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Sample records for control region sequences

  1. Investigation of length heteroplasmy in mitochondrial DNA control region by massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yen; Tsai, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Hsing-Mei; Huang, Chia-Hung; Yu, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Bill; Linacre, Adrian; Lee, James Chun-I

    2017-09-01

    Accurate sequencing of the control region of the mitochondrial genome is notoriously difficult due to the presence of polycytosine bases, termed C-tracts. The precise number of bases that constitute a C-tract and the bases beyond the poly cytosines may not be accurately defined when analyzing Sanger sequencing data separated by capillary electrophoresis. Massively parallel sequencing has the potential to resolve such poor definition and provides the opportunity to discover variants due to length heteroplasmy. In this study, the control region of mitochondrial genomes from 20 samples was sequenced using both standard Sanger methods with separation by capillary electrophoresis and also using massively parallel DNA sequencing technology. After comparison of the two sets of generated sequence, with the exception of the C-tracts where length heteroplasmy was observed, all sequences were concordant. Sequences of three segments 16184-16193, 303-315 and 568-573 with C-tracts in HVI, II and III can be clearly defined from the massively parallel sequencing data using the program SEQ Mapper. Multiple sequence variants were observed in the length of C-tracts longer than 7 bases. Our report illustrates the accurate designation of all the length variants leading to heteroplasmy in the control region of the mitochondrial genome that can be determined by SEQ Mapper based on data generated by massively parallel DNA sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Tandemly repeated sequence in 5'end of mtDNA control region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extensive length variability was observed in 5' end sequence of the mitochondrial DNA control region of the Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius). This length variability was due to the presence of varying numbers of a 56-bp tandemly repeated sequence and a 46-bp insertion/deletion (indel).

  3. High Sequence Variations in Mitochondrial DNA Control Region among Worldwide Populations of Flathead Mullet Mugil cephalus

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    Brian Wade Jamandre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sequence and structure of the complete mtDNA control region (CR of M. cephalus from African, Pacific, and Atlantic populations are presented in this study to assess its usefulness in phylogeographic studies of this species. The mtDNA CR sequence variations among M. cephalus populations largely exceeded intraspecific polymorphisms that are generally observed in other vertebrates. The length of CR sequence varied among M. cephalus populations due to the presence of indels and variable number of tandem repeats at the 3′ hypervariable domain. The high evolutionary rate of the CR in this species probably originated from these mutations. However, no excessive homoplasic mutations were noticed. Finally, the star shaped tree inferred from the CR polymorphism stresses a rapid radiation worldwide, in this species. The CR still appears as a good marker for phylogeographic investigations and additional worldwide samples are warranted to further investigate the genetic structure and evolution in M. cephalus.

  4. Sequence organization and control of transcription in the bacteriophage T4 tRNA region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, J; Abelson, J

    1985-10-05

    Bacteriophage T4 contains genes for eight transfer RNAs and two stable RNAs of unknown function. These are found in two clusters at 70 X 10(3) base-pairs on the T4 genetic map. To understand the control of transcription in this region we have completed the sequencing of 5000 base-pairs in this region. The sequence contains a part of gene 3, gene 1, gene 57, internal protein I, the tRNA genes and five open reading frames which most likely code for heretofore unidentified proteins. We have used subclones of the region to investigate the kinetics of transcription in vivo. The results show that transcription in this region consists of overlapping early, middle and late transcripts. Transcription is directed from two early promoters, one or two middle promoters and perhaps two late promoters. This region contains all of the features that are seen in T4 transcription and as such is a good place to study the phenomenon in more detail.

  5. Genetic structure of Florida green turtle rookeries as indicated by mitochondrial DNA control region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamblin, Brian M.; Bagley, Dean A.; Ehrhart, Llewellyn M.; Desjardin, Nicole A.; Martin, R. Erik; Hart, Kristen M.; Naro-Maciel, Eugenia; Rusenko, Kirt; Stiner, John C.; Sobel, Debra; Johnson, Chris; Wilmers, Thomas; Wright, Laura J.; Nairn, Campbell J.

    2014-01-01

    Green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nesting has increased dramatically in Florida over the past two decades, ranking the Florida nesting aggregation among the largest in the Greater Caribbean region. Individual beaches that comprise several hundred kilometers of Florida’s east coast and Keys support tens to thousands of nests annually. These beaches encompass natural to highly developed habitats, and the degree of demographic partitioning among rookeries was previously unresolved. We characterized the genetic structure of ten Florida rookeries from Cape Canaveral to the Dry Tortugas through analysis of 817 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 485 nesting turtles. Two common haplotypes, CM-A1.1 and CM-A3.1, accounted for 87 % of samples, and the haplotype frequencies were strongly partitioned by latitude along Florida’s Atlantic coast. Most genetic structure occurred between rookeries on either side of an apparent genetic break in the vicinity of the St. Lucie Inlet that separates Hutchinson Island and Jupiter Island, representing the finest scale at which mtDNA structure has been documented in marine turtle rookeries. Florida and Caribbean scale analyses of population structure support recognition of at least two management units: central eastern Florida and southern Florida. More thorough sampling and deeper sequencing are necessary to better characterize connectivity among Florida green turtle rookeries as well as between the Florida nesting aggregation and others in the Greater Caribbean region.

  6. Haplogroup Classification of Korean Cattle Breeds Based on Sequence Variations of mtDNA Control Region

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    Jae-Hwan Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have reported the frequency and distribution of haplogroups among various cattle breeds for verification of their origins and genetic diversity. In this study, 318 complete sequences of the mtDNA control region from four Korean cattle breeds were used for haplogroup classification. 71 polymorphic sites and 66 haplotypes were found in these sequences. Consistent with the genetic patterns in previous reports, four haplogroups (T1, T2, T3, and T4 were identified in Korean cattle breeds. In addition, T1a, T3a, and T3b sub-haplogroups were classified. In the phylogenetic tree, each haplogroup formed an independent cluster. The frequencies of T3, T4, T1 (containing T1a, and T2 were 66%, 16%, 10%, and 8%, respectively. Especially, the T1 haplogroup contained only one haplotype and a sample. All four haplogroups were found in Chikso, Jeju black and Hanwoo. However, only the T3 and T4 haplogroups appeared in Heugu, and most Chikso populations showed a partial of four haplogroups. These results will be useful for stable conservation and efficient management of Korean cattle breeds.

  7. Identifications of Captive and Wild Tilapia Species Existing in Hawaii by Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2012-01-01

    Background The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive) and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR) and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. Conclusions/Significance This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for tilapia species

  8. Identifications of captive and wild tilapia species existing in Hawaii by mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

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    Liang Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for

  9. Structure and organization of the mitochondrial DNA control region with tandemly repeated sequence in the Amazon ornamental fish.

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    Terencio, Maria Leandra; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo

    2013-02-01

    Tandemly repeated sequences are a common feature of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA control regions. However, questions still remain about their mode of evolution and function. To better understand patterns of variation in length and to explore the existence of previously described domain, we have characterized the control region structure of the Amazonian ornamental fish Nannostomus eques and Nannostomus unifasciatus. The control region ranged from 1121 to 1142 bp in length and could be separated into three domains: the domain associated with the extended terminal associated sequences, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence blocks domain. In the first domain, we encountered a sequence repeated 10 times in tandem (variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)) that could adopt an "inverted repetitions" type structural conformation. The results suggest that the VNTR pattern encountered in both N. eques and N. unifasciatus is consistent with the prerequisites of the illegitimate elongation model in which the unequal pairing of the chains near the 5'-end of the control region favors the formation of repetitions.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of Setipinna taty (Scaly hair-fin anchovy): repetitive sequences in the control region.

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    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Yuena

    2013-12-01

    The Scaly hair-fin anchovy, Setipinna taty (Clupeiformes, Engraulidae), is a commercially important marine fish species in China. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of was first determined. The mitogenome (16,887 bp) comprises 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 2 main non-coding regions (the control region (CR) and the origin of the light strand replication). A 195 bp tandem repeat sequence was identified in the CR. This mitogenome sequence data would play an important role in population genetics and phylogenetic analysis of the Engraulidae.

  11. Sequence and analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region in the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae

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    Juliana Pereira Bravo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at the sequence and analysis of the mtDNA control region (CR of the Diatraea saccharalis. The genome PCR amplification was performed using the complementary primers to the flanking regions of Bombyx mori CR mitochondrial segment. The sequencing revealed that the amplified product was 568 bp long, which was smaller than that observed for B. mori (725 bp. Within the amplified segment, a sequence with 338 nucleotides was identified as the control region, which displayed a high AT content (93.5%. The D. saccharalis mtDNA CR multiple sequence alignment analysis showed that this region had high similarity with the Lepidoptera Cydia pomonella.A broca da cana, Diatraea saccharalis pertence à família dos lepidópteros. A presença da larva pode ser extremamente destrutiva, chegando a inviabilizar a atividade canavieira, causando prejuízos consideráveis à agroindústria sucro-alcooleira. Atualmente a broca da cana vem sendo extinta da plantação por métodos de controle biológico, entretanto a evolução desses programas depende de maiores conhecimentos básicos da biologia molecular deste inseto. O estudo do segmento do genoma mitocondrial denominado região controle é amplamente utilizado em análises genéticas e filogenéticas em insetos. O objetivo desse trabalho foi sequenciar e analisar a região controle do genoma mitocondrial de Diatraea saccharalis. Esse segmento apresentou 338 nucleotídeos, menor que o observado em Bombyx mori, com conteúdo de 93,5% de A/T. As analises realizadas mostraram que Diatraea saccharalis apresenta 76% de similaridade com Cydia pomonella.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) contains triplicate putative control regions.

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    Yan, Dankan; Tang, Yunxia; Xue, Xiaofeng; Wang, Minghua; Liu, Fengquan; Fan, Jiaqin

    2012-09-10

    To investigate the features of the control region (CR) and the gene rearrangement in the mitochondrial (mt) genome of Thysanoptera insects, we sequenced the whole mt genome of the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). The mt genome is a circular molecule with 14,889 nucleotides and an A+T content of 76.6%, and it has triplicate putative CRs. We propose that tandem duplication and deletion account for the evolution of the CR and the gene translocations. Intramitochondrial recombination is a plausible model for the gene inversions. We discuss the excessive duplicate CR sequences and the transcription of the rRNA genes, which are distant from one another and from the CR. Finally, we address the significance of the complicated mt genomes in Thysanoptera for the evolution of the CR and the gene arrangement of the mt genome. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Large sequence divergence of mitochondrial DNA genotypes of the control region within populations of the African antelope, kob (Kobus kob)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birungi, J.; Arctander, Peter

    2000-01-01

    conservation genetics, control region, Kobus kob, mitochondrial DNA, population expansion, population structure......conservation genetics, control region, Kobus kob, mitochondrial DNA, population expansion, population structure...

  14. Regulation of mating-type information in yeast. Negative control requiring sequences both 5' and 3' to the regulated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J; Nasmyth, K A; Strathern, J N; Klar, A J; Hicks, J B

    1984-07-05

    The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three complete copies of the genetic information governing cell mating type. Normally, only the information in one of the copies (the MAT locus) is expressed; the other two copies (HML and HMR) are repressed and serve as donors of mating-type sequences that can be transposed to MAT in cells capable of switching mating type. We have mutagenized the silent HMR locus and have found that the repression of this locus requires two sites, one lying on each side of the mating-type sequences at HMR. The regulatory sites are positioned outside of the sequences that are included in the pair of divergent transcripts coded for by HMR, and lie about 1000 base-pairs to either side of the central promoter region of the locus. Deletion of one of the regulatory sites results phenotypically in complete loss of repression, whereas deletion of the other site gives only partial loss of control. Both of the sites are associated with an autonomous replication activity, though the relationship between this activity and the process of repression is unclear.

  15. Analysis of mitochondrial control region nucleotide sequences from Baffin Bay beluga, (Delphinapterus leucas: detecting pods or sub-populations?

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    Per Jakob Palsbøll

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of an analysis of the variation in the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial control region obtained in 218 samples collected from belugas, Delphinapterus leucas, around the Baffin Bay. We detected multiple instances of significant heterogeneity in the distribution of genetic variation among the analyzed mitochondrial control region sequences on a spatial as well as temporal scale indicating a high degree of maternal population structure. The detection of significant levels of heterogeneity between samples collected in different years but within the same area and season was unexpected. Re-examination of earlier results presented by Brown Gladden and coworkers also revealed temporal genetic heterogeneity within the one area where sufficient (n>15 samples were collected in multiple years. These findings suggest that non-random breeding and maternally directed site-fidelity are not the sole causes of genetic heterogeneity among belugas but that a matrilineal pod structure might cause significant levels of genetic heterogeneity as well, even within the same area. We propose that a maternal pod structure, which has been shown to be the cause of significant genetic heterogeneity in other odontocetes, may add to the overall level of heterogeneity in the maternally inherited DNA and hence that much of the spatial heterogeneity observed in this and previous studies might be attributed to pod rather than population structure. Our findings suggest that it is important to estimate the contribution of pod structure to overall heterogeneity before defining populations or management units in order to avoid interpreting heterogeneity due to sampling of different pods as different populations/management units.

  16. Geographic structure and demographic history of Iranian brown bear (Ursus arctos based on mtDNA control region sequences

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    Mohammad Reza Ashrafzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the brown bear's range has declined and its populations in some areas have faced extinction. Therefore, to have a comprehensive picture of genetic diversity and geographic structure of populations is essential for effective conservation strategies. In this research, we sequenced a 271bp segment of mtDNA control region of seven Iranian brown bears, where a total dataset of 467 sequences (brown and polar bears were used in analyses. Overall, 113 different haplotypes and 77 polymorphic sites were identified within the segment. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Iranian brown bears were not nested in any other clades. The low values of Nm (range=0.014-0.187 and high values of Fst (range=0.728-0.972 among Iranian bears and others revealed a genetically significant differentiation. We aren't found any significant signal of demographic reduction in Iranian bears. The time to the most recent common ancestor of Iranian brown bears (Northern Iran was found to be around 19000 BP.

  17. Genetic relationships among some subspecies of the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus L.), inferred from mitochondrial DNA control-region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Clayton M.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sage, George K.; Anderson, Clifford; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to successfully colonize and persist in diverse environments likely requires broad morphological and behavioral plasticity and adaptability, and this may partly explain why the Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) exhibits a large range of morphological characteristics across their global distribution. Regional and local differences within Peregrine Falcons were sufficiently variable that ∼75 subspecies have been described; many were subsumed, and currently 19 are generally recognized. We used sequence information from the control region of the mitochondrial genome to test for concordance between genetic structure and representatives of 12 current subspecies and from two areas where subspecies distributions overlap. Haplotypes were broadly shared among subspecies, and all geographic locales shared a widely distributed common haplotype (FalconCR2). Haplotypes were distributed in a star-like phylogeny, consistent with rapid expansion of a recently derived species, with observed genetic patterns congruent with incomplete lineage sorting and/or differential rates of evolution on morphology and neutral genetic characters. Hierarchical analyses of molecular variance did not uncover genetic partitioning at the continental level, despite strong population-level structure (FST = 0.228). Similar analyses found weak partitioning, albeit significant, among subspecies (FCT = 0.138). All reconstructions placed the hierofalcons' (Gyrfalcon [F. rusticolus] and Saker Falcon [F. cherrug]) haplotypes in a well-supported clade either basal or unresolved with respect to the Peregrine Falcon. In addition, haplotypes representing Taita Falcon (F. fasciinucha) were placed within the Peregrine Falcon clade.

  18. Inferring Invasion History of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii in China from Mitochondrial Control Region and Nuclear Intron Sequences

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    Yanhe Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the dispersal pathways of an invasive species is useful for adopting the appropriate strategies to prevent and control its spread. However, these processes are exceedingly complex. So, it is necessary to apply new technology and collect representative samples for analysis. This study used Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC in combination with traditional genetic tools to examine extensive sample data and historical records to infer the invasion history of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, in China. The sequences of the mitochondrial control region and the proPOx intron in the nuclear genome of samples from 37 sites (35 in China and one each in Japan and the USA were analyzed. The results of combined scenarios testing and historical records revealed a much more complex invasion history in China than previously believed. P. clarkii was most likely originally introduced into China from Japan from an unsampled source, and the species then expanded its range primarily into the middle and lower reaches and, to a lesser extent, into the upper reaches of the Changjiang River in China. No transfer was observed from the upper reaches to the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River. Human-mediated jump dispersal was an important dispersal pathway for P. clarkii. The results provide a better understanding of the evolutionary scenarios involved in the rapid invasion of P. clarkii in China.

  19. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to sequence and location among Escherichia coli strains

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    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas DnaA rejuvenation sequences 1 and 2 (DARS1 and DARS2) reactivate DnaAADP to DnaAATP. The structural organization of oriC, datA, DARS1, and DARS2 were found conserved among 59 fully sequenced E. coli genomes, with differences primarily in the non-functional spacer regions between key protein binding sites. The relative distances from oriC to datA, DARS1, and DARS2, respectively, was also conserved despite of large variations in genome size, suggesting that the gene dosage of either region is important for bacterial growth. Yet all three regions could be deleted alone or in combination without loss of viability. Competition experiments during balanced growth in rich medium and during mouse colonization indicated roles of datA, DARS1, and DARS2 for bacterial fitness although the relative contribution of each region differed between growth conditions. We suggest that this fitness advantage has contributed to conservation of both sequence and chromosomal location for datA, DARS1, and DARS2. PMID:26441936

  20. Inferring the phylogeny of disjunct populations of the azure-winged magpie Cyanopica cyanus from mitochondrial control region sequences.

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    Fok, Koon Wah; Wade, Christopher M; Parkin, David T

    2002-08-22

    The azure-winged magpie (AWM), Cyanopica cyanus, is found in Asia and Iberia. This remarkable disjunct distribution has been variously explained by either the sixteenth-century introduction of birds into Iberia from the Far East, or by the loss of individuals from the central part of their range as a result of Pleistocene glaciations. We have used the mitochondrial control region to undertake a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the AWM, with sequences examined from individuals collected from across the current distribution range and incorporating representatives of all currently defined subspecies. The Western birds are genetically distinct from their Asian congeners and their divergence is basal in the phylogenetic tree. This indicates that the AWM is native to Iberia and not the result of a recent introduction from Asia. In Asia, two major mitochondrial DNA lineages were identified. These correspond to an Inland Asia group and a Pacific Seaboard group, and are separated topographically by the Da Hingan Ling mountains and the Yellow Sea. Molecular clock estimates suggest that these divergences are associated with Pleistocene glaciations. Furthermore, our data do not support the current classification of the AWM into 10 subspecies, as defined based on morphology and geographical distribution.

  1. Genetic diversity and demographical history of Coilia ectenes (Clupeiformes: Engraulidae) inferred from the complete control region sequences of mitochondrial DNA.

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    Ma, Chunyan; Cheng, Qiqun; Zhang, Qingyi

    2012-10-01

    Coilia ectenes is a commercially important fishery species. In this study, genetic diversity and population structure of C. ectenes were examined by using mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in 246 individuals sampled from 10 localities in China. One hundred and ninety-five polymorphic sites defined 184 distinct haplotypes, revealing a moderately high haplotype diversity (Hd) and a relatively low nucleotide diversity (π) in the 10 localities. An excess of unique haplotypes at most sample locations were detected, which might influence the genetic structure of the C. ectenes populations. Hd ranged from 0.939 to 1.000 and π ranged from 0.26% to 1.15%. The Dongting fish population had the highest π level. The genetic distances ranged from 0.26% to 1.03% within populations and from 0.56% to 4.90% between populations. The distances between the Fuzhou (FZ) population and other populations were mostly >4.8%. Neighbor-joining tree indicated distinct patterns of phylogeographic structure among haplotypes from FZ population and those from other populations. Analyses of molecular variance and F(st) statistics suggested that the divergence existed among populations from 10 localities, indicating that gene flow might be restricted among those regions, despite the wide dispersal. In addition, neutral tests and analysis of mismatch distribution suggested that C. ectenes might have undergone a population expansion. Our study revealed the extant population genetic diversity and structure of the C. ectenes, and was in favor of the related fishery management issues including fishery stock identification and conservation.

  2. Sequence and analysis of mtDNA control region in Cnaphalacrocis medinalis Guenée and Marasmia patnalis Bradley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yajun; Wu, Zhihong; Xu, Hongxing; Zheng, Xusong; Tian, Junce; Lu, Zhongxian

    2016-11-01

    Rice leaffolders Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and Marasmia patnalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) are important rice pests and morphologically related with same damage methods. The control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in two rice leaffolders C. medinalis and M. patnalis were sequenced and analyzed. The control regions of the two rice leaffolders are located between 12S ribosomal RNA and tRNA Met , and exhibit conserved structural elements. We identified the poly T stretches, (TA)n block, and stem-loop structure. There are no long tandem repeats found in mtDNA control region in the two rice leaffolders studied. Nevertheless, we did not find the GA-rich block in mtDNA control regions of the two rice leaffolders. The molecular-based phylogenies support the traditional morphologically based view of relationships of Pyralidae within the Ditrysia. The addition of the C. medinalis and M. patnalis mtDNA control regions to the literature promotes the understanding of the molecular evolution of Pyralidae in Ditrysia.

  3. Genetic variation between two Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) populations in the eastern China based on mitochondrial DNA control region sequences.

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    Yao, Yongfang; Zhong, Lijing; Liu, Bofeng; Li, Jiayi; Ni, Qingyong; Xu, Huailiang

    2013-06-01

    Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a threatened primate species endemic to China. Population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were conducted in 66 Tibetan individuals from Sichuan (SC), Huangshan (HS), and Fujian (FJ) based on a 477-bp fragment of mitochondrial DNA control region. Four new haplotypes were defined, and a relatively high level of genetic diversity was first observed in FJ populations (Hd = 0.7661). Notably, a continuous approximately 10 bp-fragment deletion was observed near the 5' end of the mtDNA control region of both HS and FJ populations when compared with that of SC population, and a sharing haplotype was found between the two populations, revealing a closer genetic relationship. However, significant genetic differentiation (FST = 0.8700) and more poor gene exchange (Nm < 1) had occurred among three populations. This study mainly provide a further insight into the genetic relationship between HS and FJ Tibetan macaque populations, but it may be necessary to carry out further study with extra samples from other locations in the geographic coverage of the two subspecies (M. thibetana pullus and M. thibetana huangshanensis).

  4. Population structure of the African savannah elephant inferred from mitochondrial control region sequences and nuclear microsatellite loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyakaana, S; Arctander, P; Siegismund, H R

    2002-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-six mitochondrial DNA nucleotide sequences were used in combination with polymorphism at four nuclear microsatellite loci to assess the amount and distribution of genetic variation within and between African savannah elephants. They were sampled from 11 localities in easter...

  5. Control regions for chromosome replication are conserved with respect to both sequence and location between Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome replication is initiated from oriC by the DnaA initiator protein associated with ATP. Three non-coding regions contribute to the activity of DnaA. The datA locus is instrumental in conversion of DnaAATP to DnaAADP (DDAH; datA dependent DnaAATP hydrolysis) whereas Dna...

  6. MtDNA control region sequence polymorphisms and phylogenetic analysis of Malay population living in or around Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia.

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    Maruyama, S; Nohira-Koike, C; Minaguchi, K; Nambiar, P

    2010-03-01

    Control region polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA of 124 unrelated individuals from the Malay population living in or around Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia were investigated and phylogenetic haplogroup lineages were determined. The intergenic COII/tRNALys 9-bp deletion, 3010 and 5178 mutations, and several coding region polymorphisms were examined to discriminate some phylogenetic haplogroups. Sequence comparison of the control regions led to the identification of 117 mitochondrial haplotypes, in which 103 types were observed in only one individual and the other nine types were shared by more than two individuals. Gene diversity was estimated to be 0.997. Phylogenetic haplogroup determination revealed that the gene pool of the modern Malay population in Malaysia consisted mainly of southeast Asian, east Asian, unidentified and unique, and aboriginal southeast-specific haplogroups. These results suggest a multi-original nature for the modern Malay population. The present database may help not only in personal identification but also in determining geographic origin in forensic casework in Malaysian, Southeast Asian and East Asian populations.

  7. Low Genetic Diversity and Strong Geographical Structure of the Critically Endangered White-Headed Langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Control Region Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiran; Qiao, Yu; Pan, Wenshi; Yao, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Many Asian colobine monkey species are suffering from habitat destruction and population size decline. There is a great need to understand their genetic diversity, population structure and demographic history for effective species conservation. The white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus) is a Critically Endangered colobine species endemic to the limestone karst forests in southwestern China. We analyzed the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences of 390 fecal samples from 40 social groups across the main distribution areas, which represented one-third of the total extant population. Only nine haplotypes and 10 polymorphic sites were identified, indicating remarkably low genetic diversity in the species. Using a subset of 77 samples from different individuals, we evaluated genetic variation, population structure, and population demographic history. We found very low values of haplotype diversity (h = 0.570 ± 0.056) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.00323 ± 0.00044) in the hypervariable region I (HVRI) of the mtDNA control region. Distribution of haplotypes displayed marked geographical pattern, with one population (Chongzuo, CZ) showing a complete lack of genetic diversity (having only one haplotype), whereas the other population (Fusui, FS) having all nine haplotypes. We detected strong population genetic structure among habit patches (ΦST = 0.375, P population size and modest population expansion in the last 2,000 years. Our results indicate different genetic diversity and possibly distinct population history for different local populations, and suggest that CZ and FS should be considered as one evolutionarily significant unit (ESU) and two management units (MUs) pending further investigation using nuclear markers.

  8. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Non Coding Control Region of BK Virus Using Nested-PCR Sequencing Method in Renal Graft Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Emami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Polyomaviruses (BK is a comprehensive infection with more than of 80% prevalence in the world. One of the most important reasons of BK virus nephropathy is in the renal transplant recipients and rejection of transplanted tissue between them. Non Coding region of this virus play a regulatory role in replication and amplification of the virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic patterns of this area in renal graft at Namazi Transplantation Center, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In the present experimental study, 380 renal allograft serums were collected. DNAs of 129 eligible samples were extracted and evaluated using a virus genome. The presence of the virus was determined by qualitative and sequencing. Of these, 129 samples were tested for the presence of virus according to the condition study, using quantitative, qualitative genomic amplification and sequencing. Results: The study showed symptoms of nephropathy, 76 (58.9% of them were males and 46 (35.7% were females with the mean age 38.0±.089 years of age. In general, 46 patients (35.7% percent were positive for BK Polyomaviruses. After comparing the genomic sequence with applications of molecular they were categorized in three groups and then recorded in gene bank. Conclusion: About 35% of renal transplant recipients with high creatinine levels were positive for the presence of BK virus. Non-coding region of respondents in the sample survey revealed that among patients with the most common genotypes were rearranged the entire transplant patients were observed at this tranplant center. Examination of these sequences indicated that this rearrangments had a specific pattern, different from the standard strain of archaea type.

  9. Robustness analysis of chiller sequencing control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Yundan; Sun, Yongjun; Huang, Gongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Uncertainties with chiller sequencing control were systematically quantified. • Robustness of chiller sequencing control was systematically analyzed. • Different sequencing control strategies were sensitive to different uncertainties. • A numerical method was developed for easy selection of chiller sequencing control. - Abstract: Multiple-chiller plant is commonly employed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning system to increase operational feasibility and energy-efficiency under part load condition. In a multiple-chiller plant, chiller sequencing control plays a key role in achieving overall energy efficiency while not sacrifices the cooling sufficiency for indoor thermal comfort. Various sequencing control strategies have been developed and implemented in practice. Based on the observation that (i) uncertainty, which cannot be avoided in chiller sequencing control, has a significant impact on the control performance and may cause the control fail to achieve the expected control and/or energy performance; and (ii) in current literature few studies have systematically addressed this issue, this paper therefore presents a study on robustness analysis of chiller sequencing control in order to understand the robustness of various chiller sequencing control strategies under different types of uncertainty. Based on the robustness analysis, a simple and applicable method is developed to select the most robust control strategy for a given chiller plant in the presence of uncertainties, which will be verified using case studies

  10. Keragaman Spesies Ikan Tuna di Pasar Ikan Kedonganan Bali dengan Analisis Sekuen Kontrol Daerah Mitokondria DNA (SPECIES DIVERSITY OF TUNA FISH USING MITOCHONDRIAL DNA CONTROL REGION SEQUENCE ANALYSIS AT KEDONGANAN FISH MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Steven Triyomi Hariyanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tuna is an export commodity which has very high economic value. However, some tuna speciesare threatened with extinction. The purpose of this study was to identify the tuna species that aresold in Kedonganan Fish Market. The research method was polymerase chain reaction technique(PCR using the marker sequence mitochondrial DNA control region. Samples were obtained fromthe Fish Market tuna Kedonganan, Kuta, Badung, Bali. The total number of samples are 28specimens. Sequence from each sample was obtained through sequencing techniques. Sequencesobtained were run in BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool and subsequently analyzed withMEGA 5 for species confirmation. Three species of tuna that are identified in the Kedonganan FishMarket is: Thunnus albacares, T. obesus, and Katsuwonus pelamis. All three species have highgenetic variation HD = 1. This study needed to be continued with more number of samples todetermine the species of tuna sold in Kedonganan Fish Market.

  11. Characterization of the red knot (Calidris canutus) mitochondrial control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Deborah M; Baker, Allan J

    2003-08-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial control regions of 11 red knots (Calidris canutus). The control region is 1168 bp in length and is flanked by tRNA glutamate (glu) and the gene ND6 at its 5' end and tRNA phenylalanine (phe) and the gene 12S on its 3' end. The sequence possesses conserved sequence blocks F, E, D, C, CSB-1, and the bird similarity box (BSB), as expected for a mitochondrial copy. Flanking tRNA regions show correct secondary structure, and a relative rate test indicated no significant difference between substitution rates in the sequence we obtained versus the known mitochondrial sequence of turnstones (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae). These characteristics indicate that the sequence is mitochondrial in origin. To confirm this, we sequenced the control region of a single individual using both purified mitochondrial DNA and genomic DNA. The sequences were identical using both methods. The sequence and methods presented in this paper may now serve as a reference for future studies using knot and other avian control regions. Furthermore, the discovery of five variable sites in 11 knots towards the 3' end of the control region, and the variability of this region in contrast to the more conserved central domain in the alignment between knots and other Charadriiformes, highlights the importance of this area as a source of variation for future studies in knots and other birds.

  12. Using a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work used sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker to detect the Bacillus cereus strain in strawberry fields. The purpose was to develop an effective molecular method for detecting the functional target microorganisms applied in agricultural fields. A 3×109 CFU/ml vegetative cell suspension based on ...

  13. N-linked glycosylation and sequence changes in a critical negative control region of the ASCT1 and ASCT2 neutral amino acid transporters determine their retroviral receptor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Mariana; Lavillette, Dimitri; Kelly, Sean M; Kabat, David

    2003-03-01

    . Removal of this N-linked oligosaccharide by mutagenesis enabled hamster ASCT1 to function as a receptor for all viruses of this interference group. These results strongly suggest that combinations of amino acid sequence changes and N-linked oligosaccharides in a critical carboxyl-terminal region of ECL2 control retroviral utilization of both the ASCT1 and ASCT2 receptors.

  14. An ongoing earthquake sequence near Dhaka, Bangladesh, from regional recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, M.; Mondal, D. R.; Akhter, S. H.; Kim, W.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes in and around the syntaxial region between the continent-continent collision of the Himalayan arc and oceanic subduction of the Sunda arc result primarily from the convergence of India and Eurasia-Sunda plates along two fronts. The northern front, the convergence of the Indian and Eurasian plates, has produced the Himalayas. The eastern front, the convergence of the Indian and Sunda plates, ranges from ocean-continent subduction at the Andaman Arc and Burma Arc, and transitions to continent-continent collision to the north at the Assam Syntaxis in northeast India. The India-Sunda convergence at the Burma Arc is extremely oblique. The boundary-normal convergence rate is ~17 mm/yr while the boundary-parallel rate is ~45 mm/yr including the well-known Sagaing strike-slip fault, which accommodates about half the shear component. This heterogeneous tectonic setting produces multiple earthquake sources that need to be considered when assessing seismic hazard and risk in this region. The largest earthquakes, just as in other subduction systems, are expected to be interplate events that occur on the low-angle megathrusts, such as the Mw 9.2 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the 1762 earthquake along the Arakan margin. These earthquakes are known to produce large damage over vast areas, but since they account for large fault motions they are relatively rare. The majority of current seismicity in the study area is intraplate. Most of the seismicity associated with the Burma Arc subduction system is in the down-going slab, including the shallow-dipping part below the megathrust flooring the accretionary wedge. The strike of the wedge is ~N-S and Dhaka lies at its outer limit. One particular source relevant to seismic risk in Dhaka is illuminated by a multi-year sequence of earthquakes in Bangladesh less than 100 km southeast of Dhaka. The population in Dhaka (now at least 15 million) has been increasing dramatically due to rapid urbanization. The vulnerability

  15. Effective noninvasive zygosity determination by maternal plasma target region sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently very few noninvasive molecular genetic approaches are available to determine zygosity for twin pregnancies in clinical laboratories. This study aimed to develop a novel method to determine zygosity by using maternal plasma target region sequencing. METHODS: We constructed a statistic model to calculate the possibility of each zygosity type using likelihood ratios ( Li and empirical dynamic thresholds targeting at 4,524 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs loci on 22 autosomes. Then two dizygotic (DZ twin pregnancies,two monozygotic (MZ twin pregnancies and two singletons were recruited to evaluate the performance of our novel method. Finally we estimated the sensitivity and specificity of the model in silico under different cell-free fetal DNA (cff-DNA concentration and sequence depth. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: We obtained 8.90 Gbp sequencing data on average for six clinical samples. Two samples were classified as DZ with L values of 1.891 and 1.554, higher than the dynamic DZ cut-off values of 1.162 and 1.172, respectively. Another two samples were judged as MZ with 0.763 and 0.784 of L values, lower than the MZ cut-off values of 0.903 and 0.918. And the rest two singleton samples were regarded as MZ twins, with L values of 0.639 and 0.757, lower than the MZ cut-off values of 0.921 and 0.799. In silico, the estimated sensitivity of our noninvasive zygosity determination was 99.90% under 10% total cff-DNA concentration with 2 Gbp sequence data. As the cff-DNA concentration increased to 15%, the specificity was as high as 97% with 3.50 Gbp sequence data, much higher than 80% with 10% cff-DNA concentration. SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents the feasibility to noninvasively determine zygosity of twin pregnancy using target region sequencing, and illustrates the sensitivity and specificity under various detecting condition. Our method can act as an alternative approach for zygosity determination of twin pregnancies in clinical

  16. Accommodation and supply—a dual control on stratigraphic sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Wolfgang

    1993-07-01

    It is widely accepted that both eustatic and tectonically controlled regional changes of sea level have contributed to the record of stratigraphic sequences. I suggest that environmental change be added as a third, autonomous control. Sedimentologic principles clearly indicate that sequences and their systems tracts are controlled by the interplay of two rates —the rate of change in accommodation (space available for sedimentation) and the rate of sediment supply. Sea level has direct control on accommodation, but its influence on sediment supply is remote and easily overshadowed by environmental factors. For instance, the record of the most recent sea-level rise is a transgressive systems tract where supply is low; it is a prograding highstand systems tract in deltas where the supply is high. Examples of sequence boundaries generated by changes in sediment supply include tectonically driven shifts in sediment input into basins, changes in ocean currents, pulsating supply from failure of submarine slopes and drowning of carbonate platforms by environmental stress. Furthermore, the stratigraphic sequences in fluviatile continental basins are physically removed from sea-level induced changes in accommodation and must have formed by changes in the rate and pattern of supply. Subaerial exposure of marine sediments at the sequence boundary is a most important criterion for recognizing sea level cycles as opposed to supply cycles. Other criteria include downstepping of shelf breaks and characteristic patterns in the spacing of time lines within sequences. Some third-order cycles (ca. 0.5-3 Ma duration) meet these criteria, others do not. Cycle-stacking patterns and the shifting facies belts on cratons indicate that many second- and third-order cycles lack pronounced exposure unconformities and represent gradual changes superimposed on more rapid, shorter oscillations. Seismic data yield poor images of these gradational changes because they lack resolution. Seismic

  17. Molecular Identification and Historic Demography of the Marine Tucuxi (Sotalia guianensis at the Amazon River’s Mouth by Means of Mitochondrial Control Region Gene Sequences and Implications for Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mark Shostell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2005, three fishermen, with artisan fishing vessels and drift gillnets, accidentally captured around 200 dolphins between Vigia and Salinópolis in the Amazon River estuary. The dolphins died and they then prepared their vaginas and penises in order to sell them in the Ver-ao-Peso market in the city of Belem within the Brazilian state of Pará. We randomly sampled a minimal quantity of tissue of these sexual organs from 78 of these 200 dolphins and we determined the following results after sequencing 689 base pairs (bp from the mitochondrial control region gene: (1 96.15% (75/78 of these dolphins belonged to the species Sotalia guianensis. The other species detected were Steno brenadensis, Stenella coeruleoalba and Tursiops truncatus; (2 The levels of gene diversity found in this sample of S. guianensis were high (33 haplotypes, haplotype diversity of 0.917 and nucleotide diversity of 0.0045 compared to gene diversities found in other Brazilian S. guianensis locations; (3 All the population genetics methods employed indicated a clear population expansion in this population. This population expansion could have begun 400,000 years ago; (4 The haplotype divergence within this population could have begun around 2.1 millions of years ago (MYA, with posterior splits around 2.0–1.8 MYA, 1.7–1.8 MYA, 1–1.5 MYA, 0.6–0.8 MYA, 0.4–0.2 MYA and 0.16–0.02 MYA, all during the Pleistocene.

  18. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Timothy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/.

  19. Sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aims of this research were to study mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region III and establish the degree of variation characteristic of a fragment. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a small circular genome located within the mitochondria in the cytoplasm of the cell and a smaller 1.2 kb pair fragment, called the control ...

  20. A unique genomic sequence in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome [WHS] region of humans is conserved in the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarzami, S T; Kringstein, A M; Conte, R A; Verma, R S

    1996-10-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is caused by a partial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 4 band 16.3 (4p 16.3). A unique-sequence human DNA probe (39 kb) localized within this region has been used to search for sequence homology in the apes' equivalent chromosome 3 by FISH-technique. The WHS loci are conserved in higher primates at the expected position. Nevertheless, a control probe, which detects alphoid sequences of the pericentromeric region of humans, is diverged in chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan. The conservation of WHS loci and divergence of DNA alphoid sequences have further added to the controversy concerning human descent.

  1. In Silico Prediction of Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions in Large Genomic Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Frisch, Matthias; Frech, Kornelie; Klingenhoff, Andreas; Cartharius, Kerstin; Liebich, Ines; Werner, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are essential regulatory DNA elements of eukaryotic cells. They are major determinants of locus control of gene expression and can shield gene expression from position effects. Experimental detection of S/MARs requires substantial effort and is not suitable for large-scale screening of genomic sequences. In silico prediction of S/MARs can provide a crucial first selection step to reduce the number of candidates. We used experimentally defined S/MAR ...

  2. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  3. The complementarity-determining region sequences in IgY antivenom hypervariable regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitirana da Rocha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Development of IgY antibodies against anti-snake toxins endowed with highly lethal neutralizing activity" (da Rocha et al., 2017 [1]. Complementarity-determining region (CDR sequences are variable antibody (Ab sequences that respond with specificity, duration and strength to identify and bind to antigen (Ag epitopes. B lymphocytes isolated from hens immunized with Bitis arietans (Ba and anti-Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt venoms and expressing high specificity, affinity and toxicity neutralizing antibody titers were used as DNA sources. The VLF1, CDR1, CDR2, VLR1 and CDR3 sequences were validated by BLASTp, and values corresponding to IgY VL and VH anti-Ba or anti-Cdt venoms were identified, registered [Gallus gallus IgY Fv Light chain (GU815099/Gallus gallus IgY Fv Heavy chain (GU815098] and used for molecular modeling of IgY scFv anti-Ba. The resulting CDR1, CDR2 and CDR3 sequences were combined to construct the three - dimensional structure of the Ab paratope.

  4. Mitochondrial control region and GSTP1 polymorphism associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Souvik Ghatak

    2016-02-20

    Feb 20, 2016 ... Conclusion: A strong familial nuclear GSTP1 sequence variation and mitochondrial control region was observed in this study ... 2.2. Selection criteria. Clinical Practice Points about the cases are as follows: Family 1 ..... Bangalore, India; 2006. [4] Robbani F, Cordon-Cardo C. Mutation of cell cycle regulators.

  5. Intrusion Detection in Control Systems using Sequence Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Mai; Onoda, Takashi

    Intrusion detection is considered effective in control systems. Sequences of the control application behavior observed in the communication, such as the order of the control device to be controlled, are important in control systems. However, most intrusion detection systems do not effectively reflect sequences in the application layer into the detection rules. In our previous work, we considered utilizing sequences for intrusion detection in control systems, and demonstrated the usefulness of sequences for intrusion detection. However, manually writing the detection rules for a large system can be difficult, so using machine learning methods becomes feasible. Also, in the case of control systems, there have been very few observed cyber attacks, so we have very little knowledge of the attack data that should be used to train the intrusion detection system. In this paper, we use an approach that combines CRF (Conditional Random Field) considering the sequence of the system, thus able to reflect the characteristics of control system sequences into the intrusion detection system, and also does not need the knowledge of attack data to construct the detection rules.

  6. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  7. Combining text mining and sequence analysis to discover protein functional regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, E; Agichtein, E

    2004-01-01

    Recently presented protein sequence classification models can identify relevant regions of the sequence. This observation has many potential applications to detecting functional regions of proteins. However, identifying such sequence regions automatically is difficult in practice, as relatively few types of information have enough annotated sequences to perform this analysis. Our approach addresses this data scarcity problem by combining text and sequence analysis. First, we train a text classifier over the explicit textual annotations available for some of the sequences in the dataset, and use the trained classifier to predict the class for the rest of the unlabeled sequences. We then train a joint sequence text classifier over the text contained in the functional annotations of the sequences, and the actual sequences in this larger, automatically extended dataset. Finally, we project the classifier onto the original sequences to determine the relevant regions of the sequences. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by predicting protein sub-cellular localization and determining localization specific functional regions of these proteins.

  8. Deep sequencing of the MHC region in the Chinese population contributes to studies of complex disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fusheng; Cao, Hongzhi; Zuo, Xianbo; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Liu, Xiaomin; Xu, Ricong; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Jin, Xin; Gao, Jinping; Mei, Junpu; Sheng, Yujun; Li, Qibin; Liang, Bo; Shen, Juan; Shen, Changbing; Jiang, Hui; Zhu, Caihong; Fan, Xing; Xu, Fengping; Yue, Min; Yin, Xianyong; Ye, Chen; Zhang, Cuicui; Liu, Xiao; Yu, Liang; Wu, Jinghua; Chen, Mengyun; Zhuang, Xuehan; Tang, Lili; Shao, Haojing; Wu, Longmao; Li, Jian; Xu, Yu; Zhang, Yijie; Zhao, Suli; Wang, Yu; Li, Ge; Xu, Hanshi; Zeng, Lei; Wang, Jianan; Bai, Mingzhou; Chen, Yanling; Chen, Wei; Kang, Tian; Wu, Yanyan; Xu, Xun; Zhu, Zhengwei; Cui, Yong; Wang, Zaixing; Yang, Chunjun; Wang, Peiguang; Xiang, Leihong; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Anping; Gao, Xinghua; Zhang, Furen; Xu, Jinhua; Zheng, Min; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yu, Xueqing; Li, Yingrui; Yang, Sen; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianjun; Hammarström, Lennart; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-07-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been shown to be associated with numerous diseases. However, it remains a challenge to pinpoint the causal variants for these associations because of the extreme complexity of the region. We thus sequenced the entire 5-Mb MHC region in 20,635 individuals of Han Chinese ancestry (10,689 controls and 9,946 patients with psoriasis) and constructed a Han-MHC database that includes both variants and HLA gene typing results of high accuracy. We further identified multiple independent new susceptibility loci in HLA-C, HLA-B, HLA-DPB1 and BTNL2 and an intergenic variant, rs118179173, associated with psoriasis and confirmed the well-established risk allele HLA-C*06:02. We anticipate that our Han-MHC reference panel built by deep sequencing of a large number of samples will serve as a useful tool for investigating the role of the MHC region in a variety of diseases and thus advance understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  9. Targeted enrichment of genomic DNA regions for next generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, F.; El-Sharawy, A.; Sauer, S.; Van Helvoort, J.; Van der Zaag, P.J.; Franke, A.; Nilsson, M.; Lehrach. H.; Brookes, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this review we discuss the latest targeted enrichment methods, and aspects of their utilization along with second generation sequencing for complex genome analysis. In doing so we provide an overview of issues involved in detecting genetic variation, for which targeted enrichment has become a

  10. Optimal sensorimotor control in eye movement sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuera, Jérôme; Morel, Pierre; Duhamel, Jean-René; Deneve, Sophie

    2009-03-11

    Fast and accurate motor behavior requires combining noisy and delayed sensory information with knowledge of self-generated body motion; much evidence indicates that humans do this in a near-optimal manner during arm movements. However, it is unclear whether this principle applies to eye movements. We measured the relative contributions of visual sensory feedback and the motor efference copy (and/or proprioceptive feedback) when humans perform two saccades in rapid succession, the first saccade to a visual target and the second to a memorized target. Unbeknownst to the subject, we introduced an artificial motor error by randomly "jumping" the visual target during the first saccade. The correction of the memory-guided saccade allowed us to measure the relative contributions of visual feedback and efferent copy (and/or proprioceptive feedback) to motor-plan updating. In a control experiment, we extinguished the target during the saccade rather than changing its location to measure the relative contribution of motor noise and target localization error to saccade variability without any visual feedback. The motor noise contribution increased with saccade amplitude, but remained <30% of the total variability. Subjects adjusted the gain of their visual feedback for different saccade amplitudes as a function of its reliability. Even during trials where subjects performed a corrective saccade to compensate for the target-jump, the correction by the visual feedback, while stronger, remained far below 100%. In all conditions, an optimal controller predicted the visual feedback gain well, suggesting that humans combine optimally their efferent copy and sensory feedback when performing eye movements.

  11. Toward closing rice telomere gaps: mapping and sequence characterization of rice subtelomere regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, T.J.; Yu, Y.; Chang, S.B.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Oh, C.S.; Ahn, S.N.; Fang, E.; Wing, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the collective efforts of the international community to sequence the complete rice genome, telomeric regions of most chromosome arms remain uncharacterized. In this report we present sequence data from subtelomere regions obtained by analyzing telomeric clones from two 8.8 × genome

  12. Sequence of the dog immunoglobulin alpha and epsilon constant region genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, M.; Selinger, D.; Mark, G.E.; Hollis, G.F.; Hickey, G.J. [Merck Research Labs., Rathway, NJ (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The immunoglobulin alpha (IGHAC) and epsilon (IGHEC) germline constant region genes were isolated from a dog liver genomic DNA library. Sequence analysis indicates that the dog IGHEC gene is encoded by four exons spread out over 1.7 kilobases (kb). The IGHAC sequence encompasses 1.5 kb and includes all three constant region coding exons. The complete exon/intron sequence of these genes is described. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Automation tools for control systems a network based sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.; Geib, M.; Westervelt, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on development of a sequencer for control systems which works in conjunction with its realtime, distributed Vsystem database. Vsystem is a network-based data acquisition, monitoring and control system which has been applied successfully to many different types of projects. The network-based sequencer allows a user to simple define a thread of execution in any supported computer on the network. The scrip defining a sequence has a simple syntax designed for non-programmers, with facilities for selectively abbreviating the channel names for easy reference. The semantics of the script contains most of the familiar capabilities of conventional programming languages, including standard stream I/O and the ability to start other processes with parameters passed. The scrip is compiled to threaded code for execution efficiency. The implementation will be described in some detail and examples will be given of applications for which the sequencer has been used

  14. Ultradeep sequencing of a human ultraconserved region reveals somatic and constitutional genomic instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna De Grassi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer-associated genomic instability is crucial, particularly in tumour types in which this instability represents the essential underlying mechanism of tumourigenesis. Currently used methods require the presence of already established neoplastic cells because they only detect clonal mutations. In principle, parallel sequencing of single DNA filaments could reveal the early phases of tumour initiation by detecting low-frequency mutations, provided an adequate depth of coverage and an effective control of the experimental error. We applied ultradeep sequencing to estimate the genomic instability of individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. To overcome the experimental error, we used an ultraconserved region (UCR of the human genome as an internal control. By comparing the mutability outside and inside the UCR, we observed a tendency of the ultraconserved element to accumulate significantly fewer mutations than the flanking segments in both neoplastic and nonneoplastic HNPCC samples. No difference between the two regions was detectable in cells from healthy donors, indicating that all three HNPCC samples have mutation rates higher than the healthy genome. This is the first, to our knowledge, direct evidence of an intrinsic genomic instability of individuals with heterozygous mutations in mismatch repair genes, and constitutes the proof of principle for the development of a more sensitive molecular assay of genomic instability.

  15. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni applying flaA short variable region sequencing, multilocus sequencing and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Bonnichsen, Lise; Larsson, Jonas

    flaA short variable region sequencing and phenetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was applied on a collection of 102 Campylobacter jejuni isolated from continuous sampling of organic, free range geese and chickens. FTIR has been shown to serve as a valuable tool in typing...

  16. MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR POPULATIONS IN THE VIRGO OVERDENSITY REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.; Tisserand, P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Mt Stromlo Observatory, via Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Willman, B. [Haverford College, Department of Astronomy, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Arimoto, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Subaru Telescope, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Okamoto, S. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Mateo, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Saviane, I. [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Walsh, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Geha, M. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Jordan, A.; Zoccali, M. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Olszewski, E. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Walker, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kroupa, P. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-05-20

    We present deep color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS)/Virgo Overdensity (VOD) and compare them to a field centered on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of main-sequence stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g Almost-Equal-To 24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting, we derive an age of 9.1{sup +1.0}{sub -1.1} Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.70{sup +0.15}{sub -0.20} dex, and a heliocentric distance of 30.9 {+-} 3.0 kpc for the main sequence of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main-sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields ({Lambda}{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 265 Degree-Sign , B{sub Sun} Almost-Equal-To 13 Degree-Sign ) are located at a mean distance of 23.3 {+-} 1.6 kpc and have an age of {approx}8.2 Gyr, and an abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.67{sup +0.16}{sub -0.12} dex, similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These statistically robust parameters, derived from the photometry of 260 main-sequence stars, are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sgr dwarf galaxy (8.0 {+-} 1.5 Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3 Gyr old M giants, [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -0.6 dex, in the Sgr north leading arm. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law and Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo shape that is empirically calibrated with Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sgr A-branch and Two Micron All Sky Survey M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the main-sequence population at 23 kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low-density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at {approx}9 kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread over a heliocentric distance range of 42-53 kpc. At best

  17. Exome sequencing generates high quality data in non-target regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exome sequencing using next-generation sequencing technologies is a cost efficient approach to selectively sequencing coding regions of human genome for detection of disease variants. A significant amount of DNA fragments from the capture process fall outside target regions, and sequence data for positions outside target regions have been mostly ignored after alignment. Result We performed whole exome sequencing on 22 subjects using Agilent SureSelect capture reagent and 6 subjects using Illumina TrueSeq capture reagent. We also downloaded sequencing data for 6 subjects from the 1000 Genomes Project Pilot 3 study. Using these data, we examined the quality of SNPs detected outside target regions by computing consistency rate with genotypes obtained from SNP chips or the Hapmap database, transition-transversion (Ti/Tv ratio, and percentage of SNPs inside dbSNP. For all three platforms, we obtained high-quality SNPs outside target regions, and some far from target regions. In our Agilent SureSelect data, we obtained 84,049 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 65,231 SNPs inside target regions (a 129% increase. For our Illumina TrueSeq data, we obtained 222,171 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 95,818 SNPs inside target regions (a 232% increase. For the data from the 1000 Genomes Project, we obtained 7,139 high-quality SNPs outside target regions compared to 1,548 SNPs inside target regions (a 461% increase. Conclusions These results demonstrate that a significant amount of high quality genotypes outside target regions can be obtained from exome sequencing data. These data should not be ignored in genetic epidemiology studies.

  18. Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... Key words: Chinese fir, Cunninghamia lanceolata, tree breeding, SCAR markers, molecular typing, identification. INTRODUCTION ..... An RAPD band specific to some clones is indicated by a white dot. and three clones .... Detection of genomic regions differentiating two closely related oak species Quercus.

  19. Transcriptome sequencing of the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC RNA reference samples using next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry-Mieg Danielle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome sequencing using next-generation sequencing platforms will soon be competing with DNA microarray technologies for global gene expression analysis. As a preliminary evaluation of these promising technologies, we performed deep sequencing of cDNA synthesized from the Microarray Quality Control (MAQC reference RNA samples using Roche's 454 Genome Sequencer FLX. Results We generated more that 3.6 million sequence reads of average length 250 bp for the MAQC A and B samples and introduced a data analysis pipeline for translating cDNA read counts into gene expression levels. Using BLAST, 90% of the reads mapped to the human genome and 64% of the reads mapped to the RefSeq database of well annotated genes with e-values ≤ 10-20. We measured gene expression levels in the A and B samples by counting the numbers of reads that mapped to individual RefSeq genes in multiple sequencing runs to evaluate the MAQC quality metrics for reproducibility, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy and compared the results with DNA microarrays and Quantitative RT-PCR (QRTPCR from the MAQC studies. In addition, 88% of the reads were successfully aligned directly to the human genome using the AceView alignment programs with an average 90% sequence similarity to identify 137,899 unique exon junctions, including 22,193 new exon junctions not yet contained in the RefSeq database. Conclusion Using the MAQC metrics for evaluating the performance of gene expression platforms, the ExpressSeq results for gene expression levels showed excellent reproducibility, sensitivity, and specificity that improved systematically with increasing shotgun sequencing depth, and quantitative accuracy that was comparable to DNA microarrays and QRTPCR. In addition, a careful mapping of the reads to the genome using the AceView alignment programs shed new light on the complexity of the human transcriptome including the discovery of thousands of new splice variants.

  20. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Fenneropenaeus chinensis and phylogenetic relationship among different populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Li, Pengfei; Gao, Tianxiang; Zhuang, Zhimeng; Jin, Xianshi

    2012-06-01

    This paper deals with the structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The termination-associated sequence (TAS), cTAS, CSB-D-CSB-F, and CSB-1 are detected in the species. The results indicate that the structures of these parts are similar to those of most marine organisms. Two conserved regions and many stable conserved boxes are found in the extended TAS area, central sequences blocks, and conserved sequences blocks (CSBs). This is the special character of F. chinensis. All the mtDNA control region sequences do not have CSB2 and CSB3 blocks, which is quite different from most vertebrates. In addition, the complete mtDNA control region sequences are used to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of F. chinensis. The phylogenetic trees show a lack of genetic structure among populations, which is similar to many previous studies.

  1. Evaluation of a target region capture sequencing platform using monogenic diabetes as a study-model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Rui; Liu, Yanxia; Gjesing, Anette Marianne Prior

    2014-01-01

    Monogenic diabetes is a genetic disease often caused by mutations in genes involved in beta-cell function. Correct sub-categorization of the disease is a prerequisite for appropriate treatment and genetic counseling. Target-region capture sequencing is a combination of genomic region enrichment...... and next generation sequencing which might be used as an efficient way to diagnose various genetic disorders. We aimed to develop a target-region capture sequencing platform to screen 117 selected candidate genes involved in metabolism for mutations and to evaluate its performance using monogenic diabetes...

  2. Using a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... genome has been demonstrated to be a useful molecular tool. SCAR markers can be diagnostic for a genus, spe- cies, or even a particular strain (De Clercq et al., 2003;. Pujol et al., 2005; Felici et al., 2008a). The development of SCAR markers to detect bio-control micro-organisms has been reported for ...

  3. Modelling and control design for SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    With the perspective of investigating a suitable control design for autotrophic nitrogen removal, this work presents a complete model of the SHARON/Anammox reactor sequence. The dynamics of the reactor were explored pointing out the different scales of the rates in the system: slow microbial...

  4. Design and control of integrated chromatography column sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Niklas; Löfgren, Anton; Olofsson, Marianne; Sellberg, Anton; Nilsson, Bernt; Tiainen, Peter

    2017-07-01

    To increase the productivity in biopharmaceutical production, a natural step is to introduce integrated continuous biomanufacturing which leads to fewer buffer and storage tanks, smaller sizes of integrated unit operations, and full automation of the operation. The main contribution of this work is to illustrate a methodology for design and control of a downstream process based on integrated column sequences. For small scale production, for example, pre-clinical studies, integrated column sequences can be implemented on a single chromatography system. This makes for a very efficient drug development platform. The proposed methodology is composed of four steps and is governed by a set of tools, that is presented, that makes the transition from batch separations to a complete integrated separation sequence as easy as possible. This methodology, its associated tools and the physical implementation is presented and illustrated on a case study where the target protein is separated from impurities through an integrated four column sequence. This article shows that the design and control of an integrated column sequence was successfully implemented for a tertiary protein separation problem. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:923-930, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Type division and controlling factor analysis of 3rd-order sequences in marine carbonate rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Type division and controlling factor analysis of 3rd-order sequence are of practical significance to tectonic analysis, sedimentary environment identification, and other geological researches. Based on the comprehensive analysis of carbon and oxygen isotope trends, paleobathymetry and spectral-frequency of representative well logs, 3rd-order sequences can be divided into 3 types: (a global sea level (GSL sequence mainly controlled by GSL change; (b tectonic sequence mainly controlled by regional tectonic activity; and (c composite sequence jointly controlled by GSL change and regional tectonic activity. This study aims to identify the controlling factors of 3rd-order sequences and to illustrate a new method for classification of 3rd-order sequences of the middle Permian strata in the Sichuan Basin, China. The middle Permian strata in the Sichuan Basin consist of 3 basin-contrastive 3rd-order sequences, i.e., PSQ1, PSQ2 and PSQ3. Of these, PSQ1 is a GSL sequence while PSQ2 and PSQ3 are composite sequences. The results suggest that the depositional environment was stable during the deposition of PSQ1, but was activated by tectonic activity during the deposition of the middle Permian Maokou Formation.

  6. Speed Control of Multiphase Cage Induction Motors Incorporating Supply Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdowski Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the control possibility of the multiphase cage induction motors having number of phases greater than 3. These motors have additional properties for speed control that distinguish them from the standard 3 phase motors: operation at various sequences of supplying voltages due to the inverter control and possible operation with few open-circuited phases. For each supply sequence different no load speeds at the same frequency can be obtained. This feature extends the motor application for miscellaneous drive demands including vector or scalar control. This depends mainly on the type of the stator winding for a given number of phases, since the principle of motor operation is based on co-operation of higher harmonics of magnetic field. Examples of operation are presented for a 9-phase motor, though general approach has been discussed. This motor was fed by a voltage source inverter at field oriented control with forced currents. The mathematical model of the motor was reduced to the form incorporating all most important physical features and appropriate for the control law formulation. The operation was illustrated for various supply sequences for “healthy” motor and for the motor operating at one phase broken. The obtained results have shown that parasitic influence of harmonic fields interaction has negligible influence on motor operation with respect to the useful coupling for properly designed stator winding.

  7. Detection of genomic variation by selection of a 9 mb DNA region and high throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I Nikolaev

    Full Text Available Detection of the rare polymorphisms and causative mutations of genetic diseases in a targeted genomic area has become a major goal in order to understand genomic and phenotypic variability. We have interrogated repeat-masked regions of 8.9 Mb on human chromosomes 21 (7.8 Mb and 7 (1.1 Mb from an individual from the International HapMap Project (NA12872. We have optimized a method of genomic selection for high throughput sequencing. Microarray-based selection and sequencing resulted in 260-fold enrichment, with 41% of reads mapping to the target region. 83% of SNPs in the targeted region had at least 4-fold sequence coverage and 54% at least 15-fold. When assaying HapMap SNPs in NA12872, our sequence genotypes are 91.3% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 4-fold, and 97.9% concordant in regions with coverage > or = 15-fold. About 81% of the SNPs recovered with both thresholds are listed in dbSNP. We observed that regions with low sequence coverage occur in close proximity to low-complexity DNA. Validation experiments using Sanger sequencing were performed for 46 SNPs with 15-20 fold coverage, with a confirmation rate of 96%, suggesting that DNA selection provides an accurate and cost-effective method for identifying rare genomic variants.

  8. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    Human and mouse genome sequences contain roughly 100,000 regions that are unalignable in primary sequence and neighbor corresponding alignable regions between both organisms. These pairs are generally assumed to be nonconserved, although the level of structural conservation between these has never...... been investigated. Owing to the limitations in computational methods, comparative genomics has been lacking the ability to compare such nonconserved sequence regions for conserved structural RNA elements. We have investigated the presence of structural RNA elements by conducting a local structural...... alignment, using FOLDALIGN, on a subset of these 100,000 corresponding regions and estimate that 1800 contain common RNA structures. Comparing our results with the recent mapping of transcribed fragments (transfrags) in human, we find that high-scoring candidates are twice as likely to be found in regions...

  9. Tracking TCRβ sequence clonotype expansions during antiviral therapy using high-throughput sequencing of the hypervariable region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Robinson

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To maintain a persistent infection viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV employ a range of mechanisms that subvert protective T cell responses. The suppression of antigen-specific T cell responses by HCV hinders efforts to profile T cell responses during chronic infection and antiviral therapy. Conventional methods of detecting antigen-specific T cells utilise either antigen stimulation (e.g. ELISpot, proliferation assays, cytokine production or antigen-loaded tetramer staining. This limits the ability to profile T cell responses during chronic infection due to suppressed effector function and the requirement for prior knowledge of antigenic viral peptide sequences. Recently high-throughput sequencing (HTS technologies have been developed for the analysis of T cell repertoires. In the present study we have assessed the feasibility of HTS of the TCRβ complementarity determining region (CDR3 to track T cell expansions in an antigen-independent manner. Using sequential blood samples from HCV-infected individuals undergoing anti-viral therapy we were able to measure the population frequencies of >35,000 TCRβ sequence clonotypes in each individual over the course of 12 weeks. TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage varied markedly between individuals but remained relatively constant within individuals across the course of therapy. Despite this stable TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage, a number of TCRβ sequence clonotypes showed dramatic changes in read frequency. These changes could not be linked to therapy outcomes in the present study however the TCRβ CDR3 sequences with the largest fold changes did include sequences with identical TRBV/TRBJ gene segment usage and high joining region homology to previously published CDR3 sequences from HCV-specific T cells targeting the HLA-B*0801-restricted 1395HSKKKCDEL1403 and HLA-A*0101–restricted 1435ATDALMTGY1443 epitopes. The pipeline developed in this proof of concept study provides a platform for the design of

  10. Comparative analyses of multi-species sequences from targeted genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J W; Touchman, J W; Blakesley, R W; Bouffard, G G; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S M; Margulies, E H; Blanchette, M; Siepel, A C; Thomas, P J; McDowell, J C; Maskeri, B; Hansen, N F; Schwartz, M S; Weber, R J; Kent, W J; Karolchik, D; Bruen, T C; Bevan, R; Cutler, D J; Schwartz, S; Elnitski, L; Idol, J R; Prasad, A B; Lee-Lin, S-Q; Maduro, V V B; Summers, T J; Portnoy, M E; Dietrich, N L; Akhter, N; Ayele, K; Benjamin, B; Cariaga, K; Brinkley, C P; Brooks, S Y; Granite, S; Guan, X; Gupta, J; Haghighi, P; Ho, S-L; Huang, M C; Karlins, E; Laric, P L; Legaspi, R; Lim, M J; Maduro, Q L; Masiello, C A; Mastrian, S D; McCloskey, J C; Pearson, R; Stantripop, S; Tiongson, E E; Tran, J T; Tsurgeon, C; Vogt, J L; Walker, M A; Wetherby, K D; Wiggins, L S; Young, A C; Zhang, L-H; Osoegawa, K; Zhu, B; Zhao, B; Shu, C L; De Jong, P J; Lawrence, C E; Smit, A F; Chakravarti, A; Haussler, D; Green, P; Miller, W; Green, E D

    2003-08-14

    The systematic comparison of genomic sequences from different organisms represents a central focus of contemporary genome analysis. Comparative analyses of vertebrate sequences can identify coding and conserved non-coding regions, including regulatory elements, and provide insight into the forces that have rendered modern-day genomes. As a complement to whole-genome sequencing efforts, we are sequencing and comparing targeted genomic regions in multiple, evolutionarily diverse vertebrates. Here we report the generation and analysis of over 12 megabases (Mb) of sequence from 12 species, all derived from the genomic region orthologous to a segment of about 1.8 Mb on human chromosome 7 containing ten genes, including the gene mutated in cystic fibrosis. These sequences show conservation reflecting both functional constraints and the neutral mutational events that shaped this genomic region. In particular, we identify substantial numbers of conserved non-coding segments beyond those previously identified experimentally, most of which are not detectable by pair-wise sequence comparisons alone. Analysis of transposable element insertions highlights the variation in genome dynamics among these species and confirms the placement of rodents as a sister group to the primates.

  11. Plasmonic Nanopores for Trapping, Controlling Displacement, and Sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Maxim; Chao, Shu-Han; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2015-11-24

    With the aim of developing a DNA sequencing methodology, we theoretically examine the feasibility of using nanoplasmonics to control the translocation of a DNA molecule through a solid-state nanopore and to read off sequence information using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that high-intensity optical hot spots produced by a metallic nanostructure can arrest DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore, thus providing a physical knob for controlling the DNA speed. Switching the plasmonic field on and off can displace the DNA molecule in discrete steps, sequentially exposing neighboring fragments of a DNA molecule to the pore as well as to the plasmonic hot spot. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from the exposed DNA fragments contains information about their nucleotide composition, possibly allowing the identification of the nucleotide sequence of a DNA molecule transported through the hot spot. The principles of plasmonic nanopore sequencing can be extended to detection of DNA modifications and RNA characterization.

  12. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  13. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    The homolog of the gyrB gene, which has been reported to be present in the vicinity of the initiation site of replication in bacteria, was mapped on the Mycoplasma hominis genome, and the region was subsequently sequenced. Five open reading frames were identified flanking the gyrB gene, one...... of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  14. Evaluation of exome variants using the Ion Proton Platform to sequence error-prone regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Seo

    Full Text Available The Ion Proton sequencer from Thermo Fisher accurately determines sequence variants from target regions with a rapid turnaround time at a low cost. However, misleading variant-calling errors can occur. We performed a systematic evaluation and manual curation of read-level alignments for the 675 ultrarare variants reported by the Ion Proton sequencer from 27 whole-exome sequencing data but that are not present in either the 1000 Genomes Project and the Exome Aggregation Consortium. We classified positive variant calls into 393 highly likely false positives, 126 likely false positives, and 156 likely true positives, which comprised 58.2%, 18.7%, and 23.1% of the variants, respectively. We identified four distinct error patterns of variant calling that may be bioinformatically corrected when using different strategies: simplicity region, SNV cluster, peripheral sequence read, and base inversion. Local de novo assembly successfully corrected 201 (38.7% of the 519 highly likely or likely false positives. We also demonstrate that the two sequencing kits from Thermo Fisher (the Ion PI Sequencing 200 kit V3 and the Ion PI Hi-Q kit exhibit different error profiles across different error types. A refined calling algorithm with better polymerase may improve the performance of the Ion Proton sequencing platform.

  15. Depletion of Shine-Dalgarno Sequences Within Bacterial Coding Regions Is Expression Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuyue; Hockenberry, Adam J.; Jewett, Michael C.; Amaral, Luís A. N.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and accurate protein synthesis is crucial for organismal survival in competitive environments. Translation efficiency (the number of proteins translated from a single mRNA in a given time period) is the combined result of differential translation initiation, elongation, and termination rates. Previous research identified the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence as a modulator of translation initiation in bacterial genes, while codon usage biases are frequently implicated as a primary determinant of elongation rate variation. Recent studies have suggested that SD sequences within coding sequences may negatively affect translation elongation speed, but this claim remains controversial. Here, we present a metric to quantify the prevalence of SD sequences in coding regions. We analyze hundreds of bacterial genomes and find that the coding sequences of highly expressed genes systematically contain fewer SD sequences than expected, yielding a robust correlation between the normalized occurrence of SD sites and protein abundances across a range of bacterial taxa. We further show that depletion of SD sequences within ribosomal protein genes is correlated with organismal growth rates, supporting the hypothesis of strong selection against the presence of these sequences in coding regions and suggesting their association with translation efficiency in bacteria. PMID:27605518

  16. Depletion of Shine-Dalgarno Sequences Within Bacterial Coding Regions Is Expression Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuyue Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and accurate protein synthesis is crucial for organismal survival in competitive environments. Translation efficiency (the number of proteins translated from a single mRNA in a given time period is the combined result of differential translation initiation, elongation, and termination rates. Previous research identified the Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence as a modulator of translation initiation in bacterial genes, while codon usage biases are frequently implicated as a primary determinant of elongation rate variation. Recent studies have suggested that SD sequences within coding sequences may negatively affect translation elongation speed, but this claim remains controversial. Here, we present a metric to quantify the prevalence of SD sequences in coding regions. We analyze hundreds of bacterial genomes and find that the coding sequences of highly expressed genes systematically contain fewer SD sequences than expected, yielding a robust correlation between the normalized occurrence of SD sites and protein abundances across a range of bacterial taxa. We further show that depletion of SD sequences within ribosomal protein genes is correlated with organismal growth rates, supporting the hypothesis of strong selection against the presence of these sequences in coding regions and suggesting their association with translation efficiency in bacteria.

  17. Simple protocol for population (Sanger) sequencing for Zika virus genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Gabriela Bastos; Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Souza, Renato Pereira de; Cunha, Mariana Sequetin; Luchs, Adriana; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Brígido, Luís Fernando de Macedo

    2018-01-01

    A number of Zika virus (ZIKV) sequences were obtained using Next-generation sequencing (NGS), a methodology widely applied in genetic diversity studies and virome discovery. However Sanger method is still a robust, affordable, rapid and specific tool to obtain valuable sequences. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and robust Sanger sequencing protocol targeting ZIKV relevant genetic regions, as envelope protein and nonstructural protein 5 (NS5). In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV strains obtained using the present protocol and their comparison with previously published NGS sequences were also carried out. Six Vero cells isolates from serum and one urine sample were available to develop the procedure. Primer sets were designed in order to conduct a nested RT-PCR and a Sanger sequencing protocols. Bayesian analysis was used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Seven complete ZIKV envelope protein (1,571 kb) and six partial NS5 (0,798 Kb) were obtained using the protocol, with no amplification of NS5 gene from urine sample. Two NS5 sequences presented ambiguities at positions 495 and 196. Nucleotide analysis of a Sanger sequence and consensus sequence of previously NGS study revealed 100% identity. ZIKV strains described here clustered within the Asian lineage. The present study provided a simple and low-cost Sanger protocol to sequence relevant genes of the ZIKV genome. The identity of Sanger generated sequences with published consensus NGS support the use of Sanger method for ZIKV population studies. The regions evaluated were able to provide robust phylogenetic signals and may be used to conduct molecular epidemiological studies and monitor viral evolution.

  18. Sequence Ready Characterization of the Pericentromeric Region of 19p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan E. Eichler

    2006-08-31

    Current mapping and sequencing strategies have been inadequate within the proximal portion of 19p12 due, in part, to the presence of a recently expanded ZNF (zinc-finger) gene family and the presence of large (25-50 kb) inverted beta-satellite repeat structures which bracket this tandemly duplicated gene family. The virtual of absence of classically defined “unique” sequence within the region has hampered efforts to identify and characterize a suitable minimal tiling path of clones which can be used as templates required for finished sequencing of the region. The goal of this proposal is to develop and implement a novel sequence-anchor strategy to generate a contiguous BAC map of the most proximal portion of chromosome 19p12 for the purpose of complete sequence characterization. The target region will be an estimated 4.5 Mb of DNA extending from STS marker D19S450 (the beginning of the ZNF gene cluster) to the centromeric (alpha-satellite) junction of 19p11. The approach will entail 1) pre-selection of 19p12 BAC and cosmid clones (NIH approved library) utilizing both 19p12 -unique and 19p12-SPECIFIC repeat probes (Eichler et al., 1998); 2) the generation of a BAC/cosmid end-sequence map across the region with a density of one marker every 8kb; 3) the development of a second-generation of STS (sequence tagged sites) which will be used to identify and verify clonal overlap at the level of the sequence; 4) incorporation of these sequence-anchored overlapping clones into existing cosmid/BAC restriction maps developed at Livermore National Laboratory; and 5) validation of the organization of this region utilizing high-resolution FISH techniques (extended chromatin analysis) on monochromosomal 19 somatic cell hybrids and parental cell lines of source material. The data generated will be used in the selection of the most parsimonious tiling path of BAC clones to be sequenced as part of the JGI effort on chromosome 19 and should serve as a model for the sequence

  19. Quality Control of the Traditional Patent Medicine Yimu Wan Based on SMRT Sequencing and DNA Barcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jing; Xu, Zhichao; Xin, Tianyi; Shi, Linchun; Song, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Substandard traditional patent medicines may lead to global safety-related issues. Protecting consumers from the health risks associated with the integrity and authenticity of herbal preparations is of great concern. Of particular concern is quality control for traditional patent medicines. Here, we establish an effective approach for verifying the biological composition of traditional patent medicines based on single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing and DNA barcoding. Yimu Wan (YMW), a classical herbal prescription recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, was chosen to test the method. Two reference YMW samples were used to establish a standard method for analysis, which was then applied to three different batches of commercial YMW samples. A total of 3703 and 4810 circular-consensus sequencing (CCS) reads from two reference and three commercial YMW samples were mapped to the ITS2 and psbA-trnH regions, respectively. Moreover, comparison of intraspecific genetic distances based on SMRT sequencing data with reference data from Sanger sequencing revealed an ITS2 and psbA-trnH intergenic spacer that exhibited high intraspecific divergence, with the sites of variation showing significant differences within species. Using the CCS strategy for SMRT sequencing analysis was adequate to guarantee the accuracy of identification. This study demonstrates the application of SMRT sequencing to detect the biological ingredients of herbal preparations. SMRT sequencing provides an affordable way to monitor the legality and safety of traditional patent medicines. PMID:28620408

  20. Lymphatic filariasis control in Tanga Region, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Paul Erik; Derua, Yahya A.; Magesa, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundLymphatic filariasis (LF) control started in Tanga Region of Tanzania in 2004, with annual ivermectin/albendazole mass drug administration (MDA). Since then, the current project has monitored the effect in communities and schools in rural areas of Tanga District. In 2013, after 8 rounds...... of MDA, spot check surveys were added in the other 7 districts of Tanga Region, to assess the regional LF status.MethodsLF vector and transmission surveillance, and human cross sectional surveys in communities and schools, continued in Tanga District as previously reported. In each of the other 7......-examined for microfilariae (mf).ResultsThe downward trend in LF transmission and human infection previously reported for Tanga District continued, with prevalences after MDA 8 reaching 15.5% and 3.5% for CFA and mf in communities (decrease by 75.5% and 89.6% from baseline) and 2.3% for CFA in schoolchildren (decrease by 90...

  1. Targeted parallel sequencing of large genetically-defined genomic regions for identifying mutations in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Kun-hsiang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large-scale genetic screens in Arabidopsis are a powerful approach for molecular dissection of complex signaling networks. However, map-based cloning can be time-consuming or even hampered due to low chromosomal recombination. Current strategies using next generation sequencing for molecular identification of mutations require whole genome sequencing and advanced computational devises and skills, which are not readily accessible or affordable to every laboratory. We have developed a streamlined method using parallel massive sequencing for mutant identification in which only targeted regions are sequenced. This targeted parallel sequencing (TPSeq method is more cost-effective, straightforward enough to be easily done without specialized bioinformatics expertise, and reliable for identifying multiple mutations simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate its use by identifying three novel nitrate-signaling mutants in Arabidopsis.

  2. Taxonomy and phylogeny of the genus citrus based on the nuclear ribosomal dna its region sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.L.

    2015-01-01

    The genus Citrus (Aurantioideae, Rutaceae) is the sole source of the citrus fruits of commerce showing high economic values. In this study, the taxonomy and phylogeny of Citrus species is evaluated using sequence analysis of the ITS region of nrDNA. This study is based on 26 plants materials belonging to 22 Citrus species having wild, domesticated, and cultivated species. Through DNA alignment of the ITS sequence, ITS1 and ITS2 regions showed relatively high variations of sequence length and nucleotide among these Citrus species. According to previous six-tribe discrimination theory by Swingle and Reece, the grouping in our ITS phylogenetic tree reconstructed by ITS sequences was not related to tribe discrimination but species discrimination. However, the molecular analysis could provide more information on citrus taxonomy. Combined with ITS sequences of other subgenera in then true citrus fruit tree group, the ITS phylogenetic tree indicated subgenera Citrus was monophyletic and nearer to Fortunella, Poncirus, and Clymenia compared to Microcitrus and Eremocitrus. Abundant sequence variations of the ITS region shown in this study would help species identification and tribe differentiation of the genus Citrus. (author)

  3. Multi-region and single-cell sequencing reveal variable genomic heterogeneity in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingshan; Liu, Yang; Di, Jiabo; Su, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Beihai; Wang, Zaozao; Zhuang, Meng; Bai, Fan; Su, Xiangqian

    2017-11-23

    Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with complex molecular subtypes. While colon cancer has been widely investigated, studies on rectal cancer are very limited. Here, we performed multi-region whole-exome sequencing and single-cell whole-genome sequencing to examine the genomic intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) of rectal tumors. We sequenced nine tumor regions and 88 single cells from two rectal cancer patients with tumors of the same molecular classification and characterized their mutation profiles and somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) at the multi-region and the single-cell levels. A variable extent of genomic heterogeneity was observed between the two patients, and the degree of ITH increased when analyzed on the single-cell level. We found that major SCNAs were early events in cancer development and inherited steadily. Single-cell sequencing revealed mutations and SCNAs which were hidden in bulk sequencing. In summary, we studied the ITH of rectal cancer at regional and single-cell resolution and demonstrated that variable heterogeneity existed in two patients. The mutational scenarios and SCNA profiles of two patients with treatment naïve from the same molecular subtype are quite different. Our results suggest each tumor possesses its own architecture, which may result in different diagnosis, prognosis, and drug responses. Remarkable ITH exists in the two patients we have studied, providing a preliminary impression of ITH in rectal cancer.

  4. Prediction of flexible/rigid regions from protein sequences using k-spaced amino acid pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Jishou

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditionally, it is believed that the native structure of a protein corresponds to a global minimum of its free energy. However, with the growing number of known tertiary (3D protein structures, researchers have discovered that some proteins can alter their structures in response to a change in their surroundings or with the help of other proteins or ligands. Such structural shifts play a crucial role with respect to the protein function. To this end, we propose a machine learning method for the prediction of the flexible/rigid regions of proteins (referred to as FlexRP; the method is based on a novel sequence representation and feature selection. Knowledge of the flexible/rigid regions may provide insights into the protein folding process and the 3D structure prediction. Results The flexible/rigid regions were defined based on a dataset, which includes protein sequences that have multiple experimental structures, and which was previously used to study the structural conservation of proteins. Sequences drawn from this dataset were represented based on feature sets that were proposed in prior research, such as PSI-BLAST profiles, composition vector and binary sequence encoding, and a newly proposed representation based on frequencies of k-spaced amino acid pairs. These representations were processed by feature selection to reduce the dimensionality. Several machine learning methods for the prediction of flexible/rigid regions and two recently proposed methods for the prediction of conformational changes and unstructured regions were compared with the proposed method. The FlexRP method, which applies Logistic Regression and collocation-based representation with 95 features, obtained 79.5% accuracy. The two runner-up methods, which apply the same sequence representation and Support Vector Machines (SVM and Naïve Bayes classifiers, obtained 79.2% and 78.4% accuracy, respectively. The remaining considered methods are

  5. Sequence Controlled Polymers from a Novel β-Cyclodextrin Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdouni, Yamin; Yilmaz, Gökhan; Becer, C Remzi

    2017-12-01

    In this work the synthesis and use of a novel β-cyclodextrin-based single electron transfer-living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) initiator are reported. Three different approaches toward the synthesis of this initiator, based on several "click"-like reactions (copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition, nucleophilic thiol-ene reaction, and radical thiol-ene reaction), are explored and discussed. Synthesis via radical thiol-ene proves to be most successful in achieving this. The β-cyclodextrin-based initiator is subsequently used for the polymerization of several acrylates in a controlled fashion, yielding 7-arm multiblock copolymers. The achieved sequence-controlled polymers exhibit low dispersities (≤1.12) and are completed under 6.5 h at high monomer conversion (≥95%) for each block. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. LUM Smoother with Smooth Control for Noisy Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukàč Rastislav

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on adaptive structure of LUM (lower-upper-middle smoothers for noisy image sequences. For the balance between noise suppression and signal-detail preservation, the LUM smoothers are widely used in smoothing applications. The amount of smoothing done by LUM smoothers is controlled by tuning parameter. However, the smoothing level is fixed for whole image. Thus, the excessive or insufficient smoothing can be performed. This problem is solved by a new method based on the adaptive controlled level of smoothing. A new method has excellent performance of the noise reduction in the environments corrupted by the impulse noise. In addition, minimal signal-detail and motion blurring can be observed. The performance of proposed method is evaluated through objective criteria and compared with traditional temporal, spatial, and spatiotemporal LUM smoothers.

  7. Sequencing batch-reactor control using Gaussian-process models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocijan, Juš; Hvala, Nadja

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a Gaussian-process (GP) model for the design of sequencing batch-reactor (SBR) control for wastewater treatment. The GP model is a probabilistic, nonparametric model with uncertainty predictions. In the case of SBR control, it is used for the on-line optimisation of the batch-phases duration. The control algorithm follows the course of the indirect process variables (pH, redox potential and dissolved oxygen concentration) and recognises the characteristic patterns in their time profile. The control algorithm uses GP-based regression to smooth the signals and GP-based classification for the pattern recognition. When tested on the signals from an SBR laboratory pilot plant, the control algorithm provided a satisfactory agreement between the proposed completion times and the actual termination times of the biodegradation processes. In a set of tested batches the final ammonia and nitrate concentrations were below 1 and 0.5 mg L(-1), respectively, while the aeration time was shortened considerably. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Woodsmoke control in the Puget Sound region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maykut, N.N.; Fry, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Puget Sound Air Pollution Control Agency (PSAPCA) is responsible for managing the air quality in four counties in western Washington State. Woodsmoke has been identified as one of the major air quality problems in this area. Woodsmoke control strategies adopted to date have been associated with decreasing levels of particulates, especially in residential areas. Implementation of the woodstove strategies appears to be at least partially responsible for the absence of wintertime PM 10 violations in the region's PM 10 nonattainment areas over the past three years. The most effective of these control strategies have been: (1) curtailment of woodstove use during air stagnation events; and (2) public education. However, because woodsmoke is a very toxic mixture, both the long-term cancer risk and respiratory health effects are of concern at levels well below the PM 10 standard. Because of these concerns, additional research has been initiated to evaluate the public risk from woodsmoke, new strategies developed to reduce the impact from this source, and the educational program to enlighten the public on the health effects of woodsmoke has been strengthened. This paper will describe the woodsmoke control strategies which have been implemented and concurrent air quality trends. Recent and proposed research on the health effects of woodsmoke and the Agency's woodsmoke education program will also be discussed

  9. Nucleotide sequence database comparison for Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 genetic region DNA barcode dermatophyte routine identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, A C; Packeu, A; Cassagne, C; Hendrickx, M; Ranque, S; Piarroux, R

    2018-02-28

    Conventional dermatophyte identification is based on morphological features. However, recent studies have proposed to use the nucleotide sequences of the rRNA ITS region as an identification barcode of all fungi, including dermatophytes. Several nucleotide databases are available to compare sequences and thus identify isolates; however, these databases often contain mislabeled sequences that impair sequence-based identification.We evaluated five of these databases on a clinical isolate panel. We selected 292 clinical dermatophyte strains that were prospectively subjected to ITS2 nucleotide sequence analysis. Sequences were analyzed against the databases, and the results were compared to clusters obtained via DNA alignment of sequence segments. The DNA tree served as the identification standard throughout the study.According to the ITS2 sequence identification, the majority of strains (255/292) belonged to the genus Trichophyton , mainly T. rubrum complex (n=184), T. interdigitale (n=40), T. tonsurans (n=26) and T. benhamiae (n=5). Other genera included Microsporum (e.g., M canis (n=21), M. audouinii (n=10) and Nannizzia gypseum (n=3), and Epidermophyton (n=3)). Species-level identification of T. rubrum complex isolates was an issue.Overall, ITS DNA sequencing is a reliable tool to identify dermatophyte species given that a comprehensive and correctly-labeled database is consulted. As many inaccurate identification results exist in the DNA databases used for this study, reference databases must be verified frequently and amended in line with the current revisions of fungal taxonomy. Before describing a new species or adding a new DNA reference to the available databases, its position in the phylogenetic tree must be verified. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Organization and variation of the mitochondrial control region in two vulture species, Gypaetus barbatus and Neophron percnopterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, S; Godoy, J A; Negro, J J; Hiraldo, F

    2004-01-01

    We report the first entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences in two endangered vulture species, the bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) and the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus). Results showed that the general organization of vulture control regions was very similar to other birds, with three distinct domains: a left variable domain (DI), a central conserved one (DII) including the F, E, D, and C boxes, and a right domain (DIII) containing the CSB1 sequence. However, due to the presence of long tandem repeats, vulture control regions differed from other avian control regions both in size and nucleotide composition. The Egyptian vulture control region was found to be the largest sequenced so far (2031 bp), due to the simultaneous presence of repeats in both DI (80 bp) and DIII (77 bp). Low variation was found in vulture control regions, particularly in G. barbatus, as the probable result of populations declines in the last few centuries.

  11. Cellular specificity of HIV-1 replication can be controlled by LTR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed-Inderbitzin, Edward; Maury, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    Two well-established determinants of retroviral tropism are envelope sequences that regulate entry and LTR sequences that can regulate viral expression in a cell-specific manner. Studies with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) have demonstrated that tropism of this virus maps primarily to variable envelope sequences. Studies have demonstrated that T cell and macrophage-specific transcription factor binding motifs exist in the upstream region of the LTR U3; however, the ability of the core enhancer/promoter proximal elements (two NF-κB and three Sp1 sites) to function well in macrophages and T cells have led many to conclude that HIV LTR sequences are not primary determinants of HIV tropism. To determine if cellular specificity could be imparted to HIV by the core enhancer elements, the enhancer/promoter proximal region of the HIV LTR was substituted with motifs that control gene expression in a myeloid-specific manner. The enhancer region from equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) when substituted for the HIV enhancer/promoter proximal region was found to drive expression in a macrophage-specific manner and was responsive to HIV Tat. The addition of a 5' methylation-dependent binding site (MDBP) and a promoter proximal Sp1 motif increased expression without altering cellular specificity. Spacing between the promoter proximal region and the TATA box was also found to influence LTR activity. Infectivity studies using chimeric LTRs within the context of a dual-tropic infectious molecular clone established that these LTRs directed HIV replication and production of infectious virions in macrophages but not primary T cells or T cell lines. This investigation demonstrates that cellular specificity can be imparted onto HIV-1 replication at the level of viral transcription and not entry

  12. Sequence characterization of hypervariable regions in the soybean genome: leucine-rich repeats and simple sequence repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo G. de Barros

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of cultivated soybean is rather narrow. This observation has been confirmed by analysis of agronomic traits among different genotypes, and more recently by the use of molecular markers. During the construction of an RFLP soybean map (Glycine soja x Glycine max the two progenitors were analyzed with over 2,000 probes, of which 25% were polymorphic. Among the probes that revealed polymorphisms, a small proportion, about 0.5%, hybridized to regions that were highly polymorphic. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of five of these probes. Three of the five contain segments that encode leucine-rich repeat (LRR sequence homologous to known disease resistance genes in plants. Two other probes are relatively AT-rich and contain segments of (An/(Tn. DNA segments corresponding to one of the probes (A45-10 were amplified from nine soybean genotypes. Partial sequencing of these amplicons suggests that deletions and/or insertions are responsible for the extensive polymorphism observed. We propose that genes encoding LRR proteins and simple sequence repeat region prone to slippage are some of the most hypervariable regions of the soybean genome.A base genética da soja cultivada é relativamente estreita. Essa observação foi confirmada por análises de características agronômicas entre diferentes genótipos e, mais recentemente, pelo uso de marcadores moleculares. Durante a construção de um mapa de RFLP da soja (Glycine soja x Glycine max, os dois progenitores foram analisados com mais de 2000 sondas, das quais 25% eram polimórficas. Entre as sondas que revelaram polimorfismos, uma pequena proporção, cerca de 0,5%, hibridizou com regiões que eram altamente polimórficas. Neste trabalho, são apresentados o seqüenciamento e análise de cinco dessas sondas. Três dessas sondas contêm segmentos que codificam repetições ricas em leucina que são homólogas a genes de resistência a doenças já conhecidos em plantas. As duas

  13. [Identification of mutations associated with coronary artery lesion susceptibility in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D Y; Song, S R; Xie, L J; Qiu, F; Yang, J; Xiao, T T; Huang, M

    2017-07-02

    Objective: To screen and identify the mutations in Kawasaki disease by targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technique and investigate susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion. Method: This was a case-control study.A total of 114 patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease treated in Shanghai Children's Hospital between December 2015 and November 2016 were studied and another 45 healthy children who were physically examined in outpatient department were enrolled as control group. Patients were divided into two groups based on the results of echocardiogram. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from patients and controls. Genomic DNA was extracted. SeqCap EZ Choice libraries were prepared by targeted enrichment of genomic region technology. Then the libraries were sequenced to identify susceptibility genes associated with coronary artery lesion in patients diagnosed as Kawasaki disease.Susceptible genes were identified by Burden test, Pearson chi-square test or Fisher's exact probability test. Result: There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF11B(rs2073618)G>C(p.N3K)mutation and GG/GC/CC genotype between Kawasaki disease group and control group(χ(2)=15.52, P =0.00). There was statistically significant difference in TNFRSF13B(rs34562254)C>T(p.P251L)mutation(χ(2)=10.40, P =0.01)and LEFTY1(rs360057)T>G(p.D322A)mutation(χ(2)=8.505, P =0.01)between patients with coronary artery lesions and those without. Conclusion: Targeted enrichment of genomic region sequencing technology can be used to do primary screening for the susceptible genes associated with coronary artery lesions in Chinese Kawasaki patients and may provide theoretical basis for larger sample investigation of risk prediction score standard in Kawasaki disease.

  14. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  15. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-10-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  16. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Qian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  17. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  18. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Frimodt-Møller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony.

  19. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Pholis fangi and its phylogenetic implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Dianrong; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of Pholis fangi was amplified via polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing. The length of the mtDNA CR consensus sequence of P. fangi was 853 bp in length. In accordance with the recognition sites as were previously reported in fish species, the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi can be divided into 3 domains, i.e., the extended terminal associated sequence (ETAS), the central conserved sequence block (CSB), and the CSB domain. In addition, the following structures were identified in the mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi: 2 ETASs in the ETAS domain (TAS and cTAS), 6 CSBs in the central CSB domain (CSB-F to CSB-A), and 3 CSBs in the CSB domain (CSB-1 to CSB-3). These demonstrated that the structure of the mtDNA CR of P. fangi was substantially different from those of most other fish species. The mtDNA CR sequence of P. fangi contained one conserved region from 656 bp to 815 bp. Similar to most other fish species, P. fangi has no tandem repeat sequences in its mtDNA CR sequence. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete mtDNA CR sequences showed that there were no genetic differences within P. fangi populations of the same geographical origin and between P. fangi populations of different geographical origins.

  20. Identification of minority resistance mutations in the HIV-1 integrase coding region using next generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonager, Jannik; Larsson, Jonas T; Hussing, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current widely applied standard method to screen for HIV-1 genotypic resistance is based on Sanger population sequencing (Sseq), which does not allow for the identification of minority variants (MVs) below the limit of detection for the Sseq-method in patients receiving integrase...... strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTI). Next generation sequencing (NGS) has facilitated the detection of MVs at a much deeper level than Sseq. OBJECTIVES: Here, we compared Illumina MiSeq and Sseq approaches to evaluate the detection of MVs involved in resistance to the three commonly used INSTI......: raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG) and dolutegravir (DTG). STUDY DESIGN: NGS and Sseq were used to analyze RT-PCR products of the HIV-1 integrase coding region from six patients and in serial samples from two patients. NGS sequences were assembled and analyzed using the low frequency variant detection...

  1. WeederH: an algorithm for finding conserved regulatory motifs and regions in homologous sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesole Graziano

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work addresses the problem of detecting conserved transcription factor binding sites and in general regulatory regions through the analysis of sequences from homologous genes, an approach that is becoming more and more widely used given the ever increasing amount of genomic data available. Results We present an algorithm that identifies conserved transcription factor binding sites in a given sequence by comparing it to one or more homologs, adapting a framework we previously introduced for the discovery of sites in sequences from co-regulated genes. Differently from the most commonly used methods, the approach we present does not need or compute an alignment of the sequences investigated, nor resorts to descriptors of the binding specificity of known transcription factors. The main novel idea we introduce is a relative measure of conservation, assuming that true functional elements should present a higher level of conservation with respect to the rest of the sequence surrounding them. We present tests where we applied the algorithm to the identification of conserved annotated sites in homologous promoters, as well as in distal regions like enhancers. Conclusion Results of the tests show how the algorithm can provide fast and reliable predictions of conserved transcription factor binding sites regulating the transcription of a gene, with better performances than other available methods for the same task. We also show examples on how the algorithm can be successfully employed when promoter annotations of the genes investigated are missing, or when regulatory sites and regions are located far away from the genes.

  2. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region in adenovirus 5 DNA involved in cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of investigations into the primary structure of the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The phenomenon of cell transformation is discussed in general terms and the principles of a number of fairly recent techniques, which have been in use for DNA sequence determination since 1975 are dealt with. A few of the author's own techniques are described which deal both with nucleotide sequence analysis and with the determination of DNA cleavage sites of restriction endonucleases. The results are given of the mapping of cleavage sites in the HpaI-E fragment of adenovirus DNA of HpaII, HaeIII, AluI, HinfI and TaqI and of the determination of the nucleotide sequence in the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The results of the sequence determination of the Ad5 HindIII-G fragment are discussed in relation with the investigation on the transforming proteins isolated from in vitro and in vivo synthesizing systems. Labelling procedures of DNA are described including the exonuclease III/DNA polymerase 1 method and TA polynucleotide kinase labelling of DNA fragments. (Auth.)

  3. [Nucleotide sequence of HLA-DQA1 promoter region (QAP) in a lung cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, C; Zhou, W; Song, C

    1996-06-01

    The HLA-DQA1 allele and nucleotide sequence of HLA-DQA1 promoter region (QAP) in a patient with IDDM complicated lung cancer have been identified by PCR/SSCP, PCR/SSCP and PCR/sequencing. The results showed that: (1) All of the lung cancer patient and his family members carried HLA-DQA1* 0301/0501 alleles. (2) a single base substitution G-->A at position -155 and deletion CAA at position -161 to -163 occurred in the patient. These results suggest that the mutation of HLA-DQA1 promoter region may modulate HLA-DQA1 gene expression by trans-acting factors binding to variant cis-acting elements and may be responsible for pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  4. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Copy-number variations (CNV, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, and uniparental disomy (UPD are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS, is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs. In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  5. Polymorphic sequence in the ND3 region of Java endemic Ploceidae birds mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. SUSANTI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Susanti R (2011 Polymorphic sequence in the ND3 region of Java endemic Ploceidae birds mitochondrial DNA. Biodiversitas 12: 70-75. As part of biodiversity, Ploceidae bird family must be kept away from extinction and degradation of gene-diversity. This research was aimed to analyze ND3 gene from mitochondrial DNA of Java Island endemic of Ploceidae bird. Each species of Ploceidae birds family was identified based on their morphological character, then the blood sample was taken from the birds nail vein. DNA was isolated from blood using Dixit method. Fragment of ND3 gene was amplified using PCR method with specific primer pairs and sequenced using dideoxy termination method with ABI automatic sequencer. Multiple alignment of ND3 nucleotide sequences were analyzed using ClustalW of MEGA-3.1 program. Estimation of genetic distance and phylogenetic tree construction were analyzed with Neighbor-Joining method and calculation of distance matrix with Kimura 2 –parameter. The result of Java Island endemic of Ploceidae bird family exploration showed that Erythrura hyperythra and Lonchura ferruginosa can not be found anymore in nature, but the Lonchura malacca that are not actually Java island endemic was also found. Nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial ND3 gene of Ploceidae bird family showed a quite high polymorphism, with 122 substitutions from 334 nucleotides analyzed. Phylogenetic tree of nucleotide sequence of Ploceidae bird family formed 2 clusters. One cluster consisted of the Ploceus hypoxanthus, Ploceus philippinus, Ploceus manyar and Passer montanus, and the others species were included in the second cluster. ND3 gene sequence data from this Ploceidae family need to be analyzed further to see possible relationship with a particular phenotype.

  6. Structure and variation of the Fringillidae (Aves: Passeriformes) mitochondrial DNA control region and their phylogenetic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zuhao; Shen, Yamin; Ma, Yurong

    2017-11-01

    The control region is the major noncoding segment of animal mitochondrial DNA. To infer the structure and variation of Fringillidae mitochondrial DNA control region, the entire control region sequences of 25 species were analyzed. The length of the control region sequences was very conserved (1230 ± 18) and can be separated into three domains. The frequency of both substitutions and gaps was highest in the third domain and lowest in the central region. The control region has the same flanking gene order from tRNA Glu to tRNA Phe . Genetic distances between species ranged from 1.80% (between Carduelis pinus and Carduelis spinus) to 25.34% (between Carduelis sinica and Coccothraustes vespertinus). The average genetic distances among the species within the genera varied from 5.11% (Leucosticte) to 14.31% (Carpodacus). The average genetic distances showed insignificantly negative correlation with ts/tv. Domain III is the most variable of the three domains among all the genera. The control region of Fringillidae contains a putative TAS element and the highly conserved CSB-1, and F, E, D, C boxes. However, neither CSB-2 nor CSB-3 could be unambiguously identified in the Fringillidae. The maximum likelihood method was used to construct a phylogenetic tree. Control region analysis demonstrated that some currently recognized genera may be polyphyletic, including Carpodacus, Carduelis and Serinus.

  7. Evaluation of flaA short variable region sequencing, multilocus sequence typing and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for discrimination between Campylobacter jejuni strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Bonnichsen, Lise; Larsson, Jonas T.

    2012-01-01

    Discriminatory and robust typing methods are needed to improve the understanding of the dynamics of food-borne Campylobacter infections and epidemiology in primary animal production. To evaluate the strain discriminatory potential of typing methods, flaA short variable region (SVR) sequencing...... sequencing, were further subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST). It was found that flaA SVR sequencing had a slightly higher discriminatory power than FTIR spectroscopy, based on the Simpson diversity index. The clustering of strains indicated that FTIR spectroscopy is indeed a suitable method...

  8. Coding and spacer sequences in the 5.8S-2S region of Sciara coprophila ribosomal DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, B R; Latil-Damotte, M; Jourdan, R

    1980-01-01

    The sequence of 436 nucleotides around the region coding for 5.8S RNA in the Sciara coprophila rDNA transcription unit (1) has been determined. Regions coding for 5.8S and 2S RNAs have been identified; they are 80 - 90% homologous to the corresponding Drosophila sequences and are separated by a 22 nucleotide long spacer. This sequence as well as the two before the 5.8 and after the 2S coding region are very different from the corresponding Drosophila sequences. The main features reported in t...

  9. Controlling the bond scission sequence of oxygenates for energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottlemyer, Alan L.

    intermediates was observed on the Pt and Pt/WC surfaces. For CH3OH decomposition, DFT calculations suggested that the bond scission sequence could be controlled using monolayer coverage of Pt on WC. The Ni/Pt bimetallic system was studied as an example for using oxygenates as a hydrogen source. There are two well characterized surface structures for the Ni/Pt system: the surface configuration, in which the Ni atoms reside primarily on the surface of the Pt bulk, and the subsurface configuration, in which the second atomic layer is enriched in Ni atoms and the surface is enriched in Pt atoms. These configurations are denoted NiPtPt and PtNiPt, respectively. DFT results revealed that trends established for the Ni/Pt(111) system extend to the Ni/Pt(100) analogue. TPD studies revealed that the NiPtPt surface was more active for oxygenate reforming than the Pt or PtNiPt surfaces. HREELS confirmed the presence of strongly bound reaction intermediates, including aldehyde-like species, and suggested that the first decomposition step was likely O-H bond scission. Thus, the binding energies of the deprotonated reaction intermediates are important parameters in controlling the decomposition pathways of oxygenates. These studies have demonstrated that the bond scission sequence of oxygenate decomposition can be controlled using bimetallic and transition metal carbide catalysts. While this study has focused on oxygenate decomposition for energy applications, the principles and methodology applied herein are universally applicable to the development of novel and marketable value-added products. The value in such a methodology is in the combination of both calculations to predict catalytic and chemical properties, and experiments to fine-tune theoretical predictions.

  10. DNA Barcoding: Amplification and sequence analysis of rbcl and matK genome regions in three divergent plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Iqbal Wattoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA barcoding is a novel method of species identification based on nucleotide diversity of conserved sequences. The establishment and refining of plant DNA barcoding systems is more challenging due to high genetic diversity among different species. Therefore, targeting the conserved nuclear transcribed regions would be more reliable for plant scientists to reveal genetic diversity, species discrimination and phylogeny. Methods: In this study, we amplified and sequenced the chloroplast DNA regions (matk+rbcl of Solanum nigrum, Euphorbia helioscopia and Dalbergia sissoo to study the functional annotation, homology modeling and sequence analysis to allow a more efficient utilization of these sequences among different plant species. These three species represent three families; Solanaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Fabaceae respectively. Biological sequence homology and divergence of amplified sequences was studied using Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST. Results: Both primers (matk+rbcl showed good amplification in three species. The sequenced regions reveled conserved genome information for future identification of different medicinal plants belonging to these species. The amplified conserved barcodes revealed different levels of biological homology after sequence analysis. The results clearly showed that the use of these conserved DNA sequences as barcode primers would be an accurate way for species identification and discrimination. Conclusion: The amplification and sequencing of conserved genome regions identified a novel sequence of matK in native species of Solanum nigrum. The findings of the study would be applicable in medicinal industry to establish DNA based identification of different medicinal plant species to monitor adulteration.

  11. Sequences in the 5′ Nontranslated Region of Hepatitis C Virus Required for RNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebe, Peter; Lohmann, Volker; Krieger, Nicole; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2001-01-01

    Sequences in the 5′ and 3′ termini of plus-strand RNA viruses harbor cis-acting elements important for efficient translation and replication. In case of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a plus-strand RNA virus of the family Flaviviridae, a 341-nucleotide-long nontranslated region (NTR) is located at the 5′ end of the genome. This sequence contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is located downstream of an about 40-nucleotide-long sequence of unknown function. By using our recently developed HCV replicon system, we mapped and characterized the sequences in the 5′ NTR required for RNA replication. We show that deletions introduced into the 5′ terminal 40 nucleotides abolished RNA replication but only moderately affected translation. By generating a series of replicons with HCV-poliovirus (PV) chimeric 5′ NTRs, we could show that the first 125 nucleotides of the HCV genome are essential and sufficient for RNA replication. However, the efficiency could be tremendously increased upon the addition of the complete HCV 5′ NTR. These data show that (i) sequences upstream of the HCV IRES are essential for RNA replication, (ii) the first 125 nucleotides of the HCV 5′ NTR are sufficient for RNA replication, but such replicon molecules are severely impaired for multiplication, and (iii) high-level HCV replication requires sequences located within the IRES. These data provide the first identification of signals in the 5′ NTR of HCV RNA essential for replication of this virus. PMID:11711595

  12. Region 5 Toxic Substances Control Act Producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This dataset represents the query results from the Envirofacts database for facilities known as Chemical Manufacturers, Processors and Formulators (MPFs) with TSCA identification numbers located in Region 5.

  13. Sequence analysis of mtDNA COI barcode region revealed three haplotypes within Culex pipiens assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koosha, Mona; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Vatandoost, Hassan; Azari-Hamidian, Shahyad; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Mohtarami, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Members of the Culex (Culex) pipiens assemblage are known vectors of deadly encephalitides, periodic filariasis, and West Nile virus throughout the world. However, members of this assemblage are morphologically indistinguishable or hard to distinguish and play distinct roles in transmission of the diseases. The current study aimed to provide further evidence on utility of the two most popular nuclear (ITS2-rDNA) and mitochondrial (COI barcode region) genetic markers to identify members of the assemblage. Culex pipiens assemblage specimens from different climate zones of Iran were collected and identified to species level based on morphological characteristics. Nucleotide sequences of the loci for the specimens plus available data in the GenBank were analyzed to find species specific genetic structures useful for diagnosis purposes. ITS2 region was highly divergent within species or populations suggesting lack of consistency as a reliable molecular marker. In contrast, sequence analysis of 710 bp of COI gene revealed three fixed haplotypes named here "C, T, H" within the assemblage which can be distinguished by HaeIII and AluI enzymes. There were a correlation between the haplotypes and the world climate regions, where the haplotypes H/T and C are present mainly in temperate and tropical regions of the world, respectively. In the New world, Australia, and Japan only haplotype H is found. In conjunction between tropical and temperate regions such Iran, China, and Turkey, a mix of C/H or C/H/T are present. Although, the haplotypes are not strictly species-specific, however, Cx. quinquefasciatus was mainly of haplotype C. Due to the lack of mating barrier and questionable taxonomic situation of the complex members, the mentioned haplotypes in combination with other morphological and molecular characters might be used to address the genetic structure of the studied populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic diversity in the mtDNA control region and population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the genetic structure and phylogeographical patterns of Sardinella zunasi in Northwestern Pacific. The mitochondrial DNA control region was sequenced for 77 individuals of S.zunasi from four localities over most of the species range. A total of 215 polymorphic sites (72 parsimony informative) and 69 ...

  15. Sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) analysis on DNA from the three medicinal Echinacea species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Barbara; Chicca, Andrea; Martinotti, Enrica; Breschi, Maria C; Nieri, Paola

    2007-01-01

    In our previous study, RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA) analysis revealed species-specific markers for three medicinal Echinacea species (Asteraceae): E. angustifolia DC., E. pallida (Nutt.) Nutt. and E. purpurea (L.) Moench. In the present work, we have converted a RAPD marker (750 bp) for E. purpurea into a SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region) marker. SCAR-PCR, in fact, revealed the expected amplicon (330 bp) only in E. purpurea and not in the other two species, giving further evidence for differences in medicinal Echinacea spp. genome and confirming a greater similarity between E. pallida and angustifolia.

  16. Evaluation of sequence motifs found in scaffold/matrix-attached regions (S/MARs)

    OpenAIRE

    Liebich, I.; Bode, J.; Reuter, I.; Wingender, E.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the contents of the database S/MARt DB, the most comprehensive data collection of scaffold/matrix-attached regions (S/MARs) publicly available thus far, we initiated a systematic evaluation of the stored data. By analyzing the 245 S/MAR sequences presently described in this database, we found that the S/MARs contained in this collection are generally AT-rich, with certain significant exceptions. Comparative analyses showed that most of the AT-rich motifs which were found to be enrich...

  17. Whole genome sequencing and annotation of halophilic Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 isolated from the coastal region of Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Mevada

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 is a halophilic bacterium isolated from a marine water sample collected from the coastal region of Gujarat, India, from a surface water stream. Based on 16sRNA sequencing, the organism was identified as Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 (Genebank ID: KF889285. The present work was performed to determine the whole genome sequence of the organism using Ion Torrent PGM platform followed by assembly using the CLC genomics workbench and genome annotation using RAST, BASys and MaGe. The complete genome sequence was 713,204 bp identified by with second largest size for Salinicoccus sp. reported in the NCBI genome database. A total of 652 degradative pathways were identified by KEGG map analysis. Comparative genomic analysis revealed Salinicoccus sp. BAB 3246 as most highly related to Salinicoccus halodurans H3B36. Data mining identified stress response genes and operator pathway for degradation of various environmental pollutants. Annotation data and analysis indicate potential use in pollution control in industrial influent and saline environment.

  18. HYBRIDCHECK: software for the rapid detection, visualization and dating of recombinant regions in genome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ben J; van Oosterhout, Cock

    2016-03-01

    HYBRIDCHECK is a software package to visualize the recombination signal in large DNA sequence data set, and it can be used to analyse recombination, genetic introgression, hybridization and horizontal gene transfer. It can scan large (multiple kb) contigs and whole-genome sequences of three or more individuals. HYBRIDCHECK is written in the r software for OS X, Linux and Windows operating systems, and it has a simple graphical user interface. In addition, the r code can be readily incorporated in scripts and analysis pipelines. HYBRIDCHECK implements several ABBA-BABA tests and visualizes the effects of hybridization and the resulting mosaic-like genome structure in high-density graphics. The package also reports the following: (i) the breakpoint positions, (ii) the number of mutations in each introgressed block, (iii) the probability that the identified region is not caused by recombination and (iv) the estimated age of each recombination event. The divergence times between the donor and recombinant sequence are calculated using a JC, K80, F81, HKY or GTR correction, and the dating algorithm is exceedingly fast. By estimating the coalescence time of introgressed blocks, it is possible to distinguish between hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting. HYBRIDCHECK is libré software and it and its manual are free to download from http://ward9250.github.io/HybridCheck/. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  20. Housekeeping and tissue-specific genes differ in simple sequence repeats in the 5'-UTR region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Mark J; Zhang, Liqing

    2008-01-15

    SSRs (simple sequence repeats) have been shown to have a variety of effects on an organism. In this study, we compared SSRs in housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in human and mouse, in terms of SSR types and distributions in different regions including 5'-UTRs, introns, coding exons, 3'-UTRs, and upstream regions. Among all these regions, SSRs in the 5'-UTR show the most distinction between housekeeping genes and tissue-specific genes in both densities and repeat types. Specifically, SSR densities in 5'-UTRs in housekeeping genes are about 1.7 times higher than those in tissue-specific genes, in contrast to the 0.8-1.2 times differences between the two classes of genes in other regions. Tri-SSRs in 5'-UTRs of housekeeping genes are more GC rich than those of tissue-specific genes and CGG, the dominant type of tri-SSR in 5'-UTR, accounts for 74-79% of the tri-SSRs in housekeeping genes, as compared to 42-57% in tissue-specific genes. 75% of the tri-SSRs in the 5'-UTR of housekeeping genes have 4-5 repeat units, versus the 86-90% in tissue-specific genes. Taken together, our results suggest that SSRs may have an effect on gene expression and may play an important role in contributing to the different expression profiles between housekeeping and tissue-specific genes.

  1. Regional Controller | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Identifies, assesses and manages financial and administrative risks together with officers responsible for projects situated in the region by conducting recipient institutional assessments at key points in the project life-cycle, by giving advice to recipients and, where warranted, by organizing training for recipients in the area of ...

  2. The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaletsky, Helen; Kuroda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Minx, Patrick J.; Cordum, Holland S.; Hillier, LaDeana; Brown, Laura G.; Repping, Sjoerd; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Ali, Johar; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Chinwalla, Asif; Delehaunty, Andrew; Delehaunty, Kim; Du, Hui; Fewell, Ginger; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Graves, Tina; Hou, Shun-Fang; Latrielle, Philip; Leonard, Shawn; Mardis, Elaine; Maupin, Rachel; McPherson, John; Miner, Tracie; Nash, William; Nguyen, Christine; Ozersky, Philip; Pepin, Kymberlie; Rock, Susan; Rohlfing, Tracy; Scott, Kelsi; Schultz, Brian; Strong, Cindy; Tin-Wollam, Aye; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes

  3. Draft genome sequences of three virulent Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophages isolated from the dairy environment in the Veneto region of Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duarte, Viní­cius da Silva; Giaretta, Sabrina; Treu, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus, a very important dairy species, is constantly threatened by phage infection. We report the genome sequences of three S. thermophilus bacteriophages isolated from a dairy environment in the Veneto region of Italy. These sequences will be used for the development of new...

  4. Sequencing and association analysis of the type 1 diabetes – linked region on chromosome 10p12-q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barratt Bryan J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to locate susceptibility genes for type 1 diabetes (T1D several genome-wide linkage scans have been undertaken. A chromosomal region designated IDDM10 retained genome-wide significance in a combined analysis of the main linkage scans. Here, we studied sequence polymorphisms in 23 Mb on chromosome 10p12-q11, including the putative IDDM10 region, to identify genes associated with T1D. Results Initially, we resequenced the functional candidate genes, CREM and SDF1, located in this region, genotyped 13 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and found no association with T1D. We then undertook analysis of the whole 23 Mb region. We constructed and sequenced a contig tile path from two bacterial artificial clone libraries. By comparison with a clone library from an unrelated person used in the Human Genome Project, we identified 12,058 SNPs. We genotyped 303 SNPs and 25 polymorphic microsatellite markers in 765 multiplex T1D families and followed up 22 associated polymorphisms in up to 2,857 families. We found nominal evidence of association in six loci (P = 0.05 – 0.0026, located near the PAPD1 gene. Therefore, we resequenced 38.8 kb in this region, found 147 SNPs and genotyped 84 of them in the T1D families. We also tested 13 polymorphisms in the PAPD1 gene and in five other loci in 1,612 T1D patients and 1,828 controls from the UK. Overall, only the D10S193 microsatellite marker located 28 kb downstream of PAPD1 showed nominal evidence of association in both T1D families and in the case-control sample (P = 0.037 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that polymorphisms in the CREM and SDF1 genes have no major effect on T1D. The weak T1D association that we detected in the association scan near the PAPD1 gene may be either false or due to a small genuine effect, and cannot explain linkage at the IDDM10 region.

  5. Rice pseudomolecule-anchored cross-species DNA sequence alignments indicate regional genomic variation in expressed sequence conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Howard

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various methods have been developed to explore inter-genomic relationships among plant species. Here, we present a sequence similarity analysis based upon comparison of transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from five plant species and physically anchored rice coding sequences. Results A comparison of the frequency of sequence alignments, determined by MegaBLAST, between rice coding sequences in TIGR pseudomolecules and annotations vs 4.0 and comprehensive transcript-assembly and methylation-filtered databases from Lolium perenne (ryegrass, Zea mays (maize, Hordeum vulgare (barley, Glycine max (soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress was undertaken. Each rice pseudomolecule was divided into 10 segments, each containing 10% of the functionally annotated, expressed genes. This indicated a correlation between relative segment position in the rice genome and numbers of alignments with all the queried monocot and dicot plant databases. Colour-coded moving windows of 100 functionally annotated, expressed genes along each pseudomolecule were used to generate 'heat-maps'. These revealed consistent intra- and inter-pseudomolecule variation in the relative concentrations of significant alignments with the tested plant databases. Analysis of the annotations and derived putative expression patterns of rice genes from 'hot-spots' and 'cold-spots' within the heat maps indicated possible functional differences. A similar comparison relating to ancestral duplications of the rice genome indicated that duplications were often associated with 'hot-spots'. Conclusion Physical positions of expressed genes in the rice genome are correlated with the degree of conservation of similar sequences in the transcriptomes of other plant species. This relative conservation is associated with the distribution of different sized gene families and segmentally duplicated loci and may have functional and evolutionary implications.

  6. Concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions in three related seabird species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birt Tim P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many population genetic and phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA assume that mitochondrial genomes do not undergo recombination. Recently, concerted evolution of duplicated mitochondrial control regions has been documented in a range of taxa. Although the molecular mechanism that facilitates concerted evolution is unknown, all proposed mechanisms involve mtDNA recombination. Results Here, we document a duplication of a large region (cytochrome b, tRNAThr, tRNAPro, ND6, tRNAGlu and the control region in the mitochondrial genome of three related seabird species. To investigate the evolution of duplicate control regions, we sequenced both control region copies (CR1 and CR2 from 21 brown (Sula leucogaster, 21 red-footed (S. sula and 21 blue-footed boobies (S. nebouxii. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the duplicated control regions are predominantly evolving in concert; however, approximately 51 base pairs at the 5' end of CR1 and CR2 exhibited a discordant phylogenetic signal and appeared to be evolving independently. Conclusions Both the structure of the duplicated region and the conflicting phylogenetic signals are remarkably similar to a pattern found in Thalassarche albatrosses, which are united with boobies in a large clade that includes all procellariiform and most pelecaniform seabirds. Therefore we suggest that concerted evolution of duplicated control regions either is taxonomically widespread within seabirds, or that it has evolved many times.

  7. Heterogeneous regional signal control : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-12

    The goal of this project is to develop a comprehensive framework with a set of models to improve multi-modal traffic signal control, by incorporating advanced floating sensor data (e.g. GPS data, etc.) and traditional fixed sensor data (e.g. loop det...

  8. Association of genetic variations in the mitochondrial DNA control region with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falah, Masoumeh; Farhadi, Mohammad; Kamrava, Seyed Kamran; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Daneshi, Ahmad; Balali, Maryam; Asghari, Alimohamad; Houshmand, Massoud

    2017-01-01

    The prominent role of mitochondria in the generation of reactive oxygen species, cell death, and energy production contributes to the importance of this organelle in the intracellular mechanism underlying the progression of the common sensory disorder of the elderly, presbycusis. Reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression and coding region variation have frequently been reported as being associated with the development of presbycusis. The mtDNA control region regulates gene expression and replication of the genome of this organelle. To comprehensively understand of the role of mitochondria in the progression of presbycusis, we compared variations in the mtDNA control region between subjects with presbycusis and controls. A total of 58 presbycusis patients and 220 control subjects were enrolled in the study after examination by the otolaryngologist and audiology tests. Variations in the mtDNA control region were investigated by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. A total of 113 sequence variants were observed in mtDNA, and variants were detected in 100% of patients, with 84% located in hypervariable regions. The frequencies of the variants, 16,223 C>T, 16,311 T>C, 16,249 T>C, and 15,954 A>C, were significantly different between presbycusis and control subjects. The statistically significant difference in the frequencies of four nucleotide variants in the mtDNA control region of presbycusis patients and controls is in agreement with previous experimental evidence and supports the role of mitochondria in the intracellular mechanism underlying presbycusis development. Moreover, these variants have potential as diagnostic markers for individuals at a high risk of developing presbycusis. The data also suggest the possible presence of changes in the mtDNA control region in presbycusis, which could alter regulatory factor binding sites and influence mtDNA gene expression and copy number.

  9. Putative HIV and SIV G-Quadruplex Sequences in Coding and Noncoding Regions Can Form G-Quadruplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Krafčíková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The HIV virus is one of the most studied viruses in the world. This is especially true in terms of gene sequencing, and to date more than 9 thousand genomic sequences of HIV isolates have been sequenced and analyzed. In this study, a series of DNA sequences, which have the potential to form G-quadruplex structures, is analyzed. Several such sequences were found in various coding and noncoding virus domains, including the U3 LTR, tat, rev, env, and vpx regions. Interestingly, a homological sequence to the already well-known HIV integrase aptamer was identified in the minus-strand. The sequences derived from original isolates were analyzed using standard spectral and electrophoretic methods. In addition, a recently developed methodology is applied which uses induced circular dichroism spectral profiles of G-quadruplex-ligand (Thiazole Orange complexes to determine if G-rich sequences can adopt G-quadruplex structure. Targeting the G-quadruplexes or peptide domains corresponding to the G-rich coding sequence in HIV offers researchers attractive therapeutic targets which would be of particular use in the development of novel antiviral therapies. The analysis of G-rich regions can provide researchers with a path to find specific targets which could be of interest for specific types of virus.

  10. Selection of mRNA 5'-untranslated region sequence with high translation efficiency through ribosome display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mie, Masayasu; Shimizu, Shun; Takahashi, Fumio; Kobatake, Eiry

    2008-01-01

    The 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of mRNAs functions as a translation enhancer, promoting translation efficiency. Many in vitro translation systems exhibit a reduced efficiency in protein translation due to decreased translation initiation. The use of a 5'-UTR sequence with high translation efficiency greatly enhances protein production in these systems. In this study, we have developed an in vitro selection system that favors 5'-UTRs with high translation efficiency using a ribosome display technique. A 5'-UTR random library, comprised of 5'-UTRs tagged with a His-tag and Renilla luciferase (R-luc) fusion, were in vitro translated in rabbit reticulocytes. By limiting the translation period, only mRNAs with high translation efficiency were translated. During translation, mRNA, ribosome and translated R-luc with His-tag formed ternary complexes. They were collected with translated His-tag using Ni-particles. Extracted mRNA from ternary complex was amplified using RT-PCR and sequenced. Finally, 5'-UTR with high translation efficiency was obtained from random 5'-UTR library

  11. Cognitive Control Structures in the Imitation Learning of Spatial Sequences and Rhythms-An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakreida, Katrin; Higuchi, Satomi; Di Dio, Cinzia; Ziessler, Michael; Turgeon, Martine; Roberts, Neil; Vogt, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Imitation learning involves the acquisition of novel motor patterns based on action observation (AO). We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the imitation learning of spatial sequences and rhythms during AO, motor imagery (MI), and imitative execution in nonmusicians and musicians. While both tasks engaged the fronto-parietal mirror circuit, the spatial sequence task recruited posterior parietal and dorsal premotor regions more strongly. The rhythm task involved an additional network for auditory working memory. This partial dissociation supports the concept of task-specific mirror mechanisms. Two regions of cognitive control were identified: 1) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was found to be more strongly activated during MI of novel spatial sequences, which allowed us to extend the 2-level model of imitation learning by Buccino et al. (2004) to spatial sequences. 2) During imitative execution of both tasks, the posterior medial frontal cortex was robustly activated, along with the DLPFC, which suggests that both regions are involved in the cognitive control of imitation learning. The musicians' selective behavioral advantage for rhythm imitation was reflected cortically in enhanced sensory-motor processing during AO and by the absence of practice-related activation differences in DLPFC during rhythm execution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Sequences related to the ox pancreatic ribonuclease coding region in the genomic DNA of mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breukelman, H J; Beintema, J J; Confalone, E; Costanzo, C; Sasso, M P; Carsana, A; Palmieri, M; Furia, A

    1993-07-01

    Mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases form a family of homologous proteins that has been extensively investigated. The primary structures of these enzymes were used to derive phylogenetic trees. These analyses indicate that the presence of three strictly homologous enzymes in the bovine species (the pancreatic, seminal, and cerebral ribonucleases) is due to gene duplication events which occurred during the evolution of ancestral ruminants. In this paper we present evidence that confirms this finding and that suggests an overall structural conservation of the putative ribonuclease genes in ruminant species. We could also demonstrate that the sequences related to ox ribonuclease coding regions present in genomic DNA of the giraffe species are the orthologues of the bovine genes encoding the three ribonucleases mentioned above.

  13. Investment, Control of Corruption and Economic Growth in MENA region

    OpenAIRE

    Mtiraoui, Abderraouf

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to study the interaction between the control of corruption, investment and economic growth in the MENA region. Our empirical essay attempts to clarify the direct and indirect control of corruption on economic growth through investment in the period 1984-2012 in the MENA region while using the model of simultaneous equations.

  14. MRI sequences for the detection of individual lymph nodes in regional breast radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C F; van Asselen, Bram; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Cloos-van Balen, Marissa; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Bongard, Desirée; Philippens, Mariëlle E P

    2016-07-01

    In regional radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer, lymph node (LN) targets are delineated on CT, defined by anatomical boundaries. By identifying individual LNs, MRI-based delineations may reduce target volumes and thereby toxicity. We optimized MRI sequences for this purpose. Our aim was to evaluate the techniques for LN delineation in RT planning. Supine MRI was explored at 1.5 T in RT position (arms in abduction). 5 MRI techniques were optimized in 10 and evaluated in 12 healthy female volunteers. The scans included one T1 weighted (T1w), three T2 weighted (T2w) and a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) technique. Quantitative evaluation was performed by scoring LN numbers per volunteer and per scan. Qualitatively, scans were assessed on seven aspects, including LN contrast, anatomical information and insensitivity to motion during acquisition. Two T2w fast spin-echo (FSE) methods showed the highest LN numbers (median 24 axillary), high contrast, excellent fat suppression and relative insensitivity to motion during acquisition. A third T2w sequence and DWI showed significantly fewer LNs (14 and 10) and proved unsuitable due to motion sensitivity and geometrical uncertainties. T1w MRI showed an intermediate number of LNs (17), provided valuable anatomical information, but lacked LN contrast. Explicit LN imaging was achieved, in supine RT position, using MRI. Two T2w FSE techniques had the highest detection rates and were motion insensitive. T1w MRI showed anatomical information. MRI enables direct delineation of individual LNs. Our optimized MRI scans enable accurate target definition in MRI-guided regional breast RT and development of personalized treatments.

  15. Sequencing the hypervariable regions of human mitochondrial DNA using massively parallel sequencing: Enhanced data acquisition for DNA samples encountered in forensic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carey; Peters, Dixie; Warshauer, David; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA testing is a useful tool in the analysis of forensic biological evidence. In cases where nuclear DNA is damaged or limited in quantity, the higher copy number of mitochondrial genomes available in a sample can provide information about the source of a sample. Currently, Sanger-type sequencing (STS) is the primary method to develop mitochondrial DNA profiles. This method is laborious and time consuming. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can increase the amount of information obtained from mitochondrial DNA samples while improving turnaround time by decreasing the numbers of manipulations and more so by exploiting high throughput analyses to obtain interpretable results. In this study 18 buccal swabs, three different tissue samples from five individuals, and four bones samples from casework were sequenced at hypervariable regions I and II using STS and MPS. Sample enrichment for STS and MPS was PCR-based. Library preparation for MPS was performed using Nextera® XT DNA Sample Preparation Kit and sequencing was performed on the MiSeq™ (Illumina, Inc.). MPS yielded full concordance of base calls with STS results, and the newer methodology was able to resolve length heteroplasmy in homopolymeric regions. This study demonstrates short amplicon MPS of mitochondrial DNA is feasible, can provide information not possible with STS, and lays the groundwork for development of a whole genome sequencing strategy for degraded samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. swDMR: A Sliding Window Approach to Identify Differentially Methylated Regions Based on Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a widespread epigenetic modification that plays an essential role in gene expression through transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The emergence of whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS represents an important milestone in the detection of DNA methylation. Characterization of differential methylated regions (DMRs is fundamental as well for further functional analysis. In this study, we present swDMR (http://sourceforge.net/projects/swDMR/ for the comprehensive analysis of DMRs from whole genome methylation profiles by a sliding window approach. It is an integrated tool designed for WGBS data, which not only implements accessible statistical methods to perform hypothesis test adapted to two or more samples without replicates, but false discovery rate was also controlled by multiple test correction. Downstream analysis tools were also provided, including cluster, annotation and visualization modules. In summary, based on WGBS data, swDMR can produce abundant information of differential methylated regions. As a convenient and flexible tool, we believe swDMR will bring us closer to unveil the potential functional regions involved in epigenetic regulation.

  17. Rapid profiling of the antigen regions recognized by serum antibodies using massively parallel sequencing of antigen-specific libraries.

    KAUST Repository

    Domina, Maria

    2014-12-04

    There is a need for techniques capable of identifying the antigenic epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibody responses during deliberate or natural immunization. Although successful, traditional phage library screening is laborious and can map only some of the epitopes. To accelerate and improve epitope identification, we have employed massive sequencing of phage-displayed antigen-specific libraries using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This enabled us to precisely identify the regions of a model antigen, the meningococcal NadA virulence factor, targeted by serum antibodies in vaccinated individuals and to rank hundreds of antigenic fragments according to their immunoreactivity. We found that next generation sequencing can significantly empower the analysis of antigen-specific libraries by allowing simultaneous processing of dozens of library/serum combinations in less than two days, including the time required for antibody-mediated library selection. Moreover, compared with traditional plaque picking, the new technology (named Phage-based Representation OF Immuno-Ligand Epitope Repertoire or PROFILER) provides superior resolution in epitope identification. PROFILER seems ideally suited to streamline and guide rational antigen design, adjuvant selection, and quality control of newly produced vaccines. Furthermore, this method is also susceptible to find important applications in other fields covered by traditional quantitative serology.

  18. Identification of genomic regions associated with female fertility in Danish Jersey using whole genome sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höglund, Johanna; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Lund, Mogens Sandø

    2015-01-01

    (AIS), 56-day non-return rate (NRR), number of days from first to last insemination (IFL), and number of days between calving and first insemination (ICF). The objective of this study was to identify associations between sequence variants and fertility traits in Jersey cattle based on 1,225 Jersey...... quantitative trait locus regions were re-analyzed using a linear mixed model (animal model) for both FTI and its component traits AIS, NRR, IFL and ICF. The underlying traits were analyzed separately for heifers (first parity cows) and cows (later parity cows) for AIS, NRR, and IFL. Results: In the first step...... 6 QTL were detected for FTI: one QTL on each of BTA7, BTA20, BTA23, BTA25, and two QTL on BTA9 (QTL9–1 and QTL9–2). In the second step, ICF showed association with the QTL regions on BTA7, QTL9–2 QTL2 on BTA9, and BTA25, AIS for cows on BTA20 and BTA23, AIS for heifers on QTL9–2 on BTA9, IFL...

  19. Genomic region operation kit for flexible processing of deep sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Kristian; Lyly, Lauri; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Jänne, Olli A; Hautaniemi, Sampsa

    2013-01-01

    Computational analysis of data produced in deep sequencing (DS) experiments is challenging due to large data volumes and requirements for flexible analysis approaches. Here, we present a mathematical formalism based on set algebra for frequently performed operations in DS data analysis to facilitate translation of biomedical research questions to language amenable for computational analysis. With the help of this formalism, we implemented the Genomic Region Operation Kit (GROK), which supports various DS-related operations such as preprocessing, filtering, file conversion, and sample comparison. GROK provides high-level interfaces for R, Python, Lua, and command line, as well as an extension C++ API. It supports major genomic file formats and allows storing custom genomic regions in efficient data structures such as red-black trees and SQL databases. To demonstrate the utility of GROK, we have characterized the roles of two major transcription factors (TFs) in prostate cancer using data from 10 DS experiments. GROK is freely available with a user guide from >http://csbi.ltdk.helsinki.fi/grok/.

  20. Evidence for widespread degradation of gene control regions in hominid genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Keightley

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Although sequences containing regulatory elements located close to protein-coding genes are often only weakly conserved during evolution, comparisons of rodent genomes have implied that these sequences are subject to some selective constraints. Evolutionary conservation is particularly apparent upstream of coding sequences and in first introns, regions that are enriched for regulatory elements. By comparing the human and chimpanzee genomes, we show here that there is almost no evidence for conservation in these regions in hominids. Furthermore, we show that gene expression is diverging more rapidly in hominids than in murids per unit of neutral sequence divergence. By combining data on polymorphism levels in human noncoding DNA and the corresponding human-chimpanzee divergence, we show that the proportion of adaptive substitutions in these regions in hominids is very low. It therefore seems likely that the lack of conservation and increased rate of gene expression divergence are caused by a reduction in the effectiveness of natural selection against deleterious mutations because of the low effective population sizes of hominids. This has resulted in the accumulation of a large number of deleterious mutations in sequences containing gene control elements and hence a widespread degradation of the genome during the evolution of humans and chimpanzees.

  1. Coding and spacer sequences in the 5.8S-2S region of Sciara coprophila ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, B R; Latil-Damotte, M; Jourdan, R

    1980-08-25

    The sequence of 436 nucleotides around the region coding for 5.8S RNA in the Sciara coprophila rDNA transcription unit (1) has been determined. Regions coding for 5.8S and 2S RNAs have been identified; they are 80 - 90% homologous to the corresponding Drosophila sequences and are separated by a 22 nucleotide long spacer. This sequence as well as the two before the 5.8 and after the 2S coding region are very different from the corresponding Drosophila sequences. The main features reported in the Drosophila study (2) are however also found, i.e. all three spacers are very rich in A-T; the sequence of the internal spacer allows base pairing; 5.8S and 2S RNAs can pair through their 3' and 5' terminal regions respectively. The features previously proposed as processing sites in the Drosophila case are thus all found in Sciara in spite of very different spacer sequences.

  2. Sequence evolution of the hypervariable region in the putative envelope region E2/NS1 of hepatitis C virus is correlated with specific humoral immune responses.

    OpenAIRE

    van Doorn, L J; Capriles, I; Maertens, G; DeLeys, R; Murray, K; Kos, T; Schellekens, H; Quint, W

    1995-01-01

    Sequence evolution of the hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) in the N terminus of E2/NS1 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was studied retrospectively in six chimpanzees inoculated with the same genotype 1b strain, containing a unique predominant HVR1 sequence. Immediately after inoculation, all animals contained the same HVR predominant sequence. Two animals developed an acute self-limiting infection. Anti-HVR1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) was produced 40 to 60 days after inoculation and rapidly disappeared a...

  3. Characterization of the HLA-DRβ1 third hypervariable region amino acid sequence according to charge and parental inheritance in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Coline A; Gammill, Hilary S; Luu, Christine T; Mayes, Maureen D; Furst, Dan E; Nelson, J Lee

    2017-03-07

    Specific HLA class II alleles are associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc) risk, clinical characteristics, and autoantibodies. HLA nomenclature initially developed with antibodies as typing reagents defining DRB1 allele groups. However, alleles from different DRB1 allele groups encode the same third hypervariable region (3rd HVR) sequence, the primary T-cell recognition site, and 3rd HVR charge differences can affect interactions with T cells. We considered 3rd HVR sequences (amino acids 67-74) irrespective of the allele group and analyzed parental inheritance considered according to the 3rd HVR charge, comparing SSc patients with controls. In total, 306 families (121 SSc and 185 controls) were HLA genotyped and parental HLA-haplotype origin was determined. Analysis was conducted according to DRβ1 3rd HVR sequence, charge, and parental inheritance. The distribution of 3rd HVR sequences differed in SSc patients versus controls (p = 0.007), primarily due to an increase of specific DRB1*11 alleles, in accord with previous observations. The 3rd HVR sequences were next analyzed according to charge and parental inheritance. Paternal transmission of DRB1 alleles encoding a +2 charge 3rd HVR was significantly reduced in SSc patients compared with maternal transmission (p = 0.0003, corrected for analysis of four charge categories p = 0.001). To a lesser extent, paternal transmission was increased when charge was 0 (p = 0.021, corrected for multiple comparisons p = 0.084). In contrast, paternal versus maternal inheritance was similar in controls. SSc patients differed from controls when DRB1 alleles were categorized according to 3rd HVR sequences. Skewed parental inheritance was observed in SSc patients but not in controls when the DRβ1 3rd HVR was considered according to charge. These observations suggest that epigenetic modulation of HLA merits investigation in SSc.

  4. Controlling the Orbital Sequence in Individual Cu-Phthalocyanine Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlmann, C.; Swart, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837652; Repp, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the controlled change of the energetic ordering of molecular orbitals. Negatively charged copper(II)phthalocyanine on NaCl/Cu(100) undergoes a Jahn–Teller distortion that lifts the degeneracy of two frontier orbitals. The energetic order of the levels can be controlled by Au and Ag

  5. Three genetic stocks of frigate tuna Auxis thazard thazard (Lacepede, 1800) along the Indian coast revealed from sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA D-loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    GirishKumar; Kunal, S.P.; Menezes, M.R.; Meena, R.M.

    and maternal mode of inheritance, which makes it a sensitive indicator of genetic drift resulting from geographical subdivision (Lindak & Paul 1994; Garber et al. 2005). Sequence analyses involving the rapidly mutating mtDNA control region has been used... size for Port-Blair was small (N = 14) and, because of maternal mode of inheritance, mtDNA variability offers only a partial view of frigate tuna biology and population histories. Therefore, further studies with complementary genetic markers (i...

  6. A new method for detecting signal regions in ordered sequences of real numbers, and application to viral genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gog, Julia R; Lever, Andrew M L; Skittrall, Jordan P

    2018-01-01

    We present a fast, robust and parsimonious approach to detecting signals in an ordered sequence of numbers. Our motivation is in seeking a suitable method to take a sequence of scores corresponding to properties of positions in virus genomes, and find outlying regions of low scores. Suitable statistical methods without using complex models or making many assumptions are surprisingly lacking. We resolve this by developing a method that detects regions of low score within sequences of real numbers. The method makes no assumptions a priori about the length of such a region; it gives the explicit location of the region and scores it statistically. It does not use detailed mechanistic models so the method is fast and will be useful in a wide range of applications. We present our approach in detail, and test it on simulated sequences. We show that it is robust to a wide range of signal morphologies, and that it is able to capture multiple signals in the same sequence. Finally we apply it to viral genomic data to identify regions of evolutionary conservation within influenza and rotavirus.

  7. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasaki Yukako

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit. Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas. The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98 ; L: 98–100%. The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed.

  8. An integrated tool to study MHC region: accurate SNV detection and HLA genes typing in human MHC region using targeted high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Cao

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is one of the most variable and gene-dense regions of the human genome. Most studies of the MHC, and associated regions, focus on minor variants and HLA typing, many of which have been demonstrated to be associated with human disease susceptibility and metabolic pathways. However, the detection of variants in the MHC region, and diagnostic HLA typing, still lacks a coherent, standardized, cost effective and high coverage protocol of clinical quality and reliability. In this paper, we presented such a method for the accurate detection of minor variants and HLA types in the human MHC region, using high-throughput, high-coverage sequencing of target regions. A probe set was designed to template upon the 8 annotated human MHC haplotypes, and to encompass the 5 megabases (Mb of the extended MHC region. We deployed our probes upon three, genetically diverse human samples for probe set evaluation, and sequencing data show that ∼97% of the MHC region, and over 99% of the genes in MHC region, are covered with sufficient depth and good evenness. 98% of genotypes called by this capture sequencing prove consistent with established HapMap genotypes. We have concurrently developed a one-step pipeline for calling any HLA type referenced in the IMGT/HLA database from this target capture sequencing data, which shows over 96% typing accuracy when deployed at 4 digital resolution. This cost-effective and highly accurate approach for variant detection and HLA typing in the MHC region may lend further insight into immune-mediated diseases studies, and may find clinical utility in transplantation medicine research. This one-step pipeline is released for general evaluation and use by the scientific community.

  9. An integrated tool to study MHC region: accurate SNV detection and HLA genes typing in human MHC region using targeted high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Jinghua; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xiao; Xu, Yinyin; Liang, Dequan; Gao, Peng; Sun, Yepeng; Gifford, Benjamin; D'Ascenzo, Mark; Liu, Xiaomin; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Yang, Fang; Tong, Xin; Chen, Dan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Weiyang; Richmond, Todd; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui

    2013-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most variable and gene-dense regions of the human genome. Most studies of the MHC, and associated regions, focus on minor variants and HLA typing, many of which have been demonstrated to be associated with human disease susceptibility and metabolic pathways. However, the detection of variants in the MHC region, and diagnostic HLA typing, still lacks a coherent, standardized, cost effective and high coverage protocol of clinical quality and reliability. In this paper, we presented such a method for the accurate detection of minor variants and HLA types in the human MHC region, using high-throughput, high-coverage sequencing of target regions. A probe set was designed to template upon the 8 annotated human MHC haplotypes, and to encompass the 5 megabases (Mb) of the extended MHC region. We deployed our probes upon three, genetically diverse human samples for probe set evaluation, and sequencing data show that ∼97% of the MHC region, and over 99% of the genes in MHC region, are covered with sufficient depth and good evenness. 98% of genotypes called by this capture sequencing prove consistent with established HapMap genotypes. We have concurrently developed a one-step pipeline for calling any HLA type referenced in the IMGT/HLA database from this target capture sequencing data, which shows over 96% typing accuracy when deployed at 4 digital resolution. This cost-effective and highly accurate approach for variant detection and HLA typing in the MHC region may lend further insight into immune-mediated diseases studies, and may find clinical utility in transplantation medicine research. This one-step pipeline is released for general evaluation and use by the scientific community.

  10. Optimal control design of turbo spin-echo sequences with applications to parallel-transmit systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbrizzi, Alessandro; Hoogduin, Hans; Hajnal, Joseph V; van den Berg, CAT; Luijten, Peter R; Malik, Shaihan J

    PURPOSE: The design of turbo spin-echo sequences is modeled as a dynamic optimization problem which includes the case of inhomogeneous transmit radiofrequency fields. This problem is efficiently solved by optimal control techniques making it possible to design patient-specific sequences online.

  11. [Sequence polymorphisms of the mitochondrial DNA HVR I and HVR II regions in the Deng populations from Tibet in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Longli; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the sequence polymorphisms of the mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I (HVR I) and HVR II in the Deng population in Linzhi area of Tibet. mtDNAs obtained from 119 unrelated individuals were amplified and directly sequenced. One hundred and ten variable sites were identified, including nucleotide transitions, transversions, and insertions. In the HVR I region (nt16024-nt16365), 68 polymorphic sites and 119 haplotypes were observed, the genetic diversity was 0.9916. In the HVR II (nt73-nt340) region, 42 polymorphic sites and 113 haplotypes were observed, and the genetic diversity was 0.9907. The random match probability of the HVR I and HVR II regions were 0.0084 and 0.0093, respectively. When combining the HVR I and HVR II regions, 119 different haplotypes were found. The combined match probability of two unrelated persons having the same sequence was 0.0084. There are some unique polymorphic loci in the Deng population. There are different genetic structures between Chinese and other Asian populations in the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region. Sequence polymorphism of mitochondrial DNA HVR I and HVR II can be used as a genetic marker for forensic individual identification and genetic analysis.

  12. New insights into sequence variation in the IGS region of 21 cyathostomin species and the implication for molecular identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiklinski, K; Kooyman, F N J; Van Doorn, D C K; Matthews, J B; Hodgkinson, J E

    2012-07-01

    Cyathostomins comprise a group of 50 species of parasitic nematodes that infect equids. Ribosomal DNA sequences, in particular the intergenic spacer (IGS) region, have been utilized via several methodologies to identify pre-parasitic stages of the commonest species that affect horses. These methods rely on the availability of accurate sequence information for each species, as well as detailed knowledge of the levels of intra- and inter-specific variation. Here, the IGS DNA region was amplified and sequenced from 10 cyathostomin species for which sequence was not previously available. Also, additional IGS DNA sequences were generated from individual worms of 8 species already studied. Comparative analysis of these sequences revealed a greater range of intra-specific variation than previously reported (up to 23%); whilst the level of inter-specific variation (3-62%) was similar to that identified in earlier studies. The reverse line blot (RLB) method has been used to exploit the cyathostomin IGS DNA region for species identification. Here, we report validation of novel and existing DNA probes for identification of cyathostomins using this method and highlight their application in differentiating life-cycle stages such as third-stage larvae that cannot be identified to species by morphological means.

  13. Evolution and strengthening of the Calabrian Regional Seismic Network during the Pollino sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Gervasi, Anna; Guerra, Ignazio

    2013-04-01

    In the last three years the Calabria-Lucania border area is affected by an intense seismic activity generated by the activation of geological structures which be seat of clusters of microearthquakes, with energy release sufficient to be felt and to generate alarm and bother. Besides to the historical memory of the inhabitants of Mormanno (the town most affected of macroseismic effects) there are some historical documents that indicate the occurrence of a similar seismic crisis in 1888. A more recent seismic sequence, the first monitored by seismic instruments, occurred in 1973-1974. In the last case, the activity started in early 2010 and is still ongoing. The two shocks of ML = 4.3 and 5.0 and the the very long time duration differs this crisis from the previous ones. Given this background, in 1981 was installed at Mormanno a seismic station (MMN) belonging to Regional Seismic Network of the University of Calabria (RSRC), now also a station of the Italian National Seismic Network of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica Vulcanolgia (INSN-INGV). This seismic station made it possible to follow the evolution of seismicity in this area and in particular the progressive increase in seismic activity started in 2010. Since 2010, some 3D stand-alone, was installed by the University of Calabria. Further stations of INGV were installed in November 2011 after a sharp increase of the energy release and subsequently by the INGV and the GeoForschungsZentrum (Potsdam) after the main shock of the whole sequence. Seismic networks are powerful tools for understanding active tectonic processes in a monitored seismically active region. However, the optimal monitoring of a seismic region requires the assessment of the seismic network capabilities to identify seismogenic areas that are not adequately covered and to quantify measures that will allow the network improvement. In this paper we examine in detail the evolution and the strengthening of the RSRC in the last years analyzing the

  14. 40 CFR 81.112 - Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.112 Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Charleston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... Quality Control Region: Region 1. 81.107Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region: Region 2. 81...

  15. Sequence Control System of 1-MW CW Klystron for the PEFP

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Byoung R; Chun Myung Hwan; Han Yeung Jin; Hyo Jeong Maeng; Kim Sung Chul; Yang Jae Seok; Yu In Ha

    2005-01-01

    Sequence control system of 1-MW CW klystron for the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) has been developed in order to drive the 1-MW klystron amplifier. The system is able to control several power supplies and many environment conditions. The hardware of sequence control and the interlock system are based on the Allen-Bradley's SLC500 Program Logic Controller (PLC). Also the system can be controlled by a touch screen at local mode or Ethernet network with high level HMI at remote mode.

  16. Sequence-aware intrusion detection in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.; Zambon, Emmanuele; Kargl, Frank; Zhou, Jianying; Jones, D.

    Nowadays, several threats endanger cyber-physical systems. Among these systems, industrial control systems (ICS) operating on critical infrastructures have been proven to be an attractive target for attackers. The case of Stuxnet has not only showed that ICSs are vulnerable to cyber-attacks, but

  17. Completion of the nucleotide sequence of the central region of Tn5 confirms the presence of three resistance genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazodier, P; Cossart, P; Giraud, E; Gasser, F

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the region located downstream from the kanamycin resistance gene of Tn5 up to the right inverted repeat IS50R has been determined. This completes the determination of the sequence of Tn5 which is 5818 bp long. The 2.7 Kb central region contains three resistance genes: the kanamycin-neomycin resistance gene, a gene coding for resistance to CL990 an antimitotic-antibiotic compound of the bleomycin family and a third gene that confers streptomycin resistance in some bacterial...

  18. Bilingualism alters brain functional connectivity between "control" regions and "language" regions: Evidence from bimodal bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Le; Abutalebi, Jubin; Zou, Lijuan; Yan, Xin; Liu, Lanfang; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Ruiming; Guo, Taomei; Ding, Guosheng

    2015-05-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have revealed that bilingualism induces both structural and functional neuroplasticity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the left caudate nucleus (LCN), both of which are associated with cognitive control. Since these "control" regions should work together with other language regions during language processing, we hypothesized that bilingualism may also alter the functional interaction between the dACC/LCN and language regions. Here we tested this hypothesis by exploring the functional connectivity (FC) in bimodal bilinguals and monolinguals using functional MRI when they either performed a picture naming task with spoken language or were in resting state. We found that for bimodal bilinguals who use spoken and sign languages, the FC of the dACC with regions involved in spoken language (e.g. the left superior temporal gyrus) was stronger in performing the task, but weaker in the resting state as compared to monolinguals. For the LCN, its intrinsic FC with sign language regions including the left inferior temporo-occipital part and right inferior and superior parietal lobules was increased in the bilinguals. These results demonstrate that bilingual experience may alter the brain functional interaction between "control" regions and "language" regions. For different control regions, the FC alters in different ways. The findings also deepen our understanding of the functional roles of the dACC and LCN in language processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of Regional Precipitation Sequences Based on the CEEMDAN-WPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Cheng, Chen; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Chunlei; Li, Mo; Faiz, Muhammad Abrar; Li, Tianxiao; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Cui, Song

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with the adaptive noise (CEEMDAN) algorithm is introduced into the complexity research of precipitation systems to improve the traditional complexity measure method specific to the mode mixing of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and incomplete decomposition of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD). We combined the CEEMDAN with the wavelet packet transform (WPT) and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) to create the CEEMDAN-WPT-MFDFA, and used it to measure the complexity of the monthly precipitation sequence of 12 sub-regions in Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China. The results show that there are significant differences in the monthly precipitation complexity of each sub-region in Harbin. The complexity of the northwest area of Harbin is the lowest and its predictability is the best. The complexity and predictability of the middle and Midwest areas of Harbin are about average. The complexity of the southeast area of Harbin is higher than that of the northwest, middle, and Midwest areas of Harbin and its predictability is worse. The complexity of Shuangcheng is the highest and its predictability is the worst of all the studied sub-regions. We used terrain and human activity as factors to analyze the causes of the complexity of the local precipitation. The results showed that the correlations between the precipitation complexity and terrain are obvious, and the correlations between the precipitation complexity and human influence factors vary. The distribution of the precipitation complexity in this area may be generated by the superposition effect of human activities and natural factors such as terrain, general atmospheric circulation, land and sea location, and ocean currents. To evaluate the stability of the algorithm, the CEEMDAN-WPT-MFDFA was compared with the equal probability coarse graining LZC algorithm, fuzzy entropy, and wavelet entropy. The results show

  20. Genetic variation among the Mapuche Indians from the Patagonian region of Argentina: mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and allele frequencies of several nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, C; Corach, D; Penacino, G A; Rey, J A; Carnese, F R; Hutz, M H; Anderson, A; Just, J; Salzano, F M; King, M C

    1993-01-01

    DNA samples from 60 Mapuche Indians, representing 39 maternal lineages, were genetically characterized for (1) nucleotide sequences of the mtDNA control region; (2) presence or absence of a nine base duplication in mtDNA region V; (3) HLA loci DRB1 and DQA1; (4) variation at three nuclear genes with short tandem repeats; and (5) variation at the polymorphic marker D2S44. The genetic profile of the Mapuche population was compared to other Amerinds and to worldwide populations. Two highly polymorphic portions of the mtDNA control region, comprising 650 nucleotides, were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and directly sequenced. The 39 maternal lineages were defined by two or three generation families identified by the Mapuches. These 39 lineages included 19 different mtDNA sequences that could be grouped into four classes. The same classes of sequences appear in other Amerinds from North, Central, and South American populations separated by thousands of miles, suggesting that the origin of the mtDNA patterns predates the migration to the Americas. The mtDNA sequence similarity between Amerind populations suggests that the migration throughout the Americas occurred rapidly relative to the mtDNA mutation rate. HLA DRB1 alleles 1602 and 1402 were frequent among the Mapuches. These alleles also occur at high frequency among other Amerinds in North and South America, but not among Spanish, Chinese or African-American populations. The high frequency of these alleles throughout the Americas, and their specificity to the Americas, supports the hypothesis that Mapuches and other Amerind groups are closely related.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Orifice design for the control of coupled region flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherton, R.; Spadaro, P.R.; Brummerhop, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    A fluid system arrangement for nuclear reactors is described comprising a triplate orifice apparatus which simultaneously controls core flow distribution, flow rate ratio between hydraulically coupled regions of the blanket and radial static pressure gradients entering and leaving the blanket fuel region. The design of the apparatus is based on the parameters of the diameter of the orifice holes, the friction factor, and expansion, contraction and turning pressure loss coefficients of the geometry of each orifice region. These above parameters are properly matched to provide the desired pressure drop, flow split and negligible cross flow at the interface of standard and power-flattened open lattice blanket regions. (U.S.)

  2. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  3. Control Mechanism and Security Region for Intentional Islanding Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    in the grid. The concept of Islanding Security Region (ISR) has been proposed as an organic composition of the developed control mechanism. The purpose of this control mechanism is to maintain the frequency stability and eventually the security of power supply to the customers, by utilizing resources from...

  4. Sequencing the GRHL3 Coding Region Reveals Rare Truncating Mutations and a Common Susceptibility Variant for Nonsyndromic Cleft Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Elisabeth; Böhmer, Anne C.; Ishorst, Nina; Hoebel, Ann-Kathrin; Gültepe, Pinar; Schuenke, Hannah; Klamt, Johanna; Hofmann, Andrea; Gölz, Lina; Raff, Ruth; Tessmann, Peter; Nowak, Stefanie; Reutter, Heiko; Hemprich, Alexander; Kreusch, Thomas; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Braumann, Bert; Reich, Rudolf; Schmidt, Gül; Jäger, Andreas; Reiter, Rudolf; Brosch, Sibylle; Stavusis, Janis; Ishida, Miho; Seselgyte, Rimante; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Borck, Guntram; Aldhorae, Khalid A.; Lace, Baiba; Stanier, Philip; Knapp, Michael; Ludwig, Kerstin U.

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with/without cleft palate (nsCL/P) and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (nsCPO) are the most frequent subphenotypes of orofacial clefts. A common syndromic form of orofacial clefting is Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) where individuals have CL/P or CPO, often but not always associated with lower lip pits. Recently, ∼5% of VWS-affected individuals were identified with mutations in the grainy head-like 3 gene (GRHL3). To investigate GRHL3 in nonsyndromic clefting, we sequenced its coding region in 576 Europeans with nsCL/P and 96 with nsCPO. Most strikingly, nsCPO-affected individuals had a higher minor allele frequency for rs41268753 (0.099) than control subjects (0.049; p = 1.24 × 10−2). This association was replicated in nsCPO/control cohorts from Latvia, Yemen, and the UK (pcombined = 2.63 × 10−5; ORallelic = 2.46 [95% CI 1.6–3.7]) and reached genome-wide significance in combination with imputed data from a GWAS in nsCPO triads (p = 2.73 × 10−9). Notably, rs41268753 is not associated with nsCL/P (p = 0.45). rs41268753 encodes the highly conserved p.Thr454Met (c.1361C>T) (GERP = 5.3), which prediction programs denote as deleterious, has a CADD score of 29.6, and increases protein binding capacity in silico. Sequencing also revealed four novel truncating GRHL3 mutations including two that were de novo in four families, where all nine individuals harboring mutations had nsCPO. This is important for genetic counseling: given that VWS is rare compared to nsCPO, our data suggest that dominant GRHL3 mutations are more likely to cause nonsyndromic than syndromic CPO. Thus, with rare dominant mutations and a common risk variant in the coding region, we have identified an important contribution for GRHL3 in nsCPO. PMID:27018475

  5. Application of a mitochondrial DNA control region frequency database for UK domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Barbara; Lall, Gurdeep Matharu; Sacchini, Federico; Jobling, Mark A; Wetton, Jon H

    2017-03-01

    DNA variation in 402bp of the mitochondrial control region flanked by repeat sequences RS2 and RS3 was evaluated by Sanger sequencing in 152 English domestic cats, in order to determine the significance of matching DNA sequences between hairs found with a victim's body and the suspect's pet cat. Whilst 95% of English cats possessed one of the twelve globally widespread mitotypes, four new variants were observed, the most common of which (2% frequency) was shared with the evidential samples. No significant difference in mitotype frequency was seen between 32 individuals from the locality of the crime and 120 additional cats from the rest of England, suggesting a lack of local population structure. However, significant differences were observed in comparison with frequencies in other countries, including the closely neighbouring Netherlands, highlighting the importance of appropriate genetic databases when determining the evidential significance of mitochondrial DNA evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complete re-sequencing of a 2Mb topological domain encompassing the FTO/IRXB genes identifies a novel obesity-associated region upstream of IRX5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunt, Lilian E; Noyvert, Boris; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena

    2015-01-01

    implicated in the aetiology of obesity. METHODS: Here, we sequence a 2 Mb region encompassing the FTO, RPGRIP1L and IRXB cluster genes in 284 individuals from a well-characterised study group of Danish men containing extremely overweight young adults and controls. We further replicate our findings both......BACKGROUND: Association studies have identified a number of loci that contribute to an increased body mass index (BMI), the strongest of which is in the first intron of the FTO gene on human chromosome 16q12.2. However, this region is both non-coding and under strong linkage disequilibrium, making...... in an expanded male cohort and an independent female study group. Finally, we compare our variant data with a previous study describing IRX3 and FTO interactions in this region. RESULTS: We obtain deep coverage across the entire region, allowing accurate and unequivocal determination of almost every single...

  7. Association of genetic variations in the mitochondrial DNA control region with presbycusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falah M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Masoumeh Falah,1 Mohammad Farhadi,1 Seyed Kamran Kamrava,1 Saeid Mahmoudian,1 Ahmad Daneshi,1 Maryam Balali,1 Alimohamad Asghari,2 Massoud Houshmand1,3 1ENT and Head & Neck Research Center and Department, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Skull Base Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran Background: The prominent role of mitochondria in the generation of reactive oxygen species, cell death, and energy production contributes to the importance of this organelle in the intracellular mechanism underlying the progression of the common sensory disorder of the elderly, presbycusis. Reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA gene expression and coding region variation have frequently been reported as being associated with the development of presbycusis. The mtDNA control region regulates gene expression and replication of the genome of this organelle. To comprehensively understand of the role of mitochondria in the progression of presbycusis, we compared variations in the mtDNA control region between subjects with presbycusis and controls.Methods: A total of 58 presbycusis patients and 220 control subjects were enrolled in the study after examination by the otolaryngologist and audiology tests. Variations in the mtDNA control region were investigated by polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing.Results: A total of 113 sequence variants were observed in mtDNA, and variants were detected in 100% of patients, with 84% located in hypervariable regions. The frequencies of the variants, 16,223 C>T, 16,311 T>C, 16,249 T>C, and 15,954 A>C, were significantly different between presbycusis and control subjects.Conclusion: The statistically significant difference in the frequencies of four nucleotide variants in the mtDNA control region of presbycusis patients and controls is in agreement with previous experimental

  8. Three Ingredients for Improved Global Aftershock Forecasts: Tectonic Region, Time-Dependent Catalog Incompleteness, and Inter-Sequence Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M. T.; Hardebeck, J.; Felzer, K. R.; Michael, A. J.; van der Elst, N.

    2015-12-01

    Following a large earthquake, seismic hazard can be orders of magnitude higher than the long-term average as a result of aftershock triggering. Due to this heightened hazard, there is a demand from emergency managers and the public for rapid, authoritative, and reliable aftershock forecasts. In the past, USGS aftershock forecasts following large, global earthquakes have been released on an ad-hoc basis with inconsistent methods, and in some cases, aftershock parameters adapted from California. To remedy this, we are currently developing an automated aftershock product that will generate more accurate forecasts based on the Reasenberg and Jones (Science, 1989) method. To better capture spatial variations in aftershock productivity and decay, we estimate regional aftershock parameters for sequences within the Garcia et al. (BSSA, 2012) tectonic regions. We find that regional variations for mean aftershock productivity exceed a factor of 10. The Reasenberg and Jones method combines modified-Omori aftershock decay, Utsu productivity scaling, and the Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution. We additionally account for a time-dependent magnitude of completeness following large events in the catalog. We generalize the Helmstetter et al. (2005) equation for short-term aftershock incompleteness and solve for incompleteness levels in the global NEIC catalog following large mainshocks. In addition to estimating average sequence parameters within regions, we quantify the inter-sequence parameter variability. This allows for a more complete quantification of the forecast uncertainties and Bayesian updating of the forecast as sequence-specific information becomes available.

  9. The nucleotide sequence of two restriction fragments located in the gene AB region of bacteriophage S13.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.H. Spencer

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide sequence of a double stranded DNA fragment from the gene AB region of bacteriophage S13 DNA has been determined. The fragment was isolated as two adjacent shorter fragments by cleavage of S13 replicative form (RF) DNA with restriction endonuclease III from Hemophilus

  10. Identification and verification of hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibody variable region sequences using recombinant DNA technology and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody engineering requires the identification of antigen binding domains or variable regions (VR) unique to each antibody. It is the VR that define the unique antigen binding properties and proper sequence identification is essential for functional evaluation and performance of recombinant antibo...

  11. Sequence-controlled polymerization guided by aryl-fluoroaryl π-stacking

    KAUST Repository

    Mugemana, Clement

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control monomer sequences is essential in macromolecular chemistry. Better sequence control leads to better control over macromolecular folding and self-assembly, which, in turn, would enable control over bulk properties (such as thermal behavior, conductivity and rigidity), as well as mimicking the properties of globular proteins. Here, we present a three-part synopsis of recent advances in research on sequence-controlled polymerization guided by aryl-perfluoroaryl π-π stacking of monomer pairs. We also show that for monomers that are capable of strong associative interactions, the classical reactivity ratio analysis based on Fineman-Ross/terminal reactivity models may lead to an imprecise determination of the monomer alternation mode. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Genetic Diversity of Toxoplasma gondii Strains from Different Hosts and Geographical Regions by Sequence Analysis of GRA20 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hong-Rui; Huang, Si-Yang; Wang, Jin-Lei; Xu, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a eukaryotic parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa, which infects all warm-blood animals, including humans. In the present study, we examined sequence variation in dense granule 20 (GRA20) genes among T. gondii isolates collected from different hosts and geographical regions worldwide. The complete GRA20 genes were amplified from 16 T. gondii isolates using PCR, sequence were analyzed, and phylogenetic reconstruction was analyzed by maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) methods. The results showed that the complete GRA20 gene sequence was 1,586 bp in length among all the isolates used in this study, and the sequence variations in nucleotides were 0-7.9% among all strains. However, removing the type III strains (CTG, VEG), the sequence variations became very low, only 0-0.7%. These results indicated that the GRA20 sequence in type III was more divergence. Phylogenetic analysis of GRA20 sequences using MP and ML methods can differentiate 2 major clonal lineage types (type I and type III) into their respective clusters, indicating the GRA20 gene may represent a novel genetic marker for intraspecific phylogenetic analyses of T. gondii.

  13. The regional costs and benefits of acid rain control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkman, M.P.

    1991-01-01

    Congress recently enacted acid rain control legislation as part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments following a decade-long debate among disparate regional interests. Although Congress succeeded in drafting a law acceptable to all regions, the regional costs and benefits of the legislation remain uncertain. The research presented here attempts to estimate the regional costs and benefits and the economic impacts of acid rain controls. These estimates are made using a modeling system composed of econometric, linear programming and input-output models. The econometric and linear programming components describe markets for electricity and coal. The outputs of these components including capital investment, electricity demand, and coal production are taken as exogenous inputs by a multiregional input-output model. The input-output model produces estimates of changes in final demand, gross output, and employment. The utility linear programming model also predicts sulfur dioxide emissions (an acid-rain precursor). According to model simulations, the costs of acid rain control exceed the benefits for many regions including several regions customarily thought to be the major beneficiaries of acid rain control such as New England

  14. SEQATOMS: a web tool for identifying missing regions in PDB in sequence context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, B.W.; Heringa, J.; Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    With over 46 000 proteins, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the most important database with structural information of biological macromolecules. PDB files contain sequence and coordinate information. Residues present in the sequence can be absent from the coordinate section, which means their

  15. A multifunction editor for programming control sequences for a robot based radiopharmaceutical synthesis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelquist, G.; Bohm, C.

    1990-01-01

    A Multifunction Editor is a development tool for building control sequences for a robotized production system for positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. This system consists of SCARA robot and a PC-AT personal computer as a controller together with general and synthesis specific chemistry equipment. The general equipment, which is common for many synthesis, is fixed to the wall of the hotcell, while the specific equipment, dedicated to the given synthesis, is located on a removable tray. The program recognizes commands to move the robot, to control valves and to control the computer screen. From within the editor it is possible to run the control sequence forward or backward to test it and to use the single step feature to debug. The editor commands include insert, replace and delete of commands in the sequence. When programming or editing robot movements the robot may be controlled by the mouse, from the keyboard or from a remote control box. The robot control sequence consists of a succession of stored robot positions. The screen control is used to display dynamic flowchart diagrams. This is achieved by displaying a modified picture on the screen whenever the system state has been changed significantly

  16. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism mining and nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene in exonic regions of Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraj, Diwesh Kumar; Kumar, Pushpendra; Mishra, Chinmoy; Narayan, Raj; Bhattacharya, Tarun Kumar; Shrivastava, Kush; Bhushan, Bharat; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Saxena, Vishesh; Sahoo, Nihar Ranjan; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-12-01

    An attempt has been made to study the Myxovirus resistant (Mx1) gene polymorphism in Japanese quail. In the present, investigation four fragments viz. Fragment I of 185 bp (Exon 3 region), Fragment II of 148 bp (Exon 5 region), Fragment III of 161 bp (Exon 7 region), and Fragment IV of 176 bp (Exon 13 region) of Mx1 gene were amplified and screened for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique in 170 Japanese quail birds. Out of the four fragments, one fragment (Fragment II) was found to be polymorphic. Remaining three fragments (Fragment I, III, and IV) were found to be monomorphic which was confirmed by custom sequencing. Overall nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene of Japanese quail showed 100% homology with common quail and more than 80% homology with reported sequence of chicken breeds. The Mx1 gene is mostly conserved in Japanese quail. There is an urgent need of comprehensive analysis of other regions of Mx1 gene along with its possible association with the traits of economic importance in Japanese quail.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism mining and nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene in exonic regions of Japanese quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diwesh Kumar Niraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An attempt has been made to study the Myxovirus resistant (Mx1 gene polymorphism in Japanese quail. Materials and Methods: In the present, investigation four fragments viz. Fragment I of 185 bp (Exon 3 region, Fragment II of 148 bp (Exon 5 region, Fragment III of 161 bp (Exon 7 region, and Fragment IV of 176 bp (Exon 13 region of Mx1 gene were amplified and screened for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique in 170 Japanese quail birds. Results: Out of the four fragments, one fragment (Fragment II was found to be polymorphic. Remaining three fragments (Fragment I, III, and IV were found to be monomorphic which was confirmed by custom sequencing. Overall nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene of Japanese quail showed 100% homology with common quail and more than 80% homology with reported sequence of chicken breeds. Conclusion: The Mx1 gene is mostly conserved in Japanese quail. There is an urgent need of comprehensive analysis of other regions of Mx1 gene along with its possible association with the traits of economic importance in Japanese quail.

  19. Theory of Regions for Control Synthesis without Computing Reachability Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadok Rezig

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the design of Petri net (PN supervisor using the theory of regions for forbidden state problem with a set of general mutual exclusion constraints. In fact, as any method of supervisory control based on reachability graph, the theory of regions suffers from a technical obstacle in control synthesis, which is the necessity of computing the graph at each iteration step. Moreover, based on the reachability graph, which may contain a large number of states, with respect to the structural size of the system, the computation of PN controllers becomes harder and even impossible. The main contribution of this paper, compared to previous works, is the development of a control synthesis method in order to decrease significantly the computation cost of the PN supervisor. Thus, based on PN properties and mathematical concepts, the proposed methodology provides an optimal PN supervisor for bounded Petri nets following the interpretation of the theory of regions. Finally, case studies are solved by CPLEX software to compare our new control policy with previous works which use the theory of regions for control synthesis.

  20. Rapid evaluation and quality control of next generation sequencing data with FaQCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chien-Chi; Chain, Patrick S G

    2014-11-19

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that parallelize the sequencing process and produce thousands to millions, or even hundreds of millions of sequences in a single sequencing run, have revolutionized genomic and genetic research. Because of the vagaries of any platform's sequencing chemistry, the experimental processing, machine failure, and so on, the quality of sequencing reads is never perfect, and often declines as the read is extended. These errors invariably affect downstream analysis/application and should therefore be identified early on to mitigate any unforeseen effects. Here we present a novel FastQ Quality Control Software (FaQCs) that can rapidly process large volumes of data, and which improves upon previous solutions to monitor the quality and remove poor quality data from sequencing runs. Both the speed of processing and the memory footprint of storing all required information have been optimized via algorithmic and parallel processing solutions. The trimmed output compared side-by-side with the original data is part of the automated PDF output. We show how this tool can help data analysis by providing a few examples, including an increased percentage of reads recruited to references, improved single nucleotide polymorphism identification as well as de novo sequence assembly metrics. FaQCs combines several features of currently available applications into a single, user-friendly process, and includes additional unique capabilities such as filtering the PhiX control sequences, conversion of FASTQ formats, and multi-threading. The original data and trimmed summaries are reported within a variety of graphics and reports, providing a simple way to do data quality control and assurance.

  1. Phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes from DNA sequences in the Psi eta-globin region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, M.M.; Slightom, J.L.; Goodman, M.

    1987-10-16

    Sequences from the upstream and downstream flanking DNA regions of the Psi eta-globin locus in Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee), Gorilla gorilla (gorilla), and Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan, the closest living relative to Homo, Pan, and Gorilla) provided further data for evaluating the phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes. These newly sequenced orthologs (an additional 4.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) for each species) were combined with published Psi eta-gene sequences and then compared to the same orthologous stretch (a continuous 7.1-kbp region) available for humans. Phylogenetic analysis of these nucleotide sequences by the parsimony method indicated (i) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than either is to gorilla and (ii) that the slowdown in the rate of sequence evolution evident in higher primates is especially pronounced in humans. These results indicate that features unique to African apes (but not to humans) are primitive and that even local molecular clocks should be applied with caution.

  2. Exchange of regions of the carboxypeptidase Y propeptide. Sequence specificity and function in folding in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, C; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    a more strict requirement for sequence conservation. Nevertheless, an overall lack of requirement for propeptide sequence conservation was found by substitution of the carboxypeptidase Y propeptide with that of a highly divergent propeptide sequence from an otherwise similar carboxypeptidase from Candida...... albicans. This propeptide was partially functional when combined with carboxypeptidase Y. Analysis of the biosynthesis of the mutant forms of the zymogen showed that a fraction of the molecules proceeded from the endoplasmic reticulum with fairly rapid kinetics, while the rest was degraded....

  3. PuLSE: Quality control and quantification of peptide sequences explored by phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave, Steven; Mann, Stefan; Koszela, Joanna; Kerr, Alastair; Auer, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    The design of highly diverse phage display libraries is based on assumption that DNA bases are incorporated at similar rates within the randomized sequence. As library complexity increases and expected copy numbers of unique sequences decrease, the exploration of library space becomes sparser and the presence of truly random sequences becomes critical. We present the program PuLSE (Phage Library Sequence Evaluation) as a tool for assessing randomness and therefore diversity of phage display libraries. PuLSE runs on a collection of sequence reads in the fastq file format and generates tables profiling the library in terms of unique DNA sequence counts and positions, translated peptide sequences, and normalized 'expected' occurrences from base to residue codon frequencies. The output allows at-a-glance quantitative quality control of a phage library in terms of sequence coverage both at the DNA base and translated protein residue level, which has been missing from toolsets and literature. The open source program PuLSE is available in two formats, a C++ source code package for compilation and integration into existing bioinformatics pipelines and precompiled binaries for ease of use.

  4. Sequence analysis of the breakpoint regions of an X;5 translocation in a female with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, I. van; Holt, S.; Craig, I. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    X;autosome translocations in females with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms responsible for chromosomal rearrangements that occur in the germ line. We describe here a detailed molecular analysis of the translocation breakpoints of an X;autosome reciprocal translocation, t(X;5) (p21;q31.1), in a female with DMD. Cosmid clones that contained the X-chromosome breakpoint region were identified, and subclones that hybridized to the translocation junction fragment in restriction digests of the patient`s DNA were isolated and sequenced. Primers designed from the X-chromosomal sequence were used to obtain the junction fragments on the der(X) and the der(5) by inverse PCR. The resultant clones were also cloned and sequenced, and this information used to isolate the chromosome 5 breakpoint region. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the junction fragments with those of the breakpoint regions on chromosomes X and 5 revealed that the translocation arose by nonhomologous recombination with an imprecise reciprocal exchange. Four and six base pairs of unknown origin are inserted at the exchange points of the der(X) and der(5), respectively, and three nucleotides are deleted from the X-chromosome sequence. Two features were found that may have played a role in the generation of the translocation. These were (1) a repeat motif with an internal homopyrimidine stretch 10 bp upstream from the X-chromosome breakpoint and (2) a 9-bp sequence of 78% homology located near the breakpoints on chromosomes 5 and X. 32 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Multiobjective H2/H? Control Design with Regional Pole Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaidi Junaidi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents multiobjective H2/H? control design with regional pole constraints. The state feedback gain can be obtained by solving a linear matrix inequality (LMI feasibility problem that robustly assigns the closed-loop poles in a prescribed LMI region. The proposed technique is illustrated with applications to the design of stabilizer for a typical single-machine infinite-bus (SMIB power system. The LMI-based control ensures adequate damping for widely varying system operating conditions. The simulation results illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed stabilizer.

  6. Identification and verification of hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibody variable region sequences using recombinant DNA technology and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babrak, Lmar; McGarvey, Jeffery A; Stanker, Larry H; Hnasko, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Antibody engineering requires the identification of antigen binding domains or variable regions (VR) unique to each antibody. It is the VR that define the unique antigen binding properties and proper sequence identification is essential for functional evaluation and performance of recombinant antibodies (rAb). This determination can be achieved by sequence analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) transcripts obtained from a monoclonal antibody (MAb) producing hybridoma and subsequent expression of a rAb. However the polyploidy nature of a hybridoma cell often results in the added expression of aberrant immunoglobulin-like transcripts or even production of anomalous antibodies which can confound production of rAb. An incorrect VR sequence will result in a non-functional rAb and de novo assembly of Ig primary structure without a sequence map is challenging. To address these problems, we have developed a methodology which combines: 1) selective PCR amplification of VR from both the heavy and light chain IgG from hybridoma, 2) molecular cloning and DNA sequence analysis and 3) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on enzyme digests obtained from the purified IgG. Peptide analysis proceeds by evaluating coverage of the predicted primary protein sequence provided by the initial DNA maps for the VR. This methodology serves to both identify and verify the primary structure of the MAb VR for production as rAb. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. New tool to assemble repetitive regions using next-generation sequencing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuśmirek, Wiktor; Nowak, Robert M.; Neumann, Łukasz

    2017-08-01

    The next generation sequencing techniques produce a large amount of sequencing data. Some part of the genome are composed of repetitive DNA sequences, which are very problematic for the existing genome assemblers. We propose a modification of the algorithm for a DNA assembly, which uses the relative frequency of reads to properly reconstruct repetitive sequences. The new approach was implemented and tested, as a demonstration of the capability of our software we present some results for model organisms. The new implementation, using a three-layer software architecture was selected, where the presentation layer, data processing layer, and data storage layer were kept separate. Source code as well as demo application with web interface and the additional data are available at project web-page: http://dnaasm.sourceforge.net.

  8. Redefinition of hypervariable region I in mitochondrial DNA control region and comparing its diversity among various ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzen, Jessica M; Hsu, Hsiu-Jun; Wang, Man-Ning

    2008-03-01

    The hypervariable region I (HVR-I) of the mitochondrial DNA control region described in the literature is variable in its 5'and 3' ends as well as in its length, causing a problem when data from different ethnic groups are to be compared. To redefine HVR-I, which should be highly polymorphic yet relatively short in length, we analyzed 1437 reported sequences distributed among 11 geographic areas in the world. The results showed that the 237-bp (nts 16126-16362) redefined HVR-I (rHVR-I) had a global genetic diversity of 0.9905 and the 154-bp (nts 16209-16362) short HVR-I (sHVR-I) had a global diversity of 0.9735. Being flanked by a stretch of highly conservative sequences, both rHVR-I and sHVR-I can be produced by PCR, even if extracted from badly degraded specimens. Comparing the genetic diversity among 3870 sequences from 25 countries, we found that the genetic diversity of rHVR-I was 0.9869+/-0.0133 in Asian countries, 0.9685+/-0.0193 in African countries, 0.9299+/-0.0664 in European countries, and 0.8477+/-0.1857 in American countries, whereas that of sHVR-I was 0.9689+/-0.0284 in Asian countries, 0.9504+/-0.0334 in African countries, 0.8721+/-0.0911 in European countries, and 0.8230+/-0.1693 in American countries. The difference in genetic diversity among these countries is consistent with the notion that genetic diversity roughly reflects the genetic history of a given ethnic group. Our results indicate that a polymorphic, short, and PCR-producible HVR-I can be defined, making the comparison among various ethnic groups possible.

  9. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MULTILEVEL RECURRENT MODEL FOR HIERARCHICAL CONTROL OF COMPLEX REGIONAL SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Masloboev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Subject of research. The research goal and scope are development of methods and software for mathematical and computer modeling of the regional security information support systems as multilevel hierarchical systems. Such systems are characterized by loosely formalization, multiple-aspect of descendent system processes and their interconnectivity, high level dynamics and uncertainty. The research methodology is based on functional-target approach and principles of multilevel hierarchical system theory. The work considers analysis and structural-algorithmic synthesis problem-solving of the multilevel computer-aided systems intended for management and decision-making information support in the field of regional security. Main results. A hierarchical control multilevel model of regional socio-economic system complex security has been developed. The model is based on functional-target approach and provides both formal statement and solving, and practical implementation of the automated information system structure and control algorithms synthesis problems of regional security management optimal in terms of specified criteria. An approach for intralevel and interlevel coordination problem-solving in the multilevel hierarchical systems has been proposed on the basis of model application. The coordination is provided at the expense of interconnection requirements satisfaction between the functioning quality indexes (objective functions, which are optimized by the different elements of multilevel systems. That gives the possibility for sufficient coherence reaching of the local decisions, being made on the different control levels, under decentralized decision-making and external environment high dynamics. Recurrent model application provides security control mathematical models formation of regional socioeconomic systems, functioning under uncertainty. Practical relevance. The model implementation makes it possible to automate synthesis realization of

  11. Structure of mitochondrial DNA control region of Argyrosomus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of Argyrosomus amoyensis was examined in this study. TAS, cTAS, CSB-D to CSB-F and CSB-1 to CSB-3 segments were detected in the species. The results indicated that the structures of these parts were different from that of most fishes. All the mtDNA control ...

  12. REGIONAL DRAINWATER MANAGEMENT: SOURCE CONTROL, AGROFORESTRY, AND EVAPORATION PONDS

    OpenAIRE

    Posnikoff, Judith F.; Knapp, Keith C.

    1996-01-01

    Source control is one way to address salinity and drainage problems in irrigated agriculture, and reuse of drainage flows on salt-tolerant crops or trees in agroforestry production is another. A regional model of agricultural production with drainwater reuse and disposal is developed. Deep percolation flows are controlled through choice of crop areas, irrigation systems, and applied-water quantities. Crop drainwater may by reused in agroforestry production, and residual emissions are disposed...

  13. Using Mendelian inheritance errors as quality control criteria in whole genome sequencing data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Valentina V; He, Hua; Kurowski, Brad G; Alexander, Eileen S; Zhang, Xue; Ding, Lili; Mersha, Tesfaye B; Kottyan, Leah; Fardo, David W; Martin, Lisa J

    2014-01-01

    Although the technical and analytic complexity of whole genome sequencing is generally appreciated, best practices for data cleaning and quality control have not been defined. Family based data can be used to guide the standardization of specific quality control metrics in nonfamily based data. Given the low mutation rate, Mendelian inheritance errors are likely as a result of erroneous genotype calls. Thus, our goal was to identify the characteristics that determine Mendelian inheritance errors. To accomplish this, we used chromosome 3 whole genome sequencing family based data from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18. Mendelian inheritance errors were provided as part of the GAW18 data set. Additionally, for binary variants we calculated Mendelian inheritance errors using PLINK. Based on our analysis, nonbinary single-nucleotide variants have an inherently high number of Mendelian inheritance errors. Furthermore, in binary variants, Mendelian inheritance errors are not randomly distributed. Indeed, we identified 3 Mendelian inheritance error peaks that were enriched with repetitive elements. However, these peaks can be lessened with the inclusion of a single filter from the sequencing file. In summary, we demonstrated that erroneous sequencing calls are nonrandomly distributed across the genome and quality control metrics can dramatically reduce the number of mendelian inheritance errors. Appropriate quality control will allow optimal use of genetic data to realize the full potential of whole genome sequencing.

  14. Infection control in anaesthesia in regional, tertiary and central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaesthetic equipment is a potential vector for the transmission of disease. This study was undertaken to observe current infection control practices among anaesthetic nurses regarding the decontamination of anaesthetic equipment in regional, tertiary and central hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal. Method: All ...

  15. Mapping of the genomic regions controlling seed storability in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seed storability is especially important in the tropics due to high temperature and relative humidity of storage environment that cause rapid deterioration of seeds in storage. The objective of this study was to use SSR markers to identify genomic regions associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling seed storability ...

  16. Baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in early heart failure assessed by the sequence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lataro, Renata Maria; Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Fazan, Rubens

    2017-06-01

    The integrity of the baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in heart failure (HF) remains under debate. We proposed the use of the sequence method to assess the baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). The sequence method assesses the spontaneous arterial pressure (AP) fluctuations and their related changes in heart rate (or other efferent responses), providing the sensitivity and the effectiveness of the baroreflex. Effectiveness refers to the fraction of spontaneous AP changes that elicits baroreflex-mediated variations in the efferent response. Using three different approaches, we showed that the baroreflex sensitivity between AP and RSNA is not altered in early HF rats. However, the sequence method provided evidence that the effectiveness of baroreflex in changing RSNA in response to AP changes is markedly decreased in HF. The results help us better understand the baroreflex control of the sympathetic nerve activity. In heart failure (HF), the reflex control of the heart rate is known to be markedly impaired; however, the baroreceptor control of the sympathetic drive remains under debate. Applying the sequence method to a series of arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), we demonstrated a clear dysfunction in the baroreflex control of sympathetic activity in rats with early HF. We analysed the baroreflex control of the sympathetic drive using three different approaches: AP vs. RSNA curve, cross-spectral analysis and sequence method between AP and RSNA. The sequence method also provides the baroreflex effectiveness index (BEI), which represents the percentage of AP ramps that actually produce a reflex response. The methods were applied to control rats and rats with HF induced by myocardial infarction. None of the methods employed to assess the sympathetic baroreflex gain were able to detect any differences between the control and the HF group. However, rats with HF exhibited a lower BEI compared to the

  17. Identification of new polymorphic regions and differentiation of cultivated olives (Olea europaea L. through plastome sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldoni Luciana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cultivated olive (Olea europaea L. is the most agriculturally important species of the Oleaceae family. Although many studies have been performed on plastid polymorphisms to evaluate taxonomy, phylogeny and phylogeography of Olea subspecies, only few polymorphic regions discriminating among the agronomically and economically important olive cultivars have been identified. The objective of this study was to sequence the entire plastome of olive and analyze many potential polymorphic regions to develop new inter-cultivar genetic markers. Results The complete plastid genome of the olive cultivar Frantoio was determined by direct sequence analysis using universal and novel PCR primers designed to amplify all overlapping regions. The chloroplast genome of the olive has an organisation and gene order that is conserved among numerous Angiosperm species and do not contain any of the inversions, gene duplications, insertions, inverted repeat expansions and gene/intron losses that have been found in the chloroplast genomes of the genera Jasminum and Menodora, from the same family as Olea. The annotated sequence was used to evaluate the content of coding genes, the extent, and distribution of repeated and long dispersed sequences and the nucleotide composition pattern. These analyses provided essential information for structural, functional and comparative genomic studies in olive plastids. Furthermore, the alignment of the olive plastome sequence to those of other varieties and species identified 30 new organellar polymorphisms within the cultivated olive. Conclusions In addition to identifying mutations that may play a functional role in modifying the metabolism and adaptation of olive cultivars, the new chloroplast markers represent a valuable tool to assess the level of olive intercultivar plastome variation for use in population genetic analysis, phylogenesis, cultivar characterisation and DNA food tracking.

  18. Sequence of the chloroplast 16S rRNA gene and its surrounding regions of Chlamydomonas reinhardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, M; Rahire, M; Rochaix, J D

    1982-01-01

    The sequence of a 2 kb DNA fragment containing the chloroplast 16S ribosomal RNA gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardii and its flanking regions has been determined. The algal 16S rRNA sequence (1475 nucleotides) and secondary structure are highly related to those found in bacteria and in the chloroplasts of higher plants. In contrast, the flanking regions are very different. In C. reinhardii the 16S rRNA gene is surrounded by AT rich segments of about 180 bases, which are followed by a long stretch of complementary bases separated from each other by 1833 nucleotides. It is likely that these structures play an important role in the folding and processing of the precursor of 16S rRNA. The primary and secondary structures of the binding sites of two ribosomal proteins in the 16SrRNAs of E. coli and C. reinhardii are considerably related. Images PMID:6296784

  19. Recombination in the 5' leader of murine leukemia virus is accurate and influenced by sequence identity with a strong bias toward the kissing-loop dimerization region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1998-01-01

    whether template switching is affected by the length of sequence identity, by palindromic sequences, and/or by putative stem-loop structures. Sixteen of 24 sites of recombination colocalized with the kissing-loop dimerization region, and we propose that RNA-RNA interactions between palindromic sequences...

  20. Three-stage quality control strategies for DNA re-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Ye, Fei; Sheng, Quanghu; Clark, Travis; Samuels, David C

    2014-11-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have greatly improved our ability to detect genomic variants for biomedical research. In particular, NGS technologies have been recently applied with great success to the discovery of mutations associated with the growth of various tumours and in rare Mendelian diseases. The advance in NGS technologies has also created significant challenges in bioinformatics. One of the major challenges is quality control of the sequencing data. In this review, we discuss the proper quality control procedures and parameters for Illumina technology-based human DNA re-sequencing at three different stages of sequencing: raw data, alignment and variant calling. Monitoring quality control metrics at each of the three stages of NGS data provides unique and independent evaluations of data quality from differing perspectives. Properly conducting quality control protocols at all three stages and correctly interpreting the quality control results are crucial to ensure a successful and meaningful study. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Pan-genome sequence analysis using Panseq: an online tool for the rapid analysis of core and accessory genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Andre

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pan-genome of a bacterial species consists of a core and an accessory gene pool. The accessory genome is thought to be an important source of genetic variability in bacterial populations and is gained through lateral gene transfer, allowing subpopulations of bacteria to better adapt to specific niches. Low-cost and high-throughput sequencing platforms have created an exponential increase in genome sequence data and an opportunity to study the pan-genomes of many bacterial species. In this study, we describe a new online pan-genome sequence analysis program, Panseq. Results Panseq was used to identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 and E. coli K-12 genomic islands. Within a population of 60 E. coli O157:H7 strains, the existence of 65 accessory genomic regions identified by Panseq analysis was confirmed by PCR. The accessory genome and binary presence/absence data, and core genome and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of six L. monocytogenes strains were extracted with Panseq and hierarchically clustered and visualized. The nucleotide core and binary accessory data were also used to construct maximum parsimony (MP trees, which were compared to the MP tree generated by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. The topology of the accessory and core trees was identical but differed from the tree produced using seven MLST loci. The Loci Selector module found the most variable and discriminatory combinations of four loci within a 100 loci set among 10 strains in 1 s, compared to the 449 s required to exhaustively search for all possible combinations; it also found the most discriminatory 20 loci from a 96 loci E. coli O157:H7 SNP dataset. Conclusion Panseq determines the core and accessory regions among a collection of genomic sequences based on user-defined parameters. It readily extracts regions unique to a genome or group of genomes, identifies SNPs within shared core genomic regions, constructs files for use in phylogeny programs

  2. Current situation, genetic relationship and control measures of infectious bronchitis virus variants circulating in African regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Khataby

    2016-08-01

    Three S1 gene hypervariable regions were studied and compared to the reference genotypes/serotypes that found emerging in African regions. This comparison was based on phylogenetic trees, nucleotide and amino-acid sequence analysis. It clearly appears that IBV variants reported in Africa, display a low genetic relationship between them and with the majority of the reference strains emerging in neighboring countries, except the case of variants from Libya and Egypt that show a high relatedness. Also the Massachusetts serotypes were the most prevalent co-circulating with both serotypes, Italy02 type in Morocco and Qx-like genotype in South part of the African continent. In order to control the IBV variants in African regions, an efficient vaccination strategy program should be implemented.

  3. Determining geographical variations in Ascaris suum isolated from different regions in northwest China through sequences of three mitochondrial genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yong; Wu, Fei; Guo, Ya-Xu; Wang, Hui-Bao; Fang, Yan-Qin; Kang, Ming; Lin, Qing

    2017-05-01

    The sequence diversities in three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions, namely portions of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (pnad1), cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (pcox1), and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (pnad4), were investigated in all Ascaris suum samples isolated from four regions in northwestern China. Those genes were amplified by PCR method and the lengths of pnad1, pcox1, and pnad4 were 419 bp, 711 bp, and 723 bp, respectively. The intraspecific sequence variations within A. suum samples were 0-2.9% for pnad1, 0-2.1% for pcox1, and 0-3.1% for pnad4. Phylogenetic analysis combined with three sequences of mtDNA fragments showed that all A. suum samples were monophyletic groups, but samples from the same geographical origin did not always cluster together. The results suggested that the three mtDNA fragments could not be used as molecular markers to identify the A. suum isolates from four regions, and have important implications for studying molecular epidemiology and population genetics of A. suum.

  4. Whole genome sequence analyses of Xylella fastidiosa PD strains from different geographical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequences were determined for two Pierce’s disease (PD) causing Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) strains, one from Florida and one from Taiwan. The Florida strain was ATCC 35879, the type of strain used as a standard reference for related taxonomy research. By contrast, the Taiwan strain used was only...

  5. Regional Seminars to Address Current Nuclear Export Control Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killinger, Mark H.

    2002-01-01

    The control of nuclear-related exports, a critical component of the nonproliferation regime, is facing several opportunities and challenges. As countries sign and ratify the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) safeguards Additional Protocol (AP), they will begin to report far more export information, including exports of a list of items similar to the Nuclear Supplier Group's Trigger List that existed when the AP was developed in the mid-1990s. This positive development contrasts with challenges such as globalization, transshipments, and tracking of end-uses. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is proposing that the US Department of Energy (DOE) develop regional seminars that address these types of issues related to export/import controls. The DOE seminars would be designed to supplement regional seminars sponsored by the IAEA and member states on topics related to the Additional Protocol (referred to as 'IAEA seminars'). The topic of nuclear export/import controls is not thoroughly addressed in the IAEA seminars. The proposed DOE seminars would therefore have two objectives: familiarizing countries with the export/import provisions of the Additional Protocol, and addressing challenges such as those noted above. The seminars would be directed particularly at countries that have not ratified the AP, and at regions where export-related problems are particularly prevalent. The intent is to encourage governments to implement more effective nuclear export control systems that meet the challenges of the 21st century.

  6. The Investigation of Promoter Sequences of Marseilleviruses Highlights a Remarkable Abundance of the AAATATTT Motif in Intergenic Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Lima, Maurício Teixeira; Arantes, Thalita Souza; Assis, Felipe Lopes; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-11-01

    Viruses display a wide range of genomic profiles and, consequently, a variety of gene expression strategies. Specific sequences associated with transcriptional processes have been described in viruses, and putative promoter motifs have been elucidated for some nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). Among NCLDV, the Marseilleviridae is a well-recognized family because of its genomic mosaicism. The marseilleviruses have an ability to incorporate foreign genes, especially from sympatric organisms inhabiting Acanthamoeba , its main known host. Here, we identified for the first time an eight-nucleotide A/T-rich promoter sequence (AAATATTT) associated with 55% of marseillevirus genes that is conserved in all marseilleviruses lineages, a higher level of conservation than that of any giant virus described to date. We instigated our prediction about the promoter motif by biological assays and by evaluating how single mutations in this octamer can impact gene expression. The investigation of sequences that regulate the expression of genes relative to lateral transfer revealed that the promoter motifs do not appear to be incorporated by marseilleviruses from donor organisms. Indeed, analyses of the intergenic regions that regulate lateral gene transfer-related genes have revealed an independent origin of the marseillevirus intergenic regions that does not match gene-donor organisms. About 50% of AAATATTT motifs spread throughout intergenic regions of the marseilleviruses are present as multiple copies. We believe that such multiple motifs are associated with increased expression of a given gene or are related to incorporation of foreign genes into the mosaic genome of marseilleviruses. IMPORTANCE The marseilleviruses draw attention because of the peculiar features of their genomes; however, little is known about their gene expression patterns or the factors that regulate those expression patterns. The limited published research on the expression patterns of the

  7. Nucleotide sequence analysis of regions of adenovirus 5 DNA containing the origins of DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbergh, P.H.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the investigations described is the determination of nucleotide sequences at the molecular ends of the linear adenovirus type 5 DNA. Knowledge of the primary structure at the termini of this DNA molecule is of particular interest in the study of the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. The initiation- and termination sites of adenovirus DNA replication are located at the ends of the DNA molecule. (Auth.)

  8. Cytoplasmic protein binding to highly conserved sequences in the 3' untranslated region of mouse protamine 2 mRNA, a translationally regulated transcript of male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Y.K.; Hecht, N.B.

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the protamines, the predominant nuclear proteins of mammalian spermatozoa, is regulated translationally during male germ-cell development. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of protamine 1 mRNA has been reported to control its time of translation. To understand the mechanisms controlling translation of the protamine mRNAs, we have sought to identify cis elements of the 3' UTR of protamine 2 mRNA that are recognized by cytoplasmic factors. From gel retardation assays, two sequence elements are shown to form specific RNA-protein complexes. Protein binding sites of the two complexes were determined by RNase T1 mapping, by blocking the putative binding sites with antisense oligonucleotides, and by competition assays. The sequences of these elements, located between nucleotides + 537 and + 572 in protamine 2 mRNA, are highly conserved among postmeiotic translationally regulated nuclear proteins of the mammalian testis. Two closely linked protein binding sites were detected. UV-crosslinking studies revealed that a protein of about 18 kDa binds to one of the conserved sequences. These data demonstrate specific protein binding to a highly conserved 3' UTR of translationally regulated testicular mRNA

  9. Sequence analysis of the ORF 7 region of transmissible gastroenteritis viruses isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ho; Han, Jeong Hee; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2008-02-01

    Three (KT2, 133, and DAE) transmissible gastroenteritis viruses (TGEVs) were isolated from pigs suspected of having TGE in Korea. One, KT2 (KT2-L), was passaged 128 times (KT2-H) in swine testicular cells. The open reading frame 7 (ORF 7) gene from each of the four TGEVs (KT2-L, KT2-H, 133, and DAE), which is located at the 3' end of the TGEV genome, was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amplified PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and compared with published sequences of non-Korean TGEV strains. Differences in replication and cytopathic effect (CPE) between the KT2-L and KT2-H strains in swine testicular cells were investigated. Korean TGEV field strains had 94.8-99.6% nucleotide and 92.1-98.7% amino acid sequence similarity with each other, and 87.8-100.0% nucleotide and 84.2-100.0% amino acid sequence similarity with non-Korean TGEV strains. Compared to the original KT2-L strain, the KT2-H strain differed by 2.2 and 3.9% in nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. Specifically, the KT2-H had six nucleotide and two amino acid deletions compared to the original KT2-L strain. In phylogenetic analysis of the ORF 7 gene, Korean TGEV strains were clustered into two groups. One group (KT2-L, KT2-H, 133) was related to TGEV strains isolated in Japan. Another Korean TGEV isolate (DAE) was related to a strain from China and one from the USA. The Korean TGEV isolates appear to have evolved from a separate lineage of TGEV strain. Differences in growth rate and CPE between the KT2-L and KT2-H strains were discovered in swine testicular cells (STCs). The KT2-H strain exhibited a higher replication rate than KT2-L and produced a CPE distinctly different from that of the KT2-L strain.

  10. More than 1,001 problems with protein domain databases: transmembrane regions, signal peptides and the issue of sequence homology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Cheong Wong

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome sequencing gained general importance for life science because functional annotation of otherwise experimentally uncharacterized sequences is made possible by the theory of biomolecular sequence homology. Historically, the paradigm of similarity of protein sequences implying common structure, function and ancestry was generalized based on studies of globular domains. Having the same fold imposes strict conditions over the packing in the hydrophobic core requiring similarity of hydrophobic patterns. The implications of sequence similarity among non-globular protein segments have not been studied to the same extent; nevertheless, homology considerations are silently extended for them. This appears especially detrimental in the case of transmembrane helices (TMs and signal peptides (SPs where sequence similarity is necessarily a consequence of physical requirements rather than common ancestry. Thus, matching of SPs/TMs creates the illusion of matching hydrophobic cores. Therefore, inclusion of SPs/TMs into domain models can give rise to wrong annotations. More than 1001 domains among the 10,340 models of Pfam release 23 and 18 domains of SMART version 6 (out of 809 contain SP/TM regions. As expected, fragment-mode HMM searches generate promiscuous hits limited to solely the SP/TM part among clearly unrelated proteins. More worryingly, we show explicit examples that the scores of clearly false-positive hits, even in global-mode searches, can be elevated into the significance range just by matching the hydrophobic runs. In the PIR iProClass database v3.74 using conservative criteria, we find that at least between 2.1% and 13.6% of its annotated Pfam hits appear unjustified for a set of validated domain models. Thus, false-positive domain hits enforced by SP/TM regions can lead to dramatic annotation errors where the hit has nothing in common with the problematic domain model except the SP/TM region itself. We suggest a workflow of

  11. 40 CFR 81.88 - Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.88 Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Montana) has been renamed the Billings Intrastate Air Quality Control... to by Montana authorities as follows: Sec. 481.168Great Falls Intrastate Air Quality Control Region...

  12. Regional seismic stratigraphy and controls on the Quaternary evolution of the Cape Hatteras region of the Atlantic passive margin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinson, D.J.; Culver, S.J.; Riggs, S.R.; Thieler, E.R.; Foster, D.; Wehmiller, J.; Farrell, K.M.; Pierson, J.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic and core data, combined with amino acid racemization and strontium-isotope age data, enable the definition of the Quaternary stratigraphic framework and recognition of geologic controls on the development of the modern coastal system of North Carolina, U.S.A. Seven regionally continuous high amplitude reflections are defined which bound six seismic stratigraphic units consisting of multiple regionally discontinuous depositional sequences and parasequence sets, and enable an understanding of the evolution of this margin. Data reveal the progressive eastward progradation and aggradation of the Quaternary shelf. The early Pleistocene inner shelf occurs at a depth of ca. 20-40 m beneath the western part of the modern estuarine system (Pamlico Sound). A mid- to outer shelf lowstand terrace (also early Pleistocene) with shelf sand ridge deposits comprising parasequence sets within a transgressive systems tract, occurs at a deeper level (ca. 45-70 m) beneath the modern barrier island system (the Outer Banks) and northern Pamlico Sound. Seismic and foraminiferal paleoenvironmental data from cores indicate the occurrence of lowstand strandplain shoreline deposits on the early to middle Pleistocene shelf. Middle to late Pleistocene deposits occur above a prominent unconformity and marine flooding surface that truncates underlying units, and contain numerous filled fluvial valleys that are incised into the early and middle Pleistocene deposits. The stratigraphic framework suggests margin progradation and aggradation modified by an increase in the magnitude of sea-level fluctuations during the middle to late Pleistocene, expressed as falling stage, lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tracts. Thick stratigraphic sequences occur within the middle Pleistocene section, suggesting the occurrence of high capacity fluvial point sources debouching into the area from the west and north. Furthermore, the antecedent topography plays a significant role in the evolution

  13. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY) Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili Azghandi, Masoume; Nasiri, Mohammadreza; Shamsa, Ali; Jalali, Mohsen; Shariati, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-04-01

    The SRY gene (SRY) provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/) and MEGA6 softwares. The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale) and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin) have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee) have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar.

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the 18S-26S rRNA intergene region of the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindenach, B R; Stafford, D W

    1984-02-10

    The DNA sequence which spans the internal transcribed spacers of a cloned ribosomal transcription unit from the sea urchin, Lytechinus variegatus, has been determined. The region extends from the conserved Eco RI site near the 3' end of the 18S rDNA to a Bam HI site in the 26S rDNA and includes 232 nucleotides coding for 18S rRNA, 367 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer, 159 nucleotides coding for 5.8S rRNA, 338 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer, and 505 nucleotides coding for 26S rRNA. The rRNA coding regions were identified by direct analysis of 3'-labeled 18S and 5.8S rRNA and 5'-labeled 5.8S rRNA, and by sequence homology of the 26S rDNA with yeast and vertebrate 26/28S rRNAs. The internal transcribed spacers are GC-rich, similar to those of vertebrates. The 5.8S and 5' 26S rDNA sequences support a proposed model for a structural domain of the yeast large subunit ribosomal RNA (Veldman et al. [1981] Nucleic Acids Res. 9, 6935-6952).

  15. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Vakili Azghandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The SRY gene (SRY provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Methods: Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/ and MEGA6 softwares. Results: The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar.

  16. Sequence Analysis of How Disability Influenced Life Trajectories in a Past Population from the Nineteenth-Century Sundsvall Region, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Vikström

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Historically, little is known about whether and to what extent disabled people found work and formed families. To fill this gap, this study analyses the life course trajectories of both disabled and non-disabled individuals, between the ages of 15 and 33, from the Sundsvall region in Sweden during the nineteenth century. Having access to micro-data that report disabilities in a population of 8,874 individuals from the parish registers digitised by the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, we employ sequence analysis on a series of events that are expected to occur in life of young adults: getting a job, marrying and becoming a parent, while also taking into account out-migration and death. Through this method we obtain a holistic picture of the life course of disabled people. Main findings show that their trajectories did not include work or family to the same extent as those of non-disabled people. Secondary findings concerning migration and mortality indicate that the disabled rarely out-migrated from the region, and they suffered from premature deaths. To our knowledge this is the first study to employ sequence analysis on a substantially large number of cases to provide demographic evidence of how disability shaped human trajectories in the past during an extended period of life. Accordingly, we detail our motivation for this method, describe our analytical approach, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages associated with sequence analysis for our case study.

  17. Draft genome sequence of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia), a vegetable and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasaki, Naoya; Takagi, Hiroki; Natsume, Satoshi; Uemura, Aiko; Taniai, Naoki; Miyagi, Norimichi; Fukushima, Mai; Suzuki, Shouta; Tarora, Kazuhiko; Tamaki, Moritoshi; Sakamoto, Moriaki; Terauchi, Ryohei; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-02-01

    Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is an important vegetable and medicinal plant in tropical and subtropical regions globally. In this study, the draft genome sequence of a monoecious bitter gourd inbred line, OHB3-1, was analyzed. Through Illumina sequencing and de novo assembly, scaffolds of 285.5 Mb in length were generated, corresponding to ∼84% of the estimated genome size of bitter gourd (339 Mb). In this draft genome sequence, 45,859 protein-coding gene loci were identified, and transposable elements accounted for 15.3% of the whole genome. According to synteny mapping and phylogenetic analysis of conserved genes, bitter gourd was more related to watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) than to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) or melon (C. melo). Using RAD-seq analysis, 1507 marker loci were genotyped in an F2 progeny of two bitter gourd lines, resulting in an improved linkage map, comprising 11 linkage groups. By anchoring RAD tag markers, 255 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map. Comparative analysis of genome sequences and predicted genes determined that putative trypsin-inhibitor and ribosome-inactivating genes were distinctive in the bitter gourd genome. These genes could characterize the bitter gourd as a medicinal plant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  18. Molecular Identification of Isolated Fungi from Unopened Containers of Greek Yogurt by DNA Sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad M. Sulaiman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In our previous study, we described the development of an internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 sequencing method, and used this protocol in species-identification of isolated fungi collected from the manufacturing areas of a compounding company known to have caused the multistate fungal meningitis outbreak in the United States. In this follow-up study, we have analyzed the unopened vials of Greek yogurt from the recalled batch to determine the possible cause of microbial contamination in the product. A total of 15 unopened vials of Greek yogurt belonging to the recalled batch were examined for the detection of fungi in these samples known to cause foodborne illness following conventional microbiological protocols. Fungi were isolated from all of the 15 Greek yogurt samples analyzed. The isolated fungi were genetically typed by DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified ITS1 region of rRNA gene. Analysis of data confirmed all of the isolated fungal isolates from the Greek yogurt to be Rhizomucor variabilis. The generated ITS1 sequences matched 100% with the published sequences available in GenBank. In addition, these yogurt samples were also tested for the presence of five types of bacteria (Salmonella, Listeria, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Escherichia coli causing foodborne disease in humans, and found negative for all of them.

  19. Genome-Based Identification of Active Prophage Regions by Next Generation Sequencing in Bacillus licheniformis DSM13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Robert; Rodríguez, David Pintor; Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Dietrich, Sascha; Leimbach, Andreas; Hoppert, Michael; Liesegang, Heiko; Volland, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Prophages are viruses, which have integrated their genomes into the genome of a bacterial host. The status of the prophage genome can vary from fully intact with the potential to form infective particles to a remnant state where only a few phage genes persist. Prophages have impact on the properties of their host and are therefore of great interest for genomic research and strain design. Here we present a genome- and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for identification and activity evaluation of prophage regions. Seven prophage or prophage-like regions were identified in the genome of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13. Six of these regions show similarity to members of the Siphoviridae phage family. The remaining region encodes the B. licheniformis orthologue of the PBSX prophage from Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of isolated phage particles (induced by mitomycin C) from the wild-type strain and prophage deletion mutant strains revealed activity of the prophage regions BLi_Pp2 (PBSX-like), BLi_Pp3 and BLi_Pp6. In contrast to BLi_Pp2 and BLi_Pp3, neither phage DNA nor phage particles of BLi_Pp6 could be visualized. However, the ability of prophage BLi_Pp6 to generate particles could be confirmed by sequencing of particle-protected DNA mapping to prophage locus BLi_Pp6. The introduced NGS-based approach allows the investigation of prophage regions and their ability to form particles. Our results show that this approach increases the sensitivity of prophage activity analysis and can complement more conventional approaches such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PMID:25811873

  20. Genome-based identification of active prophage regions by next generation sequencing in Bacillus licheniformis DSM13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Robert; Rodríguez, David Pintor; Hollensteiner, Jacqueline; Dietrich, Sascha; Leimbach, Andreas; Hoppert, Michael; Liesegang, Heiko; Volland, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Prophages are viruses, which have integrated their genomes into the genome of a bacterial host. The status of the prophage genome can vary from fully intact with the potential to form infective particles to a remnant state where only a few phage genes persist. Prophages have impact on the properties of their host and are therefore of great interest for genomic research and strain design. Here we present a genome- and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for identification and activity evaluation of prophage regions. Seven prophage or prophage-like regions were identified in the genome of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13. Six of these regions show similarity to members of the Siphoviridae phage family. The remaining region encodes the B. licheniformis orthologue of the PBSX prophage from Bacillus subtilis. Analysis of isolated phage particles (induced by mitomycin C) from the wild-type strain and prophage deletion mutant strains revealed activity of the prophage regions BLi_Pp2 (PBSX-like), BLi_Pp3 and BLi_Pp6. In contrast to BLi_Pp2 and BLi_Pp3, neither phage DNA nor phage particles of BLi_Pp6 could be visualized. However, the ability of prophage BLi_Pp6 to generate particles could be confirmed by sequencing of particle-protected DNA mapping to prophage locus BLi_Pp6. The introduced NGS-based approach allows the investigation of prophage regions and their ability to form particles. Our results show that this approach increases the sensitivity of prophage activity analysis and can complement more conventional approaches such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  1. Phylogenetic relationship of Paenibacillus species based on putative replication origin regions and analysis of an yheCD-like sequence found in this region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Otao, Masahiro; Mori, Kazuki; Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Tashiro, Kousuke; Asano, Shin-Ichiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2014-01-01

    To determine the phylogenetic relationship among Paenibacillus species, putative replication origin regions were compared. In the rsmG-gyrA region, gene arrangements in Paenibacillus species were identical to those of Bacillus species, with the exception of an open reading frame (orf14) positioned between gyrB and gyrA, which was observed only in Paenibacillus species. The orf14 product was homologous to the endospore-associated proteins YheC and YheD of Bacillus subtilis. Phylogenetic analysis based on the YheCD proteins suggested that Orf14 could be categorized into the YheC group. In the Paenibacillus genome, DnaA box clusters were found in rpmH-dnaA and dnaA-dnaN intergenic regions, known as box regions C and R, respectively; this localization was similar to that observed in B. halodurans. A phylogenetic tree based on the nucleotide sequences of the whole replication origin regions suggested that P. popilliae, P. thiaminolyticus, and P. dendritiformis are closely related species.

  2. Identification of similar regions of protein structures using integrated sequence and structure analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiland Randy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding protein function from its structure is a challenging problem. Sequence based approaches for finding homology have broad use for annotation of both structure and function. 3D structural information of protein domains and their interactions provide a complementary view to structure function relationships to sequence information. We have developed a web site http://www.sblest.org/ and an API of web services that enables users to submit protein structures and identify statistically significant neighbors and the underlying structural environments that make that match using a suite of sequence and structure analysis tools. To do this, we have integrated S-BLEST, PSI-BLAST and HMMer based superfamily predictions to give a unique integrated view to prediction of SCOP superfamilies, EC number, and GO term, as well as identification of the protein structural environments that are associated with that prediction. Additionally, we have extended UCSF Chimera and PyMOL to support our web services, so that users can characterize their own proteins of interest. Results Users are able to submit their own queries or use a structure already in the PDB. Currently the databases that a user can query include the popular structural datasets ASTRAL 40 v1.69, ASTRAL 95 v1.69, CLUSTER50, CLUSTER70 and CLUSTER90 and PDBSELECT25. The results can be downloaded directly from the site and include function prediction, analysis of the most conserved environments and automated annotation of query proteins. These results reflect both the hits found with PSI-BLAST, HMMer and with S-BLEST. We have evaluated how well annotation transfer can be performed on SCOP ID's, Gene Ontology (GO ID's and EC Numbers. The method is very efficient and totally automated, generally taking around fifteen minutes for a 400 residue protein. Conclusion With structural genomics initiatives determining structures with little, if any, functional characterization

  3. Sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for targeted genomic regions: its application in generating a molecular map of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Binod B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular markers facilitate both genotype identification, essential for modern animal and plant breeding, and the isolation of genes based on their map positions. Advancements in sequencing technology have made possible the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for any genomic regions. Here a sequence based polymorphic (SBP marker technology for generating molecular markers for targeted genomic regions in Arabidopsis is described. Results A ~3X genome coverage sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype, Niederzenz (Nd-0 was obtained by applying Illumina's sequencing by synthesis (Solexa technology. Comparison of the Nd-0 genome sequence with the assembled Columbia-0 (Col-0 genome sequence identified putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs throughout the entire genome. Multiple 75 base pair Nd-0 sequence reads containing SNPs and originating from individual genomic DNA molecules were the basis for developing co-dominant SBP markers. SNPs containing Col-0 sequences, supported by transcript sequences or sequences from multiple BAC clones, were compared to the respective Nd-0 sequences to identify possible restriction endonuclease enzyme site variations. Small amplicons, PCR amplified from both ecotypes, were digested with suitable restriction enzymes and resolved on a gel to reveal the sequence based polymorphisms. By applying this technology, 21 SBP markers for the marker poor regions of the Arabidopsis map representing polymorphisms between Col-0 and Nd-0 ecotypes were generated. Conclusions The SBP marker technology described here allowed the development of molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of Arabidopsis. It should facilitate isolation of co-dominant molecular markers for targeted genomic regions of any animal or plant species, whose genomic sequences have been assembled. This technology will particularly facilitate the development of high density molecular marker maps, essential for

  4. Distinct cis-acting regions control six6 expression during eye field and optic cup stages of eye formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Kelley L; Martinez-De Luna, Reyna I; Theisen, Matthew A; Rawlins, Karisa D; Viczian, Andrea S; Zuber, Michael E

    2017-06-15

    The eye field transcription factor, Six6, is essential for both the early (specification and proliferative growth) phase of eye formation, as well as for normal retinal progenitor cell differentiation. While genomic regions driving six6 optic cup expression have been described, the sequences controlling eye field and optic vesicle expression are unknown. Two evolutionary conserved regions 5' and a third 3' to the six6 coding region were identified, and together they faithfully replicate the endogenous X. laevis six6 expression pattern. Transgenic lines were generated and used to determine the onset and expression patterns controlled by the regulatory regions. The conserved 3' region was necessary and sufficient for eye field and optic vesicle expression. In contrast, the two conserved enhancer regions located 5' of the coding sequence were required together for normal optic cup and mature retinal expression. Gain-of-function experiments indicate endogenous six6 and GFP expression in F 1 transgenic embryos are similarly regulated in response to candidate trans-acting factors. Importantly, CRISPR/CAS9-mediated deletion of the 3' eye field/optic vesicle enhancer in X. laevis, resulted in a reduction in optic vesicle size. These results identify the cis-acting regions, demonstrate the modular nature of the elements controlling early versus late retinal expression, and identify potential regulators of six6 expression during the early stages of eye formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical modeling of block structure dynamics: Application to the Vrancea region and study of earthquakes sequences in the synthetic catalogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, A.A.; Vorobieva, I.A.

    1995-08-01

    A seismically active region is represented as a system of absolutely rigid blocks divided by infinitely thin plane faults. The interaction of the blocks along the fault planes and with the underlying medium is viscous-elastic. The system of blocks moves as a consequence of prescribed motion of boundary blocks and the underlying medium. When for some part of a fault plane the stress surpasses a certain strength level a stress-drop (''a failure'') occurs. It can cause a failure for other parts of fault planes. The failures are considered as earthquakes. As a result of the numerical simulation a synthetic earthquake catalogue is produced. This procedure is applied for numerical modeling of dynamics of the block structure approximating the tectonic structure of the Vrancea region. By numerical experiments the values of the model parameters were obtained which supplied the synthetic earthquake catalog with the space distribution of epicenters close to the real distribution of the earthquake epicenters in the Vrancea region. The frequency-magnitude relations (Gutenberg-Richter curves) obtained for the synthetic and real catalogs have some common features. The sequences of earthquakes arising in the model are studied for some artificial structures. It is found that ''foreshocks'', ''main shocks'', and ''aftershocks'' could be detected among earthquakes forming the sequences. The features of aftershocks, foreshocks, and catalogs of main shocks are analysed. (author). 5 refs, 12 figs, 16 tabs

  6. Conserved sequences of BART and BHRF regions encoding viral microRNAs in Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Keishin; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Fukumoto, Hitomi; Hasegawa, Hideki; Katano, Harutaka

    2017-07-14

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encodes at least 25 pri-microRNAs (miRNAs) in two regions of its DNA genome, BART and BHRF. B95-8, an EBV reference strain, has a deletion in the BART region. However, no information is available on the deletions or mutations in the BART and BHRF regions in clinical samples of EBV-associated lymphoma. Nine DNA fragments encoding miR-BARTs and two coding miR-BHRF1s were amplified by PCR from DNA samples extracted from 16 cases of EBV-associated lymphoma. All the PCR products were sequenced directly. DNA fragments encoding miR-BARTs and miR-BHRF1-1 were successfully amplified from all samples. An adenine-to-guanine mutation in the DNA fragment encoding miR-BART2-3p was detected in four of the 16 cases, and a cytosine-to-thymidine mutation in the DNA fragment encoding miR-BART11-3p was detected in one of the 16 samples. These mutations were not associated with any histological categories of lymphoma. In conclusion, mutations were rarely observed in the DNA encoding viral miRNAs in cases of lymphoma. This suggests that the DNA sequences of EBV-encoded miR-BARTs and miR-BHRF1-1 are conserved in EBV-associated lymphoma.

  7. Mitochondrial haplogroups, control region polymorphisms and malignant melanoma: a study in middle European Caucasians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Ebner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because mitochondria play an essential role in energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis, sequence variation in the mitochondrial genome has been postulated to be a contributing factor to the etiology of multifactorial age-related diseases, including cancer. The aim of the present study was to compare the frequencies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups as well as control region (CR polymorphisms of patients with malignant melanoma (n = 351 versus those of healthy controls (n = 1598 in Middle Europe. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using primer extension analysis and DNA sequencing, we identified all nine major European mitochondrial haplogroups and known CR polymorphisms. The frequencies of the major mitochondrial haplogroups did not differ significantly between patients and control subjects, whereas the frequencies of the one another linked CR polymorphisms A16183C, T16189C, C16192T, C16270T and T195C were significantly higher in patients with melanoma compared to the controls. Regarding clinical characteristics of the patient cohort, none of the nine major European haplogroups was associated with either Breslow thickness or distant metastasis. The CR polymorphisms A302CC-insertion and T310C-insertion were significantly associated with mean Breslow thickness, whereas the CR polymorphism T16519C was associated with metastasis. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that mtDNA variations could be involved in melanoma etiology and pathogenesis, although the functional consequence of CR polymorphisms remains to be elucidated.

  8. Broader pattern of tandem repeats in the mitochondrial control region of Perciformes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yuan; Chu, Ka Hou

    2010-07-01

    Perciformes, the largest order of vertebrates with 20 suborders, is the most diverse fish order that dominates vertebrate ocean life. The complete mitochondrial control region (CR) of Trichiurus japonicus (Trichiuridae, Scombroidei) and Pampus sp. (Stromateidae, Stromateoidei) were amplified and sequenced. Together with data from GenBank, the tandem repeats in the mitochondrial CR from 48 species, which covered nine suborders of Perciformes, are reported in this study. The tandem repeats tend to be long in the suborder Percoidei and Stromateoidei. The identical repeats in 21 species of Cichlidae suggest a common origin and have existed before species divergence. Larimichthys crocea shows tandem repeats instead of the typical structure of the central conserved sequence blocks, which was first reported in Perciformes and vertebrates. This might have resulted from interruption of the polymerase activity during the H-strand synthesis. The four broader patterns presented here for the tandem repeats, including those in both the 5' and 3' ends, only in the either 5' or 3' end, and in the central conserved domain of the control region, will be useful for understanding the evolution of species.

  9. Predictive design of mRNA translation initiation region to control prokaryotic translation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Inhae; Yang, Jina; Min, Byung Eun; Kim, Sanguk; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Precise prediction of prokaryotic translation efficiency can provide valuable information for optimizing bacterial host for the production of biochemical compounds or recombinant proteins. However, dynamic changes in mRNA folding throughout translation make it difficult to assess translation efficiency. Here, we systematically determined the universal folding regions that significantly affect the efficiency of translation in Escherichia coli. By assessing the specific regions for mRNA folding, we could construct a predictive design method, UTR Designer, and demonstrate that proper codon optimization around the 5'-proximal coding sequence is necessary to achieve a broad range of expression levels. Finally, we applied our method to control the threshold value of input signals switching on a genetic circuit. This should increase our understanding of the processes underlying gene expression and provide an efficient design principle for optimizing various biological systems, thereby facilitating future efforts in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the 18S-26S rRNA intergene region of the sea urchin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hindenach, B R; Stafford, D W

    1984-01-01

    The DNA sequence which spans the internal transcribed spacers of a cloned ribosomal transcription unit from the sea urchin, Lytechinus variegatus, has been determined. The region extends from the conserved Eco RI site near the 3' end of the 18S rDNA to a Bam HI site in the 26S rDNA and includes 232 nucleotides coding for 18S rRNA, 367 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer, 159 nucleotides coding for 5.8S rRNA, 338 nucleotides of internal transcribed spacer, and 505 nucleotides coding for...

  11. Diversity analysis of Bemisia tabaci biotypes: RAPD, PCR-RFLP and sequencing of the ITS1 rDNA region

    OpenAIRE

    Rabello, Aline R.; Queiroz, Paulo R.; Simões, Kenya C.C.; Hiragi, Cássia O.; Lima, Luzia H.C.; Oliveira, Maria Regina V.; Mehta, Angela

    2008-01-01

    The Bemisia tabaci complex is formed by approximately 41 biotypes, two of which (B and BR) occur in Brazil. In this work we aimed at obtaining genetic markers to assess the genetic diversity of the different biotypes. In order to do that we analyzed Bemisia tabaci biotypes B, BR, Q and Cassava using molecular techniques including RAPD, PCR-RFLP and sequencing of the ITS1 rDNA region. The analyses revealed a high similarity between the individuals of the B and Q biotypes, which could be distin...

  12. A modification to the SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region method provides phylogenetic insights within Ceratozamia (Zamiaceae Una modificación al método SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region aporta entendimiento filogenético en Ceratozamia (Zamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores González

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationships among closely related plant species are still problematic. DNA intergenic regions often are insufficiently variable to provide desired resolution or support. In this study, a modification to the Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR method was used to find polymorphic loci for phylogenetic analyses within Ceratozamia. RAPD markers were first used to detect variation in 5 species. Then, equal length fragments found in 2 or more species were excised from the gel, purified and digested with frequent cutter restriction enzymes for isolating both ends, which have the same primer site. Digested fragments were sequenced with the RAPD primer. Variable sequences were used to design specific primers for amplifying and sequencing in all species for phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirmed the previously known high genome sequence resemblance within this genus that contrasts with its high morphological variation. Only 7 parsimony informative characters were found with this approach. Nonetheless, the Digested-SCAR (D-SCAR method provided some phylogenetic insights. Four main clades consistent with distribution ranges of the species were detected. The approach presented here was effective to solve some relationships within the genus and can potentially be implemented in other organisms to find polymorphic loci for phylogenetic studies at any taxonomic level.Las relaciones filogenéticas entre especies de plantas cercanamente relacionadas es aún problemático. Las regiones intergénicas del ADN son a menudo insuficientemente variables para proveer los niveles de resolución y soporte deseados. En este estudio, se usó una modificación al método Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR para encontrar loci polimórficos para análisis filogenéticos en Ceratozamia. Primero se usaron marcadores RAPD para detectar variación en 5 especies; luego, se cortaron del gel los fragmentos de la misma longitud en 2 o m

  13. Problems of the results interpretation from different sequences and the better integration on the pollen data of the Baltic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapelko, Tatyana

    2017-04-01

    human impact on the vegetation sometimes exceeded the climatic impact. Pollen data from peat sediments allowed us to describe non-anthropogenic part of changes in vegetation and in climate at the local level, while pollen data from the archaeological site made it possible to reconstruct human-influenced vegetation and landscape at the same level. Marine sediments were studied in the eastern part of the Gulf of Finland. Upon this, we have traced the dynamics of vegetation in large parts of the Baltic region during the Last Pleistocene - Holocene. However, it is difficult to judge the development of a particular region, for example, of the Karelian Isthmus, through studying marine sediment data, since it allows to only characterize the vegetation at the zonal level. In addition, marine sediments often contain a hiatus in sedimentation. In particular in the studied sequence the absence of the Boreal period deposits was noted. As a result, we have traced the changes in the environment at the local, regional and zonal level. This in turn made it possible to identify similarities and differences in the pollen zones of different sequences and to interpret the results correctly.

  14. 40 CFR 81.87 - Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.87 Section 81.87 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.87 Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boise Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Idaho) consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  15. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region...

  16. 40 CFR 81.59 - Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.59 Section 81.59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.59 Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Cumberland-Keyser Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland-West Virginia) has been revised to consist...

  17. 40 CFR 81.116 - Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.116 Section 81.116 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.116 Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northern Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  18. 40 CFR 81.49 - Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.49 Section 81.49 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.49 Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the territorial area...

  19. 40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81.123 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123 Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  20. 40 CFR 81.122 - Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.122 Section 81.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.122 Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Mississippi Delta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  1. 40 CFR 81.43 - Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.43 Section 81.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.43 Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Toledo Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Michigan) consists of the territorial area...

  2. 40 CFR 81.67 - Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.67 Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Menominee-Escanaba (Michigan)-Marinette (Wisconsin) Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Lake Michigan Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) and revised to consist of the territorial area...

  3. 40 CFR 81.78 - Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.78 Section 81.78 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.78 Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Portland Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maine) consists of the territorial area...

  4. 40 CFR 81.51 - Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.51 Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Oregon-Washington) has been revised to consist of the territorial area... Portland Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Oregon-Washington) will be referred to by Washington...

  5. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.16 Section 81.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial area...

  6. 40 CFR 81.24 - Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.24 Section 81.24 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.24 Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Niagara Frontier Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial area...

  7. 40 CFR 81.48 - Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.48 Section 81.48 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.48 Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Champlain Valley Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Vermont-New York) has been revised to consist of the...

  8. 40 CFR 81.104 - Central Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.104 Section 81.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.104 Central Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  9. 40 CFR 81.115 - Northwest Nevada Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.115 Section 81.115 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.115 Northwest Nevada Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northwest Nevada Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  10. 40 CFR 81.62 - Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.62 Section 81.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.62 Northeast Mississippi Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Alabama-Mississippi-Tennessee Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeast...

  11. 40 CFR 81.75 - Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.75 Section 81.75 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.75 Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Charlotte Interstate Air Quality Control Region (North Carolina-South Carolina) has been revised...

  12. 40 CFR 81.23 - Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.23 Section 81.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.23 Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Pennsylvania Intrastate Air Quality Control Region is redesignated to consist of the territorial...

  13. 40 CFR 81.28 - Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.28 Section 81.28 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.28 Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Baltimore Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Maryland) consists of the territorial area...

  14. 40 CFR 81.118 - Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.118 Section 81.118 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.118 Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southwest Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  15. 40 CFR 81.36 - Maricopa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.36 Maricopa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Phoenix-Tucson Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Maricopa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maricopa Intrastate Air Quality...

  16. 40 CFR 81.41 - Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.41 Section 81.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.41 Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Birmingham Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alabama) has been revised to consist of the...

  17. 40 CFR 81.31 - Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.31 Section 81.31 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.31 Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Providence Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Rhode Island-Massachusetts) consists of the...

  18. 40 CFR 81.29 - Metropolitan Indianapolis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region. 81.29 Section 81.29 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.29 Metropolitan Indianapolis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Indianapolis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial...

  19. 40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81.47 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Central Oklahoma Intrastate...

  20. 40 CFR 81.45 - Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.45 Section 81.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.45 Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Atlanta Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia) has been revised to consist of the...

  1. 40 CFR 81.30 - Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.30 Section 81.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.30 Southeastern Wisconsin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Milwaukee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wisconsin) has been renamed the Southeastern...

  2. 40 CFR 81.101 - Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.101 Section 81.101 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.101 Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dubuque Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa-Wisconsin) consists of the...

  3. 40 CFR 81.117 - Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.117 Section 81.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.117 Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Southeast Missouri Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  4. 40 CFR 81.20 - Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.20 Section 81.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.20 Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cincinnati Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana) is revised to consist of...

  5. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.19 Section 81.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial area...

  6. 40 CFR 81.98 - Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.98 Section 81.98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.98 Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Burlington-Keokuk Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa) is revised to consist of the...

  7. 40 CFR 81.14 - Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.14 Section 81.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.14 Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Chicago Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Indiana) is revised to consist of the...

  8. 40 CFR 81.44 - Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.44 Section 81.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.44 Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Memphis Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Arkansas-Mississippi-Tennessee) consists of the...

  9. 40 CFR 81.119 - Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.119 Section 81.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.119 Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Western Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by...

  10. 40 CFR 81.34 - Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.34 Section 81.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.34 Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Dayton Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  11. 40 CFR 81.106 - Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.106 Section 81.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.106 Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Greenville-Spartanburg Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial...

  12. 40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81.79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79 Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Tulsa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate...

  13. 40 CFR 81.89 - Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.89 Section 81.89 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.89 Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Cheyenne Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Wyoming) consists of the territorial area...

  14. Neuropeptide processing in regional brain slices: Effect of conformation and sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.W.; Bijl, W.A.; van Nispen, J.W.; Brendel, K.; Davis, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The central enzymatic stability of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and its synthetic analogs [cycloN alpha 6, C delta 11]beta-endorphin-[6-17] and [Pro7, Lys(Ac)9]-beta-endorphin[6-17] was studied in vitro using a newly developed, regionally dissected rat brain slice, time course incubation procedure. Tissue slice viability was estimated as the ability of the brain slice to take up or release gamma-[3H]aminobutyric acid after high K+ stimulation. Results demonstrated stability of uptake/release up to 5 hr of incubation, suggesting tissue viability over this period. The estimated half-life of peptides based on the results obtained in our incubation protocol suggest that the peptides studied are metabolized at different rates in the individual brain regions tested. A good correlation exists between the high enzyme activity of neutral endopeptidase and the rapid degradation of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and [cycloN alpha 6, C delata 11]beta-endorphin-[6-17] in caudate putamen. Proline substitution combined with lysine acetylation appears to improve resistance to enzymatic metabolism in caudate putamen and hypothalamus. However, cyclization of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin forming an amide bond between the alpha-NH2 of the N-terminal threonine and the gamma-COOH of glutamic acid did not improve peptide stability in any brain region tested. The present study has shown that the brain slice technique is a valid and unique approach to study neuropeptide metabolism in small, discrete regions of rat brain where peptides, peptidases and receptors are colocalized and that specific structural modifications can improve peptide stability

  15. Neuropeptide processing in regional brain slices: Effect of conformation and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.W.; Bijl, W.A.; van Nispen, J.W.; Brendel, K.; Davis, T.P. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The central enzymatic stability of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and its synthetic analogs (cycloN alpha 6, C delta 11)beta-endorphin-(6-17) and (Pro7, Lys(Ac)9)-beta-endorphin(6-17) was studied in vitro using a newly developed, regionally dissected rat brain slice, time course incubation procedure. Tissue slice viability was estimated as the ability of the brain slice to take up or release gamma-(3H)aminobutyric acid after high K+ stimulation. Results demonstrated stability of uptake/release up to 5 hr of incubation, suggesting tissue viability over this period. The estimated half-life of peptides based on the results obtained in our incubation protocol suggest that the peptides studied are metabolized at different rates in the individual brain regions tested. A good correlation exists between the high enzyme activity of neutral endopeptidase and the rapid degradation of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin and (cycloN alpha 6, C delata 11)beta-endorphin-(6-17) in caudate putamen. Proline substitution combined with lysine acetylation appears to improve resistance to enzymatic metabolism in caudate putamen and hypothalamus. However, cyclization of des-enkephalin-gamma-endorphin forming an amide bond between the alpha-NH2 of the N-terminal threonine and the gamma-COOH of glutamic acid did not improve peptide stability in any brain region tested. The present study has shown that the brain slice technique is a valid and unique approach to study neuropeptide metabolism in small, discrete regions of rat brain where peptides, peptidases and receptors are colocalized and that specific structural modifications can improve peptide stability.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus velezensis B6, a Rhizobacterium That Can Control Plant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Han; Guo, Rong-Jun; Li, Shi-Dong

    2018-03-22

    The draft genome of Bacillus velezensis strain B6, a rhizobacterium with good biocontrol performance isolated from soil in China, was sequenced. The assembly comprises 32 scaffolds with a total size of 3.88 Mb. Gene clusters coding either ribosomally encoded bacteriocins or nonribosomally encoded antimicrobial polyketides and lipopeptides in the genome may contribute to plant disease control. Copyright © 2018 Gao et al.

  17. Performance evaluation of a mitogenome capture and Illumina sequencing protocol using non-probative, case-type skeletal samples: Implications for the use of a positive control in a next-generation sequencing procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Charla; Sturk-Andreaggi, Kimberly; Daniels-Higginbotham, Jennifer; Oliver, Robert Sean; Barritt-Ross, Suzanne; McMahon, Timothy P

    2017-11-01

    Next-generation ancient DNA technologies have the potential to assist in the analysis of degraded DNA extracted from forensic specimens. Mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequencing, specifically, may be of benefit to samples that fail to yield forensically relevant genetic information using conventional PCR-based techniques. This report summarizes the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System's Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory's (AFMES-AFDIL) performance evaluation of a Next-Generation Sequencing protocol for degraded and chemically treated past accounting samples. The procedure involves hybridization capture for targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA, massively parallel sequencing using Illumina chemistry, and an automated bioinformatic pipeline for forensic mtDNA profile generation. A total of 22 non-probative samples and associated controls were processed in the present study, spanning a range of DNA quantity and quality. Data were generated from over 100 DNA libraries by ten DNA analysts over the course of five months. The results show that the mitogenome sequencing procedure is reliable and robust, sensitive to low template (one ng control DNA) as well as degraded DNA, and specific to the analysis of the human mitogenome. Haplotypes were overall concordant between NGS replicates and with previously generated Sanger control region data. Due to the inherent risk for contamination when working with low-template, degraded DNA, a contamination assessment was performed. The consumables were shown to be void of human DNA contaminants and suitable for forensic use. Reagent blanks and negative controls were analyzed to determine the background signal of the procedure. This background signal was then used to set analytical and reporting thresholds, which were designated at 4.0X (limit of detection) and 10.0X (limit of quantiation) average coverage across the mitogenome, respectively. Nearly all human samples exceeded the reporting threshold, although coverage

  18. Genomic organization of the human PAX 3 gene: DNA sequence analysis of the region disrupted in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macina, R.A.; Galili, N.; Riethman, H.C. [Wistar Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Mutations in the human PAX3 gene have previously been associated with two distinct diseases, Waardenburg syndrome and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In this report the authors establish that the normal human PAX3 gene is encoded by 8 exons. Intron-exon boundary sequences were obtained for PAX 3 exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and together with previous work provide the complete genomic sequence organization for PAX3. Difficulties in obtaining overlapping genomic clone coverage of PAX3 were circumvented in part by RARE cleavage mapping, which showed that the entire PAX3 gene spans 100 kb of chromosome 2. Sequence analysis of the last intron of PAX3, which contains the previously mapped t(2;13)(q35;q14) translocation breakpoints of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, revealed the presence of a pair of inverted Alu repeats and a pair of inverted (GT){sub n}-rich microsatellite repeats with in a 5k-kb region. This work establishes the complete structure of PAX 3 and will permit high-resolution analyses of this locus for mutations associated with Waardenburg syndrome, alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, and other phenotypes for which PAX3 may be a candidate locus.31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Revisiting Coleoptera a + T-rich region: structural conservation, phylogenetic and phylogeographic approaches in mitochondrial control region of bioluminescent Elateridae species (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Danilo T; Mitani, Yasuo; Oliveira, Gabriela; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Viviani, Vadim R

    2017-09-01

    The control region (CR) or A + T-rich region in Coleoptera mt genome is poorly characterized, including the Elateroidea bioluminescent species. Here, we provided the first attempt to characterize and compare the structure and organization of the CR of different species within Elateridae. We also revisited some sequenced Coleoptera CR and observed consensus T-stretches, non-conserved sequences near the stem-loop and unusual inner tRNAs-like sequences. All these features are probably involved in the replication start of the mt genome. The phylogenetic relationships in Elateridae bioluminescent groups using partial sequence of CR showed the monophyly of Pyrearinus pumilus group and Pyrearinus as a polyphyletic genus, corroborating our previous results. The wider genetic variation obtained by CR analysis could separate two different lineages that occur within P. termitilluminans populations. In Elateridae, the CR exhibited high polymorphism within and between populations, which was also observed in other Coleoptera species, suggesting that the CR could be described as a suitable molecular marker to be applied in phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies.

  20. Regions of KCNQ K+ Channels Controlling Functional Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eChoveau

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available KCNQ1-5 α-subunits assemble to form K+ channels that play critical roles in the function of numerous tissues. The channels are tetramers of subunits containing six transmembrane domains. Each subunit consists of a pore region (S5-pore-S6 and a voltage sensor domain (S1-S4. Despite similar structures, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 homomers yield small current amplitudes compared to other KCNQ homomers and KCNQ2/3 heteromers. Two major mechanisms have been suggested as governing functional expression. The first involves control of channel trafficking to the plasma membrane by the distal part of the C-terminus, containing two coiled-coiled domains, required for channel trafficking and assembly. The proximal half of the C-terminus is the crucial region for channel modulation by signaling molecules such as calmodulin, which may mediate C- and N-terminal interactions. The N-terminus of KCNQ channels has also been postulated as critical for channel surface expression. The second mechanism suggests networks of interactions between the pore helix and the selectivity filter, and between the pore helix and the S6 domain that govern KCNQ current amplitudes. Here, we summarize the role of these different regions in expression of functional KCNQ channels.

  1. Sequencing the CHO DXB11 genome reveals regional variations in genomic stability and haploidy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Christian Schrøder; Kristensen, Claus; Betenbaugh, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    in eight additional analyzed CHO genomes (15-20% haploidy) but not in the genome of the Chinese hamster. The dhfr gene is confirmed to be haploid in CHO DXB11; transcriptionally active and the remaining allele contains a G410C point mutation causing a Thr137Arg missense mutation. We find similar to 2.......5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's), 44 gene deletions in the CHO DXB11 genome and 9357 SNP's, which interfere with the coding regions of 3458 genes. Copy number variations for nine CHO genomes were mapped to the chromosomes of the Chinese hamster showing unique signatures for each chromosome...

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of Malaysia's pig-tailed macaque Macaca nemestrina based on D-loop region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Latiff M. A., B.; Ampeng, A.; Yaakop, S.; Md-Zain B., M.

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Malaysian pig-tailed macaques have never been established even though the data are crucial in aiding conservation plan for the species. The aims of this study is to establish the phylogenetic relationships of Macaca nemestrina in Malaysia. A total of 21 genetic samples of M. nemestrina yielding 458 bp of D-loop sequences were used in phylogenetic analyses, in addition to one sample of M. fascicularis which was used as an outgroup. Sequence character analysis revealed that D-loop locus contains 23% parsimony informative character detected among the ingroups. Further analysis indicated a clear separation between populations originating from different regions; the Malay Peninsula populations are separated from Borneo Insular population; and Perak population formed a distinctive clade within Peninsular Malaysia populations. Phylogenetic trees (NJ, MP and Bayesian) portray a consistent clustering paradigm as Borneo population was distinguished from Peninsula population (100% bootstrap value in the NJ, MP, 1.00 posterior probability in Bayesian trees). Perak's population was separated from other Peninsula populations (100% in NJ, 99% in MP and 1.00 in Bayesian). D-loop region of mtDNA is proven to be a suitable locus in studying the separation of M. nemestrina at population level. These findings are crucial in aiding the conservation management and translocation process of M. fascicularis populations in Malaysia.

  3. Region-based association tests for sequencing data on survival traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Li-Chu; Bowden, Donald W; Chiu, Yen-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Family-based designs enriched with affected subjects and disease associated variants can increase statistical power for identifying functional rare variants. However, few rare variant analysis approaches are available for time-to-event traits in family designs and none of them applicable to the X chromosome. We developed novel pedigree-based burden and kernel association tests for time-to-event outcomes with right censoring for pedigree data, referred to FamRATS (family-based rare variant association tests for survival traits). Cox proportional hazard models were employed to relate a time-to-event trait with rare variants with flexibility to encompass all ranges and collapsing of multiple variants. In addition, the robustness of violating proportional hazard assumptions was investigated for the proposed and four current existing tests, including the conventional population-based Cox proportional model and the burden, kernel, and sum of squares statistic (SSQ) tests for family data. The proposed tests can be applied to large-scale whole-genome sequencing data. They are appropriate for the practical use under a wide range of misspecified Cox models, as well as for population-based, pedigree-based, or hybrid designs. In our extensive simulation study and data example, we showed that the proposed kernel test is the most powerful and robust choice among the proposed burden test and the existing four rare variant survival association tests. When applied to the Diabetes Heart Study, the proposed tests found exome variants of the JAK1 gene on chromosome 1 showed the most significant association with age at onset of type 2 diabetes from the exome-wide analysis. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. External and semi-internal controls for PCR amplification of homologous sequences in mixed templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalle, Elena; Gulevich, Alexander; Rensing, Christopher Günther T

    2013-01-01

    . The complexity of the external and semi-internal amplification controls must be comparable with the assumed complexity of the samples. We also emphasize that amplification controls should be applied in multi-template PCR regardless of the post-assay method used to analyze products.......In a mixed template, the presence of homologous target DNA sequences creates environments that almost inevitably give rise to artifacts and biases during PCR. Heteroduplexes, chimeras, and skewed template-to-product ratios are the exclusive attributes of mixed template PCR and never occur...... in a single template assay. Yet, multi-template PCR has been used without appropriate attention to quality control and assay validation, in spite of the fact that such practice diminishes the reliability of results. External and internal amplification controls became obligatory elements of good laboratory...

  5. Analysis of the distribution of charged residues in the N-terminal region of signal sequences: implications for protein export in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    von Heijne, G

    1984-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of charged residues in the N-terminal region of 39 prokaryotic and 134 eukaryotic signal sequences reveals a remarkable similarity between the two samples, both in terms of net charge and in terms of the position of charged residues within the N-terminal region, and suggests that the formyl group on Metf is not removed in prokaryotic signal sequences.

  6. Determining peptide sequence effects that control the size, structure, and function of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppage, Ryan; Slocik, Joseph M; Briggs, Beverly D; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Naik, Rajesh R; Knecht, Marc R

    2012-02-28

    The ability to tune the size, shape, and composition of nanomaterials at length scales particle morphology through controlling the biotic/abiotic interface. Here we demonstrate the ability to finely tune the size, surface structure, and functionality of single-crystal Pd nanoparticles between 2 and 3 nm using materials directing peptides. This was achieved by selectively altering the peptide sequence to change the binding motif, which in turn modifies the surface structure of the particles. The materials were fully characterized before and after reduction using atomically resolved spectroscopic and microscopic analyses, which indicated that the coordination environment prior to reduction significantly affects the structure of the final nanoparticles. Additionally, changes to the particle surface structure, as a function of peptide sequence, can allow for chloride ion coordination that alters the catalytic abilities of the materials for the C-C coupling Stille reaction. These results suggest that peptide-based approaches may be able to achieve control over the structure/function relationship of nanomaterials where the peptide sequence could be used to selectivity tune such capabilities.

  7. Genetic distance of Malaysian mousedeer based on mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D-loop region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Mohamad-Azam Akmal Abu; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine Japning; Ampeng, Ahmad; Yaakop, Salmah; Nor, Shukor Md; Md-Zain, Badrul Munir

    2018-04-01

    Mousedeer is one of the primitive mammals that can be found mainly in Southeast-Asia region. There are two species of mousedeer in Malaysia which are Tragulus kanchil and Tragulus napu. Both species can be distinguish by size, coat coloration, and throat pattern but clear diagnosis still cannot be found. The objective of the study is to show the genetic distance relationship between T. kanchil and T. napu and their population based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D-loop region. There are 42 sample of mousedeer were used in this study collected by PERHILITAN from different locality. Another 29 D-loop sequence were retrieved from Genbank for comparative analysis. All sample were amplified using universal primer and species-specific primer for COI and D-loop genes via PCR process. The amplified sequences were analyzed to determine genetic distance of T. kanchil and T. napu. From the analysis, the average genetic distance between T. kanchil and T. napu based on locus COI and D-loop were 0.145 and 0.128 respectively. The genetic distance between populations of T. kanchil based on locus COI was between 0.003-0.013. For locus D-loop, genetic distance analysis showed distance in relationship between west-coast populations to east-coast population of T. kanchil. COI and D-loop mtDNA region provided a clear picture on the relationship within the mousedeer species. Last but not least, conservation effort toward protecting this species can be done by study the molecular genetics and prevent the extinction of this species.

  8. SubClonal Hierarchy Inference from Somatic Mutations: Automatic Reconstruction of Cancer Evolutionary Trees from Multi-region Next Generation Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Niknafs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing of tumor samples and the ability to identify somatic mutations at low allelic fractions have opened the way for new approaches to model the evolution of individual cancers. The power and utility of these models is increased when tumor samples from multiple sites are sequenced. Temporal ordering of the samples may provide insight into the etiology of both primary and metastatic lesions and rationalizations for tumor recurrence and therapeutic failures. Additional insights may be provided by temporal ordering of evolving subclones--cellular subpopulations with unique mutational profiles. Current methods for subclone hierarchy inference tightly couple the problem of temporal ordering with that of estimating the fraction of cancer cells harboring each mutation. We present a new framework that includes a rigorous statistical hypothesis test and a collection of tools that make it possible to decouple these problems, which we believe will enable substantial progress in the field of subclone hierarchy inference. The methods presented here can be flexibly combined with methods developed by others addressing either of these problems. We provide tools to interpret hypothesis test results, which inform phylogenetic tree construction, and we introduce the first genetic algorithm designed for this purpose. The utility of our framework is systematically demonstrated in simulations. For most tested combinations of tumor purity, sequencing coverage, and tree complexity, good power (≥ 0.8 can be achieved and Type 1 error is well controlled when at least three tumor samples are available from a patient. Using data from three published multi-region tumor sequencing studies of (murine small cell lung cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, in which the authors reconstructed subclonal phylogenetic trees by manual expert curation, we show how different configurations of our tools can

  9. Natural selection in a population of Drosophila melanogaster explained by changes in gene expression caused by sequence variation in core promoter regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mitsuhiko P; Makino, Takashi; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-02-09

    Understanding the evolutionary forces that influence variation in gene regulatory regions in natural populations is an important challenge for evolutionary biology because natural selection for such variations could promote adaptive phenotypic evolution. Recently, whole-genome sequence analyses have identified regulatory regions subject to natural selection. However, these studies could not identify the relationship between sequence variation in the detected regions and change in gene expression levels. We analyzed sequence variations in core promoter regions, which are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes, in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, and identified core promoter sequence variations associated with differences in gene expression levels subjected to natural selection. Among the core promoter regions whose sequence variation could change transcription factor binding sites and explain differences in expression levels, three core promoter regions were detected as candidates associated with purifying selection or selective sweep and seven as candidates associated with balancing selection, excluding the possibility of linkage between these regions and core promoter regions. CHKov1, which confers resistance to the sigma virus and related insecticides, was identified as core promoter regions that has been subject to selective sweep, although it could not be denied that selection for variation in core promoter regions was due to linked single nucleotide polymorphisms in the regulatory region outside core promoter regions. Nucleotide changes in core promoter regions of CHKov1 caused the loss of two basal transcription factor binding sites and acquisition of one transcription factor binding site, resulting in decreased gene expression levels. Of nine core promoter regions regions associated with balancing selection, brat, and CG9044 are associated with neuromuscular junction development, and Nmda1 are associated with learning

  10. Structural conservation and variation in the mitochondrial control region of fringilline finches (Fringilla spp.) and the greenfinch (Carduelis chloris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H D; Baker, A J

    1997-02-01

    We sequenced the entire control region and portions of flanking genes (tRNA(Phe), tRNA(Glu), and ND6) in the common chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), blue chaffinch (F. teydea), brambling (F. montifringilla), and greenfinch (Carduelis chloris). In these finches the control region is similar in length (1,223-1,237 bp) and has the same flanking gene order as in other birds, and contains a putative TAS element and the highly conserved CSB-1 and F, D, and C boxes recognizable in most vertebrates. Cloverleaf-like structures associated with the TAS element at the 5' end and CSB-1 at the 3' end of the control region may be involved with the stop and start of D-loop synthesis, respectively. The pattern of nucleotide and substitution bias is similar to that in other vertebrates, and consequently the finch control region can be subdivided into a central, conserved G-rich domain (domain II) flanked by hypervariable 5'-C-rich (domain I) and 3'-AT-rich (domain III) segments. In pairwise comparisons among finch species, the central domain has unusually low transition/transversion ratios, which suggests that increased G + T content is a functional constraint, possibly for DNA primase efficiency. In finches the relative rates of evolution vary among domains according to a ratio of 4.2 (domain III) to 2.2 (domain I) to 1 (domain II), and extensively among sites within domains I and II. Domain I and III sequences are extremely useful in recovering intraspecific phylogeographic splits between populations in Africa and Europe, Madeira, and a basal lineage in Nefza, Tunisia. Domain II sequences are highly conserved, and are therefore only useful in conjunction with sequences from domains I and III in phylogenetic studies of closely related species.

  11. Sequencing of a QTL-rich region of the Theobroma cacao genome using pooled BACs and the identification of trait specific candidate genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmon Barbara P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAC-based physical maps provide for sequencing across an entire genome or a selected sub-genomic region of biological interest. Such a region can be approached with next-generation whole-genome sequencing and assembly as if it were an independent small genome. Using the minimum tiling path as a guide, specific BAC clones representing the prioritized genomic interval are selected, pooled, and used to prepare a sequencing library. Results This pooled BAC approach was taken to sequence and assemble a QTL-rich region, of ~3 Mbp and represented by twenty-seven BACs, on linkage group 5 of the Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6 genome. Using various mixtures of read coverages from paired-end and linear 454 libraries, multiple assemblies of varied quality were generated. Quality was assessed by comparing the assembly of 454 reads with a subset of ten BACs individually sequenced and assembled using Sanger reads. A mixture of reads optimal for assembly was identified. We found, furthermore, that a quality assembly suitable for serving as a reference genome template could be obtained even with a reduced depth of sequencing coverage. Annotation of the resulting assembly revealed several genes potentially responsible for three T. cacao traits: black pod disease resistance, bean shape index, and pod weight. Conclusions Our results, as with other pooled BAC sequencing reports, suggest that pooling portions of a minimum tiling path derived from a BAC-based physical map is an effective method to target sub-genomic regions for sequencing. While we focused on a single QTL region, other QTL regions of importance could be similarly sequenced allowing for biological discovery to take place before a high quality whole-genome assembly is completed.

  12. Mapping and validation of the major sex-determining region in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L. Using RAD sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Palaiokostas

    Full Text Available Sex in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia is principally determined by an XX/XY locus but other genetic and environmental factors also influence sex ratio. Restriction Associated DNA (RAD sequencing was used in two families derived from crossing XY males with females from an isogenic clonal line, in order to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs and map the sex-determining region(s. We constructed a linkage map with 3,802 SNPs, which corresponded to 3,280 informative markers, and identified a major sex-determining region on linkage group 1, explaining nearly 96% of the phenotypic variance. This sex-determining region was mapped in a 2 cM interval, corresponding to approximately 1.2 Mb in the O. niloticus draft genome. In order to validate this, a diverse family (4 families; 96 individuals in total and population (40 broodstock individuals test panel were genotyped for five of the SNPs showing the highest association with phenotypic sex. From the expanded data set, SNPs Oni23063 and Oni28137 showed the highest association, which persisted both in the case of family and population data. Across the entire dataset all females were found to be homozygous for these two SNPs. Males were heterozygous, with the exception of five individuals in the population and two in the family dataset. These fish possessed the homozygous genotype expected of females. Progeny sex ratios (over 95% females from two of the males with the "female" genotype indicated that they were neomales (XX males. Sex reversal induced by elevated temperature during sexual differentiation also resulted in phenotypic males with the "female" genotype. This study narrows down the region containing the main sex-determining locus, and provides genetic markers tightly linked to this locus, with an association that persisted across the population. These markers will be of use in refining the production of genetically male O. niloticus for aquaculture.

  13. Processes Controlling Water Vapor in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Selkirk, Henry B.; Jensen, Eric J.; Padolske, James; Sachse, Glen; Avery, Melody; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Mahoney, Michael J.; Richard, Erik

    2002-01-01

    This work describes transport and thermodynamic processes that control water vapor near the tropopause during the SAGE III-Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE), held during the Arctic 1999/2000 winter season. Aircraft-based water vapor, carbon monoxide, and ozone measurements were analyzed so as to establish how deeply tropospheric air mixes into the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and what the implications are for cloud formation and water vapor removal in this region of the atmosphere. There are three major findings. First, troposphere-to-stratosphere exchange extends into the Arctic stratosphere to about 13 km. Penetration is to similar levels throughout the winter, however, because ozone increases with altitude most rapidly in the early spring, tropospheric air mixes with the highest values of ozone in that season. The effect of this upward mixing is to elevate water vapor mixing ratios significantly above their prevailing stratospheric values of above 5ppmv. Second, the potential for cloud formation in the stratosphere is highest during early spring, with about 20% of the parcels which have ozone values of 300-350 ppbv experiencing ice saturation in a given 10 day period. Third, during early spring, temperatures at the troposphere are cold enough so that 5-10% of parcels experience relative humidities above 100%, even if the water content is as low as 5 ppmv. The implication is that during this period, dynamical processes near the Arctic tropopause can dehydrate air and keep the Arctic tropopause region very dry during early spring.

  14. Factors controlling the regional distribution of vanadium in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Although the ingestion of vanadium (V) in drinking water may have possible adverse health effects, there have been relatively few studies of V in groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater as a source of drinking water in many areas of the world, this study examines the potential sources and geochemical processes that control the distribution of V in groundwater on a regional scale. Potential sources of V to groundwater include dissolution of V rich rocks, and waste streams from industrial processes. Geochemical processes such as adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, and chemical transformations control V concentrations in groundwater. Based on thermodynamic data and laboratory studies, V concentrations are expected to be highest in samples collected from oxic and alkaline groundwater. However, the extent to which thermodynamic data and laboratory results apply to the actual distribution of V in groundwater is not well understood. More than 8400 groundwater samples collected in California were used in this study. Of these samples, high (> or = 50 μg/L) and moderate (25 to 49 μg/L) V concentrations were most frequently detected in regions where both source rock and favorable geochemical conditions occurred. The distribution of V concentrations in groundwater samples suggests that significant sources of V are mafic and andesitic rock. Anthropogenic activities do not appear to be a significant contributor of V to groundwater in this study. High V concentrations in groundwater samples analyzed in this study were almost always associated with oxic and alkaline groundwater conditions, which is consistent with predictions based on thermodynamic data.

  15. Hypertension Control and Cardiometabolic Risk: A Regional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Thoenes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the association between blood pressure control and common cardiometabolic risk factors from a global and regional perspective. Methods. In the present analysis of a large cross-sectional i-SEARCH study, 17.092 outpatients receiving antihypertensive treatment were included in 26 countries. According to clinical guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension, patients were classified based on the level of seated systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as SBP/DBP ≥140/90 mmHg for non-diabetics, and ≥130/80 mmHg for diabetics. Results. Overall, mean age was 63.1 years, 52.8% were male, and mean BMI was 28.9 kg/m2. Mean SBP/DBP was 148.9/87.0 mmHg, and 76.3% of patients had uncontrolled hypertension. Diabetes was present in 29.1% with mean HbA1c of 6.8%. Mean LDL-cholesterol was 3.2 mmol/L, HDL-cholesterol 1.3 mmol/L, and triglycerides 1.8 mmol/L; 49.0% had hyperlipidemia. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension had a higher BMI (29.4 versus 28.6 kg/m2, LDL-cholesterol (3.4 versus 3.0 mmol/L, triglycerides (1.9 versus 1.7 mmol/L, and HbA1c (6.8 versus 6.7% than those with controlled blood pressure (P<0.0001 for all parameters. Conclusions. Among outpatients treated for arterial hypertension, three quarters had uncontrolled blood pressure. Elevated SBP/DBP and uncontrolled hypertension were associated with increasing BMI, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and HbA1c, both globally and regionally.

  16. DNA authentication of Plantago Herb based on nucleotide sequences of 18S-28S rRNA internal transcribed spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Fatma Pinar; Yamashita, Hiromi; Guo, Yahong; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Kondo, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Shimada, Hiroshi; Fujita, Masao; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Sakai, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Goda, Yukihiro; Mizukami, Hajime

    2007-07-01

    Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene were amplified from 23 plant- and herbarium specimens belonging to eight Plantago species (P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major, P. erosa, P. hostifolia, P. camtschatica, P. virginica and P. lanceolata). Sequence comparison indicated that these Plantago species could be identified based on the sequence type of the ITS locus. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions amplified from the crude drug Plantago Herb obtained in the markets indicated that all the drugs from Japan were derived from P. asiatica whereas the samples obtained in China were originated from various Plantago species including P. asiatica, P. depressa, P. major and P. erosa.

  17. Development and detection efficiency of sequence characterized amplified region markers for authentication of medicinal plant Ruta graveolens and its adulterant Euphorbia dracunculoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irum Gul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With the increase in demand of herbal medicines, adulteration in these drugs is also gaining momentum and remains an indispensable problem in domestic and export markets. Correct identification is the first step toward assuring quality, safety, and efficacy of indigenous herbal medicines. Materials and Methods: In this study, sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR markers were developed to discriminate Ruta graveolens from its adulterant Euphorbia dracunculoides. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD was performed and subsequently converted into SCAR markers. Results: After performing RAPD, SCAR primers were designed from the selected unique RAPD amplicons of the genuine drug as well as its adulterant. These primers produced 670 bp and 750 bp SCAR markers with genomic DNA sample of R. graveolens and E. dracunculoides, respectively. Conclusion: Development of these markers will help in the quality control of herbal drugs and monitoring widespread adulteration of these drugs by pharmaceutical industries and government agencies.

  18. Re-annotation of the physical map of Glycine max for polyploid-like regions by BAC end sequence driven whole genome shotgun read assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shultz Jeffry

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the world's most important food crops have either polyploid genomes or homeologous regions derived from segmental shuffling following polyploid formation. The soybean (Glycine max genome has been shown to be composed of approximately four thousand short interspersed homeologous regions with 1, 2 or 4 copies per haploid genome by RFLP analysis, microsatellite anchors to BACs and by contigs formed from BAC fingerprints. Despite these similar regions,, the genome has been sequenced by whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS. Here the aim was to use BAC end sequences (BES derived from three minimum tile paths (MTP to examine the extent and homogeneity of polyploid-like regions within contigs and the extent of correlation between the polyploid-like regions inferred from fingerprinting and the polyploid-like sequences inferred from WGS matches. Results Results show that when sequence divergence was 1–10%, the copy number of homeologous regions could be identified from sequence variation in WGS reads overlapping BES. Homeolog sequence variants (HSVs were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 89% and single nucleotide indels (SNIs 10%. Larger indels were rare but present (1%. Simulations that had predicted fingerprints of homeologous regions could be separated when divergence exceeded 2% were shown to be false. We show that a 5–10% sequence divergence is necessary to separate homeologs by fingerprinting. BES compared to WGS traces showed polyploid-like regions with less than 1% sequence divergence exist at 2.3% of the locations assayed. Conclusion The use of HSVs like SNPs and SNIs to characterize BACs wil improve contig building methods. The implications for bioinformatic and functional annotation of polyploid and paleopolyploid genomes show that a combined approach of BAC fingerprint based physical maps, WGS sequence and HSV-based partitioning of BAC clones from homeologous regions to separate contigs will allow reliable de

  19. DNA-PK dependent targeting of DNA-ends to a protein complex assembled on matrix attachment region DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, S.K.; Getts, R.C.; Perez, M.L.; DiRienzo, S.; Stamato, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We find that nuclear protein extracts from mammalian cells contain an activity that allows DNA ends to associate with circular pUC18 plasmid DNA. This activity requires the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) and Ku since it was not observed in mutants lacking Ku or DNA-PKcs but was observed when purified Ku/DNA-PKcs was added to these mutant extracts. Competition experiments between pUC18 and pUC18 plasmids containing various nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences suggest that DNA ends preferentially associate with plasmids containing MAR DNA sequences. At a 1:5 mass ratio of MAR to pUC18, approximately equal amounts of DNA end binding to the two plasmids were observed, while at a 1:1 ratio no pUC18 end-binding was observed. Calculation of relative binding activities indicates that DNA-end binding activities to MAR sequences was 7 to 21 fold higher than pUC18. Western analysis of proteins bound to pUC18 and MAR plasmids indicates that XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, scaffold attachment factor A, topoisomerase II, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase preferentially associate with the MAR plasmid in the absence or presence of DNA ends. In contrast, Ku and DNA-PKcs were found on the MAR plasmid only in the presence of DNA ends. After electroporation of a 32P-labeled DNA probe into human cells and cell fractionation, 87% of the total intercellular radioactivity remained in nuclei after a 0.5M NaCl extraction suggesting the probe was strongly bound in the nucleus. The above observations raise the possibility that DNA-PK targets DNA-ends to a repair and/or DNA damage signaling complex which is assembled on MAR sites in the nucleus

  20. Sequence analysis of flanking regions of the pfoA gene of Clostridium perfringens: beta-galactosidase gene (pbg) is located in the 3'-flanking region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, T; Kobayashi, T; Ba-Thein, W; Ohtani, K; Hayashi, H

    1995-01-01

    The 3'-flanking region of the perfringolysin O (theta-toxin) gene (pfoA) of Clostridium perfringens was analyzed by chromosome walking. A total of 5,363 bp of the downstream region of the pfoA gene was sequenced and four open reading frames were found. ORF54 and ORF80 were found to be homologous to genes coding for membrane-bound transporter proteins of other bacteria and the beta-galactosidase gene (bgaB) of Bacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. ORF80 was named the pbg gene. Clones which showed beta-galactosidase activities were selected from a lambda FIXII genomic library of C. perfringens by blue plaque screening using X-Gal as a substrate. Four clones whose plaques showed blue appearances were obtained. Two of the four clones hybridized with the pbg probe but the others did not, indicating that there are two distinct beta-galactosidase genes in C. perfringens. The pbg gene was subcloned into pBR322 and was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, suggesting that the pbg gene codes for a beta-galactosidase of C. perfringens.

  1. Psychometric evaluation of a motor control test battery of the craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, H; Stotz, E; Both, A; Bahn, G; Armijo-Olivo, S; Ballenberger, N

    2017-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the structural and known-group validity as well as the inter-rater reliability of a test battery to evaluate the motor control of the craniofacial region. Seventy volunteers without TMD and 25 subjects with TMD (Axes I) per the DC/TMD were asked to execute a test battery consisting of eight tests. The tests were video-taped in the same sequence in a standardised manner. Two experienced physical therapists participated in this study as blinded assessors. We used exploratory factor analysis to identify the underlying component structure of the eight tests. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α), inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient) and construct validity (ie, hypothesis testing-known-group validity) (receiver operating curves) were also explored for the test battery. The structural validity showed the presence of one factor underlying the construct of the test battery. The internal consistency was excellent (0.90) as well as the inter-rater reliability. All values of reliability were close to 0.9 or above indicating very high inter-rater reliability. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.93 for rater 1 and 0.94 for rater two, respectively, indicating excellent discrimination between subjects with TMD and healthy controls. The results of the present study support the psychometric properties of test battery to measure motor control of the craniofacial region when evaluated through videotaping. This test battery could be used to differentiate between healthy subjects and subjects with musculoskeletal impairments in the cervical and oro-facial regions. In addition, this test battery could be used to assess the effectiveness of management strategies in the craniofacial region. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The High Degree of Sequence Plasticity of the Arenavirus Noncoding Intergenic Region (IGR) Enables the Use of a Nonviral Universal Synthetic IGR To Attenuate Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Cubitt, Beatrice; Sullivan, Brian M; de la Torre, Juan C

    2016-01-06

    Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFAs) pose important public health problems in regions where they are endemic. Concerns about human-pathogenic arenaviruses are exacerbated because of the lack of FDA-licensed arenavirus vaccines and because current antiarenaviral therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. We have recently shown that the noncoding intergenic region (IGR) present in each arenavirus genome segment, the S and L segments (S-IGR and L-IGR, respectively), plays important roles in the control of virus protein expression and that this knowledge could be harnessed for the development of live-attenuated vaccine strains to combat HFAs. In this study, we further investigated the sequence plasticity of the arenavirus IGR. We demonstrate that recombinants of the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMVs), whose S-IGRs were replaced by the S-IGR of Lassa virus (LASV) or an entirely nonviral S-IGR-like sequence (Ssyn), are viable, indicating that the function of S-IGR tolerates a high degree of sequence plasticity. In addition, rLCMVs whose L-IGRs were replaced by Ssyn or S-IGRs of the very distantly related reptarenavirus Golden Gate virus (GGV) were viable and severely attenuated in vivo but able to elicit protective immunity against a lethal challenge with wild-type LCMV. Our findings indicate that replacement of L-IGR by a nonviral Ssyn could serve as a universal molecular determinant of arenavirus attenuation. Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses (HFAs) cause high rates of morbidity and mortality and pose important public health problems in regions where they are endemic. Implementation of live-attenuated vaccines (LAVs) will represent a major step to combat HFAs. Here we document that the arenavirus noncoding intergenic region (IGR) has a high degree of plasticity compatible with virus viability. This observation led us to generate recombinant LCMVs containing nonviral synthetic IGRs. These r

  3. Special structure of mitochondrial DNA control region and phylogenetic relationship among individuals of the black rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiumei; Song, Na; Gao, Tianxiang

    2013-04-01

    This study deals with the structure of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of the black rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii. Two termination-associated sequences (TASs), two complementary termination-associated sequences (cTASs), and conserved sequence block (CSB), such as CSB-F, CSB-E, CSB-D, CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3, were detected in S. schlegelii. The results indicated that the structures of these blocks are similar to most marine fishes, but it is special that there are two TASs and two cTASs in the CR of S. schlegelii. One conserved region was found from 450 bp to the end of the CR, which is also a special feature of S. schlegelii. All sequences of CSB1, CSB2, and CSB3 blocks are the consensus among different individuals, which is quite different from most vertebrates. In addition, the complete mtDNA CR sequences and the first 449 bp of the CR are used to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of S. schlegelii. The phylogenetic trees show a lack of genetic structure among individuals. This study also indicated a signal that the genetic diversity might be similar between the wild and cultured individuals, which may be helpful to the fisheries management.

  4. Identification of a nuclear matrix attachment region like sequence in the last intron of PI3Kγ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Bingbing; Ying Lei; Cai Rong; Li Ying; Zhang Xingqian; Lu Jian; Qian Guanxiang

    2006-01-01

    MARs are not only the structure bases of chromatin higher order structure but also have much biological significance. In this study, the whole sequence of about 100 kb in length from BAC clone of GS1-223D4 (GI: 5931478), in which human PI3Kγ gene is localized, was analyzed by two online-based computer programs, MARFinder and SMARTest. A strong potential MAR was predicted in the last and largest intron of PI3Kγ. The predicted 2 kb MAR, we refer to PIMAR, was further analyzed through biochemical methods in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the PIMAR could be associated with nuclear matrices from HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further reporter gene analysis showed that in the transient transfection the expression of reporter gene linked with reversed PIMAR was repressed slightly, while in stably integrated state, the luciferase reporter both linked with reversed and orientated PIMAR was enhanced greatly in NIH-3T3 and K-562. These results suggest that the PIMAR maybe has the capacity of shielding integrated heterogeneous gene from chromatin position effect. Through combination of computer program analysis with confirmation by biochemical methods, we identified, for First time, a 2 kb matrix attachment region like sequence in the last intron of human PI3Kγ

  5. THERMAL STABILITY OF SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES MIMICKING THE SEQUENCE OF THE REGION CONTAINING THE SKIP RESIDUES IN SQUID MYOSIN ROD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Ochiai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Myosin is the major protein in skeletal muscles including those of fish and shellfish. The characteristics of this protein are closely related to the biological function and the quality and physical properties of musclefood. In the myosin rod (the coiled-coil region of myosin, several amino acid residues, known as skip residues, seem to destabilize the ordered structure (heptad repeat. These residues might be responsible for reducing thermal stability. Attempts were thus made to examine the role of these residues in the rod of squid myosin, based on the thermodynamic properties of synthetic peptides which have been designed to mimic the partial sequence of myosin heavy chain from the squid Todarodes pacificus mantle muscle. Five peptides, namely, with the sequence of Trp1343 -Ala1372  having the skip residue Glu1357 at the center (Peptide WT, without the skip residue (Peptide Δ, with the replacements of the skip residue (Glu by Ile, Gln and Pro (Peptides E/I, E/Q, and E/P, respectively to modify the helix forming propensity, were synthesized. The results obtained showed that the stability of the peptides as measured by circular dichroism spectrometry was in the order of Peptide Δ > Peptide WT > Peptide E/Q > Peptide E/P > Peptide E/I. It is suggested that the presence of the skip residues dexterously tunes the stability or flexibility of the coiled-coil structure, thus possibly regulating thick filament formation and further gel formation ability of myosin.

  6. Population genetic analysis of Lobelia rhynchopetalum Hemsl. (Campanulaceae) using DNA sequences from ITS and eight chloroplast DNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleta, Mulatu; Bryngelsson, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequence data from the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA and eight chloroplast DNA regions were used to investigate haplotypic variation and population genetic structure of the Afroalpine giant lobelia, Lobelia rhynchopetalum. The study was based on eight populations sampled from two mountain systems in Ethiopia. A total of 20 variable sites were obtained, which resulted in 13 unique haplotypes and an overall nucleotide diversity (ND) of 0.281 ± 0.15 and gene diversity (GD) of 0.85 ± 0.04. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed a highly significant variation (P mountain systems formed their own distinct clade with >90% bootstrap support. Each population should be regarded as a significant unit for conservation of this species. The primers designed for this study can be applied to any Lobelia and other closely related species for population genetics and phylogenetic studies.

  7. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Shrine, Nick; McKeever, Tricia M; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x) coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals) in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  8. Targeted Sequencing of Lung Function Loci in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Cases and Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soler Artigas

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the third leading cause of death worldwide; smoking is the main risk factor for COPD, but genetic factors are also relevant contributors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS of the lung function measures used in the diagnosis of COPD have identified a number of loci, however association signals are often broad and collectively these loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability. In order to examine the association with COPD risk of genetic variants down to low allele frequencies, to aid fine-mapping of association signals and to explain more of the missing heritability, we undertook a targeted sequencing study in 300 COPD cases and 300 smoking controls for 26 loci previously reported to be associated with lung function. We used a pooled sequencing approach, with 12 pools of 25 individuals each, enabling high depth (30x coverage per sample to be achieved. This pooled design maximised sample size and therefore power, but led to challenges during variant-calling since sequencing error rates and minor allele frequencies for rare variants can be very similar. For this reason we employed a rigorous quality control pipeline for variant detection which included the use of 3 independent calling algorithms. In order to avoid false positive associations we also developed tests to detect variants with potential batch effects and removed them before undertaking association testing. We tested for the effects of single variants and the combined effect of rare variants within a locus. We followed up the top signals with data available (only 67% of collapsing methods signals in 4,249 COPD cases and 11,916 smoking controls from UK Biobank. We provide suggestive evidence for the combined effect of rare variants on COPD risk in TNXB and in sliding windows within MECOM and upstream of HHIP. These findings can lead to an improved understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development of COPD.

  9. A Cascade Multilevel Converter of Switched Reluctance Motor and Its Control Timing Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runquan MENG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A kind of cells cascaded multilevel converter of switched reluctance motor was proposed, which can be made up of low voltage power electronic devices and can be applied to drive high voltage switched reluctance motor. Based on introducing the main circuit topology, the operating modes and the voltage superposition law of proposed converter, the control strategy for the switched reluctance drive by the use of proposed converter was analyzed and a kind of corresponding control time sequence was established. By means of Matlab/Simulink simulation and actual system experiment, the system controlled under proposed timing sequence was validated to have good driving performance. In addition, the experiment result shows that the power converter has almost no harmonic pollution to the power source and has a high grid-side power factor because of employing phase-shifting transformer and multi-pulse rectifier in the input port, the threat against insulation of the motor winding decreased with the lessening of voltage gradient of the motor winding by making the winding voltage to vary in multi-level.

  10. Morphological analysis and DNA sequencing of atmospheric pollen in Madrid region: preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Montserrat Gutierrez-Bustillo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available So far, the study of the biological particles in the air we breathe has been mainly directed at knowing and controlling pollen and spores, aeroallergens with a well-known health impact. It has been recently suggested that the air is an ecosystem in itself, and that it probably has its own biota, which would be composed mainly of viruses, bacteria, fungal spores, and pollen. The main objective of the AIRBIOTA-CM project is to study this diverse set of biological particles present in the urban air in the Community of Madrid using a multidisciplinary, innovative and integrative approach.The project is collaboration between ve research groups in very different fields, which aim is to get an overview on the composition and dynamics of biological particles in the air to optimize the methods of sampling and analysis.As a methodological innovation, there is an attempt to apply the breakthroughs in metagenomics to the study of bioaerosols. In addition, new collection strategies have been used, such as the use of unmanned aerial vehicles by designing or adapting new samplers for these vehicles, to sample at different altitudes and in urban geographic locations that might presumably have a different composition of the biota and relevant human activity.The project started in autumn 2014. The preliminary results presented here refer to the comparison of results obtained by means of traditional (light microscopy and metagenomics methods on atmospheric pollen in the Community of Madrid. The data obtained by both analyses coincide broadly, revealing that the molecular methodology is a good and possible alternative approach to morphological analysis, although more comparative studies to adapt well this technology are needed.

  11. Analysis of the grid connection sequence of stall- and pitch-controlled wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinonez-Varela, G.; Cruden, A.; Anaya-Lara, O.; Tumilty, R.; McDonald, J.R. [Univ. of Strathclyde, Inst. for Energy and Environment (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    The realistic modelling of wind turbines and wind farms is crucial in any form of power system analysis, and consequently, knowledge about their electrical characteristics and performance is also vital. One of the operating conditions producing major transient interaction between a wind turbine generator and the local grid is the grid connection sequence itself, which is particularly significant in fixed-speed turbines. This paper presents experimental measurements of the grid connection sequence of both types of fixed speed wind turbines, i.e. stall- and pitch-controlled via a soft-start device performed at two existing wind farms. Some of the results evidenced significant discrepancies between the actual soft-start operating intervals and those stated/suggested by open literature. The discussion of the paper focuses on highlighting the importance of accurate modelling of the grid connection sequence in order to avoid erroneous estimations of the interaction between the turbine and the grid during this operating state, or inappropriate design of the grid connection. (au)

  12. Application of Optimal Control Theory in Solid-State NMR. Time-Suspension Multiple-Pulse Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamiya, J. H.; Callahan, J.; Sinton, S. W.; Drobny, G. P.

    Optimal control theory (computer-aided design and optimization) is applied in a search for new time-suspension pulse sequences which scale both linear and bilinear spin interactions to zero. This computer-aided approach allows one to rapidly examine and assess the characteristics of different time-suspension pulse sequences. The objective of our search is to find a sequence which operates effectively at modest RF field strengths. The initial result of this search is a simple semiwindowless, four-pulse sequence. The basic structure of this sequence is similar to that of a semiwindowless WAHUHA sequence, but with different pulse tip angles and delays resulting from the requirements for maximum overall scaling of the homonuclear dipole-dipole and chemical-shift Hamiltonians. Theoretical results are presented on how this sequence behaves with regard to resonance offsets and spin system parameters (couplings and chemical shifts). The experimental line-narrowing performance of this sequence as a function of RF field strength and resonance offset is examined and its performance is compared to those of two other time-suspension pulse sequences as well as the theoretical predictions. At moderate RF field strengths and small resonance offsets, this new sequence is found to perform reasonably well, but line-narrowing performance improves at higher RF field strengths or large resonance offsets. The experimental results corroborate the theoretical expectations. Possible applications for the use of this sequence, in particular solid-state imaging, are discussed.

  13. Configuring the Orion Guidance, Navigation, and Control Flight Software for Automated Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Ryan G.; Siliwinski, Tomasz K.; King, Ellis T.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle is being designed with greater automation capabilities than any other crewed spacecraft in NASA s history. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) flight software architecture is designed to provide a flexible and evolvable framework that accommodates increasing levels of automation over time. Within the GN&C flight software, a data-driven approach is used to configure software. This approach allows data reconfiguration and updates to automated sequences without requiring recompilation of the software. Because of the great dependency of the automation and the flight software on the configuration data, the data management is a vital component of the processes for software certification, mission design, and flight operations. To enable the automated sequencing and data configuration of the GN&C subsystem on Orion, a desktop database configuration tool has been developed. The database tool allows the specification of the GN&C activity sequences, the automated transitions in the software, and the corresponding parameter reconfigurations. These aspects of the GN&C automation on Orion are all coordinated via data management, and the database tool provides the ability to test the automation capabilities during the development of the GN&C software. In addition to providing the infrastructure to manage the GN&C automation, the database tool has been designed with capabilities to import and export artifacts for simulation analysis and documentation purposes. Furthermore, the database configuration tool, currently used to manage simulation data, is envisioned to evolve into a mission planning tool for generating and testing GN&C software sequences and configurations. A key enabler of the GN&C automation design, the database tool allows both the creation and maintenance of the data artifacts, as well as serving the critical role of helping to manage, visualize, and understand the data-driven parameters both during software development

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of mitochondrial DNA control region in artificially propagated Chinese sucker Myxocyprinus asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuan; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Ouyang, Shan; Huang, Xiao-Chen; Zhan, Yang; Zhou, Ping; Rong, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Ping

    2015-08-01

    The genetic diversity of the three major artificially propagated populations of Chinese sucker, an endangered freshwater fish species, was investigated using the sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control regions. Among the 89 individuals tested, 66 variable sites (7.26%) and 10 haplotypes were detected (Haplotype diversity Hd = 0.805, Nucleotide diversity π = 0.0287). In general, genetic diversity was lower in artificially propagated populations than in wild populations. This reduction in genetic diversity may be due to population bottlenecks, genetic drift and human selection. A stepping-stone pattern of gene flow was detected in the populations studied, showing much higher gene flow between neighbouring populations. To increase the genetic diversity, wild lineages should be introduced, and more lineages should be shared among artificially propagated populations.

  15. The effects of alignment quality, distance calculation method, sequence filtering, and region on the analysis of 16S rRNA gene-based studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D Schloss

    Full Text Available Pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified fragments that target variable regions within the 16S rRNA gene has quickly become a powerful method for analyzing the membership and structure of microbial communities. This approach has revealed and introduced questions that were not fully appreciated by those carrying out traditional Sanger sequencing-based methods. These include the effects of alignment quality, the best method of calculating pairwise genetic distances for 16S rRNA genes, whether it is appropriate to filter variable regions, and how the choice of variable region relates to the genetic diversity observed in full-length sequences. I used a diverse collection of 13,501 high-quality full-length sequences to assess each of these questions. First, alignment quality had a significant impact on distance values and downstream analyses. Specifically, the greengenes alignment, which does a poor job of aligning variable regions, predicted higher genetic diversity, richness, and phylogenetic diversity than the SILVA and RDP-based alignments. Second, the effect of different gap treatments in determining pairwise genetic distances was strongly affected by the variation in sequence length for a region; however, the effect of different calculation methods was subtle when determining the sample's richness or phylogenetic diversity for a region. Third, applying a sequence mask to remove variable positions had a profound impact on genetic distances by muting the observed richness and phylogenetic diversity. Finally, the genetic distances calculated for each of the variable regions did a poor job of correlating with the full-length gene. Thus, while it is tempting to apply traditional cutoff levels derived for full-length sequences to these shorter sequences, it is not advisable. Analysis of beta-diversity metrics showed that each of these factors can have a significant impact on the comparison of community membership and structure. Taken together, these results

  16. Development of SCAR (sequence-characterized amplified region) markers as a complementary tool for identification of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) from crude drugs and multicomponent formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Preeti; Warude, Dnyaneshwar; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2008-05-01

    Zingiber officinale Roscoe (common or culinary ginger) is an official drug in Ayurvedic, Indian herbal, Chinese, Japanese, African and British Pharmacopoeias. The objective of the present study was to develop DNA-based markers that can be applied for the identification and differentiation of the commercially important plant Z. officinale Roscoe from the closely related species Zingiber zerumbet (pinecone, bitter or 'shampoo' ginger) and Zingiber cassumunar [cassumunar or plai (Thai) ginger]. The rhizomes of the other two Zingiber species used in the present study are morphologically similar to that of Z. officinale Roscoe and can be used as its adulterants or contaminants. Various methods, including macroscopy, microscopy and chemoprofiling, have been reported for the quality control of crude ginger and its products. These methods are reported to have limitations in distinguishing Z. officinale from closely related species. Hence, newer complementary methods for correct identification of ginger are useful. In the present study, RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) analysis was used to identify putative species-specific amplicons for Z. officinale. These were further cloned and sequenced to develop SCAR (sequence-characterized amplified region) markers. The developed SCAR markers were tested in several non-Zingiber species commonly used in ginger-containing formulations. One of the markers, P3, was found to be specific for Z. officinale and was successfully applied for detection of Z. officinale from Trikatu, a multicomponent formulation.

  17. Introduction of the Python script STRinNGS for analysis of STR regions in FASTQ or BAM files and expansion of the Danish STR sequence database to 11 STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Susanne L; Buchard, Anders; Rockenbauer, Eszter

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces the in-house developed Python application STRinNGS for analysis of STR sequence elements in BAM or FASTQ files. STRinNGS identifies sequence reads with STR loci by their flanking sequences, it analyses the STR sequence and the flanking regions, and generates a report with the......This work introduces the in-house developed Python application STRinNGS for analysis of STR sequence elements in BAM or FASTQ files. STRinNGS identifies sequence reads with STR loci by their flanking sequences, it analyses the STR sequence and the flanking regions, and generates a report...

  18. Genetic relatedness among indigenous rice varieties in the Eastern Himalayan region based on nucleotide sequences of the Waxy gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Baharul I; Khan, Mohammed L; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2014-12-29

    Indigenous rice varieties in the Eastern Himalayan region of Northeast India are traditionally classified into sali, boro and jum ecotypes based on geographical locality and the season of cultivation. In this study, we used DNA sequence data from the Waxy (Wx) gene to infer the genetic relatedness among indigenous rice varieties in Northeast India and to assess the genetic distinctiveness of ecotypes. The results of all three analyses (Bayesian, Maximum Parsimony and Neighbor Joining) were congruent and revealed two genetically distinct clusters of rice varieties in the region. The large group comprised several varieties of sali and boro ecotypes, and all agronomically improved varieties. The small group consisted of only traditionally cultivated indigenous rice varieties, which included one boro, few sali and all jum varieties. The fixation index analysis revealed a very low level of differentiation between sali and boro (F(ST) = 0.005), moderate differentiation between sali and jum (F(ST) = 0.108) and high differentiation between jum and boro (F(ST) = 0.230) ecotypes. The genetic relatedness analyses revealed that sali, boro and jum ecotypes are genetically heterogeneous, and the current classification based on cultivation type is not congruent with the genetic background of rice varieties. Indigenous rice varieties chosen from genetically distinct clusters could be used in breeding programs to improve genetic gain through heterosis, while maintaining high genetic diversity.

  19. Sequence requirements of the HIV-1 protease flap region determined by saturation mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of flap mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Everitt, Lorraine; Manchester, Marianne; Loeb, Daniel D.; Hutchison, Clyde A.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    The retroviral proteases (PRs) have a structural feature called the flap, which consists of a short antiparallel β-sheet with a turn. The flap extends over the substrate binding cleft and must be flexible to allow entry and exit of the polypeptide substrates and products. We analyzed the sequence requirements of the amino acids within the flap region (positions 46–56) of the HIV-1 PR. The phenotypes of 131 substitution mutants were determined using a bacterial expression system. Four of the mutant PRs with mutations in different regions of the flap were selected for kinetic analysis. Our phenotypic analysis, considered in the context of published structures of the HIV-1 PR with a bound substrate analogs, shows that: (i) Met-46 and Phe-53 participate in hydrophobic interactions on the solvent-exposed face of the flap; (ii) Ile-47, Ile-54, and Val-56 participate in hydrophobic interactions on the inner face of the flap; (iii) Ile-50 has hydrophobic interactions at the distance of both the δ and γ carbons; (iv) the three glycine residues in the β-turn of the flap are virtually intolerant of substitutions. Among these mutant PRs, we have identified changes in both kcat and Km. These results establish the nature of the side chain requirements at each position in the flap and document a role for the flap in both substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:9122179

  20. UTRdb and UTRsite: a collection of sequences and regulatory motifs of the untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Flavio; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Iacono, Michele; Liuni, Sabino; Kersey, Paul J.; Duarte, Jorge; Saccone, Cecilia; Pesole, Graziano

    2005-01-01

    The 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs play crucial roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression through the modulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic mRNA transport, translation efficiency, subcellular localization and message stability. UTRdb is a curated database of 5′ and 3′ untranslated sequences of eukaryotic mRNAs, derived from several sources of primary data. Experimentally validated functional motifs are annotated (and also collated as the UTRsite database) and cross-links to genomic and protein data are provided. The integration of UTRdb with genomic and protein data has allowed the implementation of a powerful retrieval resource for the selection and extraction of UTR subsets based on their genomic coordinates and/or features of the protein encoded by the relevant mRNA (e.g. GO term, PFAM domain, etc.). All internet resources implemented for retrieval and functional analysis of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of eukaryotic mRNAs are accessible at http://www.ba.itb.cnr.it/UTR/. PMID:15608165

  1. Cycle-time determination and process control of sequencing batch membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a method to determine the cycle time for sequencing batch membrane bioreactors (SBMBRs) is introduced. One of the advantages of SBMBRs is the simplicity of adapting them to varying wastewater composition. The benefit of this flexibility can only be fully utilised if the cycle times are optimised for the specific inlet load conditions. This requires either proactive and ongoing operator adjustment or active predictive instrument-based control. Determination of the cycle times for conventional sequencing batch reactor (SBR) plants is usually based on experience. Due to the higher mixed liquor suspended solids concentrations in SBMBRs and the limited experience with their application, a new approach to calculate the cycle time had to be developed. Based on results from a semi-technical pilot plant, the paper presents an approach for calculating the cycle time in relation to the influent concentration according to the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 and the German HSG (Hochschulgruppe) Approach. The approach presented in this paper considers the increased solid contents in the reactor and the resultant shortened reaction times. This allows for an exact calculation of the nitrification and denitrification cycles with a tolerance of only a few minutes. Ultimately the same approach can be used for a predictive control strategy and for conventional SBR plants.

  2. Fed-Batch Control and Visualization of Monomer Sequences of Individual ICAR ATRP Gradient Copolymer Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar R. D'hooge

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the monomer sequences of a representative number of copolymer chains (≈ 150,000, optimal synthesis procedures for linear gradient copolymers are proposed, using bulk Initiators for Continuous Activator Regeneration Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ICAR ATRP. Methyl methacrylate and n-butyl acrylate are considered as comonomers with CuBr2/PMDETA (N,N,N′,N′′,N′′-pentamethyldiethylenetriamine as deactivator at 80 °C. The linear gradient quality is determined in silico using the recently introduced gradient deviation ( polymer property. Careful selection or fed-batch addition of the conventional radical initiator I2 allows a reduction of the polymerization time with ca. a factor 2 compared to the corresponding batch case, while preserving control over polymer properties ( ≈ 0.30; dispersity ≈ 1.1. Fed-batch addition of not only I2, but also comonomer and deactivator (50 ppm under starved conditions yields a below 0.25 and, hence, an excellent linear gradient quality for the dormant polymer molecules, albeit at the expense of an increase of the overall polymerization time. The excellent control is confirmed by the visualization of the monomer sequences of ca. 1000 copolymer chains.

  3. External control of the stream of consciousness: Stimulus-based effects on involuntary thought sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Christina; Farnia, Melika; Jantz, Tiffany K; Gazzaley, Adam; Morsella, Ezequiel

    2015-05-01

    The stream of consciousness often appears whimsical and free from external control. Recent advances, however, reveal that the stream is more susceptible to external influence than previously assumed. Thoughts can be triggered by external stimuli in a manner that is involuntary, systematic, and nontrivial. Based on these advances, our experimental manipulation systematically triggered a sequence of, not one, but two involuntary thoughts. Participants were instructed to (a) not subvocalize the name of visual objects and (b) not count the number of letters comprising object names. On a substantial proportion of trials, participants experienced both kinds of involuntary thoughts. Each thought arose from distinct, high-level processes (naming versus counting). This is the first demonstration of the induction of two involuntary thoughts into the stream of consciousness. Stimulus word length influenced dependent measures systematically. Our findings are relevant to many fields associated with the study of consciousness, including attention, imagery, and action control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic start-up system of nuclear reactor based on sequence control technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao; Zhang Dafa; Peng Huaqing

    2009-01-01

    A conceptive design of an automatic start-up system based on the sequence control for the nuclear reactors is given in this paper, so as to solve the problems during the start-up process, such as the long operation time, low automatic control level and high accident rate. The start-up process and its requirements are analyzed in detail at first. Then,the principle, the architecture, the key technologies of the automatic start-up system of nuclear reactors are designed and discussed. With the designed system, the automatic start-up of the nuclear reactor can be realized,the work load of the operator can be reduced,and the safety and efficiency of the nuclear power plant during its start-up can be improved. (authors)

  5. Relationships among Tomistoma schlegelii in Malaysia Based on Cyt b-Control Region Gene Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amirul Arib Md Adzhar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomistoma schlegelii is a slender snout crocodile, secretive in nature which is currently under Appendix I of Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES. Limited information is currently available on its wild population, especially in Malaysia. Thus this study aims to describe genetic relationship of T. schlegelii populations from Malaysia which was done using partial sequencing of Cytochrome b-control region mtDNA gene. The study reveals that the genetic diversity among T. schlegelii is high, ranging from 0.16% to 3.34%, suggesting healthy populations. Analysis showed that there is gene flow among populations (Da = 1.71% to 2.21% within Western Sarawak, Peninsular Malaysia, and other geographical regions coherent with Sundaland theory, suggesting that there is ancient river system connecting the two regions of Peninsular Malaysia and West Borneo when the Sunda Shelf was exposed. Unique haplotypes had been observed in Northern Sarawak (SAM01 and SAM02 as well as in Sumatera; thus each T. schlegelii deserved its own management strategies to ensure the survival of the species.

  6. Human β-globin locus control region: Analysis of the 5' DNase I hypersensitive site HS 2 in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caterina, J.J.; Ryan, T.M.; Pawlik, K.M.; Townes, T.M.; Brinster, R.L.; Behringer, R.R.; Palmiter, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    The human β-globin locus control region (LCR) is essential for high-level expression of human var-epsilon-, γ-, and β-globin genes. Developmentally stable DNase I hypersensitive sites (designated HS) mark sequences within this region that are important for LCR activity. A 1.9-kilobase (kb) fragment containing the 5' HS 2 site enhances human β-globin gene expression 100-fold in transgenic mice and also confers position-independent expression. To further define important sequences within this region, deletion mutations of the 1.9-kb fragment were introduced upstream of the human β-globin gene, and the constructs were tested for activity in transgenic mice. Although enhancer activity was gradually lost with deletion of both 5' and 3' sequences, a 373-base-pair (BP) fragment retained the ability to confer relative position-independent expression. Three prominent DNase I footprints were observed in this region with extracts from the human erythroleukemia cell line K-562, one of which contained duplicated binding sites for transcription factor AP-1 (activator protein 1). When the 1.9-kb fragment containing an 19-bp deletion of the AP-1 binding sites was tested in transgenic mice, enhancer activity decreased 20-fold but position-independent expression was retained

  7. Development of dominant sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR marker linked with plume moth (Exelastis atomosa Walsingham 1886 resistance in pigeon-pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya R Mishra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The mode of gene action governing resistance to plume moth (Exelastis atomosa Walsingham 1886 derived from pigeon-pea (Cajanus scarabaeoides (L. Thouars accession ICPW-94 has been determined and the resistance alleles have been designated as PPM1. The progenies of F2 population and F3 families derived from an interspecific cross C. cajan (L. Huth ('ICP-26' x C. scarabaeoides (accession ICPW-94 revealed monogenic gene action for resistance to plume moth, and the dominant control by single locus or cluster of tightly linked alleles. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA of 116 F2 progenies by using 143 parental polymorphic RAPD primers could identify a fragment OPA09(910 associated with plume moth resistance in coupling phase of linkage. Further single plant analysis of the 116 F2 mapping population revealed OPA09(910 was linked to PPMi locus conferring host resistance to plume moth with recombination fraction (rf value of 0.125 (12.7 cM of Kosambi function. The resistance specific fragment OPA09(910 was cloned, sequenced and converted into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR marker, SCOPA09(942, which was also closely associated (10.3 cM with the locus PPMl with rf value 0.102. BLAST analysis with pigeon-pea genome sequence also confirmed its occurrence in CcLG02 (Scafseq.LG_V5.0fa and contig 01597 (AFSP01.fsa1. This SCAR marker showed reasonable screening efficiency in the F2, F3, and BC1F1 lines, thus it can be used as genetic handle in marker-assisted introgression of the genomic fragment conferring plume moth resistance and screening of breeding lines in pigeon-pea.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Whole Genome Sequences From Southern India Suggest Novel Resistance Mechanisms and the Need for Region-Specific Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Abigail L; Abeel, Thomas; Galagan, James E; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Salazar, Alex; Gehrmann, Thies; Shanmugam, Siva Kumar; Palaniyandi, Kannan; Narayanan, Sujatha; Swaminathan, Soumya; Earl, Ashlee M

    2017-06-01

    India is home to 25% of all tuberculosis cases and the second highest number of multidrug resistant cases worldwide. However, little is known about the genetic diversity and resistance determinants of Indian Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly for the primary lineages found in India, lineages 1 and 3. We whole genome sequenced 223 randomly selected M. tuberculosis strains from 196 patients within the Tiruvallur and Madurai districts of Tamil Nadu in Southern India. Using comparative genomics, we examined genetic diversity, transmission patterns, and evolution of resistance. Genomic analyses revealed (11) prevalence of strains from lineages 1 and 3, (11) recent transmission of strains among patients from the same treatment centers, (11) emergence of drug resistance within patients over time, (11) resistance gained in an order typical of strains from different lineages and geographies, (11) underperformance of known resistance-conferring mutations to explain phenotypic resistance in Indian strains relative to studies focused on other geographies, and (11) the possibility that resistance arose through mutations not previously implicated in resistance, or through infections with multiple strains that confound genotype-based prediction of resistance. In addition to substantially expanding the genomic perspectives of lineages 1 and 3, sequencing and analysis of M. tuberculosis whole genomes from Southern India highlight challenges of infection control and rapid diagnosis of resistant tuberculosis using current technologies. Further studies are needed to fully explore the complement of diversity and resistance determinants within endemic M. tuberculosis populations.

  9. Isolation of the Drosophila melanogaster dunce chromosomal region and recombinational mapping of dunce sequences with restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ronald L.; Davidson, Norman

    1984-01-01

    Using the method of chromosomal walking, we have isolated a contiguous region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome which corresponds to salivary gland chromosome bands 3C12 to 3D4. This five-band region contains approximately 100 kilobases of DNA, including those sequences comprising dunce, a gene which functions in memory and cyclic nucleotide metabolism. Genome blots of DNA from flies carrying several different chromosomal aberrations with breakpoints in the region have been probed w...

  10. 40 CFR 81.46 - U.S. Virgin Islands Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.46 U.S. Virgin Islands Air Quality Control Region. The U.S. Virgin Islands... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. Virgin Islands Air Quality Control Region. 81.46 Section 81.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  11. 40 CFR 81.99 - New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.99 New Mexico Southern Border Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Arizona-New Mexico Southern Border Interstate Air Quality Control Region has been renamed the...

  12. 40 CFR 81.38 - Metropolitan Houston-Galveston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Houston-Galveston... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.38 Metropolitan Houston-Galveston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Houston-Galveston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Texas) has been...

  13. 40 CFR 81.120 - Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.120 Section 81.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.120 Middle Tennessee Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  14. 40 CFR 81.111 - Georgetown Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.111 Georgetown Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Georgetown Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Georgetown Intrastate Air Quality...

  15. 40 CFR 81.95 - Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.95 Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries of the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality...

  16. 40 CFR 81.35 - Louisville Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.35 Louisville Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Louisville Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Kentucky-Indiana) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Louisville Interstate Air Quality...

  17. 40 CFR 81.17 - Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.17 Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality Control Region consists of the following territorial area (including the territorial... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Los Angeles Air Quality...

  18. 40 CFR 81.110 - Camden-Sumter Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.110 Camden-Sumter Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Camden-Sumter Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Camden-Sumter Intrastate Air Quality...

  19. 40 CFR 81.107 - Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.107 Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Greenwood Intrastate Air Quality...

  20. 40 CFR 81.121 - Four Corners Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.121 Four Corners Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Four Corners Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado-New Mexico-Utah) has been revised to consist of the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Four Corners Interstate Air Quality...

  1. 40 CFR 81.54 - Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.54 Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Alaska) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cook Inlet Intrastate Air Quality...

  2. 40 CFR 81.52 - Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.52 Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Utah) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the boundaries... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wasatch Front Intrastate Air Quality...

  3. 40 CFR 81.108 - Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.108 Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Columbia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Columbia Intrastate Air Quality...

  4. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality...

  5. 40 CFR 81.109 - Florence Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.109 Florence Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Florence Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (South Carolina) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Florence Intrastate Air Quality...

  6. 40 CFR 81.80 - Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.80 Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Nevada) has been revised to consist of the territorial area encompassed by... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Las Vegas Intrastate Air Quality...

  7. 40 CFR 81.42 - Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.42 Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Georgia-Tennessee) has been revised to consist of the territorial area... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chattanooga Interstate Air Quality...

  8. 40 CFR 81.97 - Southwest Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Southwest Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.97 Section 81.97 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.97 Southwest Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The...

  9. 40 CFR 81.136 - Corpus Christi-Victoria Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Corpus Christi-Victoria Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.136 Corpus Christi-Victoria Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Corpus Christi-Victoria Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Texas) consists of the territorial...

  10. 40 CFR 81.102 - Metropolitan Quad Cities Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan Quad Cities Interstate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.102 Metropolitan Quad Cities Interstate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Quad Cities Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Illinois-Iowa) consists of...

  11. Soil bacterial diversity screening using single 16S rRNA gene V regions coupled with multi-million read generating sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotirios Vasileiadis

    Full Text Available The novel multi-million read generating sequencing technologies are very promising for resolving the immense soil 16S rRNA gene bacterial diversity. Yet they have a limited maximum sequence length screening ability, restricting studies in screening DNA stretches of single 16S rRNA gene hypervariable (V regions. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of properties of four consecutive V regions (V3-6 on commonly applied analytical methodologies in bacterial ecology studies. Using an in silico approach, the performance of each V region was compared with the complete 16S rRNA gene stretch. We assessed related properties of the soil derived bacterial sequence collection of the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP database and concomitantly performed simulations based on published datasets. Results indicate that overall the most prominent V region for soil bacterial diversity studies was V3, even though it was outperformed in some of the tests. Despite its high performance during most tests, V4 was less conserved along flanking sites, thus reducing its ability for bacterial diversity coverage. V5 performed well in the non-redundant RDP database based analysis. However V5 did not resemble the full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence results as well as V3 and V4 did when the natural sequence frequency and occurrence approximation was considered in the virtual experiment. Although, the highly conserved flanking sequence regions of V6 provide the ability to amplify partial 16S rRNA gene sequences from very diverse owners, it was demonstrated that V6 was the least informative compared to the rest examined V regions. Our results indicate that environment specific database exploration and theoretical assessment of the experimental approach are strongly suggested in 16S rRNA gene based bacterial diversity studies.

  12. Cognitive Control Structures in the Imitation Learning of Spatial Sequences and Rhythms—An fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Sakreida, Katrin; Higuchi, Satomi; Di Dio, Cinzia; Ziessler, Michael; Turgeon, Martine; Roberts, Neil; Vogt, Stefan Reinhold

    2017-01-01

    Imitation learning involves the acquisition of novel motor patterns based on action observation (AO). We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to study the imitation learning of spatial sequences and rhythms during AO, motor imagery (MI), and imitative execution in nonmusicians and musicians. While both tasks engaged the fronto-parietal mirror circuit, the spatial sequence task recruited posterior parietal and dorsal premotor regions more strongly. The rhythm task involved ...

  13. Speech serial control in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria: Effects of sequence length and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J Reilly

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated the processes responsible for selection of sounds and syllables during production of speech sequences in 10 adults with hypokinetic dysarthria from Parkinson’s disease, 5 adults with ataxic dysarthria, and 14 healthy control speakers. Speech production data from a choice reaction time task were analyzed to evaluate the effects of sequence length and practice on speech sound sequencing. Speakers produced sequences that were between one and five syllables in length over five experimental runs of 60 trials each. In contrast to the healthy speakers, speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria demonstrated exaggerated sequence length effects for both inter-syllable intervals (ISIs and speech error rates. Conversely, speakers with ataxic dysarthria failed to demonstrate a sequence length effect on ISIs and were also the only group that did not exhibit practice-related changes in ISIs and speech error rates over the five experimental runs. The exaggerated sequence length effects in the hypokinetic speakers with Parkinson’s disease are consistent with an impairment of action selection during speech sequence production. The absent length effects observed in the speakers with ataxic dysarthria is consistent with previous findings that indicate a limited capacity to buffer speech sequences in advance of their execution. In addition, the lack of practice effects in these speakers suggests that learning-related improvements in the production rate and accuracy of speech sequences involves processing by structures of the cerebellum. Together, the current findings inform models of serial control for speech in healthy speakers and support the notion that sequencing deficits contribute to speech symptoms in speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. In addition, these findings indicate that speech sequencing is differentially impaired in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria.

  14. Speech serial control in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria: effects of sequence length and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Spencer, Kristie A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the processes responsible for selection of sounds and syllables during production of speech sequences in 10 adults with hypokinetic dysarthria from Parkinson’s disease, five adults with ataxic dysarthria, and 14 healthy control speakers. Speech production data from a choice reaction time task were analyzed to evaluate the effects of sequence length and practice on speech sound sequencing. Speakers produced sequences that were between one and five syllables in length over five experimental runs of 60 trials each. In contrast to the healthy speakers, speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria demonstrated exaggerated sequence length effects for both inter-syllable intervals (ISIs) and speech error rates. Conversely, speakers with ataxic dysarthria failed to demonstrate a sequence length effect on ISIs and were also the only group that did not exhibit practice-related changes in ISIs and speech error rates over the five experimental runs. The exaggerated sequence length effects in the hypokinetic speakers with Parkinson’s disease are consistent with an impairment of action selection during speech sequence production. The absent length effects observed in the speakers with ataxic dysarthria is consistent with previous findings that indicate a limited capacity to buffer speech sequences in advance of their execution. In addition, the lack of practice effects in these speakers suggests that learning-related improvements in the production rate and accuracy of speech sequences involves processing by structures of the cerebellum. Together, the current findings inform models of serial control for speech in healthy speakers and support the notion that sequencing deficits contribute to speech symptoms in speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. In addition, these findings indicate that speech sequencing is differentially impaired in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria. PMID:24137121

  15. Compensation of negative sequence stator flux of doubly-fed induction generator using polar voltage control-based direct torque control under unbalanced grid voltage condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrinarayan Bansilal Pimple

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a polar voltage control-based direct torque control method to reduce the effects of unbalanced grid voltage on doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind turbine system. Under unbalanced grid voltage, the stator flux has a negative sequence component which leads to second harmonic pulsation in torque, stator active power, stator reactive power, stator current and rotor current. In the control scheme, the negative sequence rotor voltage vector is controlled to compensate the negative sequence stator flux by negative sequence rotor flux. Simulation study is carried out on a 2 MW DFIG system using MATLAB/SIMULINK. Feasibility of the proposed control strategy is experimentally verified on a 1.5 kW DFIG system.

  16. Optimal supplementary frequency controller design using the wind farm frequency model and controller parameters stability region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulabi, Mohammadreza; Bahrami, Shahab; Ranjbar, Ali Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    In most of the existing studies, the frequency response in the variable speed wind turbines (VSWTs) is simply realized by changing the torque set-point via appropriate inputs such as frequency deviations signal. However, effective dynamics and systematic process design have not been comprehensively discussed yet. Accordingly, this paper proposes a proportional-derivative frequency controller and investigates its performance in a wind farm consisting of several VSWTs. A band-pass filter is deployed before the proposed controller to avoid responding to either steady state frequency deviations or high rate of change of frequency. To design the controller, the frequency model of the wind farm is first characterized. The proposed controller is then designed based on the obtained open loop system. The stability region associated with the controller parameters is analytically determined by decomposing the closed-loop system's characteristic polynomial into the odd and even parts. The performance of the proposed controller is evaluated through extensive simulations in MATLAB/Simulink environment in a power system comprising a high penetration of VSWTs equipped with the proposed controller. Finally, based on the obtained feasible area and appropriate objective function, the optimal values associated with the controller parameters are determined using the genetic algorithm (GA). Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitochondrial Control Region Variability in Mytilus galloprovincialis Populations from the Central-Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis A. Giantsis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The variable domain 1 (VD1 domain of the control region and a small segment of the rrnaL gene of the F mtDNA type were sequenced and analyzed in 174 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis. Samples were collected from eight locations in four Central-Eastern (CE Mediterranean countries (Italy, Croatia, Greece and Turkey. A new primer, specific for the F mtDNA type, was designed for the sequencing procedure. In total 40 different haplotypes were recorded, 24 of which were unique. Aside from the two populations situated in Thermaikos gulf (Northern Aegean, Greece, relatively high levels of haplotype and nucleotide diversity were estimated for both Central and Eastern Mediterranean populations. Eight out of the 40 haplotypes were shared by at least three populations while two of them were found in all populations. ΦST and cluster analysis revealed lack of structuring among CE Mediterranean populations with the exception of those located at the Sea of Marmara and Croatian coast which were highly differentiated. Apart from the species’ inherit dispersal ability, anthropogenic activities, such as the repeated translocations of mussel spat, seem to have played an important role in shaping the current genetic population structure of CE M. galloprovincialis mussels.

  18. Phenobarbital-dependent protein binding to Barbie box-like sequences in the coding region of cytochrome P450BM-3 gene from Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidamakova, E K; Alpatov, O V; Ischenko, I V; Kovalenko, S P; Lyakhovich, V V

    1996-12-12

    Phenobarbital-dependent protein binding was shown to occur to DNA fragments from the coding region of the cytochrome P450BM-3 gene from Bacillus megaterium. Incubation of the DNA fragments from the coding region of the gene with total cell extract from Bacillus megaterium revealed two DNA regions with protein-binding capacity: +237/+318 and +319/+425 considering 'O' as the start of cytochrome P450BM-3 translation. DNaseI footprint analysis of the fragment +319/+425 with the total cell extract showed that some protein(s) protected DNA stretches from the position +373 up to the position +389 on the transcribed strand and from the position +378 up to the position +398 on the non-transcribed strand. DNaseI footprint analysis of the fragment +237/+318 revealed the protection in the region +262/+277 on the non-transcribed strand. Three regions protected by cell extract protein(s) from DNaseI hydrolysis (+262/+277, +373/+389 and +378/+398) appeared to be strongly homologous to the Barbie box sequence. Barbie-box-like sequences were found in the majority of regulatory regions of phenobarbital-inducible genes whose regulatory sequences had been reported (Fulco et al., 1994). Our results suggest that a functional role of Barbie box sequence takes place not only in regulatory but also in the coding region of the gene. In line with that hypothesis we analyzed all cytochrome P450 genes in respect to the presence of Barbie box-like sequences in their coding parts. At least one cytochrome P450 gene (CYP6A1, phenobarbital-inducible gene from Musca domestica) was shown to contain Barbie box sequence in the coding part of the gene.

  19. [Population genetic differentiation of Phrynocephalus axillaris in east of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region based on sequence variation of mitochondrial ND4-tRNALeu gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Xian-Guang; Wang, Yue-Zhao

    2010-08-01

    A 838 bp fragment of mtDNA ND4-tRNALeu gene was sequenced for 66 individuals from five populations (DB: Dabancheng, TU: Turpan, SS: Shanshan, HL: Liushuquan, HD: East district of Hami) of Phrynocephalus axillaris distributed in east of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Seventeen haplotypes were identified from 29 nucleotide polymorphic sites in the aligned 838 bp sequence. Excluding DB, there were relatively high haplotype diversity [(0.600+/-0.113)oscillation since Pleistocene and genetic drift.

  20. Designing sequence to control protein function in an EF-hand protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunick, Christopher G; Nelson, Melanie R; Mangahas, Sheryll; Hunter, Michael J; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Mizoue, Laura S; Bunick, Gerard J; Chazin, Walter J

    2004-05-19

    The extent of conformational change that calcium binding induces in EF-hand proteins is a key biochemical property specifying Ca(2+) sensor versus signal modulator function. To understand how differences in amino acid sequence lead to differences in the response to Ca(2+) binding, comparative analyses of sequence and structures, combined with model building, were used to develop hypotheses about which amino acid residues control Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes. These results were used to generate a first design of calbindomodulin (CBM-1), a calbindin D(9k) re-engineered with 15 mutations to respond to Ca(2+) binding with a conformational change similar to that of calmodulin. The gene for CBM-1 was synthesized, and the protein was expressed and purified. Remarkably, this protein did not exhibit any non-native-like molten globule properties despite the large number of mutations and the nonconservative nature of some of them. Ca(2+)-induced changes in CD intensity and in the binding of the hydrophobic probe, ANS, implied that CBM-1 does undergo Ca(2+) sensorlike conformational changes. The X-ray crystal structure of Ca(2+)-CBM-1 determined at 1.44 A resolution reveals the anticipated increase in hydrophobic surface area relative to the wild-type protein. A nascent calmodulin-like hydrophobic docking surface was also found, though it is occluded by the inter-EF-hand loop. The results from this first calbindomodulin design are discussed in terms of progress toward understanding the relationships between amino acid sequence, protein structure, and protein function for EF-hand CaBPs, as well as the additional mutations for the next CBM design.

  1. Analysis of Canis mitochondrial DNA demonstrates high concordance between the control region and ATPase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Bradley N

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic studies of wild Canis species have relied heavily on the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR to infer species relationships and evolutionary lineages. Previous analyses of the CR provided evidence for a North American evolved eastern wolf (C. lycaon, that is more closely related to red wolves (C. rufus and coyotes (C. latrans than grey wolves (C. lupus. Eastern wolf origins, however, continue to be questioned. Therefore, we analyzed mtDNA from 89 wolves and coyotes across North America and Eurasia at 347 base pairs (bp of the CR and 1067 bp that included the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes. Phylogenies and divergence estimates were used to clarify the evolutionary history of eastern wolves, and regional comparisons of nonsynonomous to synonomous substitutions (dN/dS at the ATPase6 and ATPase8 genes were used to elucidate the potential role of selection in shaping mtDNA geographic distribution. Results We found high concordance across analyses between the mtDNA regions studied. Both had a high percentage of variable sites (CR = 14.6%; ATP = 9.7% and both phylogenies clustered eastern wolf haplotypes monophyletically within a North American evolved lineage apart from coyotes. Divergence estimates suggest the putative red wolf sequence is more closely related to coyotes (DxyCR = 0.01982 ± 0.00494 SD; DxyATP = 0.00332 ± 0.00097 SD than the eastern wolf sequences (DxyCR = 0.03047 ± 0.00664 SD; DxyATP = 0.00931 ± 0.00205 SD. Neutrality tests on both genes were indicative of the population expansion of coyotes across eastern North America, and dN/dS ratios suggest a possible role for purifying selection in the evolution of North American lineages. dN/dS ratios were higher in European evolved lineages from northern climates compared to North American evolved lineages from temperate regions, but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions These results demonstrate high concordance between coding

  2. Next-generation sequencing analysis of miRNA expression in control and FSHD myogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Colangelo

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has demonstrated that miRNA sequences can regulate skeletal myogenesis by controlling the process of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. However, at present a deep analysis of miRNA expression in control and FSHD myoblasts during differentiation has not yet been derived. To close this gap, we used a next-generation sequencing (NGS approach applied to in vitro myogenesis. Furthermore, to minimize sample genetic heterogeneity and muscle-type specific patterns of gene expression, miRNA profiling from NGS data was filtered with FC ≥ 4 (log(2FC ≥ 2 and p-value<0.05, and its validation was derived by qRT-PCR on myoblasts from seven muscle districts. In particular, control myogenesis showed the modulation of 38 miRNAs, the majority of which (34 out 38 were up-regulated, including myomiRs (miR-1, -133a, -133b and -206. Approximately one third of the modulated miRNAs were not previously reported to be involved in muscle differentiation, and interestingly some of these (i.e. miR-874, -1290, -95 and -146a were previously shown to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. FSHD myogenesis evidenced a reduced number of modulated miRNAs than healthy muscle cells. The two processes shared nine miRNAs, including myomiRs, although with FC values lower in FSHD than in control cells. In addition, FSHD cells showed the modulation of six miRNAs (miR-1268, -1268b, -1908, 4258, -4508- and -4516 not evidenced in control cells and that therefore could be considered FSHD-specific, likewise three novel miRNAs that seem to be specifically expressed in FSHD myotubes. These data further clarify the impact of miRNA regulation during control myogenesis and strongly suggest that a complex dysregulation of miRNA expression characterizes FSHD, impairing two important features of myogenesis: cell cycle and muscle development. The derived miRNA profiling could represent a novel molecular signature for FSHD that includes diagnostic biomarkers and

  3. Hyaluronan-binding region of aggrecan from pig laryngeal cartilage. Amino acid sequence, analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides and location of the keratan sulphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, F P; Gaw, J U; Young, C N; Neame, P J

    1992-01-01

    The hyaluronan-binding region (HABR) was prepared from pig laryngeal cartilage aggrecan and the amino acid sequence was determined. The HABR had two N-termini: one N-terminal sequence was Val-Glu-Val-Ser-Glu-Pro (367 amino acids in total), and a second N-terminal sequence (Ala-Ile-Ser-Val-Glu-Val; 370 amino acids in total) was found to arise due to alternate cleavage by the signal peptidase. The N-linked oligosaccharides were analysed by examining their reactivity with a series of lectins. It...

  4. Applying Ancestry and Sex Computation as a Quality Control Tool in Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Patrick C; Turner, Emily H; Scroggins, Sheena M; Salipante, Stephen J; Hoffman, Noah G; Pritchard, Colin C; Shirts, Brian H

    2016-03-01

    To apply techniques for ancestry and sex computation from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data as an approach to confirm sample identity and detect sample processing errors. We combined a principal component analysis method with k-nearest neighbors classification to compute the ancestry of patients undergoing NGS testing. By combining this calculation with X chromosome copy number data, we determined the sex and ancestry of patients for comparison with self-report. We also modeled the sensitivity of this technique in detecting sample processing errors. We applied this technique to 859 patient samples with reliable self-report data. Our k-nearest neighbors ancestry screen had an accuracy of 98.7% for patients reporting a single ancestry. Visual inspection of principal component plots was consistent with self-report in 99.6% of single-ancestry and mixed-ancestry patients. Our model demonstrates that approximately two-thirds of potential sample swaps could be detected in our patient population using this technique. Patient ancestry can be estimated from NGS data incidentally sequenced in targeted panels, enabling an inexpensive quality control method when coupled with patient self-report. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Sequence analysis of the 3’-untranslated region of HSP70 (type I genes in the genus Leishmania: its usefulness as a molecular marker for species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Requena Jose M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Leishmaniases are a group of clinically diverse diseases caused by parasites of the genus Leishmania. To distinguish between species is crucial for correct diagnosis and prognosis as well as for treatment decisions. Recently, sequencing of the HSP70 coding region has been applied in phylogenetic studies and for identifying of Leishmania species with excellent results. Methods In the present study, we analyzed the 3’-untranslated region (UTR of Leishmania HSP70-type I gene from 24 strains representing eleven Leishmania species in the belief that this non-coding region would have a better discriminatory capacity for species typing than coding regions. Results It was observed that there was a remarkable degree of sequence conservation in this region, even between species of the subgenus Leishmania and Viannia. In addition, the presence of many microsatellites was a common feature of the 3´-UTR of HSP70-I genes in the Leishmania genus. Finally, we constructed dendrograms based on global sequence alignments of the analyzed Leishmania species and strains, the results indicated that this particular region of HSP70 genes might be useful for species (or species complex typing, improving for particular species the discrimination capacity of phylogenetic trees based on HSP70 coding sequences. Given the large size variation of the analyzed region between the Leishmania and Viannia subgenera, direct visualization of the PCR amplification product would allow discrimination between subgenera, and a HaeIII-PCR-RFLP analysis might be used for differentiating some species within each subgenera. Conclusions Sequence and phylogenetic analyses indicated that this region, which is readily amplified using a single pair of primers from both Old and New World Leishmania species, might be useful as a molecular marker for species discrimination.

  6. Measures for regional security and arms control in the South-East Asian area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uren, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    The subject of regional security and arms control in the South-East Asia raises some new and difficult issues. No approach to ensuring regional security could be complete without military dimension including the following categories: regional arms control; global arms control measure; confidence building measures that are designed to enhance the transparency of defense policies; confidence building measures that encourage cooperation among the military forces in the region

  7. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the MRP1 gene in four populations suggest negative selection on its coding region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Stephen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MRP1 gene encodes the 190 kDa multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and effluxes diverse drugs and xenobiotics. Sequence variations within this gene might account for differences in drug response in different individuals. To facilitate association studies of this gene with diseases and/or drug response, exons and flanking introns of MRP1 were screened for polymorphisms in 142 DNA samples from four different populations. Results Seventy-one polymorphisms, including 60 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, ten insertions/deletions (indel and one short tandem repeat (STR were identified. Thirty-four of these polymorphisms have not been previously reported. Interestingly, the STR polymorphism at the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR occurs at high but different frequencies in the different populations. Frequencies of common polymorphisms in our populations were comparable to those of similar populations in HAPMAP or Perlegen. Nucleotide diversity indices indicated that the coding region of MRP1 may have undergone negative selection or recent population expansion. SNPs E10/1299 G>T (R433S and E16/2012 G>T (G671V which occur at low frequency in only one or two of four populations examined were predicted to be functionally deleterious and hence are likely to be under negative selection. Conclusion Through in silico approaches, we identified two rare SNPs that are potentially negatively selected. These SNPs may be useful for studies associating this gene with rare events including adverse drug reactions.

  8. Assessment of variation in microbial community amplicon sequencing by the Microbiome Quality Control (MBQC) project consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rashmi; Abu-Ali, Galeb; Vogtmann, Emily; Fodor, Anthony A; Ren, Boyu; Amir, Amnon; Schwager, Emma; Crabtree, Jonathan; Ma, Siyuan; Abnet, Christian C; Knight, Rob; White, Owen; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2017-11-01

    In order for human microbiome studies to translate into actionable outcomes for health, meta-analysis of reproducible data from population-scale cohorts is needed. Achieving sufficient reproducibility in microbiome research has proven challenging. We report a baseline investigation of variability in taxonomic profiling for the Microbiome Quality Control (MBQC) project baseline study (MBQC-base). Blinded specimen sets from human stool, chemostats, and artificial microbial communities were sequenced by 15 laboratories and analyzed using nine bioinformatics protocols. Variability depended most on biospecimen type and origin, followed by DNA extraction, sample handling environment, and bioinformatics. Analysis of artificial community specimens revealed differences in extraction efficiency and bioinformatic classification. These results may guide researchers in experimental design choices for gut microbiome studies.

  9. Sequence artefacts in a prospective series of formalin-fixed tumours tested for mutations in hotspot regions by massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen Q; Li, Jason; Tan, Angela Y-C; Vedururu, Ravikiran; Pang, Jia-Min B; Do, Hongdo; Ellul, Jason; Doig, Ken; Bell, Anthony; MacArthur, Grant A; Fox, Stephen B; Thomas, David M; Fellowes, Andrew; Parisot, John P; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2014-05-13

    Clinical specimens undergoing diagnostic molecular pathology testing are fixed in formalin due to the necessity for detailed morphological assessment. However, formalin fixation can cause major issues with molecular testing, as it causes DNA damage such as fragmentation and non-reproducible sequencing artefacts after PCR amplification. In the context of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), distinguishing true low frequency variants from sequencing artefacts remains challenging. The prevalence of formalin-induced DNA damage and its impact on molecular testing and clinical genomics remains poorly understood. The Cancer 2015 study is a population-based cancer cohort used to assess the feasibility of mutational screening using MPS in cancer patients from Victoria, Australia. While blocks were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded in different anatomical pathology laboratories, they were centrally extracted for DNA utilising the same protocol, and run through the same MPS platform (Illumina TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel). The sequencing artefacts in the 1-10% and the 10-25% allele frequency ranges were assessed in 488 formalin-fixed tumours from the pilot phase of the Cancer 2015 cohort. All blocks were less than 2.5 years of age (mean 93 days). Consistent with the signature of DNA damage due to formalin fixation, many formalin-fixed samples displayed disproportionate levels of C>T/G>A changes in the 1-10% allele frequency range. Artefacts were less apparent in the 10-25% allele frequency range. Significantly, changes were inversely correlated with coverage indicating high levels of sequencing artefacts were associated with samples with low amounts of available amplifiable template due to fragmentation. The degree of fragmentation and sequencing artefacts differed between blocks sourced from different anatomical pathology laboratories. In a limited validation of potentially actionable low frequency mutations, a NRAS G12D mutation in a melanoma was shown to be a false

  10. Development of sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers as a quality standard of inoculants based on Azospirillum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Priya, Pasupuleti; Selastin Antony, Raju; Gopalaswamy, Ganesan; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-04-01

    An attempt was made in this work to develop a strain-level molecular marker for unambiguous authentication of two Azospirillum inoculants, viz. A. lipoferum (strain Az204) and A. brasilense (strain Sp7). The sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers obtained from DNA fingerprints were designed for discrete detection of the strains. The SCAR primers could successfully amplify the target strain without cross-reaction with other Azospirillum strains, native isolates and other inoculants. The detection limit of SCAR primer for Az204 was 8.00 pg of DNA (approximately 10(5) cells per mL), and for Sp7, it was 0.49 pg of DNA (equal to 10(4) cells per mL). A simplified Sephadex G100-based crude DNA extraction protocol developed in this study was found suitable for SCAR marker-based strain authentication. Further, SCAR primers were assessed for simultaneous authentication as well as quantification of commercially prepared Azospirillum inoculants by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR). The RT-PCR assay can be able to quantify the commercial formulations as equal to culturable MPN method, while MPN-PCR failed for Az204. The SCAR marker-based strain authentication and presumptive quantification developed in the present work can contribute to improving the quality standard of commercial inoculants.

  11. Validation of Simple Sequence Length Polymorphism Regions of Commonly Used Mouse Strains for Marker Assisted Speed Congenics Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channabasavaiah B. Gurumurthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marker assisted speed congenics technique is commonly used to facilitate backcrossing of mouse strains in nearly half the time it normally takes otherwise. Traditionally, the technique is performed by analyzing PCR amplified regions of simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP markers between the recipient and donor strains: offspring with the highest number of markers showing the recipient genome across all chromosomes is chosen for the next generation. Although there are well-defined panels of SSLP makers established between certain pairs of mice strains, they are incomplete for most strains. The availability of well-established marker sets for speed congenic screens would enable the scientific community to transfer mutations across strain backgrounds. In this study, we tested the suitability of over 400 SSLP marker sets among 10 mouse strains commonly used for generating genetically engineered models. The panel of markers presented here can readily identify the specified strains and will be quite useful in marker assisted speed congenic screens. Moreover, unlike newer single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array methods which require sophisticated equipment, the SSLP markers panel described here only uses PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis of amplified products; therefore it can be performed in most research laboratories.

  12. Validation of simple sequence length polymorphism regions of commonly used mouse strains for marker assisted speed congenics screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Joshi, Poonam S; Kurz, Scott G; Ohtsuka, Masato; Quadros, Rolen M; Harms, Donald W; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2015-01-01

    Marker assisted speed congenics technique is commonly used to facilitate backcrossing of mouse strains in nearly half the time it normally takes otherwise. Traditionally, the technique is performed by analyzing PCR amplified regions of simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers between the recipient and donor strains: offspring with the highest number of markers showing the recipient genome across all chromosomes is chosen for the next generation. Although there are well-defined panels of SSLP makers established between certain pairs of mice strains, they are incomplete for most strains. The availability of well-established marker sets for speed congenic screens would enable the scientific community to transfer mutations across strain backgrounds. In this study, we tested the suitability of over 400 SSLP marker sets among 10 mouse strains commonly used for generating genetically engineered models. The panel of markers presented here can readily identify the specified strains and will be quite useful in marker assisted speed congenic screens. Moreover, unlike newer single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array methods which require sophisticated equipment, the SSLP markers panel described here only uses PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis of amplified products; therefore it can be performed in most research laboratories.

  13. Tooth eruption sequence and dental crowding: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkelgosha, Vahid; Khosravifard, Negar; Golkari, Ali

    2014-01-01

    When cases of dental crowding are identified and diagnosed promptly, interceptive orthodontics is particularly successful. To assess the differences in the eruption sequence of the mandibular canine and first premolar teeth in children with and without dental crowding. Children who attended the Shiraz Dental School's orthodontic clinic (Iran) from September to December 2012 were enrolled in this case-control study. Tooth size arch length discrepancy (TSALD) of all 8-10 year olds was calculated from patients' dental models. Thirty-six children were randomly selected from those with TSALD of equal or less than 4mm (those with crowding). Each selected case was matched for sex and age with another child (as control) with TSALD>-4mm attending the same clinic, in the same time period. The existing panoramic radiographs were traced and the eruption percentages were measured for mandibular canine and first premolar teeth. The mean difference between canine and first premolar eruption percentages was compared between the case and control groups using the SPSS (version PASW 18) software and a paired sample t-test. Canine and first premolar eruption percentages in the case group were 65.82±13.00 and 78.92±10.15 percent, respectively. The mean eruption percentages for canines and first premolars of the control group were 74.12±14.55 and 75.47±11.60 percent, respectively. There was a significant difference in pre-eruptive positions of canine and first premolar teeth in those with moderate to severe crowding when compared to the control group (p<0.001). These findings may improve the early diagnosis of children with high risk of developing moderate to severe crowding during mixed dentition.

  14. ITS all right mama: investigating the formation of chimeric sequences in the ITS2 region by DNA metabarcoding analyses of fungal mock communities of different complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnsgaard Aas, Anders; Davey, Marie Louise; Kauserud, Håvard

    2017-07-01

    The formation of chimeric sequences can create significant methodological bias in PCR-based DNA metabarcoding analyses. During mixed-template amplification of barcoding regions, chimera formation is frequent and well documented. However, profiling of fungal communities typically uses the more variable rDNA region ITS. Due to a larger research community, tools for chimera detection have been developed mainly for the 16S/18S markers. However, these tools are widely applied to the ITS region without verification of their performance. We examined the rate of chimera formation during amplification and 454 sequencing of the ITS2 region from fungal mock communities of different complexities. We evaluated the chimera detecting ability of two common chimera-checking algorithms: perseus and uchime. Large proportions of the chimeras reported were false positives. No false negatives were found in the data set. Verified chimeras accounted for only 0.2% of the total ITS2 reads, which is considerably less than what is typically reported in 16S and 18S metabarcoding analyses. Verified chimeric 'parent sequences' had significantly higher per cent identity to one another than to random members of the mock communities. Community complexity increased the rate of chimera formation. GC content was higher around the verified chimeric break points, potentially facilitating chimera formation through base pair mismatching in the neighbouring regions of high similarity in the chimeric region. We conclude that the hypervariable nature of the ITS region seems to buffer the rate of chimera formation in comparison with other, less variable barcoding regions, due to shorter regions of high sequence similarity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Analysis of the human cytomegalovirus genomic region from UL146 through UL147A reveals sequence hypervariability, genotypic stability, and overlapping transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Diana D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV genome is generally conserved among unrelated clinical strains, some open reading frames (ORFs are highly variable. UL146 and UL147, which encode CXC chemokine homologues are among these variable ORFs. Results The region of the HCMV genome from UL146 through UL147A was analyzed in clinical strains for sequence variability, genotypic stability, and transcriptional expression. The UL146 sequences in clinical strains from two geographically distant sites were assigned to 12 sequence groups that differ by over 60% at the amino acid level. The same groups were generated by sequences from the UL146-UL147 intergenic region and the UL147 ORF. In contrast to the high level of sequence variability among unrelated clinical strains, the sequences of UL146 through UL147A from isolates of the same strain were highly stable after repeated passage both in vitro and in vivo. Riboprobes homologous to these ORFs detected multiple overlapping transcripts differing in temporal expression. UL146 sequences are present only on the largest transcript, which also contains all of the downstream ORFs including UL148 and UL132. The sizes and hybridization patterns of the transcripts are consistent with a common 3'-terminus downstream of the UL132 ORF. Early-late expression of the transcripts associated with UL146 and UL147 is compatible with the potential role of CXC chemokines in pathogenesis associated with viral replication. Conclusion Clinical isolates from two different geographic sites cluster in the same groups based on the hypervariability of the UL146, UL147, or the intergenic sequences, which provides strong evidence for linkage and no evidence for interstrain recombination within this region. The sequence of individual strains was absolutely stable in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that sequence drift is not a mechanism for the observed sequence hypervariability. There is also no

  16. Coral bleaching pathways under the control of regional temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, C. E.; Lenton, A.; Heron, S. F.; Evenhuis, C.; Sen Gupta, A.; Brown, J. N.; Kuchinke, M.

    2017-11-01

    Increasing sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are predicted to adversely impact coral populations worldwide through increasing thermal bleaching events. Future bleaching is unlikely to be spatially uniform. Therefore, understanding what determines regional differences will be critical for adaptation management. Here, using a cumulative heat stress metric, we show that characteristics of regional SST determine the future bleaching risk patterns. Incorporating observed information on SST variability, in assessing future bleaching risk, provides novel options for management strategies. As a consequence, the known biases in climate model variability and the uncertainties in regional warming rate across climate models are less detrimental than previously thought. We also show that the thresholds used to indicate reef viability can strongly influence a decision on what constitutes a potential refugia. Observing and understanding the drivers of regional variability, and the viability limits of coral reefs, is therefore critical for making meaningful projections of coral bleaching risk.

  17. Sequencing and G-quadruplex folding of the canine proto-oncogene KIT promoter region: might dog be used as a model for human disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Da Ros

    Full Text Available Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2 were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations.

  18. Organization and variation of mitochondrial DNA control region in pleurodiran turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Three complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA control regions (CRs of Chelodina rugosa (Ogilby, 1890, Chelus fimbriata (Schneider, 1783, and Podocnemis unifilis (Troschel, 1848 were firstly determined using Long-PCR method and the length were 1,016 bp, 1,149 bp, and 985bp, respectively. Together with CRs of Pelomedusa subrufa (Bonnaterre, 1789 and nearly complete CR of Podocnemis expansa (Schweigger, 1812 obtained from GenBank, the structural and evolutionary characteristics of mtDNA CRs in pleurodiran turtle were analyzed in this study. We identified three functional domains (TAS, CD, and CSB domains as well as their conservation sequences (TAS, CSB-F, and CSB-1 according to their homology to those of other turtles. Within the TAS domain, an interrupted poly-C stretch was found in C. rugosa, C. fimbriata, and P. subrufa, which also exists in the published mt DNA CRs of Chrysemys picta (Schneider, 1783, Trachemys scripta (Thunberg in Schoepff, 1792, and Trionyx triunguis (Forskål, 1775. The analysis of the origin for the poly-C sequences in TAS domain from six turtles suggested that the poly-C sequences are more related to "goose hairpin" in birds rather than CSB2 in CSB domain. In the CSB domain, CSB2 and CSB3, which were determined in CRs of Cryptodira, were absent in Pleurodira CRs, indicating the regulative mechanisms of transcription may be varied in both two suborders and the lack of CSB2 and CSB3 could be proposed as one of diagnostic characters between Pleurodira and Cryptodira at molecular level. As for CR of other cryptodiran turtles, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs in the 3' end of the CRs was found in the five pleurodiran turtles. Interestingly, the long repeated motifs from each species could form stable stem-loop secondary structures, suggesting that the repeated sequences may play an important role in regulating replication of the mitochondrial genome in Pleurodiran, and the secondary structures of VNTRs may provide some

  19. Controllable quantum private queries using an entangled Fibonacci-sequence spiral source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Hong, E-mail: honglaimm@163.com [School of Computer and Information Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Department of Computing, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Orgun, Mehmet A. [Department of Computing, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Pieprzyk, Josef [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Xiao, Jinghua [School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876 (China); Xue, Liyin [Corporate Analytics, The Australian Taxation Office, Sydney NSW 2000 (Australia); Jia, Zhongtian, E-mail: ise_jiazt@ujn.edu.cn [Provincial Key Laboratory for Network Based Intelligent Computing, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2015-10-23

    Highlights: • Alice can easily control the size of a block by adjusting the parameter m rather than a high-dimension oracle. • The case of Alice knowing an exact multi-bit message can be realized deterministically. • Our protocol provides broad measures of protection against errors caused by the effect of noise. • Our protocol can greatly save both quantum and classical communication and exhibit some advantages in security. • Our protocol is scalable and flexible, and secure against quantum memory attacks by Alice. - Abstract: By changing the initial values in entangled Fibonacci-sequence spiral sources in Simon et al.'s (2013) experimental setup [13], we propose a controllable quantum private query protocol. Moreover, our protocol achieves flexible key expansion and even exhibits secure advantages during communications because of the following observations. We observe the close relationships between Lucas numbers and the first kind of Chebyshev maps, and the Chebyshev maps and k-Chebyshev maps; by adjusting the parameter m in k-Chebyshev maps, Alice and Bob can obtain their expected values of the key blocks and database respectively.

  20. Controllable quantum private queries using an entangled Fibonacci-sequence spiral source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Hong; Orgun, Mehmet A.; Pieprzyk, Josef; Xiao, Jinghua; Xue, Liyin; Jia, Zhongtian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Alice can easily control the size of a block by adjusting the parameter m rather than a high-dimension oracle. • The case of Alice knowing an exact multi-bit message can be realized deterministically. • Our protocol provides broad measures of protection against errors caused by the effect of noise. • Our protocol can greatly save both quantum and classical communication and exhibit some advantages in security. • Our protocol is scalable and flexible, and secure against quantum memory attacks by Alice. - Abstract: By changing the initial values in entangled Fibonacci-sequence spiral sources in Simon et al.'s (2013) experimental setup [13], we propose a controllable quantum private query protocol. Moreover, our protocol achieves flexible key expansion and even exhibits secure advantages during communications because of the following observations. We observe the close relationships between Lucas numbers and the first kind of Chebyshev maps, and the Chebyshev maps and k-Chebyshev maps; by adjusting the parameter m in k-Chebyshev maps, Alice and Bob can obtain their expected values of the key blocks and database respectively

  1. Structure of mouse rRNA precursors. Complete sequence and potential folding of the spacer regions between 18S and 28S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michot, B; Bachellerie, J P; Raynal, F

    1983-05-25

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the regions of mouse ribosomal RNA transcription unit which separate mature rRNA genes. These internal transcribed spacers (ITS) are excised from rRNA precursor during ribosome biosynthesis. ITS 1, between 18S and 5.8S rRNA genes, is 999 nucleotides long. ITS 2, between 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes, is 1089 nucleotides long. Both spacers are very rich in G + C, 70 and 74% respectively. Mouse sequences have been compared with the other available eukaryotes: while no homology is apparent with yeast or xenopus, mouse and rat ITS sequences have been largely conserved, with homologous segments interspersed with highly divergent tracts. Homology with rat is much more extensive for ITS 1 than for ITS 2. Tentative secondary structure models are proposed for the folding of these regions within rRNA precursor; they are closely related in mouse and rat.

  2. Minimal and contributing sequence determinants of the cis-acting locus of transfer (clt) of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 occur within an intrinsically curved plasmid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducote, M J; Prakash, S; Pettis, G S

    2000-12-01

    Efficient interbacterial transfer of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires the pIJ101 tra gene, as well as a cis-acting plasmid function known as clt. Here we show that the minimal pIJ101 clt locus consists of a sequence no greater than 54 bp in size that includes essential inverted-repeat and direct-repeat sequences and is located in close proximity to the 3' end of the korB regulatory gene. Evidence that sequences extending beyond the minimal locus and into the korB open reading frame influence clt transfer function and demonstration that clt-korB sequences are intrinsically curved raise the possibility that higher-order structuring of DNA and protein within this plasmid region may be an inherent feature of efficient pIJ101 transfer.

  3. Sequence variation in nuclear ribosomal small subunit, internal transcribed spacer and large subunit regions of Rhizophagus irregularis and Gigaspora margarita is high and isolate-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéry, Odile; Vasar, Martti; Jairus, Teele; Davison, John; Roux, Christophe; Kivistik, Paula-Ann; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Saks, Ülle; Moora, Mari; Zobel, Martin; Öpik, Maarja

    2016-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are known to exhibit high intra-organism genetic variation. However, information about intra- vs. interspecific variation among the genes commonly used in diversity surveys is limited. Here, the nuclear small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene portions were sequenced from 3 to 5 individual spores from each of two isolates of Rhizophagus irregularis and Gigaspora margarita. A total of 1482 Sanger sequences (0.5 Mb) from 239 clones were obtained, spanning ~4370 bp of the ribosomal operon when concatenated. Intrasporal and intra-isolate sequence variation was high for all three regions even though variant numbers were not exhausted by sequencing 12-40 clones per isolate. Intra-isolate nucleotide variation levels followed the expected order of ITS > LSU > SSU, but the values were strongly dependent on isolate identity. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) densities over 4 SNP/kb in the ribosomal operon were detected in all four isolates. Automated operational taxonomic unit picking within the sequence set of known identity overestimated species richness with almost all cut-off levels, markers and isolates. Average intraspecific sequence similarity values were 99%, 96% and 94% for amplicons in SSU, LSU and ITS, respectively. The suitability of the central part of the SSU as a marker for AM fungal community surveys was further supported by its level of nucleotide variation, which is similar to that of the ITS region; its alignability across the entire phylum; its appropriate length for next-generation sequencing; and its ease of amplification in single-step PCR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Targeted next-generation sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA region for culture-independent bacterial identification - increased discrimination of closely related species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabat, Artur J.; van Zanten, Evert; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Wisselink, Guido J; van Slochteren, Kees; de Boer, Richard F; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Rossen, John W. A.; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M.D. (Mirjam)

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-use culture-free diagnostic method based on next generation sequencing (NGS) of PCR amplification products encompassing whole 16S-23S rRNA region to improve the resolution of bacterial species identification. To determine the resolution of the new

  5. The use of amplified flanking region-PCR in the isolation of laccase promoter sequences from the edible fungus Pleurotus sajor-caju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, D M; Dobson, A D W

    2003-01-01

    To determine the regulation of laccase isozyme gene transcription in Pleurotus sajor-caju in response to different aromatic inducers and physiological parameters. The promoter regions for each of four different laccase isozymes were cloned from P. sajor-caju, using amplified flanking region-PCR (AFR-PCR). Sequences stretching 724, 214, 840 and 1740 bp upstream from the predicted start codons for lac1, lac2, lac3 and lac4, respectively, were cloned in each case and analysed for the presence of putative transcriptional response elements. A number of putative response elements including metal response elements, xenobiotic response elements and antioxidant response elements appear to be present. In addition putative consensus sequences such as those for the binding of AP1, AP2, creA and NIT2 transcription factors, which are involved in nitrogen and carbon regulation in different fungi, are also present in the promoter regions of some of the isozymes. These elements may be involved in the transcriptional regulation of laccase gene expression in P. sajor-caju. The presence of a number of putative transcriptional response elements in the promoter regions of different isozyme genes indicates a potential role for these sites in regulating laccase gene transcription in P. sajor-caju. In addition this work demonstrates the potential usefulness of AFR-PCR as a technique to clone fungal DNA sequences located upstream from known sequences.

  6. Sequence variations in C9orf72 downstream of the hexanucleotide repeat region and its effect on repeat-primed PCR interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordin, Angelica; Akimoto, Chizuru; Wuolikainen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    A large GGGGCC-repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9orf72 is the most common known cause of ALS and FTD in European populations. Sequence variations immediately downstream of the HREM region have previously been observed and have been suggested to be one reason for difficulties in interpreting R...

  7. 40 CFR 81.184 - Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.184 Section 81.184 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.184 Northwestern Connecticut Intrastate Air Quality Control...

  8. 40 CFR 81.40 - Metropolitan San Antonio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metropolitan San Antonio Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.40 Section 81.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.40 Metropolitan San Antonio Intrastate Air Quality Control...

  9. 40 CFR 81.76 - State of Hawaii Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State of Hawaii Air Quality Control... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.76 State of Hawaii Air Quality Control Region. The State of Hawaii Air Quality...

  10. Evolutionary history of Phakopsora pachyrhizi (the Asian soybean rust in Brazil based on nucleotide sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra C. M. Freire

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Phakopsora pachyrhizi has dispersed globally and brought severe economic losses to soybean growers. The fungus has been established in Brazil since 2002 and is found nationwide. To gather information on the temporal and spatial patterns of genetic variation in P. pachyrhizi , we sequenced the nuclear internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2. Total genomic DNA was extracted using either lyophilized urediniospores or lesions removed from infected leaves sampled from 26 soybean fields in Brazil and one field in South Africa. Cloning prior to sequencing was necessary because direct sequencing of PCR amplicons gave partially unreadable electrophoretograms with peak displacements suggestive of multiple sequences with length polymorphism. Sequences were determined from four clones per field. ITS sequences from African or Asian isolates available from the GenBank were included in the analyses. Independent sequence alignments of the ITS1 and ITS2 datasets identified 27 and 19 ribotypes, respectively. Molecular phylogeographic analyses revealed that ribotypes of widespread distribution in Brazil displayed characteristics of ancestrality and were shared with Africa and Asia, while ribotypes of rare occurrence in Brazil were indigenous. The results suggest P. pachyrhizi found in Brazil as originating from multiple, independent long-distance dispersal events.

  11. The ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequence region in the Musaceae: structure, diversity and use in molecular phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hřibová

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Genes coding for 45S ribosomal RNA are organized in tandem arrays of up to several thousand copies and contain 18S, 5.8S and 26S rRNA units separated by internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2. While the rRNA units are evolutionary conserved, ITS show high level of interspecific divergence and have been used frequently in genetic diversity and phylogenetic studies. In this work we report on the structure and diversity of the ITS region in 87 representatives of the family Musaceae. We provide the first detailed information on ITS sequence diversity in the genus Musa and describe the presence of more than one type of ITS sequence within individual species. Both Sanger sequencing of amplified ITS regions and whole genome 454 sequencing lead to similar phylogenetic inferences. We show that it is necessary to identify putative pseudogenic ITS sequences, which may have negative effect on phylogenetic reconstruction at lower taxonomic levels. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on ITS sequence showed that the genus Musa is divided into two distinct clades--Callimusa and Australimusa and Eumusa and Rhodochlamys. Most of the intraspecific banana hybrids analyzed contain conserved parental ITS sequences, indicating incomplete concerted evolution of rDNA loci. Independent evolution of parental rDNA in hybrids enables determination of genomic constitution of hybrids using ITS. The observation of only one type of ITS sequence in some of the presumed interspecific hybrid clones warrants further study to confirm their hybrid origin and to unravel processes leading to evolution of their genomes.

  12. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  13. Weak correlation between sequence conservation in promoter regions and in protein-coding regions of human-mouse orthologous gene pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakai Kenta

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspecies sequence comparison is a powerful tool to extract functional or evolutionary information from the genomes of organisms. A number of studies have compared protein sequences or promoter sequences between mammals, which provided many insights into genomics. However, the correlation between protein conservation and promoter conservation remains controversial. Results We examined promoter conservation as well as protein conservation for 6,901 human and mouse orthologous genes, and observed a very weak correlation between them. We further investigated their relationship by decomposing it based on functional categories, and identified categories with significant tendencies. Remarkably, the 'ribosome' category showed significantly low promoter conservation, despite its high protein conservation, and the 'extracellular matrix' category showed significantly high promoter conservation, in spite of its low protein conservation. Conclusion Our results show the relation of gene function to protein conservation and promoter conservation, and revealed that there seem to be nonparallel components between protein and promoter sequence evolution.

  14. Negative Sequence Droop Method based Hierarchical Control for Low Voltage Ride-Through in Grid-Interactive Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xin; Firoozabadi, Mehdi Savaghebi; Quintero, Juan Carlos Vasquez

    2015-01-01

    In highly microgrid (MG) integrated distribution systems, problems such as a sudden cut out of the MGs due to grid faults may lead to adverse effects to the grid. As a consequence, ancillary services provided by MGs are preferred since it can make the MG a contributor to ride through the faults....... In this paper, a voltage support strategy based on negative sequence droop control, which regulate the positive/negative sequence active and reactive power flow by means of sending proper voltage reference to the inner control loop, is proposed for the grid connected MGs to ride through voltage sags under...... complex line impedance conditions. In this case, the MGs should inject a certain amount of positive and negative sequence power to the grid so that the voltage quality at load side can be maintained at a satisfied level. A two layer hierarchical control strategy is proposed in this paper. The primary...

  15. Hemiptera Mitochondrial Control Region: New Sights into the Structural Organization, Phylogenetic Utility, and Roles of Tandem Repetitions of the Noncoding Segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As a major noncoding fragment, the control region (CR of mtDNA is responsible for the initiation of mitogenome transcription and replication. Several structural features of CR sequences have been reported in many insects. However, comprehensive analyses on the structural organization and phylogenetic utility, as well as the role of tandem replications (TRs on length variation, high A+T content, and shift of base skew of CR sequences are poorly investigated in hemipteran insects. In this study, we conducted a series of comparative analyses, using 116 samples covering all 11 infraorders of the five currently recognized monophyletic groups in the Hemiptera. Several structural elements (mononucleotide stretches containing conserved sequence blocks (CSBs, TRs, and GA-rich region were identified in the mitochondrial control region in hemipteran insects, without showing a consistent location. The presence and absence of certain specific structural elements in CR sequences show the various structural organizations of that segment among the five monophyletic groups, which indicates the diversification of the control region’s structural organization in Hemiptera. Among the many groups within Hemiptera, eight monophyletic groups and three consistent phylogenetic trees were recovered, using CSBs datasets by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, which suggests the possible utility of CR sequences for phylogenetic reconstruction in certain groups of Hemiptera. Statistical analyses showed that TRs may contribute to the length variation, high AT content, and the shift of base skewing of CR sequences toward high AT content in the Hemiptera. Our findings enrich the knowledge of structural organization, phylogenetic utility, and roles of tandem replication of hemipteran CR, and provide a possible framework for mitochondrial control region analyses in hemimetabolous insects.

  16. Exact Boundary Controllability of Electromagnetic Fields in a General Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, M. M.; Masters, J. E.

    2002-01-01

    We prove exact controllability for Maxwell's system with variable coefficients in a bounded domain by a current flux in the boundary. The proof relies on a duality argument which reduces the proof of exact controllability to the proof of continuous observability for the homogeneous adjoint system. There is no geometric restriction imposed on the domain

  17. Motor control in complex regional pain syndrome: A kinematic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilder, J.C.M.; Schouten, A.C.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Huygen, F.J.P.M.; Dahan, A.; Noldus, L.P.J.J.; van Hilten, J.J.; Marinus, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated movement velocity, frequency, and amplitude, as well as the number of arrests in three different subject groups, by kinematic analysis of repetitive movements during a finger tapping (FT) task. The most affected hands of 80 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)

  18. Sequence elements controlling expression of Barley stripe mosaic virus subgenomic RNAs in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Jennifer A.; Bragg, Jennifer N.; Lawrence, Diane M.; Jackson, Andrew O.

    2003-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) contains three positive-sense, single-stranded genomic RNAs, designated α, β, and γ, that encode seven major proteins and one minor translational readthrough protein. Three proteins (αa, βa, and γa) are translated directly from the genomic RNAs and the remaining proteins encoded on RNAβ and RNAγ are expressed via three subgenomic messenger RNAs (sgRNAs). sgRNAβ1 directs synthesis of the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein. The TGB2 protein, the TGB2' minor translational readthrough protein, and the TGB3 protein are expressed from sgRNAβ2, which is present in considerably lower abundance than sgRNAβ1. A third sgRNA, sgRNAγ, is required for expression of the γb protein. We have used deletion analyses and site-specific mutations to define the boundaries of promoter regions that are critical for expression of the BSMV sgRNAs in infected protoplasts. The results reveal that the sgRNAβ1 promoter encompasses positions -29 to -2 relative to its transcription start site and is adjacent to a cis-acting element required for RNAβ replication that maps from -107 to -74 relative to the sgRNAβ1 start site. The core sgRNAβ2 promoter includes residues -32 to -17 relative to the sgRNAβ2 transcriptional start site, although maximal activity requires an upstream hexanucleotide sequence residing from positions -64 to -59. The sgRNAγ promoter maps from -21 to +2 relative to its transcription start site and therefore partially overlaps the γa gene. The sgRNAβ1, β2, and γ promoters also differ substantially in sequence, but have similarities to the putative homologous promoters of other Hordeiviruses. These differences are postulated to affect competition for the viral polymerase, coordination of the temporal expression and abundance of the TGB proteins, and constitutive expression of the γb protein

  19. State and Regional Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitze, Arnold [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Durrant, Marie [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Carbon capture and geologic sequestration offer one method to reduce carbon emissions from coal and other hydrocarbon energy production. While the federal government is providing increased funding for carbon capture and sequestration, recent congressional legislative efforts to create a framework for regulating carbon emissions have failed. However, regional and state bodies have taken significant actions both to regulate carbon and facilitate its capture and sequestration. This article explores how regional bodies and state government are addressing the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. Several regional bodies have formed regulations and model laws that affect carbon capture and storage, and three bodies comprising twenty-three states—the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Midwest Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord, and the Western Climate initiative—have cap-­and-trade programs in various stages of development. State property, land use and environmental laws affect the development and implementation of carbon capture and sequestration projects, and unless federal standards are imposed, state laws on torts and renewable portfolio requirements will directly affect the liability and viability of these projects. This paper examines current state laws and legislative efforts addressing carbon capture and sequestration.

  20. Risk factors control in patients with cardiovascular diseases in Ivanovo region: possibilities of a regional registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belova O.A.

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion ― In primary care units of Ivanovo region in 2015 patients were insufficiently asked about their lifestyle (smoking, physical activity, eating habits, as well as their body weight was measured. If a patient had a risk factor he usually receive a proper advice. For BP, weight and blood lipids the goals were achieved rare.

  1. Development of taxon-specific sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers based on actin sequences and DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF): a case study in the Phoma exigua species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveskamp, Maikel M; Woudenberg, Joyce H C; de Gruyter, Johannes; Turco, Elena; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Crous, Pedro W

    2009-05-01

    Phoma exigua is considered to be an assemblage of at least nine varieties that are mainly distinguished on the basis of host specificity and pathogenicity. However, these varieties are also reported to be weak pathogens and secondary invaders on non-host tissue. In practice, it is difficult to distinguish P. exigua from its close relatives and to correctly identify isolates up to the variety level, because of their low genetic variation and high morphological similarity. Because of quarantine issues and phytosanitary measures, a robust DNA-based tool is required for accurate and rapid identification of the separate taxa in this species complex. The present study therefore aims to develop such a tool based on unique nucleotide sequence identifiers. More than 60 strains of P. exigua and related species were compared in terms of partial actin gene sequences, or analysed using DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) with short, arbitrary, mini-hairpin primers. Fragments in the fingerprint unique to a single taxon were identified, purified and sequenced. Alignment of the sequence data and subsequent primer trials led to the identification of taxon-specific sequence characterized amplified regions (SCARs), and to a set of specific oligonucleotide combinations that can be used to identify these organisms in plant quarantine inspections.

  2. The Use of Management Controls in Different Cultural Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmi, Teemu; Ax, Christian; Bedford, David

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses differences in management control practices in Anglo-Saxon (Australia, Canada), Germanic (Austria, Belgium, Germany), and Nordic firms (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden). Unique data is collected through structured interviews from 688 strategic business units (SBUs) in these ...

  3. Reconstructing the History of Mesoamerican Populations through the Study of the Mitochondrial DNA Control Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostiza, Amaya; Acunha-Alonzo, Víctor; Regalado-Liu, Lucía; Tirado, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Sámano, David; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; González-Martín, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The study of genetic information can reveal a reconstruction of human population’s history. We sequenced the entire mtDNA control region (positions 16.024 to 576 following Cambridge Reference Sequence, CRS) of 605 individuals from seven Mesoamerican indigenous groups and one Aridoamerican from the Greater Southwest previously defined, all of them in present Mexico. Samples were collected directly from the indigenous populations, the application of an individual survey made it possible to remove related or with other origins samples. Diversity indices and demographic estimates were calculated. Also AMOVAs were calculated according to different criteria. An MDS plot, based on FST distances, was also built. We carried out the construction of individual networks for the four Amerindian haplogroups detected. Finally, barrier software was applied to detect genetic boundaries among populations. The results suggest: a common origin of the indigenous groups; a small degree of European admixture; and inter-ethnic gene flow. The process of Mesoamerica’s human settlement took place quickly influenced by the region’s orography, which development of genetic and cultural differences facilitated. We find the existence of genetic structure is related to the region’s geography, rather than to cultural parameters, such as language. The human population gradually became fragmented, though they remained relatively isolated, and differentiated due to small population sizes and different survival strategies. Genetic differences were detected between Aridoamerica and Mesoamerica, which can be subdivided into “East”, “Center”, “West” and “Southeast”. The fragmentation process occurred mainly during the Mesoamerican Pre-Classic period, with the Otomí being one of the oldest groups. With an increased number of populations studied adding previously published data, there is no change in the conclusions, although significant genetic heterogeneity can be detected in Pima

  4. Environment control in selected industrial regions of Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, I.; Wiesenberger, H.; Kutschera, U.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental situation (air, water and soil) of fourteen Austrian regions (Arnoldstein-Gailitz, Brixlegg, Brueckl, Lend, Linz, Lenzing, Donawitz, Schwechat, Tanklager Lobau, Treibach-Althofen, Hallein, Poels, Ranshofen and St. Poelten) with industrial activities based on available data (1994-2002) is described. The connection and the temporal development of the emissions from industrial plants, the immissions and the environmental exposure as far as possible are shown, as well as actual information deficits and possible needs for action are worked out. For each region the following information is provided: location, description of present industrial plants, emissions (air, waste water and waste water treatment), wastes and residues, deposits of toxic waste, water immissions, air immissions and soil-vegetation-bioindication. (nevyjel)

  5. A distal intergenic region controls pancreatic endocrine differentiation by acting as a transcriptional enhancer and as a polycomb response element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joris van Arensbergen

    Full Text Available Lineage-selective expression of developmental genes is dependent on the interplay between activating and repressive mechanisms. Gene activation is dependent on cell-specific transcription factors that recognize transcriptional enhancer sequences. Gene repression often depends on the recruitment of Polycomb group (PcG proteins, although the sequences that underlie the recruitment of PcG proteins, also known as Polycomb response elements (PREs, remain poorly understood in vertebrates. While distal PREs have been identified in mammals, a role for positive-acting enhancers in PcG-mediated repression has not been described. Here we have used a highly efficient procedure based on lentiviral-mediated transgenesis to carry out in vivo fine-mapping of, cis-regulatory sequences that control lineage-specific activation of Neurog3, a master regulator of pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Our findings reveal an enhancer region that is sufficient to drive correct spacio-temporal expression of Neurog3 and demonstrate that this same region serves as a PRE in alternative lineages where Neurog3 is inactive.

  6. Genetic variation in scaly hair-fin anchovy Setipinna tenuifilis (Engraulididae) based on the mitochondrial DNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shengyong; Song, Na; Lu, Zhichuang; Wang, Jun; Cai, Shanshan; Gao, Tianxiang

    2014-06-01

    Scaly hair-fin anchovy (Setipinna tenuifilis) is a small, pelagic and economical species and widely distributed in Chinese coastal water. However, resources of S. tenuifilis have been reduced due to overfishing. For better fishery management, it is necessary to understand the pattern of S. tenuifilis's biogeography. Genetic analyses were taken place to detect their population genetic variation. A total of 153 individuals from 7 locations (Dongying, Yantai, Qingdao, Nantong, Wenzhou, Xiamen and Beibu Bay) were sequenced at the 5' end of mtDNA control region. A 39-bp tandem repeated sequence was found at the 5' end of the segment and a polymorphism of tandem repeated sequence was detected among 7 populations. Both mismatch distribution analysis and neutrality tests showed S. tenuifilis had experienced a recent population expansion. The topology of neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian evolutionary tree showed no significant genealogical branches or clusters of samples corresponding to sampling locality. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance and conventional pairwise population Fst value at group hierarchical level implied that there might have genetic divergence between southern group (population WZ, XM and BB) and northern group (population DY, YT, QD and NT). We concluded that there might have three different fishery management groups of S. tenuifilis and the late Pleistocene glacial event might have a crucial effect on present-day demography of S. tenuifilis in this region.

  7. ChronQC: A Quality Control Monitoring System for Clinical Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawari, Nilesh R; Seow, Justine Jia Wen; Dharuman, Perumal; Ow, Jack L; Ang, Shimin; Devasia, Arun George; Ng, Pauline C

    2017-12-28

    ChronQC is a quality control (QC) tracking system for clinical implementation of next-generation sequencing (NGS). ChronQC generates time series plots for various QC metrics to allow comparison of current runs to historical runs. ChronQC has multiple features for tracking QC data including Westgard rules for clinical validity, laboratory-defined thresholds, and historical observations within a specified time period. Users can record their notes and corrective actions directly onto the plots for long-term recordkeeping. ChronQC facilitates regular monitoring of clinical NGS to enable adherence to high quality clinical standards. ChronQC is freely available on GitHub (https://github.com/nilesh-tawari/ChronQC), Docker (https://hub.docker.com/r/nileshtawari/chronqc/) and the Python Package Index. ChronQC is implemented in Python and runs on all common operating systems (Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X). tawari.nilesh@gmail.com or pauline.c.ng@gmail.com. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Phenylketonuria and Gut Microbiota: A Controlled Study Based on Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro de Oliveira, Felipe; Mendes, Roberta Hack; Dobbler, Priscila Thiago; Mai, Volker; Pylro, Victor Salter; Waugh, Sheldon G; Vairo, Filippo; Refosco, Lilia Farret; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa Doederlein

    2016-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of metabolism associated with high blood levels of phenylalanine (Phe). A Phe-restricted diet supplemented with L-amino acids is the main treatment strategy for this disease; if started early, most neurological abnormalities can be prevented. The healthy human gut contains trillions of commensal bacteria, often referred to as the gut microbiota. The composition of the gut microbiota is known to be modulated by environmental factors, including diet. In this study, we compared the gut microbiota of 8 PKU patients on Phe-restricted dietary treatment with that of 10 healthy individuals. The microbiota were characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing using the Ion Torrent™ platform. The most dominant phyla detected in both groups were Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. PKU patients showed reduced abundance of the Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, and Lachnospiraceae families, Clostridiales class, Coprococcus, Dorea, Lachnospira, Odoribacter, Ruminococcus and Veillonella genera, and enrichment of Prevotella, Akkermansia, and Peptostreptococcaceae. Microbial function prediction suggested significant differences in starch/glucose and amino acid metabolism between PKU patients and controls. Together, our results suggest the presence of distinct taxonomic groups within the gut microbiome of PKU patients, which may be modulated by their plasma Phe concentration. Whether our findings represent an effect of the disease itself, or a consequence of the modified diet is unclear. PMID:27336782

  9. Controls on facies and sequence stratigraphy of an upper Miocene carbonate ramp and platform, Melilla basin, NE Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, K.J.; Collins, Luke S.

    2002-01-01

    Upwelling of cool seawater, paleoceanographic circulation, paleoclimate, local tectonics and relative sea-level change controlled the lithofacies and sequence stratigraphy of a carbonate ramp and overlying platform that are part of a temporally well constrained carbonate complex in the Melilla basin, northeastern Morocco. At Melilla, from oldest to youngest, a third-order depositional sequence within the carbonate complex contains (1) a retrogradational, transgressive, warm temperate-type rhodalgal ramp; (2) an early highstand, progradational, bioclastic platform composed mainly of a temperate-type, bivalve-rich molechfor facies; and (3) late highstand, progradational to downstepping, subtropical/tropical-type chlorozoan fringing Porites reefs. The change from rhodalgal ramp to molechfor platform occurred at 7.0??0.14 Ma near the Tortonian/Messinian boundary. During a late stage in the development of the bioclastic platform a transition from temperate-type molechfor facies to subtropical/tropical-type chlorozoan facies occurred and is bracketed by chron 3An.2n (??? 6.3-6.6 Ma). Comparison to a well-dated carbonate complex in southeastern Spain at Cabo de Gata suggests that upwelling of cool seawater influenced production of temperate-type limestone within the ramp and platform at Melilla during postulated late Tortonian-early Messinian subtropical/tropical paleoclimatic conditions in the western Paleo-Mediterranean region. The upwelling of cool seawater across the bioclastic platform at Melilla could be related to the beginning of 'siphoning' of deep, cold Atlantic waters into the Paleo-Mediterranean Sea at 7.17 Ma. The facies change within the bioclastic platform from molechfor to chlorozoan facies may be coincident with a reduction of the siphoning of Atlantic waters and the end of upwelling at Melilla during chron 3An.2n. The ramp contains one retrogradational parasequence and the bioclastic platform three progradational parasequences. Minor erosional surfaces

  10. Impact of emission control on regional air quality in the Pearl Delta River region, southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Xuejiao, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) in China has been suffering from air quality issues and the government has implemented a series of strategies in controlling emissions. In an attempt to provide scientific support for improving air quality, the paper investigates the concerning past-to-present air quality data and assesses air quality resulting from emission control. Statistical data revealed that energy consumption doubled from 2004 to 20014 and vehicle usage increased significantly from 2006 to 2014. Due to the effect of control efforts, primary emission of SO2, NOx and PM2.5 decreased resulting in ambient concentrations of SO2, NO2 and PM10 decreased by 66%, 20% and 24%, respectively. However, O3 increased 19% because of the increase of VOC emission. A chemical transport model, the Community Multi-scale Air Quality, was employed to evaluate the responses of nitrate, ammonium, SOA, PM2.5 and O3 to changes in NOx, VOC and NH3 emissions. Three scenarios, a baseline scenario, a CAP scenario (control strength followed as past tendency), and a REF scenario (strict control referred to latest policy and plans), were conducted to investigate the responses and mechanisms. NOx controlling scenarios showed that NOx, nitrate and PM2.5 reduced by 1.8%, 0.7% and 0.2% under CAP and reduced by 7.2%, 1.8% and 0.3% under REF, respectively. The results indicated that reducing NOx emission caused the increase of atmospheric oxidizability, which might result in a compensation of PM2.5 due to the increase of nitrate or sulfate. NH3 controlling scenarios showed that nitrate was sensitive to NH3 emission in PRD, with nitrate decreased by 0 - 10.6% and 0 - 48% under CAP and REF, respectively. Since controlling NH3 emissions not only reduced ammonium but also significantly reduced nitrate, the implement of NH3 controlling strategy was highly suggested. The VOC scenarios revealed that though SOA was not the major component of PM2.5, controlling VOC emission might take effect in southwestern PRD

  11. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, D.H.; Ledbetter, S.A.; vanTuinen, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be 100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region

  12. Genetic diversity of Histoplasma and Sporothrix complexes based on sequences of their ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions from the BOLD System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Bárcenas, Daniel Alfonso; Vite-Garín, Tania; Navarro-Barranco, Hortensia; de la Torre-Arciniega, Raúl; Pérez-Mejía, Amelia; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Ramirez, Jose Antonio; Humberto Sahaza, Jorge; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Toriello, Conchita

    2014-01-01

    High sensitivity and specificity of molecular biology techniques have proven usefulness for the detection, identification and typing of different pathogens. The ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) regions of the ribosomal DNA are highly conserved non-coding regions, and have been widely used in different studies including the determination of the genetic diversity of human fungal pathogens. This article wants to contribute to the understanding of the intra- and interspecific genetic diversity of isolates of the Histoplasma capsulatum and Sporothrix schenckii species complexes by an analysis of the available sequences of the ITS regions from different sequence databases. ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 sequences of each fungus, either deposited in GenBank, or from our research groups (registered in the Fungi Barcode of Life Database), were analyzed using the maximum likelihood (ML) method. ML analysis of the ITS sequences discriminated isolates from distant geographic origins and particular wild hosts, depending on the fungal species analyzed. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the sellar region: A comparison study of BLADE and single-shot echo planar imaging sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiping, Lu [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hui, Liu [MR Collaboration NE Asia, Siemens Healthcare, Siemens Ltd., China, Shanghai 201318 (China); Kun, Zhou [MR PLM APPL, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen 518057 (China); Daoying, Geng, E-mail: GengdaoyingGDY@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Bo, Yin, E-mail: yinbo7@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare BLADE diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) DWI on the aspects of feasibility of imaging the sellar region and image quality. Methods: A total of 3 healthy volunteers and 52 patients with suspected lesions in the sellar region were included in this prospective intra-individual study. All exams were performed at 3.0 T with a BLADE DWI sequence and a standard single-shot EP-DWI sequence. Phantom measurements were performed to measure the objective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two radiologists rated the image quality according to the visualisation of the internal carotid arteries, optic chiasm, pituitary stalk, pituitary gland and lesion, and the overall image quality. One radiologist measured lesion sizes for detecting their relationship with the image score. Results: The SNR in BLADE DWI sequence showed no significant difference from the single-shot EPI sequence (P > 0.05). All of the assessed regions received higher scores in BLADE DWI images than single-shot EP-DWI.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of Scomberomorus commerson using sequence analysis of the mtDNA D-loop region in the Persian Gulf, Oman Sea and Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mansourkiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus commerson, is an epipelagic and migratory species of family Scombridae which have a significant role in terms of ecology and fishery. 100 samples were collected from the Persian Gulf, Oman Sea and Arabian Sea. Part of their dorsal fins was snipped and transferred to micro-tubes containing ethanol; then, DNAs were extracted and HRM-Real Time PCR was performed to designate representative specimens for sequencing. Phylogenetic relationships of S. commerson from Persian Gulf, Oman Sea and Arabian Sea were investigated using sequence data of mitochondrial DNA D-loop region. None clustered Neighbor Joining tree indicated the proximity amid S. commerson in four sites. As numbers demonstrated in sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA D-Loop region a sublimely high degree of genetic similarity among S. commerson from the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea were perceived, thereafter, having one stock structure of S. commerson in four regions were proved, and this approximation can be merely justified by their migration process along the coasts of Oman Sea and Persian Gulf. Therefore, the assessment of distribution patterns of 20 haplotypes in the constructed phylogenetic tree using mtDNA D-Loop sequences ascertained that no significant clustering according to the sampling sites was concluded.

  15. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study

  16. Simultaneous identification of DNA and RNA viruses present in pig faeces using process-controlled deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sachsenröder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal faeces comprise a community of many different microorganisms including bacteria and viruses. Only scarce information is available about the diversity of viruses present in the faeces of pigs. Here we describe a protocol, which was optimized for the purification of the total fraction of viral particles from pig faeces. The genomes of the purified DNA and RNA viruses were simultaneously amplified by PCR and subjected to deep sequencing followed by bioinformatic analyses. The efficiency of the method was monitored using a process control consisting of three bacteriophages (T4, M13 and MS2 with different morphology and genome types. Defined amounts of the bacteriophages were added to the sample and their abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR during the preparation procedure. RESULTS: The procedure was applied to a pooled faecal sample of five pigs. From this sample, 69,613 sequence reads were generated. All of the added bacteriophages were identified by sequence analysis of the reads. In total, 7.7% of the reads showed significant sequence identities with published viral sequences. They mainly originated from bacteriophages (73.9% and mammalian viruses (23.9%; 0.8% of the sequences showed identities to plant viruses. The most abundant detected porcine viruses were kobuvirus, rotavirus C, astrovirus, enterovirus B, sapovirus and picobirnavirus. In addition, sequences with identities to the chimpanzee stool-associated circular ssDNA virus were identified. Whole genome analysis indicates that this virus, tentatively designated as pig stool-associated circular ssDNA virus (PigSCV, represents a novel pig virus. CONCLUSION: The established protocol enables the simultaneous detection of DNA and RNA viruses in pig faeces including the identification of so far unknown viruses. It may be applied in studies investigating aetiology, epidemiology and ecology of diseases. The implemented process control serves as quality control, ensures

  17. Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flannick, Jason; Fuchsberger, Christian; Mahajan, Anubha

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural ...

  18. The central region of the msp gene of Treponema denticola has sequence heterogeneity among clinical samples, obtained from patients with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miragliotta Luisa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treponema denticola is an oral spirochete involved in the pathogenesis and progression of periodontal disease. Of its virulence factors, the major surface protein (MSP plays a role in the interaction between the treponeme and host. To understand the possible evolution of this protein, we analyzed the sequence of the msp gene in 17 T. denticola positive clinical samples. Methods Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of MSP have been determined by PCR amplification and sequencing in seventeen T. denticola clinical specimens to evaluate the genetic variability and the philogenetic relationship of the T. denticola msp gene among the different amplified sequence of positive samples. In silico antigenic analysis was performed on each MSP sequences to determined possible antigenic variation. Results The msp sequences showed two highly conserved 5' and 3' ends and a central region that varies substantially. Phylogenetic analysis categorized the 17 specimens into 2 principal groups, suggesting a low rate of evolutionary variability and an elevated degree of conservation of msp in clinically derived genetic material. Analysis of the predicted antigenic variability between isolates, demonstrated that the major differences lay between amino acids 200 and 300. Conclusion These findings showed for the first time, the nucleotide and amino acids variation of the msp gene in infecting T. denticola, in vivo. This data suggested that the antigenic variability found in to the MSP molecule, may be an important factor involved in immune evasion by T. denticola.

  19. Sequence analysis of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein-1 gene and promoter region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvej, K; Gratama, J W; Munch, M

    1997-01-01

    . The widespread prevalence of LMP-1 sequence variations, particularly the Xho I polymorphism and the 30-bp deletion, indicate that they cannot be used as simple markers for oncogenic viruses related to particular forms of EBV-associated tumor. Several of the structural changes detected occur, however, at sites......Sequence variations in the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) gene have been described in a Chinese nasopharyngeal carcinoma-derived isolate (CAO), and in viral isolates from various EBV-associated tumors. It has been suggested that these genetic changes, which...... wild-type virus isolates, we sequenced the LMP-1 promoter and gene in EBV from lymphoblastoid cell lines from healthy carriers and patients without EBV-associated disease. Sequence changes were often present, and defined at least four main groups of viral isolates, which we designate Groups A through D...

  20. Two unusual hepatitis C virus subtypes, 2j and 2q, in Spain: Identification by nested-PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margall, N; March, F; Español, M; Torras, X; Gallego, A; Coll, P

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have reported the use of the NS5B gene to subtype hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other HCV genes, such as HCV-5' UTR, Core (C) and E1, have also been used. In some studies, NS5B have been used together with 5'-UTR or C genes to improve genotyping results obtained using commercial procedures. Only two studies in Spain have compared molecular techniques versus commercial procedures regarding the efficacy of HCV subtyping. The aim of this study was to determine whether nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region was more reliable than commercial procedures to subtype HCV. We analyzed the results of HCV genotyping in [726] serum specimens collected from 2001 to 2013. From 2001 to 2011, we used PCR and INNO-LiPA hybridization or its new version Versant HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (471 samples). From 2012 to 2013, we used nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region (255 cases). This method used two pairs of primers to amplify the RNA of the sample converted to DNA by retrotranscription. The amplification product of 270 base pairs was further sequenced. To identify the subtype, the sequences obtained were compared to those in the international database: http://hcv.lanl.gov./content/sequence/, HCV/ToolsOutline.html and Geno2pheno[hcv] http://hcv.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de/index.php. Nested PCR of a NS5B region and sequencing identified all but one subtype (0.4%, 1/255), differentiated all 1a subtypes from 1b subtypes, and characterized all HCV 2-4 subtypes. This approach also distinguished two subtypes, 2j and 2q, that had rarely been detected previously in Spain. However, commercial procedures failed to subtype 12.7% (60/471) of samples and to genotype 0.6% of specimens (3/471). Nested PCR and sequencing of a NS5B region improved the subtyping of HCV in comparison with classical procedures and identified two rare subtypes in Spain: 2j and 2q. However, full length genome sequencing is recommended to confirm HCV 2j and 2q subtypes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Desulfovibrio sp. DV isolated from the sediments of a Pb-Zn mine tailings dam in the Chita region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiia Kovaliova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the draft genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Desulfovibrio sp. DV isolated from the sediments of a Pb-Zn mine tailings dam in the Chita region, Russia. The draft genome has a size of 4.9 Mb and encodes multiple K+-transporters and proton-consuming decarboxylases. The phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated ribosomal proteins revealed that strain DV clusters together with the acid-tolerant Desulfovibrio sp. TomC and Desulfovibrio magneticus. The draft genome sequence and annotation have been deposited at GenBank under the accession number MLBG00000000.

  2. Structure of mouse rRNA precursors. Complete sequence and potential folding of the spacer regions between 18S and 28S rRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Michot, B; Bachellerie, J P; Raynal, F

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the regions of mouse ribosomal RNA transcription unit which separate mature rRNA genes. These internal transcribed spacers (ITS) are excised from rRNA precursor during ribosome biosynthesis. ITS 1, between 18S and 5.8S rRNA genes, is 999 nucleotides long. ITS 2, between 5.8S and 28S rRNA genes, is 1089 nucleotides long. Both spacers are very rich in G + C, 70 and 74% respectively. Mouse sequences have been compared with the other availabl...

  3. The regional control of the canadian energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitlaurent, S.; Sarrazin, J.

    2004-12-01

    This document provides information and presents data on the energy situation in many regions of Canada. The first part deals with the petroleum and the bitumen shales of Alberta (reserves, exploitation and production, environmental impacts), the second part discusses with the hydroelectricity choice of Quebec and the 2004 crisis. The nuclear situation of Ontario is presented in the third part (nuclear park, programs, uranium reserves, research and development on Candu reactors), while the fourth part deals with the renewable energies (wind power and biomass). The canadian situation facing the Kyoto protocol is discussed in the last part. (A.L.B.)

  4. Sequence analysis of the ITS region and 5.8S rDNA of Porphyra haitanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Shen, Songdong; He, Lihong; Xu, Pu; Wang, Guangce

    2009-09-01

    The sequences of the ITS (internal transcribed spacer) and 5.8S rDNA of three cultivated strains of Porphyra haitanensis thalli (NB, PT and ST) were amplified, sequenced and analyzed. In addition, the phylogenic relationships of the sequences identified in this study with those of other Porphyra retrieved from GenBank were evaluated. The results are as follows: the sequences of the ITS and 5.8S rDNA were essentially identical among the three strains. The sequences of ITS1 were 331 bp to 334 bp, while those of the 5.8S rDNA were 158 bp and the sequences of ITS2 ranged from 673 bp to 681 bp. The sequences of the ITS had a high level of homology (up to 99.5%) with that of P. haitanensis (DQ662228) retrieved from GenBank, but were only approximately 50% homologous with those of other species of Porphyra. The results obtained when a phylogenetic tree was constructed coincided with the results of the homology analysis. These results suggest that the three cultivated strains of P. haitanensis evolved conservatively and that the ITS showed evolutionary consistency. However, the sequences of the ITS and 5.8S rDNA of different Porphyra species showed great variations. Therefore, the relationship of Porphyra interspecies phyletic evolution could be judged, which provides the proof for Porphyra identification study. However, proper classifications of the subspecies and the populations of Porphyra should be determined through the use of other molecular techniques to determine the genetic variability and rational phylogenetic relationships.

  5. Fungal diversity in oxygen-depleted regions of the Arabian Sea revealed by targeted environmental sequencing combined with cultivation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.; Raghukumar, C.; Behnke, A.; Stoeck, T.

    us with 91 full-fragment sequences that were analyzed together in a final DOTUR analysis. Similarities between two sequences were calculated using a custom program (PairAlign) 7 provided by M. Nebel (University of Kaiserslautern), which employs... fungal specific primer sets may amplify different subsets of the fungal community (Fig. 1 and Anderson et al., 2003). This severely affects comparability of different fungal 18S rDNA data sets obtained from PCR amplification with different primers. A...

  6. Multi-region fuzzy logic controller with local PID controllers for U-tube steam generator in nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puchalski Bartosz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, analysis of multi-region fuzzy logic controller with local PID controllers for steam generator of pressurized water reactor (PWR working in wide range of thermal power changes is presented. The U-tube steam generator has a nonlinear dynamics depending on thermal power transferred from coolant of the primary loop of the PWR plant. Control of water level in the steam generator conducted by a traditional PID controller which is designed for nominal power level of the nuclear reactor operates insufficiently well in wide range of operational conditions, especially at the low thermal power level. Thus the steam generator is often controlled manually by operators. Incorrect water level in the steam generator may lead to accidental shutdown of the nuclear reactor and consequently financial losses. In the paper a comparison of proposed multi region fuzzy logic controller and traditional PID controllers designed only for nominal condition is presented. The gains of the local PID controllers have been derived by solving appropriate optimization tasks with the cost function in a form of integrated squared error (ISE criterion. In both cases, a model of steam generator which is readily available in literature was used for control algorithms synthesis purposes. The proposed multi-region fuzzy logic controller and traditional PID controller were subjected to broad-based simulation tests in rapid prototyping software - Matlab/Simulink. These tests proved the advantage of multi-region fuzzy logic controller with local PID controllers over its traditional counterpart.

  7. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. II. Nucleotide sequence, transcription start sites and protein products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.F.; Swanson, J.A.; Mulligan, J.T.; Long, S.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have established the DNA sequence and analyzed the transcription and translation products of a series of putative nodulation (nod) genes in Rhizobium meliloti strain 1021. Four loci have been designated nodF, nodE, nodG and nodH. The correlation of transposon insertion positions with phenotypes and open reading frames was confirmed by sequencing the insertion junctions of the transposons. The protein products of these nod genes were visualized by in vitro expression of cloned DNA segments in a R. meliloti transcription-translation system. In addition, the sequence for nodG was substantiated by creating translational fusions in all three reading frames at several points in the sequence; the resulting fusions were expressed in vitro in both E. coli and R. meliloti transcription-translation systems. A DNA segment bearing several open reading frames downstream of nodG corresponds to the putative nod gene mutated in strain nod-216. The transcription start sites of nodF and nodH were mapped by primer extension of RNA from cells induced with the plant flavone, luteolin. Initiation of transcription occurs approximately 25 bp downstream from the conserved sequence designated the nod box, suggesting that this conserved sequence acts as an upstream regulator of inducible nod gene expression. Its distance from the transcription start site is more suggestive of an activator binding site rather than an RNA polymerase binding site

  8. Infection control in anaesthesia in regional, tertiary and central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-10

    Sep 10, 2012 ... Describe how self-inflating resuscitation bags (Ambu®) are decontamined? Question 8. Do you feel that you have enough time between each case to adequately clean anaesthetic equipment and still perform your other duties? Table II: Definitions and classifications used in infection control practices.

  9. Regional Cancer Control in South-Eastern Nigeria: A Proposal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In children, the predominant malignant diseases are Burkitt's lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, neuroblastoma, and Wilm's tumor (nephroblastoma). The focus of efforts to control cancer in Nigeria should be directed at prevention with adequate attention to planning/policy making, early detection, accurate diagnosis, ...

  10. The 172-kb genomic DNA region of the O. rufipogon yld1.1 locus: comparative sequence analysis with O. sativa ssp. japonica and O. sativa ssp. indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Beng-Kah; Hein, Ingo; Druka, Arnis; Waugh, Robbie; Marshall, David; Nadarajah, Kalaivani; Yap, Soon-Joo; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2009-02-01

    Common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon) plays an important role by contributing to modern rice breeding. In this paper, we report the sequence and analysis of a 172-kb genomic DNA region of wild rice around the RM5 locus, which is associated with the yield QTL yld1.1. Comparative sequence analysis between orthologous RM5 regions from Oryza sativa ssp. japonica, O. sativa ssp. indica and O. rufipogon revealed a high level of conserved synteny in the content, homology, structure, orientation, and physical distance of all 14 predicted genes. Twelve of the putative genes were supported by matches to proteins with known function, whereas two were predicted by homology to rice and other plant expressed sequence tags or complementary DNAs. The remarkably high level of conservation found in coding, intronic and intergenic regions may indicate high evolutionary selection on the RM5 region. Although our analysis has not defined which gene(s) determine the yld1.1 phenotype, allelic variation and the insertion of transposable elements, among other nucleotide changes, represent potential variation responsible for the yield QTL. However, as suggested previously, two putative receptor-like protein kinase genes remain the key suspects for yld1.1.

  11. Control control control: a reassessment and comparison of GenBank and chromatogram mtDNA sequence variation in Baltic grey seals (Halichoerus grypus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Fietz

    Full Text Available Genetic data can provide a powerful tool for those interested in the biology, management and conservation of wildlife, but also lead to erroneous conclusions if appropriate controls are not taken at all steps of the analytical process. This particularly applies to data deposited in public repositories such as GenBank, whose utility relies heavily on the assumption of high data quality. Here we report on an in-depth reassessment and comparison of GenBank and chromatogram mtDNA sequence data generated in a previous study of Baltic grey seals. By re-editing the original chromatogram data we found that approximately 40% of the grey seal mtDNA haplotype sequences posted in GenBank contained errors. The re-analysis of the edited chromatogram data yielded overall similar results and conclusions as the original study. However, a significantly different outcome was observed when using the uncorrected dataset based on the GenBank haplotypes. We therefore suggest disregarding the existing GenBank data and instead using the correct haplotypes reported here. Our study serves as an illustrative example reiterating the importance of quality control through every step of a research project, from data generation to interpretation and submission to an online repository. Errors conducted in any step may lead to biased results and conclusions, and could impact management decisions.

  12. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas graminis Strain UASWS1507, a Potential Biological Control Agent and Biofertilizer Isolated in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Chablais, Romain; Cochard, Bastien; Schulz, Torsten; Lefort, François

    2016-10-06

    We report here the whole-genome shotgun sequence of the strain UASWS1507 of the species Pseudomonas graminis, isolated in Switzerland from an apple tree. This is the first genome registered for this species, which is considered as a potential and valuable resource of biological control agents and biofertilizers for agriculture. Copyright © 2016 Crovadore et al.

  13. A comparative study of pseudorandom sequences used in a c-VEP based BCI for online wheelchair control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jonas L.; Mohebbi, Ali; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a c-VEP based BCI system was developed to run on three distinctive pseudorandom sequences, namely the m-code, the Gold-code, and the Barker-code. The Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs) were provoked using these codes. In the online session, subjects controlled a LEGO® Mindstorms® robot...

  14. Japanese Wolves are Genetically Divided into Two Groups Based on an 8-Nucleotide Insertion/Deletion within the mtDNA Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Naotaka; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Sasaki, Motoki; Matsui, Akira; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Maruyama, Masashi; Hongo, Hitomi; Vostretsov, Yuri E; Gasilin, Viatcheslav; Kosintsev, Pavel A; Quanjia, Chen; Chunxue, Wang

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (198- to 598-bp) of four ancient Canis specimens (two Canis mandibles, a cranium, and a first phalanx) was examined, and each specimen was genetically identified as Japanese wolf. Two unique nucleotide substitutions, the 78-C insertion and the 482-G deletion, both of which are specific for Japanese wolf, were observed in each sample. Based on the mtDNA sequences analyzed, these four specimens and 10 additional Japanese wolf samples could be classified into two groups- Group A (10 samples) and Group B (4 samples)-which contain or lack an 8-bp insertion/deletion (indel), respectively. Interestingly, three dogs (Akita-b, Kishu 25, and S-husky 102) that each contained Japanese wolf-specific features were also classified into Group A or B based on the 8-bp indel. To determine the origin or ancestor of the Japanese wolf, mtDNA control regions of ancient continental Canis specimens were examined; 84 specimens were from Russia, and 29 were from China. However, none of these 113 specimens contained Japanese wolf-specific sequences. Moreover, none of 426 Japanese modern hunting dogs examined contained these Japanese wolf-specific mtDNA sequences. The mtDNA control region sequences of Groups A and B appeared to be unique to grey wolf and dog populations.

  15. The use of management controls in different cultural regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmi, Teemu; Ax, Christian; Bedford, David

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses cultural differences in management control practices in Anglo-Saxon (Australia, Canada), Germanic (Austria, parts of Belgium, Germany), and Nordic firms (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden). Unique data is collected by structured interviews from 688 SBUs in these countries. Anglo...... perceive compensation as important purpose, whereas Germanic and Nordic SBUs emphasize attention direction and learning. Budgets and performance measurement systems are used interactively to a larger extent by Anglo-Saxon and Germanic compared to Nordic SBUs. Rewards are based on achievement of financial...... targets more in Anglo than in Germanic SBUs. Reward and compensation in Anglo SBUs is more subjective, individual based and relies also on non-financial rewards to a larger extent than in Germanic and Nordic SBUs. Regarding cultural controls, Anglo SBUs value recruitment within organization more highly...

  16. Regional Persistent Organic Pollutants' Environmental Impact Assessment and Control Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis Staniskis

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The sources of formation, environmental distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs are increasingly seen as topics to be addressed and solved at the global scale. Therefore, there are already two international agreements concerning persistent organic pollutants: the Protocol of 1998 to the 1979 Convention on the Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution on Persistent Organic Pollutants (Aarhus Protocol; and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. For the assessment of environmental pollution of POPs, for the risk assessment, for the evaluation of new pollutants as potential candidates to be included in the POPs list of the Stokholmo or/and Aarhus Protocol, a set of different models are developed or under development. Multimedia models help describe and understand environmental processes leading to global contamination through POPs and actual risk to the environment and human health. However, there is a lack of the tools based on a systematic and integrated approach to POPs management difficulties in the region.

  17. Coupled ODEs control system with unbounded hysteresis region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel; Timoshin, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2016), s. 1934-1949 ISSN 0363-0129 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12227S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : nonlinear evolution control systems * hysteresis * nonconvex constraints Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.450, year: 2016 http://epubs.siam.org/doi/abs/10.1137/15M1018915

  18. 40 CFR 81.93 - Hampton Roads Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hampton Roads Intrastate Air Quality... Quality Control Regions § 81.93 Hampton Roads Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan... Wight, James City, Nansemond, Southampton, York. Cities—Chesapeake, Franklin, Hampton, Newport News...

  19. Characterization of a DNA sequence family in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, B.; Knoblauch, H.; Buiting, K.; Horsthemke, B. (Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    IR4-3R (D15S11) is an anonymous DNA sequence from human chromosome 15. Using YAC cloning and restriction enzyme analysis, the authors have found that IR4-3R detects five related DNA sequences, which are spread over 700 kb within the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome chromosome region in 15q11-q 13. The RsaI and StyI polymorphisms, which were described previously, are associated with the most proximal copy of IR4-3R and are in strong linkage disequilibrium. IR4-3R represents the third DNA sequence family that has been identified in 15q11-q13. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Update on Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis typing based on nucleotide sequence variations in internal transcribed spacer regions of rRNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, C H; Helweg-Larsen, J; Tang, X

    1998-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis isolates from 207 clinical specimens from nine countries were typed based on nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2, respectively) of rRNA genes. The number of ITS1 nucleotides has been revised from...... the previously reported 157 bp to 161 bp. Likewise, the number of ITS2 nucleotides has been changed from 177 to 192 bp. The number of ITS1 sequence types has increased from 2 to 15, and that of ITS2 has increased from 3 to 14. The 15 ITS1 sequence types are designated types A through O, and the 14 ITS2 types...... are named types a through n. A total of 59 types of P. carinii f. sp. hominis were found in this study....

  1. TAXONDC: CALCULATING THE SIMILARITY VALUE OF THE 16S RRNA GENE SEQUENCES OF PROKARYOTES OR ITS REGIONS OF FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Vladimirovich Tarlachkov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The TaxonDC program (Taxon Distance Calculator performs pairwise sequence alignment followed by determining the similarity value between two or more sequences of interest. Unlike widely used programs, TaxonDC makes only pairwise alignment of input sequences that allows avoiding different similarity values depending on the sequences included in the analysis. The similarity values calculated with TaxonDC are the same compared to those calculated using popular identification oriented web-based tool EzBioCloud that makes calculated values comparable with previous ones. In addition, to help prevent discrepancy among different researchers, the problem concerning the influence of the order of entered sequences on similarity values is specially considered. To our knowledge, TaxonDC is the only software which includes these capabilities in combination, simplifies and widens calculation of similarity values in systematics of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The program has easy-to-use interface and can be run on Windows and Linux. Availability and Implementation: The program is available free of charge at https://tarlachkov.ru/en/software/taxondc. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Journal of Bioinformatics and Genomics online.

  2. A New Coordinated Control Method on the Intersection of Traffic Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intersection regions widely exist in road networks as crucial connections, and the congestion effects on traffic in the networks cannot be ignored. In general, a conventional intersection region includes a merging region and more than two ramps, whose congestion brings a serious negative effect on traffic service quality and satisfaction of drivers. Specifically, intersection region congestion is caused by congestion in merging regions. However, current control methods regarding coordination of the variable speed limits and ramp metering in order to solve merging region congestion are insufficient to handle congestion occurring in the intersection region. Therefore, a new method of coordinated control is proposed in this paper based on mainline control using the variable speed limits and coordinated ramp metering. The coordinated control method is formulated considering the degree of crowdedness indexes and implemented based on the queue length, with the goal to relieve congestion in conventional intersection regions caused by merging region congestion. The coordinated control method is further evaluated based on an actual traffic network. The results show that the proposed method is effective in terms of improving traffic service quality and relieving intersection region congestion.

  3. Improved annotation of 3' untranslated regions and complex loci by combination of strand-specific direct RNA sequencing, RNA-Seq and ESTs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Schurch

    Full Text Available The reference annotations made for a genome sequence provide the framework for all subsequent analyses of the genome. Correct and complete annotation in addition to the underlying genomic sequence is particularly important when interpreting the results of RNA-seq experiments where short sequence reads are mapped against the genome and assigned to genes according to the annotation. Inconsistencies in annotations between the reference and the experimental system can lead to incorrect interpretation of the effect on RNA expression of an experimental treatment or mutation in the system under study. Until recently, the genome-wide annotation of 3' untranslated regions received less attention than coding regions and the delineation of intron/exon boundaries. In this paper, data produced for samples in Human, Chicken and A. thaliana by the novel single-molecule, strand-specific, Direct RNA Sequencing technology from Helicos Biosciences which locates 3' polyadenylation sites to within +/- 2 nt, were combined with archival EST and RNA-Seq data. Nine examples are illustrated where this combination of data allowed: (1 gene and 3' UTR re-annotation (including extension of one 3' UTR by 5.9 kb; (2 disentangling of gene expression in complex regions; (3 clearer interpretation of small RNA expression and (4 identification of novel genes. While the specific examples displayed here may become obsolete as genome sequences and their annotations are refined, the principles laid out in this paper will be of general use both to those annotating genomes and those seeking to interpret existing publically available annotations in the context of their own experimental data.

  4. Deep sequencing of HBV pre-S region reveals high heterogeneity of HBV genotypes and associations of word pattern frequencies with HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xin; Jia, Jian-An; Fang, Meng; Chen, Shipeng; Liang, Xiaotao; Zhu, Shanfeng; Zhang, Shuqin; Feng, Jianfeng; Sun, Fengzhu; Gao, Chunfang

    2018-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a common problem in the world, especially in China. More than 60-80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases can be attributed to HBV infection in high HBV prevalent regions. Although traditional Sanger sequencing has been extensively used to investigate HBV sequences, NGS is becoming more commonly used. Further, it is unknown whether word pattern frequencies of HBV reads by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) can be used to investigate HBV genotypes and predict HCC status. In this study, we used NGS to sequence the pre-S region of the HBV sequence of 94 HCC patients and 45 chronic HBV (CHB) infected individuals. Word pattern frequencies among the sequence data of all individuals were calculated and compared using the Manhattan distance. The individuals were grouped using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and hierarchical clustering. Word pattern frequencies were also used to build prediction models for HCC status using both K-nearest neighbors (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM). We showed the extremely high power of analyzing HBV sequences using word patterns. Our key findings include that the first principal coordinate of the PCoA analysis was highly associated with the fraction of genotype B (or C) sequences and the second principal coordinate was significantly associated with the probability of having HCC. Hierarchical clustering first groups the individuals according to their major genotypes followed by their HCC status. Using cross-validation, high area under the receiver operational characteristic curve (AUC) of around 0.88 for KNN and 0.92 for SVM were obtained. In the independent data set of 46 HCC patients and 31 CHB individuals, a good AUC score of 0.77 was obtained using SVM. It was further shown that 3000 reads for each individual can yield stable prediction results for SVM. Thus, another key finding is that word patterns can be used to predict HCC status with high accuracy. Therefore, our study shows clearly

  5. Regional quality control survey of blood-gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minty, B D; Nunn, J F

    1977-09-01

    We undertook an external quality control survey of blood-gas analysis in 16 laboratories at 13 hospitals. All samples were prepared in the laboratories under investigation by equilibration of blood or serum with gas mixtures of known composition. pH of serum was measured with no significant bias but with an SD of random error 0.026 pH units, which was almost twice the SD of the reference range (0.015). An acceptable random error (half SD of reference range) was not obtained in a longitudinal internal quality control suvey although there were acceptable results for buffer pH in both field and internal surveys. Blood PO2 was measured with no significant bias but with SD of random error 1.38 kPa which reduced to 0.72 kPa by excluding one egregious result. The latter value was just over half of the SD of the reference range (1.2 kPa). PCO2 of blood was also measured without significant bias but with a much smaller SD of random error of 0.28 kPa (by excluding one egregious result), which was again just over half the SD of the reference range (0.51 kPa). Measurements of blood PO2 and PCO2 seem generally acceptable in relation to their respective reference ranges but measurements of pH were unsatisfactory in both internal and external trials.

  6. Characterization of the gcv control region from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, L T; Stauffer, G V

    1994-10-01

    We constructed a set of deletions upstream of the gcv promoter and analyzed the effects of the deletions on expression of a gcvT-lacZ gene fusion. A deletion that ends at position -313 upstream of the transcription initiation site (+1) results in reduced levels of gcvT-lacZ expression, but the fusion is still inducible by glycine and repressible by purines. A deletion that ends at position -169 results in loss of both GcvA- and Lrp-mediated activation of the gcvT-lacZ fusion. The endpoints of delta -313 and delta -169 also define a site that down-regulates gcvT-lacZ expression two- to threefold. A deletion that ends at position -89 upstream from the transcription initiation site still shows PurR-mediated repression, suggesting that PurR-mediated repression is not by direct interference with the GcvA- and Lrp-mediated regulatory mechanism(s). Gel mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting showed that Lrp protein binds to multiple sites upstream of the gcv promoter, from about bp -92 to bp -229. The results suggest that the gcv regulatory region is complex, with numerous cis-acting sites that are required for normal gcv expression.

  7. A single conserved basic residue in the potassium channel filter region controls KCNQ1 insensitivity toward scorpion toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zongyun; Hu, Youtian; Wang, Bin; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-09-01

    Although many studies concerning the sensitivity mechanism of scorpion toxin-potassium channel interactions have been reported, few have explored the biochemical insensitivity mechanisms of potassium channel receptors toward natural scorpion toxin peptides, such as the KCNQ1 channel. Here, by sequence alignment analyses of the human KCNQ1 channel and scorpion potassium channel MmKv2, which is completely insensitive to scorpion toxins, we proposed that the insensitivity mechanism of KCNQ1 toward natural scorpion toxins might involve two functional regions, the turret and filter regions. Based on this observation, a series of KCNQ1 mutants were constructed to study molecular mechanisms of the KCNQ1 channel insensitivity toward natural scorpion toxins. Electrophysiological studies of chimera channels showed that the channel filter region controls KCNQ1 insensitivity toward the classical scorpion toxin ChTX. Interestingly, further residue mutant experiments showed that a single basic residue in the filter region determined the insensitivity of KCNQ1 channels toward scorpion toxins. Our present work showed that amino acid residue diversification at common sites controls the sensitivity and insensitivity of potassium channels toward scorpion toxins. The unique insensitivity mechanism of KCNQ1 toward natural scorpion toxins will accelerate the rational design of potent peptide inhibitors toward this channel.

  8. Comparison of Nucleotide Sequence of P2C Region in Diabetogenic and Non-Diabetogenic Coxsackie Virus B5 Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chong Chou

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5 isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C protein gene (p2C in 24 CVB5 isolates (4 diabetogenic, 18 non-diabetogenic and 2 prototype. We found 0.3-10% nucleotide differences. In the four isolates from type 1 DM patients, there was only 2.4-3.4% nucleotide difference, and there was only 1.7-7.1% nucleotide difference between type 1 DM isolates and non-diabetogenic isolates. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence between prototype virus and 22 CVB5 isolates revealed 18.4-24.1% difference. Twenty-one CVB5 isolates from type 1 DM and non-type 1 DM patients contained the PEVKEK sequence, as shown by the p2C nucleotide sequence. Our data showed that the viral p2C sequence with homology with GAD is highly conserved in CVB5 isolates. There was no difference between diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic CVB5 isolates. All four type 1 DM patients had at least one of the genetic susceptibility alleles HLA-DR, DQA1, DQB1. Other genetic and autoimmune factors such as HLA genetic susceptibility and GAD may also play important roles in the pathogenesis in type 1 DM.

  9. A methylation status analysis of the apomixis-specific region in Paspalum spp. suggests an epigenetic control of parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, Maricel; Cáceres, Maria E; Samoluk, Sergio S; Seijo, José G; Pessino, Silvina C; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A; Pupilli, Fulvio

    2014-12-01

    Apomixis, a clonal plant reproduction by seeds, is controlled in Paspalum spp. by a single locus which is blocked in terms of recombination. Partial sequence analysis of the apomixis locus revealed structural features of heterochromatin, namely the presence of repetitive elements, gene degeneration, and de-regulation. To test the epigenetic control of apomixis, a study on the distribution of cytosine methylation at the apomixis locus and the effect of artificial DNA demethylation on the mode of reproduction was undertaken in two apomictic Paspalum species. The 5-methylcytosine distribution in the apomixis-controlling genomic region was studied in P. simplex by methylation-sensitive restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and in P. notatum by fluorescene in situ hybridization (FISH). The effect of DNA demethylation was studied on the mode of reproduction of P. simplex by progeny test analysis of apomictic plants treated with the demethylating agent 5'-azacytidine. A high level of cytosine methylation was detected at the apomixis-controlling genomic region in both species. By analysing a total of 374 open pollination progeny, it was found that artificial demethylation had little or no effect on apospory, whereas it induced a significant depression of parthenogenesis. The results suggested that factors controlling repression of parthenogenesis might be inactivated in apomictic Paspalum by DNA methylation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Sabin 2-related poliovirus recombinant contains a homologous sequence of human enterovirus species C in the viral polymerase coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Shuangli; Chen, Li; Yan, Dongmei; Wang, Dongyan; Tang, Ruiyan; Zhu, Hui; Hou, Xiaohui; An, Hongqiu; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Wenbo

    2010-02-01

    A type 2 vaccine-related poliovirus (strain CHN3024), differing from the Sabin 2 strain by 0.44% in the VP1 coding region was isolated from a patient with vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis. Sequences downstream of nucleotide position 6735 (3D(pol) coding region) were derived from an unidentified sequence; no close match for a potential parent was found, but it could be classified into a non-polio human enteroviruses species C (HEV-C) phylogeny. The virus differed antigenically from the parental Sabin strain, having an amino acid substitution in the neutralizing antigenic site 1. The similarity between CHN3024 and Sabin 2 sequences suggests that the recombination was recent; this is supported by the estimation that the initiating OPV dose was given only 36-75 days before sampling. The patient's clinical manifestations, intratypic differentiation examination, and whole-genome sequencing showed that this recombinant exhibited characteristics of neurovirulent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPV), which may, thus, pose a potential threat to a polio-free world.

  11. Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jason, Flannick; Fuchsberger, Christian; Mahajan, Anubha

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural...... variants were identified, including 99% of low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.1-5%) non-coding variants in the whole-genome sequenced individuals and 99.7% of low-frequency coding variants in the whole-exome sequenced individuals. Each variant was tested for association with T2D in the sequenced...... from these analyses provide the largest reference to date of human genetic information relevant to T2D, for use in activities such as T2D-focused genotype imputation, functional characterization of variants or genes, and other novel analyses to detect associations between sequence variation and T2D....

  12. Sequence data and association statistics from 12,940 type 2 diabetes cases and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Flannick; Fuchsberger, Christian; Mahajan, Anubha; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Agarwala, Vineeta; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Caulkins, Lizz; Koesterer, Ryan; Ma, Clement; Moutsianas, Loukas; McCarthy, Davis J.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Perry, John R. B.; Sim, Xueling; Blackwell, Thomas W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rayner, N William; Cingolani, Pablo; Locke, Adam E.; Tajes, Juan Fernandez; Highland, Heather M.; Dupuis, Josee; Chines, Peter S.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hartl, Christopher; Jackson, Anne U.; Chen, Han; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Pearson, Richard D.; Kumar, Ashish; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Grarup, Niels; Stringham, Heather M.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Lee, Jaehoon; Chen, Yuhui; Scott, Robert A.; Below, Jennifer E.; Chen, Peng; Huang, Jinyan; Go, Min Jin; Stitzel, Michael L.; Pasko, Dorota; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Varga, Tibor V.; Green, Todd; Beer, Nicola L.; Day-Williams, Aaron G.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fingerlin, Tasha; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hu, Cheng; Huh, Iksoo; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Kim, Bong-Jo; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Young Jin; Kwon, Min-Seok; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Selyeong; Lin, Keng-Han; Maxwell, Taylor J.; Nagai, Yoshihiko; Wang, Xu; Welch, Ryan P.; Yoon, Joon; Zhang, Weihua; Barzilai, Nir; Voight, Benjamin F.; Han, Bok-Ghee; Jenkinson, Christopher P.; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Manning, Alisa; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Balkau, Beverley; Stančáková, Alena; Abboud, Hanna E.; Boeing, Heiner; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Gottesman, Omri; Scott, James; Carey, Jason; Kwan, Phoenix; Grant, George; Smith, Joshua D.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun; Butterworth, Adam S.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Lee, Heung Man; Lu, Yingchang; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Zhao, Wei; Danesh, John; Lam, Vincent K. L.; Park, Kyong Soo; Saleheen, Danish; So, Wing Yee; Tam, Claudia H. T.; Afzal, Uzma; Aguilar, David; Arya, Rector; Aung, Tin; Chan, Edmund; Navarro, Carmen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Palli, Domenico; Correa, Adolfo; Curran, Joanne E.; Rybin, Dennis; Farook, Vidya S.; Fowler, Sharon P.; Freedman, Barry I.; Griswold, Michael; Hale, Daniel Esten; Hicks, Pamela J.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kumar, Satish; Lehne, Benjamin; Thuillier, Dorothée; Lim, Wei Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Loh, Marie; Musani, Solomon K.; Puppala, Sobha; Scott, William R.; Yengo, Loïc; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Taylor, Herman A.; Thameem, Farook; Wilson, Gregory; Wong, Tien Yin; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Levy, Jonathan C.; Mangino, Massimo; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Fadista, João; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Herder, Christian; Groves, Christopher J.; Wieland, Thomas; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Kinnunen, Leena; Esko, Tõnu; Farmer, Andrew J.; Hakaste, Liisa; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Kravic, Jasmina; Lyssenko, Valeri; Hollensted, Mette; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Ladenvall, Claes; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Kriebel, Jennifer; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Lannfelt, Lars; Lauritzen, Torsten; Narisu, Narisu; Linneberg, Allan; Melander, Olle; Milani, Lili; Neville, Matt; Orho-Melander, Marju; Qi, Lu; Qi, Qibin; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Swift, Amy; Rosengren, Anders H.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Wood, Andrew R.; Mihailov, Evelin; Blancher, Christine; Carneiro, Mauricio O.; Maguire, Jared; Poplin, Ryan; Shakir, Khalid; Fennell, Timothy; DePristo, Mark; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Deloukas, Panos; Gjesing, Anette P.; Jun, Goo; Nilsson, Peter; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Onofrio, Robert; Thorand, Barbara; Hansen, Torben; Meisinger, Christa; Hu, Frank B.; Isomaa, Bo; Karpe, Fredrik; Liang, Liming; Peters, Annette; Huth, Cornelia; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pedersen, Oluf; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Salomaa, Veikko; Watanabe, Richard M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bergman, Richard N.; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Cho, Yoon Shin; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chan, Juliana CN; Chia, Kee Seng; Daly, Mark J.; Ebrahim, Shah B.; Langenberg, Claudia; Elliott, Paul; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Lehman, Donna M.; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Froguel, Philippe; Barroso, Inês; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Small, Kerrin S.; Ried, Janina S.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Grallert, Harald; Glaser, Benjamin; Metspalu, Andres; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Walker, Mark; Banks, Eric; Gieger, Christian; Ingelsson, Erik; Im, Hae Kyung; Illig, Thomas; Franks, Paul W.; Buck, Gemma; Trakalo, Joseph; Buck, David; Prokopenko, Inga; Mägi, Reedik; Lind, Lars; Farjoun, Yossi; Owen, Katharine R.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Strauch, Konstantin; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Taesung; Donnelly, Peter; Morris, Andrew D.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Bowden, Donald W.; Collins, Francis S.; Atzmon, Gil; Chambers, John C.; Spector, Timothy D.; Laakso, Markku; Strom, Tim M.; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Tai, E. Shyong; McVean, Gilean; Hanis, Craig L.; Wilson, James G.; Seielstad, Mark; Frayling, Timothy M.; Meigs, James B.; Cox, Nancy J.; Sladek, Rob; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey; Mohlke, Karen L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Groop, Leif; Abecasis, Goncalo; Scott, Laura J.; Morris, Andrew P.; Kang, Hyun Min; Altshuler, David; Burtt, Noël P.; Florez, Jose C.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) to high resolution, the GoT2D and T2D-GENES consortia catalogued variation from whole-genome sequencing of 2,657 European individuals and exome sequencing of 12,940 individuals of multiple ancestries. Over 27M SNPs, indels, and structural variants were identified, including 99% of low-frequency (minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.1–5%) non-coding variants in the whole-genome sequenced individuals and 99.7% of low-frequency coding variants in the whole-exome sequenced individuals. Each variant was tested for association with T2D in the sequenced individuals, and, to increase power, most were tested in larger numbers of individuals (>80% of low-frequency coding variants in ~82 K Europeans via the exome chip, and ~90% of low-frequency non-coding variants in ~44 K Europeans via genotype imputation). The variants, genotypes, and association statistics from these analyses provide the largest reference to date of human genetic information relevant to T2D, for use in activities such as T2D-focused genotype imputation, functional characterization of variants or genes, and other novel analyses to detect associations between sequence variation and T2D. PMID:29257133

  13. Phylogenetic relationships in Solanaceae and related species based on cpDNA sequence from plastid trnE-trnT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Montewka Melotto-Passarin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergenic spacers of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA are very useful in phylogenetic and population genetic studiesof plant species, to study their potential integration in phylogenetic analysis. The non-coding trnE-trnT intergenic spacer ofcpDNA was analyzed to assess the nucleotide sequence polymorphism of 16 Solanaceae species and to estimate its ability tocontribute to the resolution of phylogenetic studies of this group. Multiple alignments of DNA sequences of trnE-trnT intergenicspacer made the identification of nucleotide variability in this region possible and the phylogeny was estimated by maximumparsimony and rooted with Convolvulaceae Ipomoea batatas, the most closely related family. Besides, this intergenic spacerwas tested for the phylogenetic ability to differentiate taxonomic levels. For this purpose, species from four other families wereanalyzed and compared with Solanaceae species. Results confirmed polymorphism in the trnE-trnT region at different taxonomiclevels.

  14. Nonlinear H∞ Optimal Control Scheme for an Underwater Vehicle with Regional Function Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zool H. Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A conventional region control technique cannot meet the demands for an accurate tracking performance in view of its inability to accommodate highly nonlinear system dynamics, imprecise hydrodynamic coefficients, and external disturbances. In this paper, a robust technique is presented for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV with region tracking function. Within this control scheme, nonlinear H∞ and region based control schemes are used. A Lyapunov-like function is presented for stability analysis of the proposed control law. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed tracking control of the AUV. It is shown that the proposed control law is robust against parameter uncertainties, external disturbances, and nonlinearities and it leads to uniform ultimate boundedness of the region tracking error.

  15. SURVEILLANCE AND CONTROL OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Ricciardi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is one of the most relevant problems in the healthcare: the growth of resistant micro-organisms in healthcare settings is a worrisome threat, raising length to stay (LOS, morbidity and mortality in those patients. The importance of the antibiotic resistance and its spread around the world, gave rise to the activation of several surveillance systems, based especially on the collection of laboratory data to local or national level. The objective of this work is to carry out a review of the scientific literature existing on the topic and scientific activities related to surveillance on antibiotic resistance in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Recent Data from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (November 2015 show, for different combinations bacterium-drug, an increase of resistance from North to South and from West to East of Europe; it is particularly worrying the phenomenon of resistance carried out by some gram negative, specifically Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli to third-generation cephalosporin, often combined in opposition to fluoroquinolones and amino glycosides. Is particularly relevant the incidence of resistance to carbapenems by strains of Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella included. The resistance exerted by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus continues to be relevant, albeit showing some decline in recent years. The incidence of resistance carried on by Streptococcus pneumoniae is stable and is mainly relevant to macrolides. Finally, a significant increase in recording relatively exercised by Enterococcus faecium to Vancomycin. Detecting, preventing, and controlling antibiotic resistance requires strategic, coordinated, and sustained efforts. It also depends on the engagement of governments, academia, industry, healthcare providers, the general public, and the agricultural community, as well as international partners. Committing to combating antibiotic

  16. Controls of Tufa Development in Bonito Region - Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; Oste, J.; França, A.; Cury, L. F.

    2017-12-01

    environment during the annual hydrologic cycle integrated with isotopic analysis, showed very early diagenetic processes responsible for the formation of carbonate tufa in this region.

  17. Comparison of sequences of hypervariable region (HVR subunit S-1 gene of field isolate I-37 infectious bronchitis virus with Connecticut serotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bronchitis is a contagious and acute respiratory disease in chickens caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV.Antigenic differences in IBV are associated with changes in the sequence of the spike glycoprotein (S. The subunit S1 which demonstrates more sequence variability than S-2 have been identified as hypervariable region (HVR-1 and 2. There were several IB virus field isolates included I-37 have been identified in Indonesia by serum neutralization method. However, gene sequence variation in HVR subunit S-1 had not yet been identified. Isolate I-37 was close to the serotype Connecticut 46 (Conn 46. The aim of this study is to identify sequence variation of HVR subunit S-1 gene of isolate I-37 produced by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing. Several procedures were carried out in the study including virus titration, propagation and was concentrated from the allantoic fluid infected with IBV. Then, RNA was extracted for RTPCR. urther the product was sequnced and its homology with IBV references from GenBank was compared by GenMac version 8.0. Result showed that isolate I-37 produced 515 bp of amplification product. Isolate I-37 and Conn 46 are same serotype, yet their HVR subunit S-1 nucleotides and amino acids (protein differ by 6.9% and 15.6% respectively. It might be concluded that isolate I-37 was variant of Conn 46.

  18. PCR identification of meats from chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra), pyrenean ibex (Capra pyrenaica), and mouflon (Ovis ammon) targeting specific sequences from the mitochondrial D-loop region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, V; González, I; López-Calleja, I; Martín, I; Rojas, M; García, T; Hernández, P E; Martín, Rosario

    2007-08-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for the identification of meats from chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra), pyrenean ibex (Capra pyrenaica), and mouflon (Ovis ammon) by using oligonucleotides targeting mitochondrial D-loop sequences. A D-loop region (∼700-1000 bp) was firstly amplified and sequenced from various game and domestic meat DNAs, and three primer sets were then designed on the basis of nucleotide multialignment of the generated D-loop sequences. As expected from sequence analysis, PCR amplification of the targeted D-loop fragments was successfully achieved from chamois (88 bp), pyrenean ibex (178 bp), and mouflon (155 bp) meats, showing adequate specificity and reproducibility against a number of game and domestic meats. Mouflon and sheep meats were amplified together in accordance to the high nucleotide identity of their mt D-loop sequences. In this work, satisfactory amplification was also accomplished in the analysis of experimentally pasteurized (72°C for 30min) and sterilized (121°C for 20min) meats, with a detection limit of ∼0.1% for each of the targeted species. The proposed PCR assay represents a rapid and straightforward method for the detection of possible adulterations in game meat products.

  19. Human DNA contains sequences homologous to the 5'-non-coding region of hepatits C virus: characterization with restriction endonucleases reveals individual varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennin, Reinhard H; Wo, Jianer

    2003-07-01

    To investigate a 272 base pair section of the 5'-non-coding region of genomic DNA from the peripheral blood monounuclear cells of healthy hepatitis virus C (HCV)-negative human subjects (not patients). This sequence section bears interest because (1) it harbors several potential methylation (Cp-rich) sites, and (2) it represents the largest part of its internal ribosomal entry site. A pre-PCR digestion protocol was established making consistent use of four restriction endonucleases selected for certain features: SmaI, XmaCI, MspI, and HpaII are inhibited if methylation(s) are present at certain cytosines within their cutting sequences. The suspected HCV-specific sequence was found in the DNA of each subject tested. The pre-PCR digestion assay reveals individual differences in their pattern of methylation, which may be due to possible epigenetic phenomena. The results provide formal proof that these HCV-specific sequences are contained in the genomic or extra chromosomal target DNA, and probably belong to a new class of endogenous sequences.

  20. [Cloning and sequence analysis of the DHBV genome of the brown ducks in Guilin region and establishment of the quantitative method for detecting DHBV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, He-Ling; Huang, Ri-Dong; He, Song-Qing; Xu, Qing; Zhu, Hua; Mo, Zhi-Jing; Liu, Qing-Bo; Liu, Yong-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Brown ducks carrying DHBV were widely used as hepatitis B animal model in the research of the activity and toxicity of anti-HBV dugs. Studies showed that the ratio of DHBV carriers in the brown ducks in Guilin region was relatively high. Nevertheless, the characters of the DHBV genome of Guilin brown duck remain unknown. Here we report the cloning of the genome of Guilin brown duck DHBV and the sequence analysis of the genome. The full length of the DHBV genome of Guilin brown duck was 3 027bp. Analysis using ORF finder found that there was an ORF for an unknown peptide other than S-ORF, PORF and C-ORF in the genome of the DHBV. Vector NTI 8. 0 analysis revealed that the unknown peptide contained a motif which binded to HLA * 0201. Aligning with the DHBV sequences from different countries and regions indicated that there were no obvious differences of regional distribution among the sequences. A fluorescence quantitative PCR for detecting DHBV was establishment based on the recombinant plasmid pGEM-DHBV-S constructed. This study laid the groundwork for using Guilin brown duck as a hepatitis B animal model.

  1. Sequence analysis of the D2/D3 region of the large subunit RDNA from different Meloidogyne isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenente, G.C.M.V.; Ley, de P.; Ley, de I.T.; Karssen, G.; Vanfleteren, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of eight Meloidogyne species and twelve isolates from Brazil and other countries were investigated using sequence data of the D2/D3 expansion segments of the large subunit of ribosomal DNA. The phylogenetic procedures used were maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and

  2. Sequencing of 15622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munoz-Amatriain, M.; Lonardi, S.; Luo, M.C.; Madishetty, K.; Svensson, J.T.; Moscou, M. J.; Wanamaker, S.; Kudrna, D.; Zheng, J.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, J.; Mammadov, J.; Close, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 1 (2015), s. 216-227 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Barley * Hordeum vulgare L * BAC sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  3. Llama heavy-chain V regions consist of at least four distinct subfamilies revealing novel sequence features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuls, R.C.; Nijman, I.J.; Niewold, T.A.; Frenken, L.G.J.; Geus, de B.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies (Abs), camelids possess Abs consisting of only heavy chains. The variable domain of such a heavy-chain Ab (VHH) is fully capable of antigen (Ag) binding. Earlier analysis of 47 VHHs showed sequence features unique to VHH domains. These include the presence of

  4. Quality control metrics improve repeatability and reproducibility of single-nucleotide variants derived from whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Soika, V; Meehan, J; Su, Z; Ge, W; Ng, H W; Perkins, R; Simonyan, V; Tong, W; Hong, H

    2015-08-01

    Although many quality control (QC) methods have been developed to improve the quality of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in SNV-calling, QC methods for use subsequent to single-nucleotide polymorphism-calling have not been reported. We developed five QC metrics to improve the quality of SNVs using the whole-genome-sequencing data of a monozygotic twin pair from the Korean Personal Genome Project. The QC metrics improved both repeatability between the monozygotic twin pair and reproducibility between SNV-calling pipelines. We demonstrated the QC metrics improve reproducibility of SNVs derived from not only whole-genome-sequencing data but also whole-exome-sequencing data. The QC metrics are calculated based on the reference genome used in the alignment without accessing the raw and intermediate data or knowing the SNV-calling details. Therefore, the QC metrics can be easily adopted in downstream association analysis.

  5. Two-step identification of taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Xinmaoyu) using specific psbE-petL and simple sequence repeat-sequence characterized amplified regions (SSR-SCAR) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, H J; Zhang, Y M; Sun, X Q; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Cao, M X; Shen, X L; Hang, Y Y

    2016-08-05

    Colocasia esculenta cv. Xinmaoyu is an eddoe-type taro cultivar local to Taicang, Jiangsu Province, China; it is characterized by its pure flavor, glutinous texture, and high nutritional value. Due to its excellent qualities, the Trademark Office of the State Administration for Industry and Commerce of the People's Republic of China awarded Xinmaoyu, a geographical indication certification in 2014. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop an efficient molecular marker for the specific identification of this cultivar, which would greatly facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique germplasm resource. In the present study, amplifying the psbE-petL fragment from two dasheen-type and seven eddoe-type taro cultivars revealed three conserved insertions/deletions among sequences from the two taro types. Based on these sequence differences, a pair of site-specific primers was designed targeting the psbE-petL sequence from the dasheen-type taro, which specifically amplified a DNA band in all individuals from cultivars of this type, but not in those from the seven eddoe-type cultivars. To discriminate Xinmaoyu from the other eddoe-type taro cultivars, a pair of simple sequence repeat-sequence characterized amplified region (SSR-SCAR) primers was further developed to specifically amplify a DNA band from all Xinmaoyu individuals, but not from individuals of other eddoe-type taro cultivars. In conclusion, through a two-step-screening procedure using psbE-petL and SSR-SCAR markers, we developed a pair of primers that could specifically discriminate Xinmaoyu from nine taro cultivars commonly cultivated in Jiangsu Province and Fujian Province.

  6. Species determination of Brazilian mammals implicated in the epidemiology of rabies based on the control region of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnieli Junior, Pedro; Fahl, Willian de Oliveira; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2008-12-01

    Identification of animals that are decomposing or have been run over or burnt and cannot be visually identified is a problem in the surveillance and control of infectious diseases. Many of these animals are wild and represent a valuable source of information for epidemiologic research as they may be carriers of an infectious agent. This article discusses the results obtained using a method for identifying mammals genetically by sequencing their mitochondrial DNA control region. Fourteen species were analyzed and identified. These included the main reservoirs and transmitters of rabies virus, namely, canids, chiroptera and primates. The results prove that this method of genetic identification is both efficient and simple and that it can be used in the surveillance of infectious diseases which includes mammals in their epidemiologic cycle, such as rabies.

  7. Species determination of Brazilian mammals implicated in the epidemiology of rabies based on the control region of mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Carnieli Junior

    Full Text Available Identification of animals that are decomposing or have been run over or burnt and cannot be visually identified is a problem in the surveillance and control of infectious diseases. Many of these animals are wild and represent a valuable source of information for epidemiologic research as they may be carriers of an infectious agent. This article discusses the results obtained using a method for identifying mammals genetically by sequencing their mitochondrial DNA control region. Fourteen species were analyzed and identified. These included the main reservoirs and transmitters of rabies virus, namely, canids, chiroptera and primates. The results prove that this method of genetic identification is both efficient and simple and that it can be used in the surveillance of infectious diseases which includes mammals in their epidemiologic cycle, such as rabies.

  8. Masking as an effective quality control method for next-generation sequencing data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sajung; Yun, Sijung

    2014-12-13

    Next generation sequencing produces base calls with low quality scores that can affect the accuracy of identifying simple nucleotide variation calls, including single nucleotide polymorphisms and small insertions and deletions. Here we compare the effectiveness of two data preprocessing methods, masking and trimming, and the accuracy of simple nucleotide variation calls on whole-genome sequence data from Caenorhabditis elegans. Masking substitutes low quality base calls with 'N's (undetermined bases), whereas trimming removes low quality bases that results in a shorter read lengths. We demonstrate that masking is more effective than trimming in reducing the false-positive rate in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling. However, both of the preprocessing methods did not affect the false-negative rate in SNP calling with statistical significance compared to the data analysis without preprocessing. False-positive rate and false-negative rate for small insertions and deletions did not show differences between masking and trimming. We recommend masking over trimming as a more effective preprocessing method for next generation sequencing data analysis since masking reduces the false-positive rate in SNP calling without sacrificing the false-negative rate although trimming is more commonly used currently in the field. The perl script for masking is available at http://code.google.com/p/subn/. The sequencing data used in the study were deposited in the Sequence Read Archive (SRX450968 and SRX451773).

  9. Control of automated behavior: insights from the discrete sequence production task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, Elger L.; Ruitenberg, Marit F. L.; de Kleine, Elian; Verwey, Willem B.

    2013-01-01

    Work with the discrete sequence production (DSP) task has provided a substantial literature on discrete sequencing skill over the last decades. The purpose of the current article is to provide a comprehensive overview of this literature and of the theoretical progress that it has prompted. We start with a description of the DSP task and the phenomena that are typically observed with it. Then we propose a cognitive model, the dual processor model (DPM), which explains performance of (skilled) discrete key-press sequences. Key features of this model are the distinction between a cognitive processor and a motor system (i.e., motor buffer and motor processor), the interplay between these two processing systems, and the possibility to execute familiar sequences in two different execution modes. We further discuss how this model relates to several related sequence skill research paradigms and models, and we outline outstanding questions for future research throughout the paper. We conclude by sketching a tentative neural implementation of the DPM. PMID:23515430

  10. Identification of genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions and analysis of biological functions for spliced sequences using Read-Split-Fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yongsheng; Kinne, Jeff; Ding, Lizhong; Rath, Ethan C; Cox, Aaron; Naidu, Siva Dharman

    2017-10-03

    It is generally thought that most canonical or non-canonical splicing events involving U2- and U12 spliceosomes occur within nuclear pre-mRNAs. However, the question of whether at least some U12-type splicing occurs in the cytoplasm is still unclear. In recent years next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field. The "Read-Split-Walk" (RSW) and "Read-Split-Run" (RSR) methods were developed to identify genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions including special events occurring in cytoplasm. As the significant amount of genome/transcriptome data such as, Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, have been generated, we have advanced a newer more memory-efficient version of the algorithm, "Read-Split-Fly" (RSF), which can detect non-canonical spliced regions with higher sensitivity and improved speed. The RSF algorithm also outputs the spliced sequences for further downstream biological function analysis. We used open access ENCODE project RNA-Seq data to search spliced intron sequences against the U12-type spliced intron sequence database to examine whether some events could occur as potential signatures of U12-type splicing. The check was performed by searching spliced sequences against 5'ss and 3'ss sequences from the well-known orthologous U12-type spliceosomal intron database U12DB. Preliminary results of searching 70 ENCODE samples indicated that the presence of 5'ss with U12-type signature is more frequent than U2-type and prevalent in non-canonical junctions reported by RSF. The selected spliced sequences have also been further studied using miRBase to elucidate their functionality. Preliminary results from 70 samples of ENCODE datasets show that several miRNAs are prevalent in studied ENCODE samples. Two of these are associated with many diseases as suggested in the literature. Specifically, hsa-miR-1273 and hsa-miR-548 are associated with many diseases and cancers. Our RSF pipeline is able to detect many possible junctions

  11. Detection of polymorphisms of the mtDNA control region of Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae) by PCR-SSCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, E C; Albano, R M; Bondioli, A C V; Soares, L S; Lôbo-Hajdu, G

    2009-02-25

    Marine turtles are increasingly being threatened worldwide by anthropogenic activities. Better understanding of their life cycle, behavior and population structure is imperative for the design of adequate conservation strategies. The mtDNA control region is a fast-evolving matrilineal marker that has been employed in the study of marine turtle populations. We developed and tested a simple molecular tracing system for Caretta caretta mtDNA haplotypes by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). Using this technique, we were able to distinguish the SSCP patterns of 18 individuals of the haplotypes CC-A4, CC-A24 and CCxLO, which are commonly found in turtles sampled on the Brazilian coast. When we analyzed 15 turtles with previously unknown sequences, we detected two other haplotypes, in addition to the other four. Based on DNA sequencing, they were identified as the CC-A17 and CC-A1 haplotypes. Further analyses were made with the sea turtles, Chelonia mydas (N = 8), Lepidochelys olivacea (N = 3) and Eretmochelys imbricata (N = 1), demonstrating that the PCR-SSCP technique is able to distinguish intra- and interspecific variation in the family Cheloniidae. We found that this technique can be useful for identifying sea turtle mtDNA haplotypes, reducing the need for sequencing.

  12. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Allan M.; Zheng, Gang, E-mail: g.zheng@westernsydney.edu.au; Price, William S. [Western Sydney University, Nanoscale Organisation and Dynamics Group, School of Science and Health (Australia)

    2017-03-15

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω{sub 2}). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω{sub 2}. The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω{sub 1} but these signals were absent in ω{sub 2}, indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  13. NOESY-WaterControl: a new NOESY sequence for the observation of under-water protein resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Allan M.; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S.

    2017-01-01

    Highly selective and efficient water signal suppression is indispensable in biomolecular 2D nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. However, the application of conventional water suppression schemes can cause a significant or complete loss of the biomolecular resonances at and around the water chemical shift (ω 2 ). In this study, a new sequence, NOESY-WaterControl, was developed to address this issue. The new sequence was tested on lysozyme and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), demonstrating its efficiency in both water suppression and, more excitingly, preserving water-proximate biomolecular resonances in ω 2 . The 2D NOESY maps obtained using the new sequence thus provide more information than the maps obtained with conventional water suppression, thereby lessening the number of experiments needed to complete resonance assignments of biomolecules. The 2D NOESY-WaterControl map of BPTI showed strong bound water and exchangeable proton signals in ω 1 but these signals were absent in ω 2 , indicating the possibility of using the new sequence to discriminate bound water and exchangeable proton resonances from non-labile proton resonances with similar chemical shifts to water.

  14. Phylogenetic diversity of indigenous cowpea bradyrhizobia from soils in Japan based on sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Papa Saliou; Yamakawa, Takeo; Saeki, Yuichi; Guisse, Aliou

    2011-06-01

    Cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] is an important legume crop and yet its rhizobia have not been well characterized in many areas. In the present study, sequence analysis of the bacterial 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was performed to characterize genetically 76 indigenous cowpea rhizobia from five different geographic regions (Okinawa, Miyazaki, Kyoto, Fukushima and Hokkaido) of Japan. The sequence analysis clustered all isolates in the genus Bradyrhizobium. They were conspecific with B. japonicum, B. yuanmingense, B. elkanii and Bradyrhizobium sp., although none of them grouped with B. liaoningense, B. canariense, B. betae or B. iriomotense. B. yuanmingense was only isolated from the southern region (Okinawa) where it achieved the highest frequency of 69%. B. japonicum was predominant at Miyazaki, Fukushima and Hokkaido with more than 60% of the isolates. B. elkanii was mainly recorded in the southern (Okinawa: 31%, Miyazaki: 33%) and middle (Kyoto: 33%) regions. This species was present at a very low frequency in Fukushima and absent in Hokkaido in the northern area. Bradyrhizobium sp. like-strains were absent in the southern part (Okinawa, Miyazaki) but were concentrated either in the middle regions with 67% of Kyoto isolates and 28% of Fukushima isolates, and in the northern region with 40% of the Hokkaido isolates. This study revealed a geographical distribution of cowpea bradyrhizobia which seemed to be related to the differences in the environmental characteristics (soil type and soil pH, temperature, climate, moisture) of the different regions in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Sequencing and assembly of low copy and genic regions of isolated Triticum aestivum chromosome arm 7DS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berkman, O. J.; Skarshewski, A.; Lorenc, M. T.; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Batley, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Edwards, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 7 (2011), s. 768-775 ISSN 1467-7644 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk ED0007/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : wheat genome sequence * chromosome 7 * genome assembly Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.442, year: 2011

  16. Molecular characterization of the sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) from isolates of Taylorella asinigenitalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazumi, Akihiro; Ono, Shinji; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Moore, John E; Millar, B Cherie; Matsuda, Motoo

    2009-03-03

    Sequence information on the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) exhibits a large degree of sequence and length variation at both the genus and species levels. A primer pair for the amplification of 16S-23S rDNA ISR generated three amplicons for each of isolates of Taylorella asinigenitalis (UCD-1T, UK-1 and UK-2). Following TA cloning and sequencing, the three isolates of T. asinigenitalis were demonstrated to possess three ISR units of different lengths. Although the three corresponding ISRs (A, B and C) were identified to be identical to each other (UK-1 and UK-2 isolates), the ISRs shared approximately 95.3-98.9% nucleotide sequence similarities between the UCD-1T and UK-1/-2 isolates. A typical order of two intercistronic tRNA genes (5'-tRNAIle-tRNAAla-3') with the different nucleotide spacers [44 through 51 base pairs (bp)] in length was identified among the isolates. The consensus sequences of the antiterminators of boxB and boxA were also identified in all ISRs. Thus, three ISRs were identified for each isolate, and therefore, at least three distinctly different ribosomal RNA operons were suggested to occur in the genome of T. asinigenitalis. This was also confirmed by Southern hybridization procedure. The present study represents a dendrogram constructed based on the nucleotide sequence data of 16S-23S rDNA ISR for T. asinigenitalis, which may aid in the phylogenetic positioning of T. asinigenitalis within the genus Taylorella, and in the molecular discrimination of T. asinigenitalis.

  17. Molecular characterization of the sequences of the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR from isolates of Taylorella asinigenitalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millar B Cherie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence information on the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR exhibits a large degree of sequence and length variation at both the genus and species levels. A primer pair for the amplification of 16S-23S rDNA ISR generated three amplicons for each of isolates of Taylorella asinigenitalis (UCD-1T, UK-1 and UK-2. Findings Following TA cloning and sequencing, the three isolates of T. asinigenitalis were demonstrated to possess three ISR units of different lengths. Although the three corresponding ISRs (A, B and C were identified to be identical to each other (UK-1 and UK-2 isolates, the ISRs shared approximately 95.3–98.9% nucleotide sequence similarities between the UCD-1T and UK-1/-2 isolates. A typical order of two intercistronic tRNA genes (5'-tRNAIle-tRNAAla-3' with the different nucleotide spacers [44 through 51 base pairs (bp] in length was identified among the isolates. The consensus sequences of the antiterminators of boxB and boxA were also identified in all ISRs. Thus, three ISRs were identified for each isolate, and therefore, at least three distinctly different ribosomal RNA operons were suggested to occur in the genome of T. asinigenitalis. This was also confirmed by Southern hybridization procedure. Conclusion The present study represents a dendrogram constructed based on the nucleotide sequence data of 16S-23S rDNA ISR for T. asinigenitalis, which may aid in the phylogenetic positioning of T. asinigenitalis within the genus Taylorella, and in the molecular discrimination of T. asinigenitalis.

  18. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of a 12.5 Mb Homozygous Region Reveals ANO10 Mutations in Patients with Autosomal-Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Sascha; Hoischen, Alexander; Meijer, Rowdy P.P.; Gilissen, Christian; Neveling, Kornelia; Wieskamp, Nienke; de Brouwer, Arjan; Koenig, Michel; Anheim, Mathieu; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Todorovic, Slobodanka; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana; Lochmüller, Hanns; Stevanin, Giovanni; Goizet, Cyril; David, Albert; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Kremer, Berry; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.C.; Schijvenaars, Mascha M.V.A.P.; Heister, Angelien; Kwint, Michael; Arts, Peer; van der Wijst, Jenny; Veltman, Joris; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; Knoers, Nine

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias comprise a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to their dominant counterparts, unraveling the molecular background of these ataxias has proven to be more complicated and the currently known mutations provide incomplete coverage for genotyping of patients. By combining SNP array-based linkage analysis and targeted resequencing of relevant sequences in the linkage interval with the use of next-generation sequencing technology, we identified a mutation in a gene and have shown its association with autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxia. In a Dutch consanguineous family with three affected siblings a homozygous 12.5 Mb region on chromosome 3 was targeted by array-based sequence capture. Prioritization of all detected sequence variants led to four candidate genes, one of which contained a variant with a high base pair conservation score (phyloP score: 5.26). This variant was a leucine-to-arginine substitution in the DUF 590 domain of a 16K transmembrane protein, a putative calcium-activated chloride channel encoded by anoctamin 10 (ANO10). The analysis of ANO10 by Sanger sequencing revealed three additional mutations: a homozygous mutation (c.1150_1151del [p.Leu384fs]) in a Serbian family and a compound-heterozygous splice-site mutation (c.1476+1G>T) and a frameshift mutation (c.1604del [p.Leu535X]) in a French family. This illustrates the power of using initial homozygosity mapping with next-generation sequencing technology to identify genes involved in autosomal-recessive diseases. Moreover, identifying a putative calcium-dependent chloride channel involved in cerebellar ataxia adds another pathway to the list of pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause cerebellar ataxia. PMID:21092923

  19. Pinning-controlled synchronization of complex networks with bounded or unbounded synchronized regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Li, Zou; Guan-Rong, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies pinning-controlled synchronization of complex networks with bounded or unbounded synchronized regions. To study a state-feedback pinning-controlled network with N nodes, it first converts the controlled network to an extended network of N+1 nodes without controls. It is shown that the controlled synchronizability of the given network is determined by the real part of the smallest nonzero eigenvalue of the coupling matrix of its extended network when the synchronized region is unbounded; but it is determined by the ratio of the real parts of the largest and the smallest nonzero eigenvalues of the coupling matrix when the synchronized region is bounded. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the portion of controlled nodes has no critical values when the synchronized region is unbounded, but it has a critical value when the synchronized region is bounded. In the former case, therefore, it is possible to control the network to achieve synchronization by pinning only one node. In the latter case, the network can achieve controlled synchronization only when the portion of controlled nodes is larger than the critical value. (general)

  20. Optimal pseudorandom sequence selection for online c-VEP based BCI control applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jonas L.; Mohebbi, Ali; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2017-01-01

    predictor. Conclusions: The simple and fast method presented in this study as the Accuracy Score, allows c-VEP based BCI systems to support multiple pseudorandom sequences without increase in trial length. This allows for more personalized BCI systems with better performance to be tested without increased...

  1. Length heteroplasmy of the polyC-polyT-polyC stretch in the dog mtDNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verscheure, Sophie; Backeljau, Thierry; Desmyter, Stijn

    2015-09-01

    Previously, the mitochondrial control region of 214 Belgian dogs was sequenced. Analysis of this data indicated length heteroplasmy of the polyT stretch in the polyC-polyT-polyC stretch from positions 16661 to 16674. Nine polyC-polyT-polyC haplotype combinations were observed, consisting of seven major haplotypes (highest signal intensity) combined with minor haplotypes (lower signal intensity) one T shorter than the major haplotype in all but three dogs. The longer the polyT stretch, the smaller was the difference in signal intensity between the major and minor haplotype peaks. Additional sequencing, cloning, and PCR trap experiments were performed to further study the intra-individual variation of this mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) region. Cloning experiments demonstrated that the proportion of clones displaying the minor haplotypes also increased with the length of the polyT stretch. Clone amplification showed that in vitro polymerase errors might contribute to the length heteroplasmy of polyT stretches with at least 10 Ts. Although major and minor polyC-polyT-polyC haplotypes did not differ intra-individually within and between tissues in this study, interpretation of polyT stretch variation should be handled with care in forensic casework.

  2. Microcollinearity in an ethylene receptor coding gene region of the Coffea canephora genome is extensively conserved with Vitis vinifera and other distant dicotyledonous sequenced genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campa Claudine

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffea canephora, also called Robusta, belongs to the Rubiaceae, the fourth largest angiosperm family. This diploid species (2x = 2n = 22 has a fairly small genome size of ≈ 690 Mb and despite its extreme economic importance, particularly for developing countries, knowledge on the genome composition, structure and evolution remain very limited. Here, we report the 160 kb of the first C. canephora Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC clone ever sequenced and its fine analysis. Results This clone contains the CcEIN4 gene, encoding an ethylene receptor, and twenty other predicted genes showing a high gene density of one gene per 7.8 kb. Most of them display perfect matches with C. canephora expressed sequence tags or show transcriptional activities through PCR amplifications on cDNA libraries. Twenty-three transposable elements, mainly Class II transposon derivatives, were identified at this locus. Most of these Class II elements are Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE known to be closely associated with plant genes. This BAC composition gives a pattern similar to those found in gene rich regions of Solanum lycopersicum and Medicago truncatula genomes indicating that the CcEIN4 regions may belong to a gene rich region in the C. canephora genome. Comparative sequence analysis indicated an extensive conservation between C. canephora and most of the reference dicotyledonous genomes studied in this work, such as tomato (S. lycopersicum, grapevine (V. vinifera, barrel medic M. truncatula, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa and Arabidopsis thaliana. The higher degree of microcollinearity was found between C. canephora and V. vinifera, which belong respectively to the Asterids and Rosids, two clades that diverged more than 114 million years ago. Conclusion This study provides a first glimpse of C. canephora genome composition and evolution. Our data revealed a remarkable conservation of the microcollinearity

  3. Unmanned Water Craft Identification and Adaptive Control in Low-Speed and Reversing Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This paper treats L1 adaptive hovering control of an unmanned surface vehicle in a station-keeping mode where a region of zero control authority and under-actuation are main challenges. Low-speed and reversing dynamics are identied from full scale sea trials, and parameter uncertainty is estimated....... With signicant parameter variation, an L1 adaptive controller is employed for heading control. The L1 family of controllers allows for several topologies and an architecture is suggested that suits heading control of a vessel, the requirements of which dier from that of previous L1 literature. The control design...

  4. Comparative sequence analysis of VRN1 alleles of Lolium perenne with the co-linear regions in barley, wheat, and rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, Torben; Byrne, Stephen; Gundlach, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Vernalization, a period of low temperature to induce transition from vegetative to reproductive state, is an important environmental stimulus for many cool season grasses. A key gene in the vernalization pathway in grasses is the VRN1 gene. The objective of this study was to identify causative......, and characterized. Analysis of the allelic sequences identified an 8.6-kb deletion in the first intron of the VRN1 gene in the Veyo genotype which has low vernalization requirement. This deletion was in a divergent recurrent selection experiment confirmed to be associated with genotypes with low vernalization...... requirement. The region surrounding the VRN1 locus in perennial ryegrass showed microcolinearity to the corresponding region on chromosome 3 in Oryza sativa with conserved gene order and orientation, while the micro-colinearity to the corresponding region in Triticum monococcum was less conserved. Our study...

  5. SEQUENCE COMPARISON OF THE CENTRAL REGION OF THE GLYCOPROTEIN GENE OF NEUTRALIZABLE, NON-NEUTRALIZABLE, AND SERIALLY PASSED ISOLATES OF VIRAL HEMORRHAGIC SEPTICEMIA VIRUS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, P. E. V.; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Higman, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    The region of the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus glycoprotein gene coding for amino acids 142 to 357 was sequenced and compared among 6 isolates of the virus from rainbow trout in Denmark, Isolates were selected that were strongly neutralized by polyclonal and monoclonal antisera......, not neutralized by antisera, or that represented more than 500 serial passages in cell cultures. The overall diversity within this region of the glycoprotein was 5.4% at the nucleotide level and 6.9% at the amino acid level. Most of the variation was in the portion of the protein from amino acids 210 to 290 where......-neutralizable isolates were found in the regions from amino acids 257 to 259 and from 283 to 288....

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the leading region adjacent to the origin of transfer on plasmid F and its conservation among conjugative plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, S; Cram, D; Skurray, R

    1989-10-01

    The leading region of the Escherichia coli K12 F plasmid is the first segment of DNA to be transferred into the recipient cell during conjugal transfer. We report the nucleotide sequence of the 64.20-66.77F portion of the leading region immediately adjacent to the origin of transfer, oriT. The 2582 bp region encodes three open reading frames, ORF95, ORF169 and ORF273; the product of ORF273, is equivalent in size and map location to the 35 kDa protein, 6d, previously described (Cram et al. 1984). S1 nuclease analyses of mRNA transcripts have identified a potential promoter for ORF95 and ORF273 and indicated that these ORFs are transcribed as a single transcript; in contrast, ORF169 appears to be transcribed from two overlapping promoters on the complementary DNA strand. The products of ORF95 and ORF273 are mainly hydrophilic and are probably located in the cytoplasm. ORF273 shares some homology with DNA-binding proteins. There is a signal peptide sequence at the NH2-terminus of ORF169 and the mature form of ORF169 probably resides in the periplasm due to its hydrophilic nature. Both ORF273 and ORF169 are well conserved among conjugative F-like and a few non-F-like plasmids. On the other hand, ORF95 sequences are only present on some of these plasmids. Several primosome and integration host factor recognition sites are present implicating this region in DNA metabolism and/or replication functions.

  7. Needs for hepatocellular carcinoma control policy in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, John F P; Joy, Susan M; Gallego, Gisselle; Kudo, Masatoshi; Ye, Sheng-Long; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Blauvelt, Barri M

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is particularly burdensome in the Asia-Pacific region, however, cross-country comparisons have been limited to somewhat unreliable epidemiological measures. We conducted a comparative needs assessment for HCC control policy to inform HCC control efforts in the Asia-Pacific region. The aims were to identify regional needs, to compare overall competence across the region, and to identify which needs were concordant across the region. Using the self-explicated method, a stated-preference approach, clinical experts from Australia, China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and the United States valued ten previously identified dimensions of HCC control: clinical education; risk assessment; HBV strategy; HCV strategy; life-style risk factors; national statistics; funding for screening; funding for treatment; political awareness; and public awareness. Results were normalized and analyzed using Z-scores and ANOVA, with concordance of need across the region tested via the F-test. Seventy-two respondents, equally drawn from the study sites, completed the survey (response rate: 36%). Respondents were hepatologists (39%), oncologists (21%), radiologists (17%), surgeons (17%), and other specialists (7%) who were involved in liver cancer control at local/regional (35%) national (44%) or international (21%) levels. In aggregate, the most significant needs were political awareness, public awareness, and life-style risk factors (all p0.05). There were differences in the extent of needs across the region (peducation and life style risk factors. As the first comparative needs assessment for HCC for the Asia-Pacific region, our results can inform national and cross-national priorities for intervention and facilitate the identification of best practices. Regional efforts to control HCC should adopt as objectives the needs for greater political and public awareness and improved management of lifestyle risk factors because these are the most significant needs, and are

  8. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Subgenotypes 1a and 1b in Japanese Patients: Ultra-Deep Sequencing Analysis of HCV NS5B Genotype-Specific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Nakatani, Sueli M.; Ono, Suzane Kioko; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Gonoi, Tohru; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenotypes 1a and 1b have different impacts on the treatment response to peginterferon plus ribavirin with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against patients infected with HCV genotype 1, as the emergence rates of resistance mutations are different between these two subgenotypes. In Japan, almost all of HCV genotype 1 belongs to subgenotype 1b. Methods and Findings To determine HCV subgenotype 1a or 1b in Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1, real-time PCR-based method and Sanger method were used for the HCV NS5B region. HCV subgenotypes were determined in 90% by real-time PCR-based method. We also analyzed the specific probe regions for HCV subgenotypes 1a and 1b using ultra-deep sequencing, and uncovered mutations that could not be revealed using direct-sequencing by Sanger method. We estimated the prevalence of HCV subgenotype 1a as 1.2-2.5% of HCV genotype 1 patients in Japan. Conclusions Although real-time PCR-based HCV subgenotyping method seems fair for differentiating HCV subgenotypes 1a and 1b, it may not be sufficient for clinical practice. Ultra-deep sequencing is useful for revealing the resistant strain(s) of HCV before DAA treatment as well as mixed infection with different genotypes or subgenotypes of HCV. PMID:24069214

  9. 76 FR 50326 - Regional Rail, LLC-Continuance in Control Exemption-Tyburn Railroad, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    .... Regional is a Delaware limited liability company that currently controls 2 Class III railroads, East Penn... Company and operate approximately 0.9 miles of rail lines in Morrisville, Pa. The parties intend to...

  10. Sliding mode control of dissolved oxygen in an integrated nitrogen removal process in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C; Young, H; Antileo, C; Bornhardt, C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a sliding mode controller (SMC) for dissolved oxygen (DO) in an integrated nitrogen removal process carried out in a suspended biomass sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The SMC performance was compared against an auto-tuning PI controller with parameters adjusted at the beginning of the batch cycle. A method for cancelling the slow DO sensor dynamics was implemented by using a first order model of the sensor. Tests in a lab-scale reactor showed that the SMC offers a better disturbance rejection capability than the auto-tuning PI controller, furthermore providing reasonable performance in a wide range of operation. Thus, SMC becomes an effective robust nonlinear tool to the DO control in this process, being also simple from a computational point of view, allowing its implementation in devices such as industrial programmable logic controllers (PLCs).

  11. PathoQC: Computationally Efficient Read Preprocessing and Quality Control for High-Throughput Sequencing Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Changjin; Manimaran, Solaiappan; Johnson, William Evan

    2014-01-01

    Quality control and read preprocessing are critical steps in the analysis of data sets generated from high-throughput genomic screens. In the most extreme cases, improper preprocessing can negatively affect downstream analyses and may lead to incorrect biological conclusions. Here, we present PathoQC, a streamlined toolkit that seamlessly combines the benefits of several popular quality control software approaches for preprocessing next-generation sequencing data. PathoQC provides a variety of quality control options appropriate for most high-throughput sequencing applications. PathoQC is primarily developed as a module in the PathoScope software suite for metagenomic analysis. However, PathoQC is also available as an open-source Python module that can run as a stand-alone application or can be easily integrated into any bioinformatics workflow. PathoQC achieves high performance by supporting parallel computation and is an effective tool that removes technical sequencing artifacts and facilitates robust downstream analysis. The PathoQC software package is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/PathoScope/.

  12. Seismicity Controlled by a Frictional Afterslip During a Small-Magnitude Seismic Sequence (ML < 5) on the Chihshang Fault, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Alexandre; Godano, Maxime; Hsu, Ya-Ju; Lee, Hsin-Ming; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn

    2018-02-01

    We report evidence for frictional afterslip at shallow depths (about 5 to 7 km) during a small-magnitude seismic sequence (with ML<5) along the Chihshang Fault, a main active structure of the Longitudinal Valley, in southeast Taiwan. The afterslip, which was recorded by a nearby borehole dilatometer, lasted about a month with a cumulative geodetic moment magnitude of 4.8 ± 0.2. The afterslip comprised two stages and controlled the aftershock sequence. The first postseismic stage, which followed a ML 4.6 earthquake, lasted about 6 h and mostly controlled the ruptures of neighboring asperities (e.g., multiplets) near the hypocenter. Then, a 4 week duration large afterslip event following a ML 4.9 earthquake controlled the rate of aftershocks during its first 2 days through brittle creep. The study presents a rare case of simultaneous seismological and geodetic observations for afterslip following earthquakes with magnitude lower than 5. Furthermore, the geodetic moment of the postseismic phase is at least equivalent to the coseismic moment of the sequence.

  13. GWAS of DNA Methylation Variation Within Imprinting Control Regions Suggests Parent-of-Origin Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renteria, M.E.; Coolen, M.W.; Statham, A.L.; Choi, R.S.; Qu, W.; Campbell, M.J.; Smith, S.; Henders, A.K.; Montgomery, G.W.; Clark, S. J.; Martin, N.G.; Medland, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Imprinting control regions (ICRs) play a fundamental role in establishing and maintaining the non-random monoallelic expression of certain genes, via common regulatory elements such as non-coding RNAs and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of DNA. We recently surveyed DNA methylation levels

  14. Genomic relationships of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains evaluated by ribotyping, sequence analysis of ribosomal intergenic regions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fussing, V.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the genomic relationship among 112 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains obtained throughout Europe and North America. HindIII ribotyping of the strains resulted in five ribotypes of high similarity (87-98%). Sequence analysis of the riboso......The aim of the present study was to examine the genomic relationship among 112 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains obtained throughout Europe and North America. HindIII ribotyping of the strains resulted in five ribotypes of high similarity (87-98%). Sequence analysis...... of the ribosomal intergenic region of strains representing each ribotype and each country showed no differences. A common ribotype was further characterized by PFGE of 12 strains representing all countries. The resultant five PFGE patterns of European strains showed a similarity of more than 91%, to which the two...

  15. Recombination and evolution of duplicate control regions in the mitochondrial genome of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenfei Zheng

    Full Text Available Complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequences with duplicate control regions (CRs have been detected in various animal species. In Testudines, duplicate mtCRs have been reported in the mtDNA of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum, which has three living subspecies. However, the evolutionary pattern of these CRs remains unclear. In this study, we report the completed sequences of duplicate CRs from 20 individuals belonging to three subspecies of this turtle and discuss the micro-evolutionary analysis of the evolution of duplicate CRs. Genetic distances calculated with MEGA 4.1 using the complete duplicate CR sequences revealed that within turtle subspecies, genetic distances between orthologous copies from different individuals were 0.63% for CR1 and 1.2% for CR2app:addword:respectively, and the average distance between paralogous copies of CR1 and CR2 was 4.8%. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed from the CR sequences, excluding the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs at the 3' end using three methods: neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood algorithm, and Bayesian inference. These data show that any two CRs within individuals were more genetically distant from orthologous genes in different individuals within the same subspecies. This suggests independent evolution of the two mtCRs within each P. megacephalum subspecies. Reconstruction of separate phylogenetic trees using different CR components (TAS, CD, CSB, and VNTRs suggested the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicate CRs. Consequently, recombination events were detected using RDP software with break points at ≈290 bp and ≈1,080 bp. Based on these results, we hypothesize that duplicate CRs in P. megacephalum originated from heterological ancestral recombination of mtDNA. Subsequent recombination could have resulted in homogenization during independent evolutionary events, thus maintaining the functions of duplicate CRs in the mtDNA of P

  16. Genetic diversity and population structure of Anastrepha striata (Diptera: Tephritidae) in three natural regions of southwestern Colombia using mitochondrial sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Franco, Jenny Johana; Velasco-Cuervo, Sandra Marcela; Aguirre-Ramirez, Elkin; González Obando, Ranulfo; Carrejo, Nancy Soraya; Toro-Perea, Nelson

    2017-02-01

    Anastrepha striata is widely distributed across the Americas and is a pest of economically important crops, especially crops of the Myrtaceae family. Insect population structures can be influenced by the presence of physical barriers or characteristics associated with habitat differences. This study evaluated the effect of the Western Andes on the population structure of A. striata. Individuals were collected from Psidium guajava fruits from three natural regions of southwestern Colombia (Pacific Coast, mountainous region and the inter-Andean valley of the Cauca River). Based on a 1318 bp concatenated of the genes Cytochrome Oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), 14 haplotypes with few changes among them (between 1 and 3) were found. There was only one dominant haplotype in all three regions. No genetic structure associated with the three eco-geographical regions of the study was found. Moreover, the Western Andes are not an effective barrier for the genetic isolation of the populations from the Pacific Coast compared with the inter-Andean valley populations. This genetic homogeneity could be partially due to anthropogenic intervention, which acts as a dispersal agent of infested fruits. Another hypothesis to explain the lack of structure would be the relatively recent arrival of A. striata to the region, as indicated by an analysis of the demographic history, which reveals a process of population expansion. This study represents the first attempt to understand the population genetics of A. striata in Colombia and could contribute to the integral management of this pest.

  17. Sequence-Stratigraphic Analysis of the Regional Observation Monitoring Program (ROMP) 29A Test Corehole and Its Relation to Carbonate Porosity and Regional Transmissivity in the Floridan Aquifer System, Highlands County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, W. C.; Cunningham, K.J.; Renken, R.A.; Wacker, M.A.; Carlson, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis was made to describe and interpret the lithology of a part of the Upper Floridan aquifer penetrated by the Regional Observation Monitoring Program (ROMP) 29A test corehole in Highlands County, Florida. This information was integrated into a one-dimensional hydrostratigraphic model that delineates candidate flow zones and confining units in the context of sequence stratigraphy. Results from this test corehole will serve as a starting point to build a robust three-dimensional sequence-stratigraphic framework of the Floridan aquifer system. The ROMP 29A test corehole penetrated the Avon Park Formation, Ocala Limestone, Suwannee Limestone, and Hawthorn Group of middle Eocene to Pliocene age. The part of the Avon Park Formation penetrated in the ROMP 29A test corehole contains two composite depositional sequences. A transgressive systems tract and a highstand systems tract were interpreted for the upper composite sequence; however, only a highstand systems tract was interpreted for the lower composite sequence of the deeper Avon Park stratigraphic section. The composite depositional sequences are composed of at least five high-frequency depositional sequences. These sequences contain high-frequency cycle sets that are an amalgamation of vertically stacked high-frequency cycles. Three types of high-frequency cycles have been identified in the Avon Park Formation: peritidal, shallow subtidal, and deeper subtidal high-frequency cycles. The vertical distribution of carbonate-rock diffuse flow zones within the Avon Park Formation is heterogeneous. Porous vuggy intervals are less than 10 feet, and most are much thinner. The volumetric arrangement of the diffuse flow zones shows that most occur in the highstand systems tract of the lower composite sequence of the Avon Park Formation as compared to the upper composite sequence, which contains both a backstepping transgressive systems tract and a prograding highstand systems tract. Although the porous and permeable

  18. Controlling the structure of sequence-defined poly(phosphodiester)s for optimal MS/MS reading of digital information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalian, J-A; Al Ouahabi, A; Cavallo, G; König, N F; Poyer, S; Lutz, J-F; Charles, L

    2017-11-01

    Digital polymers are monodisperse chains with a controlled sequence of co-monomers, defined as letters of an alphabet, and are used to store information at the molecular level. Reading such messages is hence a sequencing task that can be efficiently achieved by tandem mass spectrometry. To improve their readability, structure of sequence-controlled synthetic polymers can be optimized, based on considerations regarding their fragmentation behavior. This strategy is described here for poly(phosphodiester)s, which were synthesized as monodisperse chains with more than 100 units but exhibited extremely complex dissociation spectra. In these polymers, two repeating units that differ by a simple H/CH 3 variation were defined as the 0 and 1 bit of the ASCII code and spaced by a phosphate moiety. They were readily ionized in negative ion mode electrospray but dissociated via cleavage at all phosphate bonds upon collisional activation. Although allowing a complete sequence coverage of digital poly(phosphodiester)s, this fragmentation behavior was not efficient for macromolecules with more than 50 co-monomers, and data interpretation was very tedious. The structure of these polymers was then modified by introducing alkoxyamine linkages at appropriate location throughout the chain. A first design consisted of placing these low dissociation energy bonds between each monomeric bit: while cleavage of this sole bond greatly simplified MS/MS spectra, efficient sequencing was limited to chains with up to about 50 units. In contrast, introduction of alkoxyamine bonds between each byte (i.e. a set of eight co-monomers) was a more successful strategy. Long messages (so far, up to 8 bytes) could be read in MS 3 experiments, where single-byte containing fragments released during the first activation stage were further dissociated for sequencing. The whole sequence of such byte-truncated poly(phosphodiester)s could be easily re-constructed based on a mass tagging system which permits

  19. Fault-Tolerant Region-Based Control of an Underwater Vehicle with Kinematically Redundant Thrusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zool H. Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new control approach for an underwater vehicle with a kinematically redundant thruster system. This control scheme is derived based on a fault-tolerant decomposition for thruster force allocation and a region control scheme for the tracking objective. Given a redundant thruster system, that is, six or more pairs of thrusters are used, the proposed redundancy resolution and region control scheme determine the number of thruster faults, as well as providing the reference thruster forces in order to keep the underwater vehicle within the desired region. The stability of the presented control law is proven in the sense of a Lyapunov function. Numerical simulations are performed with an omnidirectional underwater vehicle and the results of the proposed scheme illustrate the effectiveness in terms of optimizing the thruster forces.

  20. Characterization of bacteria in biopsies of colon and stools by high throughput sequencing of the V2 region of bacterial 16S rRNA gene in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momozawa, Yukihide; Deffontaine, Valérie; Louis, Edouard; Medrano, Juan F

    2011-02-10

    The characterization of the human intestinal microflora and their interactions with the host have been identified as key components in the study of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases. High-throughput sequencing has enabled culture-independent studies to deeply analyze bacteria in the gut. It is possible with this technology to systematically analyze links between microbes and the genetic constitution of the host, such as DNA polymorphisms and methylation, and gene expression. In this study the V2 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene using 454 pyrosequencing from seven anatomic regions of human colon and two types of stool specimens were analyzed. The study examined the number of reads needed to ascertain differences between samples, the effect of DNA extraction procedures and PCR reproducibility, and differences between biopsies and stools in order to design a large scale systematic analysis of gut microbes. It was shown (1) tha