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Sample records for control protein homolog

  1. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Wrabl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved

  2. A Drosophila homolog of cyclase-associated proteins collaborates with the Abl tyrosine kinase to control midline axon pathfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Zachary; Emerson, Mark; Rusch, Jannette; Bikoff, Jay; Baum, Buzz; Perrimon, Norbert; Van Vactor, David

    2002-11-14

    We demonstrate that Drosophila capulet (capt), a homolog of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein that binds and regulates actin in yeast, associates with Abl in Drosophila cells, suggesting a functional relationship in vivo. We find a robust and specific genetic interaction between capt and Abl at the midline choice point where the growth cone repellent Slit functions to restrict axon crossing. Genetic interactions between capt and slit support a model where Capt and Abl collaborate as part of the repellent response. Further support for this model is provided by genetic interactions that both capt and Abl display with multiple members of the Roundabout receptor family. These studies identify Capulet as part of an emerging pathway linking guidance signals to regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and suggest that the Abl pathway mediates signals downstream of multiple Roundabout receptors.

  3. AtTCTP2, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, enhances in vitro plant regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto eToscano-Morales; Beatriz eXoconostle-Cázares; José Luis eCabrera-Ponce; Jesús eHinojosa-Moya; Jorge Luis eRuiz-Salas; Valentin eGalván-Gordillo; Ramon Gerardo eGuevara-González; Roberto eRuiz-Medrano

    2015-01-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation in animals, and probably also in plants. Arabidopsis harbors two TCTP genes, AtTCTP1 (At3g16640), which is an important mitotic regulator, and AtTCTP2 (At3g05540), which is considered a pseudogene. Nevertheless, we have obtained evidence suggesting that this gene is functional. Indeed, a T-DNA insertion mutant, SALK_045146, displays a lethal phenotype during early rosette stage...

  4. AtTCTP2, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, enhances in vitro plant regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eToscano-Morales

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP is a central regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation in animals, and probably also in plants. Arabidopsis harbors two TCTP genes, AtTCTP1 (At3g16640, which is an important mitotic regulator, and AtTCTP2 (At3g05540, which is considered a pseudogene. Nevertheless, we have obtained evidence suggesting that this gene is functional. Indeed, a T-DNA insertion mutant, SALK_045146, displays a lethal phenotype during early rosette stage. Also, both the AtTCTP2 promoter and structural gene are functional, and heterozygous plants show delayed development. AtTCTP1 cannot compensate for the loss of AtTCTP2, since the accumulation levels of the AtTCTP1 transcript are even higher in heterozygous plants than in wild-type plants. Leaf explants transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring AtTCTP2, but not AtTCTP1, led to whole plant regeneration with a high frequency. Insertion of a sequence present in AtTCTP1 but absent in AtTCP2 demonstrates that this suppresses the capacity for plant regeneration; also, this phenomenon requires the presence of TCTP (AtTCTP1 or 2 in the nuclei of root cells. This confirms that AtTCTP2 is not a pseudogene and suggests the involvement of certain TCTP isoforms in vegetative reproduction in some plant species.

  5. AtTCTP2, an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein, enhances in vitro plant regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano-Morales, Roberto; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Cabrera-Ponce, José L.; Hinojosa-Moya, Jesús; Ruiz-Salas, Jorge L.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Guevara-González, Ramón G.; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation in animals, and probably also in plants. Arabidopsis harbors two TCTP genes, AtTCTP1 (At3g16640), which is an important mitotic regulator, and AtTCTP2 (At3g05540), which is considered a pseudogene. Nevertheless, we have obtained evidence suggesting that this gene is functional. Indeed, a T-DNA insertion mutant, SALK_045146, displays a lethal phenotype during early rosette stage. Also, both the AtTCTP2 promoter and structural gene are functional, and heterozygous plants show delayed development. AtTCTP1 cannot compensate for the loss of AtTCTP2, since the accumulation levels of the AtTCTP1 transcript are even higher in heterozygous plants than in wild-type plants. Leaf explants transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring AtTCTP2, but not AtTCTP1, led to whole plant regeneration with a high frequency. Insertion of a sequence present in AtTCTP1 but absent in AtTCTP2 demonstrates that it suppresses the capacity for plant regeneration; also, this phenomenon is enhanced by the presence of TCTP (AtTCTP1 or 2) in the nuclei of root cells. This confirms that AtTCTP2 is not a pseudogene and suggests the involvement of certain TCTP isoforms in vegetative reproduction in some plant species. PMID:26191065

  6. Regulated Localization Is Sufficient for Hormonal Control of Regulator of G Protein Signaling Homology Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RH-RhoGEFs)*

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    Carter, Angela M.; Gutowski, Stephen; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling homology (RH) Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) (p115RhoGEF, leukemia-associated RhoGEF, and PDZ-RhoGEF) contain an RH domain and are specific GEFs for the monomeric GTPase RhoA. The RH domains interact specifically with the α subunits of G12 heterotrimeric GTPases. Activated Gα13 modestly stimulates the exchange activity of both p115RhoGEF and leukemia-associated RhoGEF but not PDZ-RhoGEF. Because all three RH-RhoGEFs can localize to the plasma membrane upon expression of activated Gα13, cellular localization of these RhoGEFs has been proposed as a mechanism for controlling their activity. We use a small molecule-regulated heterodimerization system to rapidly control the localization of RH-RhoGEFs. Acute localization of the proteins to the plasma membrane activates RhoA within minutes and to levels that are comparable with activation of RhoA by hormonal stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors. The catalytic activity of membrane-localized RhoGEFs is not dependent on activated Gα13. We further show that the conserved RH domains can rewire two different RacGEFs to activate Rac1 in response to a traditional activator of RhoA. Thus, RH domains act as independent detectors for activated Gα13 and are sufficient to modulate the activity of RhoGEFs by hormones via mediating their localization to substrate, membrane-associated RhoA. PMID:24855647

  7. Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Leucine-rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase Controls Cell Polarity by Negatively Regulating the Activity of Atypical Protein Kinase C.

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    Xiong, Xiaopeng; Li, Xin; Wen, Yang-An; Gao, Tianyan

    2016-11-25

    The proper establishment of epithelial polarity allows cells to sense and respond to signals that arise from the microenvironment in a spatiotemporally controlled manner. Atypical PKCs (aPKCs) are implicated as key regulators of epithelial polarity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the negative regulation of aPKCs remains largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP), a novel family of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases, plays an important role in regulating epithelial polarity by controlling the phosphorylation of both aPKC isoforms. Altered expression of PHLPP1 or PHLPP2 disrupted polarization of Caco2 cells grown in 3D cell cultures as indicated by the formation of aberrant multi-lumen structures. Overexpression of PHLPP resulted in a decrease in aPKC phosphorylation at both the activation loop and the turn motif sites; conversely, knockdown of PHLPP increased aPKC phosphorylation. Moreover, in vitro dephosphorylation experiments revealed that both aPKC isoforms were substrates of PHLPP. Interestingly, knockdown of PKCζ, but not PKCι, led to similar disruption of the polarized lumen structure, suggesting that PKCζ likely controls the polarization process of Caco2 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of PHLPP altered the apical membrane localization of aPKCs and reduced the formation of aPKC-Par3 complex. Taken together, our results identify a novel role of PHLPP in regulating aPKC and cell polarity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  9. MRFalign: protein homology detection through alignment of Markov random fields.

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    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-03-01

    Sequence-based protein homology detection has been extensively studied and so far the most sensitive method is based upon comparison of protein sequence profiles, which are derived from multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of sequence homologs in a protein family. A sequence profile is usually represented as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) or an HMM (Hidden Markov Model) and accordingly PSSM-PSSM or HMM-HMM comparison is used for homolog detection. This paper presents a new homology detection method MRFalign, consisting of three key components: 1) a Markov Random Fields (MRF) representation of a protein family; 2) a scoring function measuring similarity of two MRFs; and 3) an efficient ADMM (Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers) algorithm aligning two MRFs. Compared to HMM that can only model very short-range residue correlation, MRFs can model long-range residue interaction pattern and thus, encode information for the global 3D structure of a protein family. Consequently, MRF-MRF comparison for remote homology detection shall be much more sensitive than HMM-HMM or PSSM-PSSM comparison. Experiments confirm that MRFalign outperforms several popular HMM or PSSM-based methods in terms of both alignment accuracy and remote homology detection and that MRFalign works particularly well for mainly beta proteins. For example, tested on the benchmark SCOP40 (8353 proteins) for homology detection, PSSM-PSSM and HMM-HMM succeed on 48% and 52% of proteins, respectively, at superfamily level, and on 15% and 27% of proteins, respectively, at fold level. In contrast, MRFalign succeeds on 57.3% and 42.5% of proteins at superfamily and fold level, respectively. This study implies that long-range residue interaction patterns are very helpful for sequence-based homology detection. The software is available for download at http://raptorx.uchicago.edu/download/. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  10. PDBalert: automatic, recurrent remote homology tracking and protein structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söding Johannes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last years, methods for remote homology detection have grown more and more sensitive and reliable. Automatic structure prediction servers relying on these methods can generate useful 3D models even below 20% sequence identity between the protein of interest and the known structure (template. When no homologs can be found in the protein structure database (PDB, the user would need to rerun the same search at regular intervals in order to make timely use of a template once it becomes available. Results PDBalert is a web-based automatic system that sends an email alert as soon as a structure with homology to a protein in the user's watch list is released to the PDB database or appears among the sequences on hold. The mail contains links to the search results and to an automatically generated 3D homology model. The sequence search is performed with the same software as used by the very sensitive and reliable remote homology detection server HHpred, which is based on pairwise comparison of Hidden Markov models. Conclusion PDBalert will accelerate the information flow from the PDB database to all those who can profit from the newly released protein structures for predicting the 3D structure or function of their proteins of interest.

  11. Back-Translation for Discovering Distant Protein Homologies

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    Gîrdea, Marta; Noé, Laurent; Kucherov, Gregory

    Frameshift mutations in protein-coding DNA sequences produce a drastic change in the resulting protein sequence, which prevents classic protein alignment methods from revealing the proteins’ common origin. Moreover, when a large number of substitutions are additionally involved in the divergence, the homology detection becomes difficult even at the DNA level. To cope with this situation, we propose a novel method to infer distant homology relations of two proteins, that accounts for frameshift and point mutations that may have affected the coding sequences. We design a dynamic programming alignment algorithm over memory-efficient graph representations of the complete set of putative DNA sequences of each protein, with the goal of determining the two putative DNA sequences which have the best scoring alignment under a powerful scoring system designed to reflect the most probable evolutionary process. This allows us to uncover evolutionary information that is not captured by traditional alignment methods, which is confirmed by biologically significant examples.

  12. What Evidence Is There for the Homology of Protein-Protein Interactions?

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    Lewis, Anna C. F.; Jones, Nick S.; Porter, Mason A.; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    The notion that sequence homology implies functional similarity underlies much of computational biology. In the case of protein-protein interactions, an interaction can be inferred between two proteins on the basis that sequence-similar proteins have been observed to interact. The use of transferred interactions is common, but the legitimacy of such inferred interactions is not clear. Here we investigate transferred interactions and whether data incompleteness explains the lack of evidence found for them. Using definitions of homology associated with functional annotation transfer, we estimate that conservation rates of interactions are low even after taking interactome incompleteness into account. For example, at a blastp -value threshold of , we estimate the conservation rate to be about between S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. Our method also produces estimates of interactome sizes (which are similar to those previously proposed). Using our estimates of interaction conservation we estimate the rate at which protein-protein interactions are lost across species. To our knowledge, this is the first such study based on large-scale data. Previous work has suggested that interactions transferred within species are more reliable than interactions transferred across species. By controlling for factors that are specific to within-species interaction prediction, we propose that the transfer of interactions within species might be less reliable than transfers between species. Protein-protein interactions appear to be very rarely conserved unless very high sequence similarity is observed. Consequently, inferred interactions should be used with care. PMID:23028270

  13. Persistent homology analysis of protein structure, flexibility and folding

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    Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are the most important biomolecules for living organisms. The understanding of protein structure, function, dynamics and transport is one of most challenging tasks in biological science. In the present work, persistent homology is, for the first time, introduced for extracting molecular topological fingerprints (MTFs) based on the persistence of molecular topological invariants. MTFs are utilized for protein characterization, identification and classification. The method of slicing is proposed to track the geometric origin of protein topological invariants. Both all-atom and coarse-grained representations of MTFs are constructed. A new cutoff-like filtration is proposed to shed light on the optimal cutoff distance in elastic network models. Based on the correlation between protein compactness, rigidity and connectivity, we propose an accumulated bar length generated from persistent topological invariants for the quantitative modeling of protein flexibility. To this end, a correlation matrix based filtration is developed. This approach gives rise to an accurate prediction of the optimal characteristic distance used in protein B-factor analysis. Finally, MTFs are employed to characterize protein topological evolution during protein folding and quantitatively predict the protein folding stability. An excellent consistence between our persistent homology prediction and molecular dynamics simulation is found. This work reveals the topology-function relationship of proteins. PMID:24902720

  14. Protein homology reveals new targets for bioactive small molecules.

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    Gfeller, David; Zoete, Vincent

    2015-08-15

    The functional impact of small molecules is increasingly being assessed in different eukaryotic species through large-scale phenotypic screening initiatives. Identifying the targets of these molecules is crucial to mechanistically understand their function and uncover new therapeutically relevant modes of action. However, despite extensive work carried out in model organisms and human, it is still unclear to what extent one can use information obtained in one species to make predictions in other species. Here, for the first time, we explore and validate at a large scale the use of protein homology relationships to predict the targets of small molecules across different species. Our results show that exploiting target homology can significantly improve the predictions, especially for molecules experimentally tested in other species. Interestingly, when considering separately orthology and paralogy relationships, we observe that mapping small molecule interactions among orthologs improves prediction accuracy, while including paralogs does not improve and even sometimes worsens the prediction accuracy. Overall, our results provide a novel approach to integrate chemical screening results across multiple species and highlight the promises and remaining challenges of using protein homology for small molecule target identification. Homology-based predictions can be tested on our website http://www.swisstargetprediction.ch. david.gfeller@unil.ch or vincent.zoete@isb-sib.ch. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus

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    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J.; Lewis, Warren G.; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening. PMID:27746901

  16. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J; Lewis, Warren G; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  17. FastBLAST: homology relationships for millions of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All-versus-all BLAST, which searches for homologous pairs of sequences in a database of proteins, is used to identify potential orthologs, to find new protein families, and to provide rapid access to these homology relationships. As DNA sequencing accelerates and data sets grow, all-versus-all BLAST has become computationally demanding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present FastBLAST, a heuristic replacement for all-versus-all BLAST that relies on alignments of proteins to known families, obtained from tools such as PSI-BLAST and HMMer. FastBLAST avoids most of the work of all-versus-all BLAST by taking advantage of these alignments and by clustering similar sequences. FastBLAST runs in two stages: the first stage identifies additional families and aligns them, and the second stage quickly identifies the homologs of a query sequence, based on the alignments of the families, before generating pairwise alignments. On 6.53 million proteins from the non-redundant Genbank database ("NR", FastBLAST identifies new families 25 times faster than all-versus-all BLAST. Once the first stage is completed, FastBLAST identifies homologs for the average query in less than 5 seconds (8.6 times faster than BLAST and gives nearly identical results. For hits above 70 bits, FastBLAST identifies 98% of the top 3,250 hits per query. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: FastBLAST enables research groups that do not have supercomputers to analyze large protein sequence data sets. FastBLAST is open source software and is available at http://microbesonline.org/fastblast.

  18. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

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    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  19. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  20. Protein Identification Pipeline for the Homology Driven Proteomics

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    Junqueira, Magno; Spirin, Victor; Balbuena, Tiago Santana; Thomas, Henrik; Adzhubei, Ivan; Sunyaev, Shamil; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2008-01-01

    Homology-driven proteomics is a major tool to characterize proteomes of organisms with unsequenced genomes. This paper addresses practical aspects of automated homology–driven protein identifications by LC-MS/MS on a hybrid LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. All essential software elements supporting the presented pipeline are either hosted at the publicly accessible web server, or are available for free download. PMID:18639657

  1. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations Applied to Protein Homology Models.

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    Cappel, Daniel; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James; Sherman, Woody

    2016-12-27

    A significant challenge and potential high-value application of computer-aided drug design is the accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Free energy perturbation (FEP) using molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is among the most suitable approaches to achieve accurate binding free energy predictions, due to the rigorous statistical framework of the methodology, correct representation of the energetics, and thorough treatment of the important degrees of freedom in the system (including explicit waters). Recent advances in sampling methods and force fields coupled with vast increases in computational resources have made FEP a viable technology to drive hit-to-lead and lead optimization, allowing for more efficient cycles of medicinal chemistry and the possibility to explore much larger chemical spaces. However, previous FEP applications have focused on systems with high-resolution crystal structures of the target as starting points-something that is not always available in drug discovery projects. As such, the ability to apply FEP on homology models would greatly expand the domain of applicability of FEP in drug discovery. In this work we apply a particular implementation of FEP, called FEP+, on congeneric ligand series binding to four diverse targets: a kinase (Tyk2), an epigenetic bromodomain (BRD4), a transmembrane GPCR (A2A), and a protein-protein interaction interface (BCL-2 family protein MCL-1). We apply FEP+ using both crystal structures and homology models as starting points and find that the performance using homology models is generally on a par with the results when using crystal structures. The robustness of the calculations to structural variations in the input models can likely be attributed to the conformational sampling in the molecular dynamics simulations, which allows the modeled receptor to adapt to the "real" conformation for each ligand in the series. This work exemplifies the advantages of using all-atom simulation methods with

  2. Control of intramolecular interactions between the pleckstrin homology and Dbl homology domains of Vav and Sos1 regulates Rac binding.

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    Das, B; Shu, X; Day, G J; Han, J; Krishna, U M; Falck, J R; Broek, D

    2000-05-19

    Vav and Sos1 are Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which activate Rho family GTPases in response to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase products. A pleckstrin homology domain adjacent to the catalytic Dbl homology domain via an unknown mechanism mediates the effects of phosphoinositides on guanine nucleotide exchange activity. Here we tested the possibility that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrates and products control an interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain and the Dbl homology domain, thereby explaining the inhibitory effects of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrates and stimulatory effects of the products. Binding studies using isolated fragments of Vav and Sos indicate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase substrate promotes the binding of the pleckstrin homology domain to the Dbl homology domain and blocks Rac binding to the DH domain, whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase products disrupt the Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology interactions and permit Rac binding. Additionally, Lck phosphorylation of Vav, a known activating event, reduces the affinities between the Vav Dbl homology and pleckstrin homology domains and permits Rac binding. We also show Vav activation in cells, as monitored by phosphorylation of Vav, Vav association with phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, and Vav guanine nucleotide exchange activity, is blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. These results suggest the molecular mechanisms for activation of Vav and Sos1 require disruption of inhibitory intramolecular interactions involving the pleckstrin homology and Dbl homology domains.

  3. Developing algorithms for predicting protein-protein interactions of homology modeled proteins.

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    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Sale, Kenneth L.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this project was to examine the protein-protein docking problem, especially as it relates to homology-based structures, identify the key bottlenecks in current software tools, and evaluate and prototype new algorithms that may be developed to improve these bottlenecks. This report describes the current challenges in the protein-protein docking problem: correctly predicting the binding site for the protein-protein interaction and correctly placing the sidechains. Two different and complementary approaches are taken that can help with the protein-protein docking problem. The first approach is to predict interaction sites prior to docking, and uses bioinformatics studies of protein-protein interactions to predict theses interaction site. The second approach is to improve validation of predicted complexes after docking, and uses an improved scoring function for evaluating proposed docked poses, incorporating a solvation term. This scoring function demonstrates significant improvement over current state-of-the art functions. Initial studies on both these approaches are promising, and argue for full development of these algorithms.

  4. HomPPI: a class of sequence homology based protein-protein interface prediction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobbs Drena

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although homology-based methods are among the most widely used methods for predicting the structure and function of proteins, the question as to whether interface sequence conservation can be effectively exploited in predicting protein-protein interfaces has been a subject of debate. Results We studied more than 300,000 pair-wise alignments of protein sequences from structurally characterized protein complexes, including both obligate and transient complexes. We identified sequence similarity criteria required for accurate homology-based inference of interface residues in a query protein sequence. Based on these analyses, we developed HomPPI, a class of sequence homology-based methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. We present two variants of HomPPI: (i NPS-HomPPI (Non partner-specific HomPPI, which can be used to predict interface residues of a query protein in the absence of knowledge of the interaction partner; and (ii PS-HomPPI (Partner-specific HomPPI, which can be used to predict the interface residues of a query protein with a specific target protein. Our experiments on a benchmark dataset of obligate homodimeric complexes show that NPS-HomPPI can reliably predict protein-protein interface residues in a given protein, with an average correlation coefficient (CC of 0.76, sensitivity of 0.83, and specificity of 0.78, when sequence homologs of the query protein can be reliably identified. NPS-HomPPI also reliably predicts the interface residues of intrinsically disordered proteins. Our experiments suggest that NPS-HomPPI is competitive with several state-of-the-art interface prediction servers including those that exploit the structure of the query proteins. The partner-specific classifier, PS-HomPPI can, on a large dataset of transient complexes, predict the interface residues of a query protein with a specific target, with a CC of 0.65, sensitivity of 0.69, and specificity of 0.70, when homologs of

  5. Homology inference of protein-protein interactions via conserved binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Tyagi

    Full Text Available The coverage and reliability of protein-protein interactions determined by high-throughput experiments still needs to be improved, especially for higher organisms, therefore the question persists, how interactions can be verified and predicted by computational approaches using available data on protein structural complexes. Recently we developed an approach called IBIS (Inferred Biomolecular Interaction Server to predict and annotate protein-protein binding sites and interaction partners, which is based on the assumption that the structural location and sequence patterns of protein-protein binding sites are conserved between close homologs. In this study first we confirmed high accuracy of our method and found that its accuracy depends critically on the usage of all available data on structures of homologous complexes, compared to the approaches where only a non-redundant set of complexes is employed. Second we showed that there exists a trade-off between specificity and sensitivity if we employ in the prediction only evolutionarily conserved binding site clusters or clusters supported by only one observation (singletons. Finally we addressed the question of identifying the biologically relevant interactions using the homology inference approach and demonstrated that a large majority of crystal packing interactions can be correctly identified and filtered by our algorithm. At the same time, about half of biological interfaces that are not present in the protein crystallographic asymmetric unit can be reconstructed by IBIS from homologous complexes without the prior knowledge of crystal parameters of the query protein.

  6. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel Ander; Sivaraman Subramaniam; Karim Fahmy; Francis Stewart, A.; Erik Schäffer

    2015-01-01

    Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA) is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs]), such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recog...

  7. Density parameter estimation for finding clusters of homologous proteins-tracing actinobacterial pathogenicity lifestyles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röttger, Richard; Kalaghatgi, Prabhav; Sun, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Homology detection is a long-standing challenge in computational biology. To tackle this problem, typically all-versus-all BLAST results are coupled with data partitioning approaches resulting in clusters of putative homologous proteins. One of the main problems, however, has been widely neglected...... clusters of homologous proteins between a huge set of species would open opportunities for better understanding the genetic repertoire of bacteria with different lifestyles....

  8. Acute Exercise Decreases Tribbles Homolog 3 Protein Levels in the Hypothalamus of Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Barbara De Almeira; Pauli, Luciana Santos Souza; DE Souza, Claudio Teodoro; DA Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa; Marinho, Rodolfo; DE Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eloize Cristina Chiarreotto; Botezelli, José Diego; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of acute exercise on tribbles homolog 3 (TRB3) protein levels and on the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins in the hypothalamus of obese rats. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TRB3 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and verified whether an acute exercise session influences them. In the first part of the study, the rats were divided into three groups: control (lean), fed standard rodent chow; DIO, fed a high-fat diet; and DIO-EXE, fed a high-fat diet and submitted to a swimming acute exercise protocol. In the second part of the study, we used three other groups: control (lean) group receiving an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of vehicle, lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin, and lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin and performing an acute exercise session. Four hours after the exercise session, food intake was measured, and the hypothalamus was dissected and separated for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The acute exercise session reduced TRB3 protein levels, disrupted the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins, increased the phosphorylation of Foxo1, and restored the anorexigenic effects of insulin on the hypothalamus of DIO rats. Interestingly, the suppressive effects of acute exercise on TRB3 protein levels may be related, at least in part, to decreased ER stress (evaluated though pancreatic ER kinase phosphorylation and C/EBP homologous protein levels) in the hypothalamus. Exercise-mediated reduction of hypothalamic TRB3 protein levels may be associated with reduction of ER stress. These data provide a new mechanism by which an acute exercise session improves insulin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and restores food intake control in obesity.

  9. Protein conformation and disease : pathological consequences of analogous mutations in homologous proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, F. J.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division

    2000-12-19

    The antibody light chain variable domain (V{sub L}){sup 1} and myelin protein zero (MPZ) are representatives of the functionally diverse immunoglobulin superfamily. The V{sub L} is a subunit of the antigen-binding component of antibodies, while MPZ is the major membrane-linked constituent of the myelin sheaths that coat peripheral nerves. Despite limited amino acid sequence homology, the conformations of the core structures of the two proteins are largely superimposable. Amino acid variations in V{sub L} account for various conformational disease outcomes, including amyloidosis. However, the specific amino acid changes in V{sub L} that are responsible for disease have been obscured by multiple concurrent primary structure alterations. Recently, certain demyelination disorders have been linked to point mutations and single amino acid polymorphisms in MPZ. We demonstrate here that some pathogenic variations in MPZ correspond to changes suspected of determining amyloidosis in V{sub L}. This unanticipated observation suggests that studies of the biophysical origin of conformational disease in one member of a superfamily of homologous proteins may have implications throughout the superfamily. In some cases, findings may account for overt disease; in other cases, due to the natural repertoire of inherited polymorphisms, variations in a representative protein may predict subclinical impairment of homologous proteins.

  10. Cell cycle-dependent control of homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Wei, Chengwen; Li, Jingjing; Xing, Poyuan; Li, Jingyao; Zheng, Sihao; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious type of DNA lesions threatening genome integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are two major pathways to repair DSBs. HR requires a homologous template to direct DNA repair, and is generally recognized as a high-fidelity pathway. In contrast, NHEJ directly seals broken ends, but the repair product is often accompanied by sequence alterations. The choice of repair pathways is strictly controlled by the cell cycle. The occurrence of HR is restricted to late S to G2 phases while NHEJ operates predominantly in G1 phase, although it can act throughout most of the cell cycle. Deregulation of repair pathway choice can result in genotoxic consequences associated with cancers. How the cell cycle regulates the choice of HR and NHEJ has been extensively studied in the past decade. In this review, we will focus on the current progresses on how HR is controlled by the cell cycle in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals. Particular attention will be given to how cyclin-dependent kinases modulate DSB end resection, DNA damage checkpoint signaling, repair and processing of recombination intermediates. In addition, we will discuss recent findings on how HR is repressed in G1 and M phases by the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Identification of a mammalian mitochondrial homolog of ribosomal protein S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavdar Koc, E; Blackburn, K; Burkhart, W; Spremulli, L L

    1999-12-01

    Bovine mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The region containing the most basic protein(s) was excised and the protein(s) present subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin. Electrospray tandem mass spectrometry was used to provide sequence information on some of the peptide products. Searches of the human EST database using the sequence of the longest peptide analyzed indicated that this peptide was from the mammalian mitochondrial homolog of prokaryotic ribosomal protein S7 (MRP S7(human)). MRP S7(human) is a 28-kDa protein with a pI of 10. Significant homology to bacterial S7 is observed especially in the C-terminal half of the protein. Surprisingly, MRP S7(human) shows less homology to the corresponding mitochondrial proteins from plants and fungi than to bacterial S7.

  12. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH, was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Results Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline, and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein

  13. Nuclear dynamics of RAD52 group homologous recombination proteins in response to DNA damage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke); C. Paulusma (Coen); A.L. Nigg (Alex); A. Pastink (Albert); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRecombination between homologous DNA molecules is essential for the proper maintenance and duplication of the genome, and for the repair of exogenously induced DNA damage such as double-strand breaks. Homologous recombination requires the RAD52 group proteins, including Rad51, Rad52 and

  14. Influence of homology and node age on the growth of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottinelli, Arianna; Bassetti, Bruno; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Gherardi, Marco

    2012-10-01

    Proteins participating in a protein-protein interaction network can be grouped into homology classes following their common ancestry. Proteins added to the network correspond to genes added to the classes, so the dynamics of the two objects are intrinsically linked. Here we first introduce a statistical model describing the joint growth of the network and the partitioning of nodes into classes, which is studied through a combined mean-field and simulation approach. We then employ this unified framework to address the specific issue of the age dependence of protein interactions through the definition of three different node wiring or divergence schemes. A comparison with empirical data indicates that an age-dependent divergence move is necessary in order to reproduce the basic topological observables together with the age correlation between interacting nodes visible in empirical data. We also discuss the possibility of nontrivial joint partition and topology observables.

  15. Physicochemical property distributions for accurate and rapid pairwise protein homology detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oehmen Christopher S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge of remote homology detection is that many evolutionarily related sequences have very little similarity at the amino acid level. Kernel-based discriminative methods, such as support vector machines (SVMs, that use vector representations of sequences derived from sequence properties have been shown to have superior accuracy when compared to traditional approaches for the task of remote homology detection. Results We introduce a new method for feature vector representation based on the physicochemical properties of the primary protein sequence. A distribution of physicochemical property scores are assembled from 4-mers of the sequence and normalized based on the null distribution of the property over all possible 4-mers. With this approach there is little computational cost associated with the transformation of the protein into feature space, and overall performance in terms of remote homology detection is comparable with current state-of-the-art methods. We demonstrate that the features can be used for the task of pairwise remote homology detection with improved accuracy versus sequence-based methods such as BLAST and other feature-based methods of similar computational cost. Conclusions A protein feature method based on physicochemical properties is a viable approach for extracting features in a computationally inexpensive manner while retaining the sensitivity of SVM protein homology detection. Furthermore, identifying features that can be used for generic pairwise homology detection in lieu of family-based homology detection is important for applications such as large database searches and comparative genomics.

  16. Homology modelling of protein-protein complexes: a simple method and its possibilities and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonson Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structure-based computational methods are needed to help identify and characterize protein-protein complexes and their function. For individual proteins, the most successful technique is homology modelling. We investigate a simple extension of this technique to protein-protein complexes. We consider a large set of complexes of known structures, involving pairs of single-domain proteins. The complexes are compared with each other to establish their sequence and structural similarities and the relation between the two. Compared to earlier studies, a simpler dataset, a simpler structural alignment procedure, and an additional energy criterion are used. Next, we compare the Xray structures to models obtained by threading the native sequence onto other, homologous complexes. An elementary requirement for a successful energy function is to rank the native structure above any threaded structure. We use the DFIREβ energy function, whose quality and complexity are typical of the models used today. Finally, we compare near-native models to distinctly non-native models. Results If weakly stable complexes are excluded (defined by a binding energy cutoff, as well as a few unusual complexes, a simple homology principle holds: complexes that share more than 35% sequence identity share similar structures and interaction modes; this principle was less clearcut in earlier studies. The energy function was then tested for its ability to identify experimental structures among sets of decoys, produced by a simple threading procedure. On average, the experimental structure is ranked above 92% of the alternate structures. Thus, discrimination of the native structure is good but not perfect. The discrimination of near-native structures is fair. Typically, a single, alternate, non-native binding mode exists that has a native-like energy. Some of the associated failures may correspond to genuine, alternate binding modes and/or native complexes that

  17. On the Mechanism of Homology Search by RecA Protein Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochugaeva, Maria P; Shvets, Alexey A; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2017-03-14

    Genetic stability is a key factor in maintaining, survival, and reproduction of biological cells. It relies on many processes, but one of the most important is a homologous recombination, in which the repair of breaks in double-stranded DNA molecules is taking place with a help of several specific proteins. In bacteria, this task is accomplished by RecA proteins that are active as nucleoprotein filaments formed on single-stranded segments of DNA. A critical step in the homologous recombination is a search for a corresponding homologous region on DNA, which is called a homology search. Recent single-molecule experiments clarified some aspects of this process, but its molecular mechanisms remain not well understood. We developed a quantitative theoretical approach to analyze the homology search. It is based on a discrete-state stochastic model that takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes in the system. Using a method of first-passage processes, a full dynamic description of the homology search is presented. It is found that the search dynamics depends on the degree of extension of DNA molecules and on the size of RecA nucleoprotein filaments, in agreement with experimental single-molecule measurements of DNA pairing by RecA proteins. Our theoretical calculations, supported by extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations, provide a molecular description of the mechanisms of the homology search. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using homology relations within a database markedly boosts protein sequence similarity search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jing; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Pei, Jimin; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-06-02

    Inference of homology from protein sequences provides an essential tool for analyzing protein structure, function, and evolution. Current sequence-based homology search methods are still unable to detect many similarities evident from protein spatial structures. In computer science a search engine can be improved by considering networks of known relationships within the search database. Here, we apply this idea to protein-sequence-based homology search and show that it dramatically enhances the search accuracy. Our new method, COMPADRE (COmparison of Multiple Protein sequence Alignments using Database RElationships) assesses the relationship between the query sequence and a hit in the database by considering the similarity between the query and hit's known homologs. This approach increases detection quality, boosting the precision rate from 18% to 83% at half-coverage of all database homologs. The increased precision rate allows detection of a large fraction of protein structural relationships, thus providing structure and function predictions for previously uncharacterized proteins. Our results suggest that this general approach is applicable to a wide variety of methods for detection of biological similarities. The web server is available at prodata.swmed.edu/compadre.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a rat homolog of CAP, the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Gatica, J; Gerst, J E

    1993-06-25

    We have isolated a rat cDNA whose expression suppresses the physiological consequences of the chromosomal disruption of CAP, the gene encoding the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast CAP is a bifunctional protein: the NH2 terminus is necessary and sufficient for cellular responsiveness to activated RAS proteins, while the COOH terminus is required for normal cellular morphology and growth control. The rat MCH1 cDNA encodes a protein of 474 amino acids that is 36% identical to S. cerevisiae CAP and is capable of suppressing the loss of the COOH-terminal functions of CAP when expressed in yeast. The MCH1 protein therefore appears to be a structural and functional homolog of the yeast cyclase-associated proteins. Northern analysis of MCH1 gene expression shows it to be constitutively expressed in all cell and tissue types examined. The cloning of a rat homolog of CAP, in addition to the cloning of a human CAP homolog by Matviw et al. (Matviw, H., Yu, G., and Young, D. (1992) Mol. Cell. Biol. 12, 5033-5040), demonstrates that both cyclase-associated proteins and their functions may have evolved with mammalian cells.

  20. A potent antimicrobial protein from onion seeds showing sequence homology to plant lipid transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammue, B P; Thevissen, K; Hendriks, M; Eggermont, K; Goderis, I J; Proost, P; Van Damme, J; Osborn, R W; Guerbette, F; Kader, J C

    1995-10-01

    An antimicrobial protein of about 10 kD, called Ace-AMP1, was isolated from onion (Allium cepa L.) seeds. Based on the near-complete amino acid sequence of this protein, oligonucleotides were designed for polymerase chain reaction-based cloning of the corresponding cDNA. The mature protein is homologous to plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), but it shares only 76% of the residues that are conserved among all known plant nsLTPs and is unusually rich in arginine. Ace-AMP1 inhibits all 12 tested plant pathogenic fungi at concentrations below 10 micrograms mL-1. Its antifungal activity is either not at all or is weakly affected by the presence of different cations at concentrations approximating physiological ionic strength conditions. Ace-AMP1 is also active on two Gram-positive bacteria but is apparently not toxic for Gram-negative bacteria and cultured human cells. In contrast to nsLTPs such as those isolated from radish or maize seeds, Ace-AMP1 was unable to transfer phospholipids from liposomes to mitochondria. On the other hand, lipid transfer proteins from wheat and maize seeds showed little or no antimicrobial activity, whereas the radish lipid transfer protein displayed antifungal activity only in media with low cation concentrations. The relevance of these findings with regard to the function of nsLTPs is discussed.

  1. [Probabilistic evaluation of homology of primary protein structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailov, I I; Sharov, M V; Sharov, M V; Bekmukhametova, Z U

    1994-11-01

    Criteria have been developed for resemblance of segments of certain length of different proteins to be considered as an evidence of those proteins relationship. A table is formed of minimal numbers of identical amino acids for which the probability of the causal coincidence in a segment of certain length is less then 1%. The criteria were corroborated by comparison of natural proteins and model amino acid sequences concocted by means of the random numbers generator.

  2. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  3. Refinement of homology-based protein structures by molecular dynamics simulation techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H; Mark, AE

    2004-01-01

    The use of classical molecular dynamics simulations, performed in explicit water, for the refinement of structural models of proteins generated ab initio or based on homology has been investigated. The study involved a test set of 15 proteins that were previously used by Baker and coworkers to asses

  4. Stability curve prediction of homologous proteins using temperature-dependent statistical potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Pucci

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature (Tm and the change in heat capacity (ΔCP of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies (ΔG at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted Tm's, ΔCP's and folding free energies at room temperature (ΔG25 are equal to 13° C, 1.3 kcal/(mol° C and 4.1 kcal/mol, respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed.

  5. Lipids Regulate Lck Protein Activity through Their Interactions with the Lck Src Homology 2 Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ren; Jung, Da-Jung; Silkov, Antonina; Kim, Hyunjin; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Eui; Park, Mi-Jeong; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Smrt, Sean; Honig, Barry; Baek, Kwanghee; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-08-19

    Lymphocyte-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays an essential role in T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell development, but its activation mechanism is not fully understood. To explore the possibility that plasma membrane (PM) lipids control TCR signaling activities of Lck, we measured the membrane binding properties of its regulatory Src homology 2 (SH2) and Src homology 3 domains. The Lck SH2 domain binds anionic PM lipids with high affinity but with low specificity. Electrostatic potential calculation, NMR analysis, and mutational studies identified the lipid-binding site of the Lck SH2 domain that includes surface-exposed basic, aromatic, and hydrophobic residues but not the phospho-Tyr binding pocket. Mutation of lipid binding residues greatly reduced the interaction of Lck with the ζ chain in the activated TCR signaling complex and its overall TCR signaling activities. These results suggest that PM lipids, including phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, modulate interaction of Lck with its binding partners in the TCR signaling complex and its TCR signaling activities in a spatiotemporally specific manner via its SH2 domain. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Structure and Protein-Protein Interaction Studies on Chlamydia trachomatis Protein CT670 (YscO Homolog)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, Emily; Singer, Alexander; Singh, Bhag; Lam, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Savchenko, Alexei; Gupta, Radhey S. (Toronto); (McMaster U.); (OCI)

    2010-07-28

    Comparative genomic studies have identified many proteins that are found only in various Chlamydiae species and exhibit no significant sequence similarity to any protein in organisms that do not belong to this group. The CT670 protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the proteins whose genes are in one of the type III secretion gene clusters but whose cellular functions are not known. CT670 shares several characteristics with the YscO protein of Yersinia pestis, including the neighboring genes, size, charge, and secondary structure, but the structures and/or functions of these proteins remain to be determined. Although a BLAST search with CT670 did not identify YscO as a related protein, our analysis indicated that these two proteins exhibit significant sequence similarity. In this paper, we report that the CT670 crystal, solved at a resolution of 2 {angstrom}, consists of a single coiled coil containing just two long helices. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that in solution CT670 exists in both monomeric and dimeric forms and that the monomer predominates at lower protein concentrations. We examined the interaction of CT670 with many type III secretion system-related proteins (viz., CT091, CT665, CT666, CT667, CT668, CT669, CT671, CT672, and CT673) by performing bacterial two-hybrid assays. In these experiments, CT670 was found to interact only with the CT671 protein (YscP homolog), whose gene is immediately downstream of ct670. A specific interaction between CT670 and CT671 was also observed when affinity chromatography pull-down experiments were performed. These results suggest that CT670 and CT671 are putative homologs of the YcoO and YscP proteins, respectively, and that they likely form a chaperone-effector pair.

  7. Homology modeling of the CheW coupling protein of the chemotaxis signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Derek J; Ortega, Davi R; Zhulin, Igor B; Baudry, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Homology models of the E. coli and T. maritima chemotaxis protein CheW were constructed to assess the quality of structural predictions and their applicability in chemotaxis research: i) a model of E. coli CheW was constructed using the T. maritima CheW NMR structure as a template, and ii) a model of T. maritima CheW was constructed using the E. coli CheW NMR structure as a template. The conformational space accessible to the homology models and to the NMR structures was investigated using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that even though static homology models of CheW may be partially structurally different from their corresponding experimentally determined structures, the conformational space they can access through their dynamic variations can be similar, for specific regions of the protein, to that of the experimental NMR structures. When CheW homology models are allowed to explore their local accessible conformational space, modeling can provide a rational path to predicting CheW interactions with the MCP and CheA proteins of the chemotaxis complex. Homology models of CheW (and potentially, of other chemotaxis proteins) should be seen as snapshots of an otherwise larger ensemble of accessible conformational space.

  8. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Predicting protein conformational changes for unbound and homology docking: learning from intrinsic and induced flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoran; Sun, Yuanfei; Shen, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Predicting protein conformational changes from unbound structures or even homology models to bound structures remains a critical challenge for protein docking. Here we present a study directly addressing the challenge by reducing the dimensionality and narrowing the range of the corresponding conformational space. The study builds on cNMA-our new framework of partner- and contact-specific normal mode analysis that exploits encounter complexes and considers both intrinsic and induced flexibility. First, we established over a CAPRI (Critical Assessment of PRedicted Interactions) target set that the direction of conformational changes from unbound structures and homology models can be reproduced to a great extent by a small set of cNMA modes. In particular, homology-to-bound interface root-mean-square deviation (iRMSD) can be reduced by 40% on average with the slowest 30 modes. Second, we developed novel and interpretable features from cNMA and used various machine learning approaches to predict the extent of conformational changes. The models learned from a set of unbound-to-bound conformational changes could predict the actual extent of iRMSD with errors around 0.6 Å for unbound proteins in a held-out benchmark subset, around 0.8 Å for unbound proteins in the CAPRI set, and around 1 Å even for homology models in the CAPRI set. Our results shed new insights into origins of conformational differences between homology models and bound structures and provide new support for the low-dimensionality of conformational adjustment during protein associations. The results also provide new tools for ensemble generation and conformational sampling in unbound and homology docking. Proteins 2017; 85:544-556. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Structure/function relationships in RecA protein-mediated homology recognition and strand exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentiss, Mara; Prévost, Chantal; Danilowicz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    RecA family proteins include RecA, Rad51, and Dmc1. These recombinases are responsible for homology search and strand exchange. Homology search and strand exchange occur during double-strand break repair and in eukaryotes during meiotic recombination. In bacteria, homology search begins when RecA binds an initiating single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in the primary DNA-binding site to form the presynaptic filament. The filament is a right-handed helix, where the initiating strand is bound deep within the filament. Once the presynaptic filament is formed, it interrogates nearby double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to find a homologous sequence; therefore, we provide a detailed discussion of structural features of the presynaptic filament that play important functional roles. The discussion includes many diagrams showing multiple filament turns. These diagrams illustrate interactions that are not evident in single turn structures. The first dsDNA interactions with the presynaptic filament are insensitive to mismatches. The mismatch insensitive interactions lead to dsDNA deformation that triggers a homology testing process governed by kinetics. The first homology test involves ∼8 bases. Almost all interactions are rejected by this initial rapid test, leading to a new cycle of homology testing. Interactions that pass the initial rapid test proceed to a slower testing stage. That slower stage induces nonhomologous dsDNA to reverse strand exchange and begin a new cycle of homology testing. In contrast, homologous dsDNA continues to extend the heteroduplex strand-exchange product until ATP hydrolysis makes strand exchange irreversible.

  11. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  12. Conservation of the three-dimensional structure in non-homologous or unrelated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousounis, Konstantinos; Haney, Carl E; Cao, Jin; Sunchu, Bharath; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2012-08-02

    In this review, we examine examples of conservation of protein structural motifs in unrelated or non-homologous proteins. For this, we have selected three DNA-binding motifs: the histone fold, the helix-turn-helix motif, and the zinc finger, as well as the globin-like fold. We show that indeed similar structures exist in unrelated proteins, strengthening the concept that three-dimensional conservation might be more important than the primary amino acid sequence.

  13. rec genes and homologous recombination proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A J

    1991-04-01

    The twenty-five years since the first published report of recA mutants in Escherichia coli has seen the identification of more than 12 other recombination genes. The genes are usually grouped into three pathways named RecBCD, RecE and RecF for prominent genes which function in each. A proposal is made here that there are two RecF pathways, one sensitive and one resistant to exonuclease I, the SbcB enzyme. Five methods of grouping the genes functionally are discussed: 1) by enzyme activity, 2) by common indirect suppressor, 3) by common phenotype, 4) by common regulation and 5) by epistasis. Five classes of enzyme activities implicated in recombination are discussed according to their involvement in presynapsis, synapsis or postsynapsis: 1) nucleases 2) helicases 3) DNA-binding proteins 4) topoisomerases and 5) ligases. Plausible presynaptic steps for the RecBCD, RecF (SbcBS) and RecE pathways show the common feature of generating 3'-terminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). On this ssDNA it is proposed that a RecA protein filament is generated discontinuously. This implies the existence of nucleation and possibly measurement and 3' end protection proteins. Specific proposals are made for which recombination genes might encode such products. Finally the generality of the RecA-ssDNA-filament mechanism of synapsis in the cellular biological world is discussed.

  14. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akutsu Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM. Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several

  15. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abascal, Federico; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Rodriguez-Rivas, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; del Pozo, Angela; Vázquez, Jesús; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved—all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago—and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles. PMID:26061177

  16. Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons Have Ancient Origins and Are Highly Expressed at the Protein Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Abascal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of messenger RNA can generate a wide variety of mature RNA transcripts, and these transcripts may produce protein isoforms with diverse cellular functions. While there is much supporting evidence for the expression of alternative transcripts, the same is not true for the alternatively spliced protein products. Large-scale mass spectroscopy experiments have identified evidence of alternative splicing at the protein level, but with conflicting results. Here we carried out a rigorous analysis of the peptide evidence from eight large-scale proteomics experiments to assess the scale of alternative splicing that is detectable by high-resolution mass spectroscopy. We find fewer splice events than would be expected: we identified peptides for almost 64% of human protein coding genes, but detected just 282 splice events. This data suggests that most genes have a single dominant isoform at the protein level. Many of the alternative isoforms that we could identify were only subtly different from the main splice isoform. Very few of the splice events identified at the protein level disrupted functional domains, in stark contrast to the two thirds of splice events annotated in the human genome that would lead to the loss or damage of functional domains. The most striking result was that more than 20% of the splice isoforms we identified were generated by substituting one homologous exon for another. This is significantly more than would be expected from the frequency of these events in the genome. These homologous exon substitution events were remarkably conserved--all the homologous exons we identified evolved over 460 million years ago--and eight of the fourteen tissue-specific splice isoforms we identified were generated from homologous exons. The combination of proteomics evidence, ancient origin and tissue-specific splicing indicates that isoforms generated from homologous exons may have important cellular roles.

  17. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein–protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein–protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures. PMID:26311309

  18. A Single-Strand Annealing Protein Clamps DNA to Detect and Secure Homology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Ander

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Repair of DNA breaks by single-strand annealing (SSA is a major mechanism for the maintenance of genomic integrity. SSA is promoted by proteins (single-strand-annealing proteins [SSAPs], such as eukaryotic RAD52 and λ phage Redβ. These proteins use a short single-stranded region to find sequence identity and initiate homologous recombination. However, it is unclear how SSAPs detect homology and catalyze annealing. Using single-molecule experiments, we provide evidence that homology is recognized by Redβ monomers that weakly hold single DNA strands together. Once annealing begins, dimerization of Redβ clamps the double-stranded region and nucleates nucleoprotein filament growth. In this manner, DNA clamping ensures and secures a successful detection for DNA sequence homology. The clamp is characterized by a structural change of Redβ and a remarkable stability against force up to 200 pN. Our findings not only present a detailed explanation for SSAP action but also identify the DNA clamp as a very stable, noncovalent, DNA-protein interaction.

  19. Sequence basis of Barnacle Cement Nanostructure is Defined by Proteins with Silk Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Christopher R.; Fears, Kenan P.; Leary, Dagmar H.; Scancella, Jenifer M.; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jinny L.; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Dan; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Wahl, Kathryn J.

    2016-11-01

    Barnacles adhere by producing a mixture of cement proteins (CPs) that organize into a permanently bonded layer displayed as nanoscale fibers. These cement proteins share no homology with any other marine adhesives, and a common sequence-basis that defines how nanostructures function as adhesives remains undiscovered. Here we demonstrate that a significant unidentified portion of acorn barnacle cement is comprised of low complexity proteins; they are organized into repetitive sequence blocks and found to maintain homology to silk motifs. Proteomic analysis of aggregate bands from PAGE gels reveal an abundance of Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr repeats exemplified by a prominent, previously unidentified, 43 kDa protein in the solubilized adhesive. Low complexity regions found throughout the cement proteome, as well as multiple lysyl oxidases and peroxidases, establish homology with silk-associated materials such as fibroin, silk gum sericin, and pyriform spidroins from spider silk. Distinct primary structures defined by homologous domains shed light on how barnacles use low complexity in nanofibers to enable adhesion, and serves as a starting point for unraveling the molecular architecture of a robust and unique class of adhesive nanostructures.

  20. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten

    1984-01-01

    the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins...

  1. Stringent homology-based prediction of H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hufeng; Gao, Shangzhi; Nguyen, Nam Ninh; Fan, Mengyuan; Jin, Jingjing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Liang; Xiong, Geng; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Wong, Limsoon

    2014-04-08

    H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are essential for understanding the infection mechanism of the formidable pathogen M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Computational prediction is an important strategy to fill the gap in experimental H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI data. Homology-based prediction is frequently used in predicting both intra-species and inter-species PPIs. However, some limitations are not properly resolved in several published works that predict eukaryote-prokaryote inter-species PPIs using intra-species template PPIs. We develop a stringent homology-based prediction approach by taking into account (i) differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins and (ii) differences between inter-species and intra-species PPI interfaces. We compare our stringent homology-based approach to a conventional homology-based approach for predicting host-pathogen PPIs, based on cellular compartment distribution analysis, disease gene list enrichment analysis, pathway enrichment analysis and functional category enrichment analysis. These analyses support the validity of our prediction result, and clearly show that our approach has better performance in predicting H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs. Using our stringent homology-based approach, we have predicted a set of highly plausible H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs which might be useful for many of related studies. Based on our analysis of the H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI network predicted by our stringent homology-based approach, we have discovered several interesting properties which are reported here for the first time. We find that both host proteins and pathogen proteins involved in the host-pathogen PPIs tend to be hubs in their own intra-species PPI network. Also, both host and pathogen proteins involved in host-pathogen PPIs tend to have longer primary sequence, tend to have more domains, tend to be more hydrophilic, etc. And the protein domains from both

  2. What evidence is there for the homology of protein-protein interactions?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Anna C F; Jones, Nick S; Porter, Mason A; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    .... Using definitions of homology associated with functional annotation transfer, we estimate that conservation rates of interactions are low even after taking interactome incompleteness into account...

  3. Improving Polymerase Activity with Unnatural Substrates by Sampling Mutations in Homologous Protein Architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Matthew R; Otto, Carine; Fenton, Kathryn E; Chaput, John C

    2016-05-20

    The ability to synthesize and propagate genetic information encoded in the framework of xeno-nucleic acid (XNA) polymers would inform a wide range of topics from the origins of life to synthetic biology. While directed evolution has produced examples of engineered polymerases that can accept XNA substrates, these enzymes function with reduced activity relative to their natural counterparts. Here, we describe a biochemical strategy that enables the discovery of engineered polymerases with improved activity for a given unnatural polymerase function. Our approach involves identifying specificity determining residues (SDRs) that control polymerase activity, screening mutations at SDR positions in a model polymerase scaffold, and assaying key gain-of-function mutations in orthologous protein architectures. By transferring beneficial mutations between homologous protein structures, we show that new polymerases can be identified that function with superior activity relative to their starting donor scaffold. This concept, which we call scaffold sampling, was used to generate engineered DNA polymerases that can faithfully synthesize RNA and TNA (threose nucleic acid), respectively, on a DNA template with high primer-extension efficiency and low template sequence bias. We suggest that the ability to combine phenotypes from different donor and recipient scaffolds provides a new paradigm in polymerase engineering where natural structural diversity can be used to refine the catalytic activity of synthetic enzymes.

  4. Anti-HmuY antibodies specifically recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY protein but not homologous proteins in other periodontopathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Śmiga

    Full Text Available Given the emerging evidence of an association between periodontal infections and systemic conditions, the search for specific methods to detect the presence of P. gingivalis, a principal etiologic agent in chronic periodontitis, is of high importance. The aim of this study was to characterize antibodies raised against purified P. gingivalis HmuY protein and selected epitopes of the HmuY molecule. Since other periodontopathogens produce homologs of HmuY, we also aimed to characterize responses of antibodies raised against the HmuY protein or its epitopes to the closest homologous proteins from Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia. Rabbits were immunized with purified HmuY protein or three synthetic, KLH-conjugated peptides, derived from the P. gingivalis HmuY protein. The reactivity of anti-HmuY antibodies with purified proteins or bacteria was determined using Western blotting and ELISA assay. First, we found homologs of P. gingivalis HmuY in P. intermedia (PinO and PinA proteins and T. forsythia (Tfo protein and identified corrected nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Tfo. All proteins were overexpressed in E. coli and purified using ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography and gel filtration. We demonstrated that antibodies raised against P. gingivalis HmuY are highly specific to purified HmuY protein and HmuY attached to P. gingivalis cells. No reactivity between P. intermedia and T. forsythia or between purified HmuY homologs from these bacteria and anti-HmuY antibodies was detected. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that P. gingivalis HmuY protein may serve as an antigen for specific determination of serum antibodies raised against this bacterium.

  5. Refinement of protein structure homology models via long, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Alpan; Piana, Stefano; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2012-08-01

    Accurate computational prediction of protein structure represents a longstanding challenge in molecular biology and structure-based drug design. Although homology modeling techniques are widely used to produce low-resolution models, refining these models to high resolution has proven difficult. With long enough simulations and sufficiently accurate force fields, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations should in principle allow such refinement, but efforts to refine homology models using MD have for the most part yielded disappointing results. It has thus far been unclear whether MD-based refinement is limited primarily by accessible simulation timescales, force field accuracy, or both. Here, we examine MD as a technique for homology model refinement using all-atom simulations, each at least 100 μs long-more than 100 times longer than previous refinement simulations-and a physics-based force field that was recently shown to successfully fold a structurally diverse set of fast-folding proteins. In MD simulations of 24 proteins chosen from the refinement category of recent Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiments, we find that in most cases, simulations initiated from homology models drift away from the native structure. Comparison with simulations initiated from the native structure suggests that force field accuracy is the primary factor limiting MD-based refinement. This problem can be mitigated to some extent by restricting sampling to the neighborhood of the initial model, leading to structural improvement that, while limited, is roughly comparable to the leading alternative methods.

  6. Homology-based inference sets the bar high for protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, Tobias; Kassner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Rost, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Any method that de novo predicts protein function should do better than random. More challenging, it also ought to outperform simple homology-based inference. Here, we describe a few methods that predict protein function exclusively through homology. Together, they set the bar or lower limit for future improvements. During the development of these methods, we faced two surprises. Firstly, our most successful implementation for the baseline ranked very high at CAFA1. In fact, our best combination of homology-based methods fared only slightly worse than the top-of-the-line prediction method from the Jones group. Secondly, although the concept of homology-based inference is simple, this work revealed that the precise details of the implementation are crucial: not only did the methods span from top to bottom performers at CAFA, but also the reasons for these differences were unexpected. In this work, we also propose a new rigorous measure to compare predicted and experimental annotations. It puts more emphasis on the details of protein function than the other measures employed by CAFA and may best reflect the expectations of users. Clearly, the definition of proper goals remains one major objective for CAFA.

  7. Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy by transmission of H-type prion in homologous prion protein context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juan-María; Andréoletti, Olivier; Lacroux, Caroline; Prieto, Irene; Lorenzo, Patricia; Larska, Magdalena; Baron, Thierry; Espinosa, Juan-Carlos

    2011-09-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and BSE-related disorders have been associated with a single major prion strain. Recently, 2 atypical, presumably sporadic forms of BSE have been associated with 2 distinct prion strains that are characterized mainly by distinct Western blot profiles of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres), named high-type (BSE-H) and low-type (BSE-L), that also differed from classical BSE. We characterized 5 atypical BSE-H isolates by analyzing their molecular and neuropathologic properties during transmission in transgenic mice expressing homologous bovine prion protein. Unexpectedly, in several inoculated animals, strain features emerged that were highly similar to those of classical BSE agent. These findings demonstrate the capability of an atypical bovine prion to acquire classical BSE-like properties during propagation in a homologous bovine prion protein context and support the view that the epidemic BSE agent could have originated from such a cattle prion.

  8. Comparison of the pseudorabies virus Us9 protein with homologs from other veterinary and human alphaherpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, M G; Kemp, C D; Taylor, M P; Enquist, L W

    2009-07-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) Us9 is a small, tail-anchored (TA) membrane protein that is essential for axonal sorting of viral structural proteins and is highly conserved among other members of the alphaherpesvirus subfamily. We cloned the Us9 homologs from two human pathogens, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), as well as two veterinary pathogens, equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) and bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), and fused them to enhanced green fluorescent protein to examine their subcellular localization and membrane topology. Akin to PRV Us9, all of the Us9 homologs localized to the trans-Golgi network and had a type II membrane topology (typical of TA proteins). Furthermore, we examined whether any of the Us9 homologs could compensate for the loss of PRV Us9 in anterograde, neuron-to-cell spread of infection in a compartmented chamber system. EHV-1 and BHV-1 Us9 were able to fully compensate for the loss of PRV Us9, whereas VZV and HSV-1 Us9 proteins were unable to functionally replace PRV Us9 when they were expressed in a PRV background.

  9. Sequence Analysis of the Protein Structure Homology Modeling of Growth Hormone Gene from Salmo trutta caspius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhasan Rezaei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the growth hormone protein investigated and characterized from Salmo trutta caspius. Growth hormone gene in the Salmo trutta caspius have six exons in the full length that is translated into a Molecular Weight (kDa: ssDNA: 64.98 and dsDNA: 129.6. There are also 210 amino acid residue. The assembled full length of DNA contains open reading frame of growth hormone gene that contains 15 sequences in the full length. The average GC content is 47% and AT content is 53%. This protein multiple alignment has shown that this peptide is 100% identical to the corresponding homologous protein in the growth hormone protein which including Salmo salar (Accession number: AAA49558.1 and Rainbow trout (Salmo trutta (Accession number: AAA49555.1" sequences. The sequence of protein had deposited in Gene Bank, Accession number: AEK70940. Also we were analyzed second and third structure between sequences reported in Gene Bank Network system. The results are shown, there are homology between second structure in three sequences including: Salmo trutta caspius, Salmo salar and Rainbow trout. Regarding third structure, Salmo trutta caspius and Salmo salar are same type, but Rainbow trout has different homology with Salmo trutta caspius and Salmo salar. However, the sequences were observed three parallel " helix and in second structure there were almost same percent β sheet.

  10. Efficient generation of targeted and controlled mutational events in porcine cells using nuclease-directed homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James R; Santos, Rafael M N; Martens, Gregory R; Ladowski, Joseph M; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Li, Ping; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-05-15

    Nuclease-based genome editing has rapidly sped the creation of new models of human disease. These techniques also hold great promise for the future of clinical xenotransplantation and cell-based therapies for cancer or immunodeficient pathology. However, to fully realize the potential of nuclease editing tools, the efficiency and precision of their application must be optimized. The object of this study was to use nonintegrating selection and nuclease-directed homologous recombination to efficiently control the genetic modification of the porcine genome. Clustered randomly integrating spaced palindromic repeats and associated Cas9 protein (CRISPR/Cas9)-directed mutagenesis with a single-guide RNA target was designed to target the alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase locus (GGTA1) of the porcine genome. A vector expressing a single-guide RNA, Cas9 protein, and green fluorescent protein was used to increase plasmid-delivered mutational efficiency when coupled with fluorescence sorting. Single and double-strand DNA oligonucleotides with a restriction site replacing the start codon were created with variable homology lengths surrounding the mutational event site. Finally, a transgene construct was flanked with 50 base pairs of homology directed immediately 5' to a nuclease cut site. These products were introduced to cells with a constant concentration of CRISPR/cas9 vector. Phenotype-specific mutational efficiency was measured by flow cytometer. Controlled homologous insertion was measured by Sanger sequence, restriction enzyme digest and flow cytometry. Expression of a fluorescence protein on the Cas9 vector functioned as a nonintegrating selection marker. Selection by this marker increased phenotype-silencing mutation rates from 3.5% to 82% (P = 0.0002). Insertion or deletion mutation increased from 11% to 96% (P = 0.0007). Co-transfection with homologous DNA oligonucleotides increased the aggregate phenotype-silencing mutation rates up to 22% and increased biallelic

  11. A benchmark testing ground for integrating homology modeling and protein docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnuud, Tanggis; Luo, Lingqi; Wodak, Shoshana J; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Weng, Zhiping; Vajda, Sandor; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Kozakov, Dima

    2017-01-01

    Protein docking procedures carry out the task of predicting the structure of a protein-protein complex starting from the known structures of the individual protein components. More often than not, however, the structure of one or both components is not known, but can be derived by homology modeling on the basis of known structures of related proteins deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Thus, the problem is to develop methods that optimally integrate homology modeling and docking with the goal of predicting the structure of a complex directly from the amino acid sequences of its component proteins. One possibility is to use the best available homology modeling and docking methods. However, the models built for the individual subunits often differ to a significant degree from the bound conformation in the complex, often much more so than the differences observed between free and bound structures of the same protein, and therefore additional conformational adjustments, both at the backbone and side chain levels need to be modeled to achieve an accurate docking prediction. In particular, even homology models of overall good accuracy frequently include localized errors that unfavorably impact docking results. The predicted reliability of the different regions in the model can also serve as a useful input for the docking calculations. Here we present a benchmark dataset that should help to explore and solve combined modeling and docking problems. This dataset comprises a subset of the experimentally solved 'target' complexes from the widely used Docking Benchmark from the Weng Lab (excluding antibody-antigen complexes). This subset is extended to include the structures from the PDB related to those of the individual components of each complex, and hence represent potential templates for investigating and benchmarking integrated homology modeling and docking approaches. Template sets can be dynamically customized by specifying ranges in sequence similarity and in

  12. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus (ZIKV is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  13. CMsearch: simultaneous exploration of protein sequence space and structure space improves not only protein homology detection but also protein structure prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2016-06-15

    Motivation: Protein homology detection, a fundamental problem in computational biology, is an indispensable step toward predicting protein structures and understanding protein functions. Despite the advances in recent decades on sequence alignment, threading and alignment-free methods, protein homology detection remains a challenging open problem. Recently, network methods that try to find transitive paths in the protein structure space demonstrate the importance of incorporating network information of the structure space. Yet, current methods merge the sequence space and the structure space into a single space, and thus introduce inconsistency in combining different sources of information. Method: We present a novel network-based protein homology detection method, CMsearch, based on cross-modal learning. Instead of exploring a single network built from the mixture of sequence and structure space information, CMsearch builds two separate networks to represent the sequence space and the structure space. It then learns sequence–structure correlation by simultaneously taking sequence information, structure information, sequence space information and structure space information into consideration. Results: We tested CMsearch on two challenging tasks, protein homology detection and protein structure prediction, by querying all 8332 PDB40 proteins. Our results demonstrate that CMsearch is insensitive to the similarity metrics used to define the sequence and the structure spaces. By using HMM–HMM alignment as the sequence similarity metric, CMsearch clearly outperforms state-of-the-art homology detection methods and the CASP-winning template-based protein structure prediction methods.

  14. Functional homology between the yeast regulatory proteins GAL4 and LAC9: LAC9-mediated transcriptional activation in Kluyveromyces lactis involves protein binding to a regulatory sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site.

    OpenAIRE

    Breunig, K D; Kuger, P

    1987-01-01

    As shown previously, the beta-galactosidase gene of Kluyveromyces lactis is transcriptionally regulated via an upstream activation site (UASL) which contains a sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M. Ruzzi, K.D. Breunig, A.G. Ficca, and C.P. Hollenberg, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:991-997, 1987). Here we demonstrate that the region of homology specifically binds a K. lactis regulatory protein. The binding activity was detectable in protein extracts from wil...

  15. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  16. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  17. Interaction of Mouse Pem Protein and Cell Division Cycle 37 Homolog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen GUO; Yue-Qin LI; Shi-Qian LI; Zhi-Wen LUO; Xin ZHANG; Dong-Sheng TANG; Tian-Hong ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Mouse Pem, a homeobox gene, encodes a protein consisting of 210 amino acid residues. To study the function of mouse Pem protein, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to screen the library of 7-day mouse embryo with full-length mouse Pem eDNA. Fifty-two colonies were obtained after 1.57×108 colonies were screened by nutrition limitation and β-galactosidase assay. Seven individual insert fragments were obtained from the library, and three of them were identified, one of which was confirmed to be the cell division cycle 37 (Cdc37) homolog gene by sequencing. The interaction between mouse Pem and Cdc37homolog was then confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, and the possible interaction model was suggested.

  18. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Saga, Yumiko; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2016-04-01

    Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID) technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function.

  19. Rapid Protein Depletion in Human Cells by Auxin-Inducible Degron Tagging with Short Homology Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyoaki Natsume

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Studying the role of essential proteins is dependent upon a method for rapid inactivation, in order to study the immediate phenotypic consequences. Auxin-inducible degron (AID technology allows rapid depletion of proteins in animal cells and fungi, but its application to human cells has been limited by the difficulties of tagging endogenous proteins. We have developed a simple and scalable CRISPR/Cas-based method to tag endogenous proteins in human HCT116 and mouse embryonic stem (ES cells by using donor constructs that harbor synthetic short homology arms. Using a combination of AID tagging with CRISPR/Cas, we have generated conditional alleles of essential nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in HCT116 cells, which can then be depleted very rapidly after the addition of auxin to the culture medium. This approach should greatly facilitate the functional analysis of essential proteins, particularly those of previously unknown function.

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Homologous Proteins Encoded by UL2 and UL23 genes of Herpesviridae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-ding LIU; Wen-juan WU; Min HONG; Hai-jing SHI; Shao-hui MA; Jing-jing WANG; Hong-ling ZHAO; Yun LIAO; Qi-han LI

    2007-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the Herpesviridae β-gene play a critical role in the replication stage of the virus. In this paper, phylogenetic analyses provided evidence that someβ-gene products, such as UL2 and UL23 from HSV1, have their homologous genes in its family, and also exist in prokaryotic organisms, indicating that these viruses appear to have been assembled over evolutionary time by numerous independent events of horizontal gene transfer.

  1. Characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Kentaro; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Takano, Ryo; Gong, Haiyan; Ishiwa, Akiko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa and a major pathogen of animals and immunocompromised humans, in whom it causes encephalitis. Understanding the mechanism of tachyzoite invasion is important for the discovery of new drug targets and may serve as a model for the study of other apicomplexan parasites. We previously showed that Plasmodium falciparum expresses a homolog of human calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) that is ...

  2. Homology Modeling: Generating Structural Models to Understand Protein Function and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Geneticists and molecular and cell biologists routinely uncover new proteins important in specific biological processes/pathways. However, either the molecular functions or the functional mechanisms of many of these proteins are unclear due to a lack of knowledge of their atomic structures. Yet, determining experimental structures of many proteins presents technical challenges. The current methods for obtaining atomic-resolution structures of biomolecules (X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy) require pure preparations of proteins at concentrations much higher than those at which the proteins exist in a physiological environment. Additionally, NMR has size limitations, with current technology limited to the determination of structures of proteins with masses of up to 15 kDa. Due to these reasons, atomic structures of many medically and biologically important proteins do not exist. However, the structures of these proteins are essential for several purposes, including in silico drug design [1], understanding the effects of disease mutations [2], and designing experiments to probe the functional mechanisms of proteins. Comparative modeling has gained importance as a tool for bridging the gap between sequence and structure space, allowing researchers to build structural models of proteins that are difficult to crystallize or for which structure determination by NMR spectroscopy is not tractable. Comparative modeling, or homology modeling, exploits the fact that two proteins whose sequences are evolutionarily connected display similar structural features [3]. Thus, the known structure of a protein (template) can be used to generate a molecular model of the protein (query) whose experimental structure is notknown.

  3. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder: proteins can recognize binding sites of homologous proteins in more than one way.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Martin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction is a fundamental problem with many practical applications. The fact that different proteins can bind similar partners suggests that convergently evolved binding interfaces are reused in different complexes. A set of protein complexes composed of non-homologous domains interacting with homologous partners at equivalent binding sites was collected in 2006, offering an opportunity to investigate this point. We considered 433 pairs of protein-protein complexes from the ABAC database (AB and AC binary protein complexes sharing a homologous partner A and analyzed the extent of physico-chemical similarity at the atomic and residue level at the protein-protein interface. Homologous partners of the complexes were superimposed using Multiprot, and similar atoms at the interface were quantified using a five class grouping scheme and a distance cut-off. We found that the number of interfacial atoms with similar properties is systematically lower in the non-homologous proteins than in the homologous ones. We assessed the significance of the similarity by bootstrapping the atomic properties at the interfaces. We found that the similarity of binding sites is very significant between homologous proteins, as expected, but generally insignificant between the non-homologous proteins that bind to homologous partners. Furthermore, evolutionarily conserved residues are not colocalized within the binding sites of non-homologous proteins. We could only identify a limited number of cases of structural mimicry at the interface, suggesting that this property is less generic than previously thought. Our results support the hypothesis that different proteins can interact with similar partners using alternate strategies, but do not support convergent evolution.

  4. The role of Deinococcus radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ishaque, Abu M; Ohba, Hirofumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Tejima, Kouhei; Onodera, Takefumi; Narumi, Issay

    2012-04-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits extraordinary resistance to the lethal effect of DNA-damaging agents, a characteristic attributed to its highly proficient DNA repair capacity. Although the D. radiodurans genome is clearly devoid of recBC and addAB counterparts as RecA mediators, the genome possesses all genes associated with the RecFOR pathway. In an effort to gain insights into the role of D. radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination, we generated recF, recO and recR disruptant strains and characterized the disruption effects. All the disruptant strains exhibited delayed growth relative to the wild-type, indicating that the RecF, RecO and RecR proteins play an important role in cell growth under normal growth conditions. A slight reduction in transformation efficiency was observed in the recF and recO disruptant strains compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, disruption of recR resulted in severe reduction of the transformation efficiency. On the other hand, the recF disruptant strain was the most sensitive phenotype to γ rays, UV irradiation and mitomycin C among the three disruptants. In the recF disruptant strain, the intracellular level of the LexA1 protein did not decrease following γ irradiation, suggesting that a large amount of the RecA protein remains inactive despite being induced. These results demonstrate that the RecF protein plays a crucial role in the homologous recombination repair process by facilitating RecA activation in D. radiodurans. Thus, the RecF and RecR proteins are involved in the RecA activation and the stability of incoming DNA, respectively, during RecA-mediated homologous recombination processes that initiated the ESDSA pathway in D. radiodurans. Possible mechanisms that involve the RecFOR complex in homologous intermolecular recombination and homologous recombination repair processes are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Back-translation for discovering distant protein homologies in the presence of frameshift mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noé Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frameshift mutations in protein-coding DNA sequences produce a drastic change in the resulting protein sequence, which prevents classic protein alignment methods from revealing the proteins' common origin. Moreover, when a large number of substitutions are additionally involved in the divergence, the homology detection becomes difficult even at the DNA level. Results We developed a novel method to infer distant homology relations of two proteins, that accounts for frameshift and point mutations that may have affected the coding sequences. We design a dynamic programming alignment algorithm over memory-efficient graph representations of the complete set of putative DNA sequences of each protein, with the goal of determining the two putative DNA sequences which have the best scoring alignment under a powerful scoring system designed to reflect the most probable evolutionary process. Our implementation is freely available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/path/. Conclusions Our approach allows to uncover evolutionary information that is not captured by traditional alignment methods, which is confirmed by biologically significant examples.

  6. Homology and conservation of amino acids in E-protein sequences of dengue serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Venkatachalam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the homology and phylogenetic relationship among the four dengue virus (DENV serotypes, and conservation of amino acid in E-proteins and to find out the phylogenetic relationship among the strains of four DENV serotypes. Methods: Clustal W analysis for homology and phylogram, European molecular biology open software suite for pairwise alignment of amino acid sequences and BLAST-P analysis for various strains of four DENV serotypes were carried out. Results: Homology of E-protein sequences of four DENV serotypes indicated a close relationship of DENV-1 with DENV-3. DENV-2 showed close relationship with DENV-1 and -3 forming a single cluster whereas DENV-4 alone formed group with a single serotype. In the multiple sequence alignment, 19 amino acid conserved groups were observed. BLAST-P analysis showed more number of 100% similarity among DENV-1 and -3 strains whereas only few strains showed 100% similarity in DENV-4. However, 100% similarity was absent among the DENV-3 strains. Conclusions: From the present study, phylogenetically all the four DENV serotypes were related but DENV-1, -2 and -3 were very closely related whereas DENV-4 was somewhat distant from the other three serotypes.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Fruit Ripening by Tomato FRUITFULL Homologs and Associated MADS Box Proteins[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Shima, Yoko; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Mamiko; Kimbara, Junji; Nakano, Toshitsugu; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS box FRUITFULL homologs FUL1 and FUL2 act as key ripening regulators and interact with the master regulator MADS box protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). Here, we report the large-scale identification of direct targets of FUL1 and FUL2 by transcriptome analysis of FUL1/FUL2 suppressed fruits and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) targeting tomato gene promoters. The ChIP-chip and transcriptome analysis identified FUL1/FUL2 target genes that contain at least one genomic region bound by FUL1 or FUL2 (regions that occur mainly in their promoters) and exhibit FUL1/FUL2-dependent expression during ripening. These analyses identified 860 direct FUL1 targets and 878 direct FUL2 targets; this set of genes includes both direct targets of RIN and nontargets of RIN. Functional classification of the FUL1/FUL2 targets revealed that these FUL homologs function in many biological processes via the regulation of ripening-related gene expression, both in cooperation with and independent of RIN. Our in vitro assay showed that the FUL homologs, RIN, and tomato AGAMOUS-LIKE1 form DNA binding complexes, suggesting that tetramer complexes of these MADS box proteins are mainly responsible for the regulation of ripening. PMID:24415769

  8. Transcriptional regulation of fruit ripening by tomato FRUITFULL homologs and associated MADS box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Shima, Yoko; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Mamiko; Kimbara, Junji; Nakano, Toshitsugu; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ito, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MADS box FRUITFULL homologs FUL1 and FUL2 act as key ripening regulators and interact with the master regulator MADS box protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). Here, we report the large-scale identification of direct targets of FUL1 and FUL2 by transcriptome analysis of FUL1/FUL2 suppressed fruits and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) targeting tomato gene promoters. The ChIP-chip and transcriptome analysis identified FUL1/FUL2 target genes that contain at least one genomic region bound by FUL1 or FUL2 (regions that occur mainly in their promoters) and exhibit FUL1/FUL2-dependent expression during ripening. These analyses identified 860 direct FUL1 targets and 878 direct FUL2 targets; this set of genes includes both direct targets of RIN and nontargets of RIN. Functional classification of the FUL1/FUL2 targets revealed that these FUL homologs function in many biological processes via the regulation of ripening-related gene expression, both in cooperation with and independent of RIN. Our in vitro assay showed that the FUL homologs, RIN, and tomato AGAMOUS-LIKE1 form DNA binding complexes, suggesting that tetramer complexes of these MADS box proteins are mainly responsible for the regulation of ripening.

  9. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  10. Cluster based on sequence comparison of homologous proteins of 95 organism species - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Gclust Server Cluster based on sequence comparison of homologous proteins of 95 organism species Data detail... Data name Cluster based on sequence comparison of homologous proteins of 95 organism species Description of...e History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Cluster based on sequence comparison of homologous proteins of 95 organism species - Gclust Server | LSDB Archive ...

  11. A chemical compound that stimulates the human homologous recombination protein RAD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayathilaka, Krishanthi; Sheridan, Sean D; Bold, Tyler D; Bochenska, Katarzyna; Logan, Hillary L; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Bishop, Douglas K; Connell, Philip P

    2008-10-14

    RAD51 and other members of the RecA family of strand exchange proteins assemble on ssDNA to form presynaptic filaments, which carry out the central steps of homologous recombination. A microplate-based assay was developed for high-throughput measurement of hRAD51 filament formation on ssDNA. With this method, a 10,000 compound library was screened, leading to the identification of a small molecule (RS-1) that enhances hRAD51 binding in a wide range of biochemical conditions. Salt titration experiments showed that RS-1 can enhance filament stability. Ultrastructural analysis of filaments formed on ssDNA showed that RS-1 can increase both protein-DNA complex lengths and the pitch of helical filament turns. RS-1 stimulated hRAD51-mediated homologous strand assimilation (D-loop) activity by at least 5- to 11-fold, depending on the condition. This D-loop stimulation occurred even in the presence of Ca(2+) or adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, indicating that the mechanism of stimulation was distinct from that conferred by Ca(2+) and/or inhibition of ATPase. No D-loop activity was observed in the absence of a nucleotide triphosphate cofactor, indicating that the compound does not substitute for this requirement. These results indicate that RS-1 enhances the homologous recombination activity of hRAD51 by promoting the formation of active presynaptic filaments. Cell survival assays in normal neonatal human dermal fibroblasts demonstrated that RS-1 promotes a dose-dependent resistance to the cross-linking chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Given that RAD51-dependent recombination is a major determinant of cisplatin resistance, RS-1 seems to function in vivo to stimulate homologous recombination repair proficiency. RS-1 has many potential applications in both research and medical settings.

  12. Comparison of sequence-based and structure-based phylogenetic trees of homologous proteins: Inferences on protein evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Balaji; N Srinivasan

    2007-01-01

    Several studies based on the known three-dimensional (3-D) structures of proteins show that two homologous proteins with insignificant sequence similarity could adopt a common fold and may perform same or similar biochemical functions. Hence, it is appropriate to use similarities in 3-D structure of proteins rather than the amino acid sequence similarities in modelling evolution of distantly related proteins. Here we present an assessment of using 3-D structures in modelling evolution of homologous proteins. Using a dataset of 108 protein domain families of known structures with at least 10 members per family we present a comparison of extent of structural and sequence dissimilarities among pairs of proteins which are inputs into the construction of phylogenetic trees. We find that correlation between the structure-based dissimilarity measures and the sequence-based dissimilarity measures is usually good if the sequence similarity among the homologues is about 30% or more. For protein families with low sequence similarity among the members, the correlation coefficient between the sequence-based and the structure-based dissimilarities are poor. In these cases the structure-based dendrogram clusters proteins with most similar biochemical functional properties better than the sequence-similarity based dendrogram. In multi-domain protein families and disulphide-rich protein families the correlation coefficient for the match of sequence-based and structure-based dissimilarity (SDM) measures can be poor though the sequence identity could be higher than 30%. Hence it is suggested that protein evolution is best modelled using 3-D structures if the sequence similarities (SSM) of the homologues are very low.

  13. Chromosome movements promoted by the mitochondrial protein SPD-3 are required for homology search during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Labrador

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC. These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18 mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote

  14. Chromosome movements promoted by the mitochondrial protein SPD-3 are required for homology search during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Labrador

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pairing of homologous chromosomes during early meiosis is essential to prevent the formation of aneuploid gametes. Chromosome pairing includes a step of homology search followed by the stabilization of homolog interactions by the synaptonemal complex (SC. These events coincide with dramatic changes in nuclear organization and rapid chromosome movements that depend on cytoskeletal motors and are mediated by SUN-domain proteins on the nuclear envelope, but how chromosome mobility contributes to the pairing process remains poorly understood. We show that defects in the mitochondria-localizing protein SPD-3 cause a defect in homolog pairing without impairing nuclear reorganization or SC assembly, which results in promiscuous installation of the SC between non-homologous chromosomes. Preventing SC assembly in spd-3 mutants does not improve homolog pairing, demonstrating that SPD-3 is required for homology search at the start of meiosis. Pairing center regions localize to SUN-1 aggregates at meiosis onset in spd-3 mutants; and pairing-promoting proteins, including cytoskeletal motors and polo-like kinase 2, are normally recruited to the nuclear envelope. However, quantitative analysis of SUN-1 aggregate movement in spd-3 mutants demonstrates a clear reduction in mobility, although this defect is not as severe as that seen in sun-1(jf18 mutants, which also show a stronger pairing defect, suggesting a correlation between chromosome-end mobility and the efficiency of pairing. SUN-1 aggregate movement is also impaired following inhibition of mitochondrial respiration or dynein knockdown, suggesting that mitochondrial function is required for motor-driven SUN-1 movement. The reduced chromosome-end mobility of spd-3 mutants impairs coupling of SC assembly to homology recognition and causes a delay in meiotic progression mediated by HORMA-domain protein HTP-1. Our work reveals how chromosome mobility impacts the different early meiotic events that promote

  15. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  16. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  17. Immunochemical homology between elasmobranch scale and tooth extracellular matrix proteins in Cephaloscyllium ventriosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, N; Bessem, C; Bringas, P; Slavkin, H C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were designed to test the hypothesis that homologous proteins are expressed in elasmobranch scale, tooth enameloid, and mammalian enamel. Using indirect immunohistochemistry and high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with immunoblotting, mouse enamel proteins were compared with placoid scale and enameloid proteins from the swell shark, Cephaloscyllium ventriosum. Swiss Webster mouse molar teeth show a characteristic enamel protein pattern consisting of two anionic enamel proteins of 72 kDa (pI 5.8) and 46 kDa (pI 5.5) and several more basic and lower-molecular-weight enamel polypeptides. Both anionic and basic classes of enamel proteins cross-reacted with either antiamelogenin or antienamelin antibodies. Placoid scale and tooth enameloid contained two anionic proteins identified as 58 kDa (pI 5.7) and 46 kDa (pI 5.5), which cross-reacted with either antimouse amelogenin or antihuman enamelin IgG antibodies. A minor antigenically related protein of 43 kDa (pI 6.2) was detected. Immunochemical staining showed localization within placoid scale, swell shark inner enamel epithelia, enameloid, and mouse inner enamel epithelia and enamel. We interpret these results to suggest that both placoid scale and enameloid proteins share epitopes and that these epitopes are also shared with mammalian enamel proteins. Based on molecular weights, isoelectric pH values, and amino acid compositions, placoid scale and enameloid ECM proteins do not contain amelogenin proteins. We suggest that enamelinlike proteins are highly conserved during vertebrate evolution and that these relatively anionic macromolecules may serve a primary function in the initiation of calcium hydroxyapatite formation during enameloid biomineralization.

  18. Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: The Case of Homologous G Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    In this work, we address the question of whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologous G domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the elongation factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-1α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time scale, we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favorable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favorable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that, under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that, at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that under extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue.

  19. CMsearch: simultaneous exploration of protein sequence space and structure space improves not only protein homology detection but also protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuefeng; Lu, Zhiwu; Wang, Sheng; Jing-Yan Wang, Jim; Gao, Xin

    2016-06-15

    Protein homology detection, a fundamental problem in computational biology, is an indispensable step toward predicting protein structures and understanding protein functions. Despite the advances in recent decades on sequence alignment, threading and alignment-free methods, protein homology detection remains a challenging open problem. Recently, network methods that try to find transitive paths in the protein structure space demonstrate the importance of incorporating network information of the structure space. Yet, current methods merge the sequence space and the structure space into a single space, and thus introduce inconsistency in combining different sources of information. We present a novel network-based protein homology detection method, CMsearch, based on cross-modal learning. Instead of exploring a single network built from the mixture of sequence and structure space information, CMsearch builds two separate networks to represent the sequence space and the structure space. It then learns sequence-structure correlation by simultaneously taking sequence information, structure information, sequence space information and structure space information into consideration. We tested CMsearch on two challenging tasks, protein homology detection and protein structure prediction, by querying all 8332 PDB40 proteins. Our results demonstrate that CMsearch is insensitive to the similarity metrics used to define the sequence and the structure spaces. By using HMM-HMM alignment as the sequence similarity metric, CMsearch clearly outperforms state-of-the-art homology detection methods and the CASP-winning template-based protein structure prediction methods. Our program is freely available for download from http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx : xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. A chemical compound that stimulates the human homologous recombination protein RAD51

    OpenAIRE

    Jayathilaka, Krishanthi; Sheridan, Sean D.; Bold, Tyler D.; Bochenska, Katarzyna; Logan, Hillary L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph. R.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Connell, Philip P.

    2008-01-01

    RAD51 and other members of the RecA family of strand exchange proteins assemble on ssDNA to form presynaptic filaments, which carry out the central steps of homologous recombination. A microplate-based assay was developed for high-throughput measurement of hRAD51 filament formation on ssDNA. With this method, a 10,000 compound library was screened, leading to the identification of a small molecule (RS-1) that enhances hRAD51 binding in a wide range of biochemical conditions. Salt titration ex...

  1. Structural families in loops of homologous proteins: automatic classification, modelling and application to antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A C; Thornton, J M

    1996-11-15

    Loop regions of polypeptide in homologous proteins may be classified into structural families. A method is described by which this classification may be performed automatically and "key residue" templates, which may be responsible for the loop adopting a given conformation, are defined. The technique has been applied to the hypervariable loops of antibodies and the results are compared with the previous definition of canonical classes. We have extended these definitions and provide complete sets of structurally determining residues (SDRs) for the observed clusters including the first set of key residues for seven-residue CDR-H3 loops.

  2. Sprouty-Related Ena/Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Homology 1-Domain-Containing Protein-2 Critically Regulates Influenza A Virus-Induced Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshihiro; Itakura, Junya; Takahashi, Sakuma; Sato, Miwa; Mino, Megumi; Fushimi, Soichiro; Yamada, Masao; Morishima, Tuneo; Kunkel, Steven L; Matsukawa, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    cytokine levels. Furthermore, bone marrow chimeras indicated that influenza A-induced lung pathology was most severe when sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 expression was lacking in nonimmune cell populations. Furthermore, microarray analysis revealed knockdown of sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 led to enhanced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway, resulting that viral clearance was regulated by sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 expression through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling pathway in murine lung epithelial cells. These data support an important function of sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 in controlling influenza virus-induced pneumonia and viral replication. Sprouty-related Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology 1-domain-containing protein-2 may be a novel therapeutic target for controlling the immune response against influenza influenza A virus infection.

  3. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  4. Pleckstrin homology domain containing 6 protein (PLEKHA6) polymorphisms are associated with psychopathology and response to treatment in schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellmann, Ilja; Rujescu, Dan; Musil, Richard; Meyerwas, Sebastian; Giegling, Ina; Genius, Just; Zill, Peter; Dehning, Sandra; Cerovecki, Anja; Seemüller, Florian; Schennach, Rebecca; Hartmann, Annette M; Schäfer, Martin; Müller, Norbert; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2014-06-03

    Pleckstrin homology domain (PH domain) comprises approximately 120 amino acids and is integrated in a wide range of proteins involved in intracellular signaling or as constituents of the cytoskeleton. This domain can bind phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-biphosphate and proteins such as the βγ-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and protein kinase C. Associations with psychiatric diseases have not been investigated yet. To identify genes involved in response to antipsychotics, mice were treated with haloperidol (1mg/kg, n = 11) or saline (n = 12) for one week. By analyzing microarray data, we observed an increase of pleckstrin homology domain containing 6 (PLEKHA6) gene expression. Furthermore, we genotyped 263 schizophrenic patients, who were treated monotherapeutically with different antipsychotics within randomized-controlled trials. Psychopathology was measured weekly using the PANSS for a minimum of four and a maximum of twelve weeks. Correlations between PANSS subscale scores at baseline and PANSS improvement scores after four weeks of treatment and genotypes were calculated by using a linear model for all investigated SNPs. We found associations between four PLEKHA6 polymorphisms (rs17333933 (T/G), rs3126209 (C/T), rs4951338 (A/G) and rs100900571 (T/C)) and different PANSS subscales at baseline. Furthermore two different polymorphisms (rs7513240 (T/C), rs4951353 (A/G)) were found to be associated with therapy response in terms of a significant correlation with different PANSS improvement subscores after four weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Our observation of an association between genetic polymorphisms of a protein of the PH domain and psychopathology data in schizophrenic patients might be indicative for an involvement of PLEKHA6 in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the therapy response towards antipsychotics.

  5. Sequence variation in the guillemot (Alcidae: Cepphus) mitochondrial control region and its nuclear homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, M G; Friesen, V L

    1998-01-01

    We describe sequence variation in the mitochondrial control region and its nuclear homolog in three species and seven subspecies of guillemots (Cepphus spp.). Nuclear homologs of the 5' end of the control region were found in all individuals. Nuclear sequences were approximately 50% divergent from their mitochondrial counterparts and formed a distinct phylogenetic clade; the mitochondrial-nuclear introgression event must have predated the radiation of Cepphus. As in other vertebrates, the guillemot control region has a relatively conserved central block flanked by hypervariable 5' and 3' ends. Mean pairwise interspecific divergence values among control regions were lower than those in other birds. All individuals were heteroplasmic for the number of simple tandem nucleotide repeats (A(n)C) at the 3' end of the control region. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that black guillemots are basal to pigeon and spectacled guillemots, but evolutionary relationships among subspecies remain unresolved, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting. Describing molecular variation in nuclear homologs of mitochondrial genes is of general interest in phylogenetics because, if undetected, the homologs may confound interpretations of mitochondrial phylogenies.

  6. Establishing homology between mitochondrial calcium uniporters, prokaryotic magnesium channels and chlamydial IncA proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andre; Vastermark, Ake; Saier, Milton H

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporters (MCUs) (TC no. 1.A.77) are oligomeric channel proteins found in the mitochondrial inner membrane. MCUs have two well-conserved transmembrane segments (TMSs), connected by a linker, similar to bacterial MCU homologues. These proteins and chlamydial IncA proteins (of unknown function; TC no. 9.B.159) are homologous to prokaryotic Mg(2+) transporters, AtpI and AtpZ, based on comparison scores of up to 14.5 sds. A phylogenetic tree containing all of these proteins showed that the AtpZ proteins cluster coherently as a subset within the large and diverse AtpI cluster, which branches separately from the MCUs and IncAs, both of which cluster coherently. The MCUs and AtpZs share the same two TMS topology, but the AtpIs have four TMSs, and IncAs can have either two (most frequent) or four (less frequent) TMSs. Binary alignments, comparison scores and motif analyses showed that TMSs 1 and 2 align with TMSs 3 and 4 of the AtpIs, suggesting that the four TMS AtpI proteins arose via an intragenic duplication event. These findings establish an evolutionary link interconnecting eukaryotic and prokaryotic Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) transporters with chlamydial IncAs, and lead us to suggest that all members of the MCU superfamily, including IncAs, function as divalent cation channels. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Homologous and unique G protein alpha subunits in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochrie, M A; Mendel, J E; Sternberg, P W; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA corresponding to a known G protein alpha subunit, the alpha subunit of Go (Go alpha), was isolated and sequenced. The predicted amino acid sequence of C. elegans Go alpha is 80-87% identical to other Go alpha sequences. An mRNA that hybridizes to the C. elegans Go alpha cDNA can be detected on Northern blots. A C. elegans protein that crossreacts with antibovine Go alpha antibody can be detected on immunoblots. A cosmid clone containing the C. elegans Go alpha gene (goa-1) was isolated and mapped to chromosome I. The genomic fragments of three other C. elegans G protein alpha subunit genes (gpa-1, gpa-2, and gpa-3) have been isolated using the polymerase chain reaction. The corresponding cosmid clones were isolated and mapped to disperse locations on chromosome V. The sequences of two of the genes, gpa-1 and gpa-3, were determined. The predicted amino acid sequences of gpa-1 and gpa-3 are only 48% identical to each other. Therefore, they are likely to have distinct functions. In addition they are not homologous enough to G protein alpha subunits in other organisms to be classified. Thus C. elegans has G proteins that are identifiable homologues of mammalian G proteins as well as G proteins that appear to be unique to C. elegans. Study of identifiable G proteins in C. elegans may result in a further understanding of their function in other organisms, whereas study of the novel G proteins may provide an understanding of unique aspects of nematode physiology. Images PMID:1907494

  8. Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock: A new gaussian-based score function suitable for docking in homology modelled protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tøndel, Kristin; Anderssen, Endre; Drabløs, Finn

    2006-03-01

    Protein Alpha Shape (PAS) Dock is a new empirical score function suitable for virtual library screening using homology modelled protein structures. Here, the score function is used in combination with the geometry search method Tabu search. A description of the protein binding site is generated using gaussian property fields like in Protein Alpha Shape Similarity Analysis (PASSA). Gaussian property fields are also used to describe the ligand properties. The overlap between the receptor and ligand hydrophilicity and lipophilicity fields is maximised, while minimising steric clashes. Gaussian functions introduce a smoothing of the property fields. This makes the score function robust against small structural variations, and therefore suitable for use with homology models. This also makes it less critical to include protein flexibility in the docking calculations. We use a fast and simplified version of the score function in the geometry search, while a more detailed version is used for the final prediction of the binding free energies. This use of a two-level scoring makes PAS-Dock computationally efficient, and well suited for virtual screening. The PAS-Dock score function is trained on 218 X-ray structures of protein- ligand complexes with experimental binding affinities. The performance of PAS-Dock is compared to two other docking methods, AutoDock and MOE-Dock, with respect to both accuracy and computational efficiency. According to this study, PAS-Dock is more computationally efficient than both AutoDock and MOE-Dock, and gives a better prediction of the free energies of binding. PAS-Dock is also more robust against structural variations than AutoDock.

  9. Adhesive proteins of stalked and acorn barnacles display homology with low sequence similarities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie-Leigh Jonker

    Full Text Available Barnacle adhesion underwater is an important phenomenon to understand for the prevention of biofouling and potential biotechnological innovations, yet so far, identifying what makes barnacle glue proteins 'sticky' has proved elusive. Examination of a broad range of species within the barnacles may be instructive to identify conserved adhesive domains. We add to extensive information from the acorn barnacles (order Sessilia by providing the first protein analysis of a stalked barnacle adhesive, Lepas anatifera (order Lepadiformes. It was possible to separate the L. anatifera adhesive into at least 10 protein bands using SDS-PAGE. Intense bands were present at approximately 30, 70, 90 and 110 kilodaltons (kDa. Mass spectrometry for protein identification was followed by de novo sequencing which detected 52 peptides of 7-16 amino acids in length. None of the peptides matched published or unpublished transcriptome sequences, but some amino acid sequence similarity was apparent between L. anatifera and closely-related Dosima fascicularis. Antibodies against two acorn barnacle proteins (ab-cp-52k and ab-cp-68k showed cross-reactivity in the adhesive glands of L. anatifera. We also analysed the similarity of adhesive proteins across several barnacle taxa, including Pollicipes pollicipes (a stalked barnacle in the order Scalpelliformes. Sequence alignment of published expressed sequence tags clearly indicated that P. pollicipes possesses homologues for the 19 kDa and 100 kDa proteins in acorn barnacles. Homology aside, sequence similarity in amino acid and gene sequences tended to decline as taxonomic distance increased, with minimum similarities of 18-26%, depending on the gene. The results indicate that some adhesive proteins (e.g. 100 kDa are more conserved within barnacles than others (20 kDa.

  10. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  11. Neural network and SVM classifiers accurately predict lipid binding proteins, irrespective of sequence homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Moradi-Shahrbabak, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-09-07

    Due to the central roles of lipid binding proteins (LBPs) in many biological processes, sequence based identification of LBPs is of great interest. The major challenge is that LBPs are diverse in sequence, structure, and function which results in low accuracy of sequence homology based methods. Therefore, there is a need for developing alternative functional prediction methods irrespective of sequence similarity. To identify LBPs from non-LBPs, the performances of support vector machine (SVM) and neural network were compared in this study. Comprehensive protein features and various techniques were employed to create datasets. Five-fold cross-validation (CV) and independent evaluation (IE) tests were used to assess the validity of the two methods. The results indicated that SVM outperforms neural network. SVM achieved 89.28% (CV) and 89.55% (IE) overall accuracy in identification of LBPs from non-LBPs and 92.06% (CV) and 92.90% (IE) (in average) for classification of different LBPs classes. Increasing the number and the range of extracted protein features as well as optimization of the SVM parameters significantly increased the efficiency of LBPs class prediction in comparison to the only previous report in this field. Altogether, the results showed that the SVM algorithm can be run on broad, computationally calculated protein features and offers a promising tool in detection of LBPs classes. The proposed approach has the potential to integrate and improve the common sequence alignment based methods.

  12. Loops In Proteins (LIP)--a comprehensive loop database for homology modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, E; Goede, A; Preissner, R

    2003-12-01

    One of the most important and challenging tasks in protein modelling is the prediction of loops, as can be seen in the large variety of existing approaches. Loops In Proteins (LIP) is a database that includes all protein segments of a length up to 15 residues contained in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). In this study, the applicability of LIP to loop prediction in the framework of homology modelling is investigated. Searching the database for loop candidates takes less than 1 s on a desktop PC, and ranking them takes a few minutes. This is an order of magnitude faster than most existing procedures. The measure of accuracy is the root mean square deviation (RMSD) with respect to the main-chain atoms after local superposition of target loop and predicted loop. Loops of up to nine residues length were modelled with a local RMSD <1 A and those of length up to 14 residues with an accuracy better than 2 A. The results were compared in detail with a thoroughly evaluated and tested ab initio method published recently and additionally with two further methods for a small loop test set. The LIP method produced very good predictions. In particular for longer loops it outperformed other methods.

  13. Structural and functional homology between periplasmic bacterial molecular chaperones and small heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zav'yalov, V P; Zav'yalova, G A; Denesyuk, A I; Gaestel, M; Korpela, T

    1995-07-01

    The periplasmic Yersinia pestis molecular chaperone Caf1M belongs to a superfamily of bacterial proteins for one of which (PapD protein of Escherichia coli) the immunoglobulin-like fold was solved by X-ray analysis. The N-terminal domain of Caf1M was found to share a 20% amino acid sequence identity with an inclusion body-associated protein IbpB of Escherichia coli. One of the regions that was compared, was 32 amino acids long, and displayed more than 40% identity, probability of random coincidence was 1.2 x 10(-4). IbpB is involved in a superfamily of small heat shock proteins which fulfil the function of molecular chaperone. On the basis of the revealed homology, an immunoglobulin-like one-domain model of IbpB three-dimensional structure was designed which could be a prototype conformation of sHsp's. The structure suggested is in good agreement with the known experimental data obtained for different members of sHsp's superfamily.

  14. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L., suppresses TMV infection, and displays homology with ribosome- inactivating proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shalini Srivastava; H N Verma; Aparana Srivastava; Vivek Prasad

    2015-03-01

    Root extract of Boerhaavia diffusa L. induced systemic resistance in tobacco against Tobacco mosaic virus. A 30 kDa protein was isolated as the active component, called BDP-30 on the basis of the molecular weight and source plant. BDP-30, a glycoprotein, was found to be temperature and protease resistant. It was basic, possessing a pI greater than 9.0. In-gel proteolytic digestion of BDP-30 generated two peptides that possessed the amino acid sequence KLYDIPPLR and KVTLPYSGNYER by LC/MS/MS. Both peptides shared absolute sequence identity with trichosanthin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from Trichosanthes kirilowii, and a 78% and 100% homology respectively with an RIP from Bryonia dioica, bryodin. Further, effort was made to look at the fate of TMV in induced resistant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, a systemic host of the virus, at specified days after inoculation in control and treated plants. TMV coat protein (CP) was detected by immunoblot 7 days post inoculation up to 21 days in the control set, but not in treated resistant plants. TMV RNA was detected by RT-PCR using TMV-CP specific primers. Resistant tobacco did not show presence of TMV RNA up to 21 days of inoculation. This suggests that BDP-30 may be suppressing TMV replication.

  15. A restraint molecular dynamics and simulated annealing approach for protein homology modeling utilizing mean angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Till

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed the program PERMOL for semi-automated homology modeling of proteins. It is based on restrained molecular dynamics using a simulated annealing protocol in torsion angle space. As main restraints defining the optimal local geometry of the structure weighted mean dihedral angles and their standard deviations are used which are calculated with an algorithm described earlier by Döker et al. (1999, BBRC, 257, 348–350. The overall long-range contacts are established via a small number of distance restraints between atoms involved in hydrogen bonds and backbone atoms of conserved residues. Employing the restraints generated by PERMOL three-dimensional structures are obtained using standard molecular dynamics programs such as DYANA or CNS. Results To test this modeling approach it has been used for predicting the structure of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein HPr from E. coli and the structure of the human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (Ppar γ. The divergence between the modeled HPr and the previously determined X-ray structure was comparable to the divergence between the X-ray structure and the published NMR structure. The modeled structure of Ppar γ was also very close to the previously solved X-ray structure with an RMSD of 0.262 nm for the backbone atoms. Conclusion In summary, we present a new method for homology modeling capable of producing high-quality structure models. An advantage of the method is that it can be used in combination with incomplete NMR data to obtain reasonable structure models in accordance with the experimental data.

  16. Efficient detection of unpaired DNA requires a member of the rad54-like family of homologous recombination proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Dilini A; Sauls, Pegan A; Sharp, Kevin J; Smith, Zachary J; Xiao, Hua; Groskreutz, Katie M; Malone, Tyler L; Boone, Erin C; Edwards, Kevin A; Shiu, Patrick K T; Larson, Erik D; Hammond, Thomas M

    2014-11-01

    Meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD) is a process that detects unpaired regions between homologous chromosomes and silences them for the duration of sexual development. While the phenomenon of MSUD is well recognized, the process that detects unpaired DNA is poorly understood. In this report, we provide two lines of evidence linking unpaired DNA detection to a physical search for DNA homology. First, we have found that a putative SNF2-family protein (SAD-6) is required for efficient MSUD in Neurospora crassa. SAD-6 is closely related to Rad54, a protein known to facilitate key steps in the repair of double-strand breaks by homologous recombination. Second, we have successfully masked unpaired DNA by placing identical transgenes at slightly different locations on homologous chromosomes. This masking falls apart when the distance between the transgenes is increased. We propose a model where unpaired DNA detection during MSUD is achieved through a spatially constrained search for DNA homology. The identity of SAD-6 as a Rad54 paralog suggests that this process may be similar to the searching mechanism used during homologous recombination. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Homology modeling and protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121: in silico insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Chakresh Kumar; Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of hydrocarbons plays an important role in the eco-balancing of petroleum products, pesticides and other toxic products in the environment. The degradation of hydrocarbons by microbes such as Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Burkhulderia, Gordonia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. has been studied intensively in the literature. The present study focused on the in silico protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase (ladA)-a protein involved in the alkane degradation pathway. We demonstrated the improvement in substrate binding energy with engineered ladA in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121. We identified an ortholog of ladA monooxygenase found in B. thailandensis MSMB121, and showed it to be an enzyme involved in an alkane degradation pathway studied extensively in Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. Homology modeling of the three-dimensional structure of ladA was performed with a crystal structure (protein databank ID: 3B9N) as a template in MODELLER 9v11, and further validated using PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D and WHATIF tools. Specific amino acids were substituted in the region corresponding to amino acids 305-370 of ladA protein, resulting in an enhancement of binding energy in different alkane chain molecules as compared to wild protein structures in the docking experiments. The substrate binding energy with the protein was calculated using Vina (Implemented in VEGAZZ). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamics of different alkane chain molecules inside the binding pockets of wild and mutated ladA. Here, we hypothesize an improvement in binding energies and accessibility of substrates towards engineered ladA enzyme, which could be further facilitated for wet laboratory-based experiments for validation of the alkane degradation pathway in this organism.

  18. DINAMO: a coupled sequence alignment editor/molecular graphics tool for interactive homology modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M; Bentz, J; Baucom, A; Gregoret, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaining functional information about a novel protein is a universal problem in biomedical research. With the explosive growth of the protein sequence and structural databases, it is becoming increasingly common for researchers to attempt to build a three-dimensional model of their protein of interest in order to gain information about its structure and interactions with other molecules. The two most reliable methods for predicting the structure of a protein are homology modeling, in which the novel sequence is modeled on the known three-dimensional structure of a related protein, and fold recognition (threading), where the sequence is scored against a library of fold models, and the highest scoring model is selected. The sequence alignment to a known structure can be ambiguous, and human intervention is often required to optimize the model. We describe an interactive model building and assessment tool in which a sequence alignment editor is dynamically coupled to a molecular graphics display. By means of a set of assessment tools, the user may optimize his or her alignment to satisfy the known heuristics of protein structure. Adjustments to the sequence alignment made by the user are reflected in the displayed model by color and other visual cues. For instance, residues are colored by hydrophobicity in both the three-dimensional model and in the sequence alignment. This aids the user in identifying undesirable buried polar residues. Several different evaluation metrics may be selected including residue conservation, residue properties, and visualization of predicted secondary structure. These characteristics may be mapped to the model both singly and in combination. DINAMO is a Java-based tool that may be run either over the web or installed locally. Its modular architecture also allows Java-literate users to add plug-ins of their own design.

  19. Analysis of the role of the gene bipA, encoding the major endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein in the secretion of homologous and heterologous proteins in black Aspergilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, P.J.; Gemeren, I.A. van; Drint-Kuijvenhoven, J.; Hessing, J.G.M.; Muijlwijk van - Harteveld, G.M.; Beijersbergen, A.; Verrips, C.T.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    1998-01-01

    The function of the endoplasmic-reticulum-localized chaperone binding protein (BiP) in relation to protein secretion in filamentous fungi was studied. It was shown that the overproduction of several homologous and heterologous recombinant proteins by Aspergillus strains induces the expression of bip

  20. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Ser/Thr phosphatase T1 and comparison to its mammalian homolog PP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jung-Min

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Ser/Thr phosphatase 5 (PP5 and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog protein phosphatase T1 (Ppt1p each contain an N-terminal domain consisting of several tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs and a C-terminal catalytic domain that is related to the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, and calcineurin. Analysis of yeast Ppt1p could provide important clues to the function of PP5 and its homologs, however it has not yet been characterized at the biochemical or cellular level. Results The specific activity of recombinant Ppt1p toward the artificial substrates 32P-myelin basic protein (MBP and 32P-casein was similar to that of PP5. Dephosphorylation of 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein, was stimulated by unsaturated fatty acids and by arachidoyl coenzyme A. Limited proteolysis of Ppt1p removed the TPR domain and abrogated lipid stimulation. The remaining catalytic fragment exhibited a two-fold increase in activity toward 32P-MBP, but not 32P-casein. Removal of the C terminus increased Ppt1p activity toward both substrates two fold, but did not prevent further stimulation of activity toward 32P-MBP by lipid treatment. Ppt1p was localized throughout the cell including the nucleus. Levels of PPT1 mRNA and protein peaked in early log phase growth. Conclusions Many characteristics of Ppt1p are similar to those of PP5, including stimulation of phosphatase activity with some substrates by lipids, and peak expression during periods of rapid cell growth. Unlike PP5, however, proteolytic removal of the TPR domain or C-terminal truncation only modestly increased its activity. In addition, C-terminal truncation did not prevent further activation by lipid. This suggests that these regions play only a minor role in controlling its activity compared to PP5. Ppt1p is present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, indicating that it may function in multiple compartments. The observation that Ppt1p is most highly expressed during early log

  1. Neurotrophin receptor homolog (NRH1) proteins regulate mesoderm formation and apoptosis during early Xenopus development.

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    Knapp, Dunja; Messenger, Nigel; Ahmed Rana, Amer; Smith, James C

    2006-12-15

    Recent experiments suggest that Xenopus Neurotrophin Receptor Homolog 1 (NRH1) proteins act through the planar cell polarity pathway to regulate convergent extension movements during gastrulation and neurulation. We show in this paper that NRH1 proteins are also required for the proper expression of mesodermally expressed genes such as Xbra and Chordin, and to a lesser extent, of Xwnt11. Loss of NRH1 function is followed, during gastrula and neurula stages, by a dramatic increase in apoptosis. Apoptosis is delayed by injection of Xbra RNA, suggesting that cell death is a consequence, at least in part, of the down-regulation of this gene, and it is also delayed by expression of activated forms of Rho, Rac and Cdc42. These small GTPases have previously been implicated in the planar cell polarity pathway in Xenopus and, in other systems, in the regulation of apoptosis. We conclude that the effects of NRH1 proteins include the regulation of mesodermal gene expression and that the disruption of gastrulation that is caused by their loss of function is a consequence of the down-regulation of Xbra and other genes, in addition to direct interference with the planar cell polarity pathway. The apoptosis observed in embryos lacking NRH1 function is not an indirect consequence of the disruption of gastrulation, and indeed it may contribute to the observed morphological defects.

  2. Scaffolding protein SPIDR/KIAA0146 connects the Bloom syndrome helicase with homologous recombination repair.

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    Wan, Li; Han, Jinhua; Liu, Ting; Dong, Shunli; Xie, Feng; Chen, Hongxia; Huang, Jun

    2013-06-25

    The Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family. An emerging concept is the BLM helicase collaborates with the homologous recombination (HR) machinery to help avoid undesirable HR events and to achieve a high degree of fidelity during the HR reaction. However, exactly how such coordination occurs in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we identified a protein termed SPIDR (scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair) as the link between BLM and the HR machinery. SPIDR independently interacts with BLM and RAD51 and promotes the formation of a BLM/RAD51-containing complex of biological importance. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of BLM and RAD51 foci, cells depleted of SPIDR show increased rate of sister chromatid exchange and defects in HR. Moreover, SPIDR depletion leads to genome instability and causes hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We propose that, through providing a scaffold for the cooperation of BLM and RAD51 in a multifunctional DNA-processing complex, SPIDR not only regulates the efficiency of HR, but also dictates the specific HR pathway.

  3. Biochemical analysis of the human ENA/VASP-family proteins, MENA, VASP and EVL, in homologous recombination.

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    Takaku, Motoki; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    MENA, VASP and EVL are members of the ENA/VASP family of proteins and are involved in cytoplasmic actin remodeling. Previously, we found that EVL directly interacts with RAD51, an essential protein in the homologous recombinational repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stimulates the RAD51-mediated recombination reactions in vitro. The EVL-knockdown MCF7 cells exhibited a clear reduction in RAD51-foci formation, suggesting that EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. However, the DSB repair defects were less significant in the EVL-knockdown cells, implying that two EVL paralogues, MENA and VASP, may complement the EVL function in human cells. Therefore, in the present study, we purified human MENA, VASP and EVL as recombinant proteins, and compared their biochemical activities in vitro. We found that all three proteins commonly exhibited the RAD51 binding, DNA binding and DNA-annealing activities. Stimulation of the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing was also observed with all three proteins. In addition, surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that MENA, VASP and EVL mutually interacted. These results support the ideas that the ENA/VASP-family proteins are functionally redundant in homologous recombination, and that all three may be involved in the DSB repair pathway in humans.

  4. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

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    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  5. Structure and function analysis of nucleocapsid protein of tomato spotted wilt virus interacting with RNA using homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-02-13

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Genomic clustering and homology between HET-S and the NWD2 STAND protein in various fungal genomes.

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    Asen Daskalov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prions are infectious proteins propagating as self-perpetuating amyloid polymers. The [Het-s] prion of Podospora anserina is involved in a cell death process associated with non-self recognition. The prion forming domain (PFD of HET-s adopts a β-solenoid amyloid structure characterized by the two fold repetition of an elementary triangular motif. [Het-s] induces cell death when interacting with HET-S, an allelic variant of HET-s. When templated by [Het-s], HET-S undergoes a trans-conformation, relocates to the cell membrane and induces toxicity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, comparing HET-s homologs from different species, we devise a consensus for the HET-s elementary triangular motif. We use this motif to screen genomic databases and find a match to the N-terminus of NWD2, a STAND protein, encoded by the gene immediately adjacent to het-S. STAND proteins are signal transducing ATPases which undergo ligand-induced oligomerisation. Homology modelling predicts that the NWD2 N-terminal region adopts a HET-s-like fold. We propose that upon NWD2 oligomerisation, these N-terminal extensions adopt the β-solenoid fold and template HET-S to adopt the amyloid fold and trigger toxicity. We extend this model to a putative prion, the σ infectious element in Nectria haematococca, because the s locus controlling propagation of σ also encodes a STAND protein and displays analogous features. Comparative genomic analyses indicate evolutionary conservation of these STAND/prion-like gene pairs, identify a number of novel prion candidates and define, in addition to the HET-s PFD motif, two distinct, novel putative PFD-like motifs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest the existence, in the fungal kingdom, of a widespread and evolutionarily conserved mode of signal transduction based on the transmission of an amyloid-fold from a NOD-like STAND receptor protein to an effector protein.

  7. Eps homology domain endosomal transport proteins differentially localize to the neuromuscular junction

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    Mate Suzanne E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recycling of endosomes is important for trafficking and maintenance of proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We have previously shown high expression of the endocytic recycling regulator Eps15 homology domain-containing (EHD1 proteinin the Torpedo californica electric organ, a model tissue for investigating a cholinergic synapse. In this study, we investigated the localization of EHD1 and its paralogs EHD2, EHD3, and EHD4 in mouse skeletal muscle, and assessed the morphological changes in EHD1−/− NMJs. Methods Localization of the candidate NMJ protein EHD1 was assessed by confocal microscopy analysis of whole-mount mouse skeletal muscle fibers after direct gene transfer and immunolabeling. The potential function of EHD1 was assessed by specific force measurement and α-bungarotoxin-based endplate morphology mapping in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle. Results Endogenous EHD1 localized to primary synaptic clefts of murine NMJ, and this localization was confirmed by expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein labeled-EHD1 in murine skeletal muscle in vivo. EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle had normal histology and NMJ morphology, and normal specific force generation during muscle contraction. The EHD 1–4 proteins showed differential localization in skeletal muscle: EHD2 to muscle vasculature, EHD3 to perisynaptic regions, and EHD4 to perinuclear regions and to primary synaptic clefts, but at lower levels than EHD1. Additionally, specific antibodies raised against mammalian EHD1-4 recognized proteins of the expected mass in the T. californica electric organ. Finally, we found that EHD4 expression was more abundant in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle than in wild-type skeletal muscle. Conclusion EHD1 and EHD4 localize to the primary synaptic clefts of the NMJ. Lack of obvious defects in NMJ structure and muscle function in EHD1−/− muscle may be due to functional compensation by other EHD paralogs.

  8. High mobility group A-interacting proteins in cancer: focus on chromobox protein homolog 7, homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 and PATZ

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    Monica Fedele

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The High Mobility Group A (HMGA proteins, a family of DNA architectural factors, by interacting with different proteins play crucial roles in neoplastic transformation of a wide range of tissues. Therefore, the search for HMGA-interacting partners was carried out by several laboratories in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying HMGA-dependent tumorigenesis. Three of the several HMGA-binding proteins are discussed in this review. These are the Chromobox family protein (chromobox protein homolog 7, CBX7, the homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2 and the POZ/domain and Kruppel zinc finger family member, PATZ. All of them play a critical role in tumorigenesis, and may also be independent markers of cancer. Their activities are linked to cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. In this review, we discuss the properties of each protein, including their effect on HMGA1 functions, and propose a model accounting for how their activities might be coordinated.

  9. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and homology modeling of the first caudata amphibian antifreeze-like protein in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

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    Zhang, Songyan; Gao, Jiuxiang; Lu, Yiling; Cai, Shasha; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2013-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) refer to a class of polypeptides that are produced by certain vertebrates, plants, fungi, and bacteria and which permit their survival in subzero environments. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, sequence analysis and three-dimensional structure of the axolotl antifreeze-like protein (AFLP) by homology modeling of the first caudate amphibian AFLP. We constructed a full-length spleen cDNA library of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). An EST having highest similarity (∼42%) with freeze-responsive liver protein Li16 from Rana sylvatica was identified, and the full-length cDNA was subsequently obtained by RACE-PCR. The axolotl antifreeze-like protein sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 93 amino acids. The calculated molecular mass and the theoretical isoelectric point (pl) of this mature protein were 10128.6 Da and 8.97, respectively. The molecular characterization of this gene and its deduced protein were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of current AFLP was predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. The homology model constructed could be of use for effective drug design. This is the first report of an antifreeze-like protein identified from a caudate amphibian.

  10. Structural and Sequence Similarities of Hydra Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Protein to Human Homolog Suggest Early Evolution and Conservation

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    Apurva Barve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA is a protein that binds to damaged DNA, verifies presence of a lesion, and recruits other proteins of the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway to the site. Though its homologs from yeast, Drosophila, humans, and so forth are well studied, XPA has not so far been reported from protozoa and lower animal phyla. Hydra is a fresh-water cnidarian with a remarkable capacity for regeneration and apparent lack of organismal ageing. Cnidarians are among the first metazoa with a defined body axis, tissue grade organisation, and nervous system. We report here for the first time presence of XPA gene in hydra. Putative protein sequence of hydra XPA contains nuclear localization signal and bears the zinc-finger motif. It contains two conserved Pfam domains and various characterized features of XPA proteins like regions for binding to excision repair cross-complementing protein-1 (ERCC1 and replication protein A 70 kDa subunit (RPA70 proteins. Hydra XPA shows a high degree of similarity with vertebrate homologs and clusters with deuterostomes in phylogenetic analysis. Homology modelling corroborates the very close similarity between hydra and human XPA. The protein thus most likely functions in hydra in the same manner as in other animals, indicating that it arose early in evolution and has been conserved across animal phyla.

  11. A low molecular weight peptide from snow mold with epitopic homology to the winter flounder antifreeze protein.

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    Newsted, W J; Polvi, S; Papish, B; Kendall, E; Saleem, M; Koch, M; Hussain, A; Cutler, A J; Georges, F

    1994-01-01

    Evidence for a small size protein (ca. 3500 kDa) exhibiting epitopic homology to the Atlantic winter flounder antifreeze protein (AFP) is found in the snow molds Coprinus psychromorbidus, Myriosclerotinia borealis, and Typhula incarnata. The protein shows strong cross-reactivity with antisera specific for the flounder AFP. Preliminary studies suggest that the protein is synthesized in response to lowering the culture temperature, and that it is membrane associated and, therefore, may function in an analogous capacity to the fish AFP. Also, the protein is shown to have antifreeze properties as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging experiments.

  12. Variation in the Subcellular Localization and Protein Folding Activity among Arabidopsis thaliana Homologs of Protein Disulfide Isomerase

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    Christen Y. L. Yuen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs catalyze the formation, breakage, and rearrangement of disulfide bonds to properly fold nascent polypeptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Classical animal and yeast PDIs possess two catalytic thioredoxin-like domains (a, a′ and two non-catalytic domains (b, b′, in the order a-b-b′-a′. The model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, encodes 12 PDI-like proteins, six of which possess the classical PDI domain arrangement (AtPDI1 through AtPDI6. Three additional AtPDIs (AtPDI9, AtPDI10, AtPDI11 possess two thioredoxin domains, but without intervening b-b′ domains. C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP fusions to each of the nine dual-thioredoxin PDI homologs localized predominantly to the ER lumen when transiently expressed in protoplasts. Additionally, expression of AtPDI9:GFP-KDEL and AtPDI10: GFP-KDDL was associated with the formation of ER bodies. AtPDI9, AtPDI10, and AtPDI11 mediated the oxidative folding of alkaline phosphatase when heterologously expressed in the Escherichia coli protein folding mutant, dsbA−. However, only three classical AtPDIs (AtPDI2, AtPDI5, AtPDI6 functionally complemented dsbA−. Interestingly, chemical inducers of the ER unfolded protein response were previously shown to upregulate most of the AtPDIs that complemented dsbA−. The results indicate that Arabidopsis PDIs differ in their localization and protein folding activities to fulfill distinct molecular functions in the ER.

  13. Homologous Pairing Activities of Two Rice RAD51 Proteins, RAD51A1 and RAD51A2

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    Ikawa, Shukuko; Mimida, Naozumi; Shimizu, Takeshi; Toki, Seiichi; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Shibata, Takehiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, RAD51 functions as an essential protein in homologous recombination and recombinational repair of DNA double strand breaks. During these processes, RAD51 catalyzes homologous pairing between single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA. Japonica cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) encode two RAD51 proteins, RAD51A1 and RAD51A2, whereas only one RAD51 exists in yeast and mammals. However, the functional differences between RAD51A1 and RAD51A2 have not been elucidated, because their biochemical properties have not been characterized. In the present study, we purified RAD51A1 and RAD51A2, and found that RAD51A2 robustly promotes homologous pairing in vitro. RAD51A1 also possesses homologous-pairing activity, but it is only about 10% of the RAD51A2 activity. Both RAD51A1 and RAD51A2 bind to ssDNA and dsDNA, and their DNA binding strictly requires ATP, which modulates the polymer formation activities of RAD51A1 and RAD51A2. These findings suggest that although both RAD51A1 and RAD51A2 have the potential to catalyze homologous pairing, RAD51A2 may be the major recombinase in rice. PMID:24124491

  14. Right or left turn? RecA family protein filaments promote homologous recombination through clockwise axial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Fang; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2008-01-01

    The RecA family proteins mediate homologous recombination, a ubiquitous mechanism for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stalled replication forks. Members of this family include bacterial RecA, archaeal RadA and Rad51, and eukaryotic Rad51 and Dmc1. These proteins bind to single-stranded DNA at a DSB site to form a presynaptic nucleoprotein filament, align this presynaptic filament with homologous sequences in another double-stranded DNA segment, promote DNA strand exchange and then dissociate. It was generally accepted that RecA family proteins function throughout their catalytic cycles as right-handed helical filaments with six protomers per helical turn. However, we recently reported that archaeal RadA proteins can also form an extended right-handed filament with three monomers per helical turn and a left-handed protein filament with four monomers per helical turn. Subsequent structural and functional analyses suggest that RecA family protein filaments, similar to the F1-ATPase rotary motor, perform ATP-dependent clockwise axial rotation during their catalytic cycles. This new hypothesis has opened a new avenue for understanding the molecular mechanism of RecA family proteins in homologous recombination.

  15. Reconstructing Genome-Wide Protein–Protein Interaction Networks Using Multiple Strategies with Homologous Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Shu; Huang, Sing-Han; Luo, Yong-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yu; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the crucial steps toward understanding the biological functions of a cellular system is to investigate protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. As an increasing number of reliable PPIs become available, there is a growing need for discovering PPIs to reconstruct PPI networks of interesting organisms. Some interolog-based methods and homologous PPI families have been proposed for predicting PPIs from the known PPIs of source organisms. Results Here, we propose a multiple-strategy scoring method to identify reliable PPIs for reconstructing the mouse PPI network from two well-known organisms: human and fly. We firstly identified the PPI candidates of target organisms based on homologous PPIs, sharing significant sequence similarities (joint E-value ≤ 1 × 10−40), from source organisms using generalized interolog mapping. These PPI candidates were evaluated by our multiple-strategy scoring method, combining sequence similarities, normalized ranks, and conservation scores across multiple organisms. According to 106,825 PPI candidates in yeast derived from human and fly, our scoring method can achieve high prediction accuracy and outperform generalized interolog mapping. Experiment results show that our multiple-strategy score can avoid the influence of the protein family size and length to significantly improve PPI prediction accuracy and reflect the biological functions. In addition, the top-ranked and conserved PPIs are often orthologous/essential interactions and share the functional similarity. Based on these reliable predicted PPIs, we reconstructed a comprehensive mouse PPI network, which is a scale-free network and can reflect the biological functions and high connectivity of 292 KEGG modules, including 216 pathways and 76 structural complexes. Conclusions Experimental results show that our scoring method can improve the predicting accuracy based on the normalized rank and evolutionary conservation from multiple organisms. Our predicted

  16. High-throughput plasmid construction using homologous recombination in yeast: its mechanisms and application to protein production for X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kimihiko

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a system for repairing the broken genomes of living organisms by connecting two DNA strands at their homologous sequences. Today, homologous recombination in yeast is used for plasmid construction as a substitute for traditional methods using restriction enzymes and ligases. This method has various advantages over the traditional method, including flexibility in the position of DNA insertion and ease of manipulation. Recently, the author of this review reported the construction of plasmids by homologous recombination in the methanol-utilizing yeast Pichia pastoris, which is known to be an excellent expression host for secretory proteins and membrane proteins. The method enabled high-throughput construction of expression systems of proteins using P. pastoris; the constructed expression systems were used to investigate the expression conditions of membrane proteins and to perform X-ray crystallography of secretory proteins. This review discusses the mechanisms and applications of homologous recombination, including the production of proteins for X-ray crystallography.

  17. Efficacy of heterologous and homologous heat shock protein 70s as protective agents to Artemia franciscana challenged with Vibrio campbellii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Kartik; Ranjan, Jayant; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The Hsp70 class of heat shock proteins (Hsps) has been implicated at multiple points in the immune response of both vertebrates and invertebrates. This class of chaperones is highly conserved in both sequence and structure, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. In view of their high degree of homology, it was assumed that these Hsp70 proteins derived either from the prokaryotes or eukaryotes would have similar functions, especially in relation to their protective ability in a challenge assay. To verify this, we compared two evolutionary diverse Hsp70s, Artemia Hsp70 and Escherichia coli Hsp70 equivalent DnaK (each overproduced in E.coli), for their ability to protect Artemia against Vibrio challenge. Results showed that Artemia fed with E. coli producing Artemia Hsp70 or DnaK proteins, as assessed by immune-probing in western blots, survived better in a Vibrio challenge assay. The observed effects could be due to enhancement of the Artemia immune system as phenoloxidase activity was found to be increased by these proteins. These two Hsp70 proteins exhibit a high degree of homology, particularly in the peptide-binding domain (the putative innate immunity-activating portion) with 59.6% identity, indicating that the observed protective capacity of homologous or heterologous Hsp70 proteins might reside within this peptide-binding domain.

  18. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 homolog CED-9 in Caenorhabditis elegans: dynamics of BH3 and CED-4 binding regions and comparison with mammalian antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins.

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    Modi, Vivek; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2014-06-01

    Proteins belonging to Bcl-2 family regulate intrinsic cell death pathway. Although mammalian antiapoptotic Bcl-2 members interact with multiple proapoptotic proteins, the Caenorhabditis elegans Bcl-2 homolog CED-9 is known to have only two proapoptotic partners. The BH3-motif of proapoptotic proteins bind to the hydrophobic groove of prosurvival proteins formed by the Bcl-2 helical fold. CED-9 is also known to interact with CED-4, a homolog of the human cell death activator Apaf1. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of CED-9 in two forms and compared the results with those of mammalian counterparts Bcl-XL, Bcl-w, and Bcl-2. Our studies demonstrate that the region forming the hydrophobic cleft is more flexible compared with the CED-4-binding region, and this is generally true for all antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins studied. CED-9 is the most stable protein during simulations and its hydrophobic pocket is relatively rigid explaining the absence of functional redundancy in CED-9. The BH3-binding region of Bcl-2 is less flexible among the mammalian proteins and this lends support to the studies that Bcl-2 binds to less number of BH3 peptides with high affinity. The C-terminal helix of CED-9 lost its helical character because of a large number of charged residues. We speculate that this region probably plays a role in intracellular localization of CED-9. The BH4-motif accessibility in CED-9 and Bcl-w is controlled by the loop connecting the first two helices. Although CED-9 adopts the same Bcl-2 fold, our studies highlight important differences in the dynamic behavior of CED-9 and mammalian antiapoptotic homologs.

  19. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

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    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  20. Silencing the lettuce homologs of small rubber particle protein does not influence natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Romit; Qu, Yang; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2015-05-01

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is an important raw material in chemical industries, but its biosynthetic mechanism remains elusive. Natural rubber is known to be synthesized in rubber particles suspended in laticifer cells in the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In the rubber tree, rubber elongation factor (REF) and its homolog, small rubber particle protein (SRPP), were found to be the most abundant proteins in rubber particles, and they have been implicated in natural rubber biosynthesis. As lettuce (Lactuca sativa) can synthesize natural rubber, we utilized this annual, transformable plant to examine in planta roles of the lettuce REF/SRPP homologs by RNA interference. Among eight lettuce REF/SRPP homologs identified, transcripts of two genes (LsSRPP4 and LsSRPP8) accounted for more than 90% of total transcripts of REF/SRPP homologs in lettuce latex. LsSRPP4 displays a typical primary protein sequence as other REF/SRPP, while LsSRPP8 is twice as long as LsSRPP4. These two major LsSRPP transcripts were individually and simultaneously silenced by RNA interference, and relative abundance, polymer molecular weight, and polydispersity of natural rubber were analyzed from the LsSRPP4- and LsSRPP8-silenced transgenic lettuce. Despite previous data suggesting the implications of REF/SRPP in natural rubber biosynthesis, qualitative and quantitative alterations of natural rubber could not be observed in transgenic lettuce lines. It is concluded that lettuce REF/SRPP homologs are not critically important proteins in natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

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    Zheng-Yu Jiang

    Full Text Available Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1, a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ, which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI, the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  2. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng-Yu; Chu, Hong-Xi; Xi, Mei-Yang; Yang, Ting-Ting; Jia, Jian-Min; Huang, Jing-Jie; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1), a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3)-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI), the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  3. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio; Reed, John C; Pascual, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160-Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 A resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6(1)22/P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 A. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  4. Controllability in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchty, Stefan

    2014-05-13

    Recently, the focus of network research shifted to network controllability, prompting us to determine proteins that are important for the control of the underlying interaction webs. In particular, we determined minimum dominating sets of proteins (MDSets) in human and yeast protein interaction networks. Such groups of proteins were defined as optimized subsets where each non-MDSet protein can be reached by an interaction from an MDSet protein. Notably, we found that MDSet proteins were enriched with essential, cancer-related, and virus-targeted genes. Their central position allowed MDSet proteins to connect protein complexes and to have a higher impact on network resilience than hub proteins. As for their involvement in regulatory functions, MDSet proteins were enriched with transcription factors and protein kinases and were significantly involved in bottleneck interactions, regulatory links, phosphorylation events, and genetic interactions.

  5. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  6. Signal peptide homology between the sweet protein thaumatin II and unrelated cereal alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, A; Rodriguez-Palenzuela, P; Maraña, C; Carbonero, P; Garcia-Olmedo, F

    1988-10-24

    A cDNA clone (pUP-23) corresponding to a member of a protein family that includes inhibitors of trypsin and of heterologous alpha-amylases has been selected from a library derived from developing barley endosperm and its sequence has been determined. A stretch of 95 nucleotides that included the signal peptide and the first 8 residues of the mature protein was found to be homologous to an exactly equivalent region of the nucleotide sequence encoding the sweet protein thaumatin II. Evolutionary implications of this finding are discussed.

  7. Beyond the Twilight Zone: automated prediction of structural properties of proteins by recursive neural networks and remote homology information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Catherine; Pollastri, Gianluca

    2009-10-01

    The prediction of 1D structural properties of proteins is an important step toward the prediction of protein structure and function, not only in the ab initio case but also when homology information to known structures is available. Despite this the vast majority of 1D predictors do not incorporate homology information into the prediction process. We develop a novel structural alignment method, SAMD, which we use to build alignments of putative remote homologues that we compress into templates of structural frequency profiles. We use these templates as additional input to ensembles of recursive neural networks, which we specialise for the prediction of query sequences that show only remote homology to any Protein Data Bank structure. We predict four 1D structural properties - secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, backbone structural motifs, and contact density. Secondary structure prediction accuracy, tested by five-fold cross-validation on a large set of proteins allowing less than 25% sequence identity between training and test set and query sequences and templates, exceeds 82%, outperforming its ab initio counterpart, other state-of-the-art secondary structure predictors (Jpred 3 and PSIPRED) and two other systems based on PSI-BLAST and COMPASS templates. We show that structural information from homologues improves prediction accuracy well beyond the Twilight Zone of sequence similarity, even below 5% sequence identity, for all four structural properties. Significant improvement over the extraction of structural information directly from PDB templates suggests that the combination of sequence and template information is more informative than templates alone.

  8. Homology modelling and protein engineering strategy of subtilases, the family of subtilisin-like serine proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siezen, R J; de Vos, W M; Leunissen, J A; Dijkstra, B W

    1991-10-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, greater than 50 subtilases are known, greater than 40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and proteinase K). The mature enzymes contain up to 1775 residues, with N-terminal catalytic domains ranging from 268 to 511 residues, and signal and/or activation-peptides ranging from 27 to 280 residues. Several members contain C-terminal extensions, relative to the subtilisins, which display additional properties such as sequence repeats, processing sites and membrane anchor segments. Multiple sequence alignment of the N-terminal catalytic domains allows the definition of two main classes of subtilases. A structurally conserved framework of 191 core residues has been defined from a comparison of the four known three-dimensional structures. Eighteen of these core residues are highly conserved, nine of which are glycines. While the alpha-helix and beta-sheet secondary structure elements show considerable sequence homology, this is less so for peptide loops that connect the core secondary structure elements. These loops can vary in length by greater than 150 residues. While the core three-dimensional structure is conserved, insertions and deletions are preferentially confined to surface loops. From the known three-dimensional structures various predictions are made for the other subtilases concerning essential conserved residues, allowable amino acid substitutions, disulphide bonds, Ca(2+)-binding sites, substrate-binding site residues, ionic and aromatic interactions, proteolytically susceptible surface loops, etc. These predictions form a basis for protein engineering of members of the subtilase family, for which no three-dimensional structure is known.

  9. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Northall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops, a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR, which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing.

  10. Mediators of homologous DNA pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2014-10-09

    Homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange are at the core of homologous recombination. These reactions are promoted by a DNA-strand-exchange protein assembled into a nucleoprotein filament comprising the DNA-pairing protein, ATP, and single-stranded DNA. The catalytic activity of this molecular machine depends on control of its dynamic instability by accessory factors. Here we discuss proteins known as recombination mediators that facilitate formation and functional activation of the DNA-strand-exchange protein filament. Although the basics of homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange are highly conserved in evolution, differences in mediator function are required to cope with differences in how single-stranded DNA is packaged by the single-stranded DNA-binding protein in different species, and the biochemical details of how the different DNA-strand-exchange proteins nucleate and extend into a nucleoprotein filament. The set of (potential) mediator proteins has apparently expanded greatly in evolution, raising interesting questions about the need for additional control and coordination of homologous recombination in more complex organisms. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Targeting protein-protein interactions for parasite control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Taylor

    Full Text Available Finding new drug targets for pathogenic infections would be of great utility for humanity, as there is a large need to develop new drugs to fight infections due to the developing resistance and side effects of current treatments. Current drug targets for pathogen infections involve only a single protein. However, proteins rarely act in isolation, and the majority of biological processes occur via interactions with other proteins, so protein-protein interactions (PPIs offer a realm of unexplored potential drug targets and are thought to be the next-generation of drug targets. Parasitic worms were chosen for this study because they have deleterious effects on human health, livestock, and plants, costing society billions of dollars annually and many sequenced genomes are available. In this study, we present a computational approach that utilizes whole genomes of 6 parasitic and 1 free-living worm species and 2 hosts. The species were placed in orthologous groups, then binned in species-specific orthologous groups. Proteins that are essential and conserved among species that span a phyla are of greatest value, as they provide foundations for developing broad-control strategies. Two PPI databases were used to find PPIs within the species specific bins. PPIs with unique helminth proteins and helminth proteins with unique features relative to the host, such as indels, were prioritized as drug targets. The PPIs were scored based on RNAi phenotype and homology to the PDB (Protein DataBank. EST data for the various life stages, GO annotation, and druggability were also taken into consideration. Several PPIs emerged from this study as potential drug targets. A few interactions were supported by co-localization of expression in M. incognita (plant parasite and B. malayi (H. sapiens parasite, which have extremely different modes of parasitism. As more genomes of pathogens are sequenced and PPI databases expanded, this methodology will become increasingly

  12. In silico Sequence Analysis, Homology Modeling and Function Annotation of Ocimum basilicum Hypothetical Protein G1CT28_OCIBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Idrees

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocimum basilicum is commonly known as sweet basil and belongs to the Lamiaceae Family. Ocimum basilicum has great therapeutic benefits and can be used for lowering blood pressure, as an antispasmodic as well as cleansing the blood. In the present study, subcellular localization prediction suggested that it is a cytoplasmic protein. We predicted the 3D structure of protein using homology modeling as 3D structure prediction approach. 3D structure of the protein was determined using Protein Structure Prediction Server (PS2 selecting MODELLER as 3D structure prediction method. Quality analysis of the model indicated that it is a reliable model. Furthermore, it was discovered that Ocimum basilicum hypothetical protein G1CT28_OCIBA is involved in two biological processes, oxidation reduction and metabolic process and the biochemical function of the protein is acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donors, NAD or NADP as acceptor, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase.

  13. Origin and Status of Homologous Proteins of Biomineralization (Biosilicification in the Taxonomy of Phylogenetic Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor E. Pamirsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic affiliation (in the systematisation of viruses, and biological domains of known peptides and proteins of biomineralization (silicateins, silaffins, silacidins and silicase and their primary structure homologues were analyzed (methods in silico; using Uniprot database. The total number of known peptides and proteins of biosilicification was counted. The data of the quantitative distribution of the detected homologues found in nature are presented. The similarity of the primary structures of silaffins, silacidins, silicateins, silicase, and their homologues was 21–94%, 45–98%, 39–50%, and 28–40%, respectively. These homologues are found in many organisms, from the Protista to the higher plants and animals, including humans, as well as in bacteria and extracellular agents, and they perform a variety of biological functions, such as biologically controlled mineralisation. The provisional classification of these biomineralization proteins is presented. The interrelation of the origin of the first organic polymers and biomineralization is discussed.

  14. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of “good modeling practice” to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level. PMID:28163672

  15. Targeting Neuroblastoma Cell Surface Proteins: Recommendations for Homology Modeling of hNET, ALK, and TrkB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbyněk; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Targeted therapy is a promising approach for treatment of neuroblastoma as evident from the large number of targeting agents employed in clinical practice today. In the absence of known crystal structures, researchers rely on homology modeling to construct template-based theoretical structures for drug design and testing. Here, we discuss three candidate cell surface proteins that are suitable for homology modeling: human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 or TrkB). When choosing templates, both sequence identity and structure quality are important for homology modeling and pose the first of many challenges in the modeling process. Homology modeling of hNET can be improved using template models of dopamine and serotonin transporters instead of the leucine transporter (LeuT). The extracellular domains of ALK and TrkB are yet to be exploited by homology modeling. There are several idiosyncrasies that require direct attention throughout the process of model construction, evaluation and refinement. Shifts/gaps in the alignment between the template and target, backbone outliers and side-chain rotamer outliers are among the main sources of physical errors in the structures. Low-conserved regions can be refined with loop modeling method. Residue hydrophobicity, accessibility to bound metals or glycosylation can aid in model refinement. We recommend resolving these idiosyncrasies as part of "good modeling practice" to obtain highest quality model. Decreasing physical errors in protein structures plays major role in the development of targeting agents and understanding of chemical interactions at the molecular level.

  16. Short amino acid stretches can mediate amyloid formation in globular proteins: the Src homology 3 (SH3) case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Salvador; Zurdo, Jesús; Narayanan, Saravanakumar; Parreño, Matilde; Mangues, Ramón; Reif, Bernd; Chiti, Fabrizio; Giannoni, Elisa; Dobson, Christopher M; Aviles, Francesc X; Serrano, Luis

    2004-05-11

    Protein misfolding and deposition underlie an increasing number of debilitating human disorders. We have shown that model proteins unrelated to disease, such as the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of the p58alpha subunit of bovine phosphatidyl-inositol-3'-kinase (PI3-SH3), can be converted in vitro into assemblies with structural and cytotoxic properties similar to those of pathological aggregates. By contrast, homologous proteins, such as alpha-spectrin-SH3, lack the capability of forming amyloid fibrils at a measurable rate under any of the conditions we have so far examined. However, transplanting a small sequence stretch (6 aa) from PI3-SH3 to alpha-spectrin-SH3, comprising residues of the diverging turn and adjacent RT loop, creates an amyloidogenic protein closely similar in its behavior to the original PI3-SH3. Analysis of specific PI3-SH3 mutants further confirms the involvement of this region in conferring amyloidogenic properties to this domain. Moreover, the inclusion in this stretch of two consensus residues favored in SH3 sequences substantially inhibits aggregation. These findings show that short specific amino acid stretches can act as mediators or facilitators in the incorporation of globular proteins into amyloid structures, and they support the suggestion that natural protein sequences have evolved in part to code for structural characteristics other than those included in the native fold, such as avoidance of aggregation.

  17. Identification and Crystallization of Penicillin-Binding Protein/β-Lactamase Homolog (Rp46 from Ruegeria Pomeroyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bum Han Ryu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the enormous biological and clinical significance of penicillin-binding protein (PBP/β-lactamase (βL, few of their many homologs (PBP/βLs homologs have been studied crystallographically, and have known functions. Herein, X-ray crystallographic study of a PBP/βL homolog (Rp46 from Ruegeria pomeroyi is described. Multiple sequence alignments indicate that Rp46 has a conserved serine residue within the S70-X-X-K73 motif (Motif I, acting as the catalytic nucleophile. Moreover, an invariant tyrosine residue (Tyr185 and a Trp365-X-Gly motif (Motif III were also identified. The recombinant Rp46 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity judging from the SDS-PAGE analysis. Rp46 was crystallized using a solution consisting of 20% (w/v PEG 3000, 0.1 M Tris-HCl, pH 7.0, 0.2 M calcium acetate, and the X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.90 Å with an Rmerge of 7.4%. The crystals of Rp46 belong to the space group I422, with unit cell parameters a = b = 141.26 Å, and c = 119.75. The structure determination and biochemical characterization are in progress. (Synopsis: A penicillin-binding protein/β-lactamase homolog (Rp46 from Ruegeria pomeroyi was identified and crystallized in the space group I4, and the diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.90 Å.

  18. FeatureMap3D - a tool to map protein features and sequence conservation onto homologous structures in the PDB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Rapacki, Krzysztof; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    FeatureMap3D is a web-based tool that maps protein features onto 3D structures. The user provides sequences annotated with any feature of interest, such as post-translational modifications, protease cleavage sites or exonic structure and FeatureMap3D will then search the Protein Data Bank (PDB...... without sequence annotation, to evaluate the quality of the alignment of the input sequences to the most homologous structures in the PDB, through the sequence conservation colored 3D structure visualization tool. FeatureMap3D is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/FeatureMap3D/....

  19. Overexpression of denticleless E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (DTL) is related to poor outcome in gastric carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Hiroki; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Hirajima, Shoji; Miyamae, Mahito; Okajima, Wataru; Ohashi, Takuma; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; FUJIWARA, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-01-01

    Background Denticleless E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (DTL) has been identified in amplified region (1q32) of several cancers and has an oncogenic function. In this study, we tested whether DTL acts as a cancer-promoting gene through its activation/overexpression in gastric cancer (GC). Methods We analyzed 7 GC cell lines and 100 primary tumors that were curatively resected in our hospital between 2001 and 2003. Results Overexpression of the DTL protein was detected in GC cell lines (4/...

  20. Isolation of a wheat cDNA clone for an abscisic acid-inducible transcript with homology to protein kinases.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderberg, R J; Walker-Simmons, M K

    1992-01-01

    Increases in the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) initiate water-stress responses in plants. We present evidence that a transcript with homology to protein kinases is induced by ABA and dehydration in wheat. A 1.2-kilobase cDNA clone (PKABA1) was isolated from an ABA-treated wheat embryo cDNA library by screening the library with a probe developed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of serine/threonine protein kinase subdomains VIb to VIII. The deduced amino acid sequence of the PKABA...

  1. Preliminary structural studies on the leucine-zipper homology region of the human protein Bap31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukasa, Takashi; Santelli, Eugenio [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Reed, John C. [Program on Apoptosis, Cancer Center, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Pascual, Jaime, E-mail: pascual@burnham.org [Program on Infectious Diseases, Center for Inflammation and Infectious Diseases, The Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-04-01

    A leucine-zipper with properties as apoptotic regulator in the ER has been crystallized. X-ray data to 2.5 Å resolution were collected, molecular replacement solutions were identified and refinement has been started. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 (Bap31) is an integral membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that participates in the transport and quality control of membrane proteins and plays a role in determining cell sensitivity to ER stress and apoptosis. Its cytoplasmic region contains two target sites for caspase cleavage in certain apoptotic pathways. Here, the subcloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the Homo sapiens Bap31 leucine-zipper C-terminal fragment, which spans residues Gly160–Glu246, are reported. An N-terminally His-tagged protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by chromatographic methods. X-ray diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.5 Å resolution. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22/P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 70.7, c = 80.6 Å. Data analysis indicates the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  2. Hydration in drug design. 3. Conserved water molecules at the ligand-binding sites of homologous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornima, C S; Dean, P M

    1995-12-01

    Water molecules are known to play an important rôle in mediating protein-ligand interactions. If water molecules are conserved at the ligand-binding sites of homologous proteins, such a finding may suggest the structural importance of water molecules in ligand binding. Structurally conserved water molecules change the conventional definition of 'binding sites' by changing the shape and complementarity of these sites. Such conserved water molecules can be important for site-directed ligand/drug design. Therefore, five different sets of homologous protein/protein-ligand complexes have been examined to identify the conserved water molecules at the ligand-binding sites. Our analysis reveals that there are as many as 16 conserved water molecules at the FAD binding site of glutathione reductase between the crystal structures obtained from human and E. coli. In the remaining four sets of high-resolution crystal structures, 2-4 water molecules have been found to be conserved at the ligand-binding sites. The majority of these conserved water molecules are either bound in deep grooves at the protein-ligand interface or completely buried in cavities between the protein and the ligand. All these water molecules, conserved between the protein/protein-ligand complexes from different species, have identical or similar apolar and polar interactions in a given set. The site residues interacting with the conserved water molecules at the ligand-binding sites have been found to be highly conserved among proteins from different species; they are more conserved compared to the other site residues interacting with the ligand. These water molecules, in general, make multiple polar contacts with protein-site residues.

  3. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous (CHOP protein promotes carcinogenesis in the DEN-induced hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Scaiewicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP plays pro-apoptotic roles in the integrated stress response. Recently, a tumor suppressive role for CHOP was demonstrated in lung cancer via regulation of tumor metabolism. To explore the role of CHOP in hepatocarcinogenesis, we induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in wild type (wt and CHOP knockout (KO mice using the carcinogen N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN. RESULTS: Analysis of tumor development showed reduced tumor load, with markedly smaller tumor nodules in the CHOP KO animals, suggesting oncogenic roles of CHOP in carcinogen-induced HCC. In wt tumors, CHOP was exclusively expressed in tumor tissue, with minimal expression in normal parenchyma. Analysis of human adenocarcinomas of various origins demonstrated scattered expression of CHOP in the tumors, pointing to relevance in human pathology. Characterization of pathways that may contribute to preferential expression of CHOP in the tumor identified ATF6 as a potential candidate. ATF6, a key member of the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling machinery, exhibited a similar pattern of expression as CHOP and strong activation in wt but not CHOP KO tumors. Because HCC is induced by chronic inflammation, we assessed whether CHOP deficiency affects tumor-immune system crosstalk. We found that the number of macrophages and levels of IFNγ and CCL4 mRNA were markedly reduced in tumors from CHOP KO relative to wt mice, suggesting a role for CHOP in modulating tumor microenvironment and macrophage recruitment to the tumor. CONCLUSION: Our data highlights a role for CHOP as a positive regulator of carcinogen-induced HCC progression through a complex mechanism that involves the immune system and modulation of stress signaling pathways.

  4. BindUP: a web server for non-homology-based prediction of DNA and RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Inbal; Kligun, Efrat; Bengad, Barak; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-07-08

    Gene expression is a multi-step process involving many layers of regulation. The main regulators of the pathway are DNA and RNA binding proteins. While over the years, a large number of DNA and RNA binding proteins have been identified and extensively studied, it is still expected that many other proteins, some with yet another known function, are awaiting to be discovered. Here we present a new web server, BindUP, freely accessible through the website http://bindup.technion.ac.il/, for predicting DNA and RNA binding proteins using a non-homology-based approach. Our method is based on the electrostatic features of the protein surface and other general properties of the protein. BindUP predicts nucleic acid binding function given the proteins three-dimensional structure or a structural model. Additionally, BindUP provides information on the largest electrostatic surface patches, visualized on the server. The server was tested on several datasets of DNA and RNA binding proteins, including proteins which do not possess DNA or RNA binding domains and have no similarity to known nucleic acid binding proteins, achieving very high accuracy. BindUP is applicable in either single or batch modes and can be applied for testing hundreds of proteins simultaneously in a highly efficient manner.

  5. External and semi-internal controls for PCR amplification of homologous sequences in mixed templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Elena; Gulevich, Alexander; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    In a mixed template, the presence of homologous target DNA sequences creates environments that almost inevitably give rise to artifacts and biases during PCR. Heteroduplexes, chimeras, and skewed template-to-product ratios are the exclusive attributes of mixed template PCR and never occur in a single template assay. Yet, multi-template PCR has been used without appropriate attention to quality control and assay validation, in spite of the fact that such practice diminishes the reliability of results. External and internal amplification controls became obligatory elements of good laboratory practice in different PCR assays. We propose the inclusion of an analogous approach as a quality control system for multi-template PCR applications. The amplification controls must take into account the characteristics of multi-template PCR and be able to effectively monitor particular assay performance. This study demonstrated the efficiency of a model mixed template as an adequate external amplification control for a particular PCR application. The conditions of multi-template PCR do not allow implementation of a classic internal control; therefore we developed a convenient semi-internal control as an acceptable alternative. In order to evaluate the effects of inhibitors, a model multi-template mix was amplified in a mixture with DNAse-treated sample. Semi-internal control allowed establishment of intervals for robust PCR performance for different samples, thus enabling correct comparison of the samples. The complexity of the external and semi-internal amplification controls must be comparable with the assumed complexity of the samples. We also emphasize that amplification controls should be applied in multi-template PCR regardless of the post-assay method used to analyze products.

  6. Homology modeling of the three membrane proteins of the dhurrin metabolon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Osmani, Sarah Anne; Hamann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    is derived from l-tyrosine in a pathway involving the two cytochromes P450 (CYPs) CYP79A1 and CYP71E1, a glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and the redox partner NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Experimental evidence suggests that the enzymes of this pathway form a metabolon. Homology modeling...

  7. GPCR-SSFE: A comprehensive database of G-protein-coupled receptor template predictions and homology models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuchwig Annika

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs transduce a wide variety of extracellular signals to within the cell and therefore have a key role in regulating cell activity and physiological function. GPCR malfunction is responsible for a wide range of diseases including cancer, diabetes and hyperthyroidism and a large proportion of drugs on the market target these receptors. The three dimensional structure of GPCRs is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. Although structural data are restricted to only a handful of GPCRs, homology models can be used as a proxy for those receptors not having crystal structures. However, many researchers working on GPCRs are not experienced homology modellers and are therefore unable to benefit from the information that can be gleaned from such three-dimensional models. Here, we present a comprehensive database called the GPCR-SSFE, which provides initial homology models of the transmembrane helices for a large variety of family A GPCRs. Description Extending on our previous theoretical work, we have developed an automated pipeline for GPCR homology modelling and applied it to a large set of family A GPCR sequences. Our pipeline is a fragment-based approach that exploits available family A crystal structures. The GPCR-SSFE database stores the template predictions, sequence alignments, identified sequence and structure motifs and homology models for 5025 family A GPCRs. Users are able to browse the GPCR dataset according to their pharmacological classification or search for results using a UniProt entry name. It is also possible for a user to submit a GPCR sequence that is not contained in the database for analysis and homology model building. The models can be viewed using a Jmol applet and are also available for download along with the alignments. Conclusions The data provided by GPCR-SSFE are useful for investigating

  8. GPCR-SSFE: a comprehensive database of G-protein-coupled receptor template predictions and homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Catherine L; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kleinau, Gunnar; Krause, Gerd

    2011-05-23

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce a wide variety of extracellular signals to within the cell and therefore have a key role in regulating cell activity and physiological function. GPCR malfunction is responsible for a wide range of diseases including cancer, diabetes and hyperthyroidism and a large proportion of drugs on the market target these receptors. The three dimensional structure of GPCRs is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. Although structural data are restricted to only a handful of GPCRs, homology models can be used as a proxy for those receptors not having crystal structures. However, many researchers working on GPCRs are not experienced homology modellers and are therefore unable to benefit from the information that can be gleaned from such three-dimensional models. Here, we present a comprehensive database called the GPCR-SSFE, which provides initial homology models of the transmembrane helices for a large variety of family A GPCRs. Extending on our previous theoretical work, we have developed an automated pipeline for GPCR homology modelling and applied it to a large set of family A GPCR sequences. Our pipeline is a fragment-based approach that exploits available family A crystal structures. The GPCR-SSFE database stores the template predictions, sequence alignments, identified sequence and structure motifs and homology models for 5025 family A GPCRs. Users are able to browse the GPCR dataset according to their pharmacological classification or search for results using a UniProt entry name. It is also possible for a user to submit a GPCR sequence that is not contained in the database for analysis and homology model building. The models can be viewed using a Jmol applet and are also available for download along with the alignments. The data provided by GPCR-SSFE are useful for investigating general and detailed sequence-structure-function relationships

  9. Clarification of Interaction Mechanism of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) N and nsp3 Protein with Homology Modeling and Protein-Protein Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Gizem; Tok, Tugba Taskin

    2016-02-26

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) plays an important role in the virus structure, the replication, and the transcription of CoV. This protein, which has a helix and flexible structure, and capable of binding on to the viral genomic RNA, is a non-structural protein (nsp3). Many studies suggest that the N protein interaction with nsp3 plays a critical role in the virus replication early in infection. Therefore, it is necessary to know the definition of the interaction mechanism of N and nsp3 protein in terms of the CoV replication transcription mechanism. We report on the homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation, and docking studies to explain the structure-function relationship and the interaction mechanism. In addition, the prototype MHV is preferred in the wet experiment, so we also based our study on the MHV N and nsp3 proteins that belong to the experimental study. The amino acid sequences of MHV N and nsp3 proteins have similarity between human and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Therefore, the 3D structure models of these proteins were built with using the crystal structure of the CoV family members as a template. By following these models, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to attain the most stable conformation. Finally, protein-protein docking was performed to prove accuracy of model structures of the MHV N and to clarify the interaction with nsp3. As a result, Lys 113, Arg 125, Tyr 127, Glu 173, Tyr 190 residues that play an important role in virus replication were determined.

  10. Characterization of cDNA encoding human placental anticoagulant protein (PP4): Homology with the lipocortin family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Abel, K.J.; Bohn, H.; Loebermann, H.; Lottspeich, F.; Kuepper, H. (Research Institutes, Postfach (West Germany))

    1988-06-01

    A cDNA library prepared from human placenta was screened for sequences encoding the placental protein 4 (PP4). PP4 is an anticoagulant protein that acts as an indirect inhibitor of the thromboplastin-specific complex, which is involved in the blood coagulation cascade. Partial amino acid sequence information from PP4-derived cyanogen bromide fragments was used to design three oligonucleotide probes for screening the library. From 10{sup 6} independent recombinants, 18 clones were identified that hybridized to all three probes. These 18 recombinants contained cDNA inserts encoding a protein of 320 amino acid residues. In addition to the PP4 cDNA the authors identified 9 other recombinants encoding a protein with considerable similarity (74%) to PP4, which was termed PP4-X. PP4 and PP4-X belong to the lipocortin family, as judged by their homology to lipocortin I and calpactin I.

  11. A novel homolog of protein tyrosine kinase Fyn identified in Lampetra japonica with roles in the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong; Song, Xueying; Su, Peng; Li, Ranran; Liu, Chang; Gou, Meng; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2016-04-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase (nrPTK) Fyn, a member of the avian sarcoma virus transforming gene (Src) kinase family, plays a very significant role in cell growth, survival, apoptosis, tumor formation and immune response. In this study, a homolog of nrPTK Fyn was identified for the first time in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica and was named "Lja-Fyn". The cDNA fragment of lamprey lja-fyn contains a 1611-bp open reading frame, which encodes a protein of 537 amino acids. Multiple sequence alignment analysis showed that it shares four conserved domains (Src homology (SH) 4, SH3, SH2 and protein kinases catalytic domains) and a variable unique domain with vertebrates Fyn molecules. Though Lja-Fyn has high sequence similarity with typical Fyn and Yes molecules of jawed vertebrates, the identities among Lja-Fyn and typical Fyn molecules in unique domain are relatively higher than that among Lja-Fyn and typical Yes molecules. The result indicates that Lja-Fyn is a homolog of Fyn rather than Yes. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Fyn, Yes and Src molecules are grouped into three distinct phylogenetic clusters, and Lja-Fyn is grouped as a single branch in Fyn cluster. The real-time quantitative PCR assay revealed the wide distribution of the lja-fyn mRNA in lamprey immune related tissues. After stimulation with mixed antigens, the levels of lja-fyn mRNA were obviously up-regulated in the gill and lymphocyte-like cells, and the similar results were got by western blot analysis of Lja-Fyn protein expression. These results indicated that nrPTK Lja-Fyn was likely to be involved in immune response. Furthermore, our present findings also provide the necessary information for understanding the distinction between lamprey Lja-Fyn and other members of jawed vertebrates in Src family.

  12. Not all transmembrane helices are born equal: Towards the extension of the sequence homology concept to membrane proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Sequence homology considerations widely used to transfer functional annotation to uncharacterized protein sequences require special precautions in the case of non-globular sequence segments including membrane-spanning stretches composed of non-polar residues. Simple, quantitative criteria are desirable for identifying transmembrane helices (TMs) that must be included into or should be excluded from start sequence segments in similarity searches aimed at finding distant homologues. Results We found that there are two types of TMs in membrane-associated proteins. On the one hand, there are so-called simple TMs with elevated hydrophobicity, low sequence complexity and extraordinary enrichment in long aliphatic residues. They merely serve as membrane-anchoring device. In contrast, so-called complex TMs have lower hydrophobicity, higher sequence complexity and some functional residues. These TMs have additional roles besides membrane anchoring such as intra-membrane complex formation, ligand binding or a catalytic role. Simple and complex TMs can occur both in single- and multi-membrane-spanning proteins essentially in any type of topology. Whereas simple TMs have the potential to confuse searches for sequence homologues and to generate unrelated hits with seemingly convincing statistical significance, complex TMs contain essential evolutionary information. Conclusion For extending the homology concept onto membrane proteins, we provide a necessary quantitative criterion to distinguish simple TMs (and a sufficient criterion for complex TMs) in query sequences prior to their usage in homology searches based on assessment of hydrophobicity and sequence complexity of the TM sequence segments. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Shamil Sunyaev, L. Aravind and Arcady Mushegian. PMID:22024092

  13. Controlling proteins through molecular springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocchi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We argue that the mechanical control of proteins-the notion of controlling chemical reactions and processes by mechanics-is conceptually interesting. We give a brief review of the main accomplishments so far, leading to our present approach of using DNA molecular springs to exert controlled stresses on proteins. Our focus is on the physical principles that underlie both artificial mechanochemical devices and natural mechanisms of allostery.

  14. Structural analysis of human complement protein H: homology with C4b binding protein, beta 2-glycoprotein I, and the Ba fragment of B2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Wetsel, R A; Tack, B F

    1986-01-01

    We report here a partial primary structure for human complement protein H. Tryptic peptides comprising 27% of the H molecule were isolated by conventional techniques and were sequenced (333 amino acid residues). Several mixed-sequence oligonucleotide probes were constructed, based on the peptide ....... Furthermore, the repetitive unit of H shows pronounced homology with the Ba fragment of B, the C4b binding protein, and beta 2-glycoprotein I. Therefore, it seems that at least portions of these proteins have evolved from a common ancestral DNA element...

  15. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  16. Role of Protein Quality Control Failure in Alcoholic Hepatitis Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel W. French

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of protein quality control in hepatocytes in cases of alcoholic hepatitis (AH including ufmylation, FAT10ylation, metacaspase 1 (Mca1, ERAD (endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation, JUNQ (juxta nuclear quality control, IPOD (insoluble protein deposit autophagocytosis, and ER stress are reviewed. The Mallory–Denk body (MDB formation develops in the hepatocytes in alcoholic hepatitis as a consequence of the failure of these protein quality control mechanisms to remove misfolded and damaged proteins and to prevent MDB aggresome formation within the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. The proteins involved in the quality control pathways are identified, quantitated, and visualized by immunofluorescent antibody staining of liver biopsies from patients with AH. Quantification of the proteins are achieved by measuring the fluorescent intensity using a morphometric system. Ufmylation and FAT10ylation pathways were downregulated, Mca1 pathways were upregulated, autophagocytosis was upregulated, and ER stress PERK (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein mechanisms were upregulated. In conclusion: Despite the upregulation of several pathways of protein quality control, aggresomes (MDBs still formed in the hepatocytes in AH. The pathogenesis of AH is due to the failure of protein quality control, which causes balloon-cell change with MDB formation and ER stress.

  17. Cloning and isolation of a conus cysteine-rich protein homologous to Tex31 but without proteolytic activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Qian; Zhanyun Guo; Chengwu Chi

    2008-01-01

    We cloned and isolated a cysteine-rich protein, designated Mr30, from Conus marmoreus. Mr30 belongs to the cysteinerich secretory protein family that is highly homologous to Tex31 previously obtained from Conus textile and reported as a protease responsible for processing of pro-conotoxins. Mr30, purified by a procedure similar to that of Tex31,indeed showed low proteolytic activity. However, further investigations revealed that the detected protease activity actually resulted from a trace amount of protease(s) contamination rather than from Mr30 itself. This finding led us to rethink the role of conus cysteine-rich secretory proteins: they were probably not responsible for the processing of pro-conotoxins as previously deduced, but their real biological functions remained to be clarified.

  18. The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Blomme, Jonas

    2017-04-19

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Gainand loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development.

  19. The influence of a homologous protein impurity on lysozyme crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidi, V.; Hanson, B. L.; Edmundson, A.; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E.; Schall, C.

    1999-08-01

    The effect of a structurally similar protein impurity, turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo) egg-white lysozyme (TEWL) on crystallization of the host protein, hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) from chicken ( Gallus gallus) was studied under varying impurity and host solution concentrations. A change in morphology is observed when crystals of HEWL are grown in the presence of TEWL. As the relative amount of TEWL increases, HEWL crystals become more elongated in the [0 0 1] direction. Elongation is more pronounced in samples with lower initial concentrations of HEWL than in samples with higher initial concentrations. This behavior is consistent with that of impurities in small molecule crystal growth and with predictions based on the Kubota-Mullin model. The observed effect on the growth process can be attributed to the apparent inhibition in the [1 1 0] crystal growth direction of HEWL by TEWL since slowly growing faces become dominant faces in crystal growth. Incorporation of TEWL into HEWL crystals grown in a sitting drop batch method was measured using cation exchange chromatography. The results indicate that impurity incorporation is associated with increasing supersaturation. This conclusion is consistent with a kinetically controlled process of impurity incorporation. The observed impurity effects are most probably associated with the interchange of glutamine in position 41 of HEWL by histidine in TEWL.

  20. Inhibitors of protein:farnesyl transferase and protein:geranylgeranyl transferase I : Synthesis of homologous diphosphonate analogs of isoprenylated pyrophosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overhand, M.; Stuivenberg, H.R.; Pieterman, E.; Cohen, L.H.; Leeuwen, R.E.W. van; Valentijn, A.R.P.M.; Overkleeft, H.S.; Marel, G.A. van der; Boom, J.H. van

    1998-01-01

    Novel diphosphonate homologs 7a-7c, and their cyclic counterparts 8a- 8c, of the previously synthesized farnesyl pyrophosphate analogs 1 and 2 were prepared and tested for their inhibition potency and specificity of the enzymes PFT and PGGT-I. Compound 2 was shown to be the most potent inhibitor of

  1. PSI/TM-Coffee: a web server for fast and accurate multiple sequence alignments of regular and transmembrane proteins using homology extension on reduced databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floden, Evan W; Tommaso, Paolo D; Chatzou, Maria; Magis, Cedrik; Notredame, Cedric; Chang, Jia-Ming

    2016-07-08

    The PSI/TM-Coffee web server performs multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of proteins by combining homology extension with a consistency based alignment approach. Homology extension is performed with Position Specific Iterative (PSI) BLAST searches against a choice of redundant and non-redundant databases. The main novelty of this server is to allow databases of reduced complexity to rapidly perform homology extension. This server also gives the possibility to use transmembrane proteins (TMPs) reference databases to allow even faster homology extension on this important category of proteins. Aside from an MSA, the server also outputs topological prediction of TMPs using the HMMTOP algorithm. Previous benchmarking of the method has shown this approach outperforms the most accurate alignment methods such as MSAProbs, Kalign, PROMALS, MAFFT, ProbCons and PRALINE™. The web server is available at http://tcoffee.crg.cat/tmcoffee. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Meiotic crossover control by concerted action of Rad51-Dmc1 in homolog template bias and robust homeostatic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica P Lao

    Full Text Available During meiosis, repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by recombination promotes pairing of homologous chromosomes and their connection by crossovers. Two DNA strand-exchange proteins, Rad51 and Dmc1, are required for meiotic recombination in many organisms. Studies in budding yeast imply that Rad51 acts to regulate Dmc1's strand exchange activity, while its own exchange activity is inhibited. However, in a dmc1 mutant, elimination of inhibitory factor, Hed1, activates Rad51's strand exchange activity and results in high levels of recombination without participation of Dmc1. Here we show that Rad51-mediated meiotic recombination is not subject to regulatory processes associated with high-fidelity chromosome segregation. These include homolog bias, a process that directs strand exchange between homologs rather than sister chromatids. Furthermore, activation of Rad51 does not effectively substitute for Dmc1's chromosome pairing activity, nor does it ensure formation of the obligate crossovers required for accurate homolog segregation. We further show that Dmc1's dominance in promoting strand exchange between homologs involves repression of Rad51's strand-exchange activity. This function of Dmc1 is independent of Hed1, but requires the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Hed1 makes a relatively minor contribution to homolog bias, but nonetheless this is important for normal morphogenesis of synaptonemal complexes and efficient crossing-over especially when DSB numbers are decreased. Super-resolution microscopy shows that Dmc1 also acts to organize discrete complexes of a Mek1 partner protein, Red1, into clusters along lateral elements of synaptonemal complexes; this activity may also contribute to homolog bias. Finally, we show that when interhomolog bias is defective, recombination is buffered by two feedback processes, one that increases the fraction of events that yields crossovers, and a second that we propose involves additional DSB formation

  3. Efficiency of olaparib in colorectal cancer patients with an alteration of the homologous repair protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiringhelli, Francois; Richard, Corentin; Chevrier, Sandy; Végran, Frédérique; Boidot, Romain

    2016-12-28

    Precision medicine is defined by the administration of drugs based on the tumor's particular genetic characteristics. It is developing quickly in the field of cancer therapy. For example, KRAS, NRAS and BRAF genetic testing demonstrates its efficiency for precision medicine in colorectal cancer (CRC). Besides for these well-known mutations, the purpose of performing larger genetic testing in this pathology is unknown. Recent reports have shown that using the poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib in patients with homologous repair enzyme deficiency gave positive clinical results in breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. We have reported here the cases of 2 patients with multi-treated metastatic CRC who underwent somatic and constitutional exome analyses. The analyses revealed a loss of function mutation in a homologous repair enzyme resulting in the loss of heterozygosity for both patients (Check2 for the first patient and RAD51C for the second one). Both patients were treated with off-label usage of olaparib. While the first patient showed clinical benefit, reduction of carcinoembryonic antigen tumor marker and radiologic response, the second patient quickly presented a progression of the tumor. Additional genetic analyses revealed a frameshift truncating mutation of the TP53BP1 gene in the patient who progressed. Interestingly, deficiency in TP53BP1 was previously described to confer resistance to olaparib in mice breast cancer models. Our findings suggest that exome analysis may be a helpful tool to highlight targetable mutations in CRC and that olaparib may be efficient in patients with a homologous repair deficiency.

  4. In silico sequence analysis and homology modeling of predicted beta-amylase 7-like protein in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERTUĞRUL FILIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Beta-amylase (β-amylase, EC 3.2.1.2 is an enzyme that catalyses hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds in polysaccharides. In this study, we analyzed protein sequence of predicted beta-amylase 7-like protein in Brachypodium distachyon. pI (isoelectric point value was found as 5.23 in acidic character, while the instability index (II was found as 50.28 with accepted unstable protein. The prediction of subcellular localization was revealed that the protein may reside in chloroplast by using CELLO v.2.5. The 3D structure of protein was performed using comparative homology modeling with SWISS-MODEL. The accuracy of the predicted 3D structure was checked using Ramachandran plot analysis showed that 95.4% in favored region. The results of our study contribute to understanding of β-amylase protein structure in grass species and will be scientific base for 3D modeling of beta-amylase proteins in further studies.

  5. Regulation of sperm-specific proteins by IFE-1, a germline-specific homolog of eIF4E, in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Ichiro; Jeong, Myung-Hwan; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2011-02-01

    ABSTEACT: IFE-1 is one of the five C. elegans homologs of eIF4E, which is the mRNA 5' cap-binding component of the translation initiation complex eIF4F. Depletion of IFE-1 causes defects in sperm, suggesting that IFE-1 regulates a subset of genes required for sperm functions. To further understand the molecular function of IFE-1, proteomic analysis was performed to search for sperm proteins that are downregulated in ife-1(ok1978); fem-3(q20) mutants relative to the fem-3(q20) control. The fem-3(q20) mutant background was used because it only produces sperm at restrictive temperature. Total worm proteins were subjected to 2D-DIGE, and differentially expressed protein spots were further identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Among the identified proteins, GSP-3 and Major Sperm Proteins (MSPs) were found to be significantly down-regulated in the ife-1(ok1978) mutant. Moreover, RNAi of gsp-3 caused an ife-1-like phenotype. These results suggest that IFE-1 is required for efficient expression of some sperm-specific proteins, and the fertilization defect of ife-1 mutant is caused mainly by a reduced level of GSP-3.

  6. ASP-56, a new actin sequestering protein from pig platelets with homology to CAP, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieselmann, R; Mann, K

    1992-02-24

    A new 56 kDa actin-binding protein (ASP-56) was isolated from pig platelet lysate. In falling ball viscosimetry it caused a reduction in viscosity that could be attributed to a decrease in the concentration of polymeric actin. Fluorescence measurements with NBD-labelled actin showed reduction of polymeric actin, too. These results could be explained by sequestering of actin in a non-polymerizable 1:1 ASP-56/actin complex. Sequencing of about 20 tryptic peptides of ASP-56 and comparison with known sequences revealed about 60% homology to the adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from yeast.

  7. Pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein PHLDB3 supports cancer growth via a negative feedback loop involving p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tengfei; Zhou, Xiang; Cao, Bo; Liao, Peng; Liu, Hongbing; Chen, Yun; Park, Hee-Won; Zeng, Shelya X.; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 transactivates the expression of its target genes to exert its functions. Here, we identify a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein (PHLDB3)-encoding gene as a p53 target. PHLDB3 overexpression increases proliferation and restrains apoptosis of wild-type p53-harboring cancer cells by reducing p53 protein levels. PHLDB3 binds to MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and facilitates MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53. Knockdown of PHLDB3 more efficiently inhibits the growth of mouse xenograft tumours derived from human colon cancer HCT116 cells that contain wild type p53 compared with p53-deficient HCT116 cells, and also sensitizes tumour cells to doxorubicin and 5-Fluorouracil. Analysis of cancer genomic databases reveals that PHLDB3 is amplified and/or highly expressed in numerous human cancers. Altogether, these results demonstrate that PHLDB3 promotes tumour growth by inactivating p53 in a negative feedback fashion and suggest PHLDB3 as a potential therapeutic target in various human cancers. PMID:28008906

  8. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushegian, Arcady R., E-mail: mushegian2@gmail.com [Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Elena, Santiago F., E-mail: sfelena@ibmcp.upv.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, CSIC-UPV, 46022 València (Spain); The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  9. Cloning and Characterization of a Homologous Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase PSKH1 from Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yiping; XIE Liping; XIONG Xunhao; CHEN Lei; FAN Weimin; ZHANG Rongqing

    2005-01-01

    Many of the effects of Ca2+ signaling are mediated through the Ca2+/calmodulin complex and its acceptors, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including PSKH1. Studies of the proteins involved in the calcium metabolism in oysters will help elucidate the pearl formation mechanism. This paper describes a full-length PSKH1 cDNA isolated from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Oyster PSKH1 shares 65% homology with human PSKH1 and 48% similarity with rat CaM kinase I in the amino acid sequence, and contains a calmodulin-binding domain. The results of semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization revealed that oyster PSKH1 mRNA is highly expressed in the outer epithelial cells of the mantle pallial and in the gill epithelial cells. These studies provide important information describing the complex Ca2+ signaling mechanism in oyster calcium metabolism.

  10. Detecting remote sequence homology in disordered proteins: discovery of conserved motifs in the N-termini of Mononegavirales phosphoproteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Karlin

    Full Text Available Paramyxovirinae are a large group of viruses that includes measles virus and parainfluenza viruses. The viral Phosphoprotein (P plays a central role in viral replication. It is composed of a highly variable, disordered N-terminus and a conserved C-terminus. A second viral protein alternatively expressed, the V protein, also contains the N-terminus of P, fused to a zinc finger. We suspected that, despite their high variability, the N-termini of P/V might all be homologous; however, using standard approaches, we could previously identify sequence conservation only in some Paramyxovirinae. We now compared the N-termini using sensitive sequence similarity search programs, able to detect residual similarities unnoticeable by conventional approaches. We discovered that all Paramyxovirinae share a short sequence motif in their first 40 amino acids, which we called soyuz1. Despite its short length (11-16aa, several arguments allow us to conclude that soyuz1 probably evolved by homologous descent, unlike linear motifs. Conservation across such evolutionary distances suggests that soyuz1 plays a crucial role and experimental data suggest that it binds the viral nucleoprotein to prevent its illegitimate self-assembly. In some Paramyxovirinae, the N-terminus of P/V contains a second motif, soyuz2, which might play a role in blocking interferon signaling. Finally, we discovered that the P of related Mononegavirales contain similarly overlooked motifs in their N-termini, and that their C-termini share a previously unnoticed structural similarity suggesting a common origin. Our results suggest several testable hypotheses regarding the replication of Mononegavirales and suggest that disordered regions with little overall sequence similarity, common in viral and eukaryotic proteins, might contain currently overlooked motifs (intermediate in length between linear motifs and disordered domains that could be detected simply by comparing orthologous proteins.

  11. Identification of stringent response-related and potential serological proteins released from Bacillus anthracis overexpressing the RelA/SpoT homolog, Rsh Bant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kye; Park, Moon Kyoo; Kim, Sang Hoon; Oh, Kwang Gun; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Hong, Chong-Hae; Yoon, Jang W; Chai, Young Gyu

    2014-10-01

    RelA and SpoT synthesize ppGpp, a key effector molecule that facilitates the adaptation of bacteria to nutrient starvation and other stresses, known as the stringent response. To investigate the role of Rsh Bant , a putative RelA/SpoT homolog (encoded by BAS4302) in Bacillus anthracis, we examined the alteration of the secretome profiles after the overexpression of a functional His-Rsh Bant protein in the B. anthracis strain Sterne at the stationary growth phase. In the ppGpp-deficient E. coli mutant strain CF1693, overexpression of Rsh Bant restored a ppGpp-dependent growth defect on minimal glucose media. The secretome profiles obtained using a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis were altered by overexpression of Rsh Bant in B. anthracis. Among the 66 protein spots differentially expressed >1.5-fold, the 29 proteins were abundant for further identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Functional categorization of those proteins implicated their involvement in various biological activities. Taken together, our results imply that overexpression of a functional His-Rsh Bant can lead to the increased levels of intracellular ppGpp in B. anthracis, resulting in the significant changes in its secretome profiling. The stringent response-controlled proteins identified are likely useful as potential targets for serodiagnostic applications.

  12. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of a Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) Seed Protein Homologous to Nonspecific Lipid Transfer Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, F R; Goderis, I J; Van Leuven, F; Vanderleyden, J; Cammue, B P; Broekaert, W F

    1992-10-01

    A basic 9-kD protein was purified from seeds of radish (Raphanus sativus L.). The 43 amino-terminal amino acids show extensive sequence identity with nonspecific lipid transfer proteins from other plant species. The radish seed nonspecific lipid transfer protein-like protein inhibits the growth of several fungi in vitro.

  13. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Chung

    Full Text Available Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its

  14. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten;

    1984-01-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated protein. Its quaternary structure (two covalently bound 180-kDa subunits, which are further non-covalently assembled into a tetramer of 720 kDa) is similar to that of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Here we show, from the ...

  15. Exploration of freely available web-interfaces for comparative homology modelling of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Vijay; Pal, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to find the best suited freely available software for modelling of proteins by taking a few sample proteins. The proteins used were small to big in size with available crystal structures for the purpose of benchmarking. Key players like Phyre2, Swiss-Model, CPHmodels-3.0, Homer, (PS)2, (PS)(2)-V(2), Modweb were used for the comparison and model generation. Benchmarking process was done for four proteins, Icl, InhA, and KatG of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and RpoB of Thermus Thermophilus to get the most suited software. Parameters compared during analysis gave relatively better values for Phyre2 and Swiss-Model. This comparative study gave the information that Phyre2 and Swiss-Model make good models of small and large proteins as compared to other screened software. Other software was also good but is often not very efficient in providing full-length and properly folded structure.

  16. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  17. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O;

    1998-01-01

    degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  18. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  19. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  20. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanklin, J.; Somerville, C. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the {Delta}{sup 9} desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  1. Biochemical Activities of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Homology Region 2 Domains of Sarcomere Length Short (SALS) Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Mónika Ágnes; Majoros, Andrea Kinga; Vig, Andrea Teréz; Migh, Ede; Nyitrai, Miklós; Mihály, József; Bugyi, Beáta

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster sarcomere length short (SALS) is a recently identified Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain protein involved in skeletal muscle thin filament regulation. SALS was shown to be important for the establishment of the proper length and organization of sarcomeric actin filaments. Here, we present the first detailed characterization of the biochemical activities of the tandem WH2 domains of SALS (SALS-WH2). Our results revealed that SALS-WH2 binds both monomeric and filamentous actin and shifts the monomer-filament equilibrium toward the monomeric actin. In addition, SALS-WH2 can bind to but fails to depolymerize phalloidin- or jasplakinolide-bound actin filaments. These interactions endow SALS-WH2 with the following two major activities in the regulation of actin dynamics: SALS-WH2 sequesters actin monomers into non-polymerizable complexes and enhances actin filament disassembly by severing, which is modulated by tropomyosin. We also show that profilin does not influence the activities of the WH2 domains of SALS in actin dynamics. In conclusion, the tandem WH2 domains of SALS are multifunctional regulators of actin dynamics. Our findings suggest that the activities of the WH2 domains do not reconstitute the presumed biological function of the full-length protein. Consequently, the interactions of the WH2 domains of SALS with actin must be tuned in the cellular context by other modules of the protein and/or sarcomeric components for its proper functioning.

  2. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushegian, Arcady R; Elena, Santiago F

    2015-02-01

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts.

  3. Identification of novel serum proteins in a Japanese viper: homologs of mammalian PSP94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Narumi; Sakiyama, Akie; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2007-07-27

    Three small serum proteins (SSP-1, -2, and -3), with molecular masses of 6.5-10kDa, were isolated from Habu (Trimeresurus flavoviridis) serum, and the amino acid sequences were determined by protein and cDNA analysis. Despite only limited sequence identity to any mammalian prostatic secretory protein of 94 amino acids (PSP94), all of the Cys residues in these SSPs were well conserved. SSPs are the first PSP94 family proteins to be identified in reptiles. SSP-1 and -3 weakly inhibited the proteolytic activity of a snake venom metalloproteinase. On the other hand, SSP-2 formed a tight complex with triflin, a snake venom-derived Ca(2+) channel blocker that suppresses the smooth muscle contraction. This suggests a role for SSP-2 in the self defense system of venomous snakes.

  4. Functional equivalency inferred from "authoritative sources" in networks of homologous proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreedhar Natarajan

    Full Text Available A one-on-one mapping of protein functionality across different species is a critical component of comparative analysis. This paper presents a heuristic algorithm for discovering the Most Likely Functional Counterparts (MoLFunCs of a protein, based on simple concepts from network theory. A key feature of our algorithm is utilization of the user's knowledge to assign high confidence to selected functional identification. We show use of the algorithm to retrieve functional equivalents for 7 membrane proteins, from an exploration of almost 40 genomes form multiple online resources. We verify the functional equivalency of our dataset through a series of tests that include sequence, structure and function comparisons. Comparison is made to the OMA methodology, which also identifies one-on-one mapping between proteins from different species. Based on that comparison, we believe that incorporation of user's knowledge as a key aspect of the technique adds value to purely statistical formal methods.

  5. Homology modelling and insilico analysis of neuraminidase protein in H1N1 Influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash Manohar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, modelling of Neuraminidase protein of Influenza A virus (A/Himeji/1/2009(H1N1 neuraminidase (NA protein was done using Modeller 9V2. Modelled structure was submitted to protein model database and could be downloaded using accession number PM0075830. The modelled protein structure was subjected to In silco analysis using various bioinformatics tools. Two anti-influenza drugs currently being used to treat infected patients are oseltamivir (Tamiflu and zanamivir (Relenza, both of which target the neuraminidase enzyme of the virus. Reports of the emergence of drug resistance make the development of new anti-influenza molecules a priority. Hence the modelled structure of H1NI Neuraminidase could be very useful for in silico analysis of potential neuraminidase inhibitors.

  6. Homologous high-throughput expression and purification of highly conserved E coli proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duchmann Rainer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic factors and a dysregulated immune response towards commensal bacteria contribute to the pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD. Animal models demonstrated that the normal intestinal flora is crucial for the development of intestinal inflammation. However, due to the complexity of the intestinal flora, it has been difficult to design experiments for detection of proinflammatory bacterial antigen(s involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Several studies indicated a potential association of E. coli with IBD. In addition, T cell clones of IBD patients were shown to cross react towards antigens from different enteric bacterial species and thus likely responded to conserved bacterial antigens. We therefore chose highly conserved E. coli proteins as candidate antigens for abnormal T cell responses in IBD and used high-throughput techniques for cloning, expression and purification under native conditions of a set of 271 conserved E. coli proteins for downstream immunologic studies. Results As a standardized procedure, genes were PCR amplified and cloned into the expression vector pQTEV2 in order to express proteins N-terminally fused to a seven-histidine-tag. Initial small-scale expression and purification under native conditions by metal chelate affinity chromatography indicated that the vast majority of target proteins were purified in high yields. Targets that revealed low yields after purification probably due to weak solubility were shuttled into Gateway (Invitrogen destination vectors in order to enhance solubility by N-terminal fusion of maltose binding protein (MBP, N-utilizing substance A (NusA, or glutathione S-transferase (GST to the target protein. In addition, recombinant proteins were treated with polymyxin B coated magnetic beads in order to remove lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Thus, 73% of the targeted proteins could be expressed and purified in large-scale to give soluble proteins in the range of 500

  7. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  8. ATP-binding site of adenylate kinase: mechanistic implications of its homology with ras-encoded p21, F1-ATPase, and other nucleotide-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D C; Kuby, S A; Mildvan, A S

    1986-02-01

    The MgATP binding site of adenylate kinase, located by a combination of NMR and x-ray diffraction, is near three protein segments, five to seven amino acids in length, that are homologous in sequence to segments found in other nucleotide-binding phosphotransferases, such as myosin and F1-ATPase, ras p21 and transducin GTPases, and cAMP-dependent and src protein kinases, suggesting equivalent mechanistic roles of these segments in all of these proteins. Segment 1 is a glycine-rich flexible loop that, on adenylate kinase, may control access to the ATP-binding site by changing its conformation. Segment 2 is an alpha-helix containing two hydrophobic residues that interact with the adenine-ribose moiety of ATP, and a lysine that may bind to the beta- and gamma-phosphates of ATP. Segment 3 is a hydrophobic strand of parallel beta-pleated sheet, terminated by a carboxylate, that flanks the triphosphate binding site. The various reported mutations of ras p21 that convert it to a transforming agent all appear to involve segment 1, and such substitutions may alter the properties of p21 by hindering a conformational change at this segment. In F1-ATPase, the flexible loop may, by its position, control both the accessibility and the ATP/ADP equilibrium constant on the enzyme.

  9. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L., suppresses TMV infection, and displays homology with ribosome-inactivating proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shalini; Verma, H N; Srivastava, Aparana; Prasad, Vivek

    2015-03-01

    Root extract of Boerhaavia diffusa L. induced systemic resistance in tobacco against Tobacco mosaic virus. A 30 kDa protein was isolated as the active component, called BDP-30 on the basis of the molecular weight and source plant. BDP-30, a glycoprotein, was found to be temperature and protease resistant. It was basic, possessing a pI greater than 9.0. In-gel proteolytic digestion of BDP-30 generated two peptides that possessed the amino acid sequence KLYDIPPLR and KVTLPYSGNYER by LC/MS/MS. Both peptides shared absolute sequence identity with trichosanthin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from Trichosanthes kirilowii, and a 78 percent and 100 percent homology respectively with an RIP from Bryonia dioica, bryodin. Further, effort was made to look at the fate of TMV in induced resistant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, a systemic host of the virus, at specified days after inoculation in control and treated plants. TMV coat protein (CP) was detected by immunoblot 7 days post inoculation up to 21 days in the control set, but not in treated resistant plants. TMV RNA was detected by RT-PCR using TMV-CP specific primers. Resistant tobacco did not show presence of TMV RNA up to 21 days of inoculation. This suggests that BDP-30 may be suppressing TMV replication.

  10. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  11. Ab initio and homology based prediction of protein domains by recursive neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooney Catherine

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins, especially larger ones, are often composed of individual evolutionary units, domains, which have their own function and structural fold. Predicting domains is an important intermediate step in protein analyses, including the prediction of protein structures. Results We describe novel systems for the prediction of protein domain boundaries powered by Recursive Neural Networks. The systems rely on a combination of primary sequence and evolutionary information, predictions of structural features such as secondary structure, solvent accessibility and residue contact maps, and structural templates, both annotated for domains (from the SCOP dataset and unannotated (from the PDB. We gauge the contribution of contact maps, and PDB and SCOP templates independently and for different ranges of template quality. We find that accurately predicted contact maps are informative for the prediction of domain boundaries, while the same is not true for contact maps predicted ab initio. We also find that gap information from PDB templates is informative, but, not surprisingly, less than SCOP annotations. We test both systems trained on templates of all qualities, and systems trained only on templates of marginal similarity to the query (less than 25% sequence identity. While the first batch of systems produces near perfect predictions in the presence of fair to good templates, the second batch outperforms or match ab initio predictors down to essentially any level of template quality. We test all systems in 5-fold cross-validation on a large non-redundant set of multi-domain and single domain proteins. The final predictors are state-of-the-art, with a template-less prediction boundary recall of 50.8% (precision 38.7% within ± 20 residues and a single domain recall of 80.3% (precision 78.1%. The SCOP-based predictors achieve a boundary recall of 74% (precision 77.1% again within ± 20 residues, and classify single domain proteins as

  12. Homology modeling of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans CED3 protein-inhibitor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, M K; Grossmann, J G; Zaidi, Z H

    2001-02-16

    CED3 protein, the product of a gene necessary for programmed cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, is related to a highly specific cysteine protease family i.e., caspases. A tertiary-structural model has been constructed of a complex of the CED3 protein with tetrapeptide-aldehyde inhibitor, Ac-DEVD-CHO. The conformation of CED3 protein active site and the general binding features of inhibitor residues are similar to those observed in other caspases. The loop segment (Phe380-Pro387) binds with the P4 Asp in a different fashion compared to caspase-3. The comparative modeling of active sites from caspase-3 and CED3 protein indicated that although these enzymes require Asp at the position P4, variation could occur in the binding of this residue at the S4 subsite. This model allowed the definition of substrate specificity of CED3 protein from the structural standpoint and provided insight in designing of mutants for structure-function studies of this classical caspase homologue.

  13. GPR99, a new G protein-coupled receptor with homology to a new subgroup of nucleotide receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chica Schaller H

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on sequence similarity, the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs can be subdivided into several subfamilies, the members of which often share similar ligands. The sequence data provided by the human genome project allows us to identify new GPRs by in silico homology screening, and to predict their ligands. Results By searching the human genomic database with known nucleotide receptors we discovered the gene for GPR99, a new orphan GPR. The mRNA of GPR99 was found in kidney and placenta. Phylogenetic analysis groups GPR99 into the P2Y subfamily of GPRs. Based on the phylogenetic tree we propose a new classification of P2Y nucleotide receptors into two subgroups predicting a nucleotide ligand for GPR99. By assaying known nucleotide ligands on heterologously expressed GPR99, we could not identify specifically activating substances, indicating that either they are not agonists of GPR99 or that GPR99 was not expressed at the cell surface. Analysis of the chromosomal localization of all genes of the P2Y subfamily revealed that all members of subgroup "a" are encoded by less than 370 kb on chromosome 3q24, and that the genes of subgroup "b" are clustered on one hand to chromosome 11q13.5 and on the other on chromosome 3q24-25.1 close to the subgroup "a" position. Therefore, the P2Y subfamily is a striking example for local gene amplification. Conclusions We identified a new orphan receptor, GPR99, with homology to the family of G protein-coupled nucleotide receptors. Phylogenetic analysis separates this family into different subgroups predicting a nucleotide ligand for GPR99.

  14. Dirichlet mixtures: a method for improved detection of weak but significant protein sequence homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjölander, K.; Karplus, K; Brown, M

    1996-01-01

    We present a method for condensing the information in multiple alignments of proteins into amixture of Dirichlet densities over amino acid distributions. Dirichlet mixture densities aredesigned to be combined with observed amino acid frequencies to form estimates of expectedamino acid probabiliti...

  15. Structure-driven homology pairing of chromatin fibers: the role of electrostatics and protein-induced bridging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherstvy, A G; Teif, V B

    2013-06-01

    Chromatin domains formed in vivo are characterized by different types of 3D organization of interconnected nucleosomes and architectural proteins. Here, we quantitatively test a hypothesis that the similarities in the structure of chromatin fibers (which we call "structural homology") can affect their mutual electrostatic and protein-mediated bridging interactions. For example, highly repetitive DNA sequences in heterochromatic regions can position nucleosomes so that preferred inter-nucleosomal distances are preserved on the surfaces of neighboring fibers. On the contrary, the segments of chromatin fiber formed on unrelated DNA sequences have different geometrical parameters and lack structural complementarity pivotal for stable association and cohesion. Furthermore, specific functional elements such as insulator regions, transcription start and termination sites, and replication origins are characterized by strong nucleosome ordering that might induce structure-driven iterations of chromatin fibers. We propose that shape-specific protein-bridging interactions facilitate long-range pairing of chromatin fragments, while for closely-juxtaposed fibers electrostatic forces can in addition yield fine-tuned structure-specific recognition and pairing. These pairing effects can account for some features observed for mitotic and inter-phase chromatins.

  16. The human homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease V is a nucleolar protein with affinity for branched DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrine Fladeby

    Full Text Available Loss of amino groups from adenines in DNA results in the formation of hypoxanthine (Hx bases with miscoding properties. The primary enzyme in Escherichia coli for DNA repair initiation at deaminated adenine is endonuclease V (endoV, encoded by the nfi gene, which cleaves the second phosphodiester bond 3' of an Hx lesion. Endonuclease V orthologs are widespread in nature and belong to a family of highly conserved proteins. Whereas prokaryotic endoV enzymes are well characterized, the function of the eukaryotic homologs remains obscure. Here we describe the human endoV ortholog and show with bioinformatics and experimental analysis that a large number of transcript variants exist for the human endonuclease V gene (ENDOV, many of which are unlikely to be translated into functional protein. Full-length ENDOV is encoded by 8 evolutionary conserved exons covering the core region of the enzyme, in addition to one or more 3'-exons encoding an unstructured and poorly conserved C-terminus. In contrast to the E. coli enzyme, we find recombinant ENDOV neither to incise nor bind Hx-containing DNA. While both enzymes have strong affinity for several branched DNA substrates, cleavage is observed only with E. coli endoV. We find that ENDOV is localized in the cytoplasm and nucleoli of human cells. As nucleoli harbor the rRNA genes, this may suggest a role for the protein in rRNA gene transactions such as DNA replication or RNA transcription.

  17. Molecular characterization of a cytokinin-inducible periwinkle protein showing sequence homology with pathogenesis-related proteins and the Bet v 1 allergen family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpin, S; Laffer, S; Schoentgen, F; Valenta, R; Chénieux, J C; Rideau, M; Hamdi, S

    1998-03-01

    Cytokinin treatment of periwinkle callus cultures increased the accumulation of a protein, designated T1, in two-dimensional separated protein extracts. The first 30 NH2-terminal amino acids were determined by Edman degradation and showed significant sequence homology with intracellular pathogenesis-related (IPR) plant proteins and the Bet v 1 allergen family. The deduced amino acid sequence of cDNAs coding for T1, isolated by RT-PCR and 5' RACE-PCR, exhibited an average sequence identity of 40% with both IPR and Bet v 1-related allergens. T1 and all related proteins contained a p-loop motif typically found in nucleotide-binding proteins as the most conserved sequence feature. Northern blot analysis showed that cytokinin treatment of periwinkle callus induced T1 transcripts, whereas addition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid inhibited this accumulation. Hybridization of genomic periwinkle DNA with the T1 cDNA suggested that the protein is encoded by a single-copy gene. Immunoblot studies with a panel of Bet v 1-specific antibodies and sera from Bet v 1 allergic individuals identified T1 as a protein that is immunologically distinct from the Bet v 1 allergen family and has no allergenic properties.

  18. Novel features of a PIWI-like protein homolog in the parasitic protozoan Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad K Padmanabhan

    Full Text Available In contrast to nearly all eukaryotes, the Old World Leishmania species L. infantum and L. major lack the bona fide RNAi machinery genes. Interestingly, both Leishmania genomes code for an atypical Argonaute-like protein that possesses a PIWI domain but lacks the PAZ domain found in Argonautes from RNAi proficient organisms. Using sub-cellular fractionation and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that unlike other eukaryotes, the PIWI-like protein is mainly localized in the single mitochondrion in Leishmania. To predict PIWI function, we generated a knockout mutant for the PIWI gene in both L. infantum (Lin and L. major species by double-targeted gene replacement. Depletion of PIWI has no effect on the viability of insect promastigote forms but leads to an important growth defect of the mammalian amastigote lifestage in vitro and significantly delays disease pathology in mice, consistent with a higher expression of the PIWI transcript in amastigotes. Moreover, amastigotes lacking PIWI display a higher sensitivity to apoptosis inducing agents than wild type parasites, suggesting that PIWI may be a sensor for apoptotic stimuli. Furthermore, a whole-genome DNA microarray analysis revealed that loss of LinPIWI in Leishmania amastigotes affects mostly the expression of specific subsets of developmentally regulated genes. Several transcripts encoding surface and membrane-bound proteins were found downregulated in the LinPIWI((-/- mutant whereas all histone transcripts were upregulated in the null mutant, supporting the possibility that PIWI plays a direct or indirect role in the stability of these transcripts. Although our data suggest that PIWI is not involved in the biogenesis or the stability of small noncoding RNAs, additional studies are required to gain further insights into the role of this protein on RNA regulation and amastigote development in Leishmania.

  19. Phylogenetic relationships of fungi, plantae, and animalia inferred from homologous comparison of ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veuthey, A L; Bittar, G

    1998-07-01

    The complete set of available ribosomal proteins was utilized, at both the peptidic and the nucleotidic level, to establish that plants and metazoans form two sister clades relative to fungi. Different phylogenetic inference methods are applied to the sequence data, using archeans as the outgroup. The evolutionary length of the internal branch within the eukaryotic crown trichotomy is demonstrated to be, at most, one-tenth of the evolutionary length of the branch leading to the cenancester of these three kingdoms.

  20. Novel Gbeta Mimic Kelch Proteins (Gpb1 and Gpb2 Connect G-Protein Signaling to Ras via Yeast Neurofibromin Homologs Ira1 and Ira2. A Model for Human NF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Molecular Cell (Harashima et al, 2006). These findings set the stage for studies to examine NF1 and possible mammalian kelch protein homologs of Gpb1...RasGAP neurofibromin homologs Ira1 and Ira2” was published in Molecular Cell on June 23, 2006 (see appendices). 4. Our review on this topic entitled...Heitman, J. The kelch proteins Gpb1 and Gpb2 inhibit Ras activity via assocation with the yeast RasGAP neurofibromin homologs Ira1 and Ira2, Molecular

  1. Effects of the aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis seeds on the growth and development of Hypothenemus hampei: an inhibitor showing high homology with storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Diana; Patiño, Luisa; Quintero, Mónica; Cortes, José; Bastos, Sara

    2014-02-01

    The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei is a pest that causes great economic damage to coffee grains worldwide. Because the proteins consumed are digested by aspartic proteases in the insect's midgut, the inhibition of these proteases by transferring a gene encoding an aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis Benth. to coffee plants could provide a promising strategy to control this pest. Five aspartic protease inhibitors from L. bogotensis (LbAPI) were accordingly purified and characterized. The gene encoding the L. bogotensis aspartic protease inhibitor (LbAPI), with the highest inhibitory activity against H. hampei, was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified recombinant protein (rLbAPI), with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, was subsequently assessed for its ability to inhibit the aspartic protease activity present in the H. hampei midgut in vitro, as well as its effects on the growth and development of H. hampei in vivo. The in vitro experiments showed that rLbAPI was highly effective against aspartic proteases from H. hampei guts, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.9 μg. The in vivo experiments showed that the concentration of rLbAPI (w/w) in the artificial diet necessary to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of the larvae was 0.91%. The amino acid sequence of LbAPI had high homology (52-80%) to the seed storage proteins, vicilin and β-conglutin, suggesting that this protein was generated by evolutionary events from a β-conglutin precursor. Based on these results, LbAPI may have a dual function as storage protein, and as defense protein against H. hampei. These results provide a promising alternative to obtain a coffee plant resistant to H. hampei. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy by transmission of H-type prion in homologous prion protein context

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and BSErelated disorders have been associated with a single major prion strain. Recently, 2 atypical, presumably sporadic forms of BSE have been associated with 2 distinct prion strains that are characterized mainly by distinct Western blot profi les of abnormal protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres), named high-type (BSE-H) and low-type (BSE-L), that also differed from classical BSE. We characterized 5 atypical BSE-H isolates by analyzing their molec...

  3. Merkel cell carcinoma expresses K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer similar to other high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Jennifer G; Simon, Rochelle A; Bourne, Patricia A; Spaulding, Betsy O; Scott, Glynis A; Xu, Haodong

    2009-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is an uncommon and aggressive primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Optimal management is controversial; consequently, it is imperative to identify the signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis of Merkel cell carcinoma so that effective therapeutic targeting agents can be developed. We previously reported that K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer is expressed in high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung and extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. The K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer (KOC), also known as L523S and IMP-3, is an insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA-binding protein that promotes tumor cell proliferation by enhancing insulin-like growth factor II protein expression. Expression of KOC in Merkel cell carcinoma has not been investigated. We studied 20 Merkel cell carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against L523S/KOC. Of 20 Merkel cell carcinomas, 18 (90%) overexpressed KOC, with 11 (55%) overexpressing KOC in greater than 90% of tumor cells, 3 (15%) overexpressing KOC in 50% to 90% of tumor cells, 3 (15%) overexpressing KOC in 10% to 50% of tumor cells, and 1 (5%) overexpressing KOC in less than 10% of tumor cells. The immunostaining intensity was variable, with moderate to strong staining in 14 cases and weak staining in the remaining 4. Extent of expression of K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer predicted metastasis (P = .04) and was weakly correlated with increased tumor size (P = .08). In conclusion, Merkel cell carcinoma expresses K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer with an expression pattern similar to high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas of the lung and extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. We propose K homology domain-containing protein overexpressed in cancer as a potential target molecule for the treatment of high

  4. Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase from higher plants is structurally unrelated to the animal and fungal homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, J; Somerville, C

    1991-03-15

    Stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein (ACP) desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6) was purified to homogeneity from avocado mesocarp, and monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against the protein were used to isolate full-length cDNA clones from Ricinus communis (castor) seed and Cucumis sativus (cucumber). The nucleotide sequence of the castor clone pRCD1 revealed an open reading frame of 1.2 kilobases encoding a 396-amino acid protein of 45 kDa. The cucumber clone pCSD1 encoded a homologous 396-amino acid protein with 88% amino acid identity to the castor clone. Expression of pRCD1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in the accumulation of a functional stearoyl-ACP desaturase, demonstrating that the introduction of this single gene product was sufficient to confer soluble desaturase activity to yeast. There was no detectable identity between the deduced amino acid sequences of the castor delta 9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase and either the delta 9-stearoyl-CoA desaturase from rat or yeast or the delta 12 desaturase from Synechocystis, suggesting that these enzymes may have evolved independently. However, there was a 48-residue region of 29% amino acid sequence identity between residues 53 and 101 of the castor desaturase and the proximal border of the dehydratase region of the fatty acid synthase from yeast. Stearoyl-ACP mRNA was present at substantially higher levels in developing seeds than in leaf and root tissue, suggesting that expression of the delta 9 desaturase is developmentally regulated.

  5. Thermal and Chemical Stability of Two Homologous POZ/BTB Domains of KCTD Proteins Characterized by a Different Oligomeric Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pirone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available POZ/BTB domains are widespread modules detected in a variety of different biological contexts. Here, we report a biophysical characterization of the POZ/BTB of KCTD6, a protein that is involved in the turnover of the muscle small ankyrin-1 isoform 5 and, in combination with KCTD11, in the ubiquitination and degradation of HDAC1. The analyses show that the domain is a tetramer made up by subunits with the expected α/ structure. A detailed investigation of its stability, carried out in comparison with the homologous pentameric POZ/BTB domain isolated from KCTD5, highlights a number of interesting features, which are shared by the two domains despite their different organization. Their thermal/chemical denaturation curves are characterized by a single and sharp inflection point, suggesting that the denaturation of the two domains is a cooperative two-state process. Furthermore, both domains present a significant content of secondary structure in their denatured state and a reversible denaturation process. We suggest that the ability of these domains to fold and unfold reversibly, a property that is somewhat unexpected for these oligomeric assemblies, may have important implications for their biological function. Indeed, these properties likely favor the formation of heteromeric associations that may be essential for the intricate regulation of the processes in which these proteins are involved.

  6. The Gene Targeting Approach of Small Fragment Homologous Replacement (SFHR Alters the Expression Patterns of DNA Repair and Cell Cycle Control Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pierandrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses and molecular mechanisms activated by exogenous DNA that invades cells are only partially understood. This limits the practical use of gene targeting strategies. Small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR uses a small exogenous wild-type DNA fragment to restore the endogenous wild-type sequence; unfortunately, this mechanism has a low frequency of correction. In this study, we used a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line with a stably integrated mutated gene for enhanced green fluorescence protein. The restoration of a wild-type sequence can be detected by flow cytometry analysis. We quantitatively analyzed the expression of 84 DNA repair genes and 84 cell cycle control genes. Peculiar temporal gene expression patterns were observed for both pathways. Different DNA repair pathways, not only homologous recombination, as well as the three main cell cycle checkpoints appeared to mediate the cellular response. Eighteen genes were selected as highly significant target/effectors of SFHR. We identified a wide interconnection between SFHR, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. Our results increase the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in cell invasion by exogenous DNA and SFHR. Specific molecular targets of both the cell cycle and DNA repair machineries were selected for manipulation to enhance the practical application of SFHR.

  7. The mammalian hypusine-containing protein, eukaryotic initiation factor 4D. Structural homology of this protein from several species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M H; Chung, S I; Cooper, H L; Folk, J E

    1984-04-10

    A single cellular protein of Mr approximately 18,000 and pI near 5.1, recently identified as eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF-4D, contains the unusual amino acid hypusine [N epsilon-(4-amino--2-hydroxybutyl)lysine] formed post-translationally from lysine with a structural contribution from the polyamine spermidine. When the 3H-labeled hypusine-containing protein isolated from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells that were grown with radioactive polyamine is digested with trypsin and the digest is subjected to two-dimensional separation, a single radioactive peptide is seen. A labeled peptide that occupies this same position is found in a digest of the [3H]hypusine protein from human lymphocytes and the single hypusine-containing tryptic peptide from purified rabbit reticulocyte eIF-4D also moves to this identical position. Stepwise Edman degradation of the tryptic digest of CHO cell hypusine-protein releases the radioactivity as a single peak in accordance with our earlier evidence for a single hypusine residue per molecule of eIF-4D. The similar patterns of radioactive peptides obtained from tryptic digests of radioiodinated eIF-4D from CHO cells, human lymphocytes, and rabbit reticulocytes suggest a highly conserved primary structure for this protein.

  8. A GTP-binding protein of Mycoplasma hominis: a small sized homolog to the signal recognition particle receptor FtsY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1997-01-01

    A protein homologous to the Escherichia coli FtsY which in turn has characteristics in common with the alpha-subunit of the eukaryotic signal recognition particle receptor (SRalpha) in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum, was identified in Mycoplasma hominis and its encoding DNA sequenced...

  9. DNA end resection controls the balance between homologous and illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Ivanković

    Full Text Available Even a partial loss of function of human RecQ helicase analogs causes adverse effects such as a cancer-prone Werner, Bloom or Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, whereas a complete RecQ deficiency in Escherichia coli is not deleterious for a cell. We show that this puzzling difference is due to different mechanisms of DNA double strand break (DSB resection in E. coli and humans. Coupled helicase and RecA loading activities of RecBCD enzyme, which is found exclusively in bacteria, are shown to be responsible for channeling recombinogenic 3' ending tails toward productive, homologous and away from nonproductive, aberrant recombination events. On the other hand, in recB1080/recB1067 mutants, lacking RecBCD's RecA loading activity while preserving its helicase activity, DSB resection is mechanistically more alike that in eukaryotes (by its uncoupling from a recombinase polymerization step, and remarkably, the role of RecQ also becomes akin of its eukaryotic counterparts in a way of promoting homologous and suppressing illegitimate recombination. The sickly phenotype of recB1080 recQ mutant was further exacerbated by inactivation of an exonuclease I, which degrades the unwound 3' tail. The respective recB1080 recQ xonA mutant showed poor viability, DNA repair and homologous recombination deficiency, and very increased illegitimate recombination. These findings demonstrate that the metabolism of the 3' ending overhang is a decisive factor in tuning the balance of homologous and illegitimate recombination in E. coli, thus highlighting the importance of regulating DSB resection for preserving genome integrity. recB mutants used in this study, showing pronounced RecQ helicase and exonuclease I dependence, make up a suitable model system for studying mechanisms of DSB resection in bacteria. Also, these mutants might be useful for investigating functions of the conserved RecQ helicase family members, and congruently serve as a simpler, more defined model system

  10. Intrinsic Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain Motion in Phospholipase C-β Exposes a Gβγ Protein Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadamur, Ganesh; Ross, Elliott M

    2016-05-20

    Mammalian phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) isoforms are stimulated by heterotrimeric G protein subunits and members of the Rho GTPase family of small G proteins. Although recent structural studies showed how Gαq and Rac1 bind PLC-β, there is a lack of consensus regarding the Gβγ binding site in PLC-β. Using FRET between cerulean fluorescent protein-labeled Gβγ and the Alexa Fluor 594-labeled PLC-β pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, we demonstrate that the PH domain is the minimal Gβγ binding region in PLC-β3. We show that the isolated PH domain can compete with full-length PLC-β3 for binding Gβγ but not Gαq, Using sequence conservation, structural analyses, and mutagenesis, we identify a hydrophobic face of the PLC-β PH domain as the Gβγ binding interface. This PH domain surface is not solvent-exposed in crystal structures of PLC-β, necessitating conformational rearrangement to allow Gβγ binding. Blocking PH domain motion in PLC-β by cross-linking it to the EF hand domain inhibits stimulation by Gβγ without altering basal activity or Gαq response. The fraction of PLC-β cross-linked is proportional to the fractional loss of Gβγ response. Cross-linked PLC-β does not bind Gβγ in a FRET-based Gβγ-PLC-β binding assay. We propose that unliganded PLC-β exists in equilibrium between a closed conformation observed in crystal structures and an open conformation where the PH domain moves away from the EF hands. Therefore, intrinsic movement of the PH domain in PLC-β modulates Gβγ access to its binding site. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuta; Azuma, Morio; Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Kouhei; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakakura, Takashi; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu; Tomura, Hideaki

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors.

  12. Affinity and Western blotting reveal homologies between ovine intervertebral disc serine proteinase inhibitory proteins and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, J; Shen, B; Ghosh, P

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess any similarities between ovine intervertebral disc (IVD) serine proteinase inhibitory proteins (SPIs) and known mammalian IVD SPIs. Ovine IVDs were dissected into the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus and the tissue finely diced then extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride. The tissue extracts were subjected to caesium chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation to separate the large high buoyant density (rho > 1.5 g/mL) proteoglycans from the SPI proteins of low buoyant density (rho top two ultracentrifuge fractions containing the SPIs of interest were subjected to enzyme linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA) and also examined by Western and Affinity blotting using an antibody to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and biotinylated trypsin respectively for detection and an alkaline phosphatase 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate/nitro blue tetrazolium system for visualisation. The major SPI proteins present in the Western and Affinity blots were 34-36 kDa species, minor 12 and 16, and 85 and 120 kDa species were also present. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for each respective tissue zone of the lumbar and lumbosacral disc specimens examined. Densitometric analysis of the major 34-36 kDa SPI bands visualised on Western and Affinity blots using NIH 1.61.1 image analysis software indicated that lumbar IVD samples contained higher levels of this SPI species than lumbosacral IVD samples. ELISA confirmed that lumbar IVD extracts contained quantitatively higher levels of BPTI equivalents per g of tissue extracted than lumbosacral IVDs. This study therefore has demonstrated that the ovine disc contains a range of SPI species which share some homology with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and in this respect are similar to SPIs previously demonstrated in canine IVDs.

  13. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 negatively regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Soushi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a leading cause of serious heart diseases. Although many signaling molecules are involved in hypertrophy, the functions of some proteins in this process are still unknown. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 (CHP3)/tescalcin is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in the heart; however, the function of CHP3 is unclear. Here, we aimed to identify the cardiac functions of CHP3. CHP3 was expressed in hearts at a wide range of developmental stages and was specifically detected in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) but not in cardiac fibroblasts in culture. Moreover, knockdown of CHP3 expression using adenoviral-based RNA interference in NRVMs resulted in enlargement of cardiomyocyte size, concomitant with increased expression of a pathological hypertrophy marker ANP. This same treatment elevated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α/β) phosphorylation, which is known to inhibit GSK3 function. In contrast, CHP3 overexpression blocked the insulin-induced phosphorylation of GSK3α/β without affecting the phosphorylation of Akt, which is an upstream kinase of GSK3α/β, in HEK293 cells, and it inhibited both IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in NRVMs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3β interacted with CHP3. However, a Ca(2+)-binding-defective mutation of CHP3 (CHP3-D123A) also interacted with GSK3β and had the same inhibitory effect on GSK3α/β phosphorylation, suggesting that the action of CHP3 was independent of Ca(2+). These findings suggest that CHP3 functions as a novel negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of GSK3α/β phosphorylation and subsequent enzymatic activation of GSK3α/β. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of protein kinase C inhibitory activity associated with a polypeptide isolated from a phage display system with homology to PCM-1, the pericentriolar material-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Atkinson, Trevor; Whitfield, James

    2012-07-20

    We had previously identified a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor in murine neuroblastoma cells (Chakravarthy et al. [1]). Similar PKC inhibitory activity was also found in adult rat brain. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against the partially purified PKC inhibitor from rat brain as bait, we isolated a putative brain PKC inhibitor using a T-7 phage display system expressing human brain cDNA library. After enriching the phage population expressing the putative PKC inhibitor with four rounds of biopanning using ELISA and in vitro PKC binding assays, we identified a phage clone that expressed a product with significant PKC inhibitory activity. We have cloned and expressed this cDNA in a bacterial system and purified the recombinant protein. This polypeptide (174 amino acids) is highly homologous to a region of the 228-kDa PCM-1, the human pericentriolar material 1 protein. We have mapped this polypeptide's PKC-inhibitory domain and shown its PKC inhibitory activity in vitro. However, it will need to be determined whether the full-length PCM-1 protein possesses PKC inhibitory activity in vivo, and if so, how this might contribute to PCM-1's recently demonstrated roles in ciliogenesis and neurogenesis.

  15. Identification of Toxoplasma TgPH1, a pleckstrin homology domain-containing protein that binds to the phosphoinositide PI(3,5)P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wassim; Morlon-Guyot, Juliette; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Tomavo, Stan; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2016-05-01

    The phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2) plays crucial roles in the maintenance of lysosome/vacuole morphology, membrane trafficking and regulation of endolysosome-localized membrane channel activity. In Toxoplasma gondii, we previously reported that PI(3,5)P2 is essential for parasite survival by controlling homeostasis of the apicoplast, a particular organelle of algal origin. Here, by using a phosphoinositide pull-down assay, we identified TgPH1 in Toxoplasma a protein conserved in many apicomplexan parasites. TgPH1 binds specifically to PI(3,5)P2, shows punctate intracellular localization, but plays no vital role for tachyzoite growth in vitro. TgPH1 is a protein predominantly formed by a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. So far, PH domains have been described to bind preferentially to bis- or trisphosphate phosphoinositides containing two adjacent phosphates (i.e. PI(3,4)P2, PI(4,5)P2, PI(3,4,5)P3). Therefore, our study reveals an unusual feature of TgPH1 which binds preferentially to PI(3,5)P2.

  16. Discovery of Novel Inhibitors for Nek6 Protein through Homology Model Assisted Structure Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nek6 is a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis, gene A-related serine/threonine kinase family that plays an important role in the initiation of mitotic cell cycle progression. This work is an attempt to emphasize the structural and functional relationship of Nek6 protein based on homology modeling and binding pocket analysis. The three-dimensional structure of Nek6 was constructed by molecular modeling studies and the best model was further assessed by PROCHECK, ProSA, and ERRAT plot in order to analyze the quality and consistency of generated model. The overall quality of computed model showed 87.4% amino acid residues under the favored region. A 3 ns molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the structure was reliable and stable. Two lead compounds (Binding database ID: 15666, 18602 were retrieved through structure-based virtual screening and induced fit docking approaches as novel Nek6 inhibitors. Hence, we concluded that the potential compounds may act as new leads for Nek6 inhibitors designing.

  17. I-TASSER-MR: automated molecular replacement for distant-homology proteins using iterative fragment assembly and progressive sequence truncation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Virtanen, Jouko; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2017-05-02

    Molecular replacement (MR) is one of the most common techniques used for solving the phase problem in X-ray crystal diffraction. The success rate of MR however drops quickly when the sequence identity between query and templates is reduced, while the I-TASSER-MR server is designed to solve the phase problem for proteins that lack close homologous templates. Starting from a sequence, it first generates full-length models using I-TASSER by iterative structural fragment reassembly. A progressive sequence truncation procedure is then used for editing the models based on local variations of the structural assembly simulations. Next, the edited models are submitted to MR-REX to search for optimal placements in the crystal unit-cells through replica-exchange Monte Carlo simulations, with the phasing results used by CNS for final atomic model refinement and selection. The I-TASSER-MR algorithm was tested in large-scale benchmark datasets and solved 36% more targets compared to using the best threading templates. The server takes primary sequence and raw crystal diffraction data as input, with output containing annotated phase information and refined structure models. It also allows users to choose between different methods for setting B-factors and the number of models used for phasing. The online server is freely available at http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/I-TASSER-MR. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Homologs of Human DJ-1 Are Stationary Phase-Associated Proteins That Are Involved in Autophagy and Oxidative Stress Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Su

    Full Text Available The Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1 is involved in various cellular functions including detoxification of dicarbonyl compounds, autophagy and oxidative stress response. DJ-1 homologs are widely found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, constituting a superfamily of proteins that appear to be involved in stress response. Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six DJ-1 homologs, designated Hsp3101-Hsp3105 and Sdj1 (previously named SpDJ-1. Here we show that deletion of any one of these six genes somehow affects autophagy during prolonged stationary phase. Furthermore, deletions of each of these DJ-1 homologs result in reduced stationary phase survival. Deletion of sdj1 also increases the sensitivity of stationary-phase cells to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 whereas overexpression of sdj1 has the opposite effect. Consistent with their role in stationary phase, expression of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1, and to a lesser extent hsp3103 and hsp3104, is increased in stationary phase. The induction of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1 involves the Sty1-regulated transcription factor Atf1 but not the transcription factor Pap1. Our results firmly establish that S. pombe homologs of DJ-1 are stationary-phase associated proteins and are likely involved in autophagy and antioxidant defense in stationary phase of S. pombe cells.

  19. Directed homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata.......We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata....

  20. Direct observation of the uncapping of capping protein-capped actin filaments by CARMIL homology domain 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A

    2010-01-22

    Bulk solution assays have shown that the isolated CARMIL homology 3 (CAH3) domain from mouse and Acanthamoeba CARMIL rapidly and potently restores actin polymerization when added to actin filaments previously capped with capping protein (CP). To demonstrate this putative uncapping activity directly, we used total internal reflection microscopy to observe single, CP-capped actin filaments before and after the addition of the CAH3 domain from mouse CARMIL-1 (mCAH3). The addition of mCAH3 rapidly restored the polymerization of individual capped filaments, consistent with uncapping. To verify uncapping, filaments were capped with recombinant mouse CP tagged with monomeric green fluorescent protein (mGFP-CP). Restoration of polymerization upon the addition of mCAH3 was immediately preceded by the complete dissociation of mGFP-CP from the filament end, confirming the CAH3-driven uncapping mechanism. Quantitative analyses showed that the percentage of capped filaments that uncapped increased as the concentration of mCAH3 was increased, reaching a maximum of approximately 90% at approximately 250 nm mCAH3. Moreover, the time interval between mCAH3 addition and uncapping decreased as the concentration of mCAH3 increased, with the half-time of CP at the barbed end decreasing from approximately 30 min without mCAH3 to approximately 10 s with a saturating amount of mCAH3. Finally, using mCAH3 tagged with mGFP, we obtained direct evidence that the complex of CP and mCAH3 has a small but measurable affinity for the barbed end, as inferred from previous studies and kinetic modeling. We conclude that the isolated CAH3 domain of CARMIL (and presumably the intact molecule as well) possesses the ability to uncap CP-capped actin filaments.

  1. Direct Observation of the Uncapping of Capping Protein-capped Actin Filaments by CARMIL Homology Domain 3*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Hammer, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk solution assays have shown that the isolated CARMIL homology 3 (CAH3) domain from mouse and Acanthamoeba CARMIL rapidly and potently restores actin polymerization when added to actin filaments previously capped with capping protein (CP). To demonstrate this putative uncapping activity directly, we used total internal reflection microscopy to observe single, CP-capped actin filaments before and after the addition of the CAH3 domain from mouse CARMIL-1 (mCAH3). The addition of mCAH3 rapidly restored the polymerization of individual capped filaments, consistent with uncapping. To verify uncapping, filaments were capped with recombinant mouse CP tagged with monomeric green fluorescent protein (mGFP-CP). Restoration of polymerization upon the addition of mCAH3 was immediately preceded by the complete dissociation of mGFP-CP from the filament end, confirming the CAH3-driven uncapping mechanism. Quantitative analyses showed that the percentage of capped filaments that uncapped increased as the concentration of mCAH3 was increased, reaching a maximum of ∼90% at ∼250 nm mCAH3. Moreover, the time interval between mCAH3 addition and uncapping decreased as the concentration of mCAH3 increased, with the half-time of CP at the barbed end decreasing from ∼30 min without mCAH3 to ∼10 s with a saturating amount of mCAH3. Finally, using mCAH3 tagged with mGFP, we obtained direct evidence that the complex of CP and mCAH3 has a small but measurable affinity for the barbed end, as inferred from previous studies and kinetic modeling. We conclude that the isolated CAH3 domain of CARMIL (and presumably the intact molecule as well) possesses the ability to uncap CP-capped actin filaments. PMID:19926785

  2. Long-term exposure to PGE2 causes homologous desensitization of receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malty, Ramy Habashy; Hudmon, Andy; Fehrenbacher, Jill C; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-07-11

    Acute exposure to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activates EP receptors in sensory neurons which triggers the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade resulting in enhanced excitability of the neurons. With long-term exposure to PGE2, however, the activation of PKA does not appear to mediate persistent PGE2-induced sensitization. Consequently, we examined whether homologous desensitization of PGE2-mediated PKA activation occurs after long-term exposure of isolated sensory neurons to the eicosanoid. Sensory neuronal cultures were harvested from the dorsal root ganglia of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The cultures were pretreated with vehicle or PGE2 and used to examine signaling mechanisms mediating acute versus persistent sensitization by exposure to the eicosanoid using enhanced capsaicin-evoked release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide (iCGRP) as an endpoint. Neuronal cultures chronically exposed to vehicle or PGE2 also were used to study the ability of the eicosanoid and other agonists to activate PKA and whether long-term exposure to the prostanoid alters expression of EP receptor subtypes. Acute exposure to 1 μM PGE2 augments the capsaicin-evoked release of iCGRP, and this effect is blocked by the PKA inhibitor H-89. After 5 days of exposure to 1 μM PGE2, administration of the eicosanoid still augments evoked release of iCGRP, but the effect is not attenuated by inhibition of PKA or by inhibition of PI3 kinases. The sensitizing actions of PGE2 after acute and long-term exposure were attenuated by EP2, EP3, and EP4 receptor antagonists, but not by an EP1 antagonist. Exposing neuronal cultures to 1 μM PGE2 for 12 h to 5 days blocks the ability of PGE2 to activate PKA. The offset of the desensitization occurs within 24 h of removal of PGE2 from the cultures. Long-term exposure to PGE2 also results in desensitization of the ability of a selective EP4 receptor agonist, L902688 to activate PKA, but does not alter the ability of

  3. On the necessity of dissecting sequence similarity scores into segment-specific contributions for inferring protein homology, function prediction and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing-Cheong; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-06-02

    Protein sequence similarities to any types of non-globular segments (coiled coils, low complexity regions, transmembrane regions, long loops, etc. where either positional sequence conservation is the result of a very simple, physically induced pattern or rather integral sequence properties are critical) are pertinent sources for mistaken homologies. Regretfully, these considerations regularly escape attention in large-scale annotation studies since, often, there is no substitute to manual handling of these cases. Quantitative criteria are required to suppress events of function annotation transfer as a result of false homology assignments. The sequence homology concept is based on the similarity comparison between the structural elements, the basic building blocks for conferring the overall fold of a protein. We propose to dissect the total similarity score into fold-critical and other, remaining contributions and suggest that, for a valid homology statement, the fold-relevant score contribution should at least be significant on its own. As part of the article, we provide the DissectHMMER software program for dissecting HMMER2/3 scores into segment-specific contributions. We show that DissectHMMER reproduces HMMER2/3 scores with sufficient accuracy and that it is useful in automated decisions about homology for instructive sequence examples. To generalize the dissection concept for cases without 3D structural information, we find that a dissection based on alignment quality is an appropriate surrogate. The approach was applied to a large-scale study of SMART and PFAM domains in the space of seed sequences and in the space of UniProt/SwissProt. Sequence similarity core dissection with regard to fold-critical and other contributions systematically suppresses false hits and, additionally, recovers previously obscured homology relationships such as the one between aquaporins and formate/nitrite transporters that, so far, was only supported by structure comparison.

  4. INHIBITION OF THE DNA-BINDING ACTIVITY OF DROSOPHILA SUPPRESSOR OF HAIRLESS AND OF ITS HUMAN HOMOLOG, KBF2/RBP-J-KAPPA, BY DIRECT PROTEIN-PROTEIN INTERACTION WITH DROSOPHILA HAIRLESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROU, C; LOGEAT, F; LECOURTOIS, M; VANDEKERCKHOVE, Joël; KOURILSKY, P; SCHWEISGUTH, F; ISRAEL, A

    1994-01-01

    We have purified the sequence-specific DNA-binding protein KBF2 and cloned the corresponding cDNA, which is derived from the previously described RBP-J kappa gene, the human homolog of the Drosophila Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] gene. Deletion studies of the RBP-J kappa and Su(H) proteins allowed

  5. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    A number of DNA lesions are generated in each cell every day, among which double-stranded breaks (DSBs) constitute one of the most detrimental types of DNA damage. DSBs lead to genome instability, cell death, or even tumorigenesis in human, if not repaired timely. Two main pathways are known...... for DSB repair, homologous recombination repair (HRR) and Non-homologous end joint (NHEJ). HR repairs DSBs using a homologous DNA molecule as a template resulting in error free DNA repair, whereas NHEJ promotes direct re-ligation of the broken DNA ends in an error-prone manner. In eukaryotes DSBs occurred...

  7. Effects of serum containing natural cerebrolysin on glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein expression in neuronal PC12 cells following tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengzhi Wu; Ming Li; Andrew C.J. HuangO; Xiuqing Jia; Yinghong Li; Manyin Chen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress, can prolong cell survival. Alternatively, CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), a transcription factor specific for endopiasmic reticulum stress, can cause cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis.OBJECTIVE: To study the protective effects of serum containing natural cerebrolysin on endoplasmic reticulum stress in tunicamycin-induced neuronal PC12 cells, and analyze the influence on GRP78 and CHOP expressions.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A parallel controlled study was performed at the Institute of Integrated Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shenzhen Hospital, Southern Medical University, between March 2006 and August 2008.MATERIALS: Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were perfused with natural Cerebrelysin aqueous extract (0.185 g/kg/d) to produce serum containing natural Cerebrolysin. Physiological saline was used to produce blank serum. PC12 cell line was provided by Shanghai Institute of Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Science. Tunicamycin was provided by Sigma (St. Louis, USA), and natural Cerebrolysin, containing ginseng, rhizoma gastrodiae, and gingko leaf (1:2:2), by Shengzhen Institute of Integrated Western and Traditional Chinese Medicine.METHODS: PC12 cells were treated with DMEM culture media containing 10% blank serum (normal control group), tunicamycin (1μg/mL; model group), and 5%, 10%, and 15% serum containing natural cerebrolysin and tunicamycin (1μg/mL; low-, moderate-, and high-dose serum containing natural cerebrelysin groups), for 2 hours.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: PC12 cells were treated with tunicamycin for 48 hours after which apoptosis was measured using the TUNEL method to calculate apoptotic index. GRP78 expression was detected using immunocytochemistry. After 24 hours of treatment with tunicamycin, GRP78 and CHOP mRNA expressions were measured using RT-PCR.RESULTS: The apoptotic index and CHOP mRNA expression were in the model group

  8. Protein-protein docking and analysis reveal that two homologous bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins interact with calmodulin differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Jureller, Justin E; Warren, Julia T; Solomaha, Elena; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-08-29

    Calmodulin (CaM), a eukaryotic calcium sensor that regulates diverse biological activities, consists of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively). CaM serves as the activator of CyaA, a 188-kDa adenylyl cyclase toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, which is the etiologic agent for whooping cough. Upon insertion of the N-terminal adenylyl cyclase domain (ACD) of CyaA to its targeted eukaryotic cells, CaM binds to this domain tightly ( approximately 200 pm affinity). This interaction activates the adenylyl cyclase activity of CyaA, leading to a rise in intracellular cAMP levels to disrupt normal cellular signaling. We recently solved the structure of CyaA-ACD in complex with C-CaM to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic activation. However, the structure of the interface between N-CaM and CyaA, the formation of which contributes a 400-fold increase of binding affinity between CyaA and CaM, remains elusive. Here, we used site-directed mutations and molecular dynamic simulations to generate several working models of CaM-bound CyaA-ACD. The validity of these models was evaluated by disulfide bond cross-linking, point mutations, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. Our study reveals that a beta-hairpin region (amino acids 259-273) of CyaA-ACD likely makes contacts with the second calcium binding motif of the extended CaM. This mode of interaction differs from the interaction of N-CaM with anthrax edema factor, which binds N-CaM via its helical domain. Thus, two structurally conserved, bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins have evolved to utilize distinct binding surfaces and modes of activation in their interaction with CaM, a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling protein.

  9. Homological descent for motivic homology theories

    OpenAIRE

    Geisser, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give homological descent theorems for motivic homology theories (for example, Suslin homology) and motivic Borel-Moore homology theories (for example, higher Chow groups) for certain hypercoverings.

  10. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  11. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  12. Enhanced homology-directed human genome engineering by controlled timing of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Staahl, Brett T; Alla, Ravi K; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-12-15

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a robust genome editing technology that works in human cells, animals and plants based on the RNA-programmed DNA cleaving activity of the Cas9 enzyme. Building on previous work (Jinek et al., 2013), we show here that new genetic information can be introduced site-specifically and with high efficiency by homology-directed repair (HDR) of Cas9-induced site-specific double-strand DNA breaks using timed delivery of Cas9-guide RNA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Cas9 RNP-mediated HDR in HEK293T, human primary neonatal fibroblast and human embryonic stem cells was increased dramatically relative to experiments in unsynchronized cells, with rates of HDR up to 38% observed in HEK293T cells. Sequencing of on- and potential off-target sites showed that editing occurred with high fidelity, while cell mortality was minimized. This approach provides a simple and highly effective strategy for enhancing site-specific genome engineering in both transformed and primary human cells.

  13. Identification of SopE2, a Salmonella Secreted Protein Which Is Highly Homologous to SopE and Involved in Bacterial Invasion of Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Type III secreted Sop protein effectors are delivered into target eukaryotic cells and elicit cellular responses underlying Salmonella pathogenicity. In this work, we have identified another secreted protein, SopE2, and showed that SopE2 is an important invasion-associated effector. SopE2 is encoded by the sopE2 gene which is present and conserved in pathogenic strains of Salmonella. SopE2 is highly homologous to SopE, a protein encoded by a gene within a temperate bacteriophage and present i...

  14. Novel matrix proteins of Pteria penguin pearl oyster shell nacre homologous to the jacalin-related β-prism fold lectins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Naganuma

    Full Text Available Nacreous layers of pearl oyster are one of the major functional biominerals. By participating in organic compound-crystal interactions, they assemble into consecutive mineral lamellae-like photonic crystals. Their biomineralization mechanisms are controlled by macromolecules; however, they are largely unknown. Here, we report two novel lectins termed PPL2A and PPL2B, which were isolated from the mantle and the secreted fluid of Pteria penguin oyster. PPL2A is a hetero-dimer composed of α and γ subunits, and PPL2B is a homo-dimer of β subunit, all of which surprisingly shared sequence homology with the jacalin-related plant lectin. On the basis of knockdown experiments at the larval stage, the identification of PPLs in the shell matrix, and in vitro CaCO3 crystallization analysis, we conclude that two novel jacalin-related lectins participate in the biomineralization of P. penguin nacre as matrix proteins. Furthermore, it was found that trehalose, which is specific recognizing carbohydrates for PPL2A and is abundant in the secreted fluid of P. penguin mantle, functions as a regulatory factor for biomineralization via PPL2A. These observations highlight the unique functions, diversity and molecular evolution of this lectin family involved in the mollusk shell formation.

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  16. Yes-associated protein homolog, YAP-1, is involved in the thermotolerance and aging in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Hiroaki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Maimaiti, Sainawaer [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Department of Psychotherapy, The Fourth People' s Hospital of Urumqi, Urumqi 830000 (China); Kuroyanagi, Hidehito [Laboratory of Gene Expression, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Kawano, Shodai; Inami, Kazutoshi; Timalsina, Shikshya; Ikeda, Mitsunobu; Nakagawa, Kentaro [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Hata, Yutaka, E-mail: yuhammch@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    The mammalian Hippo pathway comprises mammalian Ste20-like kinases (MST1/2) and large tumor suppressor kinases (LATS1/2). LATS1/2, which are activated by MST1/2, phosphorylate a transcriptional co-activator, yes-associated protein (YAP), and induce the recruitment of YAP by 14-3-3 to cytoplasm, so that the TEAD-dependent gene transcriptions are turned off. Although the core components of the Hippo pathway are well conserved in metazoans, it has been discussed that Caenorhabditis elegans lacks YAP ortholog, we found that F13E6.4 gene encodes a protein that shows sequence similarities to YAP in the N-terminal TEAD-binding domain and in the WW domain. We designated this gene as yap-1. YAP-1 is widely expressed in various cells such as epithelial cells, muscles, hypodermal cells, gonadal sheath cells, spermatheca, and hypodermal cells. YAP-1 is distributed in cytoplasm and nuclei. wts-1 (LATS ortholog) and ftt-2 (14-3-3 ortholog) knockdowns cause nuclear accumulation of YAP-1, supporting that the subcellular localization of YAP-1 is regulated in a similar way as that of YAP. Heat shock also causes the nuclear accumulation of YAP-1 but after heat shock, YAP-1 translocates to cytoplasm. Knockdowns of DAF-21 (HSP90 ortholog) and HSF-1block the nuclear export of YAP-1 during this recovery. YAP-1 overexpression is beneficial for thermotolerance, whereas YAP-1 hyperactivity induced by wts-1 and ftt-2 knockdowns is deleterious on thermal response and yap-1 deficiency promotes health aging. In short, YAP-1 partially shares basal characters with mammalian YAP and plays a role in thermal stress response and healthy aging. - Highlights: ► We named Caenorhabditis elegans F13E6.4 gene yap-1 as a putative YAP homolog. ► The localization of YAP-1 is regulated by WTS-1 and FTT-2. ► YAP-1 is involved in healthy aging and thermosensitivity.

  17. A GTP-binding protein of Mycoplasma hominis: a small sized homolog to the signal recognition particle receptor FtsY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1997-01-01

    A protein homologous to the Escherichia coli FtsY which in turn has characteristics in common with the alpha-subunit of the eukaryotic signal recognition particle receptor (SRalpha) in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum, was identified in Mycoplasma hominis and its encoding DNA sequenced......-anchoring fragment. Comparison of sequenced SRalpha homologue indicates that M. hominis together with Bacillus subtilis comprise a distinct cluster of similar small SRP receptors....

  18. External and semi-internal controls for PCR amplification of homologous sequences in mixed templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalle, Elena; Gulevich, Alexander; Rensing, Christopher Günther T

    2013-01-01

    in a single template assay. Yet, multi-template PCR has been used without appropriate attention to quality control and assay validation, in spite of the fact that such practice diminishes the reliability of results. External and internal amplification controls became obligatory elements of good laboratory...... practice in different PCR assays. We propose the inclusion of an analogous approach as a quality control system for multi-template PCR applications. The amplification controls must take into account the characteristics of multi-template PCR and be able to effectively monitor particular assay performance...

  19. The Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins Bim and bid are functionally active and restrained by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in healthy liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takahiro; Hikita, Hayato; Kawaguchi, Tsukasa; Saito, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shigekawa, Minoru; Shimizu, Satoshi; Li, Wei; Miyagi, Takuya; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2013-10-18

    An intrinsic pathway of apoptosis is regulated by the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family proteins. We previously reported that a fine rheostatic balance between the anti- and pro-apoptotic multidomain Bcl-2 family proteins controls hepatocyte apoptosis in the healthy liver. The Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins set this rheostatic balance toward apoptosis upon activation in the diseased liver. However, their involvement in healthy Bcl-2 rheostasis remains unknown. In the present study, we focused on two BH3-only proteins, Bim and Bid, and we clarified the Bcl-2 network that governs hepatocyte life and death in the healthy liver. We generated hepatocyte-specific Bcl-xL- or Mcl-1-knock-out mice, with or without disrupting Bim and/or Bid, and we examined hepatocyte apoptosis under physiological conditions. We also examined the effect of both Bid and Bim disruption on the hepatocyte apoptosis caused by the inhibition of Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. Spontaneous hepatocyte apoptosis in Bcl-xL- or Mcl-1-knock-out mice was significantly ameliorated by Bim deletion. The disruption of both Bim and Bid completely prevented hepatocyte apoptosis in Bcl-xL-knock-out mice and weakened massive hepatocyte apoptosis via the additional in vivo knockdown of mcl-1 in these mice. Finally, the hepatocyte apoptosis caused by ABT-737, which is a Bcl-xL/Bcl-2/Bcl-w inhibitor, was completely prevented in Bim/Bid double knock-out mice. The BH3-only proteins Bim and Bid are functionally active but are restrained by the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins under physiological conditions. Hepatocyte integrity is maintained by the dynamic and well orchestrated Bcl-2 network in the healthy liver.

  20. The checkpoint clamp protein Rad9 facilitates DNA-end resection and prevents alternative non-homologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Ling; Kai, Mihoko

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage activates the cell cycle checkpoint to regulate cell cycle progression. The checkpoint clamp (Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 complex) is recruited to damage sites, and is required for checkpoint activation. While functions of the checkpoint clamp in checkpoint activation have been well studied, its functions in DNA repair regulation remain elusive. Here we show that Rad9 is required for efficient homologous recombination (HR), and facilitates DNA-end resection. The role of Rad9 in homologous recombination is independent of its function in checkpoint activation, and this function is important for preventing alternative non-homologous end joining (altNHEJ). These findings reveal novel function of the checkpoint clamp in HR.

  1. Homology-Based Modeling of Universal Stress Protein from Listeria innocua Up-Regulated under Acid Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremonte, Patrizio; Succi, Mariantonietta; Coppola, Raffaele; Sorrentino, Elena; Tipaldi, Luca; Picariello, Gianluca; Pannella, Gianfranco; Fraternali, Franca

    2016-01-01

    An Universal Stress Protein (USP) expressed under acid stress condition by Listeria innocua ATCC 33090 was investigated. The USP was up-regulated not only in the stationary phase but also during the exponential growth phase. The three dimensional (3D) structure of USP was predicted using a combined proteomic and bioinformatics approach. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the USP from Listeria detected in our study was distant from the USPs of other bacteria (such as Pseudomonas spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp.) and clustered in a separate and heterogeneous class including several USPs from Listeria spp. and Lactobacillus spp. An important information on the studied USP was obtained from the 3D-structure established through the homology modeling procedure. In detail, the Model_USP-691 suggested that the investigated USP had a homo-tetrameric quaternary structure. Each monomer presented an architecture analogous to the Rossmann-like α/β-fold with five parallel β-strands, and four α-helices. The analysis of monomer-monomer interfaces and quality of the structure alignments confirmed the model reliability. In fact, the structurally and sequentially conserved hydrophobic residues of the β-strand 5 (in particular the residues V146 and V148) were involved in the inter-chains contact. Moreover, the highly conserved residues I139 and H141 in the region α4 were involved in the dimer association and functioned as hot spots into monomer–monomer interface assembly. The hypothetical assembly of dimers was also supported by the large interface area and by the negative value of solvation free energy gain upon interface interaction. Finally, the structurally conserved ATP-binding motif G-2X-G-9X-G(S/T-N) suggested for a putative role of ATP in stabilizing the tetrameric assembly of the USP. Therefore, the results obtained from a multiple approach, consisting in the application of kinetic, proteomic, phylogenetic and modeling analyses, suggest that Listeria USP could

  2. windbeutel, a gene required for dorsoventral patterning in Drosophila, encodes a protein that has homologies to vertebrate proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolaki, M; Schüpbach, T

    1998-01-01

    The formation of the dorsoventral axis of the Drosophila embryo depends on cell-cell interactions that take place in the female ovary and involve the activation of transmembrane receptors by secreted ligands. The gene windbeutel functions in the somatic follicle cells of the ovary and is required for the generation of a signal that will determine the ventral side of the embryo. This signal originates in the follicle cells during oogenesis, but its actions are only manifested after fertilization, when the egg has already been laid. We have performed a molecular analysis of windbeutel. We have found that windbeutel encodes a putative resident protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, and has homologs in rats and humans. The gene is expressed for a brief period of time in the follicle cells of the ovary, at around the time when the dorsoventral axis of the egg chamber is first established. We propose that Windbeutel is responsible for the folding and/or modification of a specific factor that is secreted from the follicle cells and participates in the activation of the ventralizing signal.

  3. Protein quality control in the nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl; Rebula, Caio A.

    2014-01-01

    to aggregate, cells have evolved several elaborate quality control systems to deal with these potentially toxic proteins. First, various molecular chaperones will seize the misfolded protein and either attempt to refold the protein or target it for degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... to be particularly active in protein quality control. Thus, specific ubiquitin-protein ligases located in the nucleus, target not only misfolded nuclear proteins, but also various misfolded cytosolic proteins which are transported to the nucleus prior to their degradation. In comparison, much less is known about...... these mechanisms in mammalian cells. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of nuclear protein quality control, in particular regarding substrate recognition and proteasomal degradation....

  4. After Embedding in Membranes Antiapoptotic Bcl-XL Protein Binds Both Bcl-2 Homology Region 3 and Helix 1 of Proapoptotic Bax Protein to Inhibit Apoptotic Mitochondrial Permeabilization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jingzhen; Mooers, Blaine H. M.; Zhang, Zhi; Kale, Justin; Falcone, Domina; McNichol, Jamie; Huang, Bo; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Xing, Chengguo; Andrews, David W.; Lin, Jialing

    2014-01-01

    Bcl-XL binds to Bax, inhibiting Bax oligomerization required for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) during apoptosis. How Bcl-XL binds to Bax in the membrane is not known. Here, we investigated the structural organization of Bcl-XL·Bax complexes formed in the MOM, including the binding interface and membrane topology, using site-specific cross-linking, compartment-specific labeling, and computational modeling. We found that one heterodimer interface is formed by a specific interaction between the Bcl-2 homology 1–3 (BH1–3) groove of Bcl-XL and the BH3 helix of Bax, as defined previously by the crystal structure of a truncated Bcl-XL protein and a Bax BH3 peptide (Protein Data Bank entry 3PL7). We also discovered a novel interface in the heterodimer formed by equivalent interactions between the helix 1 regions of Bcl-XL and Bax when their helical axes are oriented either in parallel or antiparallel. The two interfaces are located on the cytosolic side of the MOM, whereas helix 9 of Bcl-XL is embedded in the membrane together with helices 5, 6, and 9 of Bax. Formation of the helix 1·helix 1 interface partially depends on the formation of the groove·BH3 interface because point mutations in the latter interface and the addition of ABT-737, a groove-binding BH3 mimetic, blocked the formation of both interfaces. The mutations and ABT-737 also prevented Bcl-XL from inhibiting Bax oligomerization and subsequent MOMP, suggesting that the structural organization in which interactions at both interfaces contribute to the overall stability and functionality of the complex represents antiapoptotic Bcl-XL·Bax complexes in the MOM. PMID:24616095

  5. Gene expression of a green fluorescent protein homolog as a host-specific biomarker of heat stress within a reef-building coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Keune, C; Dove, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent incidences of mass coral bleaching indicate that major reef building corals are increasingly suffering thermal stress associated with climate-related temperature increases. The development of pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry has enabled rapid detection of the onset of thermal stress within coral algal symbionts, but sensitive biomarkers of thermal stress specific to the host coral have been slower to emerge. Differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) was used to produce fingerprints of gene expression for the reef-building coral Acropora millepora exposed to 33 degrees C. Changes in the expression of 23 out of 399 putative genes occurred within 144 h. Down-regulation of one host-specific gene (AmA1a) occurred within just 6 h. Full-length sequencing revealed the product of this gene to be an all-protein chromatophore (green fluorescent protein [GFP]-homolog). RT-PCR revealed consistent down-regulation of this GFP-homolog for three replicate colonies within 6 h at both 32 degrees C and 33 degrees C but not at lower temperatures. Down-regulation of this host gene preceded significant decreases in the photosynthetic activity of photosystem II (dark-adapted F (v)/F (m)) of algal symbionts as measured by PAM fluorometry. Gene expression of host-specific genes such as GFP-homologs may therefore prove to be highly sensitive indicators for the onset of thermal stress within host coral cells.

  6. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C; Pinas, Johan E; Lindhout, Beatrice I; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2013-12-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU construct led to a 200- to 300-fold increase in the frequency of somatic intrachromosomal homologous recombination (iHR). Because the expression of each ZF-ATF leads to a large number of transcriptional changes, we designed a strategy employing a collection of structurally similar ZF-ATFs to filter out the transcriptional changes relevant to the phenotype by deep sequencing. In that manner, 30 transcripts were found to be consistently induced in plants with enhanced homologous recombination (HR). For 25 of the cognate genes, their effect on the HR process was assessed using cDNA/gDNA expression constructs. For three genes, ectopic expression indeed led to enhanced iHR frequencies, albeit much lower than the frequency observed when a HR-inducing ZF-ATF was present. Altogether, our data demonstrate that despite the large number of transcriptional changes brought about by individual ZF-ATFs, causal changes can be identified. In our case, the picture emerged that a natural regulatory switch for iHR does not exist but that ZF-ATFs-like VP16-HRU act as an ectopic master switch, orchestrating the timely expression of a set of plant genes that each by themselves only have modest effects, but when acting together support an extremely high iHR frequency.

  7. Modelación por homología de la proteína Luxs de Porphyromonas gingivalis cepa W83 Modelling by homology of Luxs protein in Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Díaz Caballero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: En las proteínas no se logra siempre su cristalización, de buen tamaño y de buena calidad para someterla a difracción de rayos X. De tal manera que se abre un campo para el desarrollo de estudios teóricos moleculares y proteínicos, que permiten la representación de las moléculas en tres dimensiones, proporcionando una información espacial para estudiar la interacción entre ligandos y receptores macromoleculares. Materialesy Métodos: Estudio In silico, a partir del análisis de secuencias primarias de seis diferentes proteínas LuxS cristalizadas de diversas bacterias, se seleccionó la proteína 1J6X del Helicobacter pylori, por su similaridad con la secuencia de la proteína LuxS en Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis cepa W83, para producir un modelo por homología de esta proteína, utilizando los programas Sybyl y MOE. Se realizó un acoplamiento con el ligando natural para evaluar la reproducibilidad del modelo en un ambiente biológico. Resultados: Se desarrolló el modelado de la proteína LuxS de P. gingivalis cepa W83, que permite el acercamiento a una estructura que se propone, por la interacción entre la proteína y su ligando natural. El modelo generado con recursos computacionales logró una correcta estructura molecular que aceptó la realización de diversos cálculos. El acoplamiento demostró una cavidad donde se logran diversas posiciones del ligando con buenos resultados. Conclusiones: Se obtuvo un modelo 3D para la proteína LuxS en la P. gingivalis cepa W83 validado por diferentes métodos computacionales con una adecuada reproducibilidad biológica por medio del acoplamiento molecular.Background: Crystallization is not always achieved for all proteins in a good size and a good quality for X-ray diffraction. So that condition opens a field for the development of theoretical molecular and protein studies allowing the representation of the molecules in 3D, providing spatial information to study

  8. The inner membrane complex sub-compartment proteins critical for replication of the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii adopt a pleckstrin homology fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2014-05-16

    Toxoplasma gondii, an apicomplexan parasite prevalent in developed nations, infects up to one-third of the human population. The success of this parasite depends on several unique structures including an inner membrane complex (IMC) that lines the interior of the plasma membrane and contains proteins important for gliding motility and replication. Of these proteins, the IMC sub-compartment proteins (ISPs) have recently been shown to play a role in asexual T. gondii daughter cell formation, yet the mechanism is unknown. Complicating mechanistic characterization of the ISPs is a lack of sequence identity with proteins of known structure or function. In support of elucidating the function of ISPs, we first determined the crystal structures of representative members TgISP1 and TgISP3 to a resolution of 2.10 and 2.32 Å, respectively. Structural analysis revealed that both ISPs adopt a pleckstrin homology fold often associated with phospholipid binding or protein-protein interactions. Substitution of basic for hydrophobic residues in the region that overlays with phospholipid binding in related pleckstrin homology domains, however, suggests that ISPs do not retain phospholipid binding activity. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays revealed no phospholipid binding activity. Interestingly, mapping of conserved surface residues combined with crystal packing analysis indicates that TgISPs have functionally repurposed the phospholipid-binding site likely to coordinate protein partners. Recruitment of larger protein complexes may also be aided through avidity-enhanced interactions resulting from multimerization of the ISPs. Overall, we propose a model where TgISPs recruit protein partners to the IMC to ensure correct progression of daughter cell formation.

  9. Amino acid sequences mediating vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 binding to integrin alpha 4: homologous DSP sequence found for JC polyoma VP1 coat protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Andrew Meyer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4 to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3. For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  10. Amino Acid Sequences Mediating Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Binding to Integrin Alpha 4: Homologous DSP Sequence Found for JC Polyoma VP1 Coat Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The JC polyoma viral coat protein VP1 was analyzed for amino acid sequences homologies to the IDSP sequence which mediates binding of VLA-4 (integrin alpha 4) to vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Although the full sequence was not found, a DSP sequence was located near the critical arginine residue linked to infectivity of the virus and binding to sialic acid containing molecules such as integrins (3). For the JC polyoma virus, a DSP sequence was found at residues 70, 71 and 72 with homology also noted for the mouse polyoma virus and SV40 virus. Three dimensional modeling of the VP1 molecule suggests that the DSP loop has an accessible site for interaction from the external side of the assembled viral capsid pentamer.

  11. Patterning of inflorescences and flowers by the F-Box protein DOUBLE TOP and the LEAFY homolog ABERRANT LEAF AND FLOWER of petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souer, Erik; Rebocho, Alexandra B; Bliek, Mattijs; Kusters, Elske; de Bruin, Robert A M; Koes, Ronald

    2008-08-01

    Angiosperms display a wide variety of inflorescence architectures differing in the positions where flowers or branches arise. The expression of floral meristem identity (FMI) genes determines when and where flowers are formed. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this is regulated via transcription of LEAFY (LFY), which encodes a transcription factor that promotes FMI. We found that this is regulated in petunia (Petunia hybrida) via transcription of a distinct gene, DOUBLE TOP (DOT), a homolog of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) from Arabidopsis. Mutation of DOT or its tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) homolog ANANTHA abolishes FMI. Ubiquitous expression of DOT or UFO in petunia causes very early flowering and transforms the inflorescence into a solitary flower and leaves into petals. Ectopic expression of DOT or UFO together with LFY or its homolog ABERRANT LEAF AND FLOWER (ALF) in petunia seedlings activates genes required for identity or outgrowth of organ primordia. DOT interacts physically with ALF, suggesting that it activates ALF by a posttranslational mechanism. Our findings suggest a wider role than previously thought for DOT and UFO in the patterning of flowers and indicate that the different roles of LFY and UFO homologs in the spatiotemporal control of floral identity in distinct species result from their divergent expression patterns.

  12. Alignment of Homologous Chromosomes and Effective Repair of Programmed DNA Double-Strand Breaks during Mouse Meiosis Require the Minichromosome Maintenance Domain Containing 2 (MCMDC2) Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterbusch, Friederike; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Dereli, Ihsan; Stanzione, Marcello; Tränkner, Daniel; Tóth, Attila

    2016-10-01

    Orderly chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division requires meiotic recombination to form crossovers between homologous chromosomes (homologues). Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase family have been implicated in meiotic recombination. In addition, they have roles in initiation of DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair and mitotic DNA double-strand break repair. Here, we addressed the function of MCMDC2, an atypical yet conserved MCM protein, whose function in vertebrates has not been reported. While we did not find an important role for MCMDC2 in mitotically dividing cells, our work revealed that MCMDC2 is essential for fertility in both sexes due to a crucial function in meiotic recombination. Meiotic recombination begins with the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks into the genome. DNA ends at break sites are resected. The resultant 3-prime single-stranded DNA overhangs recruit RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases that promote the invasion of homologous duplex DNAs by the resected DNA ends. Multiple strand invasions on each chromosome promote the alignment of homologous chromosomes, which is a prerequisite for inter-homologue crossover formation during meiosis. We found that although DNA ends at break sites were evidently resected, and they recruited RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases, these recombinases were ineffective in promoting alignment of homologous chromosomes in the absence of MCMDC2. Consequently, RAD51 and DMC1 foci, which are thought to mark early recombination intermediates, were abnormally persistent in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Importantly, the strand invasion stabilizing MSH4 protein, which marks more advanced recombination intermediates, did not efficiently form foci in Mcmdc2-/- meiocytes. Thus, our work suggests that MCMDC2 plays an important role in either the formation, or the stabilization, of DNA strand invasion events that promote homologue alignment and provide the basis for inter-homologue crossover formation during

  13. Identification and characterization of two temperature-induced surface-associated proteins of Streptococcus suis with high homologies to members of the Arginine Deiminase system of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterhoff, Nora; Goethe, Ralph; Gruening, Petra; Rohde, Manfred; Kalisz, Henryk; Smith, Hilde E; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2002-12-01

    The present study was performed to identify stress-induced putative virulence proteins of Streptococcus suis. For this, protein expression patterns of streptococci grown at 32, 37, and 42 degrees C were compared by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Temperature shifts from 32 and 37 to 42 degrees C induced expression of two cell wall-associated proteins with apparent molecular masses of approximately 47 and 53 kDa. Amino-terminal sequence analysis of the two proteins indicated homologies of the 47-kDa protein with an ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) from Streptococcus pyogenes and of the 53-kDa protein with the streptococcal acid glycoprotein (SAGP) from S. pyogenes, an arginine deiminase (AD) recently proposed as a putative virulence factor. Cloning and sequencing the genes encoding the putative OCT and AD of S. suis, octS and adiS, respectively, revealed that they had 81.2 (octS) and 80.2% (adiS) identity with the respective genes of S. pyogenes. Both genes belong to the AD system, also found in other bacteria. Southern hybridization analysis demonstrated the presence of the adiS gene in all 42 serotype 2 and 9 S. suis strains tested. In 9 of these 42 strains, selected randomly, we confirmed expression of the AdiS protein, homologous to SAGP, by immunoblot analysis using a specific antiserum against the SAGP of S. pyogenes. In all strains AD activity was detected. Furthermore, by immunoelectron microscopy using the anti-S. pyogenes SAGP antiserum we were able to demonstrate that the AdiS protein is expressed on the streptococcal surface in association with the capsular polysaccharides but is not coexpressed with them.

  14. Increased efficiency of homologous recombination in Toxoplasma gondii dense granule protein 3 demonstrates that GRA3 is not necessary in cell culture but does contribute to virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Mary Patricia J; Knoll, Laura J

    2007-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii possesses unique secretory organelles, which synchronously release proteins during and after invasion. One of these organelles, the dense granules, secrete proteins after invasion which are thought to be important in development of the parasite throughout all stages of its life cycle. Dense granule protein 3 (GRA3) is a 30 kDa protein localized to the intravacuolar network and parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). Like many dense granule proteins, GRA3 has no homology to proteins with described functions. However, it has been hypothesized to be involved in nutrient acquisition for the parasite due to its localization on the PVM. To begin to investigate the importance of GRA3, the locus was disrupted by homologous replacement with a chloramphenicol resistance gene in a type II strain. Two DeltaGRA3 strains were obtained after two independent electroporations with efficiency greater than 80%. No differences between wild-type and DeltaGRA3 were detected in cell culture growth rate or bradyzoite formation. Location of other parasite dense granule proteins and association with host cell organelles were also not affected in DeltaGRA3. Interestingly, at an infectious dose approximately four-fold above the lethal dose 50% for wild-type parasites, all mice infected with DeltaGRA3-2 infected mice survived acute infection. Complementation of GRA3 expression in the DeltaGRA3-2 strain restored virulence to wild-type levels, and increased the virulence of the DeltaGRA3-1, confirming that the GRA3 protein plays a role during acute infection in a type II strain.

  15. The WW domain of Yes-associated protein binds a proline-rich ligand that differs from the consensus established for Src homology 3-binding modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H I; Sudol, M

    1995-08-15

    The WW domain has previously been described as a motif of 38 semiconserved residues found in seemingly unrelated proteins, such as dystrophin, Yes-associated protein (YAP), and two transcriptional regulators, Rsp-5 and FE65. The molecular function of the WW domain has been unknown until this time. Using a functional screen of a cDNA expression library, we have identified two putative ligands of the WW domain of YAP, which we named WBP-1 and WBP-2. Peptide sequence comparison between the two partial clones revealed a homologous region consisting of a proline-rich domain followed by a tyrosine residue (with the shared sequence PPPPY), which we shall call the PY motif. Binding assays and site-specific mutagenesis have shown that the PY motif binds with relatively high affinity and specificity to the WW domain of YAP, with the preliminary consensus XPPXY being critical for binding. Herein, we have implicated the WW domain with a role in mediating protein-protein interactions, as a variant of the paradigm set by Src homology 3 domains and their proline-rich ligands.

  16. A pericentrin-related protein homolog in Aspergillus nidulans plays important roles in nucleus positioning and cell polarity by affecting microtubule organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peiying; Gao, Rongsui; Chen, Shaochun; Pu, Li; Li, Pin; Huang, Ying; Lu, Ling

    2012-12-01

    Pericentrin is a large coiled-coil protein in mammalian centrosomes that serves as a multifunctional scaffold for anchoring numerous proteins. Recent studies have linked numerous human disorders with mutated or elevated levels of pericentrin, suggesting unrecognized contributions of pericentrin-related proteins to the development of these disorders. In this study, we characterized AnPcpA, a putative homolog of pericentrin-related protein in the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, and found that it is essential for conidial germination and hyphal development. Compared to the hyphal apex localization pattern of calmodulin (CaM), which has been identified as an interactive partner of the pericentrin homolog, GFP-AnPcpA fluorescence dots are associated mainly with nuclei, while the accumulation of CaM at the hyphal apex depends on the function of AnPcpA. In addition, the depletion of AnPcpA by an inducible alcA promoter repression results in severe growth defects and abnormal nuclear segregation. Most interestingly, in mature hyphal cells, knockdown of pericentrin was able to significantly induce changes in cell shape and cytoskeletal remodeling; it resulted in some enlarged compartments with condensed nuclei and anucleate small compartments as well. Moreover, defects in AnPcpA significantly disrupted the microtubule organization and nucleation, suggesting that AnPcpA may affect nucleus positioning by influencing microtubule organization.

  17. Controlling the loading of protein nanocages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, W.F.

    2013-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on the use of natural protein building blocks to assemble nanocages. Most common strategies for the loading of different protein nanocages suffer from a lack of numerical control over cargo loading. The aim of this thesis was to create a controllable method

  18. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  19. Homology of the NifS family of proteins to a new class of pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, C; Sander, C

    1993-05-10

    Iterative profile sequence analysis reveals a remote homology of peroxisomal serine-pyruvate aminotransferases from mammals to the small subunit of soluble hydrogenases from cyanobacteria, an isopenicillin N epimerase, the NifS gene products from bacteria and yeast, and the phosphoserine aminotransferase family. All members of this new class whose function is known are pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes, yet they have distinct catalytic activities. Upon alignment, a lysine around position 200 remains invariant and is predicted to be the pyridoxal phosphate-binding residue. Based on the detected homology, it is predicted that NifS has also a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent serine (or related) aminotransferase function associated with nitrogen economy and/or protection during nitrogen fixation.

  20. Nonstructural 3 Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Modulates the Tribbles Homolog 3/Akt Signaling Pathway for Persistent Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Si C.; Pham, Tu M.; Nguyen, Lam N.; Park, Eun-Mee; Lim, Yun-Sook; Hwang, Soon B.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often causes chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the mechanisms underlying HCV-induced liver pathogenesis are still not fully understood. By transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis, we recently identified host genes that were significantly differentially expressed in cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Of these, tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) was selected for further characterization. TRIB3 was init...

  1. Mutations of Conserved Residues in the Major Homology Region Arrest Assembling HIV-1 Gag as a Membrane-Targeted Intermediate Containing Genomic RNA and Cellular Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motoko; Robinson, Bridget A; Chutiraka, Kasana; Geary, Clair D; Reed, Jonathan C; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2015-12-09

    The major homology region (MHR) is a highly conserved motif that is found within the Gag protein of all orthoretroviruses and some retrotransposons. While it is widely accepted that the MHR is critical for assembly of HIV-1 and other retroviruses, how the MHR functions and why it is so highly conserved are not understood. Moreover, consensus is lacking on when HIV-1 MHR residues function during assembly. Here, we first addressed previous conflicting reports by confirming that MHR deletion, like conserved MHR residue substitution, leads to a dramatic reduction in particle production in human and nonhuman primate cells expressing HIV-1 proviruses. Next, we used biochemical analyses and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that conserved residues in the MHR are required after assembling Gag has associated with genomic RNA, recruited critical host factors involved in assembly, and targeted to the plasma membrane. The exact point of inhibition at the plasma membrane differed depending on the specific mutation, with one MHR mutant arrested as a membrane-associated intermediate that is stable upon high-salt treatment and other MHR mutants arrested as labile, membrane-associated intermediates. Finally, we observed the same assembly-defective phenotypes when the MHR deletion or conserved MHR residue substitutions were engineered into Gag from a subtype B, lab-adapted provirus or Gag from a subtype C primary isolate that was codon optimized. Together, our data support a model in which MHR residues act just after membrane targeting, with some MHR residues promoting stability and another promoting multimerization of the membrane-targeted assembling Gag oligomer. The retroviral Gag protein exhibits extensive amino acid sequence variation overall; however, one region of Gag, termed the major homology region, is conserved among all retroviruses and even some yeast retrotransposons, although the reason for this conservation remains poorly understood. Highly conserved residues

  2. Potential involvement of a cucumber homolog of phloem protein 1 in the long-distance movement of Cucumber mosaic virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, A; Simón-Buela, L; Salcedo, G; García-Arenal, F

    2006-07-01

    The systemic movement of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in cucumber plants was analyzed. The structure that is translocated and its putative interactions with phloem components were analyzed in phloem exudate (PE) samples, which reflect sieve tubes stream composition. Rate zonal centrifugation and electron-microscopy analyses of PE from CMV-infected plants showed that CMV moves through sieve tubes as virus particles. Gel overlay assays revealed that CMV particles interact with a PE protein, p48. The amino-acid sequence of several tryptic peptides of p48 was determined. Partial amino-acid sequence of p48 showed it was a cucumber homolog of phloem protein 1 (PP1) from pumpkin, with which p48 also shares several chemical properties. PP1 from pumpkin has plasmodesmata-gating ability and translocates in sieve tubes. Encapsidated CMV RNA in PE samples from infected plants was less accessible to digestion by RNase A than RNA in purified CMV particles, a property that was reconstituted by the in vitro interaction of purified CMV particles and protein p48. These results indicate that the interaction with p48 modifies CMV particle structure and suggest that CMV particles interact with the cucumber homolog of PP1 during translocation in the sieve tubes.

  3. Spike protein homology between the SARS-associated virus and murine hepatitis virus implies existence of a putative receptor-binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Coronavirus has been determined to be the cause of the recent outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Human coronavirus 229E had been studied well and its receptor-binding domain was restricted to aa417-547 of S protein. However, this region has no homology with the newly separated SARS-associated virus (Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Then we analyzed the phylogenesis of S1 subunit of the coronavirus spike protein (SARS-associated virus, Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Interestingly, the highest homology between murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and SARS-associated coronavirus was found. And the important sites (aa62-65 and aa214-216) on the spike protein of MHV with receptor-binding capacity were highly conservative in comparison with the newly separated SARS-asso- ciated virus (the corresponding sites are aa51-54 and aa195-197). These results from bioinformatics analysis might help us to study the receptor-binding sites of SARS-associ- ated virus and the mechanism of the virus entry into the target cell, and design antiviral drugs and potent vaccines.

  4. Phylogenetic analyses of the homologous transmembrane channel-forming proteins of the F0F1-ATPases of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, A; Ngo, L; Park, J; Paulsen, I T; Saier, M H

    1996-01-01

    Sequences of the three integral membrane subunits (subunits a, b and c) of the F0 sector of the proton-translocating F-type (F0F1-) ATPases of bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria have been analysed. All homologous-sequenced proteins of these subunits, comprising three distinct families, have been identified by database searches, and the homologous protein sequences have been aligned and analysed for phylogenetic relatedness. The results serve to define the relationships of the members of each of these three families of proteins, to identify regions of relative conservation, and to define relative rates of evolutionary divergence. Of these three subunits, c-subunits exhibited the slowest rate of evolutionary divergence, b-subunits exhibited the most rapid rate of evolutionary divergence, and a-subunits exhibited an intermediate rate of evolutionary divergence. The results allow definition of the relative times of occurrence of specific events during evolutionary history, such as the intragenic duplication event that gave rise to large c-subunits in eukaryotic vacuolar-type ATPases after eukaryotes diverged from archaea, and the extragenic duplication of F-type ATPase b-subunits that occurred in blue-green bacteria before the advent of chloroplasts. The results generally show that the three F0 subunits evolved as a unit from a primordial set of genes without appreciable horizontal transmission of the encoding genetic information although a few possible exceptions were noted.

  5. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 controls extent of resection during homology directed repair by signalling through Exonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, Amanda W; Lim, Yi Chieh; Bolderson, Emma; Cerosaletti, Karen; Gatei, Magtouf; Jakob, Burkhard; Tobias, Frank; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Gueven, Nuri; Oakley, Greg; Concannon, Patrick; Wolvetang, Ernst; Khanna, Kum Kum; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-09-30

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex plays a central role as a sensor of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and is responsible for the efficient activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Once activated ATM in turn phosphorylates RAD50 and NBS1, important for cell cycle control, DNA repair and cell survival. We report here that MRE11 is also phosphorylated by ATM at S676 and S678 in response to agents that induce DNA DSB, is dependent on the presence of NBS1, and does not affect the association of members of the complex or ATM activation. A phosphosite mutant (MRE11S676AS678A) cell line showed decreased cell survival and increased chromosomal aberrations after radiation exposure indicating a defect in DNA repair. Use of GFP-based DNA repair reporter substrates in MRE11S676AS678A cells revealed a defect in homology directed repair (HDR) but single strand annealing was not affected. More detailed investigation revealed that MRE11S676AS678A cells resected DNA ends to a greater extent at sites undergoing HDR. Furthermore, while ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Kap1 and SMC1 was normal in MRE11S676AS678A cells, there was no phosphorylation of Exonuclease 1 consistent with the defect in HDR. These results describe a novel role for ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 in limiting the extent of resection mediated through Exonuclease 1.

  6. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  7. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gen...

  8. echinus, required for interommatidial cell sorting and cell death in the Drosophila pupal retina, encodes a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorski Sharon M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death is used to remove excess cells between ommatidia in the Drosophila pupal retina. This death is required to establish the crystalline, hexagonal packing of ommatidia that characterizes the adult fly eye. In previously described echinus mutants, interommatidial cell sorting, which precedes cell death, occurred relatively normally. Interommatidial cell death was partially suppressed, resulting in adult eyes that contained excess pigment cells, and in which ommatidia were mildly disordered. These results have suggested that echinus functions in the pupal retina primarily to promote interommatidial cell death. Results We generated a number of new echinus alleles, some likely null mutants. Analysis of these alleles provides evidence that echinus has roles in cell sorting as well as cell death. echinus encodes a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases. These proteins cleave ubiquitin-conjugated proteins at the ubiquitin C-terminus. The echinus locus encodes multiple splice forms, including two proteins that lack residues thought to be critical for deubiquitination activity. Surprisingly, ubiquitous expression in the eye of versions of Echinus that lack residues critical for ubiquitin specific protease activity, as well as a version predicted to be functional, rescue the echinus loss-of-function phenotype. Finally, genetic interactions were not detected between echinus loss and gain-of-function and a number of known apoptotic regulators. These include Notch, EGFR, the caspases Dronc, Drice, Dcp-1, Dream, the caspase activators, Rpr, Hid, and Grim, the caspase inhibitor DIAP1, and Lozenge or Klumpfuss. Conclusion The echinus locus encodes multiple splice forms of a protein with homology to ubiquitin-specific proteases, but protease activity is unlikely to be required for echinus function, at least when echinus is overexpressed. Characterization of likely echinus null alleles and genetic interactions

  9. Eps15 homology domain containing protein of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEHD) associates with endocytosis and vesicular trafficking towards neutral lipid storage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vandana; Asad, Mohd; Jain, Shaifali; Hossain, Mohammad E; Gupta, Akanksha; Kaur, Inderjeet; Rathore, Sumit; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Nida J; Mohmmed, Asif

    2015-11-01

    The human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, takes up numerous host cytosolic components and exogenous nutrients through endocytosis during the intra-erythrocytic stages. Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHDs) are conserved NTPases, which are implicated in membrane remodeling and regulation of specific endocytic transport steps in eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we have characterized the dynamin-like C-terminal Eps15 homology domain containing protein of P. falciparum (PfEHD). Using a GFP-targeting approach, we studied localization and trafficking of PfEHD in the parasite. The PfEHD-GFP fusion protein was found to be a membrane bound protein that associates with vesicular network in the parasite. Time-lapse microscopy studies showed that these vesicles originate at parasite plasma membrane, migrate through the parasite cytosol and culminate into a large multi-vesicular like structure near the food-vacuole. Co-staining of food vacuole membrane showed that the multi-vesicular structure is juxtaposed but outside the food vacuole. Labeling of parasites with neutral lipid specific dye, Nile Red, showed that this large structure is neutral lipid storage site in the parasites. Proteomic analysis identified endocytosis modulators as PfEHD associated proteins in the parasites. Treatment of parasites with endocytosis inhibitors obstructed the development of PfEHD-labeled vesicles and blocked their targeting to the lipid storage site. Overall, our data suggests that the PfEHD is involved in endocytosis and plays a role in the generation of endocytic vesicles at the parasite plasma membrane, that are subsequently targeted to the neutral lipid generation/storage site localized near the food vacuole.

  10. Immunohistological profile of the Ras homologous B protein (RhoB) in human testes showing normal spermatogenesis, spermatogenic arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, Mohamed A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk Abdelwahed

    2010-09-01

    Ras homologous B protein (RhoB) belongs to the Ras homologous subfamily which consists of low molecular weight (21 kDa) GTP-binding proteins. Rho proteins are regulatory molecules associated with various kinases and as such they mediate changes in cell shape, contractility, motility and gene expression. To date, no data are available about the expression pattern of RhoB protein in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis. The present study addresses these issues. Human testicular biopsy specimens were obtained from patients suffering from post-testicular infertility (testis showing normal spermatogenesis, 10 cases) and testicular infertility (testis showing Sertoli cell only syndrome and spermatogenic arrest, 10 patients each). The expression of RhoB was examined using in situ immunofluorescent staining methods. In testes showing normal spermatogenesis, RhoB had a strong expression in the seminiferous epithelium (cytoplasm of Sertoli-cells, spermatogonia and spermatocytes) and in the interstitium (Leydig cells). RhoB expression was weak in the myofibroblasts and absent in the spermatids and sperms. In the testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis, RhoB expression was moderate in the seminiferous epithelium (cytoplasm of Sertoli cells, spermatogonia and spermatocytes) and was completely absent in the Leydig cells, myofibroblasts, spermatids and sperms. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first morphological indication that RhoB protein is expressed in human testis and its expression undergoes testicular infertility associated changes. These findings suggest the involvement of RhoB in the process of spermatogenesis in human and their possible therapeutic ramifications in testicular infertility are open for further investigations.

  11. DTL, the Drosophila homolog of PIMT/Tgs1 nuclear receptor coactivator-interacting protein/RNA methyltransferase, has an essential role in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komonyi, Orbán; Pápai, Gábor; Enunlu, Izzet; Muratoglu, Selen; Pankotai, Tibor; Kopitova, Darija; Maróy, Péter; Udvardy, Andor; Boros, Imre

    2005-04-01

    We describe a novel Drosophila gene, dtl (Drosophila Tat-like), which encodes a 60-kDa protein with RNA binding activity and a methyltransferase (MTase) domain. Dtl has an essential role in Drosophila development. The homologs of DTL recently described include PIMT (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-interacting protein with a methyltransferase domain), an RNA-binding protein that interacts with and enhances the nuclear receptor coactivator function, and TGS1, the methyltransferase involved in the formation of the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine (m3G) cap of non-coding small RNAs. DTL is expressed throughout all of the developmental stages of Drosophila. The dtl mRNA has two ORFs (uORF and dORF). The product of dORF is the 60-kDa PIMT/TGS1 homolog protein that is translated from an internal AUG located 538 bp downstream from the 5' end of the message. This product of dtl is responsible for the formation of the m3G cap of small RNAs of Drosophila. Trimethylguanosine synthase activity is essential in Drosophila. The deletion in the dORF or point mutation in the putative MTase active site results in a reduced pool of m3G cap-containing RNAs and lethality in the early pupa stage. The 5' region of the dtl message also has the coding capacity (uORF) for a 178 amino acid protein. For complete rescue of the lethal phenotype of dtl mutants, the presence of the entire dtl transcription unit is required. Transgenes that carry mutations within the uORF restore the MTase activity but result in only partial rescue of the lethal phenotype. Interestingly, two transgenes bearing a mutation in uORF or dORF in trans can result in complete rescue.

  12. On the Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: the Case of Homologous G-domains

    OpenAIRE

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work we address the question whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologues G-domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the Elongation-Factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time-scale we show that both proteins host water molecules in int...

  13. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  14. T-Coffee: a web server for the multiple sequence alignment of protein and RNA sequences using structural information and homology extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tommaso, Paolo; Moretti, Sebastien; Xenarios, Ioannis; Orobitg, Miquel; Montanyola, Alberto; Chang, Jia-Ming; Taly, Jean-François; Notredame, Cedric

    2011-07-01

    This article introduces a new interface for T-Coffee, a consistency-based multiple sequence alignment program. This interface provides an easy and intuitive access to the most popular functionality of the package. These include the default T-Coffee mode for protein and nucleic acid sequences, the M-Coffee mode that allows combining the output of any other aligners, and template-based modes of T-Coffee that deliver high accuracy alignments while using structural or homology derived templates. These three available template modes are Expresso for the alignment of protein with a known 3D-Structure, R-Coffee to align RNA sequences with conserved secondary structures and PSI-Coffee to accurately align distantly related sequences using homology extension. The new server benefits from recent improvements of the T-Coffee algorithm and can align up to 150 sequences as long as 10,000 residues and is available from both http://www.tcoffee.org and its main mirror http://tcoffee.crg.cat.

  15. Two cytosolic puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase isozymes in chicken brain: molecular homology to brain-specific 14-3-3 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, K S; Saito, M; Hui, M; Saito, M; Lajtha, A; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1993-05-01

    Two puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase isozymes (PSA-I and PSA-II) were isolated from chicken brain cytosol by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by column chromatography on Cellex D and AH-Sepharose 4B and separated on Bio-Gel HTP. Each was purified to homogeneity on Sephadex G-200, Arg-Tyr-AH-Sepharose, Bio-Gel HTP, and preparative gel electrophoresis. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, PSA-I appeared to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 105 kDa, and PSA-II to be composed of two subunits of 25 kDa and 100 kDa. The tryptic maps of 100 kDa and 105 kDa protein in HPLC are different in peak frequency, height, and composition. The internal peptide sequence of PSA-I has a considerable homology to PSA-II. Both isozymes have repeated copies of common peptide segments and have no significant sequence homology to other peptidases and proteinases. These thio and Co(2+)-activated isozymes have a neutral pH optimum and are inhibited by puromycin and bestatin. PSA-II is more sensitive to trypsin and heat treatment, has a lower Km to Met-enkephalin, and is more active on Arg BNA and Pro BNA. Our results suggest that PSA-I and PSA-II derive from translation of two RNAs of a new gene family related to the brain-specific 14-3-3 protein.

  16. Are the surface layer homology domains essential for cell surface display and glycosylation of the S-layer protein from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesch, Bettina; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2013-02-01

    Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) cells are decorated with a two-dimensional (2D) crystalline array comprised of the glycosylated S-layer protein SpaA. At its N terminus, SpaA possesses three consecutive surface layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domains containing the amino acid motif TRAE, known to play a key role in cell wall binding, as well as the TVEE and TRAQ variations thereof. SpaA is predicted to be anchored to the cell wall by interaction of the SLH domains with a peptidoglycan (PG)-associated, nonclassical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP). In this study, we have analyzed the role of the three predicted binding motifs within the SLH domains by mutating them into TAAA motifs, either individually, pairwise, or all of them. Effects were visualized in vivo by homologous expression of chimeras made of the mutated S-layer proteins and enhanced green fluorescent protein and in an in vitro binding assay using His-tagged SpaA variants and native PG-containing cell wall sacculi that either contained SCWP or were deprived of it. Experimental data indicated that (i) the TRAE, TVEE, and TRAQ motifs are critical for the binding function of SLH domains, (ii) two functional motifs are sufficient for cell wall binding, regardless of the domain location, (iii) SLH domains have a dual-recognition function for the SCWP and the PG, and (iv) cell wall anchoring is not necessary for SpaA glycosylation. Additionally, we showed that the SLH domains of SpaA are sufficient for in vivo cell surface display of foreign proteins at the cell surface of P. alvei.

  17. Pathogen and autoantigen homologous regions within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein suggest an autoimmune treatable component of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J

    2011-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel provides the glutathione and hypochlorous acid necessary for bactericidal/viricidal actions. CFTR mutations block these effects, diminishing pathogen defence and allowing extracellular pathogen accumulation, where antibody encounter is likely. KEGG pathway analysis of the CFTR interactome shows that CFTR is involved in pathogen entry pathways and immune defence as well as in pathways relevant to comorbid conditions (diabetes, cardiomyopathies and sexual organ development). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infections decrease the lifespan of cystic fibrosis patients and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia colonization is increased. Autoantibodies, targeting myeloperoxidase, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and calgranulin may further compromise pathogen defence. Short consensus sequences, within immunogenic extracellular regions of the CFTR protein, are homologous to proteins expressed by P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. maltophilia, and to several autoantigens, with a universal overlap between autoantigen/pathogen/CFTR consensi. Antibodies to pathogens are thus likely responsible for the creation of these autoantibodies, which, with pathogen antibodies, may target the CFTR protein acting as antagonists, further compromising its function. This creates a feedforward cycle, diminishing the function of the CFTR protein and increasing the probability of pathogen accumulation and antibody production at every turn. Interruption of this cycle by antibody adsorption or immunosuppressant therapy may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis.

  18. Could the homologous sequence of anti-inflammatory pentapeptide (MLIF) produced by Entamoeba histolytica in the N protein of rabies virus affect the inflammatory process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M E; Rico, G; Gómez, J L; Alonso, R; Cortés, R; Silva, R; Giménez, J A; Kretschmer, R; Aguilar-Setién, A

    2006-02-01

    Amebiasis and rabies are public health problems, and they have in common a poor inflammatory effect in the target organs that they affect. In the GenBank, it was found that the anti-inflammatory peptide monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor (MLIF) produced by Entamoeba histolytica homologates 80%, with a fragment of the N protein of the rabies virus. We speculated if the N protein could contribute to the scant inflammatory reaction produced by rabies virus in central nervous system. The N protein was obtained and studied in vitro and in vivo. The N protein, as MLIF, inhibited the respiratory burst in human mononuclear phagocytes (43%, p<0.05), but in contrast to MLIF, it increased chemotaxis and it did not significantly inhibit delayed hypersensitivity skin reaction to 1-chloro-2-4-dinitrobenzene in guinea pigs. Therefore, the full peptide sequence has to be present or it has to be cleaved-free from the large recombinant N protein molecule (55 kDa) to become active.

  19. Heat shock protein 104 (Hsp104)-mediated curing of [PSI+] yeast prions depends on both [PSI+] conformation and the properties of the Hsp104 homologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Rodriguez, Ramon; Silberman, Rebecca E.; Ahearn, Joseph M.; Saidha, Sheela; Cummins, Kaelyn C.; Eisenberg, Evan; Greene, Lois E.

    2017-01-01

    Prions arise from proteins that have two possible conformations: properly folded and non-infectious or misfolded and infectious. The [PSI+] yeast prion, which is the misfolded and self-propagating form of the translation termination factor eRF3 (Sup35), can be cured of its infectious conformation by overexpression of Hsp104, which helps dissolve the prion seeds. This dissolution depends on the trimming activity of Hsp104, which reduces the size of the prion seeds without increasing their number. To further understand the relationship between trimming and curing, trimming was followed by measuring the loss of GFP-labeled Sup35 foci from both strong and weak [PSI+] variants; the former variant has more seeds and less soluble Sup35 than the latter. Overexpression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 (Sc-Hsp104) trimmed the weak [PSI+] variants much faster than the strong variants and cured the weak variants an order of magnitude faster than the strong variants. Overexpression of the fungal Hsp104 homologs from Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sp-Hsp104) or Candida albicans (Ca-Hsp104) also trimmed and cured the weak variants, but interestingly, it neither trimmed nor cured the strong variants. These results show that, because Sc-Hsp104 has greater trimming activity than either Ca-Hsp104 or Sp-Hsp104, it cures both the weak and strong variants, whereas Ca-Hsp104 and Sp-Hsp104 only cure the weak variants. Therefore, curing by Hsp104 overexpression depends on both the trimming ability of the fungal Hsp104 homolog and the strength of the [PSI+] variant: the greater the trimming activity of the Hsp104 homolog and the weaker the variant, the greater the curing. PMID:28373280

  20. Evolution and virulence contributions of the autotransporter proteins YapJ and YapK of Yersinia pestis CO92 and their homologs in Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Jonathan D; Temple, Brenda R S; Miller, Virginia L

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, evolved from the gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Both species have numerous type Va autotransporters, most of which appear to be highly conserved. In Y. pestis CO92, the autotransporter genes yapK and yapJ share a high level of sequence identity. By comparing yapK and yapJ to three homologous genes in Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 (YPTB0365, YPTB3285, and YPTB3286), we show that yapK is conserved in Y. pseudotuberculosis, while yapJ is unique to Y. pestis. All of these autotransporters exhibit >96% identity in the C terminus of the protein and identities ranging from 58 to 72% in their N termini. By extending this analysis to include homologous sequences from numerous Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains, we determined that these autotransporters cluster into a YapK (YPTB3285) class and a YapJ (YPTB3286) class. The YPTB3286-like gene of most Y. pestis strains appears to be inactivated, perhaps in favor of maintaining yapJ. Since autotransporters are important for virulence in many bacterial pathogens, including Y. pestis, any change in autotransporter content should be considered for its impact on virulence. Using established mouse models of Y. pestis infection, we demonstrated that despite the high level of sequence identity, yapK is distinct from yapJ in its contribution to disseminated Y. pestis infection. In addition, a mutant lacking both of these genes exhibits an additive attenuation, suggesting nonredundant roles for yapJ and yapK in systemic Y. pestis infection. However, the deletion of the homologous genes in Y. pseudotuberculosis does not seem to impact the virulence of this organism in orogastric or systemic infection models.

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel bacterial virulence factor that shares homology with mammalian Toll/interleukin-1 receptor family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ruchi M; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Godzik, Adam; Reed, John C

    2006-01-01

    Many important bacterial virulence factors act as mimics of mammalian proteins to subvert normal host cell processes. To identify bacterial protein mimics of components of the innate immune signaling pathway, we searched the bacterial genome database for proteins with homology to the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of the mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their adaptor proteins. A previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named tlpA (for TIR-like protein A), was identified in the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis genome that is predicted to encode a protein resembling mammalian TIR domains, We show that overexpression of TlpA in mammalian cells suppresses the ability of mammalian TIR-containing proteins TLR4, IL-1 receptor, and MyD88 to induce the transactivation and DNA-binding activities of NF-kappaB, a downstream target of the TIR signaling pathway. In addition, TlpA mimics the previously characterized Salmonella virulence factor SipB in its ability to induce activation of caspase-1 in a mammalian cell transfection model. Disruption of the chromosomal tlpA gene rendered a virulent serovar Enteritidis strain defective in intracellular survival and IL-1beta secretion in a cell culture infection model using human THP1 macrophages. Bacteria with disrupted tlpA also displayed reduced lethality in mice, further confirming an important role for this factor in pathogenesis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the bacterial TIR-like protein TlpA is a novel prokaryotic modulator of NF-kappaB activity and IL-1beta secretion that contributes to serovar Enteritidis virulence.

  2. Phox homology band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin-like proteins function as molecular scaffolds that interact with cargo receptors and Ras GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rajesh; Mobli, Mehdi; Norwood, Suzanne J; Bugarcic, Andrea; Teasdale, Rohan D; King, Glenn F; Collins, Brett M

    2011-05-10

    Following endocytosis, the fates of receptors, channels, and other transmembrane proteins are decided via specific endosomal sorting pathways, including recycling to the cell surface for continued activity. Two distinct phox-homology (PX)-domain-containing proteins, sorting nexin (SNX) 17 and SNX27, are critical regulators of recycling from endosomes to the cell surface. In this study we demonstrate that SNX17, SNX27, and SNX31 all possess a novel 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin (FERM)-like domain. SNX17 has been shown to bind to Asn-Pro-Xaa-Tyr (NPxY) sequences in the cytoplasmic tails of cargo such as LDL receptors and the amyloid precursor protein, and we find that both SNX17 and SNX27 display similar affinities for NPxY sorting motifs, suggesting conserved functions in endosomal recycling. Furthermore, we show for the first time that all three proteins are able to bind the Ras GTPase through their FERM-like domains. These interactions place the PX-FERM-like proteins at a hub of endosomal sorting and signaling processes. Studies of the SNX17 PX domain coupled with cellular localization experiments reveal the mechanistic basis for endosomal localization of the PX-FERM-like proteins, and structures of SNX17 and SNX27 determined by small angle X-ray scattering show that they adopt non-self-assembling, modular structures in solution. In summary, this work defines a novel family of proteins that participate in a network of interactions that will impact on both endosomal protein trafficking and compartment specific Ras signaling cascades.

  3. Conditional Knockout of Src Homology 2 Domain-containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 in Myeloid Cells Attenuates Renal Fibrosis after Unilateral Ureter Obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Fei Teng; Kai Wang; Yao Li; Fa-Jun Qu; Qing Yuan; Xin-Gang Cui; Quan-Xing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) is a kind of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatase.Studies have revealed its roles in various disease,however,whether SHP-2 involves in renal fibrosis remains unclear.The aim of this study was to explore the roles of myeloid cells SHP-2 in renal interstitial fibrosis.Methods:Myeloid cells SHP-2 gene was conditionally knocked-out (CKO) in mice using loxP-Cre system,and renal interstitial fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO).The total collagen deposition in the renal interstitium was assessed using picrosirius red stain.F4/80 immunostaing was used to evaluate macrophage infiltration in renal tubular interstitium.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay were used to analyze the production of cytokines in the kidney.Transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling stain was used to assess the apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells.Results:Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 gene CKO in myeloid cells significantly reduced collagen deposition in the renal interstitium after UUO.Macrophage infiltration was evidently decreased in renal tubular interstitium of SHP-2 CKO mice.Meanwhile,the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly suppressed in SHP-2 CKO mice.However,no significant difference was observed in the number of apoptotic renal tubular epithelial cells between wild-type and SHP-2 CKO mice.Conclusions:Our observations suggested that SHP-2 in myeloid cells plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis,and that silencing of SHP-2 gene in myeloid cells may protect renal from inflammatory damage and prevent renal fibrosis after renal injury.

  4. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation.

  5. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of a coat protein of an Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y: comparison with homologous sequences of other isolates and phylogenetic analysis

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    Budzanivska I. G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Identification of the widespread Ukrainian isolate(s of PVY (Potato virus Y in different potato cultivars and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of detected PVY isolates based on NA and AA sequences of coat protein. Methods. ELISA, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Results. PVY has been identified serologically in potato cultivars of Ukrainian selection. In this work we have optimized a method for total RNA extraction from potato samples and offered a sensitive and specific PCR-based test system of own design for diagnostics of the Ukrainian PVY isolates. Part of the CP gene of the Ukrainian PVY isolate has been sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. It is demonstrated that the Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y (CP gene has a higher percentage of homology with the recombinant isolates (strains of this pathogen (approx. 98.8– 99.8 % of homology for both nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the CP gene. The Ukrainian isolate of PVY is positioned in the separate cluster together with the isolates found in Syria, Japan and Iran; these isolates possibly have common origin. The Ukrainian PVY isolate is confirmed to be recombinant. Conclusions. This work underlines the need and provides the means for accurate monitoring of Potato virus Y in the agroecosystems of Ukraine. Most importantly, the phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the recombinant nature of this PVY isolate which has been attributed to the strain group O, subclade N:O.

  6. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

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    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  7. In-silico screening for DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitors: Combined homology modeling, docking, molecular dynamic study followed by biological investigation.

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    Tarazi, Hamadeh; Saleh, Ekram; El-Awady, Raafat

    2016-10-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a key enzyme in non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. The targeted inhibition of such enzyme would furnish a valuable option for cancer treatment. In this study we report the development of validation of enzyme homology model, and the subsequent use of this model to perform docking-based virtual screening against a database of FDA-approved drugs. The nominated highest ranking hits (Praziquantel and Dutasteride) were subjected to biological investigation. Additionally, molecular dynamic study was carried-out for binding mode exploration. Results of the biological evaluation revealed that both compounds inhibit the DNA-PK enzymatic activity at relatively high concentration levels with an IC50 of 17.3μM for praziquantel and >20μM for dutasteride. Furthermore, both agents enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of doxorubicin and cisplatin on breast cancer (MCF7) and lung cancer (A549) cell lines. This result indicates that these two hits are good candidate as DNA-PK inhibitors and worth further structural modifications to enhance their enzyme inhibitory effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Two homologous putative protein tyrosine phosphatases, OsPFA-DSP2 and AtPFA-DSP4, negatively regulate the pathogen response in transgenic plants.

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    Hanjie He

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatases, together with protein kinases, regulate protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and play critical roles in plant growth and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the biological functions of plant protein tyrosine dual-specificity phosphatase (PFA-DSP in biotic stresses. Here, we found that OsPFA-DSP2 was mainly expressed in calli, seedlings, roots, and young panicles, and localized in cytoplasm and nucleus. Ectopic overexpression of OsPFA-DSP2 in rice increased sensitivity to Magnaporthe grisea (M. grisea Z1 strain, inhibited the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 and suppressed the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR genes after fungal infection. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPFA-DSP4, which is homologous to OsPFA-DSP2, also exhibited sensitivity to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000, reduced accumulation of H(2O(2 and decreased photosynthesic capacity after infection compared with Col-0. These results indicate that OsPFA-DSP2 and AtPFA-DSP4 act as negative regulators of the pathogen response in transgenic plants.

  9. Two homologous putative protein tyrosine phosphatases, OsPFA-DSP2 and AtPFA-DSP4, negatively regulate the pathogen response in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hanjie; Su, Jianbin; Shu, Shengying; Zhang, Yang; Ao, Ying; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dongru; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hongbin

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, together with protein kinases, regulate protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and play critical roles in plant growth and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the biological functions of plant protein tyrosine dual-specificity phosphatase (PFA-DSP) in biotic stresses. Here, we found that OsPFA-DSP2 was mainly expressed in calli, seedlings, roots, and young panicles, and localized in cytoplasm and nucleus. Ectopic overexpression of OsPFA-DSP2 in rice increased sensitivity to Magnaporthe grisea (M. grisea Z1 strain), inhibited the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and suppressed the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes after fungal infection. Interestingly, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPFA-DSP4, which is homologous to OsPFA-DSP2, also exhibited sensitivity to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), reduced accumulation of H(2)O(2) and decreased photosynthesic capacity after infection compared with Col-0. These results indicate that OsPFA-DSP2 and AtPFA-DSP4 act as negative regulators of the pathogen response in transgenic plants.

  10. Arabidopsis Small Rubber Particle Protein Homolog SRPs Play Dual Roles as Positive Factors for Tissue Growth and Development and in Drought Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Yu; Park, Ki Youl; Seo, Young Sam; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-04-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) act as repositories for fatty acids and sterols, which are used for various cellular processes such as energy production and membrane and hormone synthesis. LD-associated proteins play important roles in seed development and germination, but their functions in postgermination growth are not well understood. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains three SRP homologs (SRP1, SRP2, and SRP3) that share sequence identities with small rubber particle proteins of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). In this report, the possible cellular roles of SRPs in postgermination growth and the drought tolerance response were investigated. Arabidopsis SRPs appeared to be LD-associated proteins and displayed polymerization properties in vivo and in vitro. SRP-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:SRP1, 35S:SRP2, and 35S:SRP3) exhibited higher vegetative and reproductive growth and markedly better tolerance to drought stress than wild-type Arabidopsis. In addition, constitutive over-expression of SRPs resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in postgermination seedlings. In contrast, single (srp1, 35S:SRP2-RNAi, and srp3) and triple (35S:SRP2-RNAi/srp1srp3) loss-of-function mutant lines exhibited the opposite phenotypes. Our results suggest that Arabidopsis SRPs play dual roles as positive factors in postgermination growth and the drought stress tolerance response. The possible relationships between LD-associated proteins and the drought stress response are discussed. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Contribution of the first K-homology domain of poly(C)-binding protein 1 to its affinity and specificity for C-rich oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoga, Yano M K; Traore, Daouda A K; Sidiqi, Mahjooba; Szeto, Chris; Pendini, Nicole R; Barker, Andrew; Leedman, Peter J; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2012-06-01

    Poly-C-binding proteins are triple KH (hnRNP K homology) domain proteins with specificity for single stranded C-rich RNA and DNA. They play diverse roles in the regulation of protein expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we analyse the contributions of individual αCP1 KH domains to binding C-rich oligonucleotides using biophysical and structural methods. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we demonstrate that KH1 makes the most stable interactions with both RNA and DNA, KH3 binds with intermediate affinity and KH2 only interacts detectibly with DNA. The crystal structure of KH1 bound to a 5'-CCCTCCCT-3' DNA sequence shows a 2:1 protein:DNA stoichiometry and demonstrates a molecular arrangement of KH domains bound to immediately adjacent oligonucleotide target sites. SPR experiments, with a series of poly-C-sequences reveals that cytosine is preferred at all four positions in the oligonucleotide binding cleft and that a C-tetrad binds KH1 with 10 times higher affinity than a C-triplet. The basis for this high affinity interaction is finally detailed with the structure determination of a KH1.W.C54S mutant bound to 5'-ACCCCA-3' DNA sequence. Together, these data establish the lead role of KH1 in oligonucleotide binding by αCP1 and reveal the molecular basis of its specificity for a C-rich tetrad.

  12. RNA- and single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins expressed during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis: a homolog of bacterial and eukaryotic mitochondrial SSBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroumbakis, N D; Li, Z; Tolias, P P

    1994-06-10

    Little is known about the identity and involvement of single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding (SSB) and RNA-binding proteins in developmental processes that occur during oogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). Here, we describe a molecular approach designed to identify such proteins by virtue of their ssDNA-binding activity. We have constructed a directional ovarian cDNA library and conducted expression cloning screens which identified five unique cDNAs that encode proteins capable of binding ssDNA. All five represent previously unreported sequences. The remainder of this paper focuses on one of these cDNAs which encodes a Dm protein displaying significant sequence homology to Escherichia coli ssDNA-binding protein (SSB, involved in DNA replication, repair and recombination), as well as eukaryotic SSBs isolated from the mitochondria (mt) of rats, frogs, humans and yeast. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of this 15.6-kDa protein, which we will refer to as Dm mtSSB, displays average identities of 38.3% with eukaryotic mtSSBs and 23.4% with bacterial SSBs. Gel retardation analysis with an affinity-purified GST fusion protein confirms that Dm mtSSB specifically binds ss, but not double stranded DNA. Dm mtSSB is encoded by a nuclear gene whose expression appears to be developmentally regulated. It is expressed as a single 600-nucleotide (nt) transcript during oogenesis and embryogenesis. A larger transcript of 1500 nt is prevalent in some later stages of Dm development.

  13. Fast pseudolikelihood maximization for direct-coupling analysis of protein structure from many homologous amino-acid sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeberg, Magnus; Hartonen, Tuomo; Aurell, Erik

    2014-11-01

    Direct-coupling analysis is a group of methods to harvest information about coevolving residues in a protein family by learning a generative model in an exponential family from data. In protein families of realistic size, this learning can only be done approximately, and there is a trade-off between inference precision and computational speed. We here show that an earlier introduced l2-regularized pseudolikelihood maximization method called plmDCA can be modified as to be easily parallelizable, as well as inherently faster on a single processor, at negligible difference in accuracy. We test the new incarnation of the method on 143 protein family/structure-pairs from the Protein Families database (PFAM), one of the larger tests of this class of algorithms to date.

  14. On the Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: the Case of Homologous G-domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    In this work we address the question whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologues G-domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the Elongation-Factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time-scale we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favourable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favourable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that at extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G-domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue. PMID:25317828

  15. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

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    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  16. Homology modeling, docking studies and functional analysis of various azoreductase accessory interacting proteins of Nostoc sp.PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philem, Priyadarshini Devi; Adhikari, Samrat

    2012-01-01

    Azo dyes have become a threat to public health because of its toxicity and carcinogenicity. Azoreductase enzyme plays a pivotal role in the degradation of azodyes released by industrial effluents and other resources. The degradation pathway has to be studied in detail for increasing the activity of azoreductase and for better degradation of azo dyes. But the data available on cyanobacterial azoreductase enzyme and its degradation pathway are still very less. Therefore the present work explored the azoreductase pathway of the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 for better understanding of the degradation pathway and the other accessory interacting proteins involved. The accessory interacting proteins of azoreductase from cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 were obtained from STRING database. The proteins do not have a comprehensive three dimensional structure and are hypothetical. The secondary structure and functional analysis indicated that the proteins are all soluble proteins, without disulphide bonds and have alpha helices only. The structural prediction and docking study showed that alr2106, alr1063 and alr2326 have best docking result which tally with the STRING database confidence score and thus these proteins could possibly enhance the azoreductase activity and better dye degradation. These results will pave way for further increase in azoreductase activity and for better understanding of the dye degradation pathway.

  17. Homologous recombination and its regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Lumir; Altmannova, Veronika; Spirek, Mario; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is critical both for repairing DNA lesions in mitosis and for chromosomal pairing and exchange during meiosis. However, some forms of HR can also lead to undesirable DNA rearrangements. Multiple regulatory mechanisms have evolved to ensure that HR takes place at the right time, place and manner. Several of these impinge on the control of Rad51 nucleofilaments that play a central role in HR. Some factors promote the formation of these structures while others lead to their disassembly or the use of alternative repair pathways. In this article, we review these mechanisms in both mitotic and meiotic environments and in different eukaryotic taxa, with an emphasis on yeast and mammal systems. Since mutations in several proteins that regulate Rad51 nucleofilaments are associated with cancer and cancer-prone syndromes, we discuss how understanding their functions can lead to the development of better tools for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22467216

  18. PRL-1 protein promotes ERK1/2 and RhoA protein activation through a non-canonical interaction with the Src homology 3 domain of p115 Rho GTPase-activating protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yunpeng; Luo, Yong; Liu, Sijiu; Zhang, Lujuan; Shen, Kui; Dong, Yuanshu; Walls, Chad D; Quilliam, Lawrence A; Wells, Clark D; Cao, Youjia; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2011-12-09

    Phosphatases of the regenerating liver (PRL) play oncogenic roles in cancer development and metastasis. Although previous studies indicate that PRL-1 promotes cell growth and migration by activating both the ERK1/2 and RhoA pathways, the mechanism by which it activates these signaling events remains unclear. We have identified a PRL-1-binding peptide (Peptide 1) that shares high sequence identity with a conserved motif in the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of p115 Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP). p115 RhoGAP directly binds PRL-1 in vitro and in cells via its SH3 domain. Structural analyses of the PRL-1·Peptide 1 complex revealed a novel protein-protein interaction whereby a sequence motif within the PxxP ligand-binding site of the p115 RhoGAP SH3 domain occupies a folded groove within PRL-1. This prevents the canonical interaction between the SH3 domain of p115 RhoGAP and MEKK1 and results in activation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, PRL-1 binding activates RhoA signaling by inhibiting the catalytic activity of p115 RhoGAP. The results demonstrate that PRL-1 binding to p115 RhoGAP provides a coordinated mechanism underlying ERK1/2 and RhoA activation.

  19. Ablation of C/EBP homologous protein does not protect T17M RHO mice from retinal degeneration.

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    Sonali Nashine

    Full Text Available Despite the proposed link between ablation of the CHOP protein and delay of the onset of ER stress-mediated disorders including diabetes, Alzheimer Disease, and cardiac hypertrophy, the role of CHOP protein in photoreceptor cell death associated with Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (ADRP has not been investigated. T17M RHO transgenic mice carry a mutated human rhodopsin transgene, the expression of which in retina leads to protein misfolding, activation of UPR and progressive retinal degeneration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of CHOP protein in T17M RHO retina. Wild-type, CHOP-/-, T17M RHO and T17M RHO CHOP-/-mice were used in the study. Evaluation of the impact of CHOP ablation was performed using electroretinography (ERG, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Dark-adapted ERG analysis demonstrated that by 1 month, the T17M RHO CHOP-/- mice had a 70% reduction of the a-wave amplitude compared to the T17M RHO mice. The loss of function in T17M RHO CHOP-/- photoreceptors was associated with a 22-24% decline in the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These mice had significant reduction in the expression of transcription factors, Crx and Nrl, and also in mouse Rho, and human RHO. The reduction was associated with an 8-fold elevation of the UPR marker, p-eIf2α protein and 30% down-regulation of sXbp1 protein. In addition, the histone deacetylase 1 (Hdac1 protein was 2-fold elevated in the T17M RHO CHOP-/- retina. The ablation of CHOP led to a reduction in the expression of photoreceptor-specific transcriptional factors, and both endogenous and exogenous RHO mRNA. Thus, despite its role in promoting apoptosis, CHOP protects rod photoreceptors carrying an ADRP mutation.

  20. Controlling multi-function of biomaterials interfaces based on multiple and competing adsorption of functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Chao-Wei; Huang, Mei-Ching; Wu, Chih-Yu; Liu, Hui-Yu; Ding, Shih-Torng; Chen, Hsien-Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional biomaterial surfaces can be created by controlling the competing adsorption of multiple proteins. To demonstrate this concept, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and fibronectin were adsorbed to the hydrophobic surface of polychloro-para-xylylene. The resulting adsorption properties on the surface depended on the dimensional and steric characteristics of the selected protein molecule, the degree of denaturation of the adsorbed proteins, the associated adsorption of interphase water molecules within the protein layers, and the aggregation of proteins in a planar direction with respect to the adsorbent surface. Additionally, a defined surface composition was formed by the competing adsorption of multiple proteins, and this surface composition was directly linked to the composition of the protein mixture in the solution phase. Although the mechanism of this complex competing adsorption process is not fully understood, the adsorbed proteins were irreversibly adsorbed and were unaffected by the further adsorption of homologous or heterologous proteins. Moreover, synergistic biological activities, including cell osteogenesis and proliferation independently and specifically induced by BMP-2 or fibronectin, were observed on the modified surface, and these biological activities were positively correlated with the surface composition of the multiple adsorbed proteins. These results provide insights and important design parameters for prospective biomaterials and biointerfaces for (multi)functional modifications. The ability to control protein/interface properties will be beneficial for the processing of biomaterials for clinical applications and industrial products.

  1. Prokaryotic homologs of Argonaute proteins are predicted to function as key components of a novel system of defense against mobile genetic elements

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    van der Oost John

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, RNA interference (RNAi is a major mechanism of defense against viruses and transposable elements as well of regulating translation of endogenous mRNAs. The RNAi systems recognize the target RNA molecules via small guide RNAs that are completely or partially complementary to a region of the target. Key components of the RNAi systems are proteins of the Argonaute-PIWI family some of which function as slicers, the nucleases that cleave the target RNA that is base-paired to a guide RNA. Numerous prokaryotes possess the CRISPR-associated system (CASS of defense against phages and plasmids that is, in part, mechanistically analogous but not homologous to eukaryotic RNAi systems. Many prokaryotes also encode homologs of Argonaute-PIWI proteins but their functions remain unknown. Results We present a detailed analysis of Argonaute-PIWI protein sequences and the genomic neighborhoods of the respective genes in prokaryotes. Whereas eukaryotic Ago/PIWI proteins always contain PAZ (oligonucleotide binding and PIWI (active or inactivated nuclease domains, the prokaryotic Argonaute homologs (pAgos fall into two major groups in which the PAZ domain is either present or absent. The monophyly of each group is supported by a phylogenetic analysis of the conserved PIWI-domains. Almost all pAgos that lack a PAZ domain appear to be inactivated, and the respective genes are associated with a variety of predicted nucleases in putative operons. An additional, uncharacterized domain that is fused to various nucleases appears to be a unique signature of operons encoding the short (lacking PAZ pAgo form. By contrast, almost all PAZ-domain containing pAgos are predicted to be active nucleases. Some proteins of this group (e.g., that from Aquifex aeolicus have been experimentally shown to possess nuclease activity, and are not typically associated with genes for other (putative nucleases. Given these observations, the apparent extensive

  2. A protein with amino acid sequence homology to bovine insulin is present in the legume Vigna unguiculata (cowpea

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    Venâncio T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of bovine insulin in plants, much effort has been devoted to the characterization of these proteins and elucidation of their functions. We report here the isolation of a protein with similar molecular mass and same amino acid sequence to bovine insulin from developing fruits of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata genotype Epace 10. Insulin was measured by ELISA using an anti-human insulin antibody and was detected both in empty pods and seed coats but not in the embryo. The highest concentrations (about 0.5 ng/µg of protein of the protein were detected in seed coats at 16 and 18 days after pollination, and the values were 1.6 to 4.0 times higher than those found for isolated pods tested on any day. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of insulin was performed on the protein purified by C4-HPLC. The significance of the presence of insulin in these plant tissues is not fully understood but we speculate that it may be involved in the transport of carbohydrate to the fruit.

  3. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

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    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  4. HCV NS5A protein containing potential ligands for both Src homology 2 and 3 domains enhances autophosphorylation of Src family kinase Fyn in B cells.

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    Kenji Nakashima

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects B lymphocytes and induces mixed cryoglobulinemia and B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The molecular mechanism for the pathogenesis of HCV infection-mediated B cell disorders remains obscure. To identify the possible role for HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A protein in B cells, we generated the stable B cell lines expressing Myc-His tagged NS5A. Immunoprecipitation study in the presence or absence of pervanadate (PV implied that NS5A was tyrosine phosphorylated by pervanadate (PV treatment of the cells. Therefore we examined pull-down assay by using glutathione S-transferase (GST-fusion proteins of various Src homology 2 (SH2 domains, which associates with phosphotyrosine within a specific amino acid sequence. The results showed that NS5A specifically bound to SH2 domain of Fyn from PV-treated B cells in addition to Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Substitution of Arg(176 to Lys in the SH2 domain of Fyn abrogated this interaction. Deletion mutational analysis demonstrated that N-terminal region of NS5A was not required for the interaction with the SH2 domain of Fyn. Tyr(334 was identified as a tyrosine phosphorylation site in NS5A. Far-western analysis revealed that SH2 domain of Fyn directly bound to NS5A. Fyn and NS5A were colocalized in the lipid raft. These results suggest that NS5A directly binds to the SH2 domain of Fyn in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner. Lastly, we showed that the expression of NS5A in B cells increased phosphorylation of activation loop tyrosine in the kinase domain of Fyn. NS5A containing ligand for both SH2 and SH3 domains enhances an aberrant autophosphorylation and kinase activity of Fyn in B cells.

  5. n Silico Analysis of Envelope Dengue Virus-2 and Envelope Dengue Virus-3 Protein as the Backbone of Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine by Using Homology Modeling Method

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    Rizky I. Taufik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dengue fever, which was caused by Dengue virus infection, had became a major public health problem in the tropic and subtropical countries. Dengue virus (DENV had four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, based on their immunogenic in the human body. Preventive measure will be necessary to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, by developing modern vaccine. Approach: This research was focused on in silico study of dengue virus vaccines, by using envelope (E protein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 as their backbones. T cell epitope prediction was determined by using MULTIPRED server and B cell epitope prediction was determined by using Conformational Epitope Prediction server (CEP. Homology modeling study of E DENV-3 protein as the vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (HMM Vaccine 1-6. Moreover, homology modeling study of E DENV-2 protein as vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (ANN vaccine 1-6. Results: The BLAST analysis of HMM and ANN vaccines had produced 93% and 91% identity, respectively. The Ramachandran Plot of both vaccines had shown less than 15% non glycine residue in the disallowed region, therefore it showed the solid stability of the proteins. The VAST analysis of E DENV-3 backbone vaccines had determined, that HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-3. HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest VAST score of 64.5. Moreover, the VAST analysis of E DENV-2 backbone vaccines had determined, that ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-2. ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 have the highest VAST score of 64.7. Conclusion/Recommendation: It could be inferred from this research that HMM4; HMM6; ANN1; ANN3; ANN4; ANN5; and ANN6 were the best in silico vaccine design, based on their similarity with native E DENV Proteins. This research could be applied for the wet

  6. Homology and causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Valen, L M

    1982-09-01

    Homology is resemblance caused by a continuity of information. In biology it is a unified developmental phenomenon. Homologies among and within individuals intergrade in several ways, so historical homology cannot be separated sharply from repetitive homology. Nevertheless, the consequences of historical and repetitive homologies can be mutually contradictory. A detailed discussion of the rise and fall of the "premolar-analogy" theory of homologies of mammalian molar-tooth cusps exemplifies such a contradiction. All other hypotheses of historical homology which are based on repetitive homology, such as the foliar theory of the flower considered phyletically, are suspect.

  7. The S-layer homology domain-containing protein SlhA from Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is important for swarming and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Janesch

    Full Text Available Swarming and biofilm formation have been studied for a variety of bacteria. While this is well investigated for Gram-negative bacteria, less is known about Gram-positive bacteria, including Paenibacillus alvei, a secondary invader of diseased honeybee colonies infected with Melissococcus pluton, the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB.Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T is a Gram-positive bacterium which was recently shown to employ S-layer homology (SLH domains as cell wall targeting modules to display proteins on its cell surface. This study deals with the newly identified 1335-amino acid protein SlhA from P. alvei which carries at the C‑terminus three consecutive SLH-motifs containing the predicted binding sequences SRGE, VRQD, and LRGD instead of the common TRAE motif. Based on the proof of cell surface location of SlhA by fluorescence microscopy using a SlhA-GFP chimera, the binding mechanism was investigated in an in vitro assay. To unravel a putative function of the SlhA protein, a knockout mutant was constructed. Experimental data indicated that one SLH domain is sufficient for anchoring of SlhA to the cell surface, and the SLH domains of SlhA recognize both the peptidoglycan and the secondary cell wall polymer in vitro. This is in agreement with previous data from the S-layer protein SpaA, pinpointing a wider utilization of that mechanism for cell surface display of proteins in P. alvei. Compared to the wild-type bacterium ΔslhA revealed changed colony morphology, loss of swarming motility and impaired biofilm formation. The phenotype was similar to that of the flagella knockout Δhag, possibly due to reduced EPS production influencing the functionality of the flagella of ΔslhA.This study demonstrates the involvement of the SLH domain-containing protein SlhA in swarming and biofilm formation of P. alvei CCM 2051(T.

  8. Lethal mutations in the major homology region and their suppressors act by modulating the dimerization of the rous sarcoma virus capsid protein C-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalessio, Paula M; Craven, Rebecca C; Lokhandwala, Parvez M; Ropson, Ira J

    2013-02-01

    An infective retrovirus requires a mature capsid shell around the viral replication complex. This shell is formed by about 1500 capsid protein monomers, organized into hexamer and pentamer rings that are linked to each other by the dimerization of the C-terminal domain (CTD). The major homology region (MHR), the most highly conserved protein sequence across retroviral genomes, is part of the CTD. Several mutations in the MHR appear to block infectivity by preventing capsid formation. Suppressor mutations have been identified that are distant in sequence and structure from the MHR and restore capsid formation. The effects of two lethal and two suppressor mutations on the stability and function of the CTD were examined. No correlation with infectivity was found for the stability of the lethal mutations (D155Y-CTD, F167Y-CTD) and suppressor mutations (R185W-CTD, I190V-CTD). The stabilities of three double mutant proteins (D155Y/R185W-CTD, F167Y/R185W-CTD, and F167Y/I190V-CTD) were additive. However, the dimerization affinity of the mutant proteins correlated strongly with biological function. The CTD proteins with lethal mutations did not dimerize, while those with suppressor mutations had greater dimerization affinity than WT-CTD. The suppressor mutations were able to partially correct the dimerization defect caused by the lethal MHR mutations in double mutant proteins. Despite their dramatic effects on dimerization, none of these residues participate directly in the proposed dimerization interface in a mature capsid. These findings suggest that the conserved sequence of the MHR has critical roles in the conformation(s) of the CTD that are required for dimerization and correct capsid maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. GENE SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY OF CHEMOKINES ACROSS SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The abundance of expressed gene and protein sequences available in the biological information databases facilitates comparison of protein homologies. A high degree of sequence similarity typically implies homology regarding structure and function and may provide clues to antibody cross-react...

  10. Completion of HLA protein sequences by automated homology-based nearest-neighbor extrapolation of HLA database sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K; Niemann, M; de Hoop, T; Spierings, E

    The IMGT/HLA database contains every publicly available HLA sequence. However, most of these HLA protein sequences are restricted to the alpha-1/alpha-2 domain for HLA class-I and alpha-1/beta-1 domain for HLA class-II. Nevertheless, also polymorphism outside these domains may play a role in

  11. Tomato Cf resistance proteins mediate recognition of cognate homologous effectors from fungi pathogenic on diots and monocots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.; Burg, van den H.A.; Ökmen, B.; Beenen, H.G.; Liere, van S.; Kema, G.H.J.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Most fungal effectors characterized so far are species-specific and facilitate virulence on a particular host plant. During infection of its host tomato, Cladosporium fulvum secretes effectors that function as virulence factors in the absence of cognate Cf resistance proteins and induce

  12. Shu proteins promote the formation of homologous recombination intermediates that are processed by Sgs1-Rmi1-Top3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    repair (HRR), their precise role(s) within this pathway remains poorly understood. Here, we have identified a specific role for the Shu proteins in a Rad51/Rad54-dependent HRR pathway(s) to repair MMS-induced lesions during S-phase. We show that, although mutation of RAD51 or RAD54 prevented...

  13. Different secondary structure elements as scaffolds for protein folding transition states of two homologous four-helix bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Thormann, Thorsten; Caterer, Nigel R.

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of the folding processes for homologue proteins can provide valuable information about details in the interactions leading to the formation of the folding transition state. Here the folding kinetics of 18 variants of yACBP and 3 variants of bACBP have been studied by -value analysis. I...

  14. Tomato Cf resistance proteins mediate recognition of cognate homologous effectors from fungi pathogenic on diots and monocots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.; Burg, van den H.A.; Ökmen, B.; Beenen, H.G.; Liere, van S.; Kema, G.H.J.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Most fungal effectors characterized so far are species-specific and facilitate virulence on a particular host plant. During infection of its host tomato, Cladosporium fulvum secretes effectors that function as virulence factors in the absence of cognate Cf resistance proteins and induce effector-tri

  15. A new black Aspergillus species, A. vadensis, is a promising host for homologous and heterologous protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vries, R.P.; Burgers, K.; van de Vondervoort, P.J.I;

    2004-01-01

    . The production of FaeA in A. vadensis resulted in larger amounts of intact protein than production in A. tubingensis and was similar to production in an A. niger protease disruptant, confirming in vivo the low proteolytic activity of A. vadensis. The protoplast formation and transformation efficiencies of A...

  16. Identification of a CAP (adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein) homologous gene in Lentinus edodes and its functional complementation of yeast CAP mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G L; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, K; Shishido, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1998-04-01

    The adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was originally identified in yeasts as a protein that functions in both signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization. This paper reports the identification of a cDNA and genomic DNA that encodes a CAP homologue from the mushroom Lentinus edodes. The L. edodes cap gene contains eight introns and an ORF encoding a 518 amino acid protein. The L. edodes CAP is 35.5% and 40.9% identical at the amino acid level with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe CAP, respectively. The C-terminal domain shows greater homology (39-46% identity) with yeast CAPs than does the N-terminal domain (27-35% identity). Southern blotting and Northern blotting results suggest that L. edodes cap is a single-copy gene and uniformly expressed. Expression of the L. edodes CAP in both Schiz. pombe and Sacch. cerevisiae complemented defects associated with the loss of the C-terminal domain function of the endogenous CAP. By using a yeast two-hybrid assay, an interaction was demonstrated between the L. edodes CAP and Schiz. pombe actin. This result and the functional complementation test indicate that CAP from L. edodes has a conserved C-terminal domain function.

  17. Protection against tuberculosis with homologous or heterologous protein/vector vaccine approaches is not dependent on CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan L; Ching, Lance K; Pine, Samuel O; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Lucas, Elyse; Vallur, Aarthy; Orr, Mark T; Bertholet, Sylvie; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2013-09-01

    Considerable effort has been directed to develop Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines to boost bacille Calmette-Guérin or for those who cannot be immunized with bacille Calmette-Guérin. We hypothesized that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses with a heterologous prime/boost vaccine approach could induce long-lived vaccine efficacy against M. tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. We produced an adenovirus vector expressing ID93 (Ad5-ID93) for induction of CD8 T cells to use with our candidate tuberculosis vaccine, ID93/glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA)-stable emulsion (SE), which induces potent Th1 CD4 T cells. Ad5-ID93 generates ID93-specific CD8(+) T cell responses and induces protection against M. tuberculosis. When Ad5-ID93 is administered in a prime-boost strategy with ID93/GLA-SE, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide protection against M. tuberculosis. In a MHC class I-deficient mouse model, all groups including the Ad5-ID93 group elicited an Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell response and significantly fewer Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, but were still protected against M. tuberculosis, suggesting that CD4(+) Th1 T cells could compensate for the loss of CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, the order of the heterologous immunizations was critical. Long-lived vaccine protection was observed only when Ad5-ID93 was given as the boost following an ID93/GLA-SE prime. The homologous ID93/GLA-SE prime/boost regimen also induced long-lived protection. One of the correlates of protection between these two approaches was an increase in the total number of ID93-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells 6 mo following the last immunization. Our findings provide insight into the development of vaccines not only for tuberculosis, but other diseases requiring T cell immunity.

  18. Memory B cells and CD8⁺ lymphocytes do not control seasonal influenza A virus replication after homologous re-challenge of rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Carroll

    Full Text Available This study sought to define the role of memory lymphocytes in the protection from homologous influenza A virus re-challenge in rhesus macaques. Depleting monoclonal antibodies (mAb were administered to the animals prior to their second experimental inoculation with a human seasonal influenza A virus strain. Treatment with either anti-CD8α or anti-CD20 mAbs prior to re-challenge had minimal effect on influenza A virus replication. Thus, in non-human primates with pre-existing anti-influenza A antibodies, memory B cells and CD8α⁺ T cells do not contribute to the control of virus replication after re-challenge with a homologous strain of influenza A virus.

  19. Eps15 Homology Domain-containing Protein 3 Regulates Cardiac T-type Ca2+ Channel Targeting and Function in the Atria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Makara, Michael A.; Little, Sean C.; Higgins, John D.; Hund, Thomas J.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters is requisite for normal cardiac function. Endosome-based protein trafficking of membrane-bound ion channels and transporters in the heart is poorly understood, particularly in vivo. In fact, for select cardiac cell types such as atrial myocytes, virtually nothing is known regarding endosomal transport. We previously linked the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 3 (EHD3) with endosome-based protein trafficking in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Here we sought to define the roles and membrane protein targets for EHD3 in atria. We identify the voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.1, CaV3.2) as substrates for EHD3-dependent trafficking in atria. Mice selectively lacking EHD3 in heart display reduced expression and targeting of both Cav3.1 and CaV3.2 in the atria. Furthermore, functional experiments identify a significant loss of T-type-mediated Ca2+ current in EHD3-deficient atrial myocytes. Moreover, EHD3 associates with both CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. T-type Ca2+ channel function is critical for proper electrical conduction through the atria. Consistent with these roles, EHD3-deficient mice demonstrate heart rate variability, sinus pause, and atrioventricular conduction block. In summary, our findings identify CaV3.1 and CaV3.2 as substrates for EHD3-dependent protein trafficking in heart, provide in vivo data on endosome-based trafficking pathways in atria, and implicate EHD3 as a key player in the regulation of atrial myocyte excitability and cardiac conduction. PMID:25825486

  20. Molecular characterization of Dau c 1, the Bet v 1 homologous protein from carrot and its cross-reactivity with Bet v 1 and Api g 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; O'Riordain, G; Ahorn, H; Ebner, C; Laimer Da Camara Machado, M; Pühringer, H; Scheiner, O; Breiteneder, H

    1999-06-01

    Up to 70% of patients with birch pollen allergy exhibit the so-called oral allergy syndrome, an IgE-mediated food allergy. The most frequent and therefore best characterized pollen-fruit syndrome is apple allergy in patients suffering from tree pollen-induced pollinosis. The occurrence of adverse reactions to proteins present in vegetables such as celery and carrots in patients suffering from pollen allergy has also been reported. cDNAs for Bet v 1 homologous proteins have been cloned from celery, apple and cherry. Objective The aim of the study was to identify Bet v 1 homologues from carrot (Daucus carota), to isolate the respective cDNA, to compare the IgE-binding capacity of the natural protein to the recombinant allergen and determine the cross-reactivity to Api g 1 and Bet v 1. Molecular characterization of the carrot allergen was performed using IgE-immunoblotting, cross-inhibition assays, N-terminal sequencing, PCR-based cDNA cloning and expression of the recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. A 16-kDa protein from carrot was identified as a major IgE-binding component and designated Dau c 1. Sequencing corresponding cDNAs revealed three extremely similar sequences (Dau c 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3) with an open reading frame of 462 bp coding for 154 amino acid residues. Purified recombinant Dau c 1.2 was tested in immunoblots displaying IgE-binding capacity comparable to its natural counterpart. Cross-inhibition assays verified the existence of common B-cell epitopes present on Dau c 1, Api g 1 as well as on Bet v 1.

  1. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  2. Phylogenetic characterization of Clonorchis sinensis proteins homologous to the sigma-class glutathione transferase and their differential expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Kong, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferase (GST) is one of the major antioxidant proteins with diverse supplemental activities including peroxidase, isomerase, and thiol transferase. GSTs are classified into multiple classes on the basis of their primary structures and substrate/inhibitor specificity. However, the evolutionary routes and physiological environments specific to each of the closely related bioactive enzymes remain elusive. The sigma-like GSTs exhibit amino acid conservation patterns similar to the prostaglandin D synthases (PGDSs). In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic position of the GSTs of the biocarcinogenic liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis. We also observed induction profile of the GSTs in association with the parasite's maturation and in response to exogenous oxidative stresses, with special attention to sigma-class GSTs and PGDSs. The C. sinensis genome encoded 12 GST protein species, which were separately assigned to cytosolic (two omega-, one zeta-, two mu-, and five sigma-class), mitochondrial (one kappa-class), and microsomal (one membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism-like protein) GST families. Multiple sigma GST (or PGDS) orthologs were also detected in Opisthorchis viverrini. Other trematode species possessed only a single sigma-like GST gene. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that one of the sigma GST lineages duplicated in the common ancestor of trematodes were specifically expanded in the opisthorchiids, but deleted in other trematodes. The induction profiles of these sigma GST genes along with the development and aging of C. sinensis, and against various exogenous chemical stimuli strongly suggest that the paralogous sigma GST genes might be undergone specialized evolution to cope with the diverse hostile biochemical environments within the mammalian hepatobiliary ductal system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  4. Homology, Analogy, and Ethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Colin G.

    1984-01-01

    Because the main criterion of structural homology (the principle of connections) does not exist for behavioral homology, the utility of the ethological concept of homology has been questioned. The confidence with which behavioral homologies can be claimed varies inversely with taxonomic distance. Thus, conjectures about long-range phylogenetic…

  5. The fusion of genomes leads to more options: A comparative investigation on the desulfo-glucosinolate sulfotransferases of Brassica napus and homologous proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Felix; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2015-06-01

    Sulfotransferases (SOTs) (EC 2.8.2.-) play a crucial role in the glucosinolate (Gl) biosynthesis, by catalyzing the final step of the core glucosinolate formation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the three desulfo (ds)-Gl SOTs AtSOT16, AtSOT17 and AtSOT18 were previously characterized, showing different affinities to ds-Gls. But can the knowledge about these SOTs be generally transferred to other Gl-synthesizing plants? It was investigated how many SOTs are present in the economically relevant crop plant Brassica napus L., and if it is possible to predict their characteristics by sequence analysis. The recently sequenced B. napus is a hybrid of Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. By database research, 71 putative functional BnSOT family members were identified and at least eleven of those are putative ds-Gl SOTs. Besides the homologs of AtSOT16 - 18, phylogenetic analyses revealed new subfamilies of ds-Gl SOTs, which are not present in A. thaliana. Three of the B. napus ds-Gl SOT proteins were expressed and purified, and characterized by determining the substrate affinities to different ds-Gls. Two of them, BnSOT16-a and BnSOT16-b, showed a significantly higher affinity to an indolic ds-Gl, similarly to AtSOT16. Additionally, BnSOT17-a was characterized and showed a higher affinity to long chained aliphatic Gls, similarly to AtSOT17. Identification of homologs to AtSOT18 was less reliable, because putative SOT18 sequences are more heterogeneous and confirmation of similar characteristics was not possible.

  6. The MCM-binding protein ETG1 aids sister chromatid cohesion required for postreplicative homologous recombination repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA replication process represents a source of DNA stress that causes potentially spontaneous genome damage. This effect might be strengthened by mutations in crucial replication factors, requiring the activation of DNA damage checkpoints to enable DNA repair before anaphase onset. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance helicase-binding protein ETG1 of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a stringent late G2 cell cycle arrest. This arrest correlated with a partial loss of sister chromatid cohesion. The lack-of-cohesion phenotype was intensified in plants without functional CTF18, a replication fork factor needed for cohesion establishment. The synergistic effect of the etg1 and ctf18 mutants on sister chromatid cohesion strengthened the impact on plant growth of the replication stress caused by ETG1 deficiency because of inefficient DNA repair. We conclude that the ETG1 replication factor is required for efficient cohesion and that cohesion establishment is essential for proper development of plants suffering from endogenous DNA stress. Cohesion defects observed upon knockdown of its human counterpart suggest an equally important developmental role for the orthologous mammalian ETG1 protein.

  7. S-layer homology domain proteins Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 are implicated in plant polysaccharide deconstruction by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Inci; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kelly, Robert M

    2012-02-01

    The genus Caldicellulosiruptor contains extremely thermophilic bacteria that grow on plant polysaccharides. The genomes of Caldicellulosiruptor species reveal certain surface layer homology (SLH) domain proteins that have distinguishing features, pointing to a role in lignocellulose deconstruction. Two of these proteins in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus (Csac_0678 and Csac_2722) were examined from this perspective. In addition to three contiguous SLH domains, the Csac_0678 gene encodes a glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5) catalytic domain and a family 28 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM); orthologs to Csac_0678 could be identified in all genome-sequenced Caldicellulosiruptor species. Recombinant Csac_0678 was optimally active at 75°C and pH 5.0, exhibiting both endoglucanase and xylanase activities. SLH domain removal did not impact Csac_0678 GH activity, but deletion of the CBM28 domain eliminated binding to crystalline cellulose and rendered the enzyme inactive on this substrate. Csac_2722 is the largest open reading frame (ORF) in the C. saccharolyticus genome (predicted molecular mass of 286,516 kDa) and contains two putative sugar-binding domains, two Big4 domains (bacterial domains with an immunoglobulin [Ig]-like fold), and a cadherin-like (Cd) domain. Recombinant Csac_2722, lacking the SLH and Cd domains, bound to cellulose and had detectable carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrolytic activity. Antibodies directed against Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 confirmed that these proteins bound to the C. saccharolyticus S-layer. Their cellular localization and functional biochemical properties indicate roles for Csac_0678 and Csac_2722 in recruitment and hydrolysis of complex polysaccharides and the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, these results suggest that related SLH domain proteins in other Caldicellulosiruptor genomes may also be important contributors to plant biomass utilization.

  8. An analysis of the calcium-binding protein 1 of Fasciola gigantica with a comparison to its homologs in the phylum Platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Subpipattana, Pornpimol; Sobhon, Prasert; Viyanant, Vithoon; Grams, Rudi

    2006-03-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding the Fasciola gigantica calcium-binding protein 1 (FgCaBP1) was cloned from an adult stage cDNA expression library in an immunoscreen using rabbit immune serum against the parasite's excretion/secretion antigens. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 96.3% identity to Fh22CBP of Fasciola hepatica. During development in the mammalian host FgCaBP1 RNA was detected in metacercariae, juveniles and adults and was exclusively localized to the tegumental cell bodies. Immune serum of a rabbit infected with F. gigantica detected recombinant FgCaBP1 starting from the sixth week of infection. Immune sera of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma mekongi cross-reacted with recombinant FgCaBP1 in immunoblots. Recombinant FgCaBP1 showed calcium and magnesium-binding activity by a mobility shift during non-denaturing PAGE in the presence of Ca2+ or Mg2+, respectively. A polyclonal mouse anti-rFgCaBP1 antiserum detected the native protein as a major component of the parasite's tegumental antigens in immunoblots and as a strictly tegumental antigen in tissue cross-sections of adult and juvenile parasites. Comparative sequence analysis of homologs from Fasciola and Schistosoma present in the GenBank database revealed sequence signatures specific to these trematode proteins and thereby indicates their origin from a single ancestor. FgCaBP1 contains two adjacent, N-terminal located EF-hands and a C-terminal located domain similar to dynein light chain type 1. Independent structure predictions of the two domains suggest that they will fold according to the already determined structures of the EF-hand motif and the dynein light chain type 1 proteins.

  9. Molecular characterization and expression of a novel homolog of uncoupling protein 5 (UCP5) from the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Britt; Ivanina, Anna V; Piontkivska, Helen; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2009-06-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) belong to the mitochondrial anion carrier gene family which has been implicated in diverse physiological functions ranging from thermoregulation to antioxidant defense. In mammals, the UCP family is well characterized and contains five members (UCP1-5). In contrast, invertebrate homologues of uncoupling proteins are much less studied both from the viewpoints of structure and function. In this study we report nucleotide and predicted protein structure of an important member of UCP family, UCP5 from eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica. UCP5 from oysters appears to be a close homolog of the mammalian brain mitochondrial carrier protein (BMCP1, or UCP5) and is the first full-length UCP described from a Lophotrochozoan invertebrate. Evolutionary analysis of UCP sequences indicates at least three monophyletic UCP branches (UCP1-3, UCP4 and UCP5) that have diverged early in the evolution, prior to the divergence of vertebrates and invertebrates. In oysters, two forms of UCP5 transcript are found (UCP5S and UCP5L) that differ by 152 bp in length due to the presence of an intron in UCP5L. UCP5 was expressed in all studied oyster tissues, unlike mammals, where UCP5 is predominantly expressed in brains and male gonads. Hypoxia-reoxygenation stress, sublethal Cd exposure (50 ?g L(?1) Cd for 56 days) and acclimation to different temperatures (12 and 20 °C) had no significant effect on UCP5 mRNA expression in oysters indicative of its relative unimportance in antioxidant defense and temperature adaptation of oyster mitochondria. These data suggest that despite the relatively high degree of evolutionary conservation of the UCP5 amino acid sequence, its functional significance in mitochondria changed in the course of evolution of mollusks and vertebrates.

  10. Dose response and adaptive response of non-homologous end joining repair genes and proteins in resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to γ radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Shridevi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    Ionising radiation induces single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks (DSB) and base damages in human cell. DSBs are the most deleterious and if not repaired may lead to genomic instability and cell death. DSB can be repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway in resting lymphocytes. In this study, NHEJ genes and proteins were studied in irradiated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at resting stage. Dose-response, time point kinetics and adaptive-response studies were conducted in irradiated PBMC at various end points such as DNA damage quantitation, transcription and protein expression profile. Venous blood samples were collected from 20 random, normal and healthy donors with written informed consent. PBMC was separated and irradiated with various doses between 0.1 and 2.0 Gy ((60)CO-γ source) for dose-response study. Repair kinetics of DNA damage and time point changes in expression of genes and proteins were studied in post-irradiated PBMC at 2.0 Gy at various time points up to 240 min. Adaptive-response study was conducted with a priming dose of 0.1 Gy followed by a challenging dose of 2.0 Gy after 4-h incubation. Our results revealed that Ku70, Ku80, XLF and Ligase IV were significantly upregulated (P Adaptive-response study showed significantly increased expression of the proteins involved in NHEJ, suggesting their role in adaptive response in human PBMC at G0/G1, which has important implications to human health. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A Novel Synaptobrevin/VAMP Homologous Protein (VAMP5) Is Increased during In Vitro Myogenesis and Present in the Plasma Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qi; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Wong, Siew Heng; Tang, Bor Luen; Parton, Robert G.; Rea, Shane; James, David E.; Hong, Wanjin

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding a novel protein (VAMP5) homologous to synaptobrevins/VAMPs are detected during database searches. The predicted 102–amino acid VAMP5 harbors a 23-residue hydrophobic region near the carboxyl terminus and exhibits an overall amino acid identity of 33% with synaptobrevin/VAMP1 and 2 and cellubrevin. Northern blot analysis reveals that the mRNA for VAMP5 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle and heart, whereas significantly lower levels are detected in several other tissues but not in the brain. During in vitro differentiation (myogenesis) of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes, the mRNA level for VAMP5 is increased ∼8- to 10-fold. Immunoblot analysis using antibodies specific for VAMP5 shows that the protein levels are also elevated ∼6-fold during in vitro myogenesis of C2C12 cells. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy reveal that VAMP5 is associated with the plasma membrane as well as intracellular perinuclear and peripheral vesicular structures of myotubes. Epitope-tagged versions of VAMP5 are similarly targeted to the plasma membrane. PMID:9725904

  12. Differential Expression and Roles of Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 5 and the Wingless Homolog Wnt5a in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, T; Kulwattanaporn, P; Hosur, K; Domon, H; Oda, M; Terao, Y; Maeda, T; Hajishengallis, G

    2017-05-01

    The Wingless/integrase-1 (Wnt) family of protein ligands and their functional antagonists, secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs), regulate various biological processes ranging from embryonic development to immunity and inflammation. Wnt5a and sFRP5 comprise a typical ligand/antagonist pair, and the former molecule was recently detected at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level in human periodontitis. The main objective of this study was to investigate the interrelationship of expression of Wnt5a and sFRP5 in human periodontitis (as compared to health) and to determine their roles in inflammation and bone loss in an animal model. We detected both Wnt5a and sFRP5 mRNA in human gingiva, with Wnt5a dominating in diseased and sFRP5 in healthy tissue. Wnt5a and sFRP5 protein colocalized in the gingival epithelium, suggesting epithelial cell expression, which was confirmed in cultured human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs). The HGEC expression of Wnt5a and sFRP5 was differentially regulated by a proinflammatory stimulus (lipopolysaccharide [LPS] from Porphyromonas gingivalis) in a manner consistent with the clinical observations (i.e., LPS upregulated Wnt5a and downregulated sFRP5). In HGECs, exogenously added Wnt5a enhanced whereas sFRP5 inhibited LPS-induced inflammation, as monitored by interleukin 8 production. Consistent with this, local treatment with sFRP5 in mice subjected to ligature-induced periodontitis inhibited inflammation and bone loss, correlating with decreased numbers of osteoclasts in bone tissue sections. As in humans, mouse periodontitis was associated with high expression of Wnt5a and low expression of sFRP5, although this profile was reversed after treatment with sFRP5. In conclusion, we demonstrated a novel reciprocal relationship between sFRP5 and Wnt5a expression in periodontal health and disease, paving the way to clinical investigation of the possibility of using the Wnt5a/sFRP5 ratio as a periodontitis biomarker. Moreover, we showed that sFRP5

  13. Armenian hamster female protein (serum amyloid P component). Comparison with the sex-regulated homolog in Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, S B; Waggoner, D J

    1989-12-01

    Complementary DNA clones for Armenian hamster female protein (FP) were isolated and the complete nucleotide sequence and derived amino acid sequence were determined and compared with relevant data for the closely related Syrian hamster. Although biosynthesis of preSAP is directed by a 1.0-kb mRNA in both genera and the molecular mass of the primary translation product of FP is identical, the FP gene structure and regulation of expression of FP are different in Syrian and Armenian hamsters. Whereas the direction of alteration in FP mRNA levels is divergent in Syrian hamsters during an acute phase reaction, hepatic FP mRNA levels increase in both male and female Armenian hamsters during inflammation. Regulation of expression of Armenian and Syrian hamster FP genes occurs at a pretranslational level.

  14. Yes-associated protein homolog, YAP-1, is involved in the thermotolerance and aging in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Hiroaki; Maimaiti, Sainawaer; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Kawano, Shodai; Inami, Kazutoshi; Timalsina, Shikshya; Ikeda, Mitsunobu; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Hata, Yutaka

    2013-04-15

    The mammalian Hippo pathway comprises mammalian Ste20-like kinases (MST1/2) and large tumor suppressor kinases (LATS1/2). LATS1/2, which are activated by MST1/2, phosphorylate a transcriptional co-activator, yes-associated protein (YAP), and induce the recruitment of YAP by 14-3-3 to cytoplasm, so that the TEAD-dependent gene transcriptions are turned off. Although the core components of the Hippo pathway are well conserved in metazoans, it has been discussed that Caenorhabditis elegans lacks YAP ortholog, we found that F13E6.4 gene encodes a protein that shows sequence similarities to YAP in the N-terminal TEAD-binding domain and in the WW domain. We designated this gene as yap-1. YAP-1 is widely expressed in various cells such as epithelial cells, muscles, hypodermal cells, gonadal sheath cells, spermatheca, and hypodermal cells. YAP-1 is distributed in cytoplasm and nuclei. wts-1 (LATS ortholog) and ftt-2 (14-3-3 ortholog) knockdowns cause nuclear accumulation of YAP-1, supporting that the subcellular localization of YAP-1 is regulated in a similar way as that of YAP. Heat shock also causes the nuclear accumulation of YAP-1 but after heat shock, YAP-1 translocates to cytoplasm. Knockdowns of DAF-21 (HSP90 ortholog) and HSF-1block the nuclear export of YAP-1 during this recovery. YAP-1 overexpression is beneficial for thermotolerance, whereas YAP-1 hyperactivity induced by wts-1 and ftt-2 knockdowns is deleterious on thermal response and yap-1 deficiency promotes health aging. In short, YAP-1 partially shares basal characters with mammalian YAP and plays a role in thermal stress response and healthy aging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Apolipocrustacein, formerly vitellogenin, is the major egg yolk precursor protein in decapod crustaceans and is homologous to insect apolipophorin II/I and vertebrate apolipoprotein B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubzens Esther

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animals, the biogenesis of some lipoprotein classes requires members of the ancient large lipid transfer protein (LLTP superfamily, including the cytosolic large subunit of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP, vertebrate apolipoprotein B (apoB, vitellogenin (Vtg, and insect apolipophorin II/I precursor (apoLp-II/I. In most oviparous species, Vtg, a large glycolipoprotein, is the main egg yolk precursor protein. Results This report clarifies the phylogenetic relationships of LLTP superfamily members and classifies them into three families and their related subfamilies. This means that the generic term Vtg is no longer a functional term, but is rather based on phylogenetic/structural criteria. In addition, we determined that the main egg yolk precursor protein of decapod crustaceans show an overall greater sequence similarity with apoLp-II/I than other LLTP, including Vtgs. This close association is supported by the phylogenetic analysis, i.e. neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, of conserved sequence motifs and the presence of three common conserved domains: an N-terminal large lipid transfer module marker for LLTP, a DUF1081 domain of unknown function in their central region exclusively shared with apoLp-II/I and apoB, and a von Willebrand-factor type D domain at their C-terminal end. Additionally, they share a conserved functional subtilisin-like endoprotease cleavage site with apoLp-II/I, in a similar location. Conclusion The structural and phylogenetic data presented indicate that the major egg yolk precursor protein of decapod crustaceans is surprisingly closely related to insect apoLp-II/I and vertebrate apoB and should be known as apolipocrustacein (apoCr rather than Vtg. These LLTP may arise from an ancient duplication event leading to paralogs of Vtg sequences. The presence of LLTP homologs in one genome may facilitate redundancy, e.g. involvement in lipid metabolism and as

  16. Immunological evidence for structural homology between Drosophila melanogaster (S14), rabbit liver (S12), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S25), Bacillus subtilis (S6), and Escherichia coli (S6) ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, W Y; Otaka, E

    1984-11-01

    Specific antibodies directed against Drosophila melanogaster acidic ribosomal protein S14 were used in a comparative study of eucaryotic and procaryotic ribosomes by immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Common antigenic determinants and, thus, structural homology were found between D. melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S25), rabbit liver (S12), Bacillus subtilis (S6), and Escherichia coli (S6) ribosomes.

  17. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  18. Light-inducible genetic engineering and control of non-homologous end-joining in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms: LML 3.0 and OFN 1.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Xihua; Zhang, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jiajia; Wang, Xuedong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Wei; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-02-09

    Filamentous fungi play important roles in the production of plant cell-wall degrading enzymes. In recent years, homologous recombinant technologies have contributed significantly to improved enzymes production and system design of genetically manipulated strains. When introducing multiple gene deletions, we need a robust and convenient way to control selectable marker genes, especially when only a limited number of markers are available in filamentous fungi. Integration after transformation is predominantly nonhomologous in most fungi other than yeast. Fungal strains deficient in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway have limitations associated with gene function analyses despite they are excellent recipient strains for gene targets. We describe strategies and methods to address these challenges above and leverage the power of resilient NHEJ deficiency strains. We have established a foolproof light-inducible platform for one-step unmarked genetic modification in industrial eukaryotic microorganisms designated as 'LML 3.0', and an on-off control protocol of NHEJ pathway called 'OFN 1.0', using a synthetic light-switchable transactivation to control Cre recombinase-based excision and inversion. The methods provide a one-step strategy to sequentially modify genes without introducing selectable markers and NHEJ-deficiency. The strategies can be used to manipulate many biological processes in a wide range of eukaryotic cells.

  19. INVHOGEN: a database of homologous invertebrate genes

    OpenAIRE

    Paulsen, Ingo; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2005-01-01

    Classification of proteins into families of homologous sequences constitutes the basis of functional analysis or of evolutionary studies. Here we present INVertebrate HOmologous GENes (INVHOGEN), a database combining the available invertebrate protein genes from UniProt (consisting of Swiss-Prot and TrEMBL) into gene families. For each family INVHOGEN provides a multiple protein alignment, a maximum likelihood based phylogenetic tree and taxonomic information about the sequences. It is possib...

  20. Computer-based comparison of structural features of envelope protein of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus with the homologous proteins of two closest viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was prediction of epitopes and medically important structural properties of protein E of Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) and comparing these features with two closely relates viruses, i.e. Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) and Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by bioinformatics tools. Prediction of evolutionary distance, localization, sequence of signal peptides, C, N O glycosylation sites, transmembrane helices (TMHs), cysteine bond positions and B cell and T cell epitopes of E proteins were performed. 2D-MH, Virus-PLoc, Signal-CF, EnsembleGly, MemBrain, DiANNA, BCPREDS and MHCPred servers were applied for the prediction. According to the results, the evolutionary distance of E protein of AHFV and two other viruses was almost equal. In all three proteins of study, residues 1-35 were predicted as signal sequences and one asparagine was predicted to be glycosylated. Results of prediction of transmembrane helices showed one TMH at position 444-467 and the other one at position 476-490. Twelve cysteines were potentially involved to form six disulfide bridges in the proteins. Four parts were predicted as B cell epitopes in E protein of AHFV. One epitope was conserved between three proteins of study. The only conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding epitope between three viruses was for DRB0401 allele. As there are not much experimental data available about AHFV, computer-aided study and comparison of E protein of this virus with two closely related flaviviruses can help in better understanding of medical properties of the virus.

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of the Salmonella invasion gene invA: homology of InvA to members of a new protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, J E; Ginocchio, C; Costeas, P

    1992-07-01

    One of the earliest steps in the pathogenic cycle of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella spp. is the invasion of the cells of the intestinal epithelium. We have previously identified a genetic locus, inv, that allows Salmonella spp. to enter cultured epithelial cells. invA is a member of this locus, and it is the first gene of an operon consisting of at least two additional invasion genes. We have constructed strains carrying nonpolar mutations in invA and examined the individual contribution of this gene to the invasion phenotype of Salmonella typhimurium. Nonpolar S. typhimurium invA mutants were deficient in invasion of cultured epithelial cells although they were fully capable of attaching to the same cells. In addition, unlike wild-type S. typhimurium, invA mutants did not alter the normal architecture of the microvilli of polarized epithelial cells nor did they cause any alterations in the distribution of actin microfilaments of infected cells. The invasion phenotype of invA mutants was readily rescued by wild-type S. typhimurium when cultured epithelial cells were simultaneously infected with both strains. On the contrary, in a similar experiment, the adherent Escherichia coli strain RDEC-1 was not internalized into cultured cells when coinfected with wild-type S. typhimurium. The invA locus was found to be located at about 59 min on the Salmonella chromosome, 7% linked to mutS. The nucleotide sequence of invA showed an open reading frame capable of encoding a polypeptide of 686 amino acids with eight possible membrane-spanning regions and a predicted molecular weight of 75,974. A protein of this size was visualized when invA was expressed in a bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system. The predicted sequence of InvA was found to be homologous to Caulobacter crescentus FlbF, Yersinia LcrD, Shigella flexneri VirH, and E. coli FlhA proteins. These proteins may form part of a family of proteins with a common function, quite possibly

  2. Phylogenetic and genomewide analyses suggest a functional relationship between kayak, the Drosophila fos homolog, and fig, a predicted protein phosphatase 2c nested within a kayak intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stephanie G; Garrett, Matthew J; Carlson, Joseph W; Micklem, Gos; Celniker, Susan E; Goldstein, Elliott S; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2007-11-01

    A gene located within the intron of a larger gene is an uncommon arrangement in any species. Few of these nested gene arrangements have been explored from an evolutionary perspective. Here we report a phylogenetic analysis of kayak (kay) and fos intron gene (fig), a divergently transcribed gene located in a kay intron, utilizing 12 Drosophila species. The evolutionary relationship between these genes is of interest because kay is the homolog of the proto-oncogene c-fos whose function is modulated by serine/threonine phosphorylation and fig is a predicted PP2C phosphatase specific for serine/threonine residues. We found that, despite an extraordinary level of diversification in the intron-exon structure of kay (11 inversions and six independent exon losses), the nested arrangement of kay and fig is conserved in all species. A genomewide analysis of protein-coding nested gene pairs revealed that approximately 20% of nested pairs in D. melanogaster are also nested in D. pseudoobscura and D. virilis. A phylogenetic examination of fig revealed that there are three subfamilies of PP2C phosphatases in all 12 species of Drosophila. Overall, our phylogenetic and genomewide analyses suggest that the nested arrangement of kay and fig may be due to a functional relationship between them.

  3. Ablation of C/EBP homologous protein increases the acute phase mortality and doesn't attenuate cardiac remodeling in mice with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guangjin; Li, Qingman; Zhang, Xiajun; Shen, Liang; Xie, Jiahe; Zhang, Jingwen; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Huang, Xiaobo; Liao, Yulin

    2015-08-14

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a proapoptotic and profibrotic stimulus. Ablation of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) is reported to reverse cardiac dysfunction by attenuating cardiac endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice with pressure overload or ischemia/reperfusion, but it is unclear whether loss of CHOP also inhibits cardiac remodeling induced by permanent-infarction. In mice with permanent ligation of left coronary artery, we found that ablation of CHOP increased the acute phase mortality. For the mice survived to 4 weeks, left ventricular anterior (LV) wall thickness was larger in CHOP knockout mice than in the wildtype littermates, while no difference was noted on posterior wall thickness, LV dimensions, LV fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Similarly, invasive assessment of LV hemodynamics, morphological analysis of heart and lung weight indexes, myocardial fibrosis and TUNEL-assessed apoptosis showed no significant differences between CHOP knockout mice and their wildtype ones, while in mice with ischemia for 45 min and reperfusion for 1 week, myocardial fibrosis and apoptosis in the infarct area were significantly attenuated in CHOP knockout mice. These findings indicate that ablation of CHOP doesn't ameliorate cardiac remodeling induced by permanent-myocardial infarction, which implicates that early reperfusion is a prerequisite for ischemic myocardium to benefit from CHOP inhibition.

  4. N-terminal GNBP homology domain of Gram-negative binding protein 3 functions as a beta-1,3-glucan binding motif in Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hanna; Kwon, Hyun-Mi; Park, Ji-Won; Kurokawa, Kenji; Lee, Bok Luel

    2009-08-31

    The Toll signalling pathway in invertebrates is responsible for defense against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi, leading to the expression of antimicrobial peptides via NF-kappaB-like transcription factors. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3) detects beta-1,3-glucan, a fungal cell wall component, and activates a three step serine protease cascade for activation of the Toll signalling pathway. Here, we showed that the recombinant N-terminal domain of Tenebrio molitor GNBP3 bound to beta-1,3-glucan, but did not activate down-stream serine protease cascade in vitro. Reversely, the N-terminal domain blocked GNBP3-mediated serine protease cascade activation in vitro and also inhibited beta-1,3-glucan-mediated antimicrobial peptide induction in Tenebrio molitor larvae. These results suggest that the N-terminal GNBP homology domain of GNBP3 functions as a beta-1,3-glucan binding domain and the C-terminal domain of GNBP3 may be required for the recruitment of immediate down-stream serine protease zymogen during Toll signalling pathway activation.

  5. OsFY, a Homolog of AtFY, Encodes a Protein that Can Interact with OsFCA-γin Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi LU; Zheng-Kai XU; Ren-Tao SONG

    2006-01-01

    FCA and FY are flowering time related genes involved in the autonomous flowering pathway in Arabidopsis. FCA interacts with FY to regulate the alternative processing of FCA pre-mRNA. The FCA/FY interaction is also required for the regulation of FLC expression, a major floral repressor in Arabidopsis.However, it is not clear if the regulation of this autonomous flowering pathway is also present in monocot plants, such as rice. Recently, alternative RNA processing of OsFCA was observed in rice, which strongly suggested the existence of an autonomous flowering pathway in rice. In this work, we cloned the cDNA of the autonomous flowering pathway gene OsFY from rice. The predicted OsFY protein contained a conserved 7 WD-repeat region and at least two Pro-Pro-Leu-Pro motifs compared to Arabidopsis FY. The proteinprotein interaction between OsFY and OsFCA-γ, the key feature of their gene function, was also demonstrated using the yeast two-hybrid system. The GenBank database search provided evidence of expression for other autonomous pathway gene homologs in rice. These results indicate that the autonomous flowering pathway is present in monocots, and the regulation through FY and FCA interaction is conserved between monocots and dicots.

  6. C. elegans ring finger protein RNF-113 is involved in interstrand DNA crosslink repair and interacts with a RAD51C homolog.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyojin Lee

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA pathway recognizes interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs and contributes to their conversion into double-strand DNA breaks, which can be repaired by homologous recombination. Seven orthologs of the 15 proteins associated with Fanconi anemia are functionally conserved in the model organism C. elegans. Here we report that RNF-113, a ubiquitin ligase, is required for RAD-51 focus formation after inducing ICLs in C. elegans. However, the formation of foci of RPA-1 or FCD-2/FANCD2 in the FA pathway was not affected by depletion of RNF-113. Nevertheless, the RPA-1 foci formed did not disappear with time in the depleted worms, implying serious defects in ICL repair. As a result, RNF-113 depletion increased embryonic lethality after ICL treatment in wild-type worms, but it did not increase the ICL-induced lethality of rfs-1/rad51C mutants. In addition, the persistence of RPA-1 foci was suppressed in doubly-deficient rnf-113;rfs-1 worms, suggesting that there is an epistatic interaction between the two genes. These results lead us to suggest that RNF-113 and RFS-1 interact to promote the displacement of RPA-1 by RAD-51 on single-stranded DNA derived from ICLs.

  7. Amino acid sequence of the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP) of beef-heart mitochondria and its homology with the delta-subunit of the F1-ATPase of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Y A; Modyanov, N N; Grinkevich, V A; Aldanova, N A; Trubetskaya, O E; Nazimov, I V; Hundal, T; Ernster, L

    1984-01-23

    The complete amino acid sequence of the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP) of beef-heart mitochondria is reported. The protein contains 190 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 20 967. Its structure is characterized by a concentration of charged amino acids in the two terminal segments (N 1-77 and C 128-190) of the protein, whereas its central region is more hydrophobic. The earlier reported homology of the protein with the delta-subunit of E. coli F1, based on the terminal amino acid sequences of OSCP, is further substantiated.

  8. Combinatorial Floer Homology

    CERN Document Server

    de Silva, Vin; Salamon, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    We define combinatorial Floer homology of a transverse pair of noncontractibe nonisotopic embedded loops in an oriented 2-manifold without boundary, prove that it is invariant under isotopy, and prove that it is isomorphic to the original Lagrangian Floer homology.

  9. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  11. Object-oriented persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  12. Object-oriented Persistent Homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-15

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  13. A chronic high fat diet alters the homologous and heterologous control of appetite regulating peptide receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentish, Stephen J; Wittert, Gary A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Page, Amanda J

    2013-08-01

    Leptin, ghrelin and neuropeptide W (NPW) modulate vagal afferent activity, which may underlie their appetite regulatory actions. High fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity induces changes in the plasma levels of these peptides and alters the expression of receptors on vagal afferents. We investigated homologous and heterologous receptor regulation by leptin, ghrelin and NPW. Mice were fed (12 weeks) a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD. Nodose ganglia were cultured overnight in the presence or absence of each peptide. Leptin (LepR), ghrelin (GHS-R), NPW (GPR7) and cholecystokinin type-1 (CCK1R) receptor mRNA, and the plasma leptin, ghrelin and NPW levels were measured. SLD: leptin reduced LepR, GPR7, increased GHS-R and CCK1R mRNA; ghrelin increased LepR, GPR7, CCK1R, and decreased GHS-R. HFD: leptin decreased GHS-R and GPR7, ghrelin increased GHS-R and GPR7. NPW decreased all receptors except GPR7 which increased with HFD. Plasma leptin was higher and NPW lower in HFD. Thus, HFD-induced obesity disrupts inter-regulation of appetite regulatory receptors in vagal afferents.

  14. Control of dinucleoside polyphosphates by the FHIT-homologous HNT2 gene, adenine biosynthesis and heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieganowski Pawel

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The FHIT gene is lost early in the development of many tumors. Fhit possesses intrinsic ApppA hydrolase activity though ApppA cleavage is not required for tumor suppression. Because a mutant form of Fhit that is functional in tumor suppression and defective in catalysis binds ApppA well, it was hypothesized that Fhit-substrate complexes are the active, signaling form of Fhit. Which substrates are most important for Fhit signaling remain unknown. Results Here we demonstrate that dinucleoside polyphosphate levels increase 500-fold to hundreds of micromolar in strains devoid of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog of Fhit, Hnt2. Accumulation of dinucleoside polyphosphates is reversed by re-expression of Hnt2 and is active site-dependent. Dinucleoside polyphosphate levels depend on an intact adenine biosynthetic pathway and time in liquid culture, and are induced by heat shock to greater than 0.1 millimolar even in Hnt2+ cells. Conclusions The data indicate that Hnt2 hydrolyzes both ApppN and AppppN in vivo and that, in heat-shocked, adenine prototrophic yeast strains, dinucleoside polyphosphates accumulate to levels in which they may saturate Hnt2.

  15. Sequencing and structural homology modeling of the ecdysone receptor in two chrysopids used in biological control of pest insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Moises João; Christiaens, Olivier; Rougé, Pierre; Grutzmacher, Anderson Dionei; Zimmer, Paulo Dejalma; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-04-01

    In insects, the process of molting and metamorphosis are mainly regulated by a steroidal hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and its analogs (ecdysteroids) that specifically bind to the ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain (EcR-LBD). Currently, several synthetic non-steroidal ecdysone agonists, including tebufenozide, are commercially available as insecticides. Tebufenozide exerts its activity by binding to the 20E-binding site and thus activating EcR permanently. It appears that subtle differences in the architecture among LBDs may underpin the differential binding affinity of tebufenozide across taxonomic orders. In brief, first we demonstrated the harmlessness of tebufenozide towards Chrysoperla externa (Ce). Then, a molecular analysis of EcR-LBD of two neuropteran insects Chrysoperla carnea and Ce was presented. Finally, we constructed a chrysopid in silico homology model docked ponasterone A (PonA) and tebufenozide into the binding pocket and analyzed the amino acids indentified as critical for binding to PonA and tebufenozide. Due to a restrict extent in the cavity at the bottom of the ecdysone-binding pocket a steric clash occurred upon docking of tebufenozide. The absence of harm biological effect and the docking results suggest that tebufenozide is prevented of any deleterious effects on chrysopids.

  16. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular Crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for bio-chemists, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitants, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and Sedimentation as is achieved in "microgravity", we have been able to dramatically affect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, f o d o n of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with counteracts on for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  17. Quercetin enhances apoptotic effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in ovarian cancer cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)-death receptor 5 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liu; Zongyuan, Yang; Cheng, Gong; Lingyun, Zhang; GuiLian, Yu; Wei, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown efficacy in a phase 2 clinical trial, development of resistance to TRAIL by tumor cells is a major roadblock. We investigated whether quercetin, a flavonoid, can sensitize human ovarian cancer cells to TRAIL. Results indicate that quercetin sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL. The quercetin induced expression of death receptor DR5 but did not affect expression of DR4 in cancer cells. The induction of DR5 was mediated through activation of JNK and through upregulation of a transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP); as silencing of these signaling molecules abrogated the effect of quercetin. Upregulation of DR5 was mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as ROS scavengers reduced the effect of quercetin on JNK activation, CHOP upregulation, DR induction, TRAIL sensitization, downregulated the expression of cell survival proteins and upregulated the proapoptotic proteins. Furthermore, quercetin enhances TRAIL mediated inhibition of tumor growth of human SKOV-3 xenograft was associated with induction of apoptosis, activation of caspase-3, CHOP and DR5. Overall, our data suggest that quercetin enhances apoptotic death of ovarian cancer cells to TRAIL through upregulation of CHOP-induced DR5 expression following ROS mediated endoplasmic reticulum-stress. PMID:24612139

  18. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-02-19

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells.

  19. A new insight into viral proteins as Immunomodulatory therapeutic agents. KSHV vOX2 a homolog of human CD200 as a potent anti-inflammatory protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mousavinezhad-Moghaddam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiologic function of the immune system is defense against infectious microbes and internal tumour cells, Therefore, need to have precise modulatory mechanisms to maintain the body homeostasis. The mammalian cellular CD200 (OX2/CD200R interaction is one of such modulatory mechanisms in which myeloid and lymphoid cells are regulated. CD200 and CD200R molecules are membrane proteins that their immunomodulatory effects are able to suppress inflammatory responses, particularly in the privilege sites such as CNS and eyes. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, encodes a wide variety of immunoregulatory proteins which play central roles in modulating inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in favour of virus dissemination. One such protein is a homologue of the, encoded by open reading frame (ORF K14 and therefore called vOX2. Based on its gene expression profile during the KSHV life cycle, it is hypothesised that vOX2 modulates host inflammatory responses. Moreover, it seems that vOX2 involves in cell adhesion and modulates innate immunity and promotes Th2 immune responses. In this review the activities of mammalian CD200 and KSHV CD200 in cell adhesion and immune system modulation are reviewed in the context of potential therapeutic agents.

  20. Solution structure and backbone dynamics of the pleckstrin homology domain of the human protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). Interaction with inositol phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguin, Daniel; Barthe, Philippe; Augé-Sénégas, Marie-Thérèse; Stern, Marc-Henri; Noguchi, Masayuki; Roumestand, Christian

    2004-02-01

    The programmed cell death occurs as part of normal mammalian development. The induction of developmental cell death is a highly regulated process and can be suppressed by a variety of extracellular stimuli. Recently, the ability of trophic factors to promote survival have been attributed, at least in part, to the phosphatidylinositide 3'-OH kinase (PI3K)/Protein Kinase B (PKB, also named Akt) cascade. Several targets of the PI3K/PKB signaling pathway have been identified that may underlie the ability of this regulatory cascade to promote cell survival. PKB possesses a N-terminal Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain that binds specifically and with high affinity to PtIns(3,4,5)P(3) and PtIns(3,4)P(2), the PI3K second messengers. PKB is then recruited to the plasma membrane by virtue of its interaction with 3'-OH phosphatidylinositides and activated. Recent evidence indicates that PKB is active in various types of human cancer; constitutive PKB signaling activation is believed to promote proliferation and increased cell survival, thereby contributing to cancer progression. Thus, it has been shown that induction of PKB activity is augmented by the TCL1/MTCP1 oncoproteins through a physical association requiring the PKB PH domain. Here we present the three-dimensional solution structure of the PH domain of the human protein PKB (isoform beta). PKBbeta-PH is an electrostatically polarized molecule that adopts the same fold and topology as other PH-domains, consisting of a beta-sandwich of seven strands capped on one top by an alpha-helix. The opposite face presents three variable loops that appear poorly defined in the NMR structure. Measurements of (15)N spin relaxation times and heteronuclear (15)N[(1)H]NOEs showed that this poor definition is due to intrinsic flexibility, involving complex motions on different time scales. Chemical shift mapping studies correctly defined the binding site of Ins(1,3,4,5)P(4) (the head group of PtIns(3,4,5)P(3)), as was previously proposed

  1. Efficacy of soluble recombinant FliC protein from Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis as a potential vaccine candidate against homologous challenge in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masashi; Matsumoto, Wakako; Seike, Fumio; Tanaka, Yuuya; Teratani, Chie; Tozuka, Maki; Kashimoto, Takashige; Takehara, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    FliC, the flagellin antigen of Salmonella Enteritidis, was tested as a vaccine candidate for protective effect against a homologous challenge in chickens. After immunization with recombinant FliC (rFliC) or administration of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 56 days old, the chickens were challenged with 10(9) colony-forming units of Salmonella Enteritidis at 76 days old. The vaccinated birds showed significantly decreased bacterial counts in the liver and cecal contents compared to those administered PBS at 7 days postchallenge, but the protection was partial. The replication experiment also showed a similar result. In both experiments, vaccination induced an increased level of serum anti-rFliC IgG, which was also reactive to the native flagella. The intestinal IgA level was slightly higher in the vaccinated birds than in the control. However, neither the proliferative response nor interferon-gamma secretion of splenic cells upon stimulation with rFliC was induced. Therefore, the effect of rFliC as a vaccine is limited, and further improvement is needed.

  2. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    The main topics of this thesis are real topological Hochschild homology and real topological cyclic homology. If a ring or a ring spectrum is equipped with an anti-involution, then it induces additional structure on the topological Hochschild homology spectrum. The group O(2) acts on the spectrum......, where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  3. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Lu

    Full Text Available In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  4. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  5. The solution structure of the periplasmic domain of the TonB system ExbD protein reveals an unexpected structural homology with siderophore-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Peacock, R Sean; Howard, S Peter; Vogel, Hans J

    2007-11-01

    The transport of iron complexes through outer membrane transporters from Gram-negative bacteria is highly dependent on the TonB system. Together, the three components of the system, TonB, ExbB and ExbD, energize the transport of iron complexes through the outer membrane by utilizing the proton motive force across the cytoplasmic membrane. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the periplasmic domain of TonB has previously been determined. However, no detailed structural information for the other two components of the TonB system is currently available and their role in the iron-uptake process is not yet clearly understood. ExbD from Escherichia coli contains 141 residues distributed in three domains: a small N-terminal cytoplasmic region, a single transmembrane helix and a C-terminal periplasmic domain. Here we describe the first well-defined solution structure of the periplasmic domain of ExbD (residues 44-141) solved by multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The monomeric structure presents three clearly distinct regions: an N-terminal flexible tail (residues 44-63), a well-defined folded region (residues 64-133) followed by a small C-terminal flexible region (residues 134-141). The folded region is formed by two alpha-helices that are located on one side of a single beta-sheet. The central beta-sheet is composed of five beta-strands, with a mixed parallel and antiparallel arrangement. Unexpectedly, this fold closely resembles that found in the C-terminal lobe of the siderophore-binding proteins FhuD and CeuE. The ExbD periplasmic domain has a strong tendency to aggregate in vitro and 3D-TROSY (transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy) NMR experiments of the deuterated protein indicate that the multimeric protein has nearly identical secondary structure to that of the monomeric form. Chemical shift perturbation studies suggest that the Glu-Pro region (residues 70-83) of TonB can bind weakly to the surface and the flexible C

  6. Mechanisms for quality control of misfolded transmembrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Houck, Scott A.; Cyr, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the cell has developed a complex network of cellular quality control (QC) systems to recognize misfolded proteins and facilitate their refolding or degradation. The cell faces numerous obstacles when performing quality control on transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins have domains on both sides of a membrane and QC systems in distinct compartments must coordinate to monitor the folding status of the protein. Additionall...

  7. Differential effects of TipE and a TipE-homologous protein on modulation of gating properties of sodium channels from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxin Wang

    Full Text Available β subunits of mammalian sodium channels play important roles in modulating the expression and gating of mammalian sodium channels. However, there are no orthologs of β subunits in insects. Instead, an unrelated protein, TipE in Drosophila melanogaster and its orthologs in other insects, is thought to be a sodium channel auxiliary subunit. In addition, there are four TipE-homologous genes (TEH1-4 in D. melanogaster and three to four orthologs in other insect species. TipE and TEH1-3 have been shown to enhance the peak current of various insect sodium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, limited information is available on how these proteins modulate the gating of sodium channels, particularly sodium channel variants generated by alternative splicing and RNA editing. In this study, we compared the effects of TEH1 and TipE on the function of three Drosophila sodium channel splice variants, DmNav9-1, DmNav22, and DmNav26, in Xenopus oocytes. Both TipE and TEH1 enhanced the amplitude of sodium current and accelerated current decay of all three sodium channels tested. Strikingly, TEH1 caused hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage-dependence of activation, fast inactivation and slow inactivation of all three variants. In contrast, TipE did not alter these gating properties except for a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation of DmNav26. Further analysis of the gating kinetics of DmNav9-1 revealed that TEH1 accelerated the entry of sodium channels into the fast inactivated state and slowed the recovery from both fast- and slow-inactivated states, thereby, enhancing both fast and slow inactivation. These results highlight the differential effects of TipE and TEH1 on the gating of insect sodium channels and suggest that TEH1 may play a broader role than TipE in regulating sodium channel function and neuronal excitability in vivo.

  8. KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer): a novel molecular marker that distinguishes between benign and malignant lesions of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Woda, Bruce A; Fanger, Gary R; Kalos, M; Whalen, Giles F; Tada, Hiroomi; Andersen, Dana K; Rock, Kenneth L; Dresser, Karen

    2005-02-01

    KOC (K homology domain containing protein overexpressed in cancer) is a novel oncofetal RNA-binding protein highly expressed in pancreatic carcinomas. Recently, Corixa Corporation developed a monoclonal antibody specific for KOC that can be used with standard immunohistochemical techniques. The purposes of this study were 1) to assess KOC mRNA expression in pancreatic carcinoma, 2) to determine the pattern of KOC immunoexpression among benign, borderline, and malignant pancreatic epithelial lesions, and 3) to evaluate the utility of the KOC antibody in distinguishing between these entities. mRNA was isolated from fresh pancreatic tissues (19 carcinomas, 2 normal pancreas, 1 chronic pancreatitis) and amplified using standard RT-PCR techniques. Fifteen of 19 (79%) carcinomas overexpressed KOC mRNA relative to non-neoplastic tissue samples and expression increased progressively with tumor stage: the mean copy number of KOC mRNA transcripts was 1.5, 11.1, 31, and 28 for stage I, II, III, and IV carcinomas, respectively, compared with 0.9 and 1 for normal pancreatic tissue and chronic pancreatitis, respectively. Immunostains using the KOC antibody were performed on 50 surgical resection specimens (38 invasive adenocarcinomas, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms, 2 mucinous cystic neoplasms, 7 chronic pancreatitis). KOC staining was present in 37 of 38 (97%) carcinomas: the staining reaction was moderate or strong in 36 of 38 (94%) and present in >50% of the tumor cells in 35 of 38 (92%) cases. Severe dysplasia of the ductal epithelium, present in 19 foci of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and grade 3 pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN3) showed strong or moderate staining in 15 (79%) cases, whereas foci of mild and moderate dysplasia (intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and mucinous cystic neoplasms with adenoma and/or moderate dysplasia, PanIN1, and PanIN2) were uniformly negative for this marker in 25 and 22

  9. The OGCleaner: filtering false-positive homology clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, M Stanley; Suvorov, Anton; Jensen, Nicholas O; Clement, Mark J; Snell, Quinn; Bybee, Seth M

    2017-01-01

    Detecting homologous sequences in organisms is an essential step in protein structure and function prediction, gene annotation and phylogenetic tree construction. Heuristic methods are often employed for quality control of putative homology clusters. These heuristics, however, usually only apply to pairwise sequence comparison and do not examine clusters as a whole. We present the Orthology Group Cleaner (the OGCleaner), a tool designed for filtering putative orthology groups as homology or non-homology clusters by considering all sequences in a cluster. The OGCleaner relies on high-quality orthologous groups identified in OrthoDB to train machine learning algorithms that are able to distinguish between true-positive and false-positive homology groups. This package aims to improve the quality of phylogenetic tree construction especially in instances of lower-quality transcriptome assemblies. https://github.com/byucsl/ogcleaner CONTACT: sfujimoto@gmail.comSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  11. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  12. Colletotrichum orbiculare WHI2, a Yeast Stress-Response Regulator Homolog, Controls the Biotrophic Stage of Hemibiotrophic Infection Through TOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harata, Ken; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Kubo, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare first establishes a biotrophic infection stage in cucumber (Cucumber sativus) epidermal cells and subsequently transitions to a necrotrophic stage. Here, we found that C. orbiculare established hemibiotrophic infection via C. orbiculare WHI2, a yeast stress regulator homolog, and TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling. Plant defense responses such as callose deposition, H2O2, and antimicrobial proteins were strongly induced by the C. orbiculare whi2Δ mutant, resulting in defective pathogenesis. Expression analysis of biotrophy-specific genes evaluated by the promoter VENUS fusion gene indicated weaker VENUS signal intensity in the whi2Δ mutant, thereby suggesting that C. orbiculare WHI2 plays a key role in regulating biotrophic infection of C. orbiculare. The involvement of CoWHI2 in biotrophic infection was further explored with a DNA microarray. In the Cowhi2Δ mutant, TOR-dependent ribosomal protein-related genes were strikingly upregulated compared with the wild type. Moreover, callose deposition in the host plant after inoculation with the Cowhi2Δ mutant treated with rapamycin, which inhibits TOR activity, was reduced, and the mutant remained biotrophic in contrast to the untreated mutant. Thus, regulation of TOR by Whi2 is apparently crucial to the biotrophic stage of hemibiotrophic infection in C. orbiculare.

  13. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  14. The predicted protein product of a pathogenicity locus from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is homologous to a highly conserved domain of several procaryotic regulatory proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, C.; Panopoulos, N J

    1989-01-01

    A ca. 20-kilobase (kb) region (hrp) that controls the interaction of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola with its host (pathogenicity) and nonhost plants (hypersensitive reaction) was previously cloned and partially characterized. In this study we defined the limits and determined the nucleotide sequence of a hrp locus (hrpS), located near the right end of the hrp cluster. The largest open reading frame (ORF302) in hrpS has a coding capacity for a 302-amino-acid polypeptide. The predicted a...

  15. The predicted protein product of a pathogenicity locus from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is homologous to a highly conserved domain of several procaryotic regulatory proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    GRIMM, C; Panopoulos, N J

    1989-01-01

    A ca. 20-kilobase (kb) region (hrp) that controls the interaction of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola with its host (pathogenicity) and nonhost plants (hypersensitive reaction) was previously cloned and partially characterized. In this study we defined the limits and determined the nucleotide sequence of a hrp locus (hrpS), located near the right end of the hrp cluster. The largest open reading frame (ORF302) in hrpS has a coding capacity for a 302-amino-acid polypeptide. The predicted a...

  16. Lectures on knot homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We provide various formulations of knot homology that are predicted by string dualities. In addition, we also explain the rich algebraic structure of knot homology which can be understood in terms of geometric representation theory in these formulations. These notes are based on lectures in the workshop "Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology" at Centre de Recherches Math\\'ematiques, Universit\\'e de Montr\\'eal.

  17. Dextran-based microspheres as controlled delivery systems for proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Wensink, K.D.F.

    2007-01-01

    Dextran-based microspheres as controlled delivery systems for proteins Dextran based microspheres are investigated as controlled delivery system for proteins. Microspheres were prepared by polymerization of dex-HEMA in an aqueous two-phase system of dex-HEMA and PEG. Protein loaded microspheres are

  18. Homologs of the LapD-LapG c-di-GMP Effector System Control Biofilm Formation by Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosis, Nicolás; Boyd, Chelsea D.; O´Toole, George A.; Fernández, Julieta; Sisti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formation is important for infection by many pathogens. Bordetella bronchiseptica causes respiratory tract infections in mammals and forms biofilm structures in nasal epithelium of infected mice. We previously demonstrated that cyclic di-GMP is involved in biofilm formation in B. bronchiseptica. In the present work, based on their previously reported function in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified three genes in the B. bronchiseptica genome likely involved in c-di-GMP-dependent biofilm formation: brtA, lapD and lapG. Genetic analysis confirmed a role for BrtA, LapD and LapG in biofilm formation using microtiter plate assays, as well as scanning electron and fluorescent microscopy to analyze the phenotypes of mutants lacking these proteins. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the protease LapG of B. bronchiseptica cleaves the N-terminal domain of BrtA, as well as the LapA protein of P. fluorescens, indicating functional conservation between these species. Furthermore, while BrtA and LapG appear to have little or no impact on colonization in a mouse model of infection, a B. bronchiseptica strain lacking the LapG protease has a significantly higher rate of inducing a severe disease outcome compared to the wild type. These findings support a role for c-di-GMP acting through BrtA/LapD/LapG to modulate biofilm formation, as well as impact pathogenesis, by B. bronchiseptica PMID:27380521

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus contains G protein-coupled receptor and cyclin D homologs which are expressed in Kaposi's sarcoma and malignant lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    A new human herpesvirus was recently identified in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV] or human herpesvirus 8), as well as in primary effusion (body cavity-based) lymphomas (PELs). A 12.3-kb-long KSHV clone was obtained from a PEL genomic library. Sequencing of this clone revealed extensive homology and colinearity with the right end of the herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) genome and more limited homology to the left end of the Epstein-Barr virus genome. Fou...

  20. NRA-2, a nicalin homolog, regulates neuronal death by controlling surface localization of toxic Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Shaunak; Yeola, Shrutika; Zhang, Wenying; Bianchi, Laura; Driscoll, Monica

    2014-04-25

    Hyperactivated DEG/ENaCs induce neuronal death through excessive cation influx and disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC MEC-4 is hyperactivated by the (d) mutation and induces death of touch neurons. The analogous substitution in MEC-10 (MEC-10(d)) co-expressed in the same neurons is only mildly neurotoxic. We exploited the lower toxicity of MEC-10(d) to identify RNAi knockdowns that enhance neuronal death. We report here that knock-out of the C. elegans nicalin homolog NRA-2 enhances MEC-10(d)-induced neuronal death. Cell biological assays in C. elegans neurons show that NRA-2 controls the distribution of MEC-10(d) between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell surface. Electrophysiological experiments in Xenopus oocytes support this notion and suggest that control of channel distribution by NRA-2 is dependent on the subunit composition. We propose that nicalin/NRA-2 functions in a quality control mechanism to retain mutant channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, influencing the extent of neuronal death. Mammalian nicalin may have a similar role in DEG/ENaC biology, therefore influencing pathological conditions like ischemia.

  1. NRA-2, a Nicalin Homolog, Regulates Neuronal Death by Controlling Surface Localization of Toxic Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Shaunak; Yeola, Shrutika; Zhang, Wenying; Bianchi, Laura; Driscoll, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivated DEG/ENaCs induce neuronal death through excessive cation influx and disruption of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Caenorhabditis elegans DEG/ENaC MEC-4 is hyperactivated by the (d) mutation and induces death of touch neurons. The analogous substitution in MEC-10 (MEC-10(d)) co-expressed in the same neurons is only mildly neurotoxic. We exploited the lower toxicity of MEC-10(d) to identify RNAi knockdowns that enhance neuronal death. We report here that knock-out of the C. elegans nicalin homolog NRA-2 enhances MEC-10(d)-induced neuronal death. Cell biological assays in C. elegans neurons show that NRA-2 controls the distribution of MEC-10(d) between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cell surface. Electrophysiological experiments in Xenopus oocytes support this notion and suggest that control of channel distribution by NRA-2 is dependent on the subunit composition. We propose that nicalin/NRA-2 functions in a quality control mechanism to retain mutant channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, influencing the extent of neuronal death. Mammalian nicalin may have a similar role in DEG/ENaC biology, therefore influencing pathological conditions like ischemia. PMID:24567339

  2. Ethanol extract of propolis protects macrophages from oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis by inhibiting CD36 expression and endoplasmic reticulum stress-C/EBP homologous protein pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Sun, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Jia-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Li; Guo, Shou-Dong; Li, Yan-Yan; Jiao, Peng; Wang, Hao; Qin, Shu-Cun; Yao, Shu-Tong

    2015-07-14

    Ethanol extract of propolis (EEP), rich in flavones, has been known for various biological activities including antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antibiotic activities. Our previous studies have shown that EEP protects endothelial cells from oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced apoptosis and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development. In this present study, we explored the protective effect of EEP on ox-LDL-induced cytotoxicity in macrophages and specifically the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) pathway-mediated apoptosis. EEP was prepared and the total flavonoids content of EEP was determined by the colorimetric method of Chinese Standard (GB/T 20574-2006). The effects of EEP on lipid accumulation, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in RAW264.7 cells induced by ox-LDL or tunicamycin (TM, an ER stress inducer) were assayed using oil red O staining, MTT assay, flow cytometric analysis and so on. Immunofluorescence, Western blot and real time-PCR analysis were then used to further investigate the molecular mechanisms by which EEP protects macrophages from ox-LDL-induced apoptosis. 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), an ER stress inhibitor, was used as a positive control. EEP (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/L) not only attenuated ox-LDL-induced lipid accumulation in RAW264.7 macrophages in a dose-dependent manner but also inhibited the decreased cell viability and the increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induced by ox-LDL or tunicamycin (TM, a classical ER stress inducer), which were similar to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA, an inhibitor of ER stress) treatment. In addition, like PBA, EEP significantly suppressed the ox-LDL- or TM-induced activation of ER stress signaling pathway including the phosphorylation of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) as well as upregulation of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and the pro

  3. Biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires ARSA1, a homolog of prokaryotic arsenite transporter and eukaryotic TRC40 for guided entry of tail-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Kuras, Richard; Bassi, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    as1, for antenna size mutant 1, was obtained by insertion mutagenesis of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This strain has a low chlorophyll content, 8% with respect to the wild type, and displays a general reduction in thylakoid polypeptides. The mutant was found to carry an insertion into a homologous gene, prokaryotic arsenite transporter (ARSA), whose yeast and mammal counterparts were found to be involved in the targeting of tail-anchored (TA) proteins to cytosol-exposed membranes, essential for several cellular functions. Here we present the characterization in a photosynthetic organism of an insertion mutant in an ARSA-homolog gene. The ARSA1 protein was found to be localized in the cytosol, and yet its absence in as1 leads to a small chloroplast and a strongly decreased chlorophyll content per cell. ARSA1 appears to be required for optimal biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes because of its involvement in the accumulation of TOC34, an essential component of the outer chloroplast membrane translocon (TOC) complex, which, in turn, catalyzes the import of nucleus-encoded precursor polypeptides into the chloroplast. Remarkably, the effect of the mutation appears to be restricted to biogenesis of chlorophyll-binding polypeptides and is not compensated by the other ARSA homolog encoded by the C. reinhardtii genome, implying a non-redundant function. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MRE11 controls extent of resection during homology directed repair by signalling through Exonuclease 1

    OpenAIRE

    Kijas, Amanda W.; Lim, Yi Chieh; Bolderson, Emma; Cerosaletti, Karen; Gatei, Magtouf; Jakob, Burkhard; Tobias, Frank; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela; Gueven, Nuri; Oakley, Greg; Concannon, Patrick; Wolvetang, Ernst; Khanna, Kum Kum; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Lavin, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex plays a central role as a sensor of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and is responsible for the efficient activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Once activated ATM in turn phosphorylates RAD50 and NBS1, important for cell cycle control, DNA repair and cell survival. We report here that MRE11 is also phosphorylated by ATM at S676 and S678 in response to agents that induce DNA DSB, is dependent on the presence of NBS1, and does not affect the ...

  5. Seifert fibered homology spheres with trivial Heegaard Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Eftekhary, Eaman

    2009-01-01

    We show that among Seifert fibered integer homology spheres, Poincare sphere (with either orientation) is the only non-trivial example which has trivial Heegaard Floer homology. Together with an earlier result, this shows that if an integer homology sphere has trivial Heegaard Floer homology, then it is a connected sum of a number of Poincare spheres and hyperbolic homology spheres.

  6. An interpretation of E_n-homology as functor homology

    OpenAIRE

    Livernet, Muriel; Richter, Birgit

    2009-01-01

    We prove that E_n-homology of non-unital commutative algebras can be described as functor homology when one considers functors from a certain category of planar trees with n levels. For different n these homology theories are connected by natural maps, ranging from Hochschild homology and its higher order versions to Gamma homology.

  7. The Ski7 Antiviral Protein Is an EF1-α Homolog That Blocks Expression of Non-Poly(A) mRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Benard, Lionel; Carroll, Kathleen; Valle, Rosaura C. P.; Masison, Daniel C.; Wickner, Reed B.

    1999-01-01

    We mapped and cloned SKI7, a gene that negatively controls the copy number of L-A and M double-stranded RNA viruses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that it encodes a nonessential 747-residue protein with similarities to two translation factors, Hbs1p and EF1-α. The ski7 mutant was hypersensitive to hygromycin B, a result also suggesting a role in translation. The SKI7 product repressed the expression of nonpolyadenylated [non-poly(A)] mRNAs, whether capped or uncapped, thus explaining w...

  8. Small-molecule control of protein function through Staudinger reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ji; Liu, Qingyang; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using small molecules to control the function of proteins in live cells with complete specificity is highly desirable, but challenging. Here we report a small-molecule switch that can be used to control protein activity. The approach uses a phosphine-mediated Staudinger reduction to activate protein function. Genetic encoding of an ortho-azidobenzyloxycarbonyl amino acid using a pyrrolysyl transfer RNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in mammalian cells enables the site-specific introduction of a small-molecule-removable protecting group into the protein of interest. Strategic placement of this group renders the protein inactive until deprotection through a bioorthogonal Staudinger reduction delivers the active wild-type protein. This developed methodology was applied to the conditional control of several cellular processes, including bioluminescence (luciferase), fluorescence (enhanced green fluorescent protein), protein translocation (nuclear localization sequence), DNA recombination (Cre) and gene editing (Cas9).

  9. Case-control study of vitamin D, dickkopf homolog 1 (DKK1 gene methylation, VDR gene polymorphism and the risk of colon adenoma in African Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ashktorab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are sparse data on genetic, epigenetic and vitamin D exposure in African Americans (AA with colon polyp. Consequently, we evaluated serum 25(OH D levels, vitamin D receptor (VDR polymorphisms and the methylation status of the tumor suppressor gene dickkopf homolog 1 (DKK1 as risk factors for colon polyp in this population. METHODS: The case-control study consisted of 93 patients with colon polyp (cases and 187 healthy individuals (controls at Howard University Hospital. Serum levels of 25(OHD (including D3, D2, and total were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. DNA analysis focused on 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the VDR gene. Promoter methylation analysis of DKK1 was also performed. The resulting data were processed in unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Cases and controls differed in vitamin D status (D(3<50 nmol/L: Median of 35.5 in cases vs. 36.8 in controls nmol/L; P = 0.05. Low levels of 25(OHD(3 (<50 nmol/L were observed in 86% of cases and 68% of controls and it was associated with higher risks of colon polyp (odds ratio of 2.7, 95% confidence interval 1.3-3.4. The SNP analysis showed no association between 46 VDR polymorphisms and colon polyp. The promoter of the DKK1 gene was unmethylated in 96% of the samples. CONCLUSION: We found an inverse association between serum 25(OHD(3 and colon polyp in AAs. VDR SNPs and DKK1 methylation were not associated with colon polyp. Vitamin D levels may in part explain the higher incidence of polyp in AAs.

  10. Control of Entamoeba histolytica adherence involves metallosurface protease 1, an M8 family surface metalloprotease with homology to leishmanolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Jose E; Sateriale, Adam; Bessoff, Kovi E; Huston, Christopher D

    2012-06-01

    Invasive amebiasis due to Entamoeba histolytica infection is an important cause of morbidity in developing countries. The E. histolytica genome contains two homologues to the metalloprotease leishmanolysin gene, Entamoeba histolytica MSP-1 (EhMSP-1) and EhMSP-2, while the commensal ameba Entamoeba dispar has lost EhMSP-1. In this study, we sought to characterize E. histolytica metallosurface protease 1 (EhMSP-1). Using immunoprecipitation and a model substrate, we found that EhMSP-1 was a functional metalloprotease. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that EhMSP-1 localized to the cell surface and revealed the existence of distinct, nonclonal trophozoite populations with high and low EhMSP-1 surface abundance that became synchronized following serum starvation. Phenotypic assays were performed after silencing EhMSP-1. Adherence of EhMSP-1-deficient trophozoites to tissue culture cell monolayers was more than five times greater than that of control amebas, but surface staining of several antigens, including the galactose adherence lectin, was unchanged. EhMSP-1 silencing similarly increased adherence to both viable and apoptotic Jurkat lymphocytes. Tissue culture cell monolayer destruction was reduced by EhMSP-1 silencing, although it was blocked almost completely by inhibiting cysteine proteases. Consistent with a primary defect in regulation of amebic adherence, EhMSP-1 silencing also resulted in reduced mobility on tissue culture cell monolayers and in increased phagocytosis. In conclusion, EhMSP-1 was shown to be a surface metalloprotease involved in regulation of amebic adherence, with additional effects on cell motility, cell monolayer destruction, and phagocytosis.

  11. Localization of P42 and F(1)-ATPase α-subunit homolog of the gliding machinery in Mycoplasma mobile revealed by newly developed gene manipulation and fluorescent protein tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulum, Isil; Yabe, Masaru; Uenoyama, Atsuko; Miyata, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a unique mechanism that enables it to glide on solid surfaces faster than any other gliding mycoplasma. To elucidate the gliding mechanism, we developed a transformation system for M. mobile based on a transposon derived from Tn4001. Modification of the electroporation conditions, outgrowth time, and colony formation from the standard method for Mycoplasma species enabled successful transformation. A fluorescent-protein tagging technique was developed using the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) and applied to two proteins that have been suggested to be involved in the gliding mechanism: P42 (MMOB1050), which is transcribed as continuous mRNA with other proteins essential for gliding, and a homolog of the F1-ATPase α-subunit (MMOB1660). Analysis of the amino acid sequence of P42 by PSI-BLAST suggested that P42 evolved from a common ancestor with FtsZ, the bacterial tubulin homologue. The roles of P42 and the F(1)-ATPase subunit homolog are discussed as part of our proposed gliding mechanism.

  12. Localization of P42 and F1-ATPase α-Subunit Homolog of the Gliding Machinery in Mycoplasma mobile Revealed by Newly Developed Gene Manipulation and Fluorescent Protein Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulum, Isil; Yabe, Masaru; Uenoyama, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a unique mechanism that enables it to glide on solid surfaces faster than any other gliding mycoplasma. To elucidate the gliding mechanism, we developed a transformation system for M. mobile based on a transposon derived from Tn4001. Modification of the electroporation conditions, outgrowth time, and colony formation from the standard method for Mycoplasma species enabled successful transformation. A fluorescent-protein tagging technique was developed using the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) and applied to two proteins that have been suggested to be involved in the gliding mechanism: P42 (MMOB1050), which is transcribed as continuous mRNA with other proteins essential for gliding, and a homolog of the F1-ATPase α-subunit (MMOB1660). Analysis of the amino acid sequence of P42 by PSI-BLAST suggested that P42 evolved from a common ancestor with FtsZ, the bacterial tubulin homologue. The roles of P42 and the F1-ATPase subunit homolog are discussed as part of our proposed gliding mechanism. PMID:24509320

  13. Despite sequence homologies to gluten, salivary proline-rich proteins do not elicit immune responses central to the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Na; Leffler, Daniel A; Kelly, Ciaran P; Hansen, Joshua; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A; Schuppan, Detlef; Helmerhorst, Eva J

    2015-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an inflammatory disorder triggered by ingested gluten, causing immune-mediated damage to the small-intestinal mucosa. Gluten proteins are strikingly similar in amino acid composition and sequence to proline-rich proteins (PRPs) in human saliva. On the basis of this feature and their shared destination in the gastrointestinal tract, we hypothesized that salivary PRPs may modulate gluten-mediated immune responses in CD. Parotid salivary secretions were collected from CD patients, refractory CD patients, non-CD patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, and healthy controls. Structural similarities of PRPs with gluten were probed with anti-gliadin antibodies. Immune responses to PRPs were investigated toward CD patient-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in a humanized transgenic HLA-DQ2/DQ8 mouse model for CD. Anti-gliadin antibodies weakly cross-reacted with the abundant salivary amylase but not with PRPs. Likewise, the R5 antibody, recognizing potential antigenic gluten epitopes, showed negligible reactivity to salivary proteins from all groups. Inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were provoked by gliadins whereas responses to PRPs were similar to control levels, and PRPs did not compete with gliadins in immune stimulation. In vivo, PRP peptides were well tolerated and nonimmunogenic in the transgenic HLA-DQ2/DQ8 mouse model. Collectively, although structurally similar to dietary gluten, salivary PRPs were nonimmunogenic in CD patients and in a transgenic HLA-DQ2/DQ8 mouse model for CD. It is possible that salivary PRPs play a role in tolerance induction to gluten early in life. Deciphering the structural basis for the lack of immunogenicity of salivary PRPs may further our understanding of the toxicity of gluten.

  14. On Galaxies and Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Novak, Gregory S.; Jonsson, Patrik; Primack, Joel R.; Cox, Thomas J.; Dekel, Avishai

    2012-01-01

    The definition of homology for single-component galaxies is clear, but for multi-component (luminous and dark matter) galaxies there is some ambiguity. We attempt to clarify the situation by carefully separating the different concepts of homology that have been used to date. We argue that the most useful definition is that a set of galaxies is homologous if they are the same in all respects up to a set of three dimensional scaling constants which may differ from one galaxy to the next. Noting...

  15. The specificity of controlled protein disorder in the photoprotection of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Tjaart P J; Ilioaia, Cristian; Johnson, Matthew P; Belgio, Erica; Horton, Peter; Ruban, Alexander V; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2013-08-20

    Light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of photosystem II of plants have a dual function: they efficiently use absorbed energy for photosynthesis at limiting sunlight intensity and dissipate the excess energy at saturating intensity for photoprotection. Recent single-molecule spectroscopy studies on the trimeric LHCII complex showed that environmental control of the intrinsic protein disorder could in principle explain the switch between their light-harvesting and photoprotective conformations in vivo. However, the validity of this proposal depends strongly on the specificity of the protein dynamics. Here, a similar study has been performed on the minor monomeric antenna complexes of photosystem II (CP29, CP26, and CP24). Despite their high structural homology, similar pigment content and organization compared to LHCII trimers, the environmental response of these proteins was found to be rather distinct. A much larger proportion of the minor antenna complexes were present in permanently weakly fluorescent states under most conditions used; however, unlike LHCII trimers the distribution of the single-molecule population between the strongly and weakly fluorescent states showed no significant sensitivity to low pH, zeaxanthin, or low detergent conditions. The results support a unique role for LHCII trimers in the regulation of light harvesting by controlled fluorescence blinking and suggest that any contribution of the minor antenna complexes to photoprotection would probably involve a distinct mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Heterologous prime-boost regimens using rAd35 and rMVA vectors elicit stronger cellular immune responses to HIV proteins than homologous regimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ratto-Kim

    Full Text Available We characterized prime-boost vaccine regimens using heterologous and homologous vector and gene inserts. Heterologous regimens offer a promising approach that focuses the cell-mediated immune response on the insert and away from vector-dominated responses. Ad35-GRIN/ENV (Ad35-GE vaccine is comprised of two vectors containing sequences from HIV-1 subtype A gag, rt, int, nef (Ad35-GRIN and env (Ad35-ENV. MVA-CMDR (MVA-C, MVA-KEA (MVA-K and MVA-TZC (MVA-T vaccines contain gag, env and pol genes from HIV-1 subtypes CRF01_AE, A and C, respectively. Balb/c mice were immunized with different heterologous and homologous vector and insert prime-boost combinations. HIV and vector-specific immune responses were quantified post-boost vaccination. Gag-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS (CD107a, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2, pentamer staining and T-cell phenotyping were used to differentiate responses to inserts and vectors. Ad35-GE prime followed by boost with any of the recombinant MVA constructs (rMVA induced CD8+ Gag-specific responses superior to Ad35-GE-Ad35-GE or rMVA-rMVA prime-boost combinations. Notably, there was a shift toward insert-focus responses using heterologous vector prime-boost regimens. Gag-specific central and effector memory T cells were generated more rapidly and in greater numbers in the heterologous compared to the homologous prime-boost regimens. These results suggest that heterologous prime-boost vaccination regimens enhance immunity by increasing the magnitude, onset and multifunctionality of the insert-specific cell-mediated immune response compared to homologous vaccination regimens. This study supports the rationale for testing heterologous prime-boost regimens in humans.

  17. Total protein or high-abundance protein: Which offers the best loading control for Western blotting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Jonathan S; Yeung, Derrick H; Staines, W Richard; Mielke, John G

    2016-03-01

    Western blotting routinely involves a control for variability in the amount of protein across immunoblot lanes. Normalizing a target signal to one found for an abundantly expressed protein is widely regarded as a reliable loading control; however, this approach is being increasingly questioned. As a result, we compared blotting for two high-abundance proteins (actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH]) and two total protein membrane staining methods (Ponceau and Coomassie Brilliant Blue) to determine the best control for loading variability. We found that Ponceau staining optimally balanced accuracy and precision, and we suggest that this approach be considered as an alternative to normalizing with a high-abundance protein.

  18. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C.; Pinas, Johan E.; Lindhout, Beatrice I.; Hooykaas, Paul J.J.; Van der Zaal, Bert J.

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU c

  19. Surface Sites for Engineering Allosteric Control in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Natarajan, Madhusudan; Nashine, Vishal C.; Socolich, Michael; Vo, Tina; Russ, William P.; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Ranganathan, Rama

    2010-01-01

    Statistical analyses of protein families reveal networks of coevolving amino acids that functionally link distantly positioned functional surfaces. Such linkages suggest a concept for engineering allosteric control into proteins: The intramolecular networks of two proteins could be joined across their surface sites such that the activity of one protein might control the activity of the other. We tested this idea by creating PAS-DHFR, a designed chimeric protein that connects a light-sensing signaling domain from a plant member of the Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) family of proteins with Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). With no optimization, PAS-DHFR exhibited light-dependent catalytic activity that depended on the site of connection and on known signaling mechanisms in both proteins. PAS-DHFR serves as a proof of concept for engineering regulatory activities into proteins through interface design at conserved allosteric sites. PMID:18927392

  20. Detailed assessment of homology detection using different substitution matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; WANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Homology detection plays a key role in bioinformatics, whereas substitution matrix is one of the most important components in homology detection. Thus, besides the improvement of alignment algorithms, another effective way to enhance the accuracy of homology detection is to use proper substitution matrices or even construct new matrices.A study on the features of various matrices and on the comparison of the performances between different matrices in homology detection enable us to choose the most proper or optimal matrix for some specific applications. In this paper, by taking BLOSUM matrices as an example, some detailed features of matrices in homology detection are studied by calculating the distributions of numbers of recognized proteins over different sequence identities and sequence lengths. Our results clearly showed that different matrices have different preferences and abilities to the recognition of remote homologous proteins. Furthermore, detailed features of the various matrices can be used to improve the accuracy of homology detection.

  1. HOMOLOGY RIGIDITY OF GRASSMANNIANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang; Duan Haibao

    2009-01-01

    Applying the theory of GrSbner basis to the Schubert presentation for the cohomology of Grassmannians [2], we extend the homology rigidity results known for the classical Grassmaniaas to the exceptional cases.

  2. Homology, convergence and parallelism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiselin, Michael T

    2016-01-05

    Homology is a relation of correspondence between parts of parts of larger wholes. It is used when tracking objects of interest through space and time and in the context of explanatory historical narratives. Homologues can be traced through a genealogical nexus back to a common ancestral precursor. Homology being a transitive relation, homologues remain homologous however much they may come to differ. Analogy is a relationship of correspondence between parts of members of classes having no relationship of common ancestry. Although homology is often treated as an alternative to convergence, the latter is not a kind of correspondence: rather, it is one of a class of processes that also includes divergence and parallelism. These often give rise to misleading appearances (homoplasies). Parallelism can be particularly hard to detect, especially when not accompanied by divergences in some parts of the body. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Sutures and contact homology I

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Vincent; Honda, Ko; Hutchings, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We define a relative version of contact homology for contact manifolds with convex boundary, and prove basic properties of this relative contact homology. Similar considerations also hold for embedded contact homology.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of ginkbilobin-2 from Ginkgo biloba seeds: a novel antifungal protein with homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Hatano, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Faculty of Engineering, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biochemical Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-09-01

    Purification and crystallization of ginkbilobin-2 and its selenomethionine derivative allowed the collection of complete data to 2.38 Å resolution and multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data sets, respectively. The antifungal protein ginkbilobin-2 (Gnk2) from Ginkgo biloba seeds does not show homology to other pathogenesis-related proteins, but does show homology to the extracellular domain of plant cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases. Native Gnk2 purified from ginkgo nuts and the selenomethionine derivative of recombinant Gnk2 (SeMet-rGnk2) were crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using different precipitants. X-ray diffraction data were collected from Gnk2 at 2.38 Å resolution and from SeMet-rGnk2 at 2.79 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals of both proteins belonged to the primitive cubic space group P2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 143.2 Å.

  5. Tetrahymena gene encodes a protein that is homologous with the liver-specific F-antigen and associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus and transport vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummel, R; Nørgaard, P; Andreasen, P H

    1992-01-01

    . In accordance with the predicted molecular mass of the TF-ag protein, antibodies raised against a cro-lacZ'-TF-ag fusion protein specifically recognized a 45,000 M(r) protein in Western blots of total T. thermophila protein. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that the TF-ag is associated with membranes...

  6. [DNA homologous recombination repair in mammalian cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popławski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious DNA damage. Due to a great variety of factors causing DSBs, the efficacy of their repair is crucial for the cell's functioning and prevents DNA fragmentation, chromosomal translocation and deletion. In mammalian cells DSBs can be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HRR) and single strand annealing (SSA). HRR can be divided into the first and second phase. The first phase is initiated by sensor proteins belonging to the MRN complex, that activate the ATM protein which target HRR proteins to obtain the second response phase--repair. HRR is precise because it utilizes a non-damaged homologous DNA fragment as a template. The key players of HRR in mammalian cells are MRN, RPA, Rad51 and its paralogs, Rad52 and Rad54.

  7. INVHOGEN: a database of homologous invertebrate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Ingo; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2006-01-01

    Classification of proteins into families of homologous sequences constitutes the basis of functional analysis or of evolutionary studies. Here we present INVertebrate HOmologous GENes (INVHOGEN), a database combining the available invertebrate protein genes from UniProt (consisting of Swiss-Prot and TrEMBL) into gene families. For each family INVHOGEN provides a multiple protein alignment, a maximum likelihood based phylogenetic tree and taxonomic information about the sequences. It is possible to download the corresponding GenBank flatfiles, the alignment and the tree in Newick format. Sequences and related information have been structured in an ACNUC database under a client/server architecture. Thus, complex selections can be performed. An external graphical tool (FamFetch) allows access to the data to evaluate homology relationships between genes and distinguish orthologous from paralogous sequences. Thus, INVHOGEN complements the well-known HOVERGEN database. The databank is available at http://www.bi.uni-duesseldorf.de/~invhogen/invhogen.html.

  8. Ubiquitin in signaling and protein quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Saoudi, Sofie Vincents

    Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification that holds a variety of cellular functions. This Ph.D. thesis is comprised of two studies, of which one focused on ubiquitylation related to inflammatory signaling, and the other on the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system ...

  9. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-08-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of U. maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins.

  10. Selective interactions between vertebrate polycomb homologs and the SUV39H1 histone lysine methyltransferase suggest that histone H3-K9 methylation contributes to chromosomal targeting of Polycomb group proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewalt, Richard G A B; Lachner, Monika; Vargas, Mark; Hamer, Karien M; den Blaauwen, Jan L; Hendrix, Thijs; Melcher, Martin; Schweizer, Dieter; Jenuwein, Thomas; Otte, Arie P

    2002-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multimeric chromatin-associated protein complexes that are involved in heritable repression of gene activity. Two distinct human PcG complexes have been characterized. The EED/EZH2 PcG complex utilizes histone deacetylation to repress gene activity. The HPC/HPH PcG complex contains the HPH, RING1, BMI1, and HPC proteins. Here we show that vertebrate Polycomb homologs HPC2 and XPc2, but not M33/MPc1, interact with the histone lysine methyltransferase (HMTase) SUV39H1 both in vitro and in vivo. We further find that overexpression of SUV39H1 induces selective nuclear relocalization of HPC/HPH PcG proteins but not of the EED/EZH2 PcG proteins. This SUV39H1-dependent relocalization concentrates the HPC/HPH PcG proteins to the large pericentromeric heterochromatin domains (1q12) on human chromosome 1. Within these PcG domains we observe increased H3-K9 methylation. Finally, we show that H3-K9 HMTase activity is associated with endogenous HPC2. Our findings suggest a role for the SUV39H1 HMTase and histone H3-K9 methylation in the targeting of human HPC/HPH PcG proteins to modified chromatin structures.

  11. Singular (Lipschitz) homology and homology of integral currents

    OpenAIRE

    Riedweg, Christian; Schäppi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We compare the homology groups $H_n ^{IC}(X)$ of the chain complex of integral currents with compact support of a metric space $X$ with the singular Lipschitz homology $H^L_n (X)$ and with ordinary singular homology. If $X$ satisfies certain cone inequalities all these homology theories coincide. On the other hand, for the Hawaiian Earring the homology of integral currents differs from the singular Lipschitz homology and it differs also from the classical singular homology $H_n(X)$.

  12. Characterization of the complement inhibitory function of rhesus rhadinovirus complement control protein (RCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okroj, Marcin; Mark, Linda; Stokowska, Anna; Wong, Scott W; Rose, Nicola; Blackbourn, David J; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Spiller, O Brad; Blom, Anna M

    2009-01-02

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is currently the closest known, fully sequenced homolog of human Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Both these viruses encode complement inhibitors as follows: Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-complement control protein (KCP) and RRV-complement control protein (RCP). Previously we characterized in detail the functional properties of KCP as a complement inhibitor. Here, we performed comparative analyses for two variants of RCP protein, encoded by RRV strains H26-95 and 17577. Both RCP variants and KCP inhibited human and rhesus complement when tested in hemolytic assays measuring all steps of activation via the classical and the alternative pathway. RCP variants from both RRV strains supported C3b and C4b degradation by factor I and decay acceleration of the classical C3 convertase, similar to KCP. Additionally, the 17577 RCP variant accelerated decay of the alternative C3 convertase, which was not seen for KCP. In contrast to KCP, RCP showed no affinity to heparin and is the first described complement inhibitor in which the binding site for C3b/C4b does not interact with heparin. Molecular modeling shows a structural disruption in the region of RCP that corresponds to the KCP-heparin-binding site. This makes RRV a superior model for future in vivo investigations of complement evasion, as RCP does not play a supportive role in viral attachment as KCP does.

  13. Nitrogen control of photosynthetic protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Plant growth is severely affected by impaired photosynthesis resulting from nitrogen deficiency. The molecular aspects of this effect are being studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas grown in continuous culture systems. Photosynthetic membranes of nitrogen-limited cells are dramatically depleted in chlorophylls, xanthophylls and proteins of the light-harvesting complexes. In contrast, enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and electron transport chain complexes are reduced only 40 to 65% on a per cell basis comparison with nitrogen-sufficient cultures. From analyses of mRNA levels by in vitro translation and hybridization analyses with cloned DNA sequences for photosynthetic proteins, we have found there are rather minor effects of nitrogen deficiency on nuclear or chloroplast gene transcription. Maturation of a transcript of the nuclear-encoded small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase is inhibited in nitrogen-deficient cells and causes accumulation of large amounts of mRNA precursors. Most of the effects of nitrogen deficiency on photosynthetic proteins appear to result from posttranscriptional regulatory processes: light-harvesting protein synthesis may be sustained but their import into chloroplasts or translocation to photosynthetic membranes is impaired. Nitrogen-deficient cells lack violaxanthin, a pigment that is essential for the structure, function and biogenesis of the major antenna complexes. The absence of this pigment may be a causative factor for the deficiency of light harvesting complexes. Finally, the accumulation of massive amounts of starch and triglycerides in nitrogen-limited cells indicate there are some genes whose maximal expression is dependent upon nitrogen-limiting conditions. 10 refs.

  14. Braid Floer homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  15. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Karin [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden); Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Grawé, Jan [Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75185 (Sweden); McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L. [Department of Hematology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Daley, George Q. [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Welsh, Michael, E-mail: michael.welsh@mcb.uu.se [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via

  16. Coiled-coil protein composition of 22 proteomes – differences and common themes in subcellular infrastructure and traffic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Iris

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in diverse organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems and tissues, motors, levers, rotating arms, and possibly springs. Mutations in long coiled-coil proteins have been implemented in a growing number of human diseases. Using the coiled-coil prediction program MultiCoil, we have previously identified all long coiled-coil proteins from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have established a searchable Arabidopsis coiled-coil protein database. Results Here, we have identified all proteins with long coiled-coil domains from 21 additional fully sequenced genomes. Because regions predicted to form coiled-coils interfere with sequence homology determination, we have developed a sequence comparison and clustering strategy based on masking predicted coiled-coil domains. Comparing and grouping all long coiled-coil proteins from 22 genomes, the kingdom-specificity of coiled-coil protein families was determined. At the same time, a number of proteins with unknown function could be grouped with already characterized proteins from other organisms. Conclusion MultiCoil predicts proteins with extended coiled-coil domains (more than 250 amino acids to be largely absent from bacterial genomes, but present in archaea and eukaryotes. The structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins and their relatives are the only long coiled-coil protein family clearly conserved throughout all kingdoms, indicating their ancient nature. Motor proteins, membrane tethering and vesicle transport proteins are the dominant eukaryote-specific long coiled-coil proteins, suggesting that coiled-coil proteins have gained functions in the increasingly complex processes of subcellular infrastructure maintenance and trafficking control of the eukaryotic cell.

  17. A simple recipe for the non-expert bioinformaticist for building experimentally-testable hypotheses for proteins with no known homologs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zawaira, A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of unique ORFs is a strategy for deciphering the biological roles of unique ORFs of interest. For uniform reference, we define unique ORFs as those for which no matching protein is found after PDB...

  18. Ubiquitin in signaling and protein quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Saoudi, Sofie Vincents

    Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification that holds a variety of cellular functions. This Ph.D. thesis is comprised of two studies, of which one focused on ubiquitylation related to inflammatory signaling, and the other on the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system......-terminal methionine (M1), and recently, the deubiquitylating enzyme, OTULIN, was discovered to counter LUBAC activity by exclusively cleaving M1-linked ubiquitin chains. We provide the molecular detail of the interaction between the LUBAC subunit, HOIP, and OTULIN. The interaction was mapped to the PUB-domain of HOIP...

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT009 is a structural and functional homolog to the key morphogenesis component RodZ and interacts with division septal plane localized MreB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Barta, Michael L.; Wickstrum, Jason; Balwalli, Namita; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Hefty, P. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein encoded by ORF CT009 interacts with MreB despite low sequence similarity to RodZ. The studies herein expand on those observations through protein structure, mutagenesis, and cellular localization analyses. Structural analysis indicated that CT009 shares high level of structural similarity to RodZ, revealing the conserved orientation of two residues critical for MreB interaction. Substitutions eliminated MreB protein interaction and partial complementation provided by CT009 in RodZ deficient E. coli. Cellular localization analysis of CT009 showed uniform membrane staining in Chlamydia. This was in contrast to the localization of MreB, which was restricted to predicted septal planes. MreB localization to septal planes provides direct experimental observation for the role of MreB in cell division and supports the hypothesis that it serves as a functional replacement for FtsZ in Chlamydia. PMID:25382739

  20. Association of Piebaldism, multiple café-au-lait macules, and intertriginous freckling: clinical evidence of a common pathway between KIT and sprouty-related, ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Dugan, Stefanie; Basel, Donald; Siegel, Dawn H

    2013-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare genodermatosis caused by KIT mutations. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy who had the white forelock and leukoderma of piebaldism, but the presence of many café-au-lait macules and axillary and inguinal freckling complicated the diagnosis. Patients with similar cutaneous findings have been previously reported, and their disorder has been attributed to an overlap of piebaldism and neurofibromatosis type 1. Legius syndrome is a recently described syndrome caused by Sprouty-related, Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein homology-1 domain containing protein 1 (SPRED1) mutations that also has multiple café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling. Based on our current understanding of KIT and SPRED1 protein interactions, we propose that café-au-lait macules and freckling may be seen in some patients with piebaldism and does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1.

  1. A Toxoplasma gondii protein with homology to intracellular type Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers is important for osmoregulation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francia, Maria E.; Wicher, Sarah [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Life Sciences South Room 142, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Pace, Douglas A. [Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases and Department of Cellular Biology University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Sullivan, Jack [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Life Sciences South Room 142, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Moreno, Silvia N.J. [Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases and Department of Cellular Biology University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Arrizabalaga, Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo@uidaho.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Life Sciences South Room 142, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is exposed to a variety of physiological conditions while propagating in an infected organism. The mechanisms by which Toxoplasma overcomes these dramatic changes in its environment are not known. In yeast and plants, ion detoxification and osmotic regulation are controlled by vacuolar compartments. A novel compartment named the plant-like vacuole or vacuolar compartment (PLV/VAC) has recently been described in T.gondii, which could potentially protect extracellular tachyzoites against salt and other ionic stresses. Here, we report the molecular characterization of the vacuolar type Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in T. gondii, TgNHE3, and its co-localization with the PLV/VAC proton-pyrophosphatase (TgVP1). We have created a TgNHE3 knockout strain, which is more sensitive to hyperosmotic shock and toxic levels of sodium, possesses a higher intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, and exhibits a reduced host invasion efficiency. The defect in invasion correlates with a measurable reduction in the secretion of the adhesin TgMIC2. Overall, our results suggest that the PLV/VAC has functions analogous to those of the vacuolar compartments of plants and yeasts, providing the parasite with a mechanism to resist ionic fluctuations and, potentially, regulate protein trafficking.

  2. A Toxoplasma gondii protein with homology to intracellular type Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers is important for osmoregulation and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Maria E; Wicher, Sarah; Pace, Douglas A; Sullivan, Jack; Moreno, Silvia N J; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2011-06-10

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is exposed to a variety of physiological conditions while propagating in an infected organism. The mechanisms by which Toxoplasma overcomes these dramatic changes in its environment are not known. In yeast and plants, ion detoxification and osmotic regulation are controlled by vacuolar compartments. A novel compartment named the plant-like vacuole or vacuolar compartment (PLV/VAC) has recently been described in T.gondii, which could potentially protect extracellular tachyzoites against salt and other ionic stresses. Here, we report the molecular characterization of the vacuolar type Na(+)/H(+) exchanger in T. gondii, TgNHE3, and its co-localization with the PLV/VAC proton-pyrophosphatase (TgVP1). We have created a TgNHE3 knockout strain, which is more sensitive to hyperosmotic shock and toxic levels of sodium, possesses a higher intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i), and exhibits a reduced host invasion efficiency. The defect in invasion correlates with a measurable reduction in the secretion of the adhesin TgMIC2. Overall, our results suggest that the PLV/VAC has functions analogous to those of the vacuolar compartments of plants and yeasts, providing the parasite with a mechanism to resist ionic fluctuations and, potentially, regulate protein trafficking.

  3. RNA-processing protein TDP-43 regulates FOXO-dependent protein quality control in stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein homeostasis is critical for cell survival and functions during stress and is regulated at both RNA and protein levels. However, how the cell integrates RNA-processing programs with post-translational protein quality control systems is unknown. Transactive response DNA-binding protein (TARDBP/TDP-43 is an RNA-processing protein that is involved in the pathogenesis of major neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Here, we report a conserved role for TDP-43, from C. elegans to mammals, in the regulation of protein clearance via activation of FOXO transcription factors. In response to proteotoxic insults, TDP-43 redistributes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, promoting nuclear translocation of FOXOs and relieving an inhibition of FOXO activity in the nucleus. The interaction between TDP-43 and the FOXO pathway in mammalian cells is mediated by their competitive binding to 14-3-3 proteins. Consistent with FOXO-dependent protein quality control, TDP-43 regulates the levels of misfolded proteins. Therefore, TDP-43 mediates stress responses and couples the regulation of RNA metabolism and protein quality control in a FOXO-dependent manner. The results suggest that compromising the function of TDP-43 in regulating protein homeostasis may contribute to the pathogenesis of related neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. RNA-Processing Protein TDP-43 Regulates FOXO-Dependent Protein Quality Control in Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Baldie, Gerard; Periz, Goran; Wang, Jiou

    2014-01-01

    Protein homeostasis is critical for cell survival and functions during stress and is regulated at both RNA and protein levels. However, how the cell integrates RNA-processing programs with post-translational protein quality control systems is unknown. Transactive response DNA-binding protein (TARDBP/TDP-43) is an RNA-processing protein that is involved in the pathogenesis of major neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we report a conserved role for TDP-43, from C. elegans to mammals, in the regulation of protein clearance via activation of FOXO transcription factors. In response to proteotoxic insults, TDP-43 redistributes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, promoting nuclear translocation of FOXOs and relieving an inhibition of FOXO activity in the nucleus. The interaction between TDP-43 and the FOXO pathway in mammalian cells is mediated by their competitive binding to 14-3-3 proteins. Consistent with FOXO-dependent protein quality control, TDP-43 regulates the levels of misfolded proteins. Therefore, TDP-43 mediates stress responses and couples the regulation of RNA metabolism and protein quality control in a FOXO-dependent manner. The results suggest that compromising the function of TDP-43 in regulating protein homeostasis may contribute to the pathogenesis of related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25329970

  5. Controlled oxidative protein refolding using an ion-exchange column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhof, Marc; Leong, Susanna S J; Pattenden, Leonard K; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2005-04-01

    Column-based refolding of complex and highly disulfide-bonded proteins simplifies protein renaturation at both preparative and process scale by integrating and automating a number of operations commonly used in dilution refolding. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein for refolding and oxido-shuffling on an ion-exchange column to give a refolding yield of 55% after 40 h incubation. Successful on-column refolding was conducted at protein concentrations of up to 10 mg/ml and refolded protein, purified from misfolded forms, was eluted directly from the column at a concentration of 3 mg/ml. This technique integrates the dithiothreitol removal, refolding, concentration and purification steps, achieving a high level of process simplification and automation, and a significant saving in reagent costs when scaled. Importantly, the current result suggests that it is possible to controllably refold disulfide-bonded proteins using common and inexpensive matrices, and that it is not always necessary to control protein-surface interactions using affinity tags and expensive chromatographic matrices. Moreover, it is possible to strictly control the oxidative refolding environment once denatured protein is bound to the ion-exchange column, thus allowing precisely controlled oxido-shuffling.

  6. Controlled Activation of Protein Rotational Dynamics Using Smart Hydrogel Tethering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beech, Brenda M.; Xiong, Yijia; Boschek, Curt B.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-05

    Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications to take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with [13C] and [15N], permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Upon initial formation of hydrogels protein dynamics are suppressed, with concomitant increases in protein stability. Relaxation of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in the activation of protein dynamics and restoration of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain motions necessary for substrate binding.

  7. BRIEF REPORT OF ACTIVE CONTROLLED AND OBSERVABLE PROTEIN CRYSTALLIZATION FACILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ There are two tendency of development on space protein crystal growth facility.Increase the number of samples, for commercial purpose, or observe and control the crystallization process, for study of crystallization process.

  8. Flux control through protein phosphorylation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    describe the development of phosphoproteomics in yeast as well as approaches to analysing the phosphoproteomics data. Finally, we focus on integrated analyses with other omics data sets and genome-scale metabolic models. Despite the advances, future studies improving both experimental technologies......Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms regulating metabolism as it can directly modify metabolic enzymes by the addition of phosphate groups. Attributed to such a rapid and reversible mechanism, cells can adjust metabolism rapidly in response to temporal changes. The yeast...... as well as identify mechanisms underlying human metabolic diseases. Here we collect functional phosphorylation events of 41 enzymes involved in yeast metabolism and demonstrate functional mechanisms and the application of this information in metabolic engineering. From a systems biology perspective, we...

  9. Expression of C/EBP homology protein in patients with severe traumatic brain injury%C/EBP同源蛋白在严重创伤性脑损伤患者中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊学华; 孙晓川; 邓建平; 周昌龙; 周帅

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究C/EBP同源蛋白(C/EBP homology protein,CHOP)在严重创伤性脑损伤(traumatic brain injury,TBI)患者颅脑周围组织中的表达,探讨其与损伤严重程度的关系. 方法 选取41例TBI患者(TBI组)颅脑周围组织,并选取因其他疾病(排除TBI及其他中枢神经系统疾病)死亡的16例尸检标本作为对照组,对照组及TBI组按年龄分为未成年组(≤18岁)、成年组(18 ~59岁)和老年组(>59岁).TBI组患者根据入院时GCS评分再分为重型TBI组(GCS 6 ~8分)和特重型TBI组(GCS 3~5分).比较不同年龄、性别及GCS组间CHOP在TBI周围组织中的表达差异.TUNEL法检测神经细胞凋亡,并对CHOP表达水平与凋亡数量进行相关性分析. 结果 对照组CHOP表达在年龄与性别间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).与对照组比较,TBI组CHOP表达显著上调(P<0.05).在TBI组中,CHOP表达在性别间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),而老年组患者CHOP表达低于成年组和未成年组(P<0.05),特重型TBI组明显高于重型TBI组(P<0.05).TBI组较对照组神经细胞凋亡数量明显增加(P<0.05),且CHOP表达水平与凋亡指数呈正相关(r =0.72,P<0.05). 结论 TBI后CHOP表达水平与损伤严重程度及神经细胞凋亡密切相关,但CHOP诱导的凋亡途径可能不是老年组TBI后继发性脑损害的主要因素.%Objective To investigate the expression of C/EBP homology protein (CHOP) in peripheral brain tissue of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its correlation with the injury severity.Methods The study included peripheral brain tissues of 41 TBI patients (TBI group).Another 16 autopsy specimens succumbed to other diseases (except for TBI or other central nervous system diseases) were selected as controls.The control group and TBI group were subdivided into immaturity group (≤18 years),adult group (18-59 years) and elderly group (>59 years).According to Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on admission,TBI group was

  10. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...

  11. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenstein...

  12. A computational approach to discovering the functions of bacterial phytochromes by analysis of homolog distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Tilman

    2006-03-16

    Phytochromes are photoreceptors, discovered in plants, that control a wide variety of developmental processes. They have also been found in bacteria and fungi, but for many species their biological role remains obscure. This work concentrates on the phytochrome system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a non-photosynthetic soil bacterium with two phytochromes. To identify proteins that might share common functions with phytochromes, a co-distribution analysis was performed on the basis of protein sequences from 138 bacteria. A database of protein sequences from 138 bacteria was generated. Each sequence was BLASTed against the entire database. The homolog distribution of each query protein was then compared with the homolog distribution of every other protein (target protein) of the same species, and the target proteins were sorted according to their probability of co-distribution under random conditions. As query proteins, phytochromes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Deinococcus radiodurans and Synechocystis PCC 6803 were chosen along with several phytochrome-related proteins from A. tumefaciens. The Synechocystis photosynthesis protein D1 was selected as a control. In the D1 analyses, the ratio between photosynthesis-related proteins and those not related to photosynthesis among the top 150 in the co-distribution tables was > 3:1, showing that the method is appropriate for finding partner proteins with common functions. The co-distribution of phytochromes with other histidine kinases was remarkably high, although most co-distributed histidine kinases were not direct BLAST homologs of the query protein. This finding implies that phytochromes and other histidine kinases share common functions as parts of signalling networks. All phytochromes tested, with one exception, also revealed a remarkably high co-distribution with glutamate synthase and methionine synthase. This result implies a general role of bacterial phytochromes in ammonium

  13. Homology modeling and virtual screening studies of FGF-7 protein-a structure-based approach to design new molecules against tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadija, Rajender; Mustyala, Kiran Kumar; Nambigari, Navaneetha; Dulapalli, Ramasree; Dumpati, Rama Krishna; Ramatenki, Vishwanath; Vellanki, Santhi Prada; Vuruputuri, Uma

    2016-07-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) protein is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, which is also known as FGF-7. The FGF-7 plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis. In the present work, FGF-7 is treated as a potential therapeutic target to prevent angiogenesis in cancerous tissue. Computational techniques are applied to evaluate and validate the 3D structure of FGF-7 protein. The active site region of the FGF-7 protein is identified based on hydrophobicity calculations using CASTp and Q-site Finder active site prediction tools. The protein-protein docking study of FGF-7 with its natural receptor FGFR2b is carried out to confirm the active site region in FGF-7. The amino acid residues Asp34, Arg67, Glu116, and Thr194 in FGF-7 interact with the receptor protein (FGFR2b). A grid is generated at the active site region of FGF-7 using Glide module of Schrödinger suite. Subsequently, a virtual screening study is carried out at the active site using small molecular structural databases to identify the ligand molecules. The binding interactions of the ligand molecules, with piperazine moiety as a pharmacophore, are observed at Arg67 and Glu149 residues of the FGF-7 protein. The identified ligand molecules against the FGF-7 protein show permissible pharmacokinetic properties (ADME). The ligand molecules with good docking scores and satisfactory pharmacokinetic properties are prioritized and identified as novel ligands for the FGF-7 protein in cancer therapy.

  14. Transcription regulation by CHD proteins to control plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng eHu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CHD (Chromodomain-Helicase-DNA binding proteins have been characterized in various species as important transcription regulators by their chromatin remodeling activity. However, in plant the function of these proteins has hardly been analyzed before except that Arabidopsis PICKLE and rice CHR729 are identified to play critical roles in the regulation of series of genes involved in developmental or stress responding process. In this review we focus on how plant CHD proteins regulate gene expression and the role of these proteins in controlling plant development and stress response.

  15. Identification and characterization of two temperature-induced surface-associated proteins of Streptococcus suis with high homologies to members of the arginine deiminase system of Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winterhoff, N.; Goethe, R.; Gruening, P.; Rohde, M.; Kalisz, H.; Smith, H.E.; Valentin-Weigand, P.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to identify stress-induced putative virulence proteins of Streptococcus suis. For this, protein expression patterns of streptococci grown at 32, 37, and 42°C were compared by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Temperature shifts from 32 and 37 to 42°C induc

  16. Fragile X mental retardation protein: A paradigm for translational control by RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eileen; Joseph, Simpson

    2015-07-01

    Translational control is a common mechanism used to regulate gene expression and occur in bacteria to mammals. Typically in translational control, an RNA-binding protein binds to a unique sequence in the mRNA to regulate protein synthesis by the ribosomes. Alternatively, a protein may bind to or modify a translation factor to globally regulate protein synthesis by the cell. Here, we review translational control by the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the absence of which causes the neurological disease, fragile X syndrome (FXS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. Monopole Floer homology for rational homology 3-spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Froyshov, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    We give a new construction of monopole Floer homology for $\\text{spin}^c$ rational homology $3$ -spheres. As applications, we define two invariants of certain $4$ -manifolds with $b_1=1$ and $b^+=0$ .

  18. DNA-Pairing and Annealing Processes in Homologous Recombination and Homology-Directed Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of heteroduplex DNA is a central step in the exchange of DNA sequences via homologous recombination, and in the accurate repair of broken chromosomes via homology-directed repair pathways. In cells, heteroduplex DNA largely arises through the activities of recombination proteins that promote DNA-pairing and annealing reactions. Classes of proteins involved in pairing and annealing include RecA-family DNA-pairing proteins, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins, recombination mediator proteins, annealing proteins, and nucleases. This review explores the properties of these pairing and annealing proteins, and highlights their roles in complex recombination processes including the double Holliday junction (DhJ) formation, synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and single-strand annealing pathways—DNA transactions that are critical both for genome stability in individual organisms and for the evolution of species. PMID:25646379

  19. The Interaction Pattern between a Homology Model of 40S Ribosomal S9 Protein of Rhizoctonia solani and 1-Hydroxyphenaize by Docking Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Dharni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-Hydroxyphenazine (1-OH-PHZ, a natural product from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain SD12, was earlier reported to have potent antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. In the present work, the antifungal activity of 1-OH-PHZ on 40S ribosomal S9 protein was validated by molecular docking approach. 1-OH-PHZ showed interaction with two polar contacts with residues, Arg69 and Phe19, which inhibits the synthesis of fungal protein. Our study reveals that 1-OH-PHZ can be a potent inhibitor of 40S ribosomal S9 protein of R. solani that may be a promising approach for the management of fungal diseases.

  20. Controllability of protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networks: Participation of the hub 14-3-3 protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhart, Marina; Flores, Gabriel; Bustos, Diego M

    2016-05-19

    Posttranslational regulation of protein function is an ubiquitous mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Here, we analyzed biological properties of nodes and edges of a human protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based network, especially of those nodes critical for the network controllability. We found that the minimal number of critical nodes needed to control the whole network is 29%, which is considerably lower compared to other real networks. These critical nodes are more regulated by posttranslational modifications and contain more binding domains to these modifications than other kinds of nodes in the network, suggesting an intra-group fast regulation. Also, when we analyzed the edges characteristics that connect critical and non-critical nodes, we found that the former are enriched in domain-to-eukaryotic linear motif interactions, whereas the later are enriched in domain-domain interactions. Our findings suggest a possible structure for protein-protein interaction networks with a densely interconnected and self-regulated central core, composed of critical nodes with a high participation in the controllability of the full network, and less regulated peripheral nodes. Our study offers a deeper understanding of complex network control and bridges the controllability theorems for complex networks and biological protein-protein interaction phosphorylation-based networked systems.

  1. In vitro and in vivo activity of novel small-molecule inhibitors targeting the pleckstrin homology domain of protein kinase B/AKT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Sylvestor A; Ali, M Ahad; Zuohe, Song; Du-Cuny, Lei; Zhou, Li Li; Lemos, Robert; Ihle, Nathan; Skillman, A Geoffrey; Zhang, Shuxing; Mash, Eugene A; Powis, Garth; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J

    2009-06-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in activating survival and antiapoptotic pathways within cancer cells. Several studies have shown that this pathway is constitutively activated in many different cancer types. The goal of this study was to discover novel compounds that bind to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT, thereby inhibiting AKT activation. Using proprietary docking software, 22 potential PH domain inhibitors were identified. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy was used to measure the binding of the compounds to the expressed PH domain of AKT followed by an in vitro activity screen in Panc-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell lines. We identified a novel chemical scaffold in several of the compounds that binds selectively to the PH domain of AKT, inducing a decrease in AKT activation and causing apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. Structural modifications of the scaffold led to compounds with enhanced inhibitory activity in cells. One compound, 4-dodecyl-N-(1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)benzenesulfonamide, inhibited AKT and its downstream targets in cells as well as in pancreatic cancer cell xenografts in immunocompromised mice; it also exhibited good antitumor activity. In summary, a pharmacophore for PH domain inhibitors targeting AKT function was developed. Computer-aided modeling, synthesis, and testing produced novel AKT PH domain inhibitors that exhibit promising preclinical properties.

  2. The structure and refinement of apocrustacyanin C2 to 1.3 A resolution and the search for differences between this protein and the homologous apoproteins A1 and C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash, Jarjis; Helliwell, John R; Raftery, James; Cianci, Michele; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Chayen, Naomi E; Nneji, Gwen A; Zagalsky, Peter F

    2004-03-01

    The blue carotenoprotein alpha-crustacyanin of Homarus gammarus lobster carapace is comprised chemically of five 20 kDa subunits. Only two genes for the proteins have been isolated (J. B. C. Findlay, personal communication) and the five apoproteins fall into two sets of homologous proteins based on their chemical properties (CRTC, consisting of apoproteins C(1), C(2) and A(1), and CRTA, consisting of apoproteins A(2) and A(3)). The diffraction quality of apo C(2) has been improved from 2.2 to 1.3 A and its structure solved. The structure is compared with the A(1) and C(1) proteins determined at 1.4 A [Cianci et al. (2001), Acta Cryst. D57, 1219-1229] and 1.15 A, respectively [Gordon et al. (2001), Acta Cryst. D57, 1230-1237] and found to be very similar. Normalized B-factor difference plots per residue of different types were used to try to find chemically modified residues; none were found at these resolutions. It remains possible that the differences between the CRTC proteins result from differences in amidation. By comparison of a crystal grown with glycerol (studied at 1.6 A) and one grown without glycerol (studied at 1.3 A) it was seen that glycerol bound at the astaxanthin site.

  3. Controlling chitosan-based encapsulation for protein and vaccine delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Kumar, Thallapuranam K.S.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Chitosan-based nano/microencapsulation is under increasing investigation for the delivery of drugs, biologics and vaccines. Despite widespread interest, the literature lacks a defined methodology to control chitosan particle size and drug/protein release kinetics. In this study, the effects of precipitation-coacervation formulation parameters on chitosan particle size, protein encapsulation efficiency and protein release were investigated. Chitosan particle sizes, which ranged from 300 nm to 3 μm, were influenced by chitosan concentration, chitosan molecular weight and addition rate of precipitant salt. The composition of precipitant salt played a significant role in particle formation with upper Hofmeister series salts containing strongly hydrated anions yielding particles with a low polydispersity index (PDI) while weaker anions resulted in aggregated particles with high PDIs. Sonication power had minimal effect on mean particle size, however, it significantly reduced polydispersity. Protein loading efficiencies in chitosan nano/microparticles, which ranged from 14.3% to 99.2%, was inversely related to the hydration strength of precipitant salts, protein molecular weight and directly related to the concentration and molecular weight of chitosan. Protein release rates increased with particle size and were generally inversely related to protein molecular weight. This study demonstrates that chitosan nano/microparticles with high protein loading efficiencies can be engineered with well-defined sizes and controllable release kinetics through manipulation of specific formulation parameters. PMID:24560459

  4. Definition of the tempo of sequence diversity across an alignment and automatic identification of sequence motifs: Application to protein homologous families and superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Alex C W

    2002-12-01

    It is often possible to identify sequence motifs that characterize a protein family in terms of its fold and/or function from aligned protein sequences. Such motifs can be used to search for new family members. Partitioning of sequence alignments into regions of similar amino acid variability is usually done by hand. Here, I present a completely automatic method for this purpose: one that is guaranteed to produce globally optimal solutions at all levels of partition granularity. The method is used to compare the tempo of sequence diversity across reliable three-dimensional (3D) structure-based alignments of 209 protein families (HOMSTRAD) and that for 69 superfamilies (CAMPASS). (The mean alignment length for HOMSTRAD and CAMPASS are very similar.) Surprisingly, the optimal segmentation distributions for the closely related proteins and distantly related ones are found to be very similar. Also, optimal segmentation identifies an unusual protein superfamily. Finally, protein 3D structure c