old children starting school. The study is performed in close collaboration with the school health care and is designed as a cluster-randomised controlled trial with a mixed methods approach. In total, 14 pre-school classes are included from a municipality in Stockholm county where there is large variation in socio-economic status between the families. The school classes are randomised to intervention (n = 7) and control (n = 7) groups including a total of 242 children. The intervention is based on social cognitive theory and consists of three main components: 1) a health information brochure; 2) two motivational interviewing sessions with the parents; and 3) teacher-led classroom activities with the children. The primary outcomes are physical activity in the children measured objectively by accelerometry, children's dietary and physical activity habits measured with a parent-proxy questionnaire and parents' self-efficacy measured by a questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are height, weight and waist circumference in the children. The duration of the intervention is six months and includes baseline, post intervention and six months follow-up measurements. Linear and logistic regression models will be used to analyse differences between intervention and control groups in the outcome variables. Mediator and moderator analysis will be performed. Participants will be interviewed. The results from

  3. Community-based educational intervention improved the diversity of complementary diets in western Kenya: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waswa, Lydiah M; Jordan, Irmgard; Herrmann, Johannes; Krawinkel, Michael B; Keding, Gudrun B

    2015-12-01

    Lack of diversity is a major factor contributing to inadequate nutrient intakes among children during the complementary feeding period in many rural areas in developing countries. This has been attributed to inadequate feeding practices and nutrition knowledge among their caregivers. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of an educational intervention on children's dietary diversity and nutrition knowledge of caregivers. Cluster randomization was applied and twenty matched village pairs were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The nutrition education intervention consisted of four sessions comprising of group trainings and cooking demonstrations that were conducted over a period of 5 months. Households in rural communities in Bondo and Teso South sub-counties, western Kenya. Caregivers with children aged 6-17 months receiving nutrition education. The children's dietary diversity scores (CDDS) and nutrition knowledge scores of the caregivers improved significantly in the intervention group at endline. The treatment effect on CDDS was positive and significant (P=0.001). The CDDS rate of the children in the intervention group was 27% larger than it would have been without the treatment effect. The intervention also had a significant effect on the caregivers' nutrition knowledge scores (incidence rate ratio=2.05; Pnutrition knowledge of the caregivers did not have a significant effect on CDDS (P=0.731). The nutrition education intervention led to improvements in children's dietary diversity and nutrition knowledge of the caregivers.

  4. The effect of dietary counselling on food intakes in pregnant women at risk for gestational diabetes: a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial RADIEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkama, A; Koivusalo, S; Lindström, J; Meinilä, J; Kautiainen, H; Stach-Lempinen, B; Rönö, K; Klemetti, M; Pöyhönen-Alho, M; Tiitinen, A; Huvinen, E; Laivuori, H; Andersson, S; Roine, R; Eriksson, J G

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. GDM may be prevented by improving the diets of pregnant women. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary counselling on the diets of pregnant women at GDM risk. This study was a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial the Finnish gestational diabetes prevention study (RADIEL) in which pre-pregnant and pregnant women with previous GDM or BMI ⩾30 kg/m(2) were allocated into two groups, namely the control and the intervention groups. The control group received standard antenatal dietary counselling according to the Finnish Nutrition Recommendations. The intervention group participated in one individual dietary counselling session and one group dietary counselling session in addition to the standard counselling. This study included women who were recruited during pregnancy. To assess changes in food intake, food-intake questionnaires were collected during the first and the second trimester of pregnancy. Bootstrap type analysis of covariance was used, and 242 participants were included in the final analysis to study changes in food intake. The intakes of low-fat cheese (baseline adjusted mean 0.09 times/day; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07, 0.24; P=0.040) and fish (baseline adjusted mean 0.28 times per week; 95% CI 0.08, 0.49; P=0.011) showed a significant increase in the intervention group compared with the control group. This study showed that dietary counselling in early pregnancy can lead to modest dietary improvements in pregnant women at GDM risk.

  5. Renal Function Following Three Distinct Weight Loss Dietary Strategies During 2 Years of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tirosh, Amir; Golan, Rachel; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Henkin, Yaakov; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Rudich, Assaf; Kovsan, Julia; Fiedler, Georg M.; Blüher, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Thiery, Joachim; Stampfer, Meir J.; Shai, Iris

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study addressed the long-term effect of various diets, particularly low-carbohydrate high-protein, on renal function on participants with or without type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In the 2-year Dietary Intervention Randomized Controlled Trial (DIRECT), 318 participants (age, 51 years; 86% men; BMI, 31 kg/m2; mean estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], 70.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean urine microalbumin-to-creatinine ratio, 12:12) with serum creatinine 0.05) across...

  6. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  7. Factors influencing the dietary response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern in healthy women from the Quebec City metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Julie; Lamarche, Benoît; Lemieux, Simone

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and baseline food habits on the dietary response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern and maintenance of dietary modifications in 73 healthy women. The 12-week nutritional intervention in free-living conditions consisted of two group courses and seven individual sessions with a dietitian. A follow-up visit was performed 12 weeks after the end of the intervention (week 24). A Mediterranean dietary score was derived from a food frequency questionnaire, administered at 0, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Marital status, socioeconomic level, educational level and household size did not seem to influence the dietary response, whereas women without children followed more closely dietary advice than women with children (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3-10.0). Planning food purchases in function of weekly discounts was also associated with better dietary response to the intervention (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3-8.8). Nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern was effective in modifying food habits of healthy women. The fact of having children or not and food purchase habits seem to influence the response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern.

  8. Physical activity and dietary behavior change in Internet-based weight loss interventions: comparing two multiple-behavior change indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jordan A; Sallis, James F; Ramirez, Ernesto R; Patrick, Kevin; Norman, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of two Internet-based weight loss interventions on physical activity (PA) and dietary behaviors using two approaches for computing combined behavior change. Participants were 352 overweight/obese women and men completing 12-month interventions in San Diego, California during 2002-2007. Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and sedentary time were measured with accelerometers, and dietary fat and fruit and vegetable intake were assessed with food frequency questionnaires. Longitudinal analyses tested the effect of the intervention on combined health behavior change quantified using a standardized residualized change index (SRCI) and a risk factor change index (RFCI). At baseline, participants engaged in an average of 153 min/week of MVPA and 525 min/day of sedentary time, and consumed 37% of calories from fat and behavior change as measured with each approach (pbehaviors appear effective. The SRCI was more sensitive for evaluating the intervention, but the RFCI may be easier to use for communicating public health significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of a Group-Mediated Exercise and Dietary Intervention in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy: Results From the IDEA-P Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Grainger, Elizabeth; Simpson, Christina; Fairman, Ciaran M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Buell, Jackie; Monk, J Paul; Mortazavi, Amir; Clinton, Steven K

    2018-04-19

    Although androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the foundation of treatment for prostate cancer, the physiological impacts of ADT result in functional decline and enhanced risk of chronic disease and metabolic syndrome. The Individualized Diet and Exercise Adherence Pilot Trial (IDEA-P) is a single-blind, randomized, pilot trial comparing the effects of a group-mediated, cognitive-behavioral (GMCB) exercise and dietary intervention (EX+D) with those of a standard-of-care (SC) control during the treatment of prostate cancer patients undergoing ADT. A total of 32 prostate cancer patients (M age = 66.28, SD = 7.79) undergoing ADT were randomly assigned to the 12-week EX+D intervention (n = 16) or control (n = 16). The primary outcome in IDEA-P was change in mobility performance with secondary outcomes including body composition and muscular strength. Blinded assessment of outcomes were obtained at baseline and at 2- and 3-month follow-ups. Favorable adherence and retention rates were observed, and no serious intervention-related adverse events were documented. Intent-to-treat ANCOVA controlling for baseline value and ADT duration demonstrated that EX+D resulted in significantly greater improvements in mobility performance (p < .02), muscular strength (p < .01), body fat percentage (p < .05), and fat mass (p < .03) at 3-month follow-up, relative to control. Findings from the IDEA-P trial suggest that a GMCB-based EX+D intervention resulted in significant, clinically meaningful improvements in mobility performance, muscular strength, and body composition, relative to controls. Collectively, these results suggest that the EX+D was a safe and well-tolerated intervention for prostate cancer patients on ADT. The utility of implementing this approach in the treatment of prostate cancer patients on ADT should be evaluated in future large-scale efficacy trials. NCT02050906.

  10. The effects of the HEALTHY study intervention on middle school student dietary intakes

    OpenAIRE

    Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; El Ghormli, Laurie; Mobley, Connie; Gillis, Bonnie; Stadler, Diane; Hartstein, Jill; Volpe, Stella L; Virus, Amy; Bridgman, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The HEALTHY study was designed to respond to the alarming trends in increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in youth. The objective of this analysis was to examine the effects of the HEALTHY study on student self-reported dietary intakes (energy, macronutrients and grams consumed of selected food groups). Methods HEALTHY was a cluster-randomized study in 42 public middle schools. Students, n = 3908, self-reported dietary intake using the Block...

  11. Benefits of repeated individual dietary counselling in long-term weight control in women after delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Johanna; Isolauri, Erika; Poussa, Tuija; Laitinen, Kirsi

    2015-10-01

    As pregnancy may trigger overweight in women, new means for its prevention are being sought. The aim here was to investigate the effect of individual dietary counselling during and after pregnancy on post-partum weight and waist circumference up to 4 years post-partum. A cohort of women (n = 256) were randomized to receive repeated individual dietary counselling by a nutritionist during and after pregnancy, or as controls not receiving dietary counselling, from the first trimester of pregnancy until 6 months after delivery. Counselling aimed to bring dietary intake into line with recommendations, with particular focus on the increase in the intake of unsaturated fatty acids instead of saturated. Pre-pregnancy weight was taken from welfare clinic records. Weight and waist circumference were measured at 4 years after delivery. The proportion of overweight women increased from 26% prior to pregnancy to 30% at 4 years after delivery among women receiving dietary counselling, as against considerably more, from 32% to 57%, among controls. The prevalence of central adiposity was 31% in women receiving dietary counselling, 64% in controls. Likewise, both the risk of overweight (odds ratio: 0.23, 0.08-0.63, P = 0.005) and central adiposity (odds ratio: 0.18, 0.06-0.52, P = 0.002) were lower in women receiving dietary counselling compared with controls. Repeated dietary counselling initiated in early pregnancy can be beneficial in long-term weight control after delivery. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A review of the characteristics of dietary fibers relevant to appetite and energy intake outcomes in human intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutanen, Kaisa S; Dussort, Pierre; Erkner, Alfrun; Fiszman, Susana; Karnik, Kavita; Kristensen, Mette; Marsaux, Cyril Fm; Miquel-Kergoat, Sophie; Pentikäinen, Saara P; Putz, Peter; Slavin, Joanne L; Steinert, Robert E; Mela, David J

    2017-09-01

    Background: Many intervention studies have tested the effect of dietary fibers (DFs) on appetite-related outcomes, with inconsistent results. However, DFs comprise a wide range of compounds with diverse properties, and the specific contribution of these to appetite control is not well characterized. Objective: The influence of specific DF characteristics [i.e., viscosity, gel-forming capacity, fermentability, or molecular weight (MW)] on appetite-related outcomes was assessed in healthy humans. Design: Controlled human intervention trials that tested the effects of well-characterized DFs on appetite ratings or energy intake were identified from a systematic search of literature. Studies were included only if they reported 1 ) DF name and origin and 2 ) data on viscosity, gelling properties, fermentability, or MW of the DF materials or DF-containing matrixes. Results: A high proportion of the potentially relevant literature was excluded because of lack of adequate DF characterization. In total, 49 articles that met these criteria were identified, which reported 90 comparisons of various DFs in foods, beverages, or supplements in acute or sustained-exposure trials. In 51 of the 90 comparisons, the DF-containing material of interest was efficacious for ≥1 appetite-related outcome. Reported differences in material viscosity, MW, or fermentability did not clearly correspond to differences in efficacy, whereas gel-forming DF sources were consistently efficacious (but with very few comparisons). Conclusions: The overall inconsistent relations of DF properties with respect to efficacy may reflect variation in measurement methodology, nature of the DF preparation and matrix, and study designs. Methods of DF characterization, incorporation, and study design are too inconsistent to allow generalized conclusions about the effects of DF properties on appetite and preclude the development of reliable, predictive, structure-function relations. Improved standards for

  13. Food product health warnings promote dietary self-control through reductions in neural signals indexing food cue reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Daniel H; Summerell, Patrick; Ng, Alyssa; Dixon, Helen; Murawski, Carsten; Wakefield, Melanie; Bode, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Modern societies are replete with palatable food cues. A growing body of evidence suggests that food cue exposure activates conditioned appetitive physiological and psychological responses that may override current metabolic needs and existing eating goals, such as the desire to maintain a healthy diet. This conditioned response results in unhealthy dietary choices and is a contributing factor in the current obesity epidemic. Prime based obesity prevention measures such as health warnings at point-of-sale or on product packaging may have the potential to counteract the influence of the obesogenic environment at the crucial moment when people make food purchasing or consumption decisions. Existing research into the efficacy of these intervention strategies has predominantly employed self-report and population level measures, and little evidence exists to support the contention that these measures counteract food cue reactivity at the time of decision making. Using a dietary self-control priming paradigm, we demonstrated that brief exposure to food product health warnings enhanced dietary self-control. Further, we analysed electroencephalographic correlates of selective attention and food cue evoked craving (N1, P3, LPP) to show that health warning exposure reduced the automatic appetitive response towards palatable food cues. These findings contribute to existing evidence that exogenous information can successfully prime latent goals, and substantiate the notion that food product health warnings may provide a new avenue through which to curb excessive energy intake and reduce rising obesity rates.

  14. Effective weight-loss using an e-health delivered physical activity and dietary intervention: A federal credit union pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoski, Mathew J; Newton, Janis; Ling, Catherine G; Blaylock, Kathleen; Smith, Sheila A O; Paguntalan, John; Treiber, Frank A

    2016-04-06

    This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of a distance-based e-health program delivered across multiple rural Federal Credit Union worksites that focused on physical activity and dietary education. Program design and implementation were based on the premises of Social Impact Theory (SIT). A sample of fifty-four participants (47 white. 7 black) aged 24 to 58 across different worksite locations completed 10 weeks of e-health delivered physical activity and dietary intervention. Pre to post weight changes were examined as a primary outcome. The findings showed that regardless of worksite location, participants on average reduced their weight by 10.13 lbs if they completed both the exercise and lunch and learn components of the study compared to a decrease of 2.73 lbs for participants who chose not to engage in the exercise related activities. Participant dropout from either group was less than four percent. The results of this study show the beneficial influence of physical activity integration using SIT upon distance programs targeting weight loss. In addition, the high adherence and weight loss success show promise and demonstrates the potential for e-health delivered exercise and lifestyle interventions. Further replication of results via additional randomized controlled trials is needed.

  15. The effect of health and nutrition education intervention on women's postpartum beliefs and practices: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Ping

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 'Sitting month' is the Chinese tradition for postpartum customs. Available studies indicate that some of the traditional postpartum practices are potentially harmful for women's health. However, no intervention study aiming at postpartum practices has been performed. In this paper we evaluated the effect of a health and nutrition education intervention, which focused on improving postpartum dietary quality and optimal health behaviors. Methods The study design was a randomized controlled trial conducted in both urban and rural area of Hubei between August 2003 and June 2004. A total of 302 women who attended the antenatal clinic during the third trimester with an uncomplicated pregnancy were recruited. Women randomized to the education intervention group in both urban and rural area received two two-hour prenatal education sessions and four postpartum counseling visits. Control group women received usual health care during pregnancy and postpartum period. Women were followed up until 42 days postpartum. Outcome measures were nutrition and health knowledge, dietary behavior, health behavior and health problems during the postpartum period. Results Women in the intervention groups exhibited significantly greater improvement in overall dietary behaviors such as consumption of fruits, vegetables, soybean and soybean products as well as nutrition and health knowledge than those in the control groups. Significantly more women in the intervention groups give up the traditional behavior taboos. The incidence of constipation, leg cramp or joint pain and prolonged lochia rubra was significantly lower in the intervention groups as compared with the control groups. Conclusion The study shows that health and nutrition education intervention enable the women take away some of the unhealthy traditional postpartum practices and decrease the prevalence of postpartum health problems. The intervention has potential for adaptation and

  16. Dietary fiber and colorectal cancer risk: a nested case-control study using food diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Christina C; Keogh, Ruth H; Spencer, Elizabeth A; Greenwood, Darren C; Key, Tim J; Fentiman, Ian S; Shipley, Martin J; Brunner, Eric J; Cade, Janet E; Burley, Victoria J; Mishra, Gita; Stephen, Alison M; Kuh, Diana; White, Ian R; Luben, Robert; Lentjes, Marleen A H; Khaw, Kay Tee; Rodwell Bingham, Sheila A

    2010-05-05

    Results of epidemiological studies of dietary fiber and colorectal cancer risk have not been consistent, possibly because of attenuation of associations due to measurement error in dietary exposure ascertainment. To examine the association between dietary fiber intake and colorectal cancer risk, we conducted a prospective case-control study nested within seven UK cohort studies, which included 579 case patients who developed incident colorectal cancer and 1996 matched control subjects. We used standardized dietary data obtained from 4- to 7-day food diaries that were completed by all participants to calculate the odds ratios for colorectal, colon, and rectal cancers with the use of conditional logistic regression models that adjusted for relevant covariates. We also calculated odds ratios for colorectal cancer by using dietary data obtained from food-frequency questionnaires that were completed by most participants. All statistical tests were two-sided. Intakes of absolute fiber and of fiber intake density, ascertained by food diaries, were statistically significantly inversely associated with the risks of colorectal and colon cancers in both age-adjusted models and multivariable models that adjusted for age; anthropomorphic and socioeconomic factors; and dietary intakes of folate, alcohol, and energy. For example, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio of colorectal cancer for highest vs the lowest quintile of fiber intake density was 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.45 to 0.96). However, no statistically significant association was observed when the same analysis was conducted using dietary data obtained by food-frequency questionnaire (multivariable odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.57 to 1.36). Intake of dietary fiber is inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk. Methodological differences (ie, study design, dietary assessment instruments, definition of fiber) may account for the lack of convincing evidence for the inverse association

  17. Dietary patterns and risk of colorectal cancer in Tehran Province: a case?control study

    OpenAIRE

    Safari, Akram; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Rashidkhani, Bahram; Fereidooni, Foroozandeh

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is the third and fourth leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality among men and women, respectively in Iran. However, the role of dietary factors that could contribute to this high cancer incidence remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine major dietary patterns and its relationship with colorectal cancer. Methods This case?control study was conducted in four hospitals in Tehran city of Iran. A total of 71 patients (35 men and 36 women, aged 40...

  18. [Assessment of control of cardiovascular risk factors in obese posmenopausal women after monitoring a structured dietary education and exercise program. (SÍSIFO Program)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Soto, Z M; Montoro García, S; Leal Hernández, M; Abellán Alemán, J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the influence of a specific program of physical exercise on cardiovascular risk, quality of life and eating habits of menopausal women. Prospective, intervention study previous-after without control group for three months. 66 menopausal women were included. The intervention consisted of a structured diet and exercise program. Biochemical, anthropometric, dietary and life quality parameters were determined before and three months after surgery. After the intervention a decrease in weight (4.4±2,3kg) and BMI (1.83±0.84kg/m(2)) (pcardiovascular risk by the Framingham tables decreases by 3% postoperatively (pcardiovascular risk of the women studied. It also improves the quality of life and dietary habits. Copyright © 2016 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional Assessment of Patients with Head and Neck Cancer in North-East India and Dietary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Abhinandan; Bahar, Iqbal; Saikia, Abijit

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNCA) patients have poor nutritional status which clearly bears a negative prognosis in cancer. There is no study and consensus on nutritional assessment tools and diet structure for such patients. This study intends to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and formulate a diet chart keeping in view the general food habit and economic condition of HNCA patients of North East (NE) region. To find out an affordable dietary intervention for HNCA patients based on dietary principles. To assess the role of nutritional assessment tools in these group of patients. This is a 1-year prospective interventional study on HNCA patients attending the Dept of ENT of a teaching hospital. The outcome of the nutritional intervention using a specific diet were assessed using clinical, laboratory and anthropomorphic assessment tools and indices like Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI) and Nutritional Assessment Index (NAI). The study diet provided appropriate amounts of nutrients to HNCA patients as evident from improvements in anthropomorphic parameters and nutritional indices. Clinically, Hemoglobin percentage (Hb%), Body Mass Index (BMI), Mid Arm Circumference (MAC) and triceps skin fold thickness (TST) were found to be reliable malnutrition markers. Nutritional Assessment Index has been found to be the best index to evaluate malnutrition. The daily requirement of nutrients for HNCA patients can be satisfactorily met by adopting specific diet chart presented in our study. As no structured diet plan are available in literature, our diet chart can act as a template diet appropriate for HNCA patients of this region.

  20. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wu, FanFan; Spaccarotella, Kim; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-07-11

    Well-designed research trials are critical for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of nutrition education interventions. To determine whether behavioral and/or cognition changes can be attributed to an intervention, the experimental design must include a control or comparison condition against which outcomes from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature. A systematic review of control groups in nutrition education interventions was conducted to better understand how control conditions are described in peer-reviewed journal articles compared with experimental conditions. To be included in the systematic review, articles had to be indexed in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, WoS, and/or ERIC and report primary research findings of controlled nutrition education intervention trials conducted in the United States with free-living consumer populations and published in English between January 2005 and December 2015. Key elements extracted during data collection included treatment provided to the experimental and control groups (e.g., overall intervention content, tailoring methods, delivery mode, format, duration, setting, and session descriptions, and procedures for standardizing, fidelity of implementation, and blinding); rationale for control group type selected; sample size and attrition; and theoretical foundation. The search yielded 43 publications; about one-third of these had an inactive control condition, which is considered a weak study design. Nearly two-thirds of reviewed studies had an active control condition considered a stronger research design; however, many failed to report one or more key elements of the intervention, especially for the control condition. None of the experimental and control group treatments were sufficiently detailed to permit replication of the

  1. Nutrient adequacy during weight loss interventions: a randomized study in women comparing the dietary intake in a meal replacement group with a traditional food group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bovee Vicki

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe and effective weight control strategies are needed to stem the current obesity epidemic. The objective of this one-year study was to document and compare the macronutrient and micronutrient levels in the foods chosen by women following two different weight reduction interventions. Methods Ninety-six generally healthy overweight or obese women (ages 25–50 years; BMI 25–35 kg/m2 were randomized into a Traditional Food group (TFG or a Meal Replacement Group (MRG incorporating 1–2 meal replacement drinks or bars per day. Both groups had an energy-restricted goal of 5400 kJ/day. Dietary intake data was obtained using 3-Day Food records kept by the subjects at baseline, 6 months and one-year. For more uniform comparisons between groups, each diet intervention consisted of 18 small group sessions led by the same Registered Dietitian. Results Weight loss for the 73% (n = 70 completing this one-year study was not significantly different between the groups, but was significantly different (p ≤ .05 within each group with a mean (± standard deviation weight loss of -6.1 ± 6.7 kg (TFG, n = 35 vs -5.0 ± 4.9 kg (MRG, n = 35. Both groups had macronutrient (Carbohydrate:Protein:Fat ratios that were within the ranges recommended (50:19:31, TFG vs 55:16:29, MRG. Their reported reduced energy intake was similar (5729 ± 1424 kJ, TFG vs 5993 ± 2016 kJ, MRG. There was an improved dietary intake pattern in both groups as indicated by decreased intake of saturated fat (≤ 10%, cholesterol ( Conclusion In this one-year university-based intervention, both dietitian-led groups successfully lost weight while improving overall dietary adequacy. The group incorporating fortified meal replacements tended to have a more adequate essential nutrient intake compared to the group following a more traditional food group diet. This study supports the need to incorporate fortified foods and/or dietary supplements while following an energy

  2. Maternal Dietary Patterns and Gestational Diabetes Risk: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Maternal dietary patterns play an important role in the progress of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. The aim of the present study was to explore this association. Method. A total of 388 pregnant women (122 case and 266 control were included. Dietary intake were collected using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. GDM was diagnosed using a 100-gram, 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Dietary pattern was identified by factor analysis. To investigate the relation between each of the independent variables with gestational diabetes, the odds ratio (OR was calculated. Results. Western dietary pattern was high in sweets, jams, mayonnaise, soft drinks, salty snacks, solid fat, high-fat dairy products, potatoes, organ meat, eggs, red meat, processed foods, tea, and coffee. The prudent dietary pattern was characterized by higher intake of liquid oils, legumes, nuts and seeds, fruits and dried fruits, fish and poultry whole, and refined grains. Western dietary pattern was associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes mellitus before and after adjustment for confounders (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.27–3.04, OR = 1.68, 95% CI: 1.04–2.27. However, no significant association was found for a prudent pattern. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the Western dietary pattern was associated with an increased risk of GDM.

  3. Family-centered brief intervention for reducing obesity and cardiovascular disease risk: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Scott; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; McPhee, Julia; Zinn, Caryn; Grøntved, Anders; Schofield, Grant

    2016-11-01

    To assess the effects of a family-centered, physical activity and nutrition "brief" intervention (time-limited contact) on body weight and related health outcomes in primary health care patients with an elevated 5-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This study implemented a cluster randomized controlled trial design with two treatment conditions: a CVD risk assessment and one-time consultation ("usual care" control) and a CVD risk assessment and up to five home sessions that aimed to reduce obesity by encouraging physical activity and healthy eating (intervention). Three hundred and twenty patients aged 35 to 65 years from 16 primary health care clinics in Auckland, New Zealand, participated in the study. Intervention effects on BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, 5-year CVD risk, physical activity, and dietary patterns were assessed using generalized linear mixed models. When compared with the control group, the intervention resulted in a significant but relatively modest decrease in BMI between baseline and the 12-month follow-up (-0.633 kg m -2 , P adj  = 0.048). Significant decreases were also observed for total cholesterol at 4 and 12 months, the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio at 4 months, 5-year CVD risk at 4 months, and fast food consumption at 12 months. Our findings show that a family-centered brief intervention targeting physical activity and nutrition can generate slightly better obesity-related health outcomes than usual care alone. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  4. Use of a Mobile Application for Self-Monitoring Dietary Intake: Feasibility Test and an Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Song, Sihan; Ahn, Jeong Sun; Kim, Yoonhee; Lee, Jung Eun

    2017-07-13

    Given the increasing social and economic burden of chronic disease and the need for efficient approaches to prevent and treat chronic disease, emphasis on the use of information and communication technology (ICT)-based health care has emerged. We aimed to test the feasibility of a mobile application, Diet-A, and examine whether Diet-A could be used to monitor dietary intake among adolescents. In a three-month pre-post intervention study, 9 male and 24 female high school students aged 16-18 years consented and participated in this study. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages consumed using voice or text mode input. Nutrient intake was measured using 24-h recalls pre- and post-intervention. We compared nutrient intake data assessed by Diet-A application with those assessed by 24-h recalls. Participants tended to underreport intakes of nutrients compared to those assessed by two 24-h recalls. There were significant decreases in sodium ( p = 0.04) and calcium ( p = 0.03) intake between pre- and post-intervention. Of participants who completed questionnaires of feasibility ( n = 24), 61.9% reported that they were satisfied using the application to monitor their food intake, and 47.7% liked getting personal information about their dietary intake from the application. However, more than 70% of participants answered that it was burdensome to use the application or that they had trouble remembering to record their food intake. The mobile application Diet-A offers the opportunity to monitor dietary intake through real-time feedback. However, use of Diet-A may not provide accurate information on the food intake of adolescents, partly because of the recording burden.

  5. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer T; Moore, Carolyn E; Radcliffe, John D

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day) (intervention) to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control). At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d) when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01508689.

  6. Effect of dietary intervention and lipid-lowering treatment on brachial vasoreactivity in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva; Møller, Jacob E; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The "Mediterranean" diet and statin treatment have both independently been shown to improve survival and reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD), but no studies have evaluated the effect of this combination on endothelial function. We the...... factors and vessel size (P =.02; beta = -2.66 [-4.91; -0.41]). CONCLUSION: Dietary intervention with the Mediterranean diet and statin treatment improve FMD in the brachial artery in patients with IHD and hypercholesterolemia to a greater degree than statin treatment alone....

  7. Situation of Iron Deficiency and Its Management Prioritizing Dietary Intervention in Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, BK; Koirala, U; Lama, STA

    2012-01-01

    the extent of iron deficiency anemia and intake of dietary iron among the general population in Nepal. Materials and methods Published research articles, books, bulletins, and online materials regarding iron deficiency were studied in both national and international scenarios. Results Nearly 46 percent...... of children (6–59 months) and 35 percent of women (15–49 years) were still suffering from anemia though the trend has been decreasing for the last 15 years. Mostly, young children (6–23 months) and pregnant women were the victims due to their high iron requirements and lower intake of dietary iron. The most...... common risk factors related to iron deficiency anemia (IDA) found in different studies were low intake of dietary iron, vitamin A deficiency, hookworm infection, malaria, heavy menstrual blood loss, and multiparity. Iron deficiency situation in the Nepalese population is triggered by Illiteracy, lack...

  8. Effect of a mobile app intervention on vegetable consumption in overweight adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummah, Sarah; Robinson, Thomas N; Mathur, Maya; Farzinkhou, Sarah; Sutton, Stephen; Gardner, Christopher D

    2017-09-15

    Mobile applications (apps) have been heralded as transformative tools to deliver behavioral health interventions at scale, but few have been tested in rigorous randomized controlled trials. We tested the effect of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults attempting weight loss maintenance. Overweight adults (n=135) aged 18-50 years with BMI=28-40 kg/m 2 near Stanford, CA were recruited from an ongoing 12-month weight loss trial (parent trial) and randomly assigned to either the stand-alone, theory-based Vegethon mobile app (enabling goal setting, self-monitoring, and feedback and using "process motivators" including fun, surprise, choice, control, social comparison, and competition) or a wait-listed control condition. The primary outcome was daily vegetables servings, measured by an adapted Harvard food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) 8 weeks post-randomization. Daily vegetable servings from 24-hour dietary recalls, administered by trained, certified, and blinded interviewers 5 weeks post-randomization, was included as a secondary outcome. All analyses were conducted according to principles of intention-to-treat. Daily vegetable consumption was significantly greater in the intervention versus control condition for both measures (adjusted mean difference: 2.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.1, 3.8, p=0.04 for FFQ; and 1.0 servings; 95% CI: 0.2, 1.9; p=0.02 for 24-hour recalls). Baseline vegetable consumption was a significant moderator of intervention effects (p=0.002) in which effects increased as baseline consumption increased. These results demonstrate the efficacy of a mobile app to increase vegetable consumption among overweight adults. Theory-based mobile interventions may present a low-cost, scalable, and effective approach to improving dietary behaviors and preventing associated chronic diseases. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01826591. Registered 27 March 2013.

  9. Dietary taurine intake, nutrients intake, dietary habits and life stress by depression in Korean female college students: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ji-Yeon; You, Jeong-Soon; Chang, Kyung-Ja

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the dietary taurine intake, nutrients intake, dietary habits and life stress by depression in Korean female college students. Methods In this study, research data were collected in March 2009 and 65 patients with depression and 65 controls without depression participated. The CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression) scale was used for depression measure and controls were matched for age. A 3-day recall method was used...

  10. Combined effect of new complete dentures and simple dietary advice on nutritional status in edentulous patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Iwaki, Maiko; Jo, Ayami; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Amagai, Noriko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2016-11-09

    Individuals who are edentulous have a lower intake of fruit, vegetables, fiber, and protein compared with their dentate counterparts because tooth loss is accompanied by a decrease in ability to chew. Whether or not a combination of prosthetic rehabilitation and simple dietary advice produces improvement in dietary intake among edentulous persons is unclear. We aim to investigate the effect of a simultaneous combination of simple dietary advice delivered by dentists and provision of new complete dentures on dietary intake in edentulous individuals who request new dentures. Through a double-blinded, parallel, randomized controlled trial in which 70 edentate persons who request new complete dentures will be enrolled, eligible study participants will be randomly allocated to either a dietary intervention group receiving dietary advice or to a control group receiving only advice on the care and maintenance of dentures. Outcome measures include daily intake of nutrients and food items, assessed using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire; antioxidant capacity, determined using blood and urine samples; nutritional status, assessed with the Mini-Nutritional Assessment-Short Form; oral health-related quality of life, assessed with the Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile-EDENT and the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index; subjective chewing ability; masticatory performance, assessed using a color-changeable chewing gum and a gummy jelly; patient self-assessment of dentures; mild cognitive impairment, assessed with the Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; and functional capacity, assessed with the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence. Outcome measures, except for antioxidant capacity, are to be implemented at three time points: at baseline and at 3 and 6 months following intervention. Antioxidant capacity data are to be collected twice: at baseline and at 3 months following intervention. Differences

  11. Nutritional biomarkers and foodomic methodologies for qualitative and quantitative analysis of bioactive ingredients in dietary intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiggròs, Francesc; Solà, Rosa; Bladé, Cinta; Salvadó, Maria-Josepa; Arola, Lluís

    2011-10-21

    Traditional dietary assessment methods, such as 24-h recalls, weighted food diaries and food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) are highly subjective and impair the assessment of successfully accomplished dietary interventions. Foodomic technologies offer promising methodologies for gathering scientific evidence from clinical trials with sensitive methods (e.g., GC-MS, LC-MS, CE, NMR) to detect and quantify markers of nutrient exposure or subtle changes in dietary patterns. This review provides a summary of recently developed foodomic methodologies for the detection of suggested biomarkers, including the food specificity for each suggested biomarker and a brief description of the key aspects of 24-h recalls that may affect marker detection and stability, such as mixed nutrients and cooking processes. The primary aim of this review is to contribute to the assessment of the metabolic effects of active ingredients and foods using cutting-edge methods to improve approaches to future nutritional programs tailored for health maintenance and disease prevention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduction in risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in response to a low-sugar, high-fiber dietary intervention in overweight Latino adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Emily; Davis, Jaimie; Byrd-Williams, Courtney; Alexander, Katharine; McClain, Arianna; Lane, Christianne Joy; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Weigensberg, Marc; Goran, Michael

    2009-04-01

    To examine if reductions in added sugar intake or increases in fiber intake in response to a 16-week intervention were related to improvements in metabolic outcomes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus risk. Secondary analysis of a randomized control trial. Intervention classes at a lifestyle laboratory and metabolic measures at the General Clinical Research Center. Fifty-four overweight Latino adolescents (mean [SD] age, 15.5 [1] years). Intervention Sixteen-week study with 3 groups: control, nutrition, or nutrition plus strength training. Body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; visceral adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging; glucose and insulin incremental area under the curve by oral glucose tolerance test; insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, and disposition index by intravenous glucose tolerance test; and dietary intake by 3-day records. Fifty-five percent of all participants decreased added sugar intake (mean decrease, 47 g/d) and 59% increased fiber intake (mean increase, 5 g/d), and percentages were similar in all intervention groups, including controls. Those who decreased added sugar intake had an improvement in glucose incremental area under the curve (-15% vs +3%; P = .049) and insulin incremental area under the curve (-33% vs -9%; P = .02). Those who increased fiber intake had an improvement in body mass index (-2% vs +2%; P = .01) and visceral adipose tissue (-10% vs no change; P = .03). Individuals who reduced added sugar intake by the equivalent of 1 can of soda per day or increased fiber intake by the equivalent of a cup of beans showed improvements in key risk factors for type 2 diabetes, specifically in insulin secretion and visceral fat. Improvements occurred independent of group assignment and were equally likely to occur in control group participants.

  13. A 3-Year Workplace-Based Intervention Program to Control Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors in Sousse, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhiri, Sana; Maatoug, Jihene; Zammit, Nawel; Msakni, Zineb; Harrabi, Imed; Amimi, Souad; Mrizek, Nejib; Ghannem, Hassen

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a 3-year workplace-based intervention program on the control of the main noncommunicable disease risk factors (poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and tobacco use) among the employees of Sousse, Tunisia. We conducted a quasi-experimental study (pre- and postassessments with intervention and control groups) in six companies of the governorate of Sousse in Tunisia.The intervention program consisted of health education programs (eg, workshops, films and open sensitization days). We also scheduled free physical activity sessions and free smoking cessation consultations. Our intervention program showed meaningful improvement among the employees toward dietary and physical activity behaviors but not for tobacco use. Workplace is a crucial setting for health promotion, and future programs should consider a multisectoral approach to control the main noncommunicable disease risk factors.

  14. The role of family in a dietary risk reduction intervention for cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet is an essential strategy for the prevention of primary and secondary cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The objectives were to examine: how families at increased risk of CVD perceived personal risk, their motivations to make dietary changes, their understanding of diet, and the influence of o...

  15. Preadolescents' and Parents' Dietary Coping Efficacy during Behavioral Family-Based Weight Control Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theim, Kelly R.; Sinton, Meghan M.; Stein, Richard I.; Saelens, Brian E.; Thekkedam, Sucheta C.; Welch, R. Robinson; Epstein, Leonard H.; Wilfley, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    Developmentally relevant high-risk dietary situations (e.g., parties where tempting foods are available) may influence overweight youth's weight control, as they increase risk for overeating. Better self-efficacy for coping with these situations--which preadolescents may learn from their parents--could foster successful weight control. Overweight…

  16. Does dietary calcium interact with dietary fiber against colorectal cancer? A case?control study in Central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Galas, Aleksander; Augustyniak, Malgorzata; Sochacka-Tatara, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Background An unfavorable trend of increasing rates of colorectal cancer has been observed across modern societies. In general, dietary factors are understood to be responsible for up to 70% of the disease?s incidence, though there are still many inconsistencies regarding the impact of specific dietary items. Among the dietary minerals, calcium intake may play a crucial role in the prevention. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of intake of higher levels of dietary calcium on ...

  17. Effect of personalized dietary intervention on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S; Molfino, A; Coppola, B; De Leo, S; Tommasi, V; Galani, A; Migliaccio, S; Greco, E A; Gnerre Musto, T; Muscaritoli, M

    2015-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) present a markedly increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality since the early stages of the disease and a high prevalence of malnutrition, inflammation, and accelerated atherosclerosis. Personalized nutritional intervention, with of a low-protein diet (LPD), since the early stages of CKD should be able to achieve significant metabolic improvements. In our study we have verified the effects of a personalized dietary intervention in patients in the CKD stages 3/4 KDOQI on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices. We have evaluated renal function, lipid profile, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and acid-base balance of 16 patients with CKD (stages 3/4 KDOQI). Assessment of nutritional status, body composition, bone mineral density and muscle mass, using body mass index (BMI), handgrip strength, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed. Vascular indices and endothelial dysfunction such as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (baFMD) were also analyzed. After dietary interventions, we observed a significant increase in plasma bicarbonate (p = 0.004) and vitamin D levels (p = 0.03) and a concomitant significant reduction of phosphorus concentration (p = 0.001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.01). Nutritional intervention potentially plays a major role in reducing the progression of CKD and systemic complications of predialysis patients. A low-protein diet (LPD) ensuring vegetable protein intake and a reduced amount of specific micronutrients should be recommended to stage 3/4 CKD patients in order to ameliorate metabolic profile, renal outcome, and reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  18. The effect of prosthetic rehabilitation and simple dietary counseling on food intake and oral health related quality of life among the edentulous individuals: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagai, Noriko; Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Iwaki, Maiko; Jo, Ayami; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the combined effect of complete denture renewal and simple dietary advice. A randomized controlled trial was performed with edentulous patients who required new complete dentures. All participants received complete denture treatment. In addition, the intervention group received dietary advice in a pamphlet form, while the control group received advice pertaining to the care and maintenance of the dentures. The advice was given by dentists for each group. The participants' food intake was assessed at baseline and 3 months after intervention using a diet history questionnaire and an oral health related quality of life assessment measured using the Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile for edentulous people (OHIP-EDENT-J). Among 70 participants who were randomized, 62 participants finished all parts of this trial. At baseline, there was no significant difference in the food intake between the two groups. At the 3-month assessment, the intervention group showed significantly greater intake of chicken (P=0.013), fish with bones (P=0.012), and carrots and pumpkins (P=0.025) compared to the control group. However, at baseline and at the 3-month assessment, there was no significant difference in the OHIP-EDENT-J scores between the groups, but the OHIP-EDENT-J scores significantly improved for both groups at the 3-month assessment. There were more significant improved dimensions of OHIP-EDENT-J in the intervention group than in the control group at the 3-month assessment. Simple dietary advice combined with complete denture treatment could improve food intake of edentulous patients. The present study suggests that brief dietary advice provided by dentists can improve food intake of edentulous elderly. This simply diet advice is much easier compared to customized forms, might enable normal dentists provide patients it. The result of this study broadens possibility of nutritional counseling in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  19. Pre-operative oral nutritional supplementation with dietary advice versus dietary advice alone in weight-losing patients with colorectal cancer: single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Sorrel T; Gibson, Debra J; Lal, Simon; Hill, James; Pilling, Mark; Soop, Mattias; Ramesh, Aswatha; Todd, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Pre-operative weight loss has been consistently associated with increased post-operative morbidity. The study aims to determine if pre-operative oral nutritional supplements (ONSs) with dietary advice reduce post-operative complications. Single-blinded randomized controlled trial. People with colorectal cancer scheduled for surgery with pre-operative weight loss >1 kg/3-6 months were randomized by using stratified blocks (1:1 ratio) in six hospitals (1 November 2013-28 February 2015). Intervention group was given 250 mL/day ONS (10.1 KJ and 0.096 g protein per mL) and dietary advice. Control group received dietary advice alone. Oral nutritional supplements were administered from diagnosis to the day preceding surgery. Research team was masked to group allocation. Primary outcome was patients with one or more surgical site infection (SSI) or chest infection; secondary outcomes included percentage weight loss, total complications, and body composition measurements. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed with both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. A sample size of 88 was required. Of 101 participants, (55 ONS, 46 controls) 97 had surgery. In intention-to-treat analysis, there were 21/45 (47%) patients with an infection-either an SSI or chest infection in the control group vs. 17/55 (30%) in the ONS group. The odds ratio of a patient incurring either an SSI or chest infection was 0.532 (P = 0.135 confidence interval 0.232 to 1.218) in the unadjusted analysis and when adjusted for random differences at baseline (age, gender, percentage weight loss, and cancer staging) was 0.341 (P = 0.031, confidence interval 0.128 to 0.909). Pre-operative percentage weight loss at the first time point after randomization was 4.1% [interquartile range (IQR) 1.7-7.0] in ONS group vs. 6.7% (IQR 2.6-10.8) in controls (Mann-Whitney U P = 0.021) and post-operatively was 7.4% (IQR 4.3-10.0) in ONS group vs. 10.2% (IQR 5.1-18.5) in controls (P = 0.016). Compared

  20. Does providing written dietary advice improve the ingestion of non-allergic nuts in children with existing nut allergies? - A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M; South, C; Quinn, P; Chan, D; Palmer, S; Netting, M; Gold, M

    2016-05-01

    Allergy to one or more nuts is common in children and often complete nut avoidance is advised. More recently, introduction of non-allergic nuts into the diet is advised by some allergists. This study aims to determine whether the provision of additional written dietary advice increases the ingestion of non-allergic nuts by children with nut allergy. Secondary aims include determining which factors facilitate or prevent successful inclusion of non-allergic nuts in the diet, and how inclusion influences quality of life, sensitization and the rate of nut reactions. This is a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial of children with nut allergy who were asked to ingest one or more non-allergic nuts. Participants were 75 children aged 2-16 years (Intervention=36, Control=39), recruited in Adelaide, Australia. Randomized participants were supplied with the intervention (recipe booklet and monthly reminder text messages) or provided standard verbal dietary advice. After 6 months participants were assessed by a blinded investigator with regard to nut ingestion, quality of life, sensitization and nut reactions. The intervention did not increase the ingestion of non-allergic nuts. A negative hospital challenge was a predictor of successful introduction. Parental report of child concern about a reaction was the greatest barrier. Ingestion of non-allergic nuts did not improve quality of life or change nut sensitization. Few nut reactions occurred during the study. Ingestion of non-allergic nuts by children with nut allergy was not improved by additional dietary intervention. Selective introduction of non-allergic nuts is difficult to achieve when the child is anxious about introduction and challenges cannot be done in a medically supervised setting. This dietary intervention did not improve non-allergic nut ingestion by nut allergic children. Hospital challenge increased introduction rates, whilst parentally reported child concern about a reaction reduced success. Non

  1. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer: a case-control study from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Bruno; Bastos, Joana; Lunet, Nuno

    2011-09-01

    Dietary pattern analysis is a powerful technique to study the relationships between diet and cancer, accounting for the specificities of overall dietary intake in each setting. The objective of this study was to quantify the association between dietary patterns and colon and rectum cancers. We evaluated 151 rectum and 102 colon cancer cases selected among surgical patients at the Portuguese Oncology Institute, and 879 community controls. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns were defined with principal components and cluster analyses. Age, sex, education, total energy intake, and physical activity-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were computed. Three dietary patterns were identified: (i) PI: 'healthy,' high consumption of dairy products, wholegrain cereals, vegetables/salads, legumes, fruits and vegetable soup, and low intake of wine; (ii) PII: 'low consumption of milk and foods containing dietary fiber,' low intake of dairy products, vegetables/salads, legumes, and fruits; and (iii) PIII: 'western,' high consumption of red/processed meat, refined cereals, sugar and sweets, potatoes, alcoholic beverages, and low intake of wholegrain cereals and vegetable soup. Compared with PI, the risk of colon cancer was higher among subjects with PII (OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.04-4.14) and PIII (OR = 2.35; 95% CI: 1.19-4.64). The OR estimates for rectum cancer were 3.12 (95% CI: 1.74-5.61) and 1.41 (95% CI: 0.75-2.63), respectively. Our results confirm the higher risk of colorectal cancer among subjects with 'western' diets and 'low consumption of milk and foods containing foods containing dietary fiber'. At a local level, these results support public health messages based on the accumulated evidence on the relationship between individual food items/groups and colorectal cancer.

  2. Healthcare interventions for the prevention and control of gestational diabetes mellitus in China: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; He, Yasheng; Dainelli, Livia; Yu, Kai; Detzel, Patrick; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Volger, Sheri; Fang, Hai

    2017-06-05

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is a type of diabetes which occurs during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at greater risk of complications during pregnancy and delivery, while babies born from mothers with GDM are at greater risk of post-natal complications. Using the most updated diagnosis criteria, the GDM prevalence is estimated at 9.3-25.5% worldwide and 9.3-18.9% in China. Our objective was to identify healthcare interventions aimed at GDM prevention and control in China. A best-evidence synthesis was performed based on a systematic search of literature published between 1997 and October 2015 in PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wan-fang databases using keywords "Gestational Diabetes Mellitus", "GDM", "Intervention" "Medical Intervention" "Early Medical Intervention", "Dietary Intervention", "Exercise Intervention", "Lifestyle Intervention", "Therapy", "Treatment" and "China". Inclusion criteria were studies conducted in China, reporting GDM healthcare interventions, and published in either Chinese or English. Two reviewers independently assessed eligibility and quality of the studies and extracted the data. Treatment efficacy was examined with weighted pooled odds ratio (OR) meta-analyses. The search resulted in 5961 articles (published in 276 different Chinese language journals and 6 English language journals), of which 802 were included in this synthesis. While 39.4% (n = 316) failed to report the GDM diagnostic criteria used, the remaining studies classified GDM with various international (n = 5) or Chinese (n = 7) diagnostic standards. Treatment interventions were categorized into 6 types: dietary (18.6%), exercise (1.6%), medication (20.7%), health education (9.0%), psychological (2.6%) and combination (47.4%). No interventions aimed at GDM prevention were identified. Meta-analyses demonstrated a statistically significant overall benefit of GDM treatment strategies in reducing the odds of maternal and

  3. Nutrition education improves dietary diversity of children 6-23 months at community-level: Results from a cluster randomized controlled trial in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchenbecker, Judith; Reinbott, Anika; Mtimuni, Beatrice; Krawinkel, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Low dietary quality and quantity and inappropriate feeding practices can cause undernutrition. Poor nutritional status in early childhood is associated with growth faltering. The objective of the study was to assess the potential of community-based nutrition education to improve height-for-age z-scores in children 6–23 months of age. Methods and Findings: We carried out a cluster-randomized-controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of nutrition education. A total of 24 Extension Planning Area Sections served as clusters. The selection criteria were: the position of the extension officer was staffed and the sections had been selected by the project for activities in its first project year. The sections were randomized into intervention and control restricted on mean height for age Z-score using baseline information. In the intervention area, food security activities and community-based nutrition education was implemented. The control area received food security activities only. At baseline (2011) and endline (2014), caregivers with a child below two years of age were enrolled. Data assessment included anthropometric measurements, interviews on socio-economic status, dietary intake and feeding practices. A difference-in-differences estimator was used to calculate intervention effects. A positive impact on child dietary diversity was observed (B (SE) = 0.39 (0.15), p = 0.01; 95%CI 0.09–0.68). There was a non-significant positive intervention effect on mean height-for-age z-scores (B (SE) = 0.17 (0.12), p = 0.15; 95%CI -0.06–0.41). Limitations: The 24h dietary recalls used to measure dietary diversity did not consider quantities of consumed foods. Unrecorded poor quality of consumed foods might have masked a potential benefit of increased child dietary diversity on growth. Conclusions: Participatory community-based nutrition education for caregivers improved child dietary diversity even in a food insecure area. Nutrition education should be part of

  4. Nutrition education improves dietary diversity of children 6-23 months at community-level: Results from a cluster randomized controlled trial in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kuchenbecker

    Full Text Available Low dietary quality and quantity and inappropriate feeding practices can cause undernutrition. Poor nutritional status in early childhood is associated with growth faltering. The objective of the study was to assess the potential of community-based nutrition education to improve height-for-age z-scores in children 6-23 months of age.We carried out a cluster-randomized-controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of nutrition education. A total of 24 Extension Planning Area Sections served as clusters. The selection criteria were: the position of the extension officer was staffed and the sections had been selected by the project for activities in its first project year. The sections were randomized into intervention and control restricted on mean height for age Z-score using baseline information. In the intervention area, food security activities and community-based nutrition education was implemented. The control area received food security activities only. At baseline (2011 and endline (2014, caregivers with a child below two years of age were enrolled. Data assessment included anthropometric measurements, interviews on socio-economic status, dietary intake and feeding practices. A difference-in-differences estimator was used to calculate intervention effects. A positive impact on child dietary diversity was observed (B (SE = 0.39 (0.15, p = 0.01; 95%CI 0.09-0.68. There was a non-significant positive intervention effect on mean height-for-age z-scores (B (SE = 0.17 (0.12, p = 0.15; 95%CI -0.06-0.41.The 24h dietary recalls used to measure dietary diversity did not consider quantities of consumed foods. Unrecorded poor quality of consumed foods might have masked a potential benefit of increased child dietary diversity on growth.Participatory community-based nutrition education for caregivers improved child dietary diversity even in a food insecure area. Nutrition education should be part of programs in food insecure settings aiming at

  5. Effects of dietary fiber and low glycemic index diet on glucose control in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Sarah A; Morello, Candis M

    2010-11-01

    To review the effects of dietary fiber and a low glycemic index diet on glycemic risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or T2DM and dyslipidemia. Literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane Library, The Natural Standard, and The Natural Medicines through July 2010 using the terms type 2 diabetes mellitus, dietary fiber, psyllium, and glycemic index. Articles included were randomized controlled studies or meta-analyses examining the effects of dietary interventions (dietary fiber, low glycemic index diet, or psyllium) on glycemic risk factors (glycosylated hemoglobin A₁(c) [A1C] or postprandial plasma glucose [PPG] concentrations) in subjects with T2DM or T2DM and dyslipidemia. Both psyllium supplementation and low glycemic index diets have been studied as monotherapy in the treatment of T2DM. Seven studies were reviewed (3 randomized crossover studies, 1 randomized parallel study, 3 randomized blinded parallel studies). Individually, psyllium supplementation and a low glycemic index diet improved glycemic risk factors. PPG and A1C decreased with psyllium 10.2 g per day, while A1C decreased with a low glycemic index diet (average glycemic index 59). However, the results for the low glycemic index diet are controversial. One study was underpowered to detect changes in A1C, while another study had psyllium fiber as a confounding variable. Psyllium supplementation might be an additional therapeutic option for people with T2DM who are already receiving diabetes medication and who still experience elevated PPG concentrations. Further well-designed clinical trials and adjustment for confounding variables are needed to determine the role of a low glycemic index diet in the treatment of T2DM.

  6. Who benefits from diabetes self-management interventions? The influence of depression in the Latinos en Control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Monica L; Lemon, Stephenie C; Whited, Matthew C; Rosal, Milagros C

    2014-10-01

    Depressive symptoms are common among adults with diabetes. Depression and social support may influence diabetes self-management. This study aimed to examine change in depressive symptoms and the role of depression and support on clinical and dietary outcomes among Latinos with type 2 diabetes participating in a diabetes self-management intervention. Participants (N = 252) were randomized to the intervention or usual care. Mixed effects models were used to examine interaction effects between intervention status and depressive symptoms (Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) score) and support for diabetes self-management behaviors at baseline. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 4 and 12 months and included dietary quality, physical activity, depressive symptoms, and hemoglobin A1c levels. Intervention participants had lower CES-D scores at follow-up than control participants. An interaction effect between intervention status and CES-D scores predicted diet quality. Latinos with depressive symptoms may derive the greatest benefits from diabetes self-management interventions. Additional research on support during diabetes self-management interventions is warranted.

  7. The new Nordic diet - consumer expenditures and economic incentives estimated from a controlled intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Poulsen, Sanne Kellebjerg

    2013-01-01

    a randomized controlled ad libitum dietary 6 month intervention for central obese adults (18-65 years) and market retail price data of the products consumed in the intervention. Adjust consumed quantities to market price incentives using econometrically estimated price elasticities. Results: Average daily food...... adjusting for energy content of the diet). Adjusting for price incentives in a real market setting, the estimated cost of the Average Danish Diet is reduced by 2.50 DKK (ADD-m), compared to the unadjusted ADD-i diet, whereas the adjusted cost of the New Nordic Diet (NND-m) is reduced by about 3.50 DKK......, compared to the unadjusted NND-i. The distribution of food cost is however much more heterogeneous among consumers within the NND than within the ADD. Conclusion: On average, the New Nordic Diet is 24-25 per cent more expensive than an Average Danish Diet at the current market prices in Denmark (and 16...

  8. Effects of manipulating eating frequency during a behavioral weight loss intervention: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jessica L; Raynor, Hollie A

    2012-05-01

    Eating frequency has been inversely related to BMI but the impact of eating frequency on weight loss is unclear. This randomized controlled trial pilot study examined the effect of eating frequency on hunger, energy intake, and weight loss during a 6-month behavioral weight loss intervention. Participants (age: 51.0 ± 9.9 years, BMI: 35.5 ± 4.8 kg/m(2), 57.8% female, 94.1% white) were randomized to one of two eating frequency prescriptions: Three meal (n = 25): three eating bouts/day; or grazing (n = 26): eat at least 100 kcals every 2-3 h. Both groups attended 20 sessions and had identical dietary (1,200-1,500 kcals/day, frequency than three meal at 6 months (5.8 ± 1.1 eating bouts/day vs. 3.2 ± 0.6 eating bouts/day, P weight loss intervention.

  9. NSAID Use after Bariatric Surgery: a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yska, Jan Peter; Gertsen, Sanneke; Flapper, Gerbrich; Emous, Marloes; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N

    2016-12-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be avoided in bariatric surgery patients. If use of an NSAID is inevitable, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) should also be used. To determine the effect of an, compared to care-as-usual, additional intervention to reduce NSAID use in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, and to determine the use of PPIs in patients who use NSAIDs after bariatric surgery. A randomized controlled intervention study in patients after bariatric surgery. Patients were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of sending a letter to patients and their general practitioners on the risks of use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery and the importance of avoiding NSAID use. The control group received care-as-usual. Dispensing data of NSAIDs and PPIs were collected from patients' pharmacies: from a period of 6 months before and from 3 until 9 months after the intervention. Two hundred forty-eight patients were included (intervention group: 124; control group: 124). The number of users of NSAIDs decreased from 22 to 18 % in the intervention group and increased from 20 to 21 % in the control group (NS). The use of a PPI with an NSAID rose from 52 to 55 % in the intervention group, and from 52 to 69 % in the control group (NS). Informing patients and their general practitioners by letter, in addition to care-as-usual, is not an effective intervention to reduce the use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery (trial number NTR3665).

  10. Dietary Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes to Help

    OpenAIRE

    Kam, Jason; Puranik, Swati; Yadav, Rama; Manwaring, Hanna R.; Pierre, Sandra; Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Yadav, Rattan S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has become a highly problematic and increasingly prevalent disease world-wide. It has contributed toward 1.5 million deaths in 2012. Management techniques for diabetes prevention in high-risk as well as in affected individuals, beside medication, are mainly through changes in lifestyle and dietary regulation. Particularly, diet can have a great influence on life quality for those that suffer from, as well as those at risk of, diabetes. As such, considerations on nutritional aspects a...

  11. Fat, sugar and water intakes among families from the IDEFICS intervention and control groups: first observations from I.Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, L; Bogl, L-H; Eiben, G; Hebestreit, A; Nagy, P; Tornaritis, M; Moreno, L A; Siani, A; Veidebaum, T; De Henauw, S; Lissner, L

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate differences in diets of families in intervention versus control communities 5 years after the Identification and Prevention of Dietary- and Lifestyle-Induced Health Effects in Children and Infants intervention ended. Altogether, 4,691 families from the I.Family study with at least one participating parent and one child are included in this analysis. Diet quality indicators, defined as propensities to consume fat, sugar, water and fruit and vegetables, are calculated from a 59-item food frequency questionnaire. Multilevel linear models with random intercepts for study centre are used to determine whether mean diet indicators, calculated at the family level, differed as a function of previous exposure to the intervention. Families in the intervention communities reported a significantly lower sugar propensity (19.8% vs. 20.7% of total food items, p beverages, p sustainability of some aspects of the diet intervention. © 2015 World Obesity.

  12. The unique response of renin and aldosterone to dietary sodium intervention in sodium sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung Joon; Lim, ChiYeon; Oh, Sang Woo; Rhee, Moo-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Sodium sensitivity (SS) is a phenomenon in which significant changes in blood pressure (BP) are observed based on sodium intake. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays a critical role in sodium handling and hypertension. We identified the specific responses of renin and aldosterone based on dietary sodium intake and revealed the relationship between these hormonal changes and dietary sodium intake in patients with SS. In total, 61 subjects were available to analyze full data including plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone. Participants were given a low-sodium DASH diet (LSD) for 7 days and a high-sodium DASH diet (HSD) for the following 7 days. SS was found in five (14.71%) in normotensives, and 14 (51.85%) in hypertensives. In sodium-resistant (SR) subjects, both PRA and aldosterone decreased significantly after consuming HSD. Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between PRA and aldosterone in SR subjects. In contrast, only hypertensive subjects showed a marked fall in PRA after consuming HSD (1.299 ± 0.904 vs. 0.593 ± 0.479) among SS subjects. This study demonstrated the different responses of renin and aldosterone in SS and SR subjects based on dietary sodium intake whether or not they had hypertension. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Culturally adaptive storytelling intervention versus didactic intervention to improve hypertension control in Vietnam: a cluster-randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L; Allison, Jeroan J; Ha, Duc A; Chiriboga, Germán; Ly, Ha N; Tran, Hanh T; Nguyen, Cuong K; Dang, Diem M; Phan, Ngoc T; Vu, Nguyen C; Nguyen, Quang P; Goldberg, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Vietnam is experiencing an epidemiologic transition with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Novel, large-scale, effective, and sustainable interventions to control hypertension in Vietnam are needed. We report the results of a cluster-randomized feasibility trial at 3 months follow-up conducted in Hung Yen province, Vietnam, designed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of two community-based interventions to improve hypertension control: a "storytelling" intervention, "We Talk about Our Hypertension," and a didactic intervention. The storytelling intervention included stories about strategies for coping with hypertension, with patients speaking in their own words, and didactic content about the importance of healthy lifestyle behaviors including salt reduction and exercise. The didactic intervention included only didactic content. The storytelling intervention was delivered by two DVDs at 3-month intervals; the didactic intervention included only one installment. The trial was conducted in four communes, equally randomized to the two interventions. The mean age of the 160 study patients was 66 years, and 54% were men. Most participants described both interventions as understandable, informative, and motivational. Between baseline and 3 months, mean systolic blood pressure declined by 8.2 mmHg (95% CI 4.1-12.2) in the storytelling group and by 5.5 mmHg (95% CI 1.4-9.5) in the didactic group. The storytelling group also reported a significant increase in hypertension medication adherence. Both interventions were well accepted in several rural communities and were shown to be potentially effective in lowering blood pressure. A large-scale randomized trial is needed to compare the effectiveness of the two interventions in controlling hypertension. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02483780.

  14. A 24-week dietary and physical activity lifestyle intervention reduces hepatic insulin resistance in the obese with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattullo, Venessa; Duarte-Rojo, Andres; Soliman, Wael; Vargas-Vorackova, Florencia; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Fantus, Ivan G; Allard, Johane; Heathcote, Jenny

    2013-03-01

    Obesity- and virus-mediated insulin resistance (IR) are associated with adverse hepatic and metabolic outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study evaluates the tolerability and effects of a dietary and physical activity (PA) intervention in obese patients with insulin-resistant CHC. Obese patients (body mass index, BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) ) with CHC were recruited prospectively. Non-diabetic patients with IR (homeostasis model assessment of IR, HOMA-IR >2.0) proceeded to a 24-week lifestyle intervention comprising pedometer monitored increase in PA (≥10 000 steps/day) and an individualised dietary plan. Ten non-cirrhotic and six cirrhotic patients [age 52 ± 8.5 years, BMI 35.9 (31.46-38.21)kg/m(2) ] were recruited, of whom all 16 (100%) completed the 24-week protocol. Increase in PA from 6853 (2440-9533) to 10 697 (7959-13566) steps/day (P = 0.001) and reduction in caloric intake from 2263 (1805.4-2697.0) to 1281 (1099.5-1856.3) kcal/day (equivalent to reduction of median 33% (25.3-49.8%), P insulin sensitivity index (ISI) improved significantly, but the skeletal muscle ISI did not. At week 24, 8/16 (50%) patients were no longer insulin-resistant (P = 0.008). This 24-week intervention reduced BMI and reversed IR in significant proportion of patients. Such adjunctive therapy may improve hepatic and metabolic status in obese insulin-resistant CHC. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Hypnosis as an intervention for pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotanch, P H; Harrison, M; Roberts, J

    1987-09-01

    The use of formal hypnosis and/or positive, comforting suggestions to patients for control of pain, fear, and anxiety is simple and effective. In addition, it is easy to learn and teach to patients. Spiegel states that hypnosis, a group of techniques long associated with fantasies of loss of control, is ironically very helpful in actually enhancing patients' sense of control. The clinicians daring to become proficient in the use of hypnotic trance must begin with a conscious effort to abandon all negative suggestions such as "Do you have pain?"; "How much do you hurt?"; and "Move your bad leg." Simultaneously, a conscious effort is made to increase the use of the following positive suggestions: "How comfortable are you going to be tonight?" "Your hand feels so soft and warm"; "It is important to move this leg." These communication skills are best learned from clinicians skilled in hypnotherapeutic techniques. Simultaneously, it is important to become familiar with the works of Erikson and Barber. The American Society of Clinical Hypnosis will provide information about the national organizations and state hypnosis societies that offer approved workshops, conferences, and training opportunities. Hypnosis as analgesia surely provides rest, relaxation, and comfort for patients without the negative side effects of other analgesics. In addition, the ultimate benefit of hypnotic analgesia lies in enabling patients to potentiate their inner strength, resulting in improved self-esteem and self-control.

  16. Dietary taurine intake, nutrients intake, dietary habits and life stress by depression in Korean female college students: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Yeon; You, Jeong-Soon; Chang, Kyung-Ja

    2010-08-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dietary taurine intake, nutrients intake, dietary habits and life stress by depression in Korean female college students. In this study, research data were collected in March 2009 and 65 patients with depression and 65 controls without depression participated. The CES-D (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression) scale was used for depression measure and controls were matched for age. A 3-day recall method was used for dietary assessment (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day). Average height, weight and body mass index (BMI) were 161.3+/-0.5 cm, 55.3+/-1.0 kg and 21.2+/-0.4 kg/m2 for depression patients and those of control group were 161.4+/-0.7 cm, 53.1+/-0.8 kg and 20.3+/-0.2 kg/m2, respectively. Average dietary taurine intakes of depression patients and control group were 89.1 and 88.0 mg/day, respectively. There was no significant difference in dietary taurine intake between depression patients and control group. The average intakes of vitamin A (phabit score of depression patients (47.2) was significantly lower than that of control group (51.3) (phabit scores of "eating meals at regular times" (peating adequate amount of meals" (peating spicy foods" (peating protein foods such as meat, fish, eggs, beans more than 2 times a day" (pstress (pstress categories of depression patients were significantly higher than those of control group except faculty problem score. These results show that depression patients have poor dietary habits and unbalanced nutrition status. Also depression patients have higher life stress score.Therefore, continuous nutrition education and counselling for good dietary habits and balanced nutrition status are needed to prevent depression in Korean college students.

  17. Effect of increasing fruit and vegetable intake by dietary intervention on nutritional biomarkers and attitudes to dietary change: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Susan J; Duthie, Garry G; Russell, Wendy R; Kyle, Janet A M; Macdiarmid, Jennie I; Rungapamestry, Vanessa; Stephen, Sylvia; Megias-Baeza, Cristina; Kaniewska, Joanna J; Shaw, Lindsey; Milne, Lesley; Bremner, David; Ross, Karen; Morrice, Philip; Pirie, Lynn P; Horgan, Graham; Bestwick, Charles S

    2017-05-30

    Low fruit and vegetable consumption is linked with an increased risk of death from vascular disease and cancer. The benefit of eating fruits and vegetables is attributed in part to antioxidants, vitamins and phytochemicals. Whether increasing intake impacts on markers of disease remains to be established. This study investigates whether increasing daily intake of fruits, vegetables and juices from low (approx. 3 portions), to high intakes (approx. 8 portions) impacts on nutritional and clinical biomarkers. Barriers to achieving the recommended fruit and vegetable intakes are also investigated. In a randomised clinical trial, the participants [19 men and 26 women (39-58 years)] with low reported fruit, juice and vegetable intake (fruit and vegetables and fruit juice (300 ml) daily for 12 weeks. Nutritional biomarkers (vitamin C, carotenoids, B vitamins), antioxidant capacity and genomic stability were measured pre-intervention, at 4-, 8- and 12 weeks throughout the intervention. Samples were also taken post-intervention after a 6-week washout period. Glucose, homocysteine, lipids, blood pressure, weight and arterial stiffness were also measured. Intake of fruit, fruit juice and vegetables was reassessed 12 months after conducting the study and a questionnaire was developed to identify barriers to healthy eating. Intake increased significantly in the intervention group compared to controls, achieving 8.4 portions/day after 12 weeks. Plasma vitamin C (35%), folate (15%) and certain carotenoids [α-carotene (50%) and β-carotene (70%) and lutein/zeaxanthin (70%)] were significantly increased (P fruits and vegetables measured 12 months after the intervention period were amount, inconvenience and cost. While increasing fruit, juice and vegetable consumption increases circulating level of beneficial nutrients in healthy subjects, a 12-week intervention was not associated with effects on antioxidant status or lymphocyte DNA damage. This trial was registered at

  18. Choosing a control intervention for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djulbegovic Benjamin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled clinical trials are performed to resolve uncertainty concerning comparator interventions. Appropriate acknowledgment of uncertainty enables the concurrent achievement of two goals : the acquisition of valuable scientific knowledge and an optimum treatment choice for the patient-participant. The ethical recruitment of patients requires the presence of clinical equipoise. This involves the appropriate choice of a control intervention, particularly when unapproved drugs or innovative interventions are being evaluated. Discussion We argue that the choice of a control intervention should be supported by a systematic review of the relevant literature and, where necessary, solicitation of the informed beliefs of clinical experts through formal surveys and publication of the proposed trial's protocol. Summary When clinical equipoise is present, physicians may confidently propose trial enrollment to their eligible patients as an act of therapeutic beneficence.

  19. Dietary habits in patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rodríguez-Campello

    Full Text Available Diet appears to have some role in stroke development. The objective of our study was to describe the dietary habits in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke and compare selected dietary components with healthy controls. Adherence to healthy diet behaviors was also assessed.A case-control study of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the Neurology Department of Hospital del Mar from 2007 to 2010. Patients were matched by age and sex with control subjects. A previously validated nutritional survey was administered to patients and controls. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, caloric intake and dietary nutrients were evaluated. Intention to follow a healthy diet was also assessed in both groups.A total of 300 acute ischemic stroke patients and 300 controls with evaluation of dietary habits. No differences were observed in vascular risk factors, except smoking habit, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Stroke patients reported a higher caloric intake: 2444.8(1736.8-3244.5 vs 2208.7(1753.1-2860.7 Kcal, p = 0.001. After adjusting for energy intake, patients had higher intake of proteins (p<0.001; OR 1.02, total cholesterol (p = 0.001; OR 1.04, and breaded foods (p = 0.001; OR 1.94 and lower consumption of probiotic yogurt (p = 0.002; OR 0.88. Compared to patients, control participants indicated greater intention to eat vegetables (p = 0.002; OR 1.5 and whole foods (p = 0.000; OR 2.4 and reduce their intake of salt (p = 0.002; OR 1.7, fat (p = 0.000; OR 3.7 and sweets (p = 0.004; OR 1.7 than patients.We observed different dietary patterns between stroke patients and controls. Stroke patients have a higher caloric intake and are less concerned about maintaining healthy nutritional habits.

  20. Low-fat diet and skin cancer risk: the women's health initiative randomized controlled dietary modification trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Christina S; Stefanick, Marcia L; Shikany, James M; Larson, Joseph; Linos, Eleni; Sims, Stacy T; Marshall, James; Van Horn, Linda; Zeitouni, Nathalie; Tang, Jean Y

    2013-09-01

    Large cohort studies have reported no relationship between dietary fat and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), although a low-fat diet intervention reduced NMSC risk in a small clinical trial. In animal studies, skin tumor development has been reduced by low-fat diet. We evaluated the effect of a low-fat dietary pattern on NMSC and melanoma in the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial. Postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years (n = 48,835) were randomly assigned to the low-fat dietary pattern intervention (n = 19,541) or comparison group (n = 29,294). The intervention goals included decreasing fat intake to 20% or less of calories, increasing vegetable and fruit intake, and increasing grain intake. Self-reported incident NMSC (n = 4,907) and physician-adjudicated incident melanoma (n = 279) were ascertained every 6 months. Over 8.1 years of follow-up, the low-fat diet intervention did not affect overall incidence of NMSC [HR 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.04] or melanoma (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.82-1.32). In subgroup analyses of melanoma risk, baseline fat intake interacted significantly with group assignment (Pinteraction = 0.006). Among women with higher baseline fat intake, the dietary intervention significantly increased risk (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.06-2.07), whereas, among women with lower baseline fat intake, the intervention tended to reduce melanoma risk (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.50-1.02). In this large randomized trial, a low-fat dietary pattern did not affect overall incidence of NMSC or melanoma. A low-fat diet does not reduce incidence of NMSC, but an interaction between baseline fat intake and dietary intervention on melanoma risk warrants further investigation.

  1. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials testing the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for gastrointestinal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jennifer L; Bress, Kathryn; Popichak, Lydia; Evans, Jonathan S; Savkova, Alexandra; Biala, Michelle; Ordos, Josh; Carr, Brian I

    2014-06-01

    Psychological morbidity in those diagnosed with cancer has been shown to result in poorer quality of life and increase the risk of mortality. As a result, researchers have designed and tested psychosocial interventions to improve quality of life and survival of patients diagnosed with cancer. A systematic review of the literature was performed to describe the psychosocial interventions that have been tested in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. Databases such as MEDLINE, PsychINFO, PubMed, MedLine, and Cochrane Reviews were searched. The searches were inclusive of studies published in English between 1966 and October 2013. Raters conducted full-text review of the resulting articles for the following eligibility criteria: (1) participants were 18 years or older, (2) the majority of patients in the sample were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal cancer, (3) the trial was testing a psychosocial intervention, and (4) random assignment to one or more interventions versus a usual care, placebo, attention control, or waiting-list control condition. The interventions that were eligible for this review included psychosocial or behavioral intervention (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, problem solving, educational, and collaborative care), physical activity, and/or psychopharmacologic treatment (e.g., selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor). Interventions that included dietary changes were not included in the present review. Study quality was also assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) system. The results of the review resulted in a finding of eight studies to have been conducted, testing psychosocial interventions, in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. Findings of these studies suggested that the interventions were effective in reducing psychological and physical symptoms associated with the cancer, improved quality of life, and reduced immune system dysregulation, and one study demonstrated an improvement in survival. Two studies reported no

  2. Restoring interventions: eco-sustainable weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facciotto G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and enlargement of ecological networks is paramount to conserve plant biodiversity, to offer refuge to the local fauna and to improve the environment in general. Such networks intend to conserve areas of great natural value, to restore degraded areas and to link them physically through the creation of ecological corridors. The work described was carried out in order to improve and enlarge an ecological corridor within the experimental farm “Mezzi” of CRA-ISP at Casale Monferrato (AL - Italy. One of its bigger problems, weed control, was solved by increasing the planting density, by sowing herbaceous crops and mulching with woody chips.

  3. 21 CFR 111.130 - What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for returned dietary supplements? 111.130 Section 111.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING...

  4. Dietary intake and metabolic control of children aged six to ten with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the dietary intake and metabolic control of children with type 1 diabetes. Design: A cross-sectional observational study was carried out. Subjects: A total of 30 subjects whose ages ranged from six to ten years were included in the study. Setting: The study was conducted at ...

  5. Dietary fiber and blood pressure. A meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streppel, M.T.; Arends, L.R.; Veer, van 't P.; Grobbee, D.E.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dietary fiber is part of a healthy diet and may exert a protective effect in the cardiovascular system. The effect of fiber intake on blood pressure (BP) has not yet been established. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials to estimate the effect of

  6. Possibility of pain reduction by dietary intervention in patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapała, Aleksandra; Lange, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Pain in advanced cancer can have many causes, and they are not necessarily associated with the presence of cancer. Invalid daily food rations in terms of energy, nutritional value, and cooking techniques used can significantly impair quality of life, increase patients' pain and other somatic symptoms and aggravate malnutrition and cachexia. Basic dietary factors affecting the quality of life and severity of somatic symptoms are the nutritional value of the diet, the frequency of meals and their consistency, the presence of fiber, fat, sugars, lactose, gluten and nutraceuticals. Extremely important is the role of a team of specialists, that offers professional nutritional advice to the patients and their carers.

  7. Personalised Interventions—A Precision Approach for the Next Generation of Dietary Intervention Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baukje de Roos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Diet is a key modifiable risk factor for non-communicable diseases. However, we currently are not benefitting from the full potential of its protective effects. This is due to a number of reasons, including high individual variability in response to certain diets. It is now well acknowledged that in order to gain the full benefit of dietary regimes it is essential to take into account individual responses. With this in mind, the present review examines the concept of precision nutrition and the performance of n-of-1 studies, and discusses the development of certain approaches that will be critical for development of the concepts.

  8. Candy or apple? How self-control resources and motives impact dietary healthiness in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproesser, Gudrun; Strohbach, Stefanie; Schupp, Harald; Renner, Britta

    2011-06-01

    People can choose between a virtually endless array of food items rising the question, which factors determine healthy or unhealthy food choice. The present study examines the impact of two contrasting motives for food choice (affect regulation and body weight control) and self-regulatory competences on healthy eating within a sample of women (N=761). The data show that a relative lack of self-regulatory resources combined with a high tendency to regulate negative affect through comfort eating was associated with an unfavorable dietary pattern. Accordingly, a healthy dietary pattern requires not only self-regulatory capacities but also a facilitating motive structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of olive oil in disease prevention: a focus on the recent epidemiological evidence from cohort studies and dietary intervention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Genevieve; Gonzalez, Carlos A

    2015-04-01

    Consumption of olive oil within the Mediterranean diet has been long known to have many health benefits. However, only over the last decade has epidemiological research confirmed its protective role against developing several chronic diseases. The objective of this review was to give an overview of the state of art epidemiological evidence concerning the relationship between olive oil and key public health outcomes including mortality, CVD, diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity and cancer, with a particular focus on recent results from cohort studies and dietary intervention trials. Recent epidemiological research has shown that regular consumption of olive oil is associated with increased longevity. This benefit is partly due to the olive oil's unequivocal cardio-protective role. There is converging evidence on the benefits of olive oil for preventing several CVD risk factors, including diabetes, MetS and obesity. Olive oil is also implicated in preventing certain cancers, with the most promising findings for breast and digestive tract cancers, although the data are still not entirely consistent and mainly from case-control studies. These health benefits are supported by strong mechanistic evidence from experimental studies, demonstrating that specific components of olive oil have antihypertensive, antithrombotic, antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic action. Despite the accumulating epidemiological research, there is still a lack of consistent results from high-quality studies for many health outcomes (i.e. certain cancers and metabolism-related disorders). Further research is mandatory, above all from prospective studies and randomised dietary intervention trials when feasible, to confirm some of the still potential health benefits.

  10. Dietary pattern and risk of hodgkin lymphoma in a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Mara M; Chang, Ellen T; Zhang, Yawei; Fung, Teresa T; Batista, Julie L; Ambinder, Richard F; Zheng, Tongzhang; Mueller, Nancy E; Birmann, Brenda M

    2015-09-01

    Classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) has few known modifiable risk factors, and the relationship between diet and cHL risk is unclear. We performed the first investigation of an association between dietary pattern and cHL risk in 435 cHL cases and 563 population-based controls from Massachusetts and Connecticut (1997-2000) who completed baseline diet questionnaires. We identified 4 major dietary patterns ("vegetable," "high meat," "fruit/low-fat dairy," "desserts/sweets") using principal components analysis. We computed multivariable odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for associations of dietary pattern score (quartiles) with younger-adult (age dietary patterns were not clearly associated with cHL. We report the first evidence for a role of dietary pattern in cHL etiology. Diets featuring high intake of meat or desserts and sweets may increase cHL risk. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. An Overview of Dietary Interventions and Strategies to Optimize the Management of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J. Perumpail

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the efficacy of lifestyle adjustment strategies as a preventive measure and/or treatment of obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adults. Method: A systematic review of literature through 1 July 2017 on the PubMed Database was performed. A comprehensive search was conducted using key terms, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, combined with lifestyle intervention, diet, and exercise. All of the articles and studies obtained from the search were reviewed. Redundant literature was excluded. Results: Several types of dietary compositions and exercise techniques were identified. Most studies concluded and recommended reduction in the intake of saturated and trans fatty acids, carbohydrates, and animal-based protein, and increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs, plant-based proteins, antioxidants, and other nutrients was recommended. The Mediterranean and Paleo diet both seem to be promising schemes for NAFLD patients to follow. Exercise was also encouraged, but the type of exercise did not affect its efficacy as a NAFLD treatment when the duration is consistent. Conclusions: Although these different dietary strategies and exercise regimens can be adopted to treat NAFLD, current literature on the topic is limited in scope. Further research should be conducted to truly elucidate which lifestyle adjustments individually, and in combination, may facilitate patients with obesity-related NAFLD.

  12. Effect of dietary pulse intake on established therapeutic lipid targets for cardiovascular risk reduction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Vanessa; Sievenpiper, John L; de Souza, Russell J; Jayalath, Viranda H; Mirrahimi, Arash; Agarwal, Arnav; Chiavaroli, Laura; Mejia, Sonia Blanco; Sacks, Frank M; Di Buono, Marco; Bernstein, Adam M; Leiter, Lawrence A; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Vuksan, Vladimir; Bazinet, Richard P; Josse, Robert G; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W C; Jenkins, David J A

    2014-05-13

    Evidence from controlled trials encourages the intake of dietary pulses (beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas) as a method of improving dyslipidemia, but heart health guidelines have stopped short of ascribing specific benefits to this type of intervention or have graded the beneficial evidence as low. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effect of dietary pulse intake on established therapeutic lipid targets for cardiovascular risk reduction. We searched electronic databases and bibliographies of selected trials for relevant articles published through Feb. 5, 2014. We included RCTs of at least 3 weeks' duration that compared a diet emphasizing dietary pulse intake with an isocaloric diet that did not include dietary pulses. The lipid targets investigated were low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol. We pooled data using a random-effects model. We identified 26 RCTs (n = 1037) that satisfied the inclusion criteria. Diets emphasizing dietary pulse intake at a median dose of 130 g/d (about 1 serving daily) significantly lowered LDL cholesterol levels compared with the control diets (mean difference -0.17 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval -0.25 to -0.09 mmol/L). Treatment effects on apolipoprotein B and non-HDL cholesterol were not observed. Our findings suggest that dietary pulse intake significantly reduces LDL cholesterol levels. Trials of longer duration and higher quality are needed to verify these results. ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT01594567.

  13. Control Systems Engineering for Understanding and Optimizing Smoking Cessation Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Kevin P; Rivera, Daniel E; Collins, Linda M; Piper, Megan E

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major public health issue. Despite a variety of treatment options, existing intervention protocols intended to support attempts to quit smoking have low success rates. An emerging treatment framework, referred to as adaptive interventions in behavioral health, addresses the chronic, relapsing nature of behavioral health disorders by tailoring the composition and dosage of intervention components to an individual's changing needs over time. An important component of a rapid and effective adaptive smoking intervention is an understanding of the behavior change relationships that govern smoking behavior and an understanding of intervention components' dynamic effects on these behavioral relationships. As traditional behavior models are static in nature, they cannot act as an effective basis for adaptive intervention design. In this article, behavioral data collected daily in a smoking cessation clinical trial is used in development of a dynamical systems model that describes smoking behavior change during cessation as a self-regulatory process. Drawing from control engineering principles, empirical models of smoking behavior are constructed to reflect this behavioral mechanism and help elucidate the case for a control-oriented approach to smoking intervention design.

  14. Carbohydrate Counting: A Simple Method of Dietary Management for Glycemic Control in Japanese Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yukie; Mikami, Noriko; Hyodo, Toru; Hida, Miho; Kawakami, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrate counting used in dietary therapy for diabetes is based on the concept that the postprandial rise in blood glucose levels is primarily affected by ingested carbohydrates. This method has been widely accepted and used since 1993, when its usefulness was demonstrated in the United States, largely due to the ease with which patients can understand the method. However, in Japan, there is a common misunderstanding that energy intake determines postprandial blood glucose levels. We examined the effectiveness of using basic carbohydrate counting and advanced carbohydrate counting with Japanese diabetic dialysis patients. With both methods, predialysis blood glucose and HbA1c levels were significantly decreased at the final follow-up compared with preinstruction values. There were no significant changes in other parameters. The carbohydrate counting method was able to be applied independently of, but concurrently with, the control of potassium and phosphorus intake, which is the basis of dietary therapy for dialysis patients. Moreover, those patients who completed the basic carbohydrate counting instruction sessions had a mean relative carbohydrate intake (% of total energy) of 51.0 ± 4.7% per meal, indicating they did not consume a low-carbohydrate diet. Key Messages: At present, there is no literature on carbohydrate counting performed by dialysis patients. Carbohydrate counting is a useful method of dietary management for glycemic control that can be applied independently of, but concurrently with, the control of potassium and phosphorus intake in dietary therapy for dialysis patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Acupuncture intervention in ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peng-Fei; Kong, Li; Ni, Li-Wei; Guo, Hai-Long; Yang, Sha; Zhang, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Long; Guo, Jia-Kui; Xiong, Jie; Zhen, Zhong; Shi, Xue-Min

    2012-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of death and few pharmacological therapies show benefits in ischemic stroke. In this study, 290 patients aged 40-75 years old with first onset of acute ischemic stroke (more than 24 hours but within 14 days) were treated with standard treatments, and then were randomly allocated into an intervention group (treated with resuscitating acupuncture) and a control group (treated using sham-acupoints). Primary outcome measures included Barthel Index (BI), relapse and death up to six months. For the 290 patients in both groups, one case in the intervention group died, and two cases in the control group died from the disease (p = 0.558). Six patients of the 144 cases in the intervention group had relapse, whereas 34 of 143 patients had relapse in the control group (p two groups, respectively (p two groups for the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), not at two weeks (7.03 ± 3.201 vs. 8.13 ± 3.634; p = 0.067), but at four weeks (4.15 ± 2.032 vs. 6.35 ± 3.131, p Stroke Scale (CSS) at four weeks showed more improvement in the intervention group than that in the control group (9.40 ± 4.51 vs. 13.09 ± 5.80, p Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QOL) at six months was higher in the intervention group (166.63 ± 45.70) than the control group (143.60 ± 50.24; p < 0.01). The results of this clinical trial showed a clinically relevant decrease of relapse in patients treated with resuscitating acupuncture intervention by the end of six months, compared with needling at the sham-acupoints. The resuscitating acupuncture intervention could also improve self-care ability and quality of life, evaluated with BI, NIHSS, CSS, Oxford Handicap Scale (OHS), and SS-QOL.

  16. Dietary patterns and adult asthma: population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakolis, I; Hooper, R; Thompson, R L; Shaheen, S O

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of diet and asthma have focused on relations with intakes of individual nutrients and foods and evidence has been conflicting. Few studies have examined associations with dietary patterns. We carried out a population-based case-control study of asthma in adults aged between 16 and 50 in South London, UK. Information about usual diet was obtained by food frequency questionnaire and we used principal components analysis to define five dietary patterns in controls. We used logistic and linear regression, controlling for confounders, to relate these patterns to asthma, asthma severity, rhinitis and chronic bronchitis in 599 cases and 854 controls. Overall, there was weak evidence that a 'vegetarian' dietary pattern was positively associated with asthma [adjusted odds ratio comparing top vs bottom quintile of pattern score 1.43 (95% CI: 0.93-2.20), P trend 0.075], and a 'traditional' pattern (meat and vegetables) was negatively associated [OR 0.68 (0.45-1.03), P trend 0.071]. These associations were stronger amongst nonsupplement users (P trend 0.030 and 0.001, respectively), and the association with the 'vegetarian' pattern was stronger amongst whites (P trend 0.008). No associations were observed with asthma severity. A 'prudent' dietary pattern (wholemeal bread, fish and vegetables) was positively associated with chronic bronchitis [OR 2.61 (1.13-6.05), P trend 0.025], especially amongst nonsupplement users (P trend 0.002). Overall there were no clear relations between dietary patterns and adult asthma; associations in nonsupplement users and whites require confirmation. The finding for chronic bronchitis was unexpected and also requires replication.

  17. Effect of changes in food groups intake on magnesium, zinc, copper, and selenium serum levels during 2 years of dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Tal, Ofra; Canfi, Ayala; Marko, Rachel; Katorza, Esther; Karpas, Zeev; Shai, Iris; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Sheiner, Einat K

    2015-01-01

    Essential elements in serum are related to specific changes in food groups intake. To address the effect of 2-year food intake changes in an intervention study on serum concentrations of magnesium, zinc, copper, and selenium. Two hundred thirty-one participants, a subgroup of the Dietary Intervention Randomized Control Trial (DIRECT) study (age = 52 years; body mass index = 32.8 kg/m(2); 85% males) randomized to low-fat, Mediterranean, or low-carbohydrate diets in a 2-year dietary intervention trial were followed for serum concentrations determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Changes in the intake of 11 food groups were evaluated by food frequency questionnaires. Using multivariate regression models, adjusted for age, sex, baseline body weight (kg), and changes in intakes of 11 food groups (g/d), at 12 months, serum element elevations were observed mainly in the low-carbohydrate group: selenium, by increasing consumption of fats and oils (β = 0.415, p = 0.009) and legumes (β = 0.183, p = 0.010) and decreasing fruit intake (β = -0.438, p = 0.030); copper, by increasing consumption of legumes (β = 0.453, p = 0.018) and dairy products (β = 0.320, p = 0.039); magnesium by increasing fish consumption (β = 0.374, p = 0.042) in the low-carbohydrate group and in the entire study population (β = 0.237, p = 0.016); and zinc exclusively in the low-fat group by decreasing consumption of fats and oils (β = -0.575, p = 0.022). At 24 months, serum elements were elevated mainly in the low-fat diet group, mostly by decreasing intake of snacks, sweets, and cakes: zinc (β = -0.570, p = 0.027), copper (β = -0.649, p = 0.012), and selenium (β = -0.943, p low-fat diet group. No significant associations between changes in food groups intake and the 4 elements were found in the Mediterranean diet group. During this 2-year intervention, serum concentrations of 4 essential elements were associated with a diversity of food group intake patterns

  18. Acceptability and feasibility of the 'DASH for Asthma' intervention in a randomized controlled trial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonstein, Andrea C; Lv, Nan; Camargo, Carlos A; Wilson, Sandra R; Buist, A Sonia; Rosas, Lisa G; Strub, Peg; Ma, Jun

    2016-08-01

    'DASH for Asthma' (n 90) was a 6-month randomized controlled trial that demonstrated potential benefits of a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) behavioural intervention for improving diet quality and asthma control by comparing intervention to usual care in adults with uncontrolled asthma. The present study examined acceptability and feasibility of the intervention from the perspective of intervention participants and lifestyle coaches. Grounded in Social Cognitive Theory, the 3-month intensive stage, including three individual and eight group sessions, focused on diet modifications and behavioural self-regulation. The 3-month maintenance stage contained telephone consultations. Participants and lifestyle coaches completed surveys including 5-point Likert scales and open-ended questions. We analysed data using descriptive and inductive content analyses. Forty-six intervention participants (survey response rate was 65-72 %) and two lifestyle coaches. Participants and lifestyle coaches were highly satisfied (all mean ratings >4) with individual and group sessions. Participants identified mastery of knowledge and skills (awareness, goal setting, self-monitoring, problem solving), social learning (class members sharing experiences and ideas) and good coaching skills (reflective listening, empathy, motivational counselling) as important contributors to self-efficacy and programme satisfaction. Participants also valued personalized feedback received in individual sessions. Lifestyle coaches viewed participant engagement as a facilitator to effective sessions. Finally, participants and lifestyle coaches identified food tasting as beneficial for observational learning and facilitation of participant engagement. High class attendance and self-monitoring rate also reflected the high engagement among participants. The DASH behavioural intervention was feasible and highly acceptable to participants with uncontrolled asthma and lifestyle coaches.

  19. Effect of dietary fiber on circulating C-reactive protein in overweight and obese adults: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jun; Xu, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Weiguo; Han, Shufen; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies suggested that dietary fiber intake may have a lowing effect on circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) level, a sensitive marker of inflammation, in overweight/obese adults with inconsistent results. A literature search was performed in April 2014 for related randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analysis was conducted. Meta-analysis including 14 RCTs showed that intervention with dietary fiber or fiber-rich food, compared with control, produced a slight, but significant reduction of 0.37 mg/L (95% CI -0.74, 0) in circulating CRP level among this population. Subgroup analyses showed that such a significant reduction was only observed after combining studies where the total fiber intake was 8 g/d higher in the intervention group than in the control group. No obvious heterogeneity and publication bias were found in the meta-analysis. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides evidence that dietary fiber or food naturally rich in fiber has beneficial effects on circulating CRP level in overweight/obese adults.

  20. A food store intervention trial improves caregiver psychosocial factors and children's dietary intake in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Vijayadeva, Vinutha; Davison, Nicola; Ramirez, Vickie; Cheung, Leo W K; Murphy, Suzanne; Novotny, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Diet-related chronic diseases are at epidemic levels in low-income ethnic minority populations. The purpose of this study is to decrease risk for obesity in children by modifying the food environment and conducting point-of-purchase promotions that will lead to changes in psychosocial factors and behaviors associated with healthier food choices among low-income communities with a preponderance of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders. We implemented an intervention trial over a 9-11-month period in five food stores in two low-income multiethnic communities in Hawaii, targeting both children and their adult caregivers. The Healthy Foods Hawaii (HFH) intervention consisted of an environmental component to increase store stocking of nutritious foods, point-of-purchase promotions, interactive sessions, and involved local producers and distributors. We evaluated the impact of the program on 116 child-caregiver dyads, sampled from two intervention and two comparison areas before and after intervention implementation. Program impacts were evaluated using multivariable linear regression. The HFH program had a significant impact on caregiver knowledge and the perception that healthy foods are convenient. Intervention children significantly increased their Healthy Eating Index (HEI) score for servings of grains, their total consumption of water, and showed an average 8.5 point (out of 90 total, eliminating the 10 points for variety, giving a 9.4% increase) increase in overall HEI score. A food store intervention was effective in improving healthy food knowledge and perception that healthy foods are convenient among caregivers, and increased the consumption of several targeted healthy foods by their children. Greater intensity, sustained food system change, and further targeting for children are needed to show greater and sustained change in food-related behaviors in low-income Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities.

  1. Psychosocial constructs were not mediators of intervention effects for dietary and physical activity outcomes in a church-based lifestyle intervention: Delta Body and Soul III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jessica L; Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa M; Zoellner, Jamie M; Goodman, Melissa H

    2016-08-01

    Evaluating an intervention's theoretical basis can inform design modifications to produce more effective interventions. Hence the present study's purpose was to determine if effects from a multicomponent lifestyle intervention were mediated by changes in the psychosocial constructs decisional balance, self-efficacy and social support. Delta Body and Soul III, conducted from August 2011 to May 2012, was a 6-month, church-based, lifestyle intervention designed to improve diet quality and increase physical activity. Primary outcomes, diet quality and aerobic and strength/flexibility physical activity, as well as psychosocial constructs, were assessed via self-report, interviewer-administered surveys at baseline and post intervention. Mediation analyses were conducted using ordinary least squares (continuous outcomes) and maximum likelihood logistic (dichotomous outcomes) regression path analysis. Churches (five intervention and three control) were recruited from four counties in the Lower Mississippi Delta region of the USA. Rural, Southern, primarily African-American adults (n 321). Based upon results from the multiple mediation models, there was no evidence that treatment (intervention v. control) indirectly influenced changes in diet quality or physical activity through its effects on decisional balance, self-efficacy and social support. However, there was evidence for direct effects of social support for exercise on physical activity and of self-efficacy for sugar-sweetened beverages on diet quality. Results do not support the hypothesis that the psychosocial constructs decisional balance, self-efficacy and social support were the theoretical mechanisms by which the Delta Body and Soul III intervention influenced changes in diet quality and physical activity.

  2. Acceptance and satisfaction of parents and students about a school-based dietary intervention in Isfahan, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelishadi, Roya; Lajevardi, Bahareh; Bahreynian, Maryam; Omid-Ghaemi, Vahid; Movahedian, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Snacks play an important role in child health and nutritional status. Schools are considered as the preferred place to encourage healthy eating among children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of buffet school-based intervention on acceptance and satisfaction of parents and students in Iran. Primary school students (n = 1120, 68.83% girls) from first to third grade, with one of their parents, participated in this prospective field trial study conducted in Isfahan, Iran. The study was consisted of three phases; schools selection, kitchen selection, implementation including two different parts, getting order and distribution. We provided hot snacks as traditional and healthy fast food according to taste and food preferences of children. Acceptance and satisfaction of parents and students were evaluated via a researcher made questionnaire before and after the intervention in one-third of participants as a representative sample of students who ordered the snacks. Most of the students usually ate snack in the break-time at school, the eagerness of provided snacks was 98.8% and 63.6% in girls and boys, respectively. The most interesting tastes were Ashe Reshteh and Tahchin, (45.1% girls vs. 36.8% boys), while bean (among girls) and Ashe Jo (among boys) were ranked as the lowest. More than half of parents (66.7%) evaluated the price of snacks as "acceptable," showing their satisfaction. Results of this study indicate that school-based interventions accompanied with parental and principals' support is considered as a practical approach to promote healthful eating at an early age. Developing effective interventions for youth might, therefore, help to prevent unhealthy dietary choices becoming habitual.

  3. Dietary calcium intake and the risk of colorectal cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changwoo; Shin, Aesun; Lee, Jeonghee; Lee, Jeeyoo; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Jeongseon

    2015-12-16

    High intake of dietary calcium has been thought to be a protective factor against colorectal cancer. To explore the dose-response relationship in the associations between dietary calcium intake and colorectal cancer risk by cancer location, we conducted a case-control study among Korean population, whose dietary calcium intake levels are relatively low. The colorectal cancer cases and controls were recruited from the National Cancer Center in Korea between August 2010 and August 2013. Information on dietary calcium intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and locations of the colorectal cancers were classified as proximal colon cancer, distal colon cancer, and rectal cancer. Binary and polytomous logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between dietary calcium intake and risk of colorectal cancer. A total of 922 colorectal cancer cases and 2766 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with the lowest calcium intake quartile, the highest quartile group showed a significantly reduced risk of colorectal cancer in both men and women. (Odds ratio (OR): 0.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.11-0.24 for men; OR: 0.16, 95% CI: 0.09-0.29 for women). Among the highest calcium intake groups, decrease in cancer risk was observed across all sub-sites of colorectum in both men and women. In conclusion, calcium consumption was inversely related to colorectal cancer risk in Korean population where national average calcium intake level is relatively lower than Western countries. A decreased risk of colorectal cancer by calcium intake was observed in all sub-sites in men and women.

  4. A cluster-randomised controlled trial of a school-based fruit and vegetable intervention: Project Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charlotte E L; Ransley, Joan K; Christian, Meaghan S; Greenwood, Darren C; Thomas, James D; Cade, Janet E

    2013-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether a multi-component school-based intervention can maintain children's fruit and vegetable intake post eligibility for free school fruit and vegetables. A random sample of fifty-four English primary schools was randomised to receive the 10-month intervention Project Tomato, a multi-component theory-based intervention, or the control. Each group consisted of twenty-seven schools. Children's intake of fruit and vegetables is below recommendations. The English School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme has a short-term impact on intake while children are eligible for the scheme. Dietary measurements were collected from 658 Year 2 pupils aged 7-8 years at baseline and at follow-up 20 months later. Following an intention to treat analysis, the intervention as delivered compared with the control had no impact on the intake of fruit and vegetables (2 g/d, 95 % CI -23, 26 g/d) or on the number of portions of fruit (0.0 portions, 95 % CI - 0.3, 0.3) or vegetables (0.0 portions, 95 % CI - 0.2, 0.3) consumed daily by children. Intake of fruit and vegetables at school and home dropped by ≈ 100 g/d and 50 g/d, respectively, between baseline and follow-up in both the intervention and control groups. Implementation of the intervention was low, with associated lack of impact on fruit and vegetable consumption in children. Alternatives to the delivery of an intervention by teachers and parents are needed to improve the dietary intake of primary-school children.

  5. Dietary advice for muscularity, leanness and weight control in Men's Health magazine: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Toni M; Russell, Jean M; Barker, Margo E

    2014-10-11

    The dietary content of advice in men's lifestyle magazines has not been closely scrutinised. We carried out an analysis of such content in all 2009 issues (n = 11) of Men's Health (MH) focusing on muscularity, leanness and weight control. Promotion of a mesomorphic body image underpinned advice to affect muscle building and control weight. Diet advice was underpinned by a strong pseudo-scientific discourse, with citation of expert sources widely used to legitimise the information. Frequently multiple dietary components were advocated within one article e.g. fat, omega-3 fatty acids, thiamine, zinc and high-glycaemic index foods. Furthermore advice would cover numerous nutritional effects, e.g. strengthening bones, reducing stress and boosting testosterone, with little contextualisation. The emphasis on attainment of a mesomorphic body image permitted promotion of slimming diets.Advice to increase calorie and protein intake to augment muscle mass was frequent (183 and 262 references, respectively). Such an anabolic diet was advised in various ways, including consumption of traditional protein foods (217 references) and sports foods (107 references), thereby replicating muscle magazines' support for nutritional supplements. Although advice to increase consumption of red meat was common (52 references), fish and non-flesh sources of protein (eggs, nuts & pulses, and soy products) together exceeded red meat in number of recommendations (206 references). Advice widely asserted micronutrients and phytochemicals from plant food (161 references) as being important in muscle building. This emphasis diverges from stereotypical gender-based food consumption patterns.Dietary advice for control of body weight largely replicated that of muscularity, with strong endorsement to consume fruits and vegetables (59 references), diets rich in nuts and pulses and fish (66 references), as well as specific micronutrients and phytochemicals (62 references). Notably there was emphasis on

  6. Self-control constructs related to measures of dietary intake and physical activity in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Thomas A; Isasi, Carmen R; Mendoza, Don; Ainette, Michael G

    2007-12-01

    To test self-regulation concepts in relation to dietary intake and physical activity patterns in adolescence, which we predicted to be influenced by components of a self-control model. A survey was conducted with a multiethnic sample of 9th grade public school students in a metropolitan area (N = 539). Confirmatory analysis tested the measurement structure of self-control. Structural equation modeling tested the association of self-control constructs with measures of fruit and vegetable intake, saturated fat intake, physical activity, and sedentary behavior. Confirmatory analysis of 14 indicators of self-control showed best fit for a two-factor structure, with latent constructs of good self-control (planfulness) and poor self-control (impulsiveness). Good self-control was related to more fruit and vegetable intake, more participation in sports, and less sedentary behavior. Poor self-control was related to more saturated fat intake and less vigorous exercise. These effects were independent of gender, ethnicity, and parental education, which themselves had relations to diet and exercise measures. Multiple-group modeling indicated that effects of self-control were comparable across gender and ethnicity subgroups. Self-control concepts are relevant for patterns of dietary intake and physical activity among adolescents. Attention to self-control processes may be warranted for prevention programs to improve health behaviors in childhood and adolescence.

  7. The nutrition-based comprehensive intervention study on childhood obesity in China (NISCOC: a randomised cluster controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Guifa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity and its related metabolic and psychological abnormalities are becoming serious health problems in China. Effective, feasible and practical interventions should be developed in order to prevent the childhood obesity and its related early onset of clinical cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this paper is to describe the design of a multi-centred random controlled school-based clinical intervention for childhood obesity in China. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of the comprehensive intervention strategy with two other interventions, one only focuses on nutrition education, the other only focuses on physical activity. Methods/Design The study is designed as a multi-centred randomised controlled trial, which included 6 centres located in Beijing, Shanghai, Chongqing, Shandong province, Heilongjiang province and Guangdong province. Both nutrition education (special developed carton style nutrition education handbook and physical activity intervention (Happy 10 program will be applied in all intervention schools of 5 cities except Beijing. In Beijing, nutrition education intervention will be applied in 3 schools and physical activity intervention among another 3 schools. A total of 9750 primary students (grade 1 to grade 5, aged 7-13 years will participate in baseline and intervention measurements, including weight, height, waist circumference, body composition (bioelectrical impendence device, physical fitness, 3 days dietary record, physical activity questionnaire, blood pressure, plasma glucose and plasma lipid profiles. Data concerning investments will be collected in our study, including costs in staff training, intervention materials, teachers and school input and supervising related expenditure. Discussion Present study is the first and biggest multi-center comprehensive childhood obesity intervention study in China. Should the study produce comprehensive results, the

  8. Relevant Aspects of Nutritional and Dietary Interventions in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rodas, Maria Catalina; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Videla, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the main cause of liver disease worldwide. NAFLD is linked to circumstances such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Since the obesity figures and related comorbidities are increasing, NAFLD has turned into a liver problem that has become progressively more common. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy for NAFLD; therefore, interventions in lifestyles remain the first line of treatment. Bearing in mind that adherence rates to this type of treatment are poor, great efforts are currently focused on finding novel therapeutic agents for the prevention in the development of hepatic steatosis and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. This review presents a compilation of the scientific evidence found in the last years showing the results of interventions in lifestyle, diet, and behavioral therapies and research results in human, animal and cell models. Possible therapeutic agents ranging from supplementation with vitamins, amino acids, prebiotics, probiotics, symbiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols to interventions with medicinal plants are analyzed. PMID:26512643

  9. Human benefits of animal interventions for zoonosis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther; Roth, Felix; Bonfoh, Bassirou; de Savigny, Don; Tanner, Marcel

    2007-04-01

    Although industrialized countries have been able to contain recent outbreaks of zoonotic diseases, many resource-limited and transitioning countries have not been able to react adequately. The key for controlling zoonoses such as rabies, echinococcosis, and brucellosis is to focus on the animal reservoir. In this respect, ministries of health question whether the public health sector really benefits from interventions for livestock. Cross-sectoral assessments of interventions such as mass vaccination for brucellosis in Mongolia or vaccination of dogs for rabies in Chad consider human and animal health sectors from a societal economic perspective. Combining the total societal benefits, the intervention in the animal sector saves money and provides the economic argument, which opens new approaches for the control of zoonoses in resource-limited countries through contributions from multiple sectors.

  10. Adherence to Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Dietary Pattern in Relation to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Mohammad Emami; Onvani, Shokouh; Esmailzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study was designed to investigate the association between adherences to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in comparison to subjects without COPD. This is a case-control study. Usual dietary intake was assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Lung function was evaluated with spirometry testing, and one of the researchers inquired about other respiratory symptoms, including chronic cough, sputum, and breathlessness. Adherence to the DASH dietary pattern was assessed according to the Fung method. This study was conducted at Alzahra University Hospital of Isfahan, Iran, in 2015. Eight-four patients with COPD and 80 subjects without a history of COPD participated in study. The mean age of participants was 57 years. Average smoking in the case group was about 27.5 pack-years. Spirometry tests including forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV 1 /FVC were significantly lower in patients with COPD (p = 0.0001). Among COPD symptoms, cough was significantly decreased across tertiles of DASH score (p = 0.03). Significant differences were found for DASH score between patients with COPD and control subjects (19.82 + 3.63 vs 21.13 + 3.82, p = 0.02). Vitamin C, vitamin E, and dietary fiber intake were lower in patients with COPD (144.32 + 70.51 vs 166.97 + 71.88, p = 0.04, 7.49 + 3.91 vs 8.72 + 3.21, p = 0.02 and 19.34 + 7.05 vs 22.19 + 7.87, p = 0.01, respectively). We observed that adherence to a DASH dietary pattern among patients with COPD was significantly lower compared to the control group. Cough was significantly decreased by increments in adherence to a DASH dietary pattern.

  11. Dietary fiber is positively associated with cognitive control among prepubertal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naiman A; Raine, Lauren B; Drollette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Kramer, Arthur F; Hillman, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Converging evidence now indicates that aerobic fitness and adiposity are key correlates of childhood cognitive function and brain health. However, the evidence relating dietary intake to executive function/cognitive control remains limited. The current study assessed cross-sectional associations between performance on an attentional inhibition task and dietary fatty acids (FAs), fiber, and overall diet quality among children aged 7-9 y (n = 65). Attentional inhibition was assessed by using a modified flanker task. Three-day food records were used to conduct nutrient-level analyses and to calculate diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2005) scores. Bivariate correlations revealed that socioeconomic status and sex were not related to task performance or diet measures. However, age, intelligence quotient (IQ), pubertal staging, maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), and percentage of fat mass (%fat mass) correlated with task accuracy. Hierarchical regression models were used to determine the relation between diet variables and task accuracy and reaction time across both congruent and incongruent trials of the flanker task. After adjustment of confounding variables (age, IQ, pubertal staging, V̇O2max, and %fat mass), congruent accuracy was positively associated with insoluble fiber (β = 0.26, P = 0.03) and total dietary fiber (β = 0.23, P = 0.05). Incongruent response accuracy was positively associated with insoluble fiber (β = 0.35, P dietary fiber (β = 0.32, P dietary fiber, is an important correlate of performance on a cognitive task requiring variable amounts of cognitive control. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Dietary factors and pediatric multiple sclerosis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpoor, Julia; Seminatore, Brandon; Graves, Jennifer S; Schreiner, Teri; Waldman, Amy T; Lotze, Timothy E; Belman, Anita; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Aaen, Gregory; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; McDonald, Jamie C; Hart, Janace; Ness, Jayne M; Harris, Yolanda; Rubin, Jennifer; Candee, Meghan; Krupp, Lauren; Gorman, Mark; Benson, Leslie; Rodriguez, Moses; Chitnis, Tanuja; Mar, Soe; Kahn, Ilana; Rose, John; Carmichael, Suzan L; Roalstad, Shelly; Waltz, Michael; Casper, T Charles; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2017-06-01

    The role of diet in multiple sclerosis (MS) is largely uncharacterized, particularly as it pertains to pediatric-onset disease. To determine the association between dietary factors and MS in children. Pediatric MS patients and controls were recruited from 16 US centers (MS or clinically isolated syndrome onset before age 18, least 2 silent lesions on magnetic resonance imaging). The validated Block Kids Food Screener questionnaire was administered 2011-2016. Chi-squared test compared categorical variables, Kruskal-Wallis test compared continuous variables, and multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed. In total, 312 cases and 456 controls were included (mean ages 15.1 and 14.4 years). In unadjusted analyses, there was no difference in intake of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, sugars, fruits, or vegetables. Dietary iron was lower in cases ( p = 0.04), and cases were more likely to consume below recommended guidelines of iron (77.2% of cases vs 62.9% of controls, p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, iron consumption below recommended guidelines was associated with MS (odds ratio = 1.80, p < 0.01). Pediatric MS cases may be less likely to consume sufficient iron compared to controls, and this warrants broader study to characterize a temporal relationship. No other significant difference in intake of most dietary factors was found.

  13. Optimal interventions to control campylobacter in broilers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Bodil Hald, Anna

    In a multi disciplinary project we have evaluated interventions against Campylobacter in the broiler production chain. Taking into account risk reduction, costs, practicability and public acceptance of decontamination, it was concluded that at present the optimal control measure for the Danish...

  14. An exploration of exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and transfer effects to dietary self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Cassandra J; Kolev, Dimitar; Hall, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the effects of aerobic exercise on executive function, specifically inhibitory control, and the transfer to self-control in the dietary domain. It was hypothesized that exercise would enhance inhibitory control, and that this enhancement would facilitate self-control in a laboratory taste test paradigm. Using a crossover design, 51 participants completed counterbalanced sessions of both moderate exercise (experimental condition) and minimal effort walking (control condition) using a treadmill; the intersession interval was 7days. Prior to each exercise bout participants completed a Stroop task. Following each bout participants completed a second Stoop task, as well as a bogus taste test involving three appetitive calorie dense snack foods and two control foods; the amount of each food type consumed during the taste test was covertly measured. Results revealed that moderate exercise significantly improved performance on the Stroop task, and also reduced food consumption during the taste test for appetitive calorie dense snack foods; there was no exercise effect on control food consumption. Exercise-induced gains in Stroop performance mediated the effects of moderate exercise on appetitive snack food consumption. Together these findings provide evidence that a bout of a moderate aerobic exercise can enhance inhibitory control, and support for cross-domain transfer effects to dietary self-control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mediators and Moderators of the Effectiveness of a Community Health Worker Intervention That Improved Dietary Outcomes in Pregnant Latino Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Megha K.; Kieffer, Edith C.; Choi, Hwajung; Schumann, Christina; Heisler, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy is an opportune time to initiate diabetes prevention strategies for minority and underserved women, using culturally tailored interventions delivered by community health workers. A community-partnered randomized controlled trial (RCT) with pregnant Latino women resulted in significantly improved vegetable, fiber, added sugar,…

  16. Dietary self-control influences top?down guidance of attention to food cues

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs, Suzanne; Dolmans, Dirk; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Rutters, Femke

    2015-01-01

    Motivational objects attract attention due to their rewarding properties, but less is known about the role that top–down cognitive processes play in the attention paid to motivationally relevant objects and how this is affected by relevant behavioral traits. Here we assess how thinking about food affects attentional guidance to food items and how this is modulated by traits relating to dietary self-control. Participants completed two tasks in which they were presented with an initial cue (foo...

  17. A Plant-Based Dietary Intervention Improves Beta-Cell Function and Insulin Resistance in Overweight Adults: A 16-Week Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kahleova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the effect of a plant-based dietary intervention on beta-cell function in overweight adults with no history of diabetes. Participants (n = 75 were randomized to follow a low-fat plant-based diet (n = 38 or to make no diet changes (n = 37 for 16 weeks. At baseline and 16 weeks, beta-cell function was quantified with a mathematical model. Using a standard meal test, insulin secretory rate was calculated by C-peptide deconvolution. The Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA-IR index was used to assess insulin resistance while fasting. A marked increase in meal-stimulated insulin secretion was observed in the intervention group compared with controls (interaction between group and time, Gxt, p < 0.001. HOMA-IR index fell significantly (p < 0.001 in the intervention group (treatment effect −1.0 (95% CI, −1.2 to −0.8; Gxt, p = 0.004. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated positively with changes in body mass index (BMI and visceral fat volume (r = 0.34; p = 0.009 and r = 0.42; p = 0.001, respectively. The latter remained significant after adjustment for changes in BMI (r = 0.41; p = 0.002. Changes in glucose-induced insulin secretion correlated negatively with BMI changes (r = −0.25; p = 0.04, but not with changes in visceral fat. Beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity were significantly improved through a low-fat plant-based diet in overweight adults.

  18. Advanced glycation end products dietary restriction effects on bacterial gut microbiota in peritoneal dialysis patients; a randomized open label controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi Yacoub

    Full Text Available The modern Western diet is rich in advanced glycation end products (AGEs. We have previously shown an association between dietary AGEs and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in a population of end stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD. In the current pilot study we explored the effects of dietary AGEs on the gut bacterial microbiota composition in similar patients. AGEs play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular (CVD disease. Plasma concentrations of different bacterial products have been shown to predict the risk of incident major adverse CVD events independently of traditional CVD risk factors, and experimental animal models indicates a possible role AGEs might have on the gut microbiota population. In this pilot randomized open label controlled trial, twenty PD patients habitually consuming a high AGE diet were recruited and randomized into either continuing the same diet (HAGE, n = 10 or a one-month dietary AGE restriction (LAGE, n = 10. Blood and stool samples were collected at baseline and after intervention. Variable regions V3-V4 of 16s rDNA were sequenced and taxa was identified on the phyla, genus, and species levels. Dietary AGE restriction resulted in a significant decrease in serum Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine (CML and methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG. At baseline, our total cohort exhibited a lower relative abundance of Bacteroides and Alistipes genus and a higher abundance of Prevotella genus when compared to the published data of healthy population. Dietary AGE restriction altered the bacterial gut microbiota with a significant reduction in Prevotella copri and Bifidobacterium animalis relative abundance and increased Alistipes indistinctus, Clostridium citroniae, Clostridium hathewayi, and Ruminococcus gauvreauii relative abundance. We show in this pilot study significant microbiota differences in peritoneal dialysis patients' population, as well as the effects

  19. Advanced glycation end products dietary restriction effects on bacterial gut microbiota in peritoneal dialysis patients; a randomized open label controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Rabi; Nugent, Melinda; Cai, Weijin; Nadkarni, Girish N; Chaves, Lee D; Abyad, Sham; Honan, Amanda M; Thomas, Shruthi A; Zheng, Wei; Valiyaparambil, Sujith A; Bryniarski, Mark A; Sun, Yijun; Buck, Michael; Genco, Robert J; Quigg, Richard J; He, John C; Uribarri, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    The modern Western diet is rich in advanced glycation end products (AGEs). We have previously shown an association between dietary AGEs and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in a population of end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). In the current pilot study we explored the effects of dietary AGEs on the gut bacterial microbiota composition in similar patients. AGEs play an important role in the development and progression of cardiovascular (CVD) disease. Plasma concentrations of different bacterial products have been shown to predict the risk of incident major adverse CVD events independently of traditional CVD risk factors, and experimental animal models indicates a possible role AGEs might have on the gut microbiota population. In this pilot randomized open label controlled trial, twenty PD patients habitually consuming a high AGE diet were recruited and randomized into either continuing the same diet (HAGE, n = 10) or a one-month dietary AGE restriction (LAGE, n = 10). Blood and stool samples were collected at baseline and after intervention. Variable regions V3-V4 of 16s rDNA were sequenced and taxa was identified on the phyla, genus, and species levels. Dietary AGE restriction resulted in a significant decrease in serum Nε-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML) and methylglyoxal-derivatives (MG). At baseline, our total cohort exhibited a lower relative abundance of Bacteroides and Alistipes genus and a higher abundance of Prevotella genus when compared to the published data of healthy population. Dietary AGE restriction altered the bacterial gut microbiota with a significant reduction in Prevotella copri and Bifidobacterium animalis relative abundance and increased Alistipes indistinctus, Clostridium citroniae, Clostridium hathewayi, and Ruminococcus gauvreauii relative abundance. We show in this pilot study significant microbiota differences in peritoneal dialysis patients' population, as well as the effects of dietary

  20. Interventions targeting child undernutrition in developing countries may be undermined by dietary exposure to aflatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sinead; Gong, Yun Yun; Routledge, Michael

    2017-06-13

    Child undernutrition, a form of malnutrition, is a major public health burden in developing countries. Supplementation interventions targeting the major micronutrient deficiencies have only reduced the burden of child undernutrition to a certain extent, indicating that there are other underlying determinants that need to be addressed. Aflatoxin exposure, which is also highly prevalent in developing countries, may be considered an aggravating factor for child undernutrition. Increasing evidence suggests that aflatoxin exposure can occur in any stage of life, including in utero through a trans-placental pathway and in early childhood (through contaminated weaning food and family food). Early life exposure to aflatoxin is associated with adverse effects on low birth weight, stunting, immune suppression, and the liver function damage. The mechanisms underlying impaired growth and aflatoxin exposure are still unclear but intestinal function damage, reduced immune function, and alteration in the insulin-like growth factor axis caused by the liver damage are the suggested hypotheses. Given the fact that both aflatoxin and child undernutrition are common in sub-Saharan Africa, effective interventions aimed at reducing undernutrition cannot be satisfactorily achieved until the interactive relationship between aflatoxin and child undernutrition is clearly understood, and an aflatoxin mitigation strategy takes effect in those vulnerable mothers and children.

  1. Dietary risk factors for urolithiasis in Korea: A case-control pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Young Ryu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dietary factors are one of the main causes of urolithiasis. However, little research has evaluated dietary factors related to urolithiasis in Korea. We investigated the various dietary risk factors for urinary stone formation in Korean people. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective case-control pilot study. A total of 27 patients newly diagnosed with urolithiasis and 20 applicants without urolithiasis were designated as the patients and the control group, respectively. A face-to-face survey was carried out using a food-frequency questionnaire. After adjustment for physical activity level and total energy intake, multivariate logistic regression models were applied to search for risk factors for urolithiasis. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in gender, age, body mass index, family history, or total energy intake. The physical activity level of the control group was significantly higher than that of the patients (p=0.012. The results of the multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that intake of carbohydrate (odds ratio [OR], 1.055; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.012–1.099, protein (OR, 1.101; 95% CI, 1.001–1.211, and cereals (OR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.002–1.023 could increase the risk for urolithiasis. Conclusions: A higher intake of carbohydrate, protein, and cereal may increase the risk of urinary stone formation among Korean people.

  2. Maternal Diet and Weight at 3 Months Postpartum Following a Pregnancy Intervention with a Low Glycaemic Index Diet: Results from the ROLO Randomised Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K. Horan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy increases the risk of being overweight at a later time period, particularly when there is excessive gestational weight gain. There remains a paucity of data into the effect of low glycaemic index (GI pregnancy interventions postpartum. Aim: To examine the impact of a low glycaemic index diet during pregnancy on maternal diet 3 months postpartum. Methodology: This analysis examined the diet, weight and lifestyle of 460 participants of the ROLO study 3 months postpartum. Questionnaires on weight, physical activity, breastfeeding, supplement use, food label reading and dietary habits were completed. Results: The intervention group had significantly greater weight loss from pre-pregnancy to 3 months postpartum than the control group (1.3 vs. 0.1 kg, p = 0.022. The intervention group reported greater numbers following a low glycaemic index diet (p < 0.001 and reading food labels (p = 0.032 and had a lower glycaemic load (GL (128 vs. 145, p = 0.014 but not GI (55 vs. 55, p = 0.809 than controls. Conclusions: Low GI dietary interventions in pregnancy result in improved health-behaviours and continued reported compliance at 3 months postpartum possibly through lower dietary GL as a result of portion control. Greater levels of weight loss from pre-pregnancy to 3 months postpartum in the intervention group may have important positive implications for overweight and obesity.

  3. Rigid dietary control, flexible dietary control, and intuitive eating: Evidence for their differential relationship to disordered eating and body image concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linardon, Jake; Mitchell, Sarah

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to replicate and extend from Tylka, Calogero, and Daníelsdóttir (2015) findings by examining the relationship between rigid control, flexible control, and intuitive eating on various indices of disordered eating (i.e., binge eating, disinhibition) and body image concerns (i.e., shape and weight over-evaluation, body checking, and weight-related exercise motivations). This study also examined whether the relationship between intuitive eating and outcomes was mediated by dichotomous thinking and body appreciation. Analysing data from a sample of 372 men and women recruited through the community, this study found that, in contrast to rigid dietary control, intuitive eating uniquely and consistently predicted lower levels of disordered eating and body image concerns. This intuitive eating-disordered eating relationship was mediated by low levels of dichotomous thinking and the intuitive eating-body image relationship was mediated by high levels of body appreciation. Flexible control predicted higher levels of body image concerns and lower levels of disordered eating only when rigid control was accounted for. Findings suggest that until the adaptive properties of flexible control are further elucidated, it may be beneficial to promote intuitive eating within public health approaches to eating disorder prevention. In addition to this, particular emphasis should also be made toward promoting body acceptance and eradicating a dichotomous thinking style around food and eating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Humans, 'things' and space: costing hospital infection control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, K; Graves, N; Halton, K; Barnett, A G

    2013-07-01

    Previous attempts at costing infection control programmes have tended to focus on accounting costs rather than economic costs. For studies using economic costs, estimates tend to be quite crude and probably underestimate the true cost. One of the largest costs of any intervention is staff time, but this cost is difficult to quantify and has been largely ignored in previous attempts. To design and evaluate the costs of hospital-based infection control interventions or programmes. This article also discusses several issues to consider when costing interventions, and suggests strategies for overcoming these issues. Previous literature and techniques in both health economics and psychology are reviewed and synthesized. This article provides a set of generic, transferable costing guidelines. Key principles such as definition of study scope and focus on large costs, as well as pitfalls (e.g. overconfidence and uncertainty), are discussed. These new guidelines can be used by hospital staff and other researchers to cost their infection control programmes and interventions more accurately. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Telephone, print, and Web-based interventions for physical activity, diet, and weight control among cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Ana D; Lawler, Sheleigh P; Brakenridge, Charlotte L; Reeves, Marina M; Eakin, Elizabeth G

    2015-12-01

    Broad-reach (non-face-to-face) modalities offer an accessible and cost-effective means to provide behavior change programs in diverse and growing cancer survivor populations. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy of physical activity, dietary, and/or weight control interventions for cancer survivors in which telephone, short-message service, print, and/or Web is the primary method of delivery. A structured search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL, and CENTRAL (May 2013) was conducted. Included studies focused and reported on physical activity (PA) and dietary change and/or weight control in adult cancer survivors, delivered at least 50% of intervention contacts by broad-reach modality and included a control group. Study design, intervention features, and behavioral/weight outcomes were extracted, tabulated, and summarized. Twenty-seven studies were included; 22 telephone, three Web, and two print. Sixteen studies targeted PA, two diet, and nine targeted multiple behaviors. Most studies (18/27) targeted a single survivor group, namely breast cancer (n = 12). Nineteen of 27 studies found evidence for initiation of behavior change, with only eight reporting on maintenance and one on cost-effectiveness. This review provides support for broad-reach modalities, particularly the telephone, in the delivery of lifestyle interventions to cancer survivors. Future research should evaluate (1) newer technologies (i.e., SMS and mobile phone applications), (2) interventions for diverse cancer survivors and those targeting multiple behaviors, (3) long-term outcomes, and 4) cost-effectiveness. Broad-reach lifestyle interventions are effective, with further research needed to evaluate their generalizability and integration into cancer care.

  6. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk in a Korean population: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon; Lee, Jeonghee; Oh, Jae Hwan; Shin, Aesun; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has been recognized as one of the major malignancies in Korea. Analyses of dietary patterns can provide insight into the complex interactions of foods, nutrients, and biologically active components within a diet, which vary among populations. We aimed to investigate the associations between dietary patterns and colorectal cancer risk in Koreans. In a study of 923 cases and 1846 controls, principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns based on 33 predefined food groups using a 106-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (SQFFQ). The associations between dietary patterns and CRC risk were assessed using binary and polytomous logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Three dietary patterns (traditional, Westernized, and prudent) were derived. The proportion of total variation explained by 3 patterns was 24.2% for men and 25.3% for women. The traditional and prudent patterns were inversely associated with CRC risk [OR and 95% CI for the highest intake tertile of pattern score vs. the lowest = 0.35 (0.27-0.46) and 0.37 (0.28-0.48), respectively], whereas the Westernized pattern showed a positive association, especially among women [OR = 2.13 (1.35-3.34) for the highest tertile vs. the lowest]. A decrease in CRC risk among those with the highest intake of the prudent pattern was observed in all anatomical subsites in both men [OR = 0.36 (0.19-0.68) for proximal colon; 0.21 (0.12-0.36) for distal colon; 0.28 (0.18-0.44) for rectum] and women [OR = 0.28 (0.11-0.71); 0.27 (0.13-0.54); 0.45 (0.25-0.83)]. Our results indicate that individuals who prefer the Westernized dietary pattern should be made aware of their increased CRC risk. The traditional dietary pattern and the prudent pattern, which are rich in fruits and dairy products, are recommended for the Korean population to prevent CRC.

  7. Effectiveness of a Self-monitoring Device for Urinary Sodium-to-Potassium Ratio on Dietary Improvement in Free-Living Adults: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahori, Toshiyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Ohgami, Naoto; Yamashita, Hideyuki; Miyagawa, Naoko; Kondo, Keiko; Torii, Sayuki; Yoshita, Katsushi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Arima, Hisatomi; Miura, Katsuyuki

    2018-01-05

    Reducing the urinary sodium-to-potassium ratio is important for reducing both blood pressure and risk of cardiovascular disease. Among free-living Japanese individuals, we carried out a randomized trial to clarify the effect of lifestyle modification for lowering urinary sodium-to-potassium ratio using a self-monitoring device. This was an open, prospective, parallel randomized, controlled trial. Ninety-two individuals were recruited from Japanese volunteers. Participants were randomly allocated into intervention and control groups. A month-long dietary intervention on self-monitoring urinary sodium-to-potassium ratio was carried out using monitors (HEU-001F, OMRON Healthcare Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). All participants had brief dietary education and received a leaflet as usual care. Monitors were handed out to the intervention group, but not to the control group. The intervention group was asked to measure at least one spot urine sodium-to-potassium ratio daily, and advised to lower their sodium-to-potassium ratio toward the target of less than 1. Outcomes included changes in 24-hour urinary sodium-to-potassium ratio, sodium excretion, potassium excretion, blood pressure, and body weight in both groups. Mean measurement frequency of monitoring was 2.8 times/day during the intervention. Changes in urinary sodium-to-potassium ratio were -0.55 in the intervention group and -0.06 in the control group (P = 0.088); respective sodium excretion changes were -18.5 mmol/24 hours and -8.7 mmol/24 hours (P = 0.528); and corresponding potassium excretion was 2.6 mmol/24 hours and -1.5 mmol/24 hours (P = 0.300). No significant reductions were observed in either blood pressure or body weight after the intervention. Providing the device to self-monitor a sodium-to-potassium ratio did not achieve the targeted reduction of the ratio in "pure self-management" settings, indicating further needs to study an effective method to enhance the synergetic effect of dietary programs and self

  8. Dietary patterns and breast cancer: a case-control study in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouti, Niki; Papavagelis, Christos; Plytzanopoulou, Petrini; Kontogianni, Meropi; Vassilakou, Tonia; Malamos, Nikolaos; Linos, Athena; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

    2015-06-01

    Since dietary habits have been associated with breast cancer, the tested research hypothesis was the associations between food patterns, as derived through multivariate methods, and breast cancer. In a case-control study, Two-hundred and fifty consecutive, newly diagnosed breast cancer female patients (56 ± 12 years) and 250 one-to-one age-matched, healthy controls were studied. A standardized, validated questionnaire assessing various socio-demographic, clinical, lifestyle, and dietary characteristics was applied through face-to-face interviews. Factor analysis, with principal components method, was applied to extract dietary patterns from 86 foods or food groups consumption reported by the controls. Three components were derived explaining 43% of the total variation in consumption. Component 1 was characterized by the consumption of potatoes, red meat and its products, poultry and white meat, dairy products, use of margarine/butter in cooking or at the table, consumption of sausages, fried food as well as grilled meat or fish; component 2 was characterized by the consumption of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables; and component 3 was characterized by olive oil and fish consumption. After adjusting for various confounders, components 2 and 3 were favorably associated with the absence of having breast cancer [odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% CI 0.47-0.75 and OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.66-0.99, respectively], while component 1 was not significantly associated with the disease. Adherence to healthy dietary patterns (including whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, olive oil, and fish) seems to be favorable in not having breast cancer, among middle-aged women.

  9. Modeling the relation between obesity and sleep parameters in children referred for dietary weight reduction intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Rebecca; Althouse, Andrew; Yaqub, Yasir; Nugent, Kenneth; Raj, Rishi

    2014-08-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have demonstrated that short sleep periods increase the likelihood of obesity in children. This study was designed to identify other less-clearly defined sleep and behavioral patterns associated with changes in body mass index (BMI) in obese children referred for interventions. We retrospectively reviewed the clinic records of children with obesity and children at risk for developing obesity who were referred for counseling and weight loss. Information on sleep habits, pediatric quality of life, pediatric sleep questionnaire (PSQ), and the pediatric daytime sleepiness scale were analyzed, and children were distributed into three behavior groups using cluster analysis. Our sample contained 48 girls and 29 boys with an age range of 2.7 to 16.8 years. The mean BMI was 33.08 ± 7.37 kg/m(2), and mean sleep duration was 9.09 ± 1.09 hours. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction between sleep duration and age when the child was older than 12 years. A 1-hour increase in sleep in older children was associated with a decrease in BMI of 1.263 kg/m(2). Higher (more abnormal) pediatric quality-of-life school scores, higher PSQ1 and PSQ2 scores, and higher pediatric daytime sleepiness scale scores were associated with an increased BMI in univariate analyses but not in the multivariate analysis using the behavior group as an independent predictor. Children who shared a bedroom had a lower BMI in univariate analysis but not in the multivariate analysis. Longer sleep periods are associated with a decreased BMI, even in children who already meet the criteria for obesity. These children have poor-quality sleep, diurnal behavioral problems, and increased diurnal sleepiness. This study suggests that studies in obese children using questionnaires about sleep habits and quality of life provide useful information that could lead to better weight loss intervention studies.

  10. Translating a heart disease lifestyle intervention into the community: the South Asian Heart Lifestyle Intervention (SAHELI) study; a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Namratha R; Dave, Swapna; De Chavez, Peter John; Bharucha, Himali; Patel, Yasin; Seguil, Paola; Kumar, Santosh; Baker, David W; Spring, Bonnie; Siddique, Juned

    2015-10-16

    South Asians (Asian Indians and Pakistanis) are the second fastest growing ethnic group in the United States (U.S.) and have an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). This pilot study evaluated a culturally-salient, community-based healthy lifestyle intervention to reduce ASCVD risk among South Asians. Through an academic-community partnership, medically underserved South Asian immigrants at risk for ASCVD were randomized into the South Asian Heart Lifestyle Intervention (SAHELI) study. The intervention group attended 6 interactive group classes focused on increasing physical activity, healthful diet, weight, and stress management. They also received follow-up telephone support calls. The control group received translated print education materials about ASCVD and healthy behaviors. Primary outcomes were feasibility and initial efficacy, measured as change in moderate/vigorous physical activity and dietary saturated fat intake at 3- and 6-months. Secondary clinical and psychosocial outcomes were also measured. Participants' (n = 63) average age was 50 (SD = 8) years, 63 % were female, 27 % had less than or equal to a high school education, one-third were limited English proficient, and mean BMI was 30 kg/m2 (SD ± 5). There were no significant differences in change in physical activity or saturated fat intake between the intervention and control group. Compared to the control group, the intervention group showed significant weight loss (-1.5 kg, p-value = 0.04) and had a greater sex-adjusted decrease in hemoglobin A1C (-0.43 %, p-value culturally-salient, community-based lifestyle intervention was feasible for engaging medically underserved South Asian immigrants and more effective at addressing ASCVD risk factors than print health education materials. NCT01647438, Date of Trial Registration: July 19, 2012.

  11. Obesity induced rapid melanoma progression is reversed by orlistat treatment and dietary intervention: Role of adipokines‡

    OpenAIRE

    Malvi, Parmanand; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pandey, Vimal; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Boreddy, Purushotham Reddy; Mohammad, Naoshad; Singh, Shivendra Vikram; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, owing to adiposity, is associated with increased risk and development of various cancers, and linked to their rapid growth as well as progression. Although a few studies have attempted to understand the relationship between obesity and melanoma, the consequences of controlling body weight by reducing adiposity on cancer progression is not well understood. By employing animal models of obesity, we report that controlling obesity either by orlistat treatment or by restricting caloric i...

  12. Investigation of key interventions for shigellosis outbreak control in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianmu Chen

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is a major public health concern in China, where waterborne disease outbreaks are common. Shigellosis-containing strategies, mostly single or multiple interventions, are implemented by primary-level health departments. Systematic assessment of the effectiveness of these measures is scarce. To estimate the efficacy of commonly used intervention strategies, we developed a Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious/Asymptomatic-Recovered-Water model. No intervention was predicted to result in a total attack rate (TAR of 90% of the affected population (95% confidence interval [CI]: 86.65-92.80 and duration of outbreak (DO of 89 days, and the use of single-intervention strategies can be futile or even counter-productive. Prophylactics and water disinfection did not improve TAR or DO. School closure for up to 3 weeks did not help but only increased DO. Isolation alone significantly increased DO. Only antibiotics treatment could shorten the DO to 35 days with TAR unaffected. We observed that these intervention effects were additive when in combined usage under most circumstances. Combined intervention "Isolation+antibiotics+prophylactics+water disinfection" was predicted to result in the lowest TAR (41.9%, 95%CI: 36.97-47.04% and shortest DO (28 days. Our actual Shigellosis control implementation that also included school closure for 1 week, attained comparable results and the modeling produced an epidemic curve of Shigellosis highly similar to our actual outbreak data. This lends a strong support to the reality of our model that provides a possible reference for public health professionals to evaluate their strategies towards Shigellosis control.

  13. A high rate of non-compliance confounds the study of whole grains and weight maintenance in a randomised intervention trial - the case for greater use of dietary biomarkers in nutrition intervention studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mette Bredal; Pelletier, Xavier; Ross, Alastair B.

    2017-01-01

    randomised to a weight maintenance diet with refined-grain (RG) or whole-grain (WG) foods (80 g/day) for 12 weeks after an initial weight loss program over 8 weeks. Body weight and composition was assessed at baseline, after the initial weight loss, and after the 12-week dietary intervention. During the 12......-week dietary intervention phase, there were no group differences in changes in body weight and total fat mass %, whereas abdominal fat mass tended to increase more during the dietary intervention phase in the WG compared to the RG group (0.7 (SD 3.6) vs. -0.3 (SD 3.8) %; p = 0.052). Plasma...... than expected in both intervention groups, further supporting a lack of compliance to the post-weight-loss diet. The rate of compliance was too low to conclude any effect of whole grain on weight maintenance, and reinforces the need to use objective measures of compliance in nutrition intervention...

  14. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  15. Nutrient dietary patterns and the risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Francesca; Edefonti, Valeria; Bosetti, Cristina; Talamini, Renato; Montella, Maurizio; Giacosa, Attilio; Franceschi, Silvia; Negri, Eva; Ferraroni, Monica; La Vecchia, Carlo; Decarli, Adriano

    2010-11-01

    The role of diet on colorectal cancer has been considered in terms of single foods and nutrients, but less frequently in terms of dietary patterns. Data were derived from an Italian case-control study, including 1,225 subjects with cancer of the colon, 728 subjects with rectal cancer, and 4,154 hospital controls. We identified dietary patterns on a selected set of nutrients through principal component factor analysis. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for both cancers were estimated using unconditional multiple logistic regression. We identified 5 major dietary patterns. Direct associations were observed between the Starch-rich pattern and both cancer of the colon (OR = 1.68) and of the rectum (OR = 1.74). Inverse relationships were found between the Vitamins and fiber pattern and rectal cancer (OR = 0.61), between the Unsaturated fats (animal source) and the Unsaturated fats (vegetable source) and cancer of the colon (OR = 0.80 and OR = 0.79, respectively). No other significant association was found. The Starch-rich pattern is potentially an unfavorable indicator of risk for both colon and rectal cancer, whereas the Vitamins and fiber pattern is associated with a reduced risk of rectal cancer and the Unsaturated fats patterns with a reduced risk of colon cancer.

  16. Exercise and dietary advice intervention for survivors of triple-negative breast cancer: effects on body fat, physical function, quality of life, and adipokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Anne K; Abraham, Jame; Bonner, Daniel; Gilleland, Diana; Hobbs, Gerald; Kurian, Sobha; Yanosik, Mary Anne; Vona-Davis, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Regular exercise and healthy eating are routinely recommended for breast cancer survivors, and past studies show benefits in quality of life and decreased inflammation. However, this has not been tested specifically in triple-negative breast cancer survivors. Increasing physical activity and losing body fat are thought to positively affect inflammatory biomarkers that have been associated with breast cancer. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to determine if participation in an exercise and dietary counseling program can improve body fat, physical function, and quality of life in survivors of this aggressive breast cancer. Secondarily, we sought to determine if participation in the program had beneficial effects on obesity-related markers of the adipokine profile. Sixty-six survivors of triple-negative breast cancer with BMI >25 were invited to participate. Twenty-eight enrolled and 23 completed the randomized, controlled trial (13 intervention, 10 control). Moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (150 min per week, for 12 weeks) and diet counseling were compared to usual care, education only. The primary outcome of interest was weight loss (body mass, BMI, % fat), and secondary outcomes included physical function (exercise capacity), quality of life (Function After Cancer Therapy-Breast (FACT-B)), cytokines (C-reactive protein (CRP), TNF-α, IL-6), and adipokine profile (leptin, adiponectin, insulin). Participants in the program lost more body fat (2.4 % loss vs. 0.4 % gain, p quality of life (FACT-B total score +14 pts) and decreased sedentary time but did not improve peak exercise capacity. The intervention had no effect on serum cytokines and adipokines after 12 weeks in the program. However, serum leptin and adiponectin and their ratio were significantly correlated with BMI in the intervention group (p quality of life in survivors of triple-negative breast cancer. BMI was associated with favorable changes in leptin and adiponectin which may reflect a

  17. Stimulus control and affect in dietary behaviours. An intensive longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüz, Benjamin; Bower, Jodie; Ferguson, Stuart G

    2015-04-01

    Dietary behaviours are substantially influenced by environmental and internal stimuli, such as mood, social situation, and food availability. However, little is known about the role of stimulus control for eating in non-clinical populations, and no studies so far have looked at eating and drinking behaviour simultaneously. 53 individuals from the general population took part in an intensive longitudinal study with repeated, real-time assessments of eating and drinking using Ecological Momentary Assessment. Eating was assessed as main meals and snacks, drinks assessments were separated along alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks. Situational and internal stimuli were assessed during both eating and drinking events, and during randomly selected non-eating occasions. Hierarchical multinomial logistic random effects models were used to analyse data, comparing dietary events to non-eating occasions. Several situational and affective antecedents of dietary behaviours could be identified. Meals were significantly associated with having food available and observing others eat. Snacking was associated with negative affect, having food available, and observing others eat. Engaging in activities and being with others decreased the likelihood of eating behaviours. Non-alcoholic drinks were associated with observing others eat, and less activities and company. Alcoholic drinks were associated with less negative affect and arousal, and with observing others eat. RESULTS support the role of stimulus control in dietary behaviours, with support for both internal and external, in particular availability and social stimuli. The findings for negative affect support the idea of comfort eating, and results point to the formation of eating habits via cue-behaviour associations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary risk factors for colon and rectal cancers: a comparative case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, Kenji; Hirose, Kaoru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Kuriki, Kiyonori; Suzuki, Takeshi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Takashi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Tajima, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    In Japan, the incidence rate of colon cancer has more rapidly increased than that of rectal cancer. The differential secular trends may be due to different dietary factors in the development of colon and rectal cancers. To compare dietary risk factors between colon and rectal cancers, we undertook a case-control study at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Japan. Subjects were 507 patients with newly diagnosed colon (n = 265) and rectal (n = 242) cancers, and 2,535 cancer-free outpatients (controls). Intakes of nutrients and food groups were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire, and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using unconditional logistic models. We found a decreasing risk of colon cancer with increasing intakes of calcium and insoluble dietary fiber; the multivariate ORs across quartiles of intake were 1.00, 0.90, 0.80, and 0.67 (trend p = 0.040), and 1.00, 0.69, 0.64, and 0.65 (trend p = 0.027), respectively. For rectal cancer, a higher consumption of carotene and meat was associated with a reduced risk; the corresponding ORs were 1.00, 1.10, 0.71, and 0.70 for carotene (trend p = 0.028), and 1.00, 0.99, 0.68, and 0.72 for meat (trend p = 0.036). Carbohydrate intake was positively correlated with the risk of rectal cancer (ORs over quartiles: 1.00, 1.14, 1.42, and 1.54; trend p = 0.048). This association was stronger in women, while fat consumption was inversely correlated with the risk of female colon and rectal cancers. Dietary risk factors appear to considerably differ between colon and rectal cancers.

  19. Phenolic metabolites of anthocyanins following a dietary intervention study in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ferrars, Rachel M; Cassidy, Aedín; Curtis, Peter; Kay, Colin D

    2014-03-01

    Numerous studies feeding anthocyanin-rich foods report limited bioavailability of the parent anthocyanins. The present study explores the identity and concentration of the phenolic metabolites of anthocyanins in humans. Anthocyanin metabolites were quantified in samples collected from a previously conducted 12-wk elderberry intervention study in healthy post-menopausal women. Individual 1-, 2- and 3-h post-bolus urine samples and pooled plasma samples following acute (single bolus) and chronic (12-wk supplementation) anthocyanin consumption (500 mg/day) were analysed using HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Twenty-eight anthocyanin metabolites were identified in urine and 21 in plasma (including sulfates of vanillic, protocatechuic and benzoic acid). Phenolic metabolites reached peak concentrations of 1237 nM in plasma, while anthocyanin conjugates only reached concentrations of 34 nM. Similarly, in urine, phenolic metabolites were detected at concentrations of 33,185 ± 2549 nM/mM creatinine, while anthocyanin conjugates reached concentrations of 548 ± 219 nM/mM creatinine. There was no evidence that chronic exposure had any impact on either the profile or quantity of metabolites recovered relative to acute exposure. An extensive range of phenolic metabolites of anthocyanin was identified following elderberry consumption in humans, including 11 novel metabolites, which were identified at much higher concentrations than their parent compounds. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Early rehabilitation of cancer patients - a randomized controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arving, Cecilia; Thormodsen, Inger; Brekke, Guri; Mella, Olav; Berntsen, Sveinung; Nordin, Karin

    2013-01-07

    Faced with a life-threatening illness, such as cancer, many patients develop stress symptoms, i.e. avoidance behaviour, intrusive thoughts and worry. Stress management interventions have proven to be effective; however, they are mostly performed in group settings and it is commonly breast cancer patients who are studied. We hereby present the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an individual stress-management intervention with a stepped-care approach in several cancer diagnoses. Patients (≥ 18 years) with a recent diagnosis of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, prostate cancer or testicle cancer and scheduled for adjuvant/curative oncology treatment, will consecutively be included in the study. In this prospective longitudinal intervention study with a stepped-care approach, patients will be randomized to control, treatment as usual, or an individual stress-management intervention in two steps. The first step is a low-intensity stress-management intervention, given to all patients randomized to intervention. Patients who continue to report stress symptoms after the first step will thereafter be given more intensive treatment at the second step of the programme. In the intervention patients will also be motivated to be physically active. Avoidance and intrusion are the primary outcomes. According to the power analyses, 300 patients are planned to be included in the study and will be followed for two years. Other outcomes are physical activity level, sleep duration and quality recorded objectively, and anxiety, depression, quality of life, fatigue, stress in daily living, and patient satisfaction assessed using valid and standardized psychometric tested questionnaires. Utilization of hospital services will be derived from the computerized patient administration systems used by the hospital. The cost-effectiveness of the intervention will be evaluated through a cost-utility analysis. This RCT

  1. Obesity induced rapid melanoma progression is reversed by orlistat treatment and dietary intervention: role of adipokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pandey, Vimal; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Boreddy, Purushotham Reddy; Mohammad, Naoshad; Singh, Shivendra Vikram; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, owing to adiposity, is associated with increased risk and development of various cancers, and linked to their rapid growth as well as progression. Although a few studies have attempted to understand the relationship between obesity and melanoma, the consequences of controlling body weight by reducing adiposity on cancer progression is not well understood. By employing animal models of obesity, we report that controlling obesity either by orlistat treatment or by restricting caloric intake significantly slows down melanoma progression. The diminished tumor progression was correlated with decreased fat mass (adiposity) in obese mice. Obesity associated factors contributing to tumor progression were decreased in the experimental groups compared to respective controls. In tumors, protein levels of fatty acid synthase (FASN), caveolin (Cav)-1 and pAkt, which are tumor promoting molecules implicated in melanoma growth under obese state, were decreased. In addition, increased necrosis and reduction in angiogenesis as well as proliferative markers PCNA and cyclin D1 were observed in tumors of the orlistat treated and/or calorically restricted obese mice. We observed that growth of melanoma cells cultured in conditioned medium (CM) from orlistat-treated adipocytes was reduced. Adipokines (leptin and resistin), via activating Akt and modulation of FASN as well as Cav-1 respectively, enhanced melanoma cell growth and proliferation. Together, we demonstrate that controlling body weight reduces adipose mass thereby diminishing melanoma progression. Therefore, strategic means of controlling obesity by reduced caloric diet or with antiobesity drugs treatment may render obesity-promoted tumor progression in check and prolong survival of patients. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effectiveness of intervention programs in the prevention and control of obesity in infants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitangueira, Jacqueline Costa Dias; Rodrigues Silva, Luciana; Costa, Priscila Ribas de Farias

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to conduct a literature review to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs in the prevention and control of obesity in children and to map the locations where the studies were carried out. A systematic review using the PubMed / MEDLINE and LILACS databases to trace the published literature on intervention programs for prevention and control of obesity in the period of January 2004 to October 2013. The initial search was conducted using the terms "body mass index", " Intervention" and "children" or "adolescent" and only articles published in English, Spanish or Portuguese were selected. We found that interventions based only on advice had modest results in identifying changes in the anthropometric indicators of children and adolescents over time, although they appear to be effective in promoting positive changes in the eating habits of this population. Among the studies identified, 77.8 % were conducted in high-income countries, 22.2 % in middle to high income countries and no intervention studies were found in middle to low income countries. Intervention programs based only on counseling are effective in promoting changes in dietary patterns, but show poor results in the changes of anthropometric parameters of children and adolescents. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Lifestyle intervention in general practice for physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet in elderly: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Davorka; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Puljak, Livia; Lalić, Dragica Ivezić; Kranjčević, Ksenija; Vučak, Jasna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of programmed and intensified intervention on lifestyle changes, including physical activity, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and diet, in patients aged ≥ 65 with the usual care of general practitioners (GP). In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 738 patients aged ≥ 65 were randomly assigned to receive intensified intervention (N = 371) or usual care (N = 367) of a GP for lifestyle changes, with 18-month follow-up. The main outcome measures were physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption and diet. The study was conducted in 59 general practices in Croatia between May 2008 and May 2010. The patients' mean age was 72.3 ± 5.2 years. Significant diet correction was achieved after 18-month follow-up in the intervention group, comparing to controls. More patients followed strictly Mediterranean diet and consumed healthy foods more frequently. There was no significant difference between the groups in physical activity, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption or diet after the intervention. In conclusion, an 18-month intensified GP's intervention had limited effect on lifestyle habits. GP intervention managed to change dietary habits in elderly population, which is encouraging since elderly population is very resistant regarding lifestyle habit changes. Clinical trial registration number. ISRCTN31857696. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Dutch Obesity Intervention in Teenagers (DOiT) cluster controlled implementation trial: intervention effects and mediators and moderators of adiposity and energy balance-related behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nassau, Femke; Singh, Amika S; Cerin, Ester; Salmon, Jo; van Mechelen, Willem; Brug, Johannes; Chinapaw, Mai Jm

    2014-12-24

    The Dutch Obesity Intervention in Teenagers (DOiT) programme is an evidence-based obesity prevention programme tailored to adolescents attending the first two years of prevocational education in the Netherlands. The initial programme showed promising results during an effectiveness trial. The programme was adapted and prepared for nationwide dissemination. To gain more insight into the process of translating evidence-based approaches into 'real world' (i.e., 'natural') conditions, our research aims were to evaluate the impact of the DOiT-implementation programme on adolescents' adiposity and energy balance-related behaviours during natural dissemination and to explore the mediating and moderating factors underlying the DOiT intervention effects. We conducted a cluster-controlled implementation trial with 20 voluntary intervention schools (n=1002 adolescents) and 9 comparable control schools (n = 484 adolescents). We measured adolescents' body height and weight, skinfold thicknesses, and waist circumference. We assessed adolescents' dietary and physical activity behaviours by means of self-report. Data were collected at baseline and at 20-months follow-up. We used multivariable multilevel linear or logistic regression analyses to evaluate the intervention effects and to test the hypothesised behavioural mediating factors. We checked for potential effect modification by gender, ethnicity and education level. We found no significant intervention effects on any of the adiposity measures or behavioural outcomes. Furthermore, we found no mediating effects by any of the hypothesised behavioural mediators. Stratified analyses for gender showed that the intervention was effective in reducing sugar-containing beverage consumption in girls (B = -188.2 ml/day; 95% CI = -344.0; -32.3). In boys, we found a significant positive intervention effect on breakfast frequency (B = 0.29 days/week; 95% CI = 0.01; 0.58). Stratified analyses for education level showed

  5. Effect of a fermented dietary supplement containing chromium and zinc on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mi Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the increasing development of type 2 diabetes dietary habits play an important role. In this regard, dietary supplements are of growing interest to influence the progression of this disease. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a cascade-fermented dietary supplement based on fruits, nuts, and vegetables fortified with chromium and zinc on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, intervention study under free-living conditions using a cross-over design. Thirty-six patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled and randomized either to receive a cascade-fermented dietary supplement enriched with chromium (100 µg/d and zinc (15 mg/d or a placebo similar in taste but without supplements, over a period of 12 weeks. After a wash-out period of 12 weeks, the patients received the other test product. The main outcome variable was the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Other outcome variables were fasting blood glucose, fructosamine, and lipid parameters. Results: Thirty-one patients completed the study. HbA1c showed no relevant changes during both treatment periods, nor was there a relevant difference between the two treatments (HbA1c: p=0.48. The same results were found for fructosamine and fasting glucose (fructosamine: p=0.9; fasting glucose: p=0.31. In addition, there was no effect on lipid metabolism. Conclusion: This intervention study does not provide evidence that a cascade-fermented plant-based dietary supplement enriched with a combination of chromium and zinc improves glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under free-living conditions.

  6. Mobile-based intervention intended to stop obesity in preschool-aged children: the MINISTOP randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Christine Delisle; Sandin, Sven; Henriksson, Pontus; Henriksson, Hanna; Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva; Larsson, Christel; Maddison, Ralph; Ortega, Francisco B; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Silfvernagel, Kristin; Timpka, Toomas; Löf, Marie

    2017-06-01

    Background: Traditional obesity prevention programs are time- and cost-intensive. Mobile phone technology has been successful in changing behaviors and managing weight; however, to our knowledge, its potential in young children has yet to be examined. Objective: We assessed the effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) obesity prevention program on body fat, dietary habits, and physical activity in healthy Swedish children aged 4.5 y. Design: From 2014 to 2015, 315 children were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Parents in the intervention group received a 6-mo mHealth program. The primary outcome was fat mass index (FMI), whereas the secondary outcomes were intakes of fruits, vegetables, candy, and sweetened beverages and time spent sedentary and in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Composite scores for the primary and secondary outcomes were computed. Results: No statistically significant intervention effect was observed for FMI between the intervention and control group (mean ± SD: -0.23 ± 0.56 compared with -0.20 ± 0.49 kg/m 2 ). However, the intervention group increased their mean composite score from baseline to follow-up, whereas the control group did not (+0.36 ± 1.47 compared with -0.06 ± 1.33 units; P = 0.021). This improvement was more pronounced among the children with an FMI above the median (4.11 kg/m 2 ) ( P = 0.019). The odds of increasing the composite score for the 6 dietary and physical activity behaviors were 99% higher for the intervention group than the control group ( P = 0.008). Conclusions: This mHealth obesity prevention study in preschool-aged children found no difference between the intervention and control group for FMI. However, the intervention group showed a considerably higher postintervention composite score (a secondary outcome) than the control group, especially in children with a higher FMI. Further studies targeting specific obesity classes within preschool-aged children are warranted. This

  7. The effects of dietary and lifestyle interventions among pregnant women who are overweight or obese on longer-term maternal and early childhood outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodd, Jodie M.; Grivell, Rosalie M.; Louise, Jennie

    2017-01-01

    or is being undertaken. The primary maternal outcome is a diagnosis of maternal metabolic syndrome. The primary childhood outcome is BMI above 90%. We have identified 7 relevant trials, involving 5425 women who were overweight or obese during pregnancy, with approximately 3544 women and children with follow......Background: The aim of this individual participant data meta-analysis (IPDMA) is to evaluate the effects of dietary and lifestyle interventions among pregnant women who are overweight or obese on later maternal and early childhood outcomes at ages 3-5 years. Methods/design: We will build...... on the established International Weight Management in Pregnancy (i-WIP) IPD Collaborative Network, having identified researchers who have conducted randomised dietary and lifestyle interventions among pregnant women who are overweight or obese, and where ongoing childhood follow-up of participants has been...

  8. Impact of dietary vitamin A interventions on total body stores in Thai lactating women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasanwisut, E.; West, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is increasingly being recognized as a public health problem among pregnant and lactating women in developing countries. This proposed study will be a randomized trial to evaluate the efficacy of consuming provitamin A-rich foods in one prepared, on-site meal per weekday for 3 months on total body vitamin A stores and other aspects of vitamin A status in marginally nourished lactating women in rural Northeast Thailand. Approximately 400 lactating women, 2-18 months post-partum, will be screened in the population for marginal vitamin A status by a tier of indicators beginning from low intake or history of night blindness or impaired dark adaptability followed by low serum retinol. Assuming a prevalence of low serum retinol of ∼20%, 90 women will be identified and recruited, matched by serum retinol and month post-partum and randomized in a block fashion into three groups to receive daily cooked (fat-added) meal and snack with (1) dark green leafy and yellow/orange vegetables and fruits, (2) beta-carotene- enriched rice chips and (3) non-enriched rice chips. Groups 1 and 2 will receive ∼3.6 mg of beta-carotene per day. Prior to and following the intervention hepatic vitamin A reserves will be estimated by isotopic dilution techniques and other indicators of vitamin A status. In addition, serum C-reactive protein and maternal anthropometry will be measured. Food consumption data based on 24-hour recall for 3 randomized days will be collected every 2 weeks to assess routine intakes of vitamin A, fat and other nutrients. Morbidity will be monitored on a weekly basis throughout the study. Between-group comparisons will provide a basis for (1) estimating the adequacy of local diets to improve or maintain total body stores of vitamin A in women during lactation and (2) assessing the validity and responsiveness of widely used measures of vitamin A status in this high-risk group

  9. Mathematical models and lymphatic filariasis control: monitoring and evaluating interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Edwin; Malecela-Lazaro, Mwele N; Maegga, Bertha T A; Fischer, Peter; Kazura, James W

    2006-11-01

    Monitoring and evaluation are crucially important to the scientific management of any mass parasite control programme. Monitoring enables the effectiveness of implemented actions to be assessed and necessary adaptations to be identified; it also determines when management objectives are achieved. Parasite transmission models can provide a scientific template for informing the optimal design of such monitoring programmes. Here, we illustrate the usefulness of using a model-based approach for monitoring and evaluating anti-parasite interventions and discuss issues that need addressing. We focus on the use of such an approach for the control and/or elimination of the vector-borne parasitic disease, lymphatic filariasis.

  10. Skeletal muscle structural lipids improve during weight-maintenance after a very low calorie dietary intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Vaag, Allan; Mu, Huiling

    2009-01-01

    -guided 24-weeks weight-maintenance program (-1.2 +/- 1.5 kg, P = ns). SMPL FA composition was determined by gas liquid chromatography. During the preceding VLCD, insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) and glycemic control (HbA1c) improved but no change in SMPL omega-3 FA was observed. During the weight......-maintenance program five subjects received the pancreas lipase inhibitor Orlistat 120 mg t.i.d. versus placebo. RESULTS: HOMA-IR and HbA1c stabilized and SMPL total omega-3 FA, docosahexaenoic acid and ratio of n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated FA increased by 24% (P

  11. Dietary Intake and Risk for Reflux Esophagitis: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Specific dietary components have been associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in Europe and the United States. However, the relationship between dietary components and GERD in Chinese still remains unclear. Methods. A total of 268 patients who were newly diagnosed as reflux esophagitis (RE in Outpatient Endoscopy Center of Tongji Hospital were recruited. In addition, 269 sex- and age-matched subjects were also recruited as controls. The body measurements were determined, and the dietary intake during the previous year was evaluated using food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. Stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the association between nutrients and RE. Results. After adjustment for WC, WHR, total energy intake, and demographics, there were a positive dose-response relationship between RE and calcium, meat, oils, and salt and a negative dose-response relationship between RE and protein, carbohydrate, calories from protein (%, vitamin C, grains and potatoes, fruits, and eggs. Conclusion. High intake of meat, oils, salt, and calcium is associated with an increased risk for RE while high intake of protein, carbohydrate, calories from protein (%, vitamin C, grains and potatoes, fruits, and eggs correlates with a reduced risk for RE.

  12. Comparison of Dietary Control and Atorvastatin on High Fat Diet Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Hyperlipidemia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Peiyi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with atorvastatin (ATO or dietary control has been demonstrated to benefit patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and hyperlipidemia. However, little is known on whether combination of dietary control and ATO treatment could enhance the therapeutic effect. Methods We employed a rat model of NAFLD to examine the therapeutic efficacy of dietary control and/or ATO treatment. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with normal chow diet as normal controls or with high fat diet (HFD for 12 weeks to establish NAFLD. The NAFLD rats were randomized and continually fed with HFD, with normal chow diet, with HFD and treated with 30 mg/kg of ATO or with normal chow diet and treated with the same dose of ATO for 8 weeks. Subsequently, the rats were sacrificed and the serum lipids, aminotranferase, hepatic lipids, and liver pathology were characterized. The relative levels of fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation gene expression in hepatic tissues were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Hepatic expression of hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase was determined by Western blot assay. Results While continual feeding with HFD deteriorated NAFLD and hyperlipidemia, treatment with dietary control, ATO or ATO with dietary control effectively improved serum and liver lipid metabolism and liver function. In comparison with ATO treatment, dietary control or combined with ATO treatment significantly reduced the liver weight and attenuated the HFD-induced hyperlipidemia and liver steatosis in rats. Compared to ATO treatment or dietary control, combination of ATO and dietary control significantly reduced the levels of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. However, the combination therapy did not significantly improve triglyceride and free fatty acid metabolism, hepatic steatosis, and liver function, as compared with dietary control alone. Conclusions

  13. A randomised controlled demonstration trial of multifaceted nutritional intervention and or probiotics: the healthy mums and babies (HUMBA) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okesene-Gafa, Karaponi; Li, Minglan; Taylor, Rennae S; Thompson, John M D; Crowther, Caroline A; McKinlay, Christopher J D; McCowan, Lesley M E

    2016-11-24

    Maternal obesity is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and has lifelong negative implications for offspring health. The Institute of Medicine recommends limited gestational weight gain (GWG) in obese women for optimal maternal and infant outcomes. However, there is a gap regarding an effective and sustainable intervention strategy to achieve this goal. The aim of the healthy mums and babies (HUMBA) demonstration trial is to assess whether a multifaceted nutritional intervention and/or an oral probiotic treatment in obese pregnant women can reduce excessive GWG and optimise pregnancy outcomes. The study is a two by two factorial randomised controlled demonstration trial conducted in Counties Manukau health region, New Zealand, a multi-ethnic region with a high prevalence of obesity. A total of 220 non-diabetic obese women with a singleton pregnancy will be recruited between 12 0 and 17 6  weeks. At recruitment, women are randomised to receive either a culturally tailored multifaceted dietary intervention or routine dietary advice, and either an oral probiotic or placebo capsule. Randomisation is undertaken via a web-based protocol, randomize.net, with a 1:1 ratio using stratification by body mass index (BMI) category (BMI of 30-34.9 or BMI ≥35 kg/m 2 ). The dietary intervention includes 4 customised nutrition education visits by a trained community health worker combined with motivational text messaging. Probiotic capsules consist of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis BB12 at a dose of 7 × 10 9 colony-forming units one per day until birth. Probiotic and placebo capsules are identically pre-packed and labelled by a third party, and are prescribed in a double blinded fashion. Research assessments are conducted at enrolment, 28 weeks, 36 weeks, at birth and at 5 months post-delivery. The primary outcomes for the study are proportion of women with excessive GWG and infant birthweight. The HUMBA demonstration trial will assess the

  14. Theory of reasoned action and theory of planned behavior-based dietary interventions in adolescents and young adults: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Hackman CL; Knowlden AP

    2014-01-01

    Christine L Hackman, Adam P KnowldenDepartment of Health Science, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USABackground: Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions in many nations around the world. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the theory of reasoned action (TRA) have been used to successfully plan and evaluate numerous interventions for many different behaviors. The aim of this study was to systematically review and synthesize TPB and TRA-based dietary behavior interven...

  15. Attenuated Low-Grade Inflammation Following Long-Term Dietary Intervention in Postmenopausal Women with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomquist, Caroline; Alvehus, Malin; Burén, Jonas; Ryberg, Mats; Larsson, Christel; Lindahl, Bernt; Mellberg, Caroline; Söderström, Ingegerd; Chorell, Elin; Olsson, Tommy

    2017-05-01

    Abdominal fat accumulation after menopause is associated with low-grade inflammation and increased risk of metabolic disorders. Effective long-term lifestyle treatment is therefore needed. Seventy healthy postmenopausal women (age 60 ± 5.6 years) with BMI 32.5 ± 5.5 were randomized to a Paleolithic-type diet (PD) or a prudent control diet (CD) for 24 months. Blood samples and fat biopsies were collected at baseline, 6 months, and 24 months to analyze inflammation-related parameters. Android fat decreased significantly more in the PD group (P = 0.009) during the first 6 months with weight maintenance at 24 months in both groups. Long-term significant effects (P obesity in postmenopausal women is linked to specific changes in inflammation-related adipose gene expression. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  16. Use of Dietary Vitamin Supplements and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Population-Based Case-Control Study in Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Nan; Lerro, Catherine C; Dai, Min; Chen, Yingtai; Li, Ni; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2017-04-24

    Certain dietary supplements have been reported to increase the risk of some cancers. Over half of the US population regularly uses dietary supplements. Thyroid cancer incidence has increased over the past several decades. However, few studies have investigated the association between dietary supplements and thyroid cancer. Thus, it is essential to clarify any association between dietary supplements and risk of thyroid cancer. A population-based case-control study in Connecticut was conducted during 2010-2011 among 462 histologically confi rmed incident thyroid cancer cases and 498 population-based controls. Dietary supplement intake was ascertained through in-person interviews and a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of thyroid cancer and dietary supplement use. Overall, no statistically signifi cant associations were observed between dietary supplementation and thyroid cancer risk. Stratifi ed analyses revealed a suggestive protective effect on risk of papillary microcarcinoma among longterm (> 10 years) use of multivitamins (OR = 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.33, 1.04) and calcium supplementation (OR = 0.45, 95 % CI: 0.22, 0.93). An increased risk of large papillary thyroid cancers (tumor size > 1 cm) was observed among short-term (supplements (OR = 2.24, 95 % CI: 1.30, 3.88). No signifi cant associations were observed between supplementation and overall thyroid cancer risk. The different associations between calcium supplements and risk of papillary thyroid cancer by tumor size warrant further investigation.

  17. Dietary and lifestyle characteristics of colorectal cancer in Jordan: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Mostafa A; Waly, Mostafa I; Jriesat, Sahar; Al Khafajei, Ahmed; Sallam, Sunny

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated dietary pattern and lifestyle characteristics of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in Jordan. The case-control study included 220 recently diagnosed CRC cases and 220 age and gender matched healthy subjects as a control group. The participating CRC cases had lower dietary intake of fibre, folate, vitamin B12, β-carotene, vitamin C and selenium as compared to controls (P<0.05). The frequency of consumption of fruits and vegetables was also lower among CRC cases, while the frequency of consumption of red meat and saturated fat was higher and positively associated with CRC risk. Furthermore, family history for CRC played a positive role and the majority of CRC cases and controls had a low physical activity level. A sedentary lifestyle and a diet low in fruits and vegetables, and high in animal red meat and saturated fat, appeared associated with CRC among the studied Jordanian subjects. This is consistent with the reported CRC studies in developed nations indicating global causal effects for this tumour type.

  18. Influence of habitual dietary fibre intake on the responsiveness of the gut microbiota to a prebiotic: protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Genelle; Brough, Louise; Butts, Chrissie; Murphy, Rinki; Whelan, Kevin; Coad, Jane

    2016-09-02

    The commensal gut microbiota have been shown to have an impact on human health as aberrant gut microbiota have been linked to disease. Dietary constituents are influential in shaping the gut microbiota. Diet-specific therapeutic strategies may therefore play a role in optimising human health via beneficial manipulation of the gut microbiota. Research has suggested that an individual's baseline gut microbiota composition may influence how the gut microbiota respond to a dietary intervention and individuals with differing habitual dietary intakes appear to have distinct baseline gut microbiota compositions. The responsiveness of the gut microbiota may therefore be influenced by habitual dietary intakes. This study aims to investigate what influence differing habitual dietary fibre intakes have on the responsiveness of the gut microbiota to a prebiotic intervention. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, single-centre study, 20 low dietary fibre (dietary fibre intake gut microbiota composition (using 16S rRNA gene sequencing) and functional capacity (faecal short chain fatty acid concentrations and Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt)) as well as appetite (visual analogue scale appetite questionnaire) will be assessed at the beginning and end of each intervention phase. The Massey University Human Ethics Committee approved this study (Massey University HEC: Southern A application-15/34). Results will be disseminated through peer-review journal publications, conference presentations and a summary of findings will be distributed to participants. ACTRN12615000922572; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Impact of dietary nitrate supplementation via beetroot juice on exercising muscle vascular control in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Scott K; Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Allen, Jason D; Jones, Andrew M; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2013-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation, via its reduction to nitrite (NO2−) and subsequent conversion to nitric oxide (NO) and other reactive nitrogen intermediates, reduces blood pressure and the O2 cost of submaximal exercise in humans. Despite these observations, the effects of dietary NO3− supplementation on skeletal muscle vascular control during locomotory exercise remain unknown. We tested the hypotheses that dietary NO3− supplementation via beetroot juice (BR) would reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) and increase hindlimb muscle blood flow in the exercising rat. Male Sprague–Dawley rats (3–6 months) were administered either NO3− (via beetroot juice; 1 mmol kg−1 day−1, BR n= 8) or untreated (control, n= 11) tap water for 5 days. MAP and hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance (radiolabelled microsphere infusions) were measured during submaximal treadmill running (20 m min−1, 5% grade). BR resulted in significantly lower exercising MAP (control: 137 ± 3, BR: 127 ± 4 mmHg, P < 0.05) and blood [lactate] (control: 2.6 ± 0.3, BR: 1.9 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.05) compared to control. Total exercising hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (control: 108 ± 8, BR: 150 ± 11 ml min−1 (100 g)−1, P < 0.05) and vascular conductance (control: 0.78 ± 0.05, BR: 1.16 ± 0.10 ml min−1 (100 g)−1 mmHg−1, P < 0.05) were greater in rats that received BR compared to control. The relative differences in blood flow and vascular conductance for the 28 individual hindlimb muscles and muscle parts correlated positively with their percentage type IIb + d/x muscle fibres (blood flow: r= 0.74, vascular conductance: r= 0.71, P < 0.01 for both). These data support the hypothesis that NO3− supplementation improves vascular control and elevates skeletal muscle O2 delivery during exercise predominantly in fast-twitch type II muscles, and provide a potential mechanism by which NO3− supplementation improves metabolic control. PMID:23070702

  20. Effectiveness of a brief school-based body image intervention 'Dove Confident Me: Single Session' when delivered by teachers and researchers: Results from a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Atkinson, Melissa J; Steer, Rebecca J; Garbett, Kirsty M; Rumsey, Nichola; Halliwell, Emma

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated a 90-min single session school-based body image intervention (Dove Confident Me: Single Session), and investigated if delivery could be task-shifted to teachers. British adolescents (N = 1707; 11-13 years; 50.83% girls) participated in a cluster randomised controlled trial [lessons as usual control; intervention teacher-led (TL); intervention researcher-led (RL)]. Body image, risk factors, and psychosocial and disordered eating outcomes were assessed 1-week pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and 4-9.5 weeks follow-up. Multilevel mixed-models showed post-intervention improvements for intervention students relative to control in body esteem (TL; girls only), negative affect (TL), dietary restraint (TL; girls only), eating disorder symptoms (TL), and life engagement (TL; RL). Awareness of sociocultural pressures increased at post-intervention (TL). Effects were small-medium in size (ds 0.19-0.76) and were not maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between conditions at post or follow-up on body satisfaction, appearance comparisons, teasing, appearance conversations and self-esteem. The intervention had short-term benefits for girls' body image and dietary restraint, and for eating disorder symptoms and some psychosocial outcomes among girls and boys. A multi-session version of the intervention is likely to be necessary for sustained improvements. Teachers can deliver this intervention effectively with minimal training, indicating broader scale dissemination is feasible. ISRCTN16782819. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of calcium from dairy and dietary supplements on faecal fat excretion: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, R.; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Svith, Carina Roholm

    2009-01-01

    Observational studies have found that dietary calcium intake is inversely related to body weight and body fat mass. One explanatory mechanism is that dietary calcium increases faecal fat excretion. To examine the effect of calcium from dietary supplements or dairy products on quantitative faecal...... fat excretion, we performed a systematic review with meta-analysis. We included randomized, controlled trials of calcium (supplements or dairy) in healthy subjects, where faecal fat excretion was measured. Meta-analyses used random-effects models with changes in faecal fat excreted expressed...

  2. Effect of physical activity and dietary restriction interventions on weight loss and the musculoskeletal function of overweight and obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and mixed method data synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrushud, Asma S; Rushton, Alison B; Kanavaki, Archontissa M; Greig, Carolyn A

    2017-06-08

    Despite the clinical recommendation of exercise and diet for people with knee osteoarthritis (OA), there are no systematic reviews synthesising the effectiveness of combining physical activity and dietary restriction interventions on the musculoskeletal function of overweight and obese older adults with knee OA. To evaluate the effectiveness of combined physical activity and dietary restriction programmes on body weight, body mass index (BMI) and the musculoskeletal function of overweight and obese older adults with knee OA. A detailed search strategy was applied to key electronic databases (Ovid, Embase, Web of Science andCumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL)) for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in English prior to 15 January 2017. Participants with BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 , aged ≥55 years of age and with radiographic evidence of knee OA. Physical activity plus dietary restriction programmes with usual care or exercise as the comparators. Primary outcome measures were body weight, BMI or musculoskeletal function. Secondary outcome measures were pain and quality of life. One pilot and two definitive trials with n=794 participants were included. Two articles reporting additional data and outcome measures for one of the RCTs were identified. All included RCTs had an unclear risk of bias. Meta-analysis was only possible to evaluate mobility (6 min walk test) at 6 months and the pooled random effect 15.05 (95% CI -11.77 to 41.87) across two trials with n=155 participants did not support the combined intervention programme. Narrative synthesis showed clear differences in favour of a reduced body weight and an increased 6 min walk in the intervention group compared with control groups. The quality of evidence of benefit of combining exercise and dietary interventions in older overweight/obese adults with knee OA is unclear. CRD42015019088 and ISRCTN, ISRCTN12906938. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  3. Results of a quality control on non-interventional studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundt, Ferdinand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-interventional studies (NIS have for decades been an established part of post-authorisation medicinal research. As early as the mid-nineties, there were at least rudimentary demands for controllable data quality. Beginning with the recommendations of the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM on the execution of non interventional (observational studies of 1998 and finally with the guidelines and recommendations for ensuring Good Epidemiological Practice (GEP, with the VFA (Verband der forschenden Arzneimittelhersteller [German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies] – Recommendations for the Improvement of Quality and Transparency of NIS and the joint recommendations of BfArM and PEI (Paul-Ehrlich-Institut on the execution of NIS, pharmaceutical companies are required to monitor and/or verify quality in the course of a project. According to a survey of pharmaceutical companies 2010, about one third of the companies surveyed to date carry out such quality controls on site, at participating study centres.This report deals with the results of such quality control measures in 4 completed projects. The control rates defined in the respective cohort study plans, the measures carried out on site and any consequent measures, such as adjustment of forms, reduction of consultation time and necessary organisational changes are described. A high level of agreement between the data collected and the original patient documents is found, comparable to that in clinical trials.

  4. Lifestyle Modification through Dietary Intervention: Health Promotion of Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Khoshbaten

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is more common worldwide and no certain treatment apart from lifestyle modification has been established yet. Available data consistently show that energy intake is significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than in individuals with no evidence of fatty liver. Changing nutritional behaviors seems to be the primary approach for treatment, simultaneously addressing all the clinical and biochemical defects. This study was aimed to examine the effects of two different composition of low energy diet (diet I vs. diet II on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients.Methods: In this double-blind randomized controlled trial, 44 ultrasonography-proven overweight non-alcoholic fatty liver disease patients were divided into two groups and received two low-energy diets (-500 kcal less than energy requirement individually inc. diet I (Carbohydrate: Fat: Protein: 55:25:20 and diet II (Carbohydrate: Fat: Protein: 40:40:20 for six weeks. Anthropometric and biochemical measures as well as liver enzymes were assessed after 12 hours fasting.Results: After diet I and diet II, weight decreased significantly (%1.82 and %2.45, respectively. Liver enzymes and echogenicity decreased significantly by both diet I and diet II. Mean of triglyceride concentration decreased (%18.09 after diet II (P=0.023, while there was no significant change after diet I. Significant correlations were found between changes in aspartate aminotransferase with triglyceride and LDL-C diet I.Conclusion: Low energy diets can decrease liver enzymes regardless of their composition, while diet II seems to be more effective than diet I in reduction of weight and triglyceride level.

  5. Early workplace intervention for employees with musculoskeletal-related absenteeism: a prospective controlled intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Bengt B; Sjögren, Berit; Rydéhn, Berit; Meisel, Roland

    2003-05-01

    Sickness absenteeism caused by musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is a persistent and costly occupational health challenge. In a prospective controlled trial, we compared the effects on sickness absenteeism of a more proactive role for insurance case managers as well as workplace ergonomic interventions with that of traditional case management. Patients with physician-diagnosed MSDs were randomized either to the intervention group or the reference group offered the traditional case management routines. Participants filled out a comprehensive questionnaire at the initiation of the study and after 6 months. In addition, administrative data were collected at 0.6, and 12 months after the initiation of the project. For the entire 12-month period, the total mean number of sick days for the intervention group was 144.9 (SEM 11.8) days/person as compared to 197.9 (14.0) days in the reference group (P management of MSDs should to a greater degree focus on early return to work and building on functional capacity and employee ability. Allowing the case managers a more active role as well as involving an ergonomist in workplace adaptation meetings might also be beneficial.

  6. Dietary Adherence, Glycemic Control, and Psychological Factors Associated with Binge Eating Among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Chileans with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbozo, Sylvia; Flynn, Patricia M; Stevens, Serena D; Betancourt, Hector

    2015-12-01

    Despite the strong association between obesity and binge eating, limited research has examined the implications of binge eating on dietary adherence and psychological factors in ethnically diverse type 2 diabetes patients. This study investigated the prevalence of binge eating and its association with dietary adherence, glycemic control, and psychological factors among indigenous and non-indigenous type 2 diabetes patients in Chile. Participants were 387 indigenous (Mapuche) and non-indigenous (non-Mapuche) adults with type 2 diabetes. Self-report measures of binge eating, dietary adherence, diet self-efficacy, body image dissatisfaction, and psychological well-being were administered. Participants' weight, height, and glycemic control (HbA(1c)) were also obtained. Approximately 8 % of the type 2 diabetes patients reported binge eating. The prevalence among Mapuche patients was 4.9 %, and among non-Mapuche patients, it was 9.9 %. Compared to non-binge eaters, binge eating diabetes patients had greater body mass index values, consumed more high-fat foods, were less likely to adhere to their eating plan, and reported poorer body image and emotional well-being. Results of this study extend previous research by examining the co-occurrence of binge eating and type 2 diabetes as well as the associated dietary behaviors, glycemic control, and psychological factors among indigenous and non-indigenous patients in Chile. These findings may increase our understanding of the health challenges faced by indigenous populations from other countries and highlight the need for additional research that may inform interventions addressing binge eating in diverse patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. OP-16 DIETARY INTERVENTION USING THE LOW FODMAP DIET VERSUS THE "MILK, EGG, WHEAT AND SOYA FREE" DIET FOR TREATMENT OF FUNCTIONAL GUT DISORDERS A SINGLE CENTRE EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keetarut, K; Kiparissi, F; McCartney, S; Murray, C

    2015-10-01

    The adolescent clinic is a tertiary referral clinic including patients with a wide variety of complex gastroenterology conditions predominantly tertiary referrals fromGreat Ormond Street Hospital transition clinic. To assess the benefit of the low FODMAP diet versus the "Milk, egg, wheat and soya" (MEWS) free diet for symptom control in patients with functional gut disorders and/or food allergy from June 2013 to June 2015. A total of 436 patients were seen during this time period for dietetic advice and the age range varied from 13-21 years old with 43terms of diagnosis used. These included the broad categories of inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy, functional gut conditions, congenital gut disorders, autoimmune disorders and oncology conditions. For functional gut disorders/food allergy there were 14 terms used which varied from "Functional gut disorder" to "Irritable bowel syndrome" and also included patients with delayed gastric emptying. For patients with food allergy the terms "multiple food allergy" or EosinophilicOesophagitis or Colitis were used. A total of 40 patients with functional gut disorders were referred for the MEWS or low FODMAP diet. The efficacy of the diet was measured using a symptom scale pre and post dietary intervention assessing if patients symptoms changed from nil/mild/moderate tosignificant. The results indicate whether the presenting predominant symptom e.g., bloating, constipation or abdominal pain improved following the dietary intervention. A total of 29 patients were seen for the "MEWS" free diet.These were 17 functional, 3 food allergy, 6 IBS, 2 EosinophilicOesophagitis, 1 oncology patient. The age ranged from 14 to 21 and average ageat treatment was 16.6 years old with 11 males and 18 females. 13 patients were referred for the low FODMAP diet. The patients referred for the low FODMAP diet were 7 with a functional gut disorder, 5Irritable Bowel Syndrome and1 EosinophilicColitis.The age range was 14 to 19 years old with

  8. Differences between men and women in dietary intakes and metabolic profile in response to a 12-week nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Vicky; Hudon, Anne-Marie; Royer, Marie-Michelle; Corneau, Louise; Dodin, Sylvie; Bégin, Catherine; Lemieux, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have compared men and women in response to nutritional interventions but none has assessed differences between men and women in the response to a nutritional intervention programme based on the self-determination theory (SDT) and using the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) as a model of healthy eating, in a context of CVD prevention and within a non-Mediterranean population. The present study aimed to document differences between men and women in changes in dietary, anthropometric and metabolic variables, in response to a nutritional intervention programme promoting the adoption of the MedDiet and based on the SDT. A total of sixty-four men and fifty-nine premenopausal women presenting risk factors for CVD were recruited through different media advertisements in the Québec City Metropolitan area (Canada). The 12-week nutritional programme used a motivational interviewing approach and included individual and group sessions. A validated FFQ was administered to evaluate dietary intakes from which a Mediterranean score (Medscore) was derived. Both men and women significantly increased their Medscore in response to the intervention (P nutritional intervention promoting the adoption of the Mediterranean diet and based on the SDT led to greater improvements in dietary intakes in men than in women, which appear to have contributed to beneficial anthropometric and metabolic changes, more particularly in men. However, the more deteriorated metabolic profile found in men at baseline seems to contribute to a large extent to the more beneficial changes in CVD risk factors observed in men as compared with women.

  9. Sustainable weight loss among overweight and obese lactating women is achieved with an energy-reduced diet in line with dietary recommendations: results from the LEVA randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Fredrik; Winkvist, Anna; Brekke, Hilde K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dietary changes during and after a dietary treatment shown to result in significant and sustained weight loss among lactating overweight and obese women. This is crucial before clinical implementation. Data were collected from the LEVA (in Swedish: Livsstil för Effektiv Viktminskning under Amning [Lifestyle for Effective Weight Loss During Lactation]) randomized controlled factorial trial with a 12-week intervention and a 1-year follow up. At 10 to 14 weeks postpartum, 68 lactating Swedish women with a prepregnancy body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) of 25 to 35 were randomized to structured dietary treatment, physical exercise treatment, combined treatment, or usual care (controls) for a 12-week intervention, with a 1-year follow-up. Dietary intake was assessed with 4-day weighed dietary records. Recruitment took place between 2007 and 2010. The main outcome measures were changes in macro- and micronutrient intake from baseline to 12 weeks and 1 year. Main and interaction effects of the treatments were analyzed by a 2×2 factorial approach using a General Linear Model adjusted for relevant covariates (baseline intake and estimated underreporting). It was found that at baseline, the women had an intake of fat and sucrose above, and an intake of total carbohydrates and fiber below, recommended levels. At 12 weeks and 1 year, the dietary treatment led to reduced intake of energy (Pfiber. Weight loss through dietary treatment was achieved with a diet in line with macronutrient recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Controlled Exercise Is a Safe Pregnancy Intervention in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Kristen M; Charnigo, Richard J; Kincer, Jeanie F; Dickens, Brett J; Pearson, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    During pregnancy, women often show a willingness to make positive lifestyle changes, such as smoking cessation, initiation of a vitamin regimen, improvement of their diet, and increases in their levels of exercise or physical activity. To study health outcomes in both pregnant mice and their offspring, we developed a model of controlled maternal exercise during mouse pregnancy. Female ICR and C57BL/6 mice underwent controlled wheel walking for 1 h daily, 5 d each week, at a speed of 6 m/min prior to and during pregnancy and nursing. Dam body weight, food consumption, pregnancy rates, litter size, pup weights and litter survival were used as markers of pregnancy success and were not significantly affected by controlled maternal exercise. The proposed exercise paradigm is a safe pregnancy intervention and can be explored further. PMID:24041205

  11. Case-control analysis of dietary folate and risk of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabath, Matthew B; Spitz, Margaret R; Lerner, Seth P; Pillow, Patricia C; Hernandez, Ladia M; Delclos, George L; Grossman, H Barton; Wu, Xifeng

    2005-01-01

    Dietary folate, a water-soluble B vitamin found in a variety of fruits and vegetables, is of particular interest as a chemopreventive agent due to its role in DNA methylation and DNA synthesis and repair. We hypothesized that individuals with low folate intake would be at an increased risk for bladder cancer. Using an ongoing case-control study we assessed dietary folate in 409 incident bladder cancer patients and 451 healthy control subjects. A food-frequency questionnaire was used to estimate naturally occurring food folate (microg/kcal/day), dietary folate equivalents (DFE) from food sources (microg DFE/kcal/day), and DFE from all sources (microg DFE/kcal/day). Unconditional logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Bladder cancer patients reported a statistically significant lower intake of folate than control subjects for food folate and DFE from food sources (P < 0.001) but not for DFE from all sources (P = 0.061). In the highest quartile of food folate intake there was a 54% reduced risk for bladder cancer (OR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.29-0.73) after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, smoking, and total energy intake. Similarly, the highest quartile of intake was associated with a 59% reduced risk for DFE from food sources (OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.26-0.65) and a 35% reduced risk for DFE from all sources (OR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.42-1.00). In the joint-effects analyses using never smokers with high folate intake as the reference group (OR = 1.0), heavy smokers with low food folate intake had a 2.31-fold (95% CI = 1.11-4.82) increased risk, whereas heavy smokers with high folate intake had a reduced OR of 1.31 (95% CI = 0.53-3.26). Although the ORs were not statistically significant, light smokers and high folate intake exhibited a protective effect (OR = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.20-1.94), whereas an increased risk was observed for light smoking and low folate intake (OR = 1.41; 95% CI = 0.57-3.45). These patterns

  12. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in PKU: effect on dietary treatment, metabolic control, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesch, B; Weigel, J; Thiele, A; Mütze, U; Rohde, C; Ceglarek, U; Thiery, J; Kiess, W; Beblo, S

    2012-11-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4))-sensitive phenylketonuria (PKU) can be treated with sapropterin dihydrochloride. We studied metabolic control and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in PKU patients treated with BH(4). Based on the review of neonatal BH(4) test results and mutation analysis in 41 PKU patients, 19 were identified as potentially BH(4)-sensitive (9 females, 10 males, age 4-18 years). We analyzed phenylalanine (phe) concentrations in dried blood samples, nutrition protocols, and HRQoL questionnaires (KINDL(®)) beginning from 1 year before, during the first 42 days, and after 3 months of BH(4) therapy. Eight BH(4)-sensitive patients increased their phe tolerance (629 ± 476 vs. 2131 ± 1084 mg, p = 0.006) while maintaining good metabolic control (phe concentration in dried blood 283 ± 145 vs. 304 ± 136 μM, p = 1.0). Six of them were able to stop dietary protein restriction entirely. BH(4)-sensitive patients had average HRQoL scores that were comparable to age-matched healthy children. There was no improvement in HRQoL scores after replacing classic dietary treatment with BH(4) supply, although personal reports given by the patients and their parents suggest that available questionnaires are inappropriate to detect aspects relevant to inborn metabolic disorders. BH(4) can allow PKU patients to increase their phe consumption significantly or even stop dietary protein restrictions. Unexpectedly, this does not improve HRQoL as assessed with KINDL(®), partly due to high scores even before BH(4) therapy. Specific questionnaires should be developed for inborn metabolic disorders.

  13. What predicts postpartum pertussis booster vaccination? A controlled intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, Elizabeth Helen; Cooper, Spring Chenoa; Wood, Nicholas; Sinn, John; Skinner, S Rachel

    2015-01-01

    'Cocooning' aims to protect susceptible infants from pertussis via caregiver vaccination. Control trials evaluating educational interventions to promote cocooning are lacking. We evaluated the role of message-framing vs. standard health information in promoting pertussis vaccination. We recruited postpartum women from a maternity hospital in Sydney, Australia (November 2010-July 2012). Participants self-completed a pertussis knowledge and attitudes questionnaire. We then assigned pertussis-susceptible (no pertussis vaccine ≤10 years) participants to receive a gain-framed, loss-framed pamphlet or control (Government Pertussis factsheet) using weekly sequential block allocation. Next, participants were offered a pertussis vaccine (dTpa) and completed a post-questionnaire on discharge. A baseline questionnaire was completed for 96.4% (1433/1486) of postpartum women approached. Missing data was excluded (n=29). Next, participants (1404) were screened for vaccine status: 324 (23%) reported prior pertussis booster vaccine receipt, leaving 1080 participants requiring vaccination. Among susceptible mothers, 70% (754/1080) were vaccinated post-intervention. Rates were similar between 'gain', 'loss' or 'control' pamphlets (69.1% vs. 71.8% vs. 68.8%; p=0.62). Intention to be vaccinated (OR 2.46, pvaccine benefits (OR: 1.61, pvaccine recommendation (OR 1.68; p=0.025; 95% CI: 1.07-2.65) were independent predictors of vaccine uptake. At discharge, overall pertussis vaccine coverage had increased from 23% to 77% among women screened (1078/1404). A cocooning strategy for pertussis vaccination can be highly effective when partially implemented within maternity hospitals, with information accompanied by a funded vaccine. Mothers were highly receptive to vaccination in the postnatal ward: facts about pertussis were as effective as message-framing in promoting a high uptake of 70%. Perceived vaccine benefits, intentions and vaccine recommendation were important predictors of uptake

  14. Dietary fat and not calcium supplementation or dairy product consumption is associated with changes in anthropometrics during a randomized, placebo-controlled energy-restriction trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insufficient calcium intake has been proposed to cause unbalanced energy partitioning leading to obesity. However, weight loss interventions including dietary calcium or dairy product consumption have not reported changes in lipid metabolism measured by the plasma lipidome. Methods. The objective ...

  15. Dietary Intervention for Overweight and Obese Adults: Comparison of Low-Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diets. A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sackner-Bernstein

    Full Text Available Reduced calorie, low fat diet is currently recommended diet for overweight and obese adults. Prior data suggest that low carbohydrate diets may also be a viable option for those who are overweight and obese.Compare the effects of low carbohydrate versus low fats diet on weight and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk in overweight and obese patients.Systematic literature review via PubMed (1966-2014.Randomized controlled trials with ≥8 weeks follow up, comparing low carbohydrate (≤120gm carbohydrates/day and low fat diet (≤30% energy from fat/day.Data were extracted and prepared for analysis using double data entry. Prior to identification of candidate publications, the outcomes of change in weight and metabolic factors were selected as defined by Cochrane Collaboration. Assessment of the effects of diets on predicted risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk was added during the data collection phase.1797 patients were included from 17 trials with 99% while the reduction in predicted risk favoring low carbohydrate was >98%.Lack of patient-level data and heterogeneity in dropout rates and outcomes reported.This trial-level meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing LoCHO diets with LoFAT diets in strictly adherent populations demonstrates that each diet was associated with significant weight loss and reduction in predicted risk of ASCVD events. However, LoCHO diet was associated with modest but significantly greater improvements in weight loss and predicted ASCVD risk in studies from 8 weeks to 24 months in duration. These results suggest that future evaluations of dietary guidelines should consider low carbohydrate diets as effective and safe intervention for weight management in the overweight and obese, although long-term effects require further investigation.

  16. A review of the characteristics of dietary fibers relevant to appetite and energy intake outcomes in human intervention trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, Kaisa S; Dussort, Pierre; Erkner, Alfrun

    2017-01-01

    .Objective: The influence of specific DF characteristics [i.e., viscosity, gel-forming capacity, fermentability, or molecular weight (MW)] on appetite-related outcomes was assessed in healthy humans.Design: Controlled human intervention trials that tested the effects of well-characterized DFs on appetite ratings or energy......-containing material of interest was efficacious for ≥1 appetite-related outcome. Reported differences in material viscosity, MW, or fermentability did not clearly correspond to differences in efficacy, whereas gel-forming DF sources were consistently efficacious (but with very few comparisons...

  17. Dietary risk factors for colorectal cancer in Brazil: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Sandro Nunes; Lourenço, Gustavo J; Magro, Daniéla O; Nascimento, Helvia; Oliveira, Rogério A; Leal, Raquel F; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes S; Fagundes, João J; Coy, Claudio S R; Lima, Carmen S P

    2016-02-27

    High meat intake and low consumption of vegetables, fruits and whole grains have been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer in some relevant cohort studies conducted in distinct ethnic populations. The role of the dietary pattern on the risk of sporadic colorectal adenocarcinoma (SCA) in Brazil is unknown; therefore, it was the aim of the present study. The dietary patterns of 169 patients with SCA and 101 controls were analysed by food frequency recall. Crude odds ratios were calculated and given within 95 % confidence intervals. Patients reported higher average intakes of beef (32.0 ± 1.8 versus 23.7 ± 1.6, P = 0.0069), chicken (18.1 ± 0.9 versus 12.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.0002), and pork (8.9 ± 0.9 versus 3.4 ± 0.5, P < 0.0001). These individuals had a 1.025, 1.069, and 1.121-fold increased risk of SCA. Similar consumption of fish, vegetables, fruits and whole grains was reported by patients and controls. Meat consumption is greater in patients with SCA in the Brazilian population. Considering the study population - characterized by ethnic heterogeneity -, the environmental factor related to food habits may be associated with higher incidence of this disease in Brazil.

  18. Quality of dietary control in phenylketonuric patients and its relationship with general intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, M A; Lambruschini, N; Gómez-López, Lilianne; Gutiérrez, A; Fusté, E; Gassió, R; Artuch, R; Campistol, J

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of the quality of dietary treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients and investigation of its relationship with the general intelligence of the patients. Cross-sectional and longitudinal study of 105 PKU treated patients. The index of dietary control (IDC) was calculated as the phenylalanine (Phe) data reduction in half-year medians and the mean of all medians throughout the patient's life. We calculated four different IDCs related to age: IDC-A ( 18 years). To evaluate the fluctuation of Phe values we calculated the standard error of the estimate of the regression of Phe concentration over age. Development quotient was calculated with the Brunet-Lezine test (Intelligence quotient was evaluated with the Kaufman Bit Intelligence Test (K-Bit), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Third Edition (WAIS III). Cross-sectional study: The IDC in age groups were significantly different and so were the number of patients with good, acceptable and poor IDC related to age (p intelligence (101 +/- 10) correlated negatively with the IDC (p intelligence correlates with the IDC at all ages, which highlights the importance of good control to achieve good prognosis.

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes CAT and SOD affect the outcome of clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric variables in people with obesity under a dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guerrero, César; Parra-Carriedo, Alicia; Ruiz-de-Santiago, Diana; Galicia-Castillo, Oscar; Buenrostro-Jáuregui, Mario; Díaz-Gutiérrez, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes CAT, GPX, and SOD are involved in the etiology of obesity and its principal comorbidities. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of aforementioned SNPs over the output of several variables in people with obesity after a nutritional intervention. The study included 92 Mexican women, which received a dietary intervention by 3 months. Participants were genotyped and stratified into two groups: (1) carriers; mutated homozygous plus heterozygous (CR) and (2) homozygous wild type (WT). A comparison between CR and WT was done in clinical (CV), biochemical (BV), and anthropometric variables (AV), at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. Participants ( n  = 92) showed statistically significant differences ( p  T GPX1 (rs1050450), - 251A>G SOD1 (rs2070424), and - 262C>T CAT (rs1001179). (B) Only CR showed statistically changes ( p  T CAT (rs7943316) and 47C>T SOD2 (rs4880). The dietary intervention effect was statistically significantly between the polymorphisms of 47C>T SOD2 and BMI, SBP, TBARS, total cholesterol, and C-LCL ( p  T CAT (rs7943316) and SBP, DBP, total cholesterol, and atherogenic index ( p  CAT enzymes.

  20. Group-Based Diet and Physical Activity Weight-Loss Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Aleksandra J; Abraham, Charles; Greaves, Colin J; Tarrant, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Many weight-loss interventions are delivered in groups but evidence on their effectiveness, and characteristics associated with effectiveness, is limited. We synthesised evidence on (1) design and delivery of group-based weight-loss interventions; (2) effectiveness; and (3) associations between intervention characteristics, change techniques, and effectiveness. Five online databases were searched to May 2017 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of group-based diet and/or physical activity interventions for overweight/obese adults (BMI ≥ 25). Intervention characteristics were synthesised narratively. Mean differences (MD) in weight loss were calculated using a random-effects meta-analysis, and sub-group analyses were conducted to identify moderators of effectiveness. Forty-seven RCTs reporting 60 evaluations of group-based interventions were included. MD in weight loss between intervention and control groups was -3.49 [95% CI -4.15, -2.84], -3.44 [-4.23, -2.85], and -2.56 kg [-3.79, -1.33] at follow-ups closest to 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Explicitly targeting weight loss, men-only groups providing feedback and dietary goals were significantly associated with greater effectiveness (p < .05). Diet and physical activity interventions delivered in groups are effective in promoting clinically meaningful weight loss at 12 months. Intervention design and effectiveness vary considerably between studies, and evidence on what optimises the effectiveness of group-based weight-loss interventions remains limited. © 2018 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  1. Elucidation of dietary risk factors in osteoarthritis knee—a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghi, Divya; Mishra, Abhishek; Sharma, Amar Chandra; Raj, Saloni; Mishra, Rachna; Kumari, Reema; Natu, S M; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Srivastava, Rajeshwar Nath

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional imbalance, combined with endocrine abnormalities, may be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). This study was conducted to determine the association of OA with dietary factors, such as quantity and quality of nutrient intake. This case-control study enrolled 180 knee osteoarthritis (KOA) subjects who met the American College of Rheumatology definition of KOA, with an equal number of matched controls. Outcome measures, such as dietary nutrient intake and its frequency, were recorded using a food frequency questionnaire. Compared to controls, cases were older individuals with a higher body mass index (BMI). Physical activity scores were lower in female cases compared to male cases and controls. A significantly higher intake of phosphorus and fat was observed in overall cases (fat in females only). A significantly lower intake of vitamin C and vitamin D was observed in overall cases and the significance of vitamin D persisted on gender-wise bifurcation. On multiple logistic regression analysis, the intake of vitamin D (odds ratio [OR] = 0.79) and vitamin C (OR = 0.97) was inversely associated with the presence of KOA in the observation group, especially in females. Generally, the intake of food servings/day, green leafy vegetables (GLVs), and fats/oils was higher, whereas the intake of fruits, milk/milk products, and meat/poultry was lower in cases compared to controls. Low intake of vitamin D and vitamin C is a possible risk factor for KOA. Certain food groups, such as fruits, milk/milk products, and meat/poultry are beneficial for KOA. Further studies are needed to elucidate the associations between diet and KOA.

  2. LC-QTOF-MS Analysis and Activity Profiles of Popular Antioxidant Dietary Supplements in Terms of Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwira Sieniawska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dietary supplements with claimed antioxidant activity constitute a substantial part of the dietary supplement market. In this study, we performed the LC-QTOF-MS analysis and investigated the activity profiles of popular antioxidant dietary supplements from different chemical groups in terms of quality control. The commonly used antioxidant tests and statistical analysis revealed that substantial part of the results was comparable if 1 g sample was considered, but while comparing single and daily doses, significant differences in antioxidant values were noticed in all assays. The best antioxidant activity was obtained in ORAC assay (from 142 to 13814 μM of Trolox equivalents per 1 g of sample, and the strongest correlation occurred between TPC and ORAC. The LC-QTOF-MS analysis revealed that catechins were present in samples having the best antioxidant activity and that dietary supplements showing the weakest activity contained very small amount of any chemical constituents.

  3. LC-QTOF-MS Analysis and Activity Profiles of Popular Antioxidant Dietary Supplements in Terms of Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baj, Tomasz; Sawicki, Rafal; Wanat, Aleksandra; Wojtanowski, Krzysztof Kamil; Ginalska, Grazyna; Zgorka, Grazyna; Szymanska, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    The dietary supplements with claimed antioxidant activity constitute a substantial part of the dietary supplement market. In this study, we performed the LC-QTOF-MS analysis and investigated the activity profiles of popular antioxidant dietary supplements from different chemical groups in terms of quality control. The commonly used antioxidant tests and statistical analysis revealed that substantial part of the results was comparable if 1 g sample was considered, but while comparing single and daily doses, significant differences in antioxidant values were noticed in all assays. The best antioxidant activity was obtained in ORAC assay (from 142 to 13814 μM of Trolox equivalents per 1 g of sample), and the strongest correlation occurred between TPC and ORAC. The LC-QTOF-MS analysis revealed that catechins were present in samples having the best antioxidant activity and that dietary supplements showing the weakest activity contained very small amount of any chemical constituents. PMID:28642814

  4. Nutritional Profile and Dietary Patterns of Lebanese Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Fakhoury-Sayegh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is considered the most common liver disease in the world. Dietary habits have a significant impact on the biological and physical profile of patients and increase the risk of NAFLD. The overall pattern of diet intake is more associated with health outcomes than nutrients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional profile and the dietary patterns of Lebanese NAFLD patients and compare it with controls. During this study; 112 NAFLD Lebanese adult patients (55 men and 57 women; and 110 controls (44 men and 66 women were recruited. Dietary intake was evaluated by two 24-h recalls and a semi-quantitative 90-item food frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns were determined by factor analysis. Results from the study demonstrated that 40% of cases belonged to the high fruit group as compared to 30% following a high meat; fast food dietary pattern. Both groups increased the odds of NAFLD by four-fold (p < 0.05. The traditional diet decreases the odds by 33% after adjustment with the covariables. The high fruit diet group was, as with the high meat, fast food dietary pattern, the main potential risk factor for NAFLD in Lebanese patients.

  5. Low-fat dietary pattern and cardiovascular disease: results from the Women's Health Initiative randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Ross L; Aragaki, Aaron K; Van Horn, Linda; Thomson, Cynthia A; Beresford, Shirley Aa; Robinson, Jennifer; Snetselaar, Linda; Anderson, Garnet L; Manson, JoAnn E; Allison, Matthew A; Rossouw, Jacques E; Howard, Barbara V

    2017-07-01

    Background: The influence of a low-fat dietary pattern on the cardiovascular health of postmenopausal women continues to be of public health interest. Objective: This report evaluates low-fat dietary pattern influences on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and mortality during the intervention and postintervention phases of the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. Design: Participants comprised 48,835 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 y; 40% were randomly assigned to a low-fat dietary pattern intervention (target of 20% of energy from fat), and 60% were randomly assigned to a usual diet comparison group. The 8.3-y intervention period ended in March 2005, after which >80% of surviving participants consented to additional active follow-up through September 2010; all participants were followed for mortality through 2013. Breast and colorectal cancer were the primary trial outcomes, and coronary heart disease (CHD) and overall CVD were additional designated outcomes. Results: Incidence rates for CHD and total CVD did not differ between the intervention and comparison groups in either the intervention or postintervention period. However, CHD HRs comparing these groups varied strongly with baseline CVD and hypertension status. Participants without prior CVD had an intervention period CHD HR of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.87) or 1.04 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.19) if they were normotensive or hypertensive, respectively ( P -interaction = 0.003). The CHD benefit among healthy normotensive women was partially offset by an increase in ischemic stroke risk. Corresponding HRs in the postintervention period were close to null. Participants with CVD at baseline (3.4%) had CHD HRs of 1.47 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.93) and 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.55) in the intervention and postintervention periods, respectively. However, various lines of evidence suggest that results in women with CVD or hypertension at baseline are confounded by postrandomization use of cholesterol-lowering medications

  6. Estimating Controller Intervention Probabilities for Optimized Profile Descent Arrivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Erzberger, Heinz; Huynh, Phu V.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of arrival traffic at Dallas/Fort-Worth and Denver airports were conducted to evaluate incorporating scheduling and separation constraints into advisories that define continuous descent approaches. The goal was to reduce the number of controller interventions required to ensure flights maintain minimum separation distances of 5 nmi horizontally and 1000 ft vertically. It was shown that simply incorporating arrival meter fix crossing-time constraints into the advisory generation could eliminate over half of the all predicted separation violations and more than 80% of the predicted violations between two arrival flights. Predicted separation violations between arrivals and non-arrivals were 32% of all predicted separation violations at Denver and 41% at Dallas/Fort-Worth. A probabilistic analysis of meter fix crossing-time errors is included which shows that some controller interventions will still be required even when the predicted crossing-times of the advisories are set to add a 1 or 2 nmi buffer above the minimum in-trail separation of 5 nmi. The 2 nmi buffer was shown to increase average flight delays by up to 30 sec when compared to the 1 nmi buffer, but it only resulted in a maximum decrease in average arrival throughput of one flight per hour.

  7. A High Rate of Non-Compliance Confounds the Study of Whole Grains and Weight Maintenance in a Randomised Intervention Trial—The Case for Greater Use of Dietary Biomarkers in Nutrition Intervention Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Kristensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies consistently find an inverse relationship between whole-grain intake and weight gain. We aimed to confirm this in an open-label researcher-blinded parallel design randomised trial. A total of 179 overweight/obese women with a habitually low whole-grain intake (<16 g/day were randomised to a weight maintenance diet with refined-grain (RG or whole-grain (WG foods (80 g/day for 12 weeks after an initial weight loss program over 8 weeks. Body weight and composition was assessed at baseline, after the initial weight loss, and after the 12-week dietary intervention. During the 12-week dietary intervention phase, there were no group differences in changes in body weight and total fat mass %, whereas abdominal fat mass tended to increase more during the dietary intervention phase in the WG compared to the RG group (0.7 (SD 3.6 vs. −0.3 (SD 3.8 %; p = 0.052. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations, biomarkers of wholegrain wheat and rye intake, indicated poor compliance, particularly in the WG group, where >60% of participants had alkylresorcinol concentrations below 70 nmol/L, a concentration indicating low or no intake of whole-grain wheat. Further, weight regain was lower than expected in both intervention groups, further supporting a lack of compliance to the post-weight-loss diet. The rate of compliance was too low to conclude any effect of whole grain on weight maintenance, and reinforces the need to use objective measures of compliance in nutrition intervention studies.

  8. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in multiple sclerosis patients and hot-nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp-seed and evening-primrose oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour-Firouzi, Soheila; Arefhosseini, Seyed Rafie; Ebrahimi-Mamaghani, Mehrangiz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Baradaran, Behzad; Ali, Torbati Mohammad; Zamani, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    The risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with increased dietary intake of saturated fatty acids. For many years it has been suspected that this disease might be associated with an imbalance between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids. We determined erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels in Hot nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils in multiple sclerosis patients. To determine the erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels and correlate it with expanded disability status scale (EDSS) at baseline after 6 months intervention in MS patients by gas chromatography, in this double blind, randomized trial, 100 RRMS patients with EDSShemp seed and evening primrose oils with advised Hot nature diet. "Group B" received olive oil and "Group C" received the co-supplemented oils. The results showed that the mean follow-up was 180 ± 2.9SD days (N=65, 23 M and 42 F aged 34.25 ± 8.07 years with disease duration of 6.80 ± 4.33 years). There was no significant difference in the study parameters at baseline. After 6 months, EDSS, Immunological parameters and the erythrocyte cell membrane with regard to specific fatty acids showed improvement in the group A and C, whereas there was worsening condition for the group B after the intervention. We concluded that Hot-nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils caused an increase PUFAs in MS patients and improvement in the erythrocyte membrane fatty acids composition. This could be an indication of restored plasma stores, and a reflection of disease severity reduction.

  9. Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH: process evaluation of a randomised controlled trial intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Foley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Screen Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH trial tested a family intervention to reduce screen-based sedentary behaviour in overweight children. The trial found no significant effect of the intervention on children’s screen-based sedentary behaviour. To explore these null findings, we conducted a pre-planned process evaluation, focussing on intervention delivery and uptake. Methods SWITCH was a randomised controlled trial of a 6-month family intervention to reduce screen time in overweight children aged 9–12 years (n = 251. Community workers met with each child’s primary caregiver to deliver the intervention content. Community workers underwent standard training and were monitored once by a member of the research team to assess intervention delivery. The primary caregiver implemented the intervention with their child, and self-reported intervention use at 3 and 6 months. An exploratory analysis determined whether child outcomes at 6 months varied by primary caregiver use of the intervention. Results Monitoring indicated that community workers delivered all core intervention components to primary caregivers. However, two thirds of primary caregivers reported using any intervention component “sometimes” or less frequently at both time points, suggesting that intervention uptake was poor. Additionally, analyses indicated no effect of primary caregiver intervention use on child outcomes at 6 months, suggesting the intervention itself lacked efficacy. Conclusions Poor uptake, and the efficacy of the intervention itself, may have played a role in the null findings of the SWITCH trial on health behaviour and body composition. Trial registration The trial was registered in the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (no. ACTRN12611000164998 ; registration date: 10/02/2011.

  10. Dietary Almonds Increase Serum HDL Cholesterol in Coronary Artery Disease Patients in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshed, Humaira; Sultan, Fateh Ali Tipoo; Iqbal, Romaina; Gilani, Anwar Hassan

    2015-10-01

    More than one-half of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients have low HDL cholesterol despite having well-managed LDL cholesterol. Almond supplementation has not been shown to elevate circulating HDL cholesterol concentrations in clinical trials, perhaps because the baseline HDL cholesterol of trial subjects was not low. This clinical trial was designed to test the effect of almond supplementation on low HDL cholesterol in CAD patients. A total of 150 CAD patients (50 per group), with serum LDL cholesterol ≤100 mg/dL and HDL cholesterol ≤40 mg/dL in men and ≤50 mg/dL in women, were recruited from the Aga Khan University Hospital. After recording vital signs and completing a dietary and physical activity questionnaire, patients were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 groups: the no-intervention group (NI), the Pakistani almonds group (PA), and the American almonds group (AA). The respective almond varieties (10 g/d) were given to patients with instructions to soak them overnight, remove the skin, and eat them before breakfast. Blood samples for lipid profiling, body weight, and blood pressure were collected, and assessment of dietary patterns was done at baseline, week 6, and week 12. Almonds significantly increased HDL cholesterol. At weeks 6 and 12, HDL cholesterol was 12-14% and 14-16% higher, respectively, in the PA and AA than their respective baselines. In line with previous reports, serum concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and VLDL cholesterol; total-to-HDL and LDL-to-HDL cholesterol ratios, and the atherogenic index were reduced in both the PA and AA at weeks 6 and 12 compared with baseline (P almond groups. Dietary patterns, body weight, and blood pressure did not change in any of the 3 groups during the trial. A low dose of almonds (10 g/d) consumed before breakfast can increase HDL cholesterol, in addition to improving other markers of abnormal lipid metabolism in CAD patients with low initial HDL cholesterol

  11. The association of dietary pattern and breast cancer in Jiangsu, China: A population-based case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, S.; Qian, Y.; Huang, X.; Yu, H.; Yang, J.; Han, R.; Su, J.; Du, W.; Zhou, J; Dong, M.; Yu, X.; Duijnhoven, F.; Kampman, E.; Wu, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the association of breast cancer with dietary patterns among Chinese women. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Jiangsu, China. Newly diagnosed primary breast cancer patients were recruited as cases (n = 818). Controls (n = 935), selected from the

  12. Paternal Lifestyle-Related Parenting Practices Mediate Changes in Children's Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors: Findings From the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids Community Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Adam B; Lubans, David R; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Morgan, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    This study examined potential parenting-related mediators of children's physical activity and dietary behavior change in the Healthy Dads, Healthy Kids (HDHK) community program. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 45 overweight/obese (mean [SD] age = 39.8 [5.4] years; BMI = 32.4 [3.8]) fathers and their children (n = 77; 58% boys; mean [SD] age = 7.7 [2.5] years). Families were randomized to either the HDHK program or wait-list control group. The program involved 7 sessions. Fathers and their children were assessed at baseline and at 14 weeks for physical activity (pedometery) and core food intake (Questionnaire). Fathers' lifestyle-related parenting practices included; self-efficacy, beliefs, modeling, logistic support, rules, cophysical activity, shared mealtime frequency and intentions. Significant intervention effects were found for cophysical activity and modeling physical activity. Cophysical activity mediated children's physical activity in the intervention ('mediated effect,' AB = 653, 95% CI = 4-2050) and was responsible for 59.5% of the intervention effect. Fathers' beliefs mediated children's percent energy from core foods (AB = 1.51, 95% CI = 0.05-5.55) and accounted for 72.9% of the intervention effect. Participation in the HDHK program positively impacted on fathers' cophysical activity with their child and beliefs about healthy eating which mediated changes in children's diet and physical activity behaviors.

  13. The Impact of a Cultural Lifestyle Intervention on Metabolic Parameters After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman-Kravits, Dana; Meyerstein, Naomi; Abu-Rabia, Yones; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Harman-Boehm, Ilana

    2018-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Israel is increasing in all ethnic groups but most markedly in the Bedouin population. We aimed to assess the effects of a lifestyle change intervention on risk markers for type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). One hundred eighty Jewish and Bedouin post-GDM women were randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG) starting 3-4 months after delivery. The IG participated in healthy lifestyle sessions led by a dietician and a sports instructor for 24 months after delivery. The IG participants had three individual 45-min counseling sessions and four 90-min group meetings (10 women each). The dietary and exercise recommendations were culturally adapted. The primary outcome of the study was HOMA-IR. We monitored clinical and chemical biomarkers 1 and 2 years after delivery. After 1 and 2 years of intervention, the metabolic measures improved substantially. The intervention reduced the insulin, glucose and HOMA-IR levels in the IG compared with those in the CG (p < 0.001). This novel culturally tailored lifestyle intervention program significantly improved the metabolic and morphometric indices measured 1 and 2 years after delivery. These results highlight and underscore the importance of effective lifestyle change education following GDM.

  14. Taking weight-loss supplements may elicit liberation from dietary control. A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yevvon Yi-Chi; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Given that changes in diet and exercise habits are difficult to initiate and maintain, the use of weight-loss supplements has become an appealing alternative approach to weight management for many individuals. The current research examined whether the use of weight-loss supplements induced overly optimistic assessments of progress toward weight reduction, leading to psychological abdication of dietary regulation. Participants were randomly assigned to take either an identified placebo or a purported weight-loss supplement (actually the same placebo). Each participant reported perceived progress toward weight reduction following the manipulation. Consumption of snacks in a taste test and choice of sugary drinks were recorded. The results showed that participants receiving a purported supplement ate more in a taste task and preferred larger quantities of sugar in their reward drinks than did controls. Mediation analysis supported that the perception of progress toward weight reduction contributed to the liberating effect. Using weight-loss supplements may increase perceived progress toward weight reduction but decrease dietary self-regulation. These thought-provoking findings can serve as a basis for educating the public about the myth that they are free to feel liberated from the need to regulate their eating when using weight-loss supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of a mindful eating intervention to a diabetes self-management intervention among adults with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carla K; Kristeller, Jean L; Headings, Amy; Nagaraja, Haikady

    2014-04-01

    Mindful eating may be an effective intervention for increasing awareness of hunger and satiety cues, improving eating regulation and dietary patterns, reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and promoting weight loss. Diabetes self-management education (DSME), which addresses knowledge, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations for improving food choices, also may be an effective intervention for diabetes self-care. Yet few studies have compared the impact of mindful eating to a DSME-based treatment approach on patient outcomes. Adults 35 to 65 years old with type 2 diabetes for ≥1 year not requiring insulin therapy were recruited from the community and randomly assigned to treatment group. The impact of a group-based 3-month mindful eating intervention (MB-EAT-D; n = 27) to a group-based 3-month DSME "Smart Choices" (SC) intervention (n = 25) postintervention and at 3-month follow-up was evaluated. Repeated-measures ANOVA with contrast analysis compared change in outcomes across time. There was no significant difference between groups in weight change. Significant improvement in depressive symptoms, outcome expectations, nutrition and eating-related self-efficacy, and cognitive control and disinhibition of control regarding eating behaviors occurred for both groups (all p < .0125) at 3-month follow-up. The SC group had greater increase in nutrition knowledge and self-efficacy than the MB-EAT-D group (all p < .05) at 3-month follow-up. MB-EAT-D had significant increase in mindfulness, whereas the SC group had significant increase in fruit and vegetable consumption at study end (all p < .0125). Both SC and MB-EAT-D were effective treatments for diabetes self-management. The availability of mindful eating and DSME-based approaches offers patients greater choices in meeting their self-care needs.

  16. Social media interventions for diet and exercise behaviours: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gillian; Hamm, Michele P; Shulhan, Jocelyn; Vandermeer, Ben; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-02-12

    To conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the use of social media to promote healthy diet and exercise in the general population. MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete, Alt Health Watch, Health Source, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Web of Knowledge and ProQuest Dissertation and Thesis (2000-2013). RCTs of social media interventions promoting healthy diet and exercise behaviours in the general population were eligible. Interventions using social media, alone or as part of a complex intervention, were included. Study quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. We describe the studies according to the target populations, objectives and nature of interventions, outcomes examined, and results and conclusions. We extracted data on the primary and secondary outcomes examined in each study. Where the same outcome was assessed in at least three studies, we combined data in a meta-analysis. 22 studies were included. Participants were typically middle-aged Caucasian women of mid-to-high socioeconomic status. There were a variety of interventions, comparison groups and outcomes. All studies showed a decrease in programme usage throughout the intervention period. Overall, no significant differences were found for primary outcomes which varied across studies. Meta-analysis showed no significant differences in changes in physical activity (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.13 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.30), 12 studies) and weight (SMD -0.00 (95% CI -0.19 to 0.19), 10 studies); however, pooled results from five studies showed a significant decrease in dietary fat consumption with social media (SMD -0.35 (95% CI -0.68 to -0.02)). Social media may provide certain advantages for public health interventions; however, studies of social media interventions to date relating to healthy lifestyles tend to show low levels of participation and do not show significant differences between groups in key outcomes.

  17. The effect of a prenatal lifestyle intervention on glucose metabolism: results of the Norwegian Fit for Delivery randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagedal, Linda R; Vistad, Ingvild; Øverby, Nina C; Bere, Elling; Torstveit, Monica K; Lohne-Seiler, Hilde; Hillesund, Elisabet R; Pripp, Are; Henriksen, Tore

    2017-06-02

    The effectiveness of prenatal lifestyle intervention to prevent gestational diabetes and improve maternal glucose metabolism remains to be established. The Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) randomized, controlled trial studied the effect of a combined lifestyle intervention provided to a general population, and found significantly lower gestational weight gain among intervention participants but no improvement in obstetrical outcomes or the proportion of large infants. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of the NFFD intervention on glucose metabolism, including an assessment of the subgroups of normal-weight and overweight/obese participants. Healthy, non-diabetic women expecting their first child, with pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) ≥19 kg/m 2 , age ≥ 18 years and a singleton pregnancy of ≤20 gestational-weeks were enrolled from healthcare clinics in southern Norway. Gestational weight gain was the primary endpoint. Participants (n = 606) were individually randomized to intervention (two dietary consultations and access to twice-weekly exercise groups) or control group (routine prenatal care). The effect of intervention on glucose metabolism was a secondary endpoint, measuring glucose (fasting and 2-h following 75-g glucose load), insulin, homeostatic assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and leptin levels at gestational-week 30. Blood samples from 557 (91.9%) women were analyzed. For the total group, intervention resulted in reduced insulin (adj. Mean diff -0.91 mU/l, p = 0.045) and leptin levels (adj. Mean diff -207 pmol/l, p = 0.021) compared to routine care, while glucose levels were unchanged. However, the effect of intervention on both fasting and 2-h glucose was modified by pre-pregnancy BMI (interaction p = 0.030 and p = 0.039, respectively). For overweight/obese women (n = 158), intervention was associated with increased risk of at least one glucose measurement exceeding International Association of

  18. Effect of dietary intervention to reduce the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio on maternal and fetal fatty acid profile and its relation to offspring growth and body composition at 1 year of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, D; Brunner, S; Vollhardt, C; Schmid, D; Sedlmeier, E-M; Brüderl, M; Heimberg, E; Bartke, N; Boehm, G; Bader, B L; Amann-Gassner, U; Hauner, H

    2013-03-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) are associated with offspring growth and body composition. We investigated the relationship between LCPUFAs in red blood cells (RBCs) of pregnant women/breastfeeding mothers and umbilical cord RBCs of their neonates with infant growth and body composition ≤ 1 year of age. In an open-label randomized, controlled trial, 208 healthy pregnant women received a dietary intervention (daily supplementation with 1200 mg n-3 LCPUFAs and dietary counseling to reduce arachidonic acid (AA) intake) from the 15th week of gestation until 4 months of lactation or followed their habitual diet. Fatty acids of plasma phospholipids (PLs) and RBCs from maternal and cord blood were determined and associated with infant body weight, body mass index (BMI), lean body mass and fat mass assessed by skinfold thickness measurements and ultrasonography. Dietary intervention significantly reduced the n-6/n-3 LCPUFA ratio in maternal and cord-blood plasma PLs and RBCs. Maternal RBCs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), n-3 LCPUFAs and n-6 LCPUFAs at the 32nd week of gestation were positively related to birth weight. Maternal n-3 LCPUFAs, n-6 LCPUFAs and AA were positively associated with birth length. Maternal RBCs AA and n-6 LCPUFAs were significantly negatively related to BMI and Ponderal Index at 1 year postpartum, but not to fat mass. Maternal DHA, AA, total n-3 LCPUFAs and n-6 LCPUFAs might serve as prenatal growth factors, while n-6 LCPUFAs also seems to regulate postnatal growth. The maternal n-6/n-3 LCPUFA ratio does not appear to have a role in adipose tissue development during early postnatal life.

  19. Screen-time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH: A randomized controlled trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Midi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately one third of New Zealand children and young people are overweight or obese. A similar proportion (33% do not meet recommendations for physical activity, and 70% do not meet recommendations for screen time. Increased time being sedentary is positively associated with being overweight. There are few family-based interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behavior in children. The aim of this trial is to determine the effects of a 24 week home-based, family oriented intervention to reduce sedentary screen time on children's body composition, sedentary behavior, physical activity, and diet. Methods/Design The study design is a pragmatic two-arm parallel randomized controlled trial. Two hundred and seventy overweight children aged 9-12 years and primary caregivers are being recruited. Participants are randomized to intervention (family-based screen time intervention or control (no change. At the end of the study, the control group is offered the intervention content. Data collection is undertaken at baseline and 24 weeks. The primary trial outcome is child body mass index (BMI and standardized body mass index (zBMI. Secondary outcomes are change from baseline to 24 weeks in child percentage body fat; waist circumference; self-reported average daily time spent in physical and sedentary activities; dietary intake; and enjoyment of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Secondary outcomes for the primary caregiver include change in BMI and self-reported physical activity. Discussion This study provides an excellent example of a theory-based, pragmatic, community-based trial targeting sedentary behavior in overweight children. The study has been specifically designed to allow for estimation of the consistency of effects on body composition for Māori (indigenous, Pacific and non-Māori/non-Pacific ethnic groups. If effective, this intervention is imminently scalable and could be integrated within existing weight

  20. LINDA - a solution-focused low-intensity intervention aimed at improving health behaviors of young females: a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valve, Päivi; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Eriksson, Tiina; Lehtinen, Matti; Lindfors, Pirjo; Saha, Marja-Terttu; Rimpelä, Arja; Anglé, Susanna

    2013-11-04

    We aimed to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of an individualized, long-term support lifestyle counseling approach in promoting healthy physical activity, improving dietary and sleeping behaviors, and preventing weight gain in young females. The counseling approach's intensity was designed to be low enough to be implementable in primary health care. Young women (n = 3,059, age at baseline 17-21 years) attending a population-based human papilloma virus vaccination trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00122681) in 15 vaccination centers in different communities across Finland, were cluster-randomized into intervention and control arms of the LINDA intervention. Both intervention and control arms received counseling on sexual health and contraception from the study nurses as part of the vaccination trial. Additionally, the LINDA intervention arm (n = 1,537) received a 20-minute individualized lifestyle counseling session followed by further support at the six-monthly follow-up visits of the vaccination trial, in total for 1.5-2.5 years.The LINDA solution-focused brief therapy intervention focused on healthy physical activity, and dietary and sleeping behaviors, based on the needs and interests of the participants. Anthropometrics were measured, and data on health-related behaviors were collected using self-report questionnaires at baseline and after the intervention at 1.5-2.5 years. In the intervention arm, 37% vs. 31% in the control arm made an overall improvement in their health behaviors concerning physical activity, meal regularity and/or earlier bedtime (NNT = 18, 95% CI = 11-50). The per-protocol analysis further revealed that 30% of those who actually received lifestyle change support on healthy physical activity behaviors improved their physical activity level vs. 23% in the control group (NNT = 15, 95% CI = 9-38). Respectively, 36% of those who received support on healthy sleeping behaviors went to sleep earlier before school-/work-days after the

  1. A model of phone call intervention in sensitizing the change of dietary pattern - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p136

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Corrêa Chaves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a model of phone call intervention for changing dietary patterns and to assess its effectiveness. Method: A study carried out at the Health Promotion School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, with 27 subjects, 3-5 phone calls contacts per user, by means of which were given orientations and interventions on the principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Transtheoretical Model on healthy eating. We analyzed the variables weight and body mass index, dietary patterns and overall stage of motivation to change. The data were submitted to analysis of variance with repeated measures at different stages of evaluation: pre-contact, 3rd and 5th phone calls. Results: After intervention, users showed a change in eating behavior in the third contact, and change occurred in weight and BMI in one patient. All findings were not statistically significant. There was improvement in the motivation to acquire new eating habits, also not significant. Conclusion: There was a slight change in feeding behavior, the motivation to change improved for all participants, without, however, have been effective in this type of approach.

  2. Impact of different dietary approaches on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes: a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Chaimani, Anna; Hoffmann, Georg; Schwedhelm, Carolina; Boeing, Heiner

    2017-03-20

    Dietary advice is one of the cornerstones in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The American Diabetes Association recommended a hypocaloric diet for overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes in order to induce weight loss. However, there is limited evidence on the optimal approaches to control hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes patients. The aim of the present study is to assess the comparative efficacy of different dietary approaches on glycemic control and blood lipids in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a systematic review including a standard pairwise and network meta-analysis of randomized trials. We will conduct searches in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on the Cochrane Library, PubMed (from 1966), and Google Scholar. Citations, abstracts, and relevant papers will be screened for eligibility by two reviewers independently. Randomized controlled trials (with a control group or randomized trials with at least two intervention groups) will be included if they meet the following criteria: (1) include type 2 diabetes mellitus, (2) include patients aged ≥18 years, (3) include dietary intervention (different type of diets: e.g., Mediterranean dietary pattern, low-carbohydrate diet, low-fat diet, vegetarian diet, high protein diet); either hypo, iso-caloric, or ad libitum diets, (4) minimum intervention period of 12 weeks. For each outcome measure of interest, random effects pairwise and network meta-analyses will be performed in order to determine the pooled relative effect of each intervention relative to every other intervention in terms of the post-intervention values (or mean differences between the changes from baseline value scores). Subgroup analyses are planned for study length, sample size, age, and sex. This systematic review will synthesize the available evidence on the comparative efficacy of different dietary approaches in the management of glycosylated hemoglobin (primary outcome), fasting glucose

  3. Nutrigenomic activity of plant derived compounds in health and disease: Results of a dietary intervention study in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgorlon, Sandy; Stefanon, Bruno; Sandri, Misa; Colitti, Monica

    2016-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary administrations of four nutraceuticals in dogs. Seventy four dogs were enrolled in the trials, 24 healthy dogs were fed with a control diet (CT) and the experimental groups received for 60days the same diet supplemented with nutraceuticals, namely Echinacea angustifolia (EA, 0.10mg/kg live weight as echinacoside; 14 dogs), Vaccinium myrtillus (VM, 0.20mg/kg live weight as anthocyanidin, 13 dogs), Curcuma longa (CL, 6.60mg/kg live weight as curcumin, 18 dogs with arthrosis), and Sylibum marianum (SM, 1.5mg/kg live weight as sylibin, 8 dogs with hepatopathy). Dogs were weighted at the beginning of study and blood samples were collected at the beginning (T0) and at the end (T60) of the study. VM significantly down regulated TNF, CXCL8, NFKB1 and PTGS2 and decreased plasma ceruloplasmin (CuCp). The activity of EA was evidenced by the significant decrease of TNF and NFKB1 expression and CuCp levels and by the increase of plasma Zn. Administration of CL caused a significant decrease of CuCp and increase of Zn and a down regulation of TNF, CXCL8, NFKB1 and PTGS2, corroborating the anti-inflammatory action of curcuminoids. After 60days of treatment with SM, plasma ALT/GPT activity was reduced and paraoxonase was increased, supporting the antioxidant activity of silymarin, also confirmed by the significant up regulation of SOD2. Results indicated that nutraceutical administrations in dogs can be an interesting approach to modulate immune response in order to improve health condition of animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-term Diet and Biomarker Changes after a Short-term Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors: The ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Ogden Gaffney, Ann; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Shi, Zaixing; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Santella, Regina M; Blaner, William S; Clugston, Robin D; Cremers, Serge; Pollak, Susan; Sirosh, Iryna; Crew, Katherine D; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-11-01

    Among Hispanic breast cancer survivors, we examined the long-term effects of a short-term culturally based dietary intervention on increasing fruits/vegetables (F/V), decreasing fat, and changing biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. Spanish-speaking women (n = 70) with a history of stage 0-III breast cancer who completed treatment were randomized to ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! (n = 34), a culturally based 9-session program (24 hours over 12 weeks, including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips), or a control group (n = 36, written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors). Diet recalls, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. We report changes between groups at 12 months in dietary intake and biomarkers using 2-sample Wilcoxon t tests and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. At 12 months, the intervention group compared with the control group reported higher increases in mean daily F/V servings (total: +2.0 vs. -0.4; P Salud! program was effective at increasing long-term F/V intake in Hispanic breast cancer survivors and changed biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. It is possible for short-term behavioral interventions to have long-term effects on behaviors and biomarkers in minority cancer patient populations. Results can inform future study designs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(11); 1491-502. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Intervention effects on dietary intake among children by maternal education level: results of the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt W.; von Kappelgaard, Lene M.; Nielsen, Birgit M.

    2015-01-01

    by a 7-d food record. Analyses were conducted based on the daily intake of macronutrients (energy percentage (E%)), fatty acids (E%), added sugar (E%) and dietary fibre (g/d and g/MJ). Analyses were stratified by maternal education level into three categories. Changes in nutrient intake were observed...

  6. Tobacco industry denormalisation as a tobacco control intervention: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Ruth E; Grundy, Quinn; Bero, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To conduct a review of research examining the effects of tobacco industry denormalisation (TID) on smoking-related and attitude-related outcomes. Methods The authors searched Pubmed and Scopus databases for articles published through December 2010 (see figure 1). We included all peer-reviewed TID studies we could locate that measured smoking-related outcomes and attitudes toward the tobacco industry. Exclusion criteria included: non-English language, focus on tobacco use rather than TID, perceived ad efficacy as sole outcome, complex program interventions without a separately analysable TID component and non peer-reviewed literature. We analysed the literature qualitatively and summarised findings by outcome measured. Results After excluding articles not meeting the search criteria, the authors reviewed 60 studies examining TID and 9 smoking-related outcomes, including smoking prevalence, smoking initiation, intention to smoke and intention to quit. The authors also reviewed studies of attitudes towards the tobacco industry and its regulation. The majority of studies suggest that TID is effective in reducing smoking prevalence and initiation and increasing intentions to quit. Evidence is mixed for some other outcomes, but some of the divergent findings may be explained by study designs. Conclusions A robust body of evidence suggests that TID is an effective tobacco control intervention at the population level that has a clear exposure–response effect. TID may also contribute to other tobacco control outcomes not explored in this review (including efforts to ‘directly erode industry power’), and thus may enhance public support and political will for structural reforms to end the tobacco epidemic. PMID:22345240

  7. Improvements in stage of change correlate to changes in dietary intake and clinical outcomes in a 5-year lifestyle intervention in young high-risk Sri Lankans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, N; Vasantharajah, L; Gulliford, M; Viberti, G; Gnudi, L; Karalliedde, J; Wijesuriya, M

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of a stage-matched approach to lifestyle change are that individuals progress forward through the stages of change. It also posits that progression through the stages of change is associated with positive changes in lifestyle behaviours. Measuring the relationship between stage of change and food intake is challenging due to the plurality of dietary behaviours. Furthermore, it is not clear whether changes in behaviour are sustained long-term. In this study we assess the movement through stages of change in the intensive (visits every 3months) and control groups (visits annually) of a large-scale primary prevention study in cardiovascular disease, carried out in 2637 children and young adults in Sri Lanka between 2007 and 2012. We also examine their relationship to dietary behaviours and clinical outcomes. We demonstrate that individuals in both groups continue to progress through stages of change over the course of the study and that measures of dietary behaviours improved from baseline to final follow-up. We also demonstrate that stage of change positively correlates to dietary behaviours including the ratio of recommended:not-recommended items, unpolished:polished starches and low-fat:high-fat food items throughout each year of the study. Finally, participants in the later stages of change at Y2, Y3 and Y4, had a significantly attenuated increase in weight and waist circumference at the final visit in both groups. We therefore demonstrate the usefulness of stage-matched approach in modifying complex dietary behaviours, and that stage of change is a valid measure of dietary behaviours across a large population over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intervention Fidelity: Monitoring Drift, Providing Feedback, and Assessing the Control Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bova, Carol; Jaffarian, Carol; Crawford, Sybil; Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Lee, Mary; Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan

    Measurement of intervention fidelity is an essential component of any scientifically sound intervention trial. However, few papers have proposed ways to integrate intervention fidelity data into the execution of these trials. The purpose of this article is to describe the intervention fidelity process used in a randomized controlled trial of a human patient simulator intervention and how these data were used to monitor drift and provide feedback to improve the consistency of both intervention and control delivery over time in a multisite education intervention for parents of children with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes. Intervention fidelity was measured for both the intervention and control condition by direct observation, self-report of interventionist delivery, and parent participant receipt of educational information. Intervention fidelity data were analyzed after 50%, 75%, and 100% of the participants had been recruited and compared by group (treatment and control) and research site. The sample included 191 parents of young children newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Observations scores in both intervention and control groups indicated a high level of intervention fidelity. Treatment receipt was also high and did not differ by treatment group. The teaching session attendance rates by site and session were significantly different at Time Point 1 (50% enrollment); following study staff retraining and reinforcement, there were no significant differences at Time Point 3 (100% enrollment). Results demonstrate the importance of monitoring intervention fidelity in both the intervention and control condition over time and using these data to correct drift during the course of a multisite clinical trial.

  9. An engaged research study to assess the effect of a ‘real-world’ dietary intervention on urinary bisphenol A (BPA) levels in teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Tamara S; Baglin, Nigel; Lee, Benjamin P; Kocur, Anna L; Shepherd, Maggie H; Steele, Anna M; Harries, Lorna W

    2018-01-01

    Objective Bisphenol A (BPA) has been associated with adverse human health outcomes and exposure to this compound is near-ubiquitous in the Western world. We aimed to examine whether self-moderation of BPA exposure is possible by altering diet in a real-world setting. Design An Engaged Research dietary intervention study designed, implemented and analysed by healthy teenagers from six schools and undertaken in their own homes. Participants A total of 94 students aged between 17 and 19 years from schools in the South West of the UK provided diet diaries and urine samples for analysis. Intervention Researcher participants designed a set of literature-informed guidelines for the reduction of dietary BPA to be followed for 7 days. Main outcome measures Creatinine-adjusted urinary BPA levels were taken before and after the intervention. Information on packaging and food/drink ingested was used to calculate a BPA risk score for anticipated exposure. A qualitative analysis was carried out to identify themes addressing long-term sustainability of the diet. Results BPA was detected in urine of 86% of participants at baseline at a median value of 1.22 ng/mL (IQR 1.99). No effect of the intervention diet on BPA levels was identified overall (P=0.25), but there was a positive association in those participants who showed a drop in urinary BPA concentration postintervention and their initial BPA level (P=0.003). Qualitative analysis identified themes around feelings of lifestyle restriction and the inadequacy of current labelling practices. Conclusions We found no evidence in this self-administered intervention study that it was possible to moderate BPA exposure by diet in a real-world setting. Furthermore, our study participants indicated that they would be unlikely to sustain such a diet long term, due to the difficulty in identifying BPA-free foods. PMID:29431133

  10. Lack of Benefit of Early Intervention with Dietary Flax and Fish Oil and Soy Protein in Orthologous Rodent Models of Human Hereditary Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamio Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Rationale for dietary advice in polycystic kidney disease (PKD is based in part on animal studies that have examined non-orthologous models with progressive development of cystic disease. Since no model completely mimics human PKD, the purpose of the current studies was to examine the effects of dietary soy protein (compared to casein or oils enriched in omega-3 fatty acids (fish or flax oil compared to soy oil on early disease progression in two orthologous models of PKD. The models studied were Pkd2WS25/- mice as a model of autosomal dominant PKD, and PCK rats as a model of autosomal recessive PKD. After 13 weeks of feeding, dietary fish (but not flax oil resulted in larger kidneys and greater kidney water content in female Pkd2WS25/- compared to control mice. After 12 weeks of feeding male PCK compared to control rats, both fish and flax compared to soy oil resulted in enlarged kidneys and livers, greater kidney water content and higher kidney cyst area in diseased rats. Dietary soy protein compared to casein had no effects in Pkd2WS25/- compared to control mice. In PCK rats, kidney and liver histology were not improved, but lower proteinuria and higher urine pH suggest that soy protein could be beneficial in the long term. Therefore, in contrast to studies in non-orthologous models during the progressive development phase, these studies in orthologous PKD models do not support dietary advice to increase soy protein or oils enriched in omega-3 oils in early PKD.

  11. The use of rabbits in atherosclerosis research. Diet and drug intervention in different rabbit models exposed to selected dietary fats and the calcium antagonist (-)-anipamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Alicja

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in atherosclerosis research. One of the most popular laboratory animal species in this field of research is the rabbit. The rabbit fulfils most of the criteria for an animal model for human atherosclerosis. Three rabbit models were established...... and used for dietary or drug intervention: 1) the cholesterol-fed normolipidemic rabbit, 2) the 1% cholesterol- fed heterozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit and 3) the homozygous WHHL rabbit. The reproductive performance and physiological blood lipid levels in growing and adult...

  12. Effectiveness of hygienic-dietary recommendations as enhancers of antidepressant treatment in patients with Depression: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Maria J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years some studies have been published supporting the efficacy of light exposure, physical activity, sleep control and a Mediterranean diet pattern on the improvement or prevention of Depression. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies using all these measures together as an adjuvant antidepressant strategy. Methods Multicenter, randomized, controlled, two arm-parallel, clinical trial. Eighty depressed patients undergoing standard antidepressant treatment will be advised to follow four additional hygienic-dietary recommendations about exercise, diet, sunlight exposure and sleep. Outcome measures will be assessed before and after the 6 month intervention period. Discussion We expect the patients in the active recommendations group to experience a greater improvement in their depressive symptoms. If so, this would be a great support for doctors who might systematically recommend these simple and costless measures, especially in primary care. Trial Registration ISRCTN59506583

  13. Effectiveness of hygienic-dietary recommendations as enhancers of antidepressant treatment in patients with depression: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Toro, Mauro; Ibarra, Olga; Gili, Margalida; Salva, Joan; Monzón, Saray; Vives, Margalida; Serrano, Maria J; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Roca, Miquel

    2010-07-09

    In recent years some studies have been published supporting the efficacy of light exposure, physical activity, sleep control and a Mediterranean diet pattern on the improvement or prevention of depression. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies using all these measures together as an adjuvant antidepressant strategy. Multicenter, randomized, controlled, two arm-parallel, clinical trial. Eighty depressed patients undergoing standard antidepressant treatment will be advised to follow four additional hygienic-dietary recommendations about exercise, diet, sunlight exposure and sleep. Outcome measures will be assessed before and after the 6 month intervention period. We expect the patients in the active recommendations group to experience a greater improvement in their depressive symptoms. If so, this would be a great support for doctors who might systematically recommend these simple and costless measures, especially in primary care. ISRCTN59506583.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of a 3-month intervention with oral nutritional supplements in disease-related malnutrition: a randomised controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, K; Pirlich, M; Smoliner, C; Kilbert, A; Schulzke, J D; Ockenga, J; Lochs, H; Reinhold, T

    2011-06-01

    Nutritional intervention with oral nutritional supplements (ONS) has been shown to increase quality of life in malnourished patients. We investigated whether post-hospital supplementation with ONS is cost-effective according to international benchmarks in malnourished patients. In total, 114 malnourished patients (50.6±16.1 years, 57 female) with benign gastrointestinal disease were included and randomised to receive either ONS for 3 months and dietary counselling at discharge (intervention, n=60) or only dietary counselling at discharge (control group, n=54). Nutritional status was assessed with Subjective Global Assessment. Intervention patients documented daily intake of ONS; quality of life was assessed with Short-Form (SF)-36 Health Survey and SF-36 values were transformed into health-status utilities. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated by adopting the area under the curve method. We used two different pricing scenarios for ONS (minimum price: [euro]2.30 and maximum: [euro]2.93/tetrapack). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of supplementation with ONS was calculated for both price scenarios. All analyses were corrected for age and gender. Intervention patients consumed 2.4±0.8 ONS per day. Intervention and control patients did not differ in their health status utilities at baseline (0.594±0.017 vs 0.619±0.018), but after 3 months, the health status utilities were significantly higher in intervention patients than in control patients (0.731±0.015 vs 0.671±0.016, P=0.028). Intervention was associated with significantly higher costs (ICER: [euro]9497 and [euro]12,099/additional QALY, respectively) but deemed cost-effective according to international thresholds (< [euro]50,000/QALY). A 3-month intervention with ONS increases quality of life in malnourished patients. This treatment appears to be cost-effective according to international benchmarks.

  15. The association of dietary pattern and breast cancer in Jiangsu, China: A population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shurong; Qian, Yun; Huang, Xingyu; Yu, Hao; Yang, Jie; Han, Renqiang; Su, Jian; Du, Wencong; Zhou, Jinyi; Dong, Meihua; Yu, Xiaojin; Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B van; Kampman, Ellen; Wu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the association of breast cancer with dietary patterns among Chinese women. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Jiangsu, China. Newly diagnosed primary breast cancer patients were recruited as cases (n = 818). Controls (n = 935), selected from the general population, were frequency matched to cases. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. Dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis and multivariable odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Four dietary patterns were identified: salty, vegetarian, sweet and traditional Chinese. The traditional Chinese pattern was found to be robustly associated with a lower risk of breast cancer among both pre- and post-menopausal women (4th vs. 1st quartile: OR for pre- and post-menopausal women was 0.47 and 0.68, respectively). Women with high factor scores of the sweet pattern also showed a decreased risk of breast cancer (4th vs. 1st quartile: OR for pre- and post-menopausal women was 0.47 and 0.68, respectively). No marked association was observed between a vegetarian pattern or a salty pattern and breast cancer. These findings indicate that dietary patterns of the traditional Chinese and the sweet may favorably associate with the risk of breast cancer among Chinese women.

  16. The association of dietary pattern and breast cancer in Jiangsu, China: A population-based case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurong Lu

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the association of breast cancer with dietary patterns among Chinese women. A population-based case-control study was conducted in Jiangsu, China. Newly diagnosed primary breast cancer patients were recruited as cases (n = 818. Controls (n = 935, selected from the general population, were frequency matched to cases. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. Dietary patterns were identified by factor analysis and multivariable odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated. Four dietary patterns were identified: salty, vegetarian, sweet and traditional Chinese. The traditional Chinese pattern was found to be robustly associated with a lower risk of breast cancer among both pre- and post-menopausal women (4th vs. 1st quartile: OR for pre- and post-menopausal women was 0.47 and 0.68, respectively. Women with high factor scores of the sweet pattern also showed a decreased risk of breast cancer (4th vs. 1st quartile: OR for pre- and post-menopausal women was 0.47 and 0.68, respectively. No marked association was observed between a vegetarian pattern or a salty pattern and breast cancer. These findings indicate that dietary patterns of the traditional Chinese and the sweet may favorably associate with the risk of breast cancer among Chinese women.

  17. Urinary lithogenic risk profile in recurrent stone formers with hyperoxaluria: a randomized controlled trial comparing DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension)-style and low-oxalate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Nazanin; Honarkar, Elaheh; Goldfarb, David S; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Taheri, Maryam; Shakhssalim, Nasser; Parvin, Mahmoud; Basiri, Abbas

    2014-03-01

    Patients with nephrolithiasis and hyperoxaluria generally are advised to follow a low-oxalate diet. However, most people do not eat isolated nutrients, but meals consisting of a variety of foods with complex combinations of nutrients. A more rational approach to nephrolithiasis prevention would be to base dietary advice on the cumulative effects of foods and different dietary patterns rather than single nutrients. Randomized controlled trial. Recurrent stone formers with hyperoxaluria (urine oxalate > 40 mg/d). The intervention group was asked to follow a calorie-controlled Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet (a diet hig