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Sample records for control mammalian nonmuscle

  1. Subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP through Hsc70.

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    Hideshi Yagi

    Full Text Available The neuronal spine is a small, actin-rich dendritic or somatic protrusion that serves as the postsynaptic compartment of the excitatory synapse. The morphology of the spine reflects the activity of the synapse and is regulated by the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton inside, which is controlled by actin binding proteins such as non-muscle myosin. Previously, we demonstrated that the subcellular localization and function of myosin IIb are regulated by its binding partner, filamin-A interacting protein (FILIP. However, how the subcellular distribution of myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP is not yet known. The objective of this study was to identify potential binding partners of FILIP that contribute to its regulation of non-muscle myosin IIb. Pull-down assays detected a 70-kDa protein that was identified by mass spectrometry to be the chaperone protein Hsc70. The binding of Hsc70 to FILIP was controlled by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase activity of Hsc70. Further, FILIP bound to Hsc70 via a domain that was not required for binding non-muscle myosin IIb. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsc70 impaired the effect of FILIP on the subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb. Further, in primary cultured neurons, an inhibitor of Hsc70 impeded the morphological change in spines induced by FILIP. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with FILIP to mediate its effects on non-muscle myosin IIb and to regulate spine morphology.

  2. Cdc42 and formin activity control non-muscle myosin dynamics during Drosophila heart morphogenesis

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    Vogler, Georg; Liu, Jiandong; Iafe, Timothy W.; Migh, Ede; Mihály, József

    2014-01-01

    During heart formation, a network of transcription factors and signaling pathways guide cardiac cell fate and differentiation, but the genetic mechanisms orchestrating heart assembly and lumen formation remain unclear. Here, we show that the small GTPase Cdc42 is essential for Drosophila melanogaster heart morphogenesis and lumen formation. Cdc42 genetically interacts with the cardiogenic transcription factor tinman; with dDAAM which belongs to the family of actin organizing formins; and with zipper, which encodes nonmuscle myosin II. Zipper is required for heart lumen formation, and its spatiotemporal activity at the prospective luminal surface is controlled by Cdc42. Heart-specific expression of activated Cdc42, or the regulatory formins dDAAM and Diaphanous caused mislocalization of Zipper and induced ectopic heart lumina, as characterized by luminal markers such as the extracellular matrix protein Slit. Placement of Slit at the lumen surface depends on Cdc42 and formin function. Thus, Cdc42 and formins play pivotal roles in heart lumen formation through the spatiotemporal regulation of the actomyosin network. PMID:25267295

  3. Synthetic RNA Controllers for Programming Mammalian Cell Fate and Function

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    2015-11-04

    Final report for “Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function” Principal Investigator: Christina D. Smolke...SUBTITLE Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18   2 Synthetic RNA controllers for programming mammalian cell fate and function Task 1

  4. Intrinsic control of electroresponsive properties of transplanted mammalian brain neurons

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    Hounsgaard, J; Yarom, Y

    1985-01-01

    The present study presents the first analysis of neurons in mammalian brain transplants based on intracellular recording. The results, obtained in brain slices including both donor and host tissue, showed that neuronal precursor cells in embryonic transplants retained their ability to complete th...

  5. Quality by control: Towards model predictive control of mammalian cell culture bioprocesses.

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    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Sissolak, Bernhard; Kandra, Kulwant; von Stosch, Moritz; Mayer, Martin; Striedner, Gerald

    2017-07-01

    The industrial production of complex biopharmaceuticals using recombinant mammalian cell lines is still mainly built on a quality by testing approach, which is represented by fixed process conditions and extensive testing of the end-product. In 2004 the FDA launched the process analytical technology initiative, aiming to guide the industry towards advanced process monitoring and better understanding of how critical process parameters affect the critical quality attributes. Implementation of process analytical technology into the bio-production process enables moving from the quality by testing to a more flexible quality by design approach. The application of advanced sensor systems in combination with mathematical modelling techniques offers enhanced process understanding, allows on-line prediction of critical quality attributes and subsequently real-time product quality control. In this review opportunities and unsolved issues on the road to a successful quality by design and dynamic control implementation are discussed. A major focus is directed on the preconditions for the application of model predictive control for mammalian cell culture bioprocesses. Design of experiments providing information about the process dynamics upon parameter change, dynamic process models, on-line process state predictions and powerful software environments seem to be a prerequisite for quality by control realization. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Epigenetic control of mammalian LINE-1 retrotransposon by retinoblastoma proteins

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    Montoya-Durango, Diego E. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Liu, Yongqing [James Graham Brown Cancer Center and Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Teneng, Ivo; Kalbfleisch, Ted; Lacy, Mary E.; Steffen, Marlene C. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Ramos, Kenneth S., E-mail: kenneth.ramos@louisville.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine Health Sciences Center, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs or L1 elements) are targeted for epigenetic silencing during early embryonic development and remain inactive in most cells and tissues. Here we show that E2F-Rb family complexes participate in L1 elements epigenetic regulation via nucleosomal histone modifications and recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDACs) HDAC1 and HDAC2. Our experiments demonstrated that (i) Rb and E2F interact with human and mouse L1 elements, (ii) L1 elements are deficient in both heterochromatin-associated histone marks H3 tri methyl K9 and H4 tri methyl K20 in Rb family triple knock out (Rb, p107, and p130) fibroblasts (TKO), (iii) L1 promoter exhibits increased histone H3 acetylation in the absence of HDAC1 and HDAC2 recruitment, (iv) L1 expression in TKO fibroblasts is upregulated compared to wild type counterparts, (v) L1 expression increases in the presence of the HDAC inhibitor TSA. On the basis of these findings we propose a model in which L1 sequences throughout the genome serve as centers for heterochromatin formation in an Rb family-dependent manner. As such, Rb proteins and L1 elements may play key roles in heterochromatin formation beyond pericentromeric chromosomal regions. These findings describe a novel mechanism of L1 reactivation in mammalian cells mediated by failure of corepressor protein recruitment by Rb, loss of histone epigenetic marks, heterochromatin formation, and increased histone H3 acetylation.

  7. Active surveillance for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Makito Miyake

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is known to be a heterogeneous malignancy that requires varying treatment modalities and follow-up schedules. Low-grade Ta papillary tumors are categorized as low-risk NMIBC because of their favorable prognosis. There is an expanding movement that overdiagnosis and overtreatment should be avoided considering the economic impact and the patients’ quality of life. It has been over 10 years since the initial assessment of active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC suggested its feasibility and safety. However, urologists are still unfamiliar with this treatment option, which can be ideal in appropriately selected patients. In this review article, we focus on active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC and discuss the evidence and rationale for this treatment option. There are several issues to resolve in order to advocate active surveillance as a standard option in selected patients. A specific follow-up protocol including intervals of cystoscopy, urine cytology, urine markers, and other radiographic examinations need to be optimized and validated. Finally, we integrate the available data into the follow-up strategy and propose a new surveillance protocol for active surveillance of recurrent low-risk bladder cancer.

  8. Antagonistic control of a dual-input mammalian gene switch by food additives.

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    Xie, Mingqi; Ye, Haifeng; Hamri, Ghislaine Charpin-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of mammalian trigger-inducible transgene-control devices that are able to programme complex cellular behaviour. Fruit-based benzoate derivatives licensed as food additives, such as flavours (e.g. vanillate) and preservatives (e.g. benzoate), are a particularly attractive class of trigger compounds for orthogonal mammalian transgene control devices because of their innocuousness, physiological compatibility and simple oral administration. Capitalizing on the genetic componentry of the soil bacterium Comamonas testosteroni, which has evolved to catabolize a variety of aromatic compounds, we have designed different mammalian gene expression systems that could be induced and repressed by the food additives benzoate and vanillate. When implanting designer cells engineered for gene switch-driven expression of the human placental secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) into mice, blood SEAP levels of treated animals directly correlated with a benzoate-enriched drinking programme. Additionally, the benzoate-/vanillate-responsive device was compatible with other transgene control systems and could be assembled into higher-order control networks providing expression dynamics reminiscent of a lap-timing stopwatch. Designer gene switches using licensed food additives as trigger compounds to achieve antagonistic dual-input expression profiles and provide novel control topologies and regulation dynamics may advance future gene- and cell-based therapies. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Control of differentiation in a self-renewing mammalian tissue by the histone demethylase JMJD3

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    Sen, George L.; Webster, Daniel E.; Barragan, Deborah I.; Chang, Howard Y.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    The recent discovery of H3K27me3 demethylases suggests that H3K27me3 may dynamically regulate gene expression, but this potential role in mammalian tissue homeostasis remains uncharacterized. In the epidermis, a tissue that balances stem cell self-renewal with differentiation, H3K27me3, occupies the promoters of many differentiation genes. During calcium-induced differentiation, H3K27me3 was erased at these promoters in concert with loss of PcG protein occupancy and increased binding by the H3K27me3 demethylase, JMJD3. Within epidermal tissue, JMJD3 depletion blocked differentiation, while active JMJD3 dominantly induced it. These results indicate that epigenetic derepression by JMJD3 controls mammalian epidermal differentiation. PMID:18628393

  10. Variant histology: role in management and prognosis of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

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    Porten, Sima P; Willis, Daniel; Kamat, Ashish M

    2014-09-01

    The true clinical significance of variant histology is controversial and diagnosis is challenging, especially in the setting of nonmuscle invasive (NMI) disease. If the presence of variant architecture in NMI identifies a high-risk population with a worse prognosis and better suited for early aggressive intervention (i.e., radical cystectomy), then treatment recommendations should reflect this notion. This review outlines the current evidence and determines whether histologic variants should change management of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk NMI tumors and variant histology should be offered early cystectomy, especially if harboring pure squamous, adenocarcinoma, sarcomatoid, plasmacytoid, or micropapillary disease. In patients with small cell disease, systemic primary chemotherapy is the ideal option followed by local therapy for primary tumor control. For squamous/glandular differentiation, nested variant, and other rare variants, intravesical therapy is an option based on standard risk stratification in patients with NMI disease. Diligence is needed in the presence of variant histology to minimize the risk of understaging as well as close surveillance to not compromise the opportunity of cure. The management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer with variant histology is challenging, largely in part to the high risk of understaging and the background of already existing controversy regarding the management of high-risk NMI disease for standard urothelial cell carcinoma (early cystectomy vs. intravesical therapy). Future studies should be focused identifying if variant architecture confers different tumor biology than that of pure urothelial carcinoma, and if this difference translates into innovations in bladder sparing therapies.

  11. Detection of anabolic androgenic steroid abuse in doping control using mammalian reporter gene bioassays.

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    Houtman, Corine J; Sterk, Saskia S; van de Heijning, Monique P M; Brouwer, Abraham; Stephany, Rainer W; van der Burg, Bart; Sonneveld, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are a class of steroid hormones related to the male hormone testosterone. They are frequently detected as drugs in sport doping control. Being similar to or derived from natural male hormones, AAS share the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) as common mechanism of action. The mammalian androgen responsive reporter gene assay (AR CALUX bioassay), measuring compounds interacting with the AR can be used for the analysis of AAS without the necessity of knowing their chemical structure beforehand, whereas current chemical-analytical approaches may have difficulty in detecting compounds with unknown structures, such as designer steroids. This study demonstrated that AAS prohibited in sports and potential designer AAS can be detected with this AR reporter gene assay, but that also additional steroid activities of AAS could be found using additional mammalian bioassays for other types of steroid hormones. Mixtures of AAS were found to behave additively in the AR reporter gene assay showing that it is possible to use this method for complex mixtures as are found in doping control samples, including mixtures that are a result of multi drug use. To test if mammalian reporter gene assays could be used for the detection of AAS in urine samples, background steroidal activities were measured. AAS-spiked urine samples, mimicking doping positive samples, showed significantly higher androgenic activities than unspiked samples. GC-MS analysis of endogenous androgens and AR reporter gene assay analysis of urine samples showed how a combined chemical-analytical and bioassay approach can be used to identify samples containing AAS. The results indicate that the AR reporter gene assay, in addition to chemical-analytical methods, can be a valuable tool for the analysis of AAS for doping control purposes.

  12. Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis

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    Risager, Malene Bøg

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis. Risager, Malene Bøg; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærsgaard; Ebbensgaard, Nanna Andersen; Zieger, Karsten. Department of Urology, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers, Denmark....... Background: Recurrences after non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) are common and a major burden for health care systems. Fluorescence-guided resection/ photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis can improve recurrence free survival, but the further outcome and cost......-invasive bladder cancer were excluded. 190 consecutive patients, treated between 03-01-2008 and 28-02-2010, were included into the intervention group, while 216 patients, treated between 03-01-2006 and 29-02-2008, served as controls. Procedures and pathology results were registered. The groups were comparable...

  13. How does a specific learning and memory system in the mammalian brain gain control of behavior?

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    McDonald, Robert J; Hong, Nancy S

    2013-11-01

    This review addresses a fundamental, yet poorly understood set of issues in systems neuroscience. The issues revolve around conceptualizations of the organization of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. One intriguing, and somewhat popular, conceptualization is the idea that there are multiple learning and memory systems in the mammalian brain and they interact in different ways to influence and/or control behavior. This approach has generated interesting empirical and theoretical work supporting this view. One issue that needs to be addressed is how these systems influence or gain control of voluntary behavior. To address this issue, we clearly specify what we mean by a learning and memory system. We then review two types of processes that might influence which memory system gains control of behavior. One set of processes are external factors that can affect which system controls behavior in a given situation including task parameters like the kind of information available to the subject, types of training experience, and amount of training. The second set of processes are brain mechanisms that might influence what memory system controls behavior in a given situation including executive functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex; switching mechanisms mediated by ascending neurotransmitter systems, the unique role of the hippocampus during learning. The issue of trait differences in control of different learning and memory systems will also be considered in which trait differences in learning and memory function are thought to potentially emerge from differences in level of prefrontal influence, differences in plasticity processes, differences in ascending neurotransmitter control, differential access to effector systems like motivational and motor systems. Finally, we present scenarios in which different mechanisms might interact. This review was conceived to become a jumping off point for new work directed at understanding these issues. The outcome of

  14. Flexible, AAV-equipped Genetic Modules for Inducible Control of Gene Expression in Mammalian Brain

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    Godwin K Dogbevia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling gene expression in mammalian brain is of utmost importance to causally link the role of gene function to cell circuit dynamics under normal conditions and disease states. We have developed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches for inducible and reversible control of gene expression in a cell type specific and brain subregion selective manner. Here, we characterize a two-virus approach to efficiently and reliably switch gene expression on and off, repetitively, both in vitro and in vivo. Our recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-Tet approach is highly flexible and it has great potential for application in basic and biomedical neuroscience research and gene therapy.

  15. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible....

  16. Tuning the Density of Poly(ethylene glycol Chains to Control Mammalian Cell and Bacterial Attachment

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    Ahmed Al-Ani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of biomaterials with polymer chains has attracted great attention because of their ability to control biointerfacial interactions such as protein adsorption, cell attachment and bacterial biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to control the immobilisation of biomolecules on silicon wafers using poly(ethylene glycol(PEG chains by a “grafting to” technique. In particular, to control the polymer chain graft density in order to capture proteins and preserve their activity in cell culture as well as find the optimal density that would totally prevent bacterial attachment. The PEG graft density was varied by changing the polymer solubility using an increasing salt concentration. The silicon substrates were initially modified with aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES, where the surface density of amine groups was optimised using different concentrations. The results showed under specific conditions, the PEG density was highest with grafting under “cloud point” conditions. The modified surfaces were characterised with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM and water contact angle measurements. In addition, all modified surfaces were tested with protein solutions and in cell (mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteoblast-like cells and bacterial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa attachment assays. Overall, the lowest protein adsorption was observed on the highest polymer graft density, bacterial adhesion was very low on all modified surfaces, and it can be seen that the attachment of mammalian cells gradually increased as the PEG grafting density decreased, reaching the maximum attachment at medium PEG densities. The results demonstrate that, at certain PEG surface coverages, mammalian cell attachment can be tuned with the potential to optimise their behaviour with controlled serum protein adsorption.

  17. Disentangling puberty: novel neuroendocrine pathways and mechanisms for the control of mammalian puberty.

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    Avendaño, M S; Vazquez, M J; Tena-Sempere, M

    2017-11-01

    Puberty is a complex developmental event, controlled by sophisticated regulatory networks that integrate peripheral and internal cues and impinge at the brain centers driving the reproductive axis. The tempo of puberty is genetically determined but is also sensitive to numerous modifiers, from metabolic and sex steroid signals to environmental factors. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that the onset of puberty is advancing in humans, through as yet unknown mechanisms. In fact, while much knowledge has been gleaned recently on the mechanisms responsible for the control of mammalian puberty, fundamental questions regarding the intimate molecular and neuroendocrine pathways responsible for the precise timing of puberty and its deviations remain unsolved. By combining data from suitable model species and humans, we aim to provide a comprehensive summary of our current understanding of the neuroendocrine mechanisms governing puberty, with particular focus on its central regulatory pathways, underlying molecular basis and mechanisms for metabolic control. A comprehensive MEDLINE search of articles published mostly from 2003 to 2017 has been carried out. Data from cellular and animal models (including our own results) as well as clinical studies focusing on the pathophysiology of puberty in mammals were considered and cross-referenced with terms related with central neuroendocrine mechanisms, metabolic control and epigenetic/miRNA regulation. Studies conducted during the last decade have revealed the essential role of novel central neuroendocrine pathways in the control of puberty, with a prominent role of kisspeptins in the precise regulation of the pubertal activation of GnRH neurosecretory activity. In addition, different transmitters, including neurokinin-B (NKB) and, possibly, melanocortins, have been shown to interplay with kisspeptins in tuning puberty onset. Alike, recent studies have documented the role of epigenetic mechanisms, involving mainly

  18. Post-transcriptional control of the mammalian circadian clock: implications for health and disease.

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    Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-06-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior display rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 h. Rhythmic changes are controlled by an endogenous time keeper, the circadian clock, and include sleep-wake cycles, physical and mental performance capability, blood pressure, and body temperature. Consequently, many diseases, such as metabolic, sleep, autoimmune and mental disorders and cancer, are connected to the circadian rhythm. The development of therapies that take circadian biology into account is thus a promising strategy to improve treatments of diverse disorders, ranging from allergic syndromes to cancer. Circadian alteration of body functions and behavior are, at the molecular level, controlled and mediated by widespread changes in gene expression that happen in anticipation of predictably changing requirements during the day. At the core of the molecular clockwork is a well-studied transcription-translation negative feedback loop. However, evidence is emerging that additional post-transcriptional, RNA-based mechanisms are required to maintain proper clock function. Here, we will discuss recent work implicating regulated mRNA stability, translation and alternative splicing in the control of the mammalian circadian clock, and its role in health and disease.

  19. Animal Models for Investigating the Central Control of the Mammalian Diving Response

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    McCulloch, Paul Frederick

    2012-01-01

    Pioneering studies by Per Scholander indicated that the diving response consists of reflexly induced apnea, bradycardia and an alteration of blood flow that maintains perfusion of the heart and brain. More recently field physiological studies have shown that many marine animals can adjust cardiorespiratory aspects of their diving response depending upon the behavioral situation. This could suggest that the very labile heart rate during diving is under direct cortical control. However, the final control of autonomic nervous system functioning resides within the brainstem and not the cortex. Many physiologists regard the brain as a “black box” where important neuronal functioning occurs, but the complexity of such functioning leaves systematic investigation a daunting task. As a consequence the central control of the diving response has been under-investigated. Thus, to further advance the field of diving physiology by understanding its central neuronal control, it would be first necessary to understand the reflex circuitry that exists within the brainstem of diving animals. To do this will require an appropriate animal model. In this review, two animals, the muskrat and rat, will be offered as animal models to investigate the central aspects of the diving response. Firstly, although these rodents are not marine animals, natural histories indicate that both animals can and do exploit aquatic environments. Secondly, physiological recordings during natural and simulated diving indicate that both animals possess the same basic physiological responses to underwater submersion that occur in marine animals. Thirdly, the size and ease of housing of both animals makes them attractive laboratory research animals. Finally, the enormous amount of scientific literature regarding rodent brainstem autonomic control mechanisms, and the availability of brain atlases, makes these animals ideal choices to study the central control of the mammalian diving response. PMID:22661956

  20. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

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    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  1. Emerging intravesical therapies for management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Jeffrey J Tomaszewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Tomaszewski, Marc C SmaldoneDepartment of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the second most common urologic malignancy, and 70% of patients present with superficial or nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the most effective agent for preventing disease recurrence, and the only therapy able to inhibit disease progression. However, recurrence rates as high as 30% and significant local and systemic toxicity have led to increased interest in alternative intravesical therapies. In patients refractory or intolerant to BCG, BCG-interferon α2b, gemcitabine, and anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, valrubicin have demonstrated durable clinical responses. Phase I trials investigating alternative cytotoxic agents, such as apaziquone, taxanes (docetaxel, paclitaxel, and suramin are reporting promising data. Novel immunomodulating agents have demonstrated promise as efficacious alternatives in patients refractory to BCG. Optimization of existing chemotherapeutic regimens using hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, magnetically-targeted carriers, and liposomes remains an area of active investigation. Despite enthusiasm for new intravesical agents, radical cystectomy remains the treatment of choice for patients with NMIBC who have failed intravesical therapy and selected patients with naïve T1 tumors and aggressive features. This report provides a comprehensive review of contemporary intravesical therapy for NMIBC and refractory NMIBC, with an emphasis on emerging agents and novel treatment modalities.Keywords: transitional cell carcinoma, nonmuscle, invasive, intravesical therapy, BCG

  2. Seasonal Control of Mammalian Energy Balance: Recent Advances in the Understanding of Daily Torpor and Hibernation.

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    Jastroch, M; Giroud, S; Barrett, P; Geiser, F; Heldmaier, G; Herwig, A

    2016-11-01

    Endothermic mammals and birds require intensive energy turnover to sustain high body temperatures and metabolic rates. To cope with the energetic bottlenecks associated with the change of seasons, and to minimise energy expenditure, complex mechanisms and strategies are used, such as daily torpor and hibernation. During torpor, metabolic depression and low body temperatures save energy. However, these bouts of torpor, lasting for hours to weeks, are interrupted by active 'euthermic' phases with high body temperatures. These dynamic transitions require precise communication between the brain and peripheral tissues to defend rheostasis in energetics, body mass and body temperature. The hypothalamus appears to be the major control centre in the brain, coordinating energy metabolism and body temperature. The sympathetic nervous system controls body temperature by adjustments of shivering and nonshivering thermogenesis, with the latter being primarily executed by brown adipose tissue. Over the last decade, comparative physiologists have put forward integrative studies on the ecophysiology, biochemistry and molecular regulation of energy balance in response to seasonal challenges, food availability and ambient temperature. Mammals coping with such environments comprise excellent model organisms for studying the dynamic regulation of energy metabolism. Beyond the understanding of how animals survive in nature, these studies also uncover general mechanisms of mammalian energy homeostasis. This research will benefit efforts of translational medicine aiming to combat emerging human metabolic disorders. The present review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of energy balance and its neuronal and endocrine control during the most extreme metabolic fluctuations in nature: daily torpor and hibernation. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  3. Genetic selection for modulators of the MAP kinase and beta-catenin growth-control pathways in mammalian cells.

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    Wheatley, William; Yoo, Sanghee; Pierce, Michael; Rebentisch, Matthew; Endo, Mark; Peterson, Isaac; Stump, Mark; McCormack, Ken; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Kamb, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    Transdominant genetic selections can yield protein fragment and peptide modulators of specific biochemical pathways. In yeast, such screens have been highly successful in targeting the MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase growth-control pathway. We performed a similar type of selection aimed at recovery of modulators of the mammalian MAP kinase cascade. Two pathway activators were identified, fragments of the TrkB and Raf-1 kinases. In a second selection directed at the beta-catenin growth-control pathway, three different clones encoding cadherin fragments were recovered. In neither selection were peptide inhibitors observed. We conclude that some transdominant selections in mammalian cells can readily yield high-penetrance protein fragments, but may be less amenable to isolation of peptide inhibitors.

  4. The parental non-equivalence of imprinting control regions during mammalian development and evolution.

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    Reiner Schulz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, imprinted gene expression results from the sex-specific methylation of imprinted control regions (ICRs in the parental germlines. Imprinting is linked to therian reproduction, that is, the placenta and imprinting emerged at roughly the same time and potentially co-evolved. We assessed the transcriptome-wide and ontology effect of maternally versus paternally methylated ICRs at the developmental stage of setting of the chorioallantoic placenta in the mouse (8.5dpc, using two models of imprinting deficiency including completely imprint-free embryos. Paternal and maternal imprints have a similar quantitative impact on the embryonic transcriptome. However, transcriptional effects of maternal ICRs are qualitatively focused on the fetal-maternal interface, while paternal ICRs weakly affect non-convergent biological processes, with little consequence for viability at 8.5dpc. Moreover, genes regulated by maternal ICRs indirectly influence genes regulated by paternal ICRs, while the reverse is not observed. The functional dominance of maternal imprints over early embryonic development is potentially linked to selection pressures favoring methylation-dependent control of maternal over paternal ICRs. We previously hypothesized that the different methylation histories of ICRs in the maternal versus the paternal germlines may have put paternal ICRs under higher mutational pressure to lose CpGs by deamination. Using comparative genomics of 17 extant mammalian species, we show here that, while ICRs in general have been constrained to maintain more CpGs than non-imprinted sequences, the rate of CpG loss at paternal ICRs has indeed been higher than at maternal ICRs during evolution. In fact, maternal ICRs, which have the characteristics of CpG-rich promoters, have gained CpGs compared to non-imprinted CpG-rich promoters. Thus, the numerical and, during early embryonic development, functional dominance of maternal ICRs can be explained as the

  5. Mammalian chromosomes contain cis-acting elements that control replication timing, mitotic condensation, and stability of entire chromosomes.

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    Thayer, Mathew J

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that mammalian chromosomes contain discrete cis-acting loci that control replication timing, mitotic condensation, and stability of entire chromosomes. Disruption of the large non-coding RNA gene ASAR6 results in late replication, an under-condensed appearance during mitosis, and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Similarly, disruption of the mouse Xist gene in adult somatic cells results in a late replication and instability phenotype on the X chromosome. ASAR6 shares many characteristics with Xist, including random mono-allelic expression and asynchronous replication timing. Additional "chromosome engineering" studies indicate that certain chromosome rearrangements affecting many different chromosomes display this abnormal replication and instability phenotype. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain "inactivation/stability centers" that control proper replication, condensation, and stability of individual chromosomes. Therefore, mammalian chromosomes contain four types of cis-acting elements, origins, telomeres, centromeres, and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to ensure proper replication, condensation, segregation, and stability of individual chromosomes. Copyright © 2012 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  7. Comparative analysis of the molecular mechanisms controlling the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in yeast and in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Elena; Hasan, Md Mehedi; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes DNA replication takes place in the S phase of the cell cycle. It initiates from hundreds to thousands of replication origins in a coordinated manner, in order to efficiently duplicate the genome. The sequence of events leading to the onset of DNA replication is conventionally divided in two interdependent processes: licensing-a process during which replication origins acquire replication competence but are kept inactive- and firing-a process during which licensed origins are activated but not re-licensed. In this review we investigate the evolutionary conservation of the molecular machinery orchestrating DNA replication initiation both in yeast and in mammalian cells, highlighting a remarkable conservation of the general architecture of this central biological mechanism. Many steps are conserved down to molecular details and are performed by orthologous proteins with high sequence conservation, while differences in molecular structure of the performing proteins and their interactions are apparent in other steps. Tight regulation of initiation of DNA replication is achieved through protein phosphorylation, exerted mostly by Cyclin-dependent kinases in order to ensure that each chromosome is fully replicated once, and only once, during each cycle, and to avoid the formation of aberrant DNA structures and incorrect chromosomal duplication, that in mammalian cells are a prerequisite for genome instability and tumorigenesis. We then consider a molecular mathematical model of DNA replication, recently proposed by our group in a collaborative project, as a frame of reference to discuss similarities and differences observed in the regulatory program controlling DNA replication initiation in yeast and in mammalian cells and discuss whether they may be dependent upon different functional constraints. We conclude that a systems biology approach, integrating molecular analysis with modeling and computational investigations, is the best choice to investigate the

  8. Cilia-mediated Hedgehog signaling controls form and function in the mammalian larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabler, Jacqueline M; Rigney, Maggie M; Berman, Gordon J; Gopalakrishnan, Swetha; Heude, Eglantine; Al-Lami, Hadeel Adel; Yannakoudakis, Basil Z; Fitch, Rebecca D; Carter, Christopher; Vokes, Steven; Liu, Karen J; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Egnor, Se Roian; Wallingford, John B

    2017-02-13

    Acoustic communication is fundamental to social interactions among animals, including humans. In fact, deficits in voice impair the quality of life for a large and diverse population of patients. Understanding the molecular genetic mechanisms of development and function in the vocal apparatus is thus an important challenge with relevance both to the basic biology of animal communication and to biomedicine. However, surprisingly little is known about the developmental biology of the mammalian larynx. Here, we used genetic fate mapping to chart the embryological origins of the tissues in the mouse larynx, and we describe the developmental etiology of laryngeal defects in mice with disruptions in cilia-mediated Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we show that mild laryngeal defects correlate with changes in the acoustic structure of vocalizations. Together, these data provide key new insights into the molecular genetics of form and function in the mammalian vocal apparatus.

  9. Temporal Control of Mammalian Cortical Neurogenesis by m6A Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ki-Jun; Ringeling, Francisca Rojas; Vissers, Caroline; Jacob, Fadi; Pokrass, Michael; Jimenez-Cyrus, Dennisse; Su, Yijing; Kim, Nam-Shik; Zhu, Yunhua; Zheng, Lily; Kim, Sunghan; Wang, Xinyuan; Doré, Louis C; Jin, Peng; Regot, Sergi; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Canzar, Stefan; He, Chuan; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2017-11-02

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A), installed by the Mettl3/Mettl14 methyltransferase complex, is the most prevalent internal mRNA modification. Whether m6A regulates mammalian brain development is unknown. Here, we show that m6A depletion by Mettl14 knockout in embryonic mouse brains prolongs the cell cycle of radial glia cells and extends cortical neurogenesis into postnatal stages. m6A depletion by Mettl3 knockdown also leads to a prolonged cell cycle and maintenance of radial glia cells. m6A sequencing of embryonic mouse cortex reveals enrichment of mRNAs related to transcription factors, neurogenesis, the cell cycle, and neuronal differentiation, and m6A tagging promotes their decay. Further analysis uncovers previously unappreciated transcriptional prepatterning in cortical neural stem cells. m6A signaling also regulates human cortical neurogenesis in forebrain organoids. Comparison of m6A-mRNA landscapes between mouse and human cortical neurogenesis reveals enrichment of human-specific m6A tagging of transcripts related to brain-disorder risk genes. Our study identifies an epitranscriptomic mechanism in heightened transcriptional coordination during mammalian cortical neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear entry of the circadian regulator mPER1 is controlled by mammalian casein kinase I epsilon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielhaber, E; Eide, E; Rivers, A; Gao, Z H; Virshup, D M

    2000-07-01

    The molecular oscillator that keeps circadian time is generated by a negative feedback loop. Nuclear entry of circadian regulatory proteins that inhibit transcription from E-box-containing promoters appears to be a critical component of this loop in both Drosophila and mammals. The Drosophila double-time gene product, a casein kinase I epsilon (CKIepsilon) homolog, has been reported to interact with dPER and regulate circadian cycle length. We find that mammalian CKIepsilon binds to and phosphorylates the murine circadian regulator mPER1. Unlike both dPER and mPER2, mPER1 expressed alone in HEK 293 cells is predominantly a nuclear protein. Two distinct mechanisms appear to retard mPER1 nuclear entry. First, coexpression of mPER2 leads to mPER1-mPER2 heterodimer formation and cytoplasmic colocalization. Second, coexpression of CKIepsilon leads to masking of the mPER1 nuclear localization signal and phosphorylation-dependent cytoplasmic retention of both proteins. CKIepsilon may regulate mammalian circadian rhythm by controlling the rate at which mPER1 enters the nucleus.

  11. ZNF598 and RACK1 Regulate Mammalian Ribosome-Associated Quality Control Function by Mediating Regulatory 40S Ribosomal Ubiquitylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Elayanambi; Leonard, Marilyn; Mak, Raymond; Liao, Jeffrey; Fulzele, Amitkumar; Bennett, Eric J

    2017-02-16

    Ribosomes that experience terminal stalls during translation are resolved by ribosome-associated quality control (QC) pathways that oversee mRNA and nascent chain destruction and recycle ribosomal subunits. The proximal factors that sense stalled ribosomes and initiate mammalian ribosome-associated QC events remain undefined. We demonstrate that the ZNF598 ubiquitin ligase and the 40S ribosomal protein RACK1 help to resolve poly(A)-induced stalled ribosomes. They accomplish this by regulating distinct and overlapping regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation events. ZNF598 primarily mediates regulatory ubiquitylation of RPS10 and RPS20, whereas RACK1 regulates RPS2, RPS3, and RPS20 ubiquitylation. Gain or loss of ZNF598 function or mutations that block RPS10 or RPS20 ubiquitylation result in defective resolution of stalled ribosomes and subsequent readthrough of poly(A)-containing stall sequences. Together, our results indicate that ZNF598, RACK1, and 40S regulatory ubiquitylation plays a pivotal role in mammalian ribosome-associated QC pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Obscurins: Goliaths and Davids take over non-muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Shriver, Marey; Perry, Nicole A; Hu, Li-Yen R; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Obscurins comprise a family of proteins originally identified in striated muscles, where they play essential roles in myofibrillogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and Ca(2+) homeostasis. They are encoded by the single OBSCN gene, and are composed of tandem adhesion domains and signaling motifs. To date, two giant obscurin isoforms have been described in detail that differ only at the extreme COOH-terminus; while obscurin-A (∼720 kDa) contains a non-modular COOH-terminus that harbors binding sites for the adaptor proteins ankyrins, obscurin-B (∼870 kDa) contains two COOH-terminal serine-threonine kinase domains preceded by adhesion motifs. Besides the two known giant obscurins, a thorough search of transcript databases suggests that complex alternative splicing of the obscurin transcript results in the generation of additional giant as well as small isoforms with molecular masses ranging between ∼50-970 kDa. These novel isoforms share common domains with the characterized isoforms, but also contain unique regions. Using a panel of highly specific antibodies directed against epitopes spanning the entire length of giant obscurins, we employed western blotting and immunohistochemistry to perform a systematic and comprehensive characterization of the expression profile of obscurins in muscle and non-muscle tissues. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that obscurins are not restricted to striated muscles, but are abundantly expressed in several tissues and organs including brain, skin, kidney, liver, spleen, and lung. While some obscurin isoforms are ubiquitously expressed, others are preferentially present in specific tissues and organs. Moreover, obscurins are present in select structures and cell types where they assume nuclear, cytosolic, and membrane distributions. Given the ubiquitous expression of some obscurins, along with the preferential expression of others, it becomes apparent that obscurins may play common and unique roles, respectively, in

  13. Clinical significance of serum and urinary HER2/neu protein levels in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Arikan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to compare serum and urinary HER2/neu levels between healthy control group and patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Additionally, we evaluated relationship of HER2/neu levels with tumor stage, grade, recurrence and progression. Materials and Methods: Fourty-four patients with primary non-muscle invasive bladder tumors (Group 2 and 40 healthy control group (Group 1 were included the study. Blood and urinary samples were collected from all patients and HER2/neu levels were measured by ELISA method. Blood and urinary HER2/neu levels and additionally, ratio of urinary HER2/neu levels to urinary creatinine levels were recorded. Demographic data and tumor characteristics were recorded. Results: Mean serum HER2/neu levels were similar between two groups and statistically significant difference wasn't observed. Urinary HER2/neu levels were significantly higher in group 2 than group 1. Ratio of urinary HER2/neu to urinary creatinine was significantly higher in group 2 than group 1, (p=0,021. Serum and urinary HER2/ neu levels were not associated with tumor stage, grade, recurrence and progression while ratio of urinary HER2/neu to urinary creatinin levels were significantly higher in high-grade tumors. HER2/neu, the sensitivity of the test was found to be 20.5%, and the specificity was 97.5%, also for the urinary HER2/neu/urinary creatinine ratio, the sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 31.8% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Urinary HER2/neu and ratio of urinary creatinine urine were significantly higher in patients with bladder cancer compared to healthy subjects. Large series and controlled studies are needed for use as a tumor marker.

  14. Fez family transcription factors: control of neurogenesis and cell fate in the developing mammalian nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckler, Matthew J.; Chen, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Fezf1 and Fezf2 are highly conserved transcription factors that were first identified by their specific expression in the anterior neuroepithelium of Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. These proteins share an N-terminal domain with homology to the canonical engrailed repressor motif and a C-terminal DNA binding domain containing six C2H2 zinc-finger repeats. Over a decade of study indicates that the Fez proteins play critical roles during nervous system development in species as diverse as fruit flies and mice. Herein we discuss recent progress in understanding the functions of Fezf1 and Fezf2 in neurogenesis and cell fate specification during mammalian nervous system development. Going forward we believe that efforts should focus on understanding how expression of these factors is precisely regulated, and on identifying target DNA sequences and interacting partners. Such knowledge may reveal the mechanisms by which Fezf1 and Fezf2 accomplish both independent and redundant functions across diverse tissue and cell types. PMID:24913420

  15. Fez family transcription factors: controlling neurogenesis and cell fate in the developing mammalian nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckler, Matthew J; Chen, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Fezf1 and Fezf2 are highly conserved transcription factors that were first identified by their specific expression in the anterior neuroepithelium of Xenopus and zebrafish embryos. These proteins share an N-terminal domain with homology to the canonical engrailed repressor motif and a C-terminal DNA binding domain containing six C2H2 zinc-finger repeats. Over a decade of study indicates that the Fez proteins play critical roles during nervous system development in species as diverse as fruit flies and mice. Herein we discuss recent progress in understanding the functions of Fezf1 and Fezf2 in neurogenesis and cell fate specification during mammalian nervous system development. Going forward we believe that efforts should focus on understanding how expression of these factors is precisely regulated, and on identifying target DNA sequences and interacting partners. Such knowledge may reveal the mechanisms by which Fezf1 and Fezf2 accomplish both independent and redundant functions across diverse tissue and cell types. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. NRK1 controls nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside metabolism in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, Joanna; Joffraud, Magali; Trammell, Samuel A J; Ras, Rosa; Canela, Núria; Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Rodrigues, Marcelo; Redpath, Philip; Migaud, Marie E; Auwerx, Johan; Yanes, Oscar; Brenner, Charles; Cantó, Carles

    2016-10-11

    NAD + is a vital redox cofactor and a substrate required for activity of various enzyme families, including sirtuins and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. Supplementation with NAD + precursors, such as nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) or nicotinamide riboside (NR), protects against metabolic disease, neurodegenerative disorders and age-related physiological decline in mammals. Here we show that nicotinamide riboside kinase 1 (NRK1) is necessary and rate-limiting for the use of exogenous NR and NMN for NAD + synthesis. Using genetic gain- and loss-of-function models, we further demonstrate that the role of NRK1 in driving NAD + synthesis from other NAD + precursors, such as nicotinamide or nicotinic acid, is dispensable. Using stable isotope-labelled compounds, we confirm NMN is metabolized extracellularly to NR that is then taken up by the cell and converted into NAD + . Our results indicate that mammalian cells require conversion of extracellular NMN to NR for cellular uptake and NAD + synthesis, explaining the overlapping metabolic effects observed with the two compounds.

  17. m6A RNA modification controls cell fate transition in mammalian embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Pedro J; Molinie, Benoit; Wang, Jinkai; Qu, Kun; Zhang, Jiajing; Li, Lingjie; Bouley, Donna M; Lujan, Ernesto; Haddad, Bahareh; Daneshvar, Kaveh; Carter, Ava C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhou, Chan; Lim, Kok-Seong; Dedon, Peter; Wernig, Marius; Mullen, Alan C; Xing, Yi; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) is the most abundant modification on messenger RNAs and is linked to human diseases, but its functions in mammalian development are poorly understood. Here we reveal the evolutionary conservation and function of m6A by mapping the m6A methylome in mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Thousands of messenger and long noncoding RNAs show conserved m6A modification, including transcripts encoding core pluripotency transcription factors. m6A is enriched over 3′ untranslated regions at defined sequence motifs, and marks unstable transcripts, including transcripts turned over upon differentiation. Genetic inactivation or depletion of mouse and human Mettl3, one of the m6A methylases, led to m6A erasure on select target genes, prolonged Nanog expression upon differentiation, and impaired ESC’s exit from self-renewal towards differentiation into several lineages in vitro and in vivo. Thus, m6A is a mark of transcriptome flexibility required for stem cells to differentiate to specific lineages. PMID:25456834

  18. Low prevalence of HPV detection and genotyping in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using single-step PCR followed by reverse line blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Borena, Wegene; Schäfer, Georg; Manzl, Claudia; Culig, Zoran; List, Sebastian; Neururer, Sabrina; Von Laer, Dorothee; Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Horninger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Hannes; Brunner, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    To clarify the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, HPV-DNA was scrutinized in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bladder cancer tissue using single-step PCR (HPV L1) for HPV detection, followed by reverse line blot (RLB) for genotyping. A total of 186 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder due to primary, non-muscle invasive bladder cancer from 2006 to 2009 were reviewed. A positive control group of 22 cervical tissues with cervical carcinoma was included. Histology confirmed urothelial carcinoma in all patients: primary CIS, pTa, pT1 and pTa + pT1 in 14 (7.5 %), 134 (72 %), 36 (19.4 %) and two (1.1 %) patients, respectively. A total of 119 (63.9 %) of them were classified as low-risk, while 67 (36.1 %) were high-risk cancers. Tumor recurrence and progression (≥pT2) were seen in 79 and 11 patients (mean follow-up 45 months). The presence of HPV-DNA by single-step PCR was detected in four (2.2 %) patients. HPV 16 and HPV 6 were positive in two (1.1 %) and one (0.6 %) patient, respectively In one case, no HPV genotype listed on the RLB assay could be identified. In the control group, the HPV infection rate was 100 %: HPV 16 in 12 (54.6 %) patients, HPV 16/18 in four (18.3 %) patients, HPV 18 in two (9.1 %) patients, HPV 16/45 in one patient (4.5 %), HPV 18/33 in one (4.5 %) patient, HPV 16/33 in one (4.5 %) patient and HPV 33 in one (4.5 %) patient. Our study demonstrates low prevalence of HPV infection in FFPE bladder cancer tissue, arguing against the etiological role of HPV in non-muscle urothelial carcinogenesis.

  19. Defining and treating the spectrum of intermediate risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Bohle, A.; Colombel, M.; Palou, J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Low, intermediate and high risk categories have been defined to help guide the treatment of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (Ta, T1, CIS). However, while low and high risk disease has been well classified, the intermediate risk category has traditionally comprised a

  20. Defining progression in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: it is time for a new, standard definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Witjes, J.A.; Palou, J.; Bohle, A.; Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Soloway, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite being one of the most important clinical outcomes in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, there is currently no standard definition of disease progression. Major clinical trials and meta-analyses have used varying definitions or have failed to define this end point altogether. A

  1. A dual small-molecule rheostat for precise control of protein concentration in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu Hsuan; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-04-14

    One of the most successful strategies for controlling protein concentrations in living cells relies on protein destabilization domains (DD). Under normal conditions, a DD will be rapidly degraded by the proteasome. However, the same DD can be stabilized or "shielded" in a stoichiometric complex with a small molecule, enabling dose-dependent control of its concentration. This process has been exploited by several labs to post-translationally control the expression levels of proteins in vitro as well as in vivo, although the previous technologies resulted in permanent fusion of the protein of interest to the DD, which can affect biological activity and complicate results. We previously reported a complementary strategy, termed traceless shielding (TShld), in which the protein of interest is released in its native form. Here, we describe an optimized protein concentration control system, TTShld, which retains the traceless features of TShld but utilizes two tiers of small molecule control to set protein concentrations in living cells. These experiments provide the first protein concentration control system that results in both a wide range of protein concentrations and proteins free from engineered fusion constructs. The TTShld system has a greatly improved dynamic range compared to our previously reported system, and the traceless feature is attractive for elucidation of the consequences of protein concentration in cell biology. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Control of respiration and ATP synthesis in mammalian mitochondria and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C

    1992-05-15

    We have seen that there is no simple answer to the question 'what controls respiration?' The answer varies with (a) the size of the system examined (mitochondria, cell or organ), (b) the conditions (rate of ATP use, level of hormonal stimulation), and (c) the particular organ examined. Of the various theories of control of respiration outlined in the introduction the ideas of Chance & Williams (1955, 1956) give the basic mechanism of how respiration is regulated. Increased ATP usage can cause increased respiration and ATP synthesis by mass action in all the main tissues. Superimposed on this basic mechanism is calcium control of matrix dehydrogenases (at least in heart and liver), and possibly also of the respiratory chain (at least in liver) and ATP synthase (at least in heart). In many tissues calcium also stimulates ATP usage directly; thus calcium may stimulate energy metabolism at (at least) four possible sites, the importance of each regulation varying with tissue. Regulation of multiple sites may occur (from a teleological point of view) because: (a) energy metabolism is branched and thus proportionate regulation of branches is required in order to maintain constant fluxes to branches (e.g. to proton leak or different ATP uses); and/or (b) control over fluxes is shared by a number of reactions, so that large increases in flux requires stimulation at multiple sites because each site has relatively little control. Control may be distributed throughout energy metabolism, possibly due to the necessity of minimizing cell protein levels (see Brown, 1991). The idea that energy metabolism is regulated by energy charge (as proposed by Atkinson, 1968, 1977) is misleading in mammals. Neither mitochondrial ATP synthesis nor cellular ATP usage is a unique function of energy charge as AMP is not a significant regulator (see for example Erecinska et al., 1977). The near-equilibrium hypothesis of Klingenberg (1961) and Erecinska & Wilson (1982) is partially correct in that

  3. Post-transcriptional control of the mammalian circadian clock: implications for health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior display rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 h. Rhythmic changes are controlled by an endogenous time keeper, the circadian clock, and include sleep-wake cycles, physical and mental performance capability, blood pressure, and body temperature. Consequently, many diseases, such as metabolic, sleep, autoimmune and mental disorders and cancer, are connected to the circadian rhythm. The development of therapies that take circadian biology int...

  4. Neuronal Control of Mammalian Vocalization, with Special Reference to the Squirrel Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Uwe

    Squirrel monkey vocalization can be considered as a suitable model for the study in humans of the neurobiological basis of nonverbal emotional vocal utterances, such as laughing, crying, and groaning. Evaluation of electrical and chemical brain stimulation data, lesioning studies, single-neurone recordings, and neuroanatomical tracing work leads to the following conclusions: The periaqueductal gray and laterally bordering tegmentum of the midbrain represent a crucial area for the production of vocalization. This area collects the various vocalization-triggering stimuli, such as auditory, visual, and somatosensory input from diverse sensory-processing structures, motivation-controlling input from some limbic structures, and volitional impulses from the anterior cingulate cortex. Destruction of this area causes mutism. It is still under dispute whether the periaqueductal region harbors the vocal pattern generator or merely couples vocalization-triggering information to motor-coordinating structures further downward in the brainstem. The periaqueductal region is connected with the phonatory motoneuron pools indirectly via one or several interneurons. The nucleus retroambiguus represents a crucial relay station for the laryngeal and expiratory component of vocalization. The articulatory component reaches the orofacial motoneuron pools via the parvocellular reticular formation. Essential proprioceptive feedback from the larynx and lungs enter the vocal-controlling network via the solitary tract nucleus.

  5. A synthetic multifunctional mammalian pH sensor and CO2 transgene-control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausländer, David; Ausländer, Simon; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Sedlmayer, Ferdinand; Müller, Marius; Frey, Olivier; Hierlemann, Andreas; Stelling, Jörg; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-07

    All metabolic activities operate within a narrow pH range that is controlled by the CO2-bicarbonate buffering system. We hypothesized that pH could serve as surrogate signal to monitor and respond to the physiological state. By functionally rewiring the human proton-activated cell-surface receptor TDAG8 to chimeric promoters, we created a synthetic signaling cascade that precisely monitors extracellular pH within the physiological range. The synthetic pH sensor could be adjusted by organic acids as well as gaseous CO2 that shifts the CO2-bicarbonate balance toward hydrogen ions. This enabled the design of gas-programmable logic gates, provided remote control of cellular behavior inside microfluidic devices, and allowed for CO2-triggered production of biopharmaceuticals in standard bioreactors. When implanting cells containing the synthetic pH sensor linked to production of insulin into type 1 diabetic mice developing diabetic ketoacidosis, the prosthetic network automatically scored acidic pH and coordinated an insulin expression response that corrected ketoacidosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A FORESIGHT REFLECTION ON SUSTAINABLE METHODS FOR CONTROLLING MAMMALIAN FARM ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Chemineau

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Controlling farm animal reproduction was/is one of the essential tools for domestication of species. It is still of high interest for genetic improvement, adjustment of production to feed availability, to market and reduction of unproductive periods. Detection of oestrous behaviour in cyclic females, synchronization of conceptions and increase of the potency of diffusion of sires are three common objectives among species. The various situations of reproductive systems, which are reviewed here, are very different among the various livestock systems in the world, because of intrinsic properties of species, but also because of the various degrees of intensification of the livestock systems themselves. A clear tendency appears to continue increasing productivity by improving reproductive efficiency, developing new and sustainable techniques without hormones, and continuing to develop AI and reproductive biotechnologies. Future areas of investment in research could be, first, the physiological and ethological bases of the socio-sexual inter-relationships between animals, second the genetic control of reproductive traits, third increasing the efficiency of classical and new reproductive biotechnologies and fourth engineering new and innovative reproductive techniques to be used in farm conditions. These reproductive techniques should be developed respecting the three pillars of sustainability: environment, economy and society. Thus, they should be included within the livestock systems in which they are supposed to be applied and which should be assessed for sustainability.

  7. Brain IGF-1 receptors control mammalian growth and lifespan through a neuroendocrine mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Kappeler

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations that decrease insulin-like growth factor (IGF and growth hormone signaling limit body size and prolong lifespan in mice. In vertebrates, these somatotropic hormones are controlled by the neuroendocrine brain. Hormone-like regulations discovered in nematodes and flies suggest that IGF signals in the nervous system can determine lifespan, but it is unknown whether this applies to higher organisms. Using conditional mutagenesis in the mouse, we show that brain IGF receptors (IGF-1R efficiently regulate somatotropic development. Partial inactivation of IGF-1R in the embryonic brain selectively inhibited GH and IGF-I pathways after birth. This caused growth retardation, smaller adult size, and metabolic alterations, and led to delayed mortality and longer mean lifespan. Thus, early changes in neuroendocrine development can durably modify the life trajectory in mammals. The underlying mechanism appears to be an adaptive plasticity of somatotropic functions allowing individuals to decelerate growth and preserve resources, and thereby improve fitness in challenging environments. Our results also suggest that tonic somatotropic signaling entails the risk of shortened lifespan.

  8. Mammalian sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  9. Metabolic Control in Mammalian Fed-Batch Cell Cultures for Reduced Lactic Acid Accumulation and Improved Process Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Konakovsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass and cell-specific metabolic rates usually change dynamically over time, making the “feed according to need” strategy difficult to realize in a commercial fed-batch process. We here demonstrate a novel feeding strategy which is designed to hold a particular metabolic state in a fed-batch process by adaptive feeding in real time. The feed rate is calculated with a transferable biomass model based on capacitance, which changes the nutrient flow stoichiometrically in real time. A limited glucose environment was used to confine the cell in a particular metabolic state. In order to cope with uncertainty, two strategies were tested to change the adaptive feed rate and prevent starvation while in limitation: (i inline pH and online glucose concentration measurement or (ii inline pH alone, which was shown to be sufficient for the problem statement. In this contribution, we achieved metabolic control within a defined target range. The direct benefit was two-fold: the lactic acid profile was improved and pH could be kept stable. Multivariate Data Analysis (MVDA has shown that pH influenced lactic acid production or consumption in historical data sets. We demonstrate that a low pH (around 6.8 is not required for our strategy, as glucose availability is already limiting the flux. On the contrary, we boosted glycolytic flux in glucose limitation by setting the pH to 7.4. This new approach led to a yield of lactic acid/glucose (Y L/G around zero for the whole process time and high titers in our labs. We hypothesize that a higher carbon flux, resulting from a higher pH, may lead to more cells which produce more product. The relevance of this work aims at feeding mammalian cell cultures safely in limitation with a desired metabolic flux range. This resulted in extremely stable, low glucose levels, very robust pH profiles without acid/base interventions and a metabolic state in which lactic acid was consumed instead of being produced from day 1. With

  10. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 and FoxO1 in the transcriptional control of lipolysis and de novo lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandror, Konstantin V

    2017-10-01

    Postprandial suppression of lipolysis in adipose tissue and stimulation of de novo lipogenesis (DNL) in the liver by insulin are essential for the metabolic homeostasis in the mammalian organism. The mechanism of coregulation of lipolysis and DNL is not clear. Insulin controls both lipolysis and DNL at the level of transcription via the same mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and FoxO1-mediated signaling pathways. mTORC1 suppresses lipolysis in adipose tissue and activates DNL in the liver, whereas FoxO1 has the opposite effect. Individual inputs of either mTORC1 or FoxO1 in the regulation of lipid metabolism may be difficult to evaluate because of the cross talk between these pathways.

  11. Urinary long noncoding RNAs in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: new architects in cancer prognostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Carolina; Musi, Gennaro; de Cobelli, Ottavio; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cimmino, Amelia

    2017-06-01

    Several reports over the last 10 years provided evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in bladder cancers. lncRNAs are longer than 200 nucleotides and function as important regulators of gene expression, interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of lncRNAs has oncogenic function and is more expressed in tumor compared with normal tissues. Their overexpression may be associated with tumor formation, progression, and metastasis in a variety of tumors including bladder cancer. Although lncRNAs have been shown to have critical regulatory roles in cancer biology, the biological functions and prognostic values in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence suggests that several lncRNAs expression profiles in bladder malignancies are associated with poor prognosis, and they can be detected in biological fluids, such as urines. Here, we review current progress in the biology and the implication of lncRNAs associated with bladder cancer, and we discuss their potential use as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers in bladder malignancies with a focus on their role in high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Drosophila non-muscle myosin II motor activity determines the rate of tissue folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Sellers, James R; Martin, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle cell contractility is critical for tissues to adopt shape changes. Although, the non-muscle myosin II holoenzyme (myosin) is a molecular motor that powers contraction of actin cytoskeleton networks, recent studies have questioned the importance of myosin motor activity cell and tissue shape changes. Here, combining the biochemical analysis of enzymatic and motile properties for purified myosin mutants with in vivo measurements of apical constriction for the same mutants, we show that in vivo constriction rate scales with myosin motor activity. We show that so-called phosphomimetic mutants of the Drosophila regulatory light chain (RLC) do not mimic the phosphorylated RLC state in vitro. The defect in the myosin motor activity in these mutants is evident in developing Drosophila embryos where tissue recoil following laser ablation is decreased compared to wild-type tissue. Overall, our data highlights that myosin activity is required for rapid cell contraction and tissue folding in developing Drosophila embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20828.001 PMID:28035903

  13. Block the function of nonmuscle myosin II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueqian; Chong, Mei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hongkui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is the name given to the multi-subunit protein product of three genes encoding different nonmuscle myosin heavy chains including NM II-A, NM II-B, and NM II-C. Blebbistatin is a small molecule that has been shown to be a relatively specific inhibitor of NM II. Blocking the function of NM II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida at a dose-dependent manner. In situ hybridization analysis with ventricular marker ventricular myosin heavy chain (vmhc) and atrial marker atrial myosin heavy chain (amhc) showed each of the heart contained both distinct atria and ventricle. However, the cardia bifida embryos had highly variable distance between two separate ventricles. We also provided evidence that time window from 12 to 20 h post fertilization (hpf) is necessary and sufficient for cardia bifida formation caused by blebbistatin treatment. Expression of spinster homolog 2 (spns2) was decreased in blebbistatin-treated embryos, suggesting the cardia bifida phenotype caused by NM II inhibition was relevant to precardiac mesoderm migration defects. Through in situ hybridization analysis, we showed that foxa1 was expressed in endoderm of blebbistatin-treated embryos at 24-hpf stage, suggesting the endoderm formation is normal in cardia bifida embryos caused by blebbistatin treatment. In addition, we demonstrated that blebbistatin treatment resulted in morphology alteration of zebrafish cardiomyocytes in vivo and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes in vitro.

  14. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  15. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical and analytical factors for hematology for mammalian and nonmammalian species, hemostasis, and crossmatching in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vap, Linda M; Harr, Kendal E; Arnold, Jill E; Freeman, Kathleen P; Getzy, Karen; Lester, Sally; Friedrichs, Kristen R

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and provides recommendations for control of preanalytical and analytical factors related to hematology for mammalian and nonmammalian species, hemostasis testing, and crossmatching and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.3 (mammalian hematology), 1.2 and 2.4 (nonmammalian hematology), 1.5 and 2.7 (hemostasis testing), and 1.6 and 2.8 (crossmatching) of the complete guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. Hey1 and Hey2 control the spatial and temporal pattern of mammalian auditory hair cell differentiation downstream of Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Gonzalez, Ana; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2014-09-17

    Mechano-sensory hair cells (HCs), housed in the inner ear cochlea, are critical for the perception of sound. In the mammalian cochlea, differentiation of HCs occurs in a striking basal-to-apical and medial-to-lateral gradient, which is thought to ensure correct patterning and proper function of the auditory sensory epithelium. Recent studies have revealed that Hedgehog signaling opposes HC differentiation and is critical for the establishment of the graded pattern of auditory HC differentiation. However, how Hedgehog signaling interferes with HC differentiation is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that in the murine cochlea, Hey1 and Hey2 control the spatiotemporal pattern of HC differentiation downstream of Hedgehog signaling. It has been recently shown that HEY1 and HEY2, two highly redundant HES-related transcriptional repressors, are highly expressed in supporting cell (SC) and HC progenitors (prosensory cells), but their prosensory function remained untested. Using a conditional double knock-out strategy, we demonstrate that prosensory cells form and proliferate properly in the absence of Hey1 and Hey2 but differentiate prematurely because of precocious upregulation of the pro-HC factor Atoh1. Moreover, we demonstrate that prosensory-specific expression of Hey1 and Hey2 and its subsequent graded downregulation is controlled by Hedgehog signaling in a largely FGFR-dependent manner. In summary, our study reveals a critical role for Hey1 and Hey2 in prosensory cell maintenance and identifies Hedgehog signaling as a novel upstream regulator of their prosensory function in the mammalian cochlea. The regulatory mechanism described here might be a broadly applied mechanism for controlling progenitor behavior in the central and peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412865-12$15.00/0.

  17. Optimal Treatment for Intermediate- and High-Risk, Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.M. van der Meijden

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to clinical and pathological factors the prognosis of a patient with non-muscle invasive bladder tumors can be assessed. The prognosis is determined by the likelihood of recurrence(30-70% and/or progression to muscle invasive bladder cancer(1-15%.Trans urethral resection of bladder tumors remains the initial therapy but adjuvant intravesical instillations are necessary.All patients benefit from a single immediate post operative instillation with a chemotherapeutic agent and for low risk tumors this is the optimal therapy.Patients with intermediate and high risk tumors need more intravesical chemo-or immunotherapy. Chemotherapy reduces recurrences but not progression. Intravesical immunotherapy(BCG prevents or delays progression. Patients at high risk for progression may need upfront cystectomy.

  18. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  19. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  20. Dynamic Prognostication Using Conditional Recurrence and Progression Estimates for Patients with Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Carmen V; Ederer, Ines A; de Martino, Michela; Hofbauer, Sebastian L; Lucca, Ilaria; Mbeutcha, Aurélie; Mathieu, Romain; Haitel, Andrea; Susani, Martin; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Klatte, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    Conditional estimates provide a dynamic prediction of outcomes but to our knowledge there are no data on nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. We assessed changes in conditional recurrence and progression rates after transurethral resection of the bladder and explored the prognostic impact of established factors and risk groups with time. We retrospectively analyzed data on 1,292 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed Ta/T1 bladder cancer who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder. Study end points were time to first recurrence and time to progression. The 2-year recurrence rate at baseline was 36%, which improved as a function of the time that patients were free of disease recurrence. After 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months the 2-year conditional recurrence rate improved to 31% (14% improvement vs baseline), 22% (39% improvement), 16% (56% improvement), 13% (64% improvement) and 11% (69% improvement), respectively. Comparably, conditional progression rates improved with increasing followup, although relative differences were less distinct. The prognostic impact of established factors and nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer risk groups progressively decreased with time and finally disappeared. However, bacillus Calmette-Guérin had a protective effect on progression even after 3 years. We provide tables with dynamic prognostic information at all analyzed time points. In patients with primary Ta/T1 bladder cancer recurrence and progression rates improve with time. The prognostic impact of established factors and risk groups decreases and finally disappears. The effect of bacillus Calmette-Guérin on progression is long-lasting. Conditional outcome estimates may improve patient counseling and individualize surveillance planning. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fiber types in mammalian skeletal muscles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Reggiani, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle comprises different fiber types, whose identity is first established during embryonic development by intrinsic myogenic control mechanisms and is later modulated by neural and hormonal factors...

  2. Mammalian neurogenesis requires Treacle-Plk1 for precise control of spindle orientation, mitotic progression, and maintenance of neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Sakai

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex is a specialized region of the brain that processes cognitive, motor, somatosensory, auditory, and visual functions. Its characteristic architecture and size is dependent upon the number of neurons generated during embryogenesis and has been postulated to be governed by symmetric versus asymmetric cell divisions, which mediate the balance between progenitor cell maintenance and neuron differentiation, respectively. The mechanistic importance of spindle orientation remains controversial, hence there is considerable interest in understanding how neural progenitor cell mitosis is controlled during neurogenesis. We discovered that Treacle, which is encoded by the Tcof1 gene, is a novel centrosome- and kinetochore-associated protein that is critical for spindle fidelity and mitotic progression. Tcof1/Treacle loss-of-function disrupts spindle orientation and cell cycle progression, which perturbs the maintenance, proliferation, and localization of neural progenitors during cortical neurogenesis. Consistent with this, Tcof1(+/- mice exhibit reduced brain size as a consequence of defects in neural progenitor maintenance. We determined that Treacle elicits its effect via a direct interaction with Polo-like kinase1 (Plk1, and furthermore we discovered novel in vivo roles for Plk1 in governing mitotic progression and spindle orientation in the developing mammalian cortex. Increased asymmetric cell division, however, did not promote increased neuronal differentiation. Collectively our research has therefore identified Treacle and Plk1 as novel in vivo regulators of spindle fidelity, mitotic progression, and proliferation in the maintenance and localization of neural progenitor cells. Together, Treacle and Plk1 are critically required for proper cortical neurogenesis, which has important implications in the regulation of mammalian brain size and the pathogenesis of congenital neurodevelopmental disorders such as microcephaly.

  3. Combinations of urinary biomarkers for surveillance of patients with incident nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: the European FP7 UROMOL project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Beukers, Willemien; van der Keur, Kirstin A; Nieuweboer, Annemieke J M; Reinert, Thomas; Dyrskjot, Lars; Orntoft, Torben F; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2013-05-01

    We determined a combination of markers with optimal sensitivity to detect recurrence in voided urine after resection of an incident low grade, nonmuscle invasive bladder tumor. A total of 136 patients with G1/G2 nonmuscle invasive bladder tumor were included in the study at transurethral resection of the incident tumor. At least 3 followup urine samples were required for patient selection. DNA was extracted from the incident tumor and cell pellets of subsequently collected urine samples. We performed FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutation analysis, and microsatellite and methylation analysis on tissue and urine DNA samples. We obtained 716 urine samples. The 136 patients experienced a total of 552 recurrences during a median 3-year followup. Sensitivity for detecting a recurrent tumor varied between 66% and 68% for the molecular tests after patient stratification based on tumor DNA analysis. A combination of markers increased sensitivity but decreased the number of patients eligible for a certain test combination. Combining urine cytology with FGFR3 analysis without stratifying for FGFR3 status of the incident tumor increased sensitivity from 56% to 76%. A combination of markers increased the percentage of patients eligible for urine based followup and the sensitivity of recurrence detection. Adding FGFR3 analysis to urine cytology could be valuable for noninvasive followup of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ovarian control of very low sperm/egg ratios at the commencement of mammalian fertilisation to avoid polyspermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R H

    1996-07-01

    This essay considers the means whereby sperm/egg ratios close to unity are generated during the initial stages of fertilisation in placental mammals. Pre-ovulatory graafian follicles and their contents are seen to be key structures orchestrating the events of sperm progression and coordinating the subsequent meeting of male and female gametes. Three levels of control over the numbers of spermatozoa activated and released from the functional reservoir in the caudal region of the fallopian tube isthmus are proposed. A primary control would be obtained by means of a countercurrent transfer of ovarian follicular progesterone from the ovarian vein into the tubal branch of the ovarian artery. The concentration of progesterone so transferred would be proportional to the number of preovulatory follicles, and thus to the number of eggs to be shed, and would act progressively to reduce sperm binding to the endosalpinx of the caudal isthmus. Differential timing of the release from epithelial binding may be a crucial means of achieving the initial low sperm/egg ratios. a secondary regulation of the release of graded numbers of viable spermatozoa towards the ampullary-isthmic junction of the fallopian tubes would be by means of molecular messages derived from the mucified oocyte-cumulus complex shortly before and after the time of ovulation. Third would be reorientation of sperm trajectories by molecular gradients within the cumulus cell mass to direct competent spermatozoa to those oocytes as yet unpenetrated. Together these differing levels of control would impose low sperm/egg ratios during the initial stages of fertilisation, such strict quantitative regulation of male gametes lasting at least until the block to polyspermy is fully established and the vitellus is no longer at risk from further sperm penetration.

  5. Synthetic dual-input mammalian genetic circuits enable tunable and stringent transcription control by chemical and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Du, Zengmin; Liu, Renmei; Yang, Yi

    2016-04-07

    Programmable transcription factors can enable precise control of gene expression triggered by a chemical inducer or light. To obtain versatile transgene system with combined benefits of a chemical inducer and light inducer, we created various chimeric promoters through the assembly of different copies of the tet operator and Gal4 operator module, which simultaneously responded to a tetracycline-responsive transcription factor and a light-switchable transactivator. The activities of these chimeric promoters can be regulated by tetracycline and blue light synergistically or antagonistically. Further studies of the antagonistic genetic circuit exhibited high spatiotemporal resolution and extremely low leaky expression, which therefore could be used to spatially and stringently control the expression of highly toxic protein Diphtheria toxin A for light regulated gene therapy. When transferring plasmids engineered for the gene switch-driven expression of a firefly luciferase (Fluc) into mice, the Fluc expression levels of the treated animals directly correlated with the tetracycline and light input program. We suggest that dual-input genetic circuits using TET and light that serve as triggers to achieve expression profiles may enable the design of robust therapeutic gene circuits for gene- and cell-based therapies. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Justin R.; Dahm, Philipp; Chang, Sam S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients’ values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care. PMID:26604443

  7. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  8. Quality-of-life survey for patients diagnosed with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abáigar-Pedraza, I; Megías-Garrigós, J; Sánchez-Payá, J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of a quality-of-life survey for patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. A total of 180 patients were included in the study. We developed a survey with 21 questions grouped into 5 areas. The patients filled in this survey and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Bladder Cancer (FACT-BL) survey. To assess reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the kappa index. To determine criterion validity, we studied the association between the scores obtained from our survey and those from the FACT-BL survey using the Pearson correlation coefficient. To determine the construct validity (factorial and discriminatory), we performed a factor analysis, comparing it with Student's t-test for the scores obtained according to the tumour characteristics of reduced quality of life (e.g., malignancies located at the trigone of the bladder). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was .83, and the kappa index varied between .7 and 1. For the association study between the new survey and the FACT-BL survey, we measured an r=.82 for the overall score and between r=.68 (disease) and r=.97 (sex life) in the various measures. In the factor analysis, we measured a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index of .77 and performed the Barlett test (Pcancer is reliable and valid. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  10. Nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: what's changing and what has changed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Rodriguez, Oscar; Parada, Rubén; Palou Redorta, Joan

    2017-02-03

    Nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is a challenging disease to manage primarily due to its varied clinical course. The management of NMIBC has witnessed a widespread change with respect to its diagnosis and treatment. Although transurethral resection (TUR) and adjuvant bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) stills remain the cornerstone, newer protocols has come into vogue to achieve optimal care. On the basis of a literature review, we aimed to establish 'what changes has already occurred and what is expected in the future' in NMIBC. A Medline search was performed to identify the published literature with respect to diagnosis, treatment and future perspectives on NMIBC. Particular emphasis was directed to determinants such as the quality of TUR and the newer modifications, Re-TUR, current status of newer macroscopic and microscopic imaging, role of urinary biomarkers, clinical, histologic and molecular predictors of high-risk disease, administration of intravesical agents, salvage therapy in BCG recurrence and the current best practice guidelines were analyzed. Optimal TUR, restaging in select group, incorporation of newer endoscopic imaging and judicious administration of intravesical chemo-immunotherapeutic agents can contribute to better patient care. Although there is a plethora of urinary markers, there is insufficient evidence for their use in isolation. The future probably lies in identification of genetic markers to determine disease recurrence, nonresponders to standard treatment and early institution of alternative/targeted therapy.

  11. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients' values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care.

  12. The Role of Interferon in the Management of BCG Refractory Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Correa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thirty to forty percent of patients with high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC fail to respond to intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG. Interferon-α2B plus BCG has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with NMIBC BCG refractory disease. Here we present a contemporary series on the effectiveness and safety of intravesical BCG plus interferon-α2B therapy in patients with BCG refractory NMIBC. Methods. From January of 2005 to April of 2014 we retrospectively found 44 patients who underwent induction with combination IFN/BCG for the management of BCG refractory NMIBC. A chart review was performed to assess initial pathological stage/grade, pathological stage/grade at the time of induction, time to IFN/BCG failure, pathological stage/grade at failure, postfailure therapy, and current disease state. Results. Of the 44 patients who met criteria for the analysis. High risk disease was found in 88.6% of patients at induction. The 12-month and 24-month recurrence-free survival were 38.6% and 18.2%, respectively. 25 (56.8% ultimately had disease recurrence. Radical cystectomy was performed in 16 (36.4% patients. Conclusion. Combination BCG plus interferon-α2B remains a reasonably safe alternative treatment for select patients with BCG refractory disease prior to proceeding to radical cystectomy.

  13. Loss of Cell Adhesion Causes Hydrocephalus in Nonmuscle Myosin II-B–ablated and Mutated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianjun; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin (NM) II-B in mice during embryonic development leads to marked enlargement of the cerebral ventricles and destruction of brain tissue, due to hydrocephalus. We have identified a transient mesh-like structure present at the apical border of cells lining the spinal canal of mice during development. This structure, which only contains the II-B isoform of NM, also contains β-catenin and N-cadherin, consistent with a role in cell adhesion. Ablation of NM II-B or replacement of NM II-B with decreased amounts of a mutant (R709C), motor-impaired NM II-B in mice results in collapse of the mesh-like structure and loss of cell adhesion. This permits the underlying neuroepithelial cells to invade the spinal canal and obstruct cerebral spinal fluid flow. These defects in the CNS of NM II-B–ablated mice seem to be the cause of hydrocephalus. Interestingly, the mesh-like structure and patency of the spinal canal can be restored by increasing expression of the motor-impaired NM II-B, which also rescues hydrocephalus. However, the mutant isoform cannot completely rescue neuronal cell migration. These studies show that the scaffolding properties of NM II-B play an important role in cell adhesion, thereby preventing hydrocephalus during mouse brain development. PMID:17429076

  14. Magnesium homeostasis in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Andrea M P

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cation within the cell, plays an important role in numerous biological functions. Experimental evidence indicates that mammalian cells tightly regulate cellular magnesium ion content through specific mechanisms controlling Mg(2+) entry and efflux across the cell membrane and the membrane of various cellular organelles as well as intracellular Mg(2+) buffering under resting conditions and following hormonal and metabolic stimuli. This chapter will provide an assessment of the various mechanisms controlling cellular Mg(2+) homeostasis and transport, and the implications changes in cellular Mg(2+) content play under physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Critical Role of Non-Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase in Thrombin-Induced Endothelial Cell Inflammation and Lung PMN Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Fabeha; Bijli, Kaiser M.; Murrill, Matthew; Leonard, Antony; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Anwar, Khandaker N.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Watterson, D. Martin; Rahman, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) involves bidirectional cooperation and close interaction between inflammatory and coagulation pathways. A key molecule linking coagulation and inflammation is the procoagulant thrombin, a serine protease whose concentration is elevated in plasma and lavage fluids of patients with ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the mechanism by which thrombin contributes to lung inflammatory response. In this study, we developed a new mouse model that permits investigation of lung inflammation associated with intravascular coagulation. Using this mouse model and in vitro approaches, we addressed the role of non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) in thrombin-induced endothelial cell (EC) inflammation and lung neutrophil (PMN) infiltration. Our in vitro experiments revealed a key role of nmMLCK in ICAM-1 expression by its ability to control nuclear translocation and transcriptional capacity of RelA/p65 in EC. When subjected to intraperitoneal thrombin challenge, wild type mice showed a marked increase in lung PMN infiltration via expression of ICAM-1. However, these responses were markedly attenuated in mice deficient in nmMLCK. These results provide mechanistic insight into lung inflammatory response associated with intravascular coagulation and identify nmMLCK as a critical target for modulation of lung inflammation. PMID:23555849

  16. Novel Simulation Model of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Platform for a Virtual Randomized Trial of Conservative Therapy vs. Cystectomy in BCG Refractory Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay; Dinh, Tuan; Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Rengarajan, Badri; Mayo, Kevin; Clark, Peter E; Kamat, Ashish M; Lee, Cheryl T; Sexton, Wade J; Steinberg, Gary D

    2015-10-26

    Introduction: There have been no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical or economic benefit of mitomycin C intravesical therapy vs. radical cystectomy in patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We used the Archimedes computational model to simulate RCT comparing radical cystectomy versus intravesical mitomycin C (MMC) therapy to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes for BCG-refractory NMIBC as well demonstrate the utility of computer based models to simulate a clinical trial. Methods: The Archimedes model was developed to generate a virtual population using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, other clinical trials, and expert opinions. Patients selected were diagnosed with NMIBC (virtual patients were evaluation. Progression to MIBC in the MMC treatment arm was 30% over the lifetime. Disease specific death at 5 years was 1.6% and 8.7% for the immediate cystectomy and MMC treatment arms respectively; while, overall death was 17.8% and 23.8% at 5 years. Over a 5-year period the average cost of immediate cystectomy was $64,675 vs $68,517 in the MMC arm. Conclusion: Immediate radical cystectomy after BCG failure for NMIBC has improved survival and is more cost-effective when compared to those undergoing MMC. Simulation of clinical trials using computational models similar to the Archimedes model can overcome shortcomings of real-world clinical trials and may prove useful in the face of current medical cost-conscious era.

  17. THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER RECURRENCE, BY APPLYING CLINICAL METHODS AND FISH ANALYSIS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Troyanov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the-state-of-the-art of diagnosis and prediction of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC. It gives data on the chromosomal abnormalities identified in urothelial cancer cells according to the results of trials. The development of a procedure for FISH diagnosis of BC is noted to be warranted. An algorithm for interpreting the result of the FISH analysis is given. The use of data on chromosomal abnormalities as additional predictors of the course of non-muscle invasive BC is described. The application of the FISH technique in assessing the results of adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive BC is also depicted. In summary, the main problems in the existing algorithms for its diagnosis and prediction, by employing the FISH technique, are indicated.

  18. THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER RECURRENCE, BY APPLYING CLINICAL METHODS AND FISH ANALYSIS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Troyanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the-state-of-the-art of diagnosis and prediction of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC. It gives data on the chromosomal abnormalities identified in urothelial cancer cells according to the results of trials. The development of a procedure for FISH diagnosis of BC is noted to be warranted. An algorithm for interpreting the result of the FISH analysis is given. The use of data on chromosomal abnormalities as additional predictors of the course of non-muscle invasive BC is described. The application of the FISH technique in assessing the results of adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive BC is also depicted. In summary, the main problems in the existing algorithms for its diagnosis and prediction, by employing the FISH technique, are indicated.

  19. Risk prediction scores for recurrence and progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: an international validation in primary tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniek M Vedder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the validity of two risk scores for patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in different European settings, in patients with primary tumours. METHODS: We included 1,892 patients with primary stage Ta or T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer who underwent a transurethral resection in Spain (n = 973, the Netherlands (n = 639, or Denmark (n = 280. We evaluated recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and the Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores for each patient and used the concordance index (c-index to indicate discriminative ability. RESULTS: The 3 cohorts were comparable according to age and sex, but patients from Denmark had a larger proportion of patients with the high stage and grade at diagnosis (p<0.01. At least one recurrence occurred in 839 (44% patients and 258 (14% patients had a progression during a median follow-up of 74 months. Patients from Denmark had the highest 10-year recurrence and progression rates (75% and 24%, respectively, whereas patients from Spain had the lowest rates (34% and 10%, respectively. The EORTC and CUETO risk scores both predicted progression better than recurrence with c-indices ranging from 0.72 to 0.82 while for recurrence, those ranged from 0.55 to 0.61. CONCLUSION: The EORTC and CUETO risk scores can reasonably predict progression, while prediction of recurrence is more difficult. New prognostic markers are needed to better predict recurrence of tumours in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

  20. THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER RECURRENCE, BY APPLYING CLINICAL METHODS AND FISH ANALYSIS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE)

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Troyanov

    2014-01-01

    The review deals with the-state-of-the-art of diagnosis and prediction of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC). It gives data on the chromosomal abnormalities identified in urothelial cancer cells according to the results of trials. The development of a procedure for FISH diagnosis of BC is noted to be warranted. An algorithm for interpreting the result of the FISH analysis is given. The use of data on chromosomal abnormalities as additional predictors of the course of non-muscle invasive ...

  1. Are we following the guidelines on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the clinical practice of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treatment in Brazil in relation to international guidelines: Sociedade Brasileira de Urologia (SBU, European Association of Urology (EAU and American Urological Association (AUA. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study using questionnaires about urological practice on treatment of NMIBC during the 32nd Brazilian Congress of Urology. A total of 650 question forms were answered. Results There were 73% of complete answers (total of 476 question forms. In total, 246 urologists (51.68% lived in the southeast region and 310 (65.13% treat 1 to 3 cases of NMIBC per month. Low risk cancer: Only 35 urologists (7.5% apply the single intravesical dose of immediate chemotherapy with Mitomicin C recommended by the above guidelines. Adjuvant therapy with BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR is used by 167 participants (35.1% and 271 urologists (56.9% use only TUR. High risk tumors: 397 urologists (83.4% use adjuvant therapy, 375 (78.8% use BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR, of which 306 (64.3% referred the use for at least one year. Intravesical chemotherapy with Mitomicin C (a controversial recommendation was used by 22 urologists (4.6%. BCG dose raised a lot of discrepancies. Induction doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 105 (22%, 193 (40.4% and 54 (11.3% respectively. Maintenance doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 190 (48.7%, 144 (37.0% and 32 (8.2% urologists, respectively. Schemes of administration were also varied and the one cited by SWOG protocol was the most used: 142 (29.8%. Conclusion SBU, EAU and AUA guidelines are partially respected by Brazilian urologists, particularly in low risk tumors. In high risk tumors, concordance rates are comparable to international data. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the reasons of such disagreement.

  2. Nonmuscle myosin II exerts tension but does not translocate actin in vertebrate cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuefei; Kovács, Mihály; Conti, Mary Anne; Wang, Aibing; Zhang, Yingfan; Sellers, James R; Adelstein, Robert S

    2012-03-20

    During vertebrate cytokinesis it is thought that contractile ring constriction is driven by nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) translocation of antiparallel actin filaments. Here we report in situ, in vitro, and in vivo observations that challenge this hypothesis. Graded knockdown of NM II in cultured COS-7 cells reveals that the amount of NM II limits ring constriction. Restoration of the constriction rate with motor-impaired NM II mutants shows that the ability of NM II to translocate actin is not required for cytokinesis. Blebbistatin inhibition of cytokinesis indicates the importance of myosin strongly binding to actin and exerting tension during cytokinesis. This role is substantiated by transient kinetic experiments showing that the load-dependent mechanochemical properties of mutant NM II support efficient tension maintenance despite the inability to translocate actin. Under loaded conditions, mutant NM II exhibits a prolonged actin attachment in which a single mechanoenzymatic cycle spans most of the time of cytokinesis. This prolonged attachment promotes simultaneous binding of NM II heads to actin, thereby increasing tension and resisting expansion of the ring. The detachment of mutant NM II heads from actin is enhanced by assisting loads, which prevent mutant NM II from hampering furrow ingression during cytokinesis. In the 3D context of mouse hearts, mutant NM II-B R709C that cannot translocate actin filaments can rescue multinucleation in NM II-B ablated cardiomyocytes. We propose that the major roles of NM II in vertebrate cell cytokinesis are to bind and cross-link actin filaments and to exert tension on actin during contractile ring constriction.

  3. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  4. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Are epicrises the ‘Bermuda Triangle’ of information transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias; Wick, Anne-Kathrin; Roiner, Michael; Mathew, Marcella; Gilfrich, Christian; Schostak, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to collect information regarding the quality of communication of risk-determining factors or risk profile, and the guideline conformity of recommendations for adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) between clinical and ambulatory urologists. Material and methods At three German urological clinics during the period between 2012-2014, epicrises of 1,033 NMIBC-patients were retrospectively summarised to 505 tumour episodes (tumour resection including any re-resections) and analysed regarding the endpoints 1) risk profile is explicitly named or recorded risk factors are sufficient for the determination of risk profile, and 2) guideline conformity of treatment recommendation. Independent factors influencing the endpoints were determined by means of multivariate logistic regression models. Results The risk profile was explicitly named for 3.6% of tumour episodes; for 68.9% a risk profile could be derived from the information in the epicrises. Treatment recommendations were given for 93.7% of tumour episodes, but only 17.8% were guideline compliant. 42.6% of the recommendations were not reliably effective; 33.1% and 0.2% resulted in under- and overtreatment respectively. Neither endpoint showed gender specific or regional differences, but both were considerably less likely to be achieved in case of recurrence. Conclusions The discrepancy between treatment recommendation (93.7%) and guideline compliance (17.8%) could indicate a lack of familiarity with guidelines. The quality of the epicrises of NMIBC-patients was poor and bore the potential risk of undertreatment. The results of this study are not necessarily applicable to other clinics, but could, however, prompt physicians to re-examine epicrises for the fulfillment of the quality criteria examined here. PMID:29104786

  5. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Are epicrises the 'Bermuda Triangle' of information transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebentrau, Steffen; May, Matthias; Wick, Anne-Kathrin; Roiner, Michael; Mathew, Marcella; Gilfrich, Christian; Schostak, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to collect information regarding the quality of communication of risk-determining factors or risk profile, and the guideline conformity of recommendations for adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) between clinical and ambulatory urologists. At three German urological clinics during the period between 2012-2014, epicrises of 1,033 NMIBC-patients were retrospectively summarised to 505 tumour episodes (tumour resection including any re-resections) and analysed regarding the endpoints 1) risk profile is explicitly named or recorded risk factors are sufficient for the determination of risk profile, and 2) guideline conformity of treatment recommendation. Independent factors influencing the endpoints were determined by means of multivariate logistic regression models. The risk profile was explicitly named for 3.6% of tumour episodes; for 68.9% a risk profile could be derived from the information in the epicrises. Treatment recommendations were given for 93.7% of tumour episodes, but only 17.8% were guideline compliant. 42.6% of the recommendations were not reliably effective; 33.1% and 0.2% resulted in under- and overtreatment respectively. Neither endpoint showed gender specific or regional differences, but both were considerably less likely to be achieved in case of recurrence. The discrepancy between treatment recommendation (93.7%) and guideline compliance (17.8%) could indicate a lack of familiarity with guidelines. The quality of the epicrises of NMIBC-patients was poor and bore the potential risk of undertreatment. The results of this study are not necessarily applicable to other clinics, but could, however, prompt physicians to re-examine epicrises for the fulfillment of the quality criteria examined here.

  6. Optimization of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer recurrence detection using a urine based FGFR3 mutation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Tjin, Stephen S; Busstra, Martijn; Bangma, Chris H; Boevé, Egbert R; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2011-08-01

    FGFR3 mutations occur in 70% of nonmuscle invasive bladder tumors. Although urine based FGFR3 mutation analysis can detect recurrence, its sensitivity may be limited if samples have few or no tumor cells. We determined whether test sensitivity depends on tumor size and the time point of urine collection, and how to increase sensitivity. A total of 440 urine samples from 18 patients with a suspicious bladder lesion at cystoscopy were collected during 6 days before surgery. Eight patients (300 samples) had an FGFR3 mutant tumor, including 4 each with a tumor greater than 3 and less than 1.5 cm. Polymerase chain reaction based FGFR3 analysis was done on all tumors and urine samples. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 257 of the 300 urine samples (86%) from patients with an FGFR3 mutant tumor. Assay sensitivity was 100% for tumors greater than 3 cm and 75% for tumors less than 1.5 cm. It increased to 100% in patients with a less than 1.5 cm tumor when samples were pooled during 24 hours. Sensitivity was not influenced by the time of urine collection. All urine samples from patients with an FGFR3 wild-type tumor were negative for FGFR3 mutation. The sensitivity of tumor detection increased with tumor size. FGFR3 assay sensitivity depends on the number of shed tumor cells and improves by increasing urine volume. These findings suggest that there is an upper limit to the sensitivity of the FGFR3 assay when 1 urine sample is analyzed. This may also apply to other DNA or RNA based assays. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-muscle myosin II regulates neuronal actin dynamics by interacting with guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-muscle myosin II (NM II regulates a wide range of cellular functions, including neuronal differentiation, which requires precise spatio-temporal activation of Rho GTPases. The molecular mechanism underlying the NM II-mediated activation of Rho GTPases is poorly understood. The present study explored the possibility that NM II regulates neuronal differentiation, particularly morphological changes in growth cones and the distal axon, through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs of the Dbl family. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NM II colocalized with GEFs, such as βPIX, kalirin and intersectin, in growth cones. Inactivation of NM II by blebbistatin (BBS led to the increased formation of short and thick filopodial actin structures at the periphery of growth cones. In line with these observations, FRET analysis revealed enhanced Cdc42 activity in BBS-treated growth cones. BBS treatment also induced aberrant targeting of various GEFs to the distal axon where GEFs were seldom observed under physiological conditions. As a result, numerous protrusions and branches were generated on the shaft of the distal axon. The disruption of the NM II-GEF interactions by overexpression of the DH domains of βPIX or Tiam1, or by βPIX depletion with specific siRNAs inhibited growth cone formation and induced slender axons concomitant with multiple branches in cultured hippocampal neurons. Finally, stimulation with nerve growth factor induced transient dissociation of the NM II-GEF complex, which was closely correlated with the kinetics of Cdc42 and Rac1 activation. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that NM II maintains proper morphology of neuronal growth cones and the distal axon by regulating actin dynamics through the GEF-Rho GTPase signaling pathway.

  8. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S., E-mail: bcssj@iacs.res.in

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  9. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) controls glycolytic gene expression by regulating Histone H3 Lysine 56 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadla, Raghavendra; Haldar, Devyani

    2017-11-16

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells, but the mechanisms are not well understood. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) controls cell growth and proliferation and plays a critical role in metabolic reprogramming in glioma. mTORC2 regulates cellular processes such as cell survival, metabolism, and proliferation by phosphorylation of AGC kinases. Components of mTORC2 are shown to localize to the nucleus, but whether mTORC2 modulates epigenetic modifications to regulate gene expression is not known. Here, we identified histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is regulated by mTORC2 and show that global H3K56Ac levels were downregulated on mTORC2 knockdown but not on mTORC1 knockdown. mTORC2 promotes H3K56Ac in a tuberous sclerosis complex 1/2 (TSC1/2) mediated signaling pathway. We show that knockdown of sirtuin6 (SIRT6) prevented H3K56 deacetylation in mTORC2 depleted cells. Using glioma model consisting of U87EGFRvIII cells, we established that mTORC2 promotes H3K56Ac in glioma. Finally, we show that mTORC2 regulates the expression of glycolytic genes by regulating H3K56Ac levels at the promoters of these genes in glioma cells and depletion of mTOR leads to increased recruitment of SIRT6 to these promoters. Collectively, these results identify mTORC2 signaling pathway positively promotes H3K56Ac through which it may mediate metabolic reprogramming in glioma.

  10. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  11. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  12. Use of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Algorithms with Gene Expression Profiling to Predict Recurrent Nonmuscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Georg; Mitra, Anirban P; Mitra, Sheetal A; Almal, Arpit A; Steven, Kenneth E; Skinner, Donald G; Fry, David W; Lenehan, Peter F; Worzel, William P; Cote, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Due to the high recurrence risk of nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma it is crucial to distinguish patients at high risk from those with indolent disease. In this study we used a machine learning algorithm to identify the genes in patients with nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma at initial presentation that were most predictive of recurrence. We used the genes in a molecular signature to predict recurrence risk within 5 years after transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Whole genome profiling was performed on 112 frozen nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma specimens obtained at first presentation on Human WG-6 BeadChips (Illumina®). A genetic programming algorithm was applied to evolve classifier mathematical models for outcome prediction. Cross-validation based resampling and gene use frequencies were used to identify the most prognostic genes, which were combined into rules used in a voting algorithm to predict the sample target class. Key genes were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The classifier set included 21 genes that predicted recurrence. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was done for these genes in a subset of 100 patients. A 5-gene combined rule incorporating a voting algorithm yielded 77% sensitivity and 85% specificity to predict recurrence in the training set, and 69% and 62%, respectively, in the test set. A singular 3-gene rule was constructed that predicted recurrence with 80% sensitivity and 90% specificity in the training set, and 71% and 67%, respectively, in the test set. Using primary nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma from initial occurrences genetic programming identified transcripts in reproducible fashion, which were predictive of recurrence. These findings could potentially impact nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma management. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PIK3CA gene alterations in bladder cancer are frequent and associate with reduced recurrence in non-muscle invasive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Marta; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; García-Escudero, Ramón; Villacampa, Felipe; Marqués, Miriam; Saiz-Ladera, Cristina; Duarte, José; Martínez, Victor; Gómez, M José; Martín, M Luisa; Fernández, Manoli; Castellano, Daniel; Real, Francisco X; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose L; De La Rosa, Federico; Paramio, Jesús M

    2015-07-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world, being the non-muscle invasive tumors (NMIBC) the most frequent. NMIBC shows a very high frequency of recurrence and, in certain cases, tumor progression. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, which controls cell growth, tumorigenesis, cell invasion and drug response, is frequently activated in numerous human cancers, including BC, in part through alterations of PIK3CA gene. However, the significance of PIK3CA gene alterations with respect to clinicopathological characteristics, and in particular tumor recurrence and progression, remains elusive. Here, we analyzed the presence of mutations in FGFR3 and PIK3CA genes and copy number alterations of PIK3CA gene in bladder tumor and their correspondent paired normal samples from 87 patients. We observed an extremely high frequency of PIK3CA gene alterations (mutations, copy gains, or both) in tumor samples, affecting primarily T1 and T2 tumors. A significant number of normal tissues also showed mutations and copy gains, being coincident with those found in the corresponding tumor sample. In low-grade tumors PIK3CA mutations associated with FGFR3 mutations. Alterations in PIK3CA gene resulted in increased Akt activity in tumors. Interestingly, the presence of PIK3CA gene alterations, and in particular gene mutations, is significantly associated with reduced recurrence of NMIBC patients. Importantly, the presence of FGFR3 mutations may influence the clinical outcome of patients bearing alterations in PIK3CA gene, and increased recurrence was associated to FGFR3 mutated, PIK3CA wt tumors. These findings may have high relevance in terms of using PI3K-targeted therapies for BC treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness......, presenile cataracts, and/or progressive nephritis leading to end-stage renal failure. No consistent correlations have been identified between the 27 different MYH9 mutations identified so far and the variable clinical evolution of the disease. We have evaluated 108 consecutive MYH9-RD patients belonging...... or 1841 result in intermediate clinical pictures. These findings are relevant not only to patients' clinical management but also to the elucidation of the pathogenesis of the disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  15. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  16. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayraud, Cyrielle; Alié, Alexandre; Jager, Muriel; Chang, Patrick; Le Guyader, Hervé; Manuel, Michaël; Quéinnec, Eric

    2012-07-02

    Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the other paralogue, PpiMHCIIb1, was

  17. Mammalian gut immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  18. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    KAUST Repository

    Forest, Alistair R R

    2014-03-26

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and tissues to produce a comprehensive overview of mammalian gene expression across the human body. We find that few genes are truly ‘housekeeping’, whereas many mammalian promoters are composite entities composed of several closely separated TSSs, with independent cell-type-specific expression profiles. TSSs specific to different cell types evolve at different rates, whereas promoters of broadly expressed genes are the most conserved. Promoter-based expression analysis reveals key transcription factors defining cell states and links them to binding-site motifs. The functions of identified novel transcripts can be predicted by coexpression and sample ontology enrichment analyses. The functional annotation of the mammalian genome 5 (FANTOM5) project provides comprehensive expression profiles and functional annotation of mammalian cell-type-specific transcriptomes with wide applications in biomedical research.

  19. Comparative Statistical Mechanics of Muscle and Non-Muscle Contractile Systems: Stationary States of Near-Equilibrium Systems in A Linear Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lecarpentier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A. Huxley’s equations were used to determine the mechanical properties of muscle myosin II (MII at the molecular level, as well as the probability of the occurrence of the different stages in the actin–myosin cycle. It was then possible to use the formalism of statistical mechanics with the grand canonical ensemble to calculate numerous thermodynamic parameters such as entropy, internal energy, affinity, thermodynamic flow, thermodynamic force, and entropy production rate. This allows us to compare the thermodynamic parameters of a non-muscle contractile system, such as the normal human placenta, with those of different striated skeletal muscles (soleus and extensor digitalis longus as well as the heart muscle and smooth muscles (trachea and uterus in the rat. In the human placental tissues, it was observed that the kinetics of the actin–myosin crossbridges were considerably slow compared with those of smooth and striated muscular systems. The entropy production rate was also particularly low in the human placental tissues, as compared with that observed in smooth and striated muscular systems. This is partly due to the low thermodynamic flow found in the human placental tissues. However, the unitary force of non-muscle myosin (NMII generated by each crossbridge cycle in the myofibroblasts of the human placental tissues was similar in magnitude to that of MII in the myocytes of both smooth and striated muscle cells. Statistical mechanics represents a powerful tool for studying the thermodynamics of all contractile muscle and non-muscle systems.

  20. A comprehensive complex systems approach to the study and analysis of mammalian cell cycle control system in the presence of DNA damage stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroudi, Ali; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2017-09-21

    Not many models of mammalian cell cycle system exist due to its complexity. Some models are too complex and hard to understand, while some others are too simple and not comprehensive enough. Moreover, some essential aspects, such as the response of G1-S and G2-M checkpoints to DNA damage as well as the growth factor signalling, have not been investigated from a systems point of view in current mammalian cell cycle models. To address these issues, we bring a holistic perspective to cell cycle by mathematically modelling it as a complex system consisting of important sub-systems that interact with each other. This retains the functionality of the system and provides a clearer interpretation to the processes within it while reducing the complexity in comprehending these processes. To achieve this, we first update a published ODE mathematical model of cell cycle with current knowledge. Then the part of the mathematical model relevant to each sub-system is shown separately in conjunction with a diagram of the sub-system as part of this representation. The model sub-systems are Growth Factor, DNA damage, G1-S, and G2-M checkpoint signalling. To further simplify the model and better explore the function of sub-systems, they are further divided into modules. Here we also add important new modules of: chk-related rapid cell cycle arrest, p53 modules expanded to seamlessly integrate with the rapid arrest module, Tyrosine phosphatase modules that activate Cyc_Cdk complexes and play a crucial role in rapid and delay arrest at both G1-S and G2-M, Tyrosine Kinase module that is important for inactivating nuclear transport of CycB_cdk1 through Wee1 to resist M phase entry, Plk1-Related module that is crucial in activating Tyrosine phosphatases and inactivating Tyrosine kinase, and APC-Related module to show steps in CycB degradation. This multi-level systems approach incorporating all known aspects of cell cycle allowed us to (i) study, through dynamic simulation of an ODE model

  1. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regula...

  2. Mammalian gut immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Chassaing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  3. Cryopreservation of mammalian semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa were among the very first cells to be successfully cryopreserved and over the last five decades the use of frozen-thawed semen for artificial insemination has come to play an important role in domestic livestock production. More recently, semen freezing has increasingly been utilized in the establishment of genetic resource banks for endangered species. Semen is collected, most commonly either by use of an artificial vagina or by electroejaculation of an anaesthetized animal, and basic sperm parameters assessed. Semen is extended using a TEST-egg yolk-glycerol diluent, packaged in 0.25-mL plastic straws and slowly cooled to 5 degrees C over a period of 1-2 h. Cooled straws are frozen by suspending within liquid nitrogen vapor above the liquid nitrogen surface before plunging into the liquid phase. Straws are thawed briefly in air before immersing in a 35 degrees C water bath for 15 s, and often are used directly for insemination without any further processing.

  4. Localization of two mammalian cyclin dependent kinases during mammalian meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, T.; Walpita, D.; de rooij, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian meiotic progression, like mitotic cell cycle progression, is regulated by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). However, the unique requirements of meiosis (homologous synapsis, reciprocal recombination and the dual divisions that segregate first homologues, then sister chromatids)

  5. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 Controls CD8 T Cell Memory Differentiation in a Foxo1-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianjun Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Upon infection, antigen-specific naive CD8 T cells are activated and differentiate into short-lived effector cells (SLECs and memory precursor cells (MPECs. The underlying signaling pathways remain largely unresolved. We show that Rictor, the core component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2, regulates SLEC and MPEC commitment. Rictor deficiency favors memory formation and increases IL-2 secretion capacity without dampening effector functions. Moreover, mTORC2-deficient memory T cells mount more potent recall responses. Enhanced memory formation in the absence of mTORC2 was associated with Eomes and Tcf-1 upregulation, repression of T-bet, enhanced mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, and fatty acid oxidation. This transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming is mainly driven by nuclear stabilization of Foxo1. Silencing of Foxo1 reversed the increased MPEC differentiation and IL-2 production and led to an impaired recall response of Rictor KO memory T cells. Therefore, mTORC2 is a critical regulator of CD8 T cell differentiation and may be an important target for immunotherapy interventions.

  6. Mammalian DNA Repair. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Mammalian DNA Repair was held at Harbortown Resort, Ventura Beach, CA. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  7. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  8. Expansion and concatenation of non-muscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenix, Aidan M; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T

    2016-03-09

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, non-muscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks) but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-F/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor-activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus, interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II-based contractile systems are assembled. © 2016 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  9. Novel Multisensor Probe for Monitoring Bladder Temperature During Locoregional Chemohyperthermia for Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Technical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional hyperthermia delivery necessitates adequate thermal dosimetry; thus, optimal thermometry methods are needed to monitor accurately the temperature distribution throughout the bladder wall. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a novel intravesical device (multi-sensor probe) developed to monitor the local bladder wall temperatures during loco-regional C-HT. Materials and Methods: A multisensor thermocouple probe was designed for deployment in the human bladder, using special sensors to cover the bladder wall in different directions. The deployment of the thermocouples against the bladder wall was evaluated with visual, endoscopic, and CT imaging in bladder phantoms, porcine models, and human bladders obtained from obduction for bladder volumes and different deployment sizes of the probe. Finally, porcine bladders were embedded in a phantom and subjected to locoregional heating to compare probe temperatures with additional thermometry inside and outside the bladder wall. Results: The 7.5 cm thermocouple probe yielded optimal bladder wall contact, adapting to different bladder volumes. Temperature monitoring was shown to be accurate and representative for the actual bladder wall temperature. Conclusions: Use of this novel multisensor probe could yield a more accurate monitoring of the bladder wall temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia. PMID:24112045

  10. Regulation of mammalian Ste20 (Mst) kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Initially identified as mammalian homologs to yeast Ste20 kinases, the mammalian sterile twenty-like (Mst) 1/2 kinases have been widely investigated subsequent to their rediscovery as key components of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway in flies. To date, our understanding of Mst substrates and downstream signaling outstrips our knowledge of how these enzymes are controlled by upstream signals. While much remains to be discovered regarding the mechanisms of Mst regulation, it is clear that Mst1 kinase activity is governed at least in part by its state of dimerization, including self-association and also heterodimerization with various other signaling partners. Here we review the basic architecture of Mst signaling and function and discuss recent advances in our understanding of how these important kinases are regulated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mammalian Synthetic Biology: Engineering Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua B; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Gersbach, Charles A

    2017-06-21

    The programming of new functions into mammalian cells has tremendous application in research and medicine. Continued improvements in the capacity to sequence and synthesize DNA have rapidly increased our understanding of mechanisms of gene function and regulation on a genome-wide scale and have expanded the set of genetic components available for programming cell biology. The invention of new research tools, including targetable DNA-binding systems such as CRISPR/Cas9 and sensor-actuator devices that can recognize and respond to diverse chemical, mechanical, and optical inputs, has enabled precise control of complex cellular behaviors at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. These tools have been critical for the expansion of synthetic biology techniques from prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic hosts to mammalian systems. Recent progress in the development of genome and epigenome editing tools and in the engineering of designer cells with programmable genetic circuits is expanding approaches to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease and to establish personalized theranostic strategies for next-generation medicines. This review summarizes the development of these enabling technologies and their application to transforming mammalian synthetic biology into a distinct field in research and medicine.

  12. Identification of an FHL1 protein complex containing gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB by analysis of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    Full Text Available FHL1 is multifunctional and serves as a modular protein binding interface to mediate protein-protein interactions. In skeletal muscle, FHL1 is involved in sarcomere assembly, differentiation, growth, and biomechanical stress. Muscle abnormalities may play a major role in congenital clubfoot (CCF deformity during fetal development. Thus, identifying the interactions of FHL1 could provide important new insights into its functional role in both skeletal muscle development and CCF pathogenesis. Using proteins derived from rat L6GNR4 myoblastocytes, we detected FHL1 interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Dynamic gene expression of FHL1 was studied. Additionally, the expression of the possible interacting proteins gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB, which were isolated from the lower limbs of E14, E15, E17, E18, E20 rat embryos or from adult skeletal muscle was analyzed. Potential interacting proteins isolated from E17 lower limbs were verified by immunoprecipitation, and co-localization in adult gastrocnemius muscle was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. FHL1 expression was associated with skeletal muscle differentiation. E17 was found to be the critical time-point for skeletal muscle differentiation in the lower limbs of rat embryos. We also identified gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB as potential binding partners of FHL1, and both were expressed in adult skeletal muscle. We then demonstrated that FHL1 exists as part of a complex, which binds gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB.

  13. Septin 7 reduces nonmuscle myosin IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex and hinders GLUT4 storage vesicle docking and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasik, Anita A.; Dumont, Vincent [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tienari, Jukka [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 00290 Helsinki, 05850 Hyvinkää (Finland); Nyman, Tuula A. [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Fogarty, Christopher L.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku [Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Abdominal Center Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 000290 Helsinki (Finland); Diabetes& Obesity Research Program, Research Program´s Unit, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Lehtonen, Eero [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory Animal Centre, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Groop, Per-Henrik [Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Abdominal Center Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 000290 Helsinki (Finland); Diabetes& Obesity Research Program, Research Program´s Unit, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, 3004 Melbourne (Australia); Lehtonen, Sanna, E-mail: sanna.h.lehtonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-01-15

    Glomerular epithelial cells, podocytes, are insulin responsive and can develop insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the small GTPase septin 7 forms a complex with nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC-IIA; encoded by MYH9), a component of the nonmuscle myosin IIA (NM-IIA) hexameric complex. We observed that knockdown of NMHC-IIA decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into podocytes. Both septin 7 and NM-IIA associate with SNAP23, a SNARE protein involved in GLUT4 storage vesicle (GSV) docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. We observed that insulin decreases the level of septin 7 and increases the activity of NM-IIA in the SNAP23 complex, as visualized by increased phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain. Also knockdown of septin 7 increases the activity of NM-IIA in the complex. The activity of NM-IIA is increased in diabetic rat glomeruli and cultured human podocytes exposed to macroalbuminuric sera from patients with type 1 diabetes. Collectively, the data suggest that the activity of NM-IIA in the SNAP23 complex plays a key role in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into podocytes. Furthermore, we observed that septin 7 reduces the activity of NM-IIA in the SNAP23 complex and thereby hinders GSV docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Septin 7, nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC-IIA) and SNAP23 form a complex. • Knockdown of septin 7 increases NM-IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex. • Insulin decreases septin 7 level and increases NM-IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex. • Septin 7 hinders GSV docking/fusion by reducing NM-IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex.

  14. A non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases: mediation of Golgi fragmentation by interaction with non-muscle myosin IIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Armen; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2013-06-01

    The Golgi apparatus undergoes morphological changes under stress or malignant transformation, but the precise mechanisms are not known. We recently showed that non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) binds to the cytoplasmic tail of Core 2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase mucus-type (C2GnT-M) and transports it to the endoplasmic reticulum for recycling. Here, we report that Golgi fragmentation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) or coatomer protein (β-COP) knockdown (KD) in Panc1-bC2GnT-M (c-Myc) cells is accompanied by the increased association of NMIIA with C2GnT-M and its degradation by proteasomes. Golgi fragmentation is prevented by inhibition or KD of NMIIA. Using multiple approaches, we have shown that the speed of BFA-induced Golgi fragmentation is positively correlated with the levels of this enzyme in the Golgi. The observation is reproduced in LNCaP cells which express high levels of two endogenous glycosyltransferases--C2GnT-L and β-galactoside α2,3 sialyltransferase 1. NMIIA is found to form complexes with these two enzymes but not Golgi matrix proteins. The KD of both enzymes or the prevention of Golgi glycosyltransferases from exiting endoplasmic reticulum reduced Golgi-associated NMIIA and decreased the BFA-induced fragmentation. Interestingly, the fragmented Golgi detected in colon cancer HT-29 cells can be restored to a compact morphology after inhibition or KD of NMIIA. The Golgi disorganization induced by the microtubule or actin destructive agent is NMIIA-independent and does not affect the levels of glycosyltransferases. We conclude that NMIIA interacts with Golgi residential but not matrix proteins, and this interaction is responsible for Golgi fragmentation induced by β-COP KD or BFA treatment. This is a novel non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases.

  15. A non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases: Mediation of Golgi fragmentation by interaction with non-muscle myosin IIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Armen; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus undergoes morphological changes under stress or malignant transformation, but the precise mechanisms are not known. We recently showed that non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) binds to the cytoplasmic tail of Core 2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase mucus-type (C2GnT-M) and transports it to the endoplasmic reticulum for recycling. Here, we report that Golgi fragmentation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) or coatomer protein (β-COP) knockdown (KD) in Panc1-bC2GnT-M (c-Myc) cells is accompanied by the increased association of NMIIA with C2GnT-M and its degradation by proteasomes. Golgi fragmentation is prevented by inhibition or KD of NMIIA. Using multiple approaches, we have shown that the speed of BFA-induced Golgi fragmentation is positively correlated with the levels of this enzyme in the Golgi. The observation is reproduced in LNCaP cells which express high levels of two endogenous glycosyltransferases—C2GnT-L and β-galactoside α2,3 sialyltransferase 1. NMIIA is found to form complexes with these two enzymes but not Golgi matrix proteins. The KD of both enzymes or the prevention of Golgi glycosyltransferases from exiting endoplasmic reticulum reduced Golgi-associated NMIIA and decreased the BFA-induced fragmentation. Interestingly, the fragmented Golgi detected in colon cancer HT-29 cells can be restored to a compact morphology after inhibition or KD of NMIIA. The Golgi disorganization induced by the microtubule or actin destructive agent is NMIIA-independent and does not affect the levels of glycosyltransferases. We conclude that NMIIA interacts with Golgi residential but not matrix proteins, and this interaction is responsible for Golgi fragmentation induced by β-COP KD or BFA treatment. This is a novel non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases. PMID:23396488

  16. Genes influenced by the non-muscle isoform of Myosin light chain kinase impact human cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available The multifunctional non-muscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK is critical to the rapid dynamic coordination of the cytoskeleton involved in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We identified 45 nmMLCK-influenced genes by bioinformatic filtering of genome-wide expression in wild type and nmMLCK knockout (KO mice exposed to preclinical models of murine acute inflammatory lung injury, pathologies that are well established to include nmMLCK as an essential participant. To determine whether these nmMLCK-influenced genes were relevant to human cancers, the 45 mouse genes were matched to 38 distinct human orthologs (M38 signature (GeneCards definition and underwent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in training and validation cohorts. These studies revealed that in training cohorts, the M38 signature successfully identified cancer patients with poor overall survival in breast cancer (P<0.001, colon cancer (P<0.001, glioma (P<0.001, and lung cancer (P<0.001. In validation cohorts, the M38 signature demonstrated significantly reduced overall survival for high-score patients of breast cancer (P = 0.002, colon cancer (P = 0.035, glioma (P = 0.023, and lung cancer (P = 0.023. The association between M38 risk score and overall survival was confirmed by univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis of overall survival in the both training and validation cohorts. This study, providing a novel prognostic cancer gene signature derived from a murine model of nmMLCK-associated lung inflammation, strongly supports nmMLCK-involved pathways in tumor growth and progression in human cancers and nmMLCK as an attractive candidate molecular target in both inflammatory and neoplastic processes.

  17. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Hindman

    Full Text Available The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa, parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa. These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling.

  18. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bridget; Goeckeler, Zoe; Sierros, Kostas; Wysolmerski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa), parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa). These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling. PMID:26136073

  19. Chromatin remodeling in mammalian embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Birgit; Cabot, Ryan A

    2018-03-01

    The mammalian embryo undergoes a dramatic amount of epigenetic remodeling during the first week of development. In this review, we discuss several epigenetic changes that happen over the course of cleavage development, focusing on covalent marks (e.g., histone methylation and acetylation) and non-covalent remodeling (chromatin remodeling via remodeling complexes; e.g., SWI/SNF-mediated chromatin remodeling). Comparisons are also drawn between remodeling events that occur in embryos from a variety of mammalian species. © 2018 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  20. Molecular Architecture of the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partch, Carrie L.; Green, Carla B.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate physiology and behavior with the 24-hour solar day to provide temporal homeostasis with the external environment. The molecular clocks that drive these intrinsic rhythmic changes are based on interlocked transcription/translation feedback loops that integrate with diverse environmental and metabolic stimuli to generate internal 24-hour timing. In this review we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the core molecular clock and how it utilizes diverse transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to impart temporal control onto mammalian physiology. Understanding the way in which biological rhythms are generated throughout the body may provide avenues for temporally-directed therapeutics to improve health and prevent disease. PMID:23916625

  1. Technology of mammalian cell encapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uludag, H; De Vos, P; Tresco, PA

    2000-01-01

    Entrapment of mammalian cells in physical membranes has been practiced since the early 1950s when it was originally introduced as a basic research tool. The method has since been developed based on the promise of its therapeutic usefulness in tissue transplantation. Encapsulation physically isolates

  2. Evolutionary dynamics of mammalian karyotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This special volume of Cytogenetic and Genome Research (edited by Roscoe Stanyon, University of Florence and Alexander Graphodatsky, Siberian division of the Russian Academy of Sciences is dedicated to the fascinating long search of the forces behind the evolutionary dynamics of mammalian karyotypes, revealed after the hypotonic miracle of the 1950s....

  3. The shape of mammalian phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purvis, Andy; Fritz, Susanne A; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    an assemblage, ecoregion or larger area always tends to be more unbalanced than expected from the phylogeny of species at the next more inclusive spatial scale. We conclude with a verbal model of mammalian macroevolution, which emphasizes the importance to diversification of accessing new regions...

  4. Identification of chikungunya virus interacting proteins in mammalian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... and STAT-2 to establish infection in the mammalian cells. [Paingankar MS .... in PBS) was added and incubated for 60 min at room .... negative control. Parental cell lines were used for negative and positive control experiments. 2.11 RNA isolation. RNA was isolated using Ribopure RNA extraction kit (Ap-.

  5. Mammalian niche conservation through deep time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa R G DeSantis

    Full Text Available Climate change alters species distributions, causing plants and animals to move north or to higher elevations with current warming. Bioclimatic models predict species distributions based on extant realized niches and assume niche conservation. Here, we evaluate if proxies for niches (i.e., range areas are conserved at the family level through deep time, from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. We analyze the occurrence of all mammalian families in the continental USA, calculating range area, percent range area occupied, range area rank, and range polygon centroids during each epoch. Percent range area occupied significantly increases from the Oligocene to the Miocene and again from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene; however, mammalian families maintain statistical concordance between rank orders across time. Families with greater taxonomic diversity occupy a greater percent of available range area during each epoch and net changes in taxonomic diversity are significantly positively related to changes in percent range area occupied from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Furthermore, gains and losses in generic and species diversity are remarkably consistent with ~2.3 species gained per generic increase. Centroids demonstrate southeastern shifts from the Eocene through the Pleistocene that may correspond to major environmental events and/or climate changes during the Cenozoic. These results demonstrate range conservation at the family level and support the idea that niche conservation at higher taxonomic levels operates over deep time and may be controlled by life history traits. Furthermore, families containing megafauna and/or terminal Pleistocene extinction victims do not incur significantly greater declines in range area rank than families containing only smaller taxa and/or only survivors, from the Pliocene to Pleistocene. Collectively, these data evince the resilience of families to climate and/or environmental change in deep time, the absence of

  6. Mammalian niche conservation through deep time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Larisa R G; Beavins Tracy, Rachel A; Koontz, Cassandra S; Roseberry, John C; Velasco, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    Climate change alters species distributions, causing plants and animals to move north or to higher elevations with current warming. Bioclimatic models predict species distributions based on extant realized niches and assume niche conservation. Here, we evaluate if proxies for niches (i.e., range areas) are conserved at the family level through deep time, from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. We analyze the occurrence of all mammalian families in the continental USA, calculating range area, percent range area occupied, range area rank, and range polygon centroids during each epoch. Percent range area occupied significantly increases from the Oligocene to the Miocene and again from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene; however, mammalian families maintain statistical concordance between rank orders across time. Families with greater taxonomic diversity occupy a greater percent of available range area during each epoch and net changes in taxonomic diversity are significantly positively related to changes in percent range area occupied from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Furthermore, gains and losses in generic and species diversity are remarkably consistent with ~2.3 species gained per generic increase. Centroids demonstrate southeastern shifts from the Eocene through the Pleistocene that may correspond to major environmental events and/or climate changes during the Cenozoic. These results demonstrate range conservation at the family level and support the idea that niche conservation at higher taxonomic levels operates over deep time and may be controlled by life history traits. Furthermore, families containing megafauna and/or terminal Pleistocene extinction victims do not incur significantly greater declines in range area rank than families containing only smaller taxa and/or only survivors, from the Pliocene to Pleistocene. Collectively, these data evince the resilience of families to climate and/or environmental change in deep time, the absence of terminal Pleistocene

  7. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure.

  8. Functional characterization of mammalian Wntless homolog in mammalian system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ting Wang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wntless (GPR177 protein is a newly identified regulator of Wnt signals in Drosophila, but its cellular function in mammals is still unclear. In this study, we explored the expression pattern and potential cellular function of Wntless in mammalian cells. Wntless mRNA was expressed in many mouse tissues, including the spleen, lung, kidney, thymus, and stomach, and lower levels of expression were detected in the mouse brain and testis. Expression of Wntless protein analyzed by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining was only detected in the submucosa, muscle, ganglia, and nerve cells of murine large intestines. Both immunofluorescence staining and subcellular fraction extraction analysis revealed that endogenous Wntless protein was expressed predominantly in the cytoplasmic organelles with a morphologically dot-shaped distribution. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless could be corrected by and may activate the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB signaling pathway in cancer (HeLa cells. These results suggest that Wntless plays a role in signaling regulation during the formation of cancer in addition to its role as a retromer protein in mammalian systems.

  9. A panel of prognostic protein markers for progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer - a multicenter tissue microarray validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Niels; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    cohort of 283 patients with long-term follow-up. For validation of the results we used three independent patient cohorts with long-term follow-up from Sweden, Spain, and Taiwan. In total 649 primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from patients with long-term follow-up were used. Protein expression...... in the independent NMIBC cohort with long-term follow-up. These results will be presented at AACR annual meeting 2012. We conclude that ADAM10, TRIM29, Aurora Kinase B, and Cyclin D1 may have prognostic value for guiding optimal treatment of NMIBC patients if successfully validated in the independent patient cohorts...... Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. Transcripts from the five genes encoding these proteins were previously included in gene expression signatures for outcome prediction for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). As a training-set, we used primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from a Danish...

  10. Evolutionary paths to mammalian cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Evolution of the cochlea and high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz; ultrasonic to humans) in mammals has been a subject of research for many years. Recent advances in paleontological techniques, especially the use of micro-CT scans, now provide important new insights that are here reviewed. True mammals arose more than 200 million years (Ma) ago. Of these, three lineages survived into recent geological times. These animals uniquely developed three middle ear ossicles, but these ossicles were not initially freely suspended as in modern mammals. The earliest mammalian cochleae were only about 2 mm long and contained a lagena macula. In the multituberculate and monotreme mammalian lineages, the cochlea remained relatively short and did not coil, even in modern representatives. In the lineage leading to modern therians (placental and marsupial mammals), cochlear coiling did develop, but only after a period of at least 60 Ma. Even Late Jurassic mammals show only a 270 ° cochlear coil and a cochlear canal length of merely 3 mm. Comparisons of modern organisms, mammalian ancestors, and the state of the middle ear strongly suggest that high-frequency hearing (>20 kHz) was not realized until the early Cretaceous (~125 Ma). At that time, therian mammals arose and possessed a fully coiled cochlea. The evolution of modern features of the middle ear and cochlea in the many later lineages of therians was, however, a mosaic and different features arose at different times. In parallel with cochlear structural evolution, prestins in therian mammals evolved into effective components of a new motor system. Ultrasonic hearing developed quite late-the earliest bat cochleae (~60 Ma) did not show features characteristic of those of modern bats that are sensitive to high ultrasonic frequencies.

  11. An orthotopic xenograft model for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in mice: influence of mouse strain, tumor cell count, dwell time and bladder pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Doreen; Rieger, Christiane; Bergmann, Ralf; Ullrich, Martin; Meister, Sebastian; Toma, Marieta; Wiedemuth, Ralf; Temme, Achim; Novotny, Vladimir; Wirth, Manfred P; Bachmann, Michael; Pietzsch, Jens; Fuessel, Susanne

    2017-11-23

    Novel theranostic options for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer are urgently needed. This requires a thorough evaluation of experimental approaches in animal models best possibly reflecting human disease before entering clinical studies. Although several bladder cancer xenograft models were used in the literature, the establishment of an orthotopic bladder cancer model in mice remains challenging. Luciferase-transduced UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells were instilled transurethrally via 24G permanent venous catheters into athymic NMRI and BALB/c nude mice as well as into SCID-beige mice. Besides the mouse strain, the pretreatment of the bladder wall (trypsin or poly-L-lysine), tumor cell count (0.5 × 106-5.0 × 106) and tumor cell dwell time in the murine bladder (30 min - 2 h) were varied. Tumors were morphologically and functionally visualized using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Immunodeficiency of the mouse strains was the most important factor influencing cancer cell engraftment, whereas modifying cell count and instillation time allowed fine-tuning of the BLI signal start and duration - both representing the possible treatment period for the evaluation of new therapeutics. Best orthotopic tumor growth was achieved by transurethral instillation of 1.0 × 106 UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells into SCID-beige mice for 2 h after bladder pretreatment with poly-L-lysine. A pilot PET experiment using 68Ga-cetuximab as transurethrally administered radiotracer revealed functional expression of epidermal growth factor receptor as representative molecular characteristic of engrafted cancer cells in the bladder. With the optimized protocol in SCID-beige mice an applicable and reliable model of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer for the development of novel theranostic approaches was established.

  12. Purified protein derivative skin test reactions are associated with clinical outcomes of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer treated with induction bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Naoya; Kikuchi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-10-30

    To investigate the relationship between purified protein derivative (PPD) skin test reactions before bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy and the clinical outcomes of BCG-naïve nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer patients treated with adjuvant BCG therapy. A total of 288 nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer patients subjected to the PPD skin test before BCG therapy were included. PPD skin test reactions were categorized into 3 groups: positive, slightly positive, and negative. The presence of an induration was positive. If an induration was absent, erythema of 10mm or more and less than 10mm corresponded to slightly positive and negative, respectively. A total of 66 (22.9%), 149 (51.7%), and 73 (25.3%) patients exhibited a positive, slightly positive, and negative to PPD skin test, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate of patients with positive PPD skin test reactions was 89.4 ± 4.1%, which was significantly higher than those of patients with slightly positive (65.5 ± 4.2%, P = 0.001) and negative reactions (56.4 ± 6.6%, P<0.001). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that a positive PPD skin test reaction was independently associated with tumor recurrence (hazard ratio of 0.233, P<0.001), but not with stage progression. The incidence of fever persisting for more than 2 days or fever of ≥38°C was significantly higher in patients with a positive PPD skin test reaction (18.2%) than in patients with slightly positive (8.7%) and negative PPD skin test reactions (4.1%). The PPD skin test reactions before BCG therapy may predict clinical outcomes following BCG therapy and help clinicians counsel patients exhibiting strong therapeutic effects with BCG therapy and potentially major BCG-related side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mammalian synthetic biology for studying the cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Melina; Xiang, Joy S; Smolke, Christina D

    2017-01-02

    Synthetic biology is advancing the design of genetic devices that enable the study of cellular and molecular biology in mammalian cells. These genetic devices use diverse regulatory mechanisms to both examine cellular processes and achieve precise and dynamic control of cellular phenotype. Synthetic biology tools provide novel functionality to complement the examination of natural cell systems, including engineered molecules with specific activities and model systems that mimic complex regulatory processes. Continued development of quantitative standards and computational tools will expand capacities to probe cellular mechanisms with genetic devices to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the cell. In this study, we review synthetic biology tools that are being applied to effectively investigate diverse cellular processes, regulatory networks, and multicellular interactions. We also discuss current challenges and future developments in the field that may transform the types of investigation possible in cell biology. © 2017 Mathur et al.

  14. Expression and subcellular localization of mammalian formin Fhod3 in the embryonic and adult heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meikun Kan-o

    Full Text Available The formin family proteins play pivotal roles in actin filament assembly via the FH2 domain. The mammalian formin Fhod3 is highly expressed in the heart, and its mRNA in the adult heart contains exons 11, 12, and 25, which are absent from non-muscle Fhod3 isoforms. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, Fhod3 localizes to the middle of the sarcomere and appears to function in its organization, although it is suggested that Fhod3 localizes differently in the adult heart. Here we show, using immunohistochemical analysis with three different antibodies, each recognizing distinct regions of Fhod3, that Fhod3 localizes as two closely spaced bands in middle of the sarcomere in both embryonic and adult hearts. The bands are adjacent to the M-line that crosslinks thick myosin filaments at the center of a sarcomere but distant from the Z-line that forms the boundary of the sarcomere, which localization is the same as that observed in cultured cardiomyocytes. Detailed immunohistochemical and immuno-electron microscopic analyses reveal that Fhod3 localizes not at the pointed ends of thin actin filaments but to a more peripheral zone, where thin filaments overlap with thick myosin filaments. We also demonstrate that the embryonic heart of mice specifically expresses the Fhod3 mRNA isoform harboring the three alternative exons, and that the characteristic localization of Fhod3 in the sarcomere does not require a region encoded by exon 25, in contrast to an essential role of exons 11 and 12. Furthermore, the exon 25-encoded region appears to be dispensable for actin-organizing activities both in vivo and in vitro, albeit it is inserted in the catalytic FH2 domain.

  15. Enhancer evolution across 20 mammalian species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villar, Diego; Berthelot, Camille; Aldridge, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    by profiling genomic enrichment of H3K27 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation. We report that rapid evolution of enhancers is a universal feature of mammalian genomes. Most of the recently evolved enhancers arise from ancestral DNA exaptation, rather than lineage-specific expansions of repeat elements......The mammalian radiation has corresponded with rapid changes in noncoding regions of the genome, but we lack a comprehensive understanding of regulatory evolution in mammals. Here, we track the evolution of promoters and enhancers active in liver across 20 mammalian species from six diverse orders....... These results provide important insight into the functional genetics underpinning mammalian regulatory evolution....

  16. Temporal organization of replication in DNA fibers of mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The extent of coordinate control over the multiple initiation events in DNA replication has been investigated in three mammalian cell lines by DNA fiber autoradiography. Quantitative estimates have been obtained of the degree of synchrony among initiations occurring on stretches of DNA. Synchrony decreases markedly with increasing distance between initiation sites in MDBK (bovine) and L929 (mouse) cells, but only slightly in muntjac cells. Possible control mechanisms for the initiation process are discussed. PMID:457781

  17. Mitochondrial transcription in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokolenko, Inna N; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of recent discoveries of intimate involvement of mitochondria with key cellular processes, there has been a resurgence of interest in all aspects of mitochondrial biology, including the intricate mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression. Despite four decades of research, there remains a lot to be learned about the processes that enable transcription of genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to RNA, as well as their regulation. These processes are vitally important, as evidenced by the lethality of inactivating the central components of mitochondrial transcription machinery. Here, we review the current understanding of mitochondrial transcription and its regulation in mammalian cells. We also discuss key theories in the field and highlight controversial subjects and future directions as we see them.

  18. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  19. Polarity in Mammalian Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roignot, Julie; Peng, Xiao; Mostov, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental for the architecture and function of epithelial tissues. Epithelial polarization requires the intervention of several fundamental cell processes, whose integration in space and time is only starting to be elucidated. To understand what governs the building of epithelial tissues during development, it is essential to consider the polarization process in the context of the whole tissue. To this end, the development of three-dimensional organotypic cell culture models has brought new insights into the mechanisms underlying the establishment and maintenance of higher-order epithelial tissue architecture, and in the dynamic remodeling of cell polarity that often occurs during development of epithelial organs. Here we discuss some important aspects of mammalian epithelial morphogenesis, from the establishment of cell polarity to epithelial tissue generation. PMID:23378592

  20. Research Note Do mammalian herbivores influence invertebrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the indirect influence of mammalian herbivores on invertebrates, by utilising long-term mammalian herbivore exclosures in Kruger National Park. The exclosures span three distinct habitat types (crest, footslope and riparian) on a catena. By performing invertebrate collections in the exclosures and in a ...

  1. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  2. Non-muscle (NM) myosin heavy chain phosphorylation regulates the formation of NM myosin filaments, adhesome assembly and smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwu; Gunst, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    Non-muscle (NM) and smooth muscle (SM) myosin II are both expressed in smooth muscle tissues, however the role of NM myosin in SM contraction is unknown. Contractile stimulation of tracheal smooth muscle tissues stimulates phosphorylation of the NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 and causes NM myosin filament assembly at the SM cell cortex. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable NM myosin mutant, NM myosin S1943A, in SM tissues inhibits ACh-induced NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction, and also inhibits the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes during contractile stimulation. NM myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation but not SM myosin RLC phosphorylation is regulated by RhoA GTPase during ACh stimulation, and NM RLC phosphorylation is required for NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction. NM myosin II plays a critical role in airway SM contraction that is independent and distinct from the function of SM myosin. The molecular function of non-muscle (NM) isoforms of myosin II in smooth muscle (SM) tissues and their possible role in contraction are largely unknown. We evaluated the function of NM myosin during contractile stimulation of canine tracheal SM tissues. Stimulation with ACh caused NM myosin filament assembly, as assessed by a Triton solubility assay and a proximity ligation assay aiming to measure interactions between NM myosin monomers. ACh stimulated the phosphorylation of NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 in tracheal SM tissues, which can regulate NM myosin IIA filament assembly in vitro. Expression of the non-phosphorylatable mutant NM myosin S1943A in SM tissues inhibited ACh-induced endogenous NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation, NM myosin filament formation, the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes and tension development. The NM myosin cross-bridge cycling inhibitor blebbistatin suppressed adhesome complex assembly and SM contraction without inhibiting NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation or NM myosin filament assembly. Rho

  3. The Mammalian Diving Response: An Enigmatic Reflex to Preserve Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian diving response is a remarkable behavior that overrides basic homeostatic reflexes. It is most studied in large aquatic mammals but is seen in all vertebrates. Pelagic mammals have developed several physiological adaptations to conserve intrinsic oxygen stores, but the apnea, bradycardia, and vasoconstriction is shared with those terrestrial and is neurally mediated. The adaptations of aquatic mammals are reviewed here as well as the neural control of cardiorespiratory physiology during diving in rodents. PMID:23997188

  4. Modeling the mammalian circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Craig; Ueda, Hiroki

    2012-02-01

    In biology, important processes often depend on a temporal schedule. The 24-hour periodicity of solar illumination caused by the earth's rotation has consequences for environmental factors such as temperature and humidity as well as ecological factors such as the presence of food, predators, or potential mates. As a result, many organisms have evolved to develop a circadian clock that allows them to anticipate these environmental changes in the absence of direct temporal cues. In recent years, extensive efforts have been made to deconstruct the biological clockwork from various organisms, develop mathematical models of circadian function, and construct synthetic analogues to test our understanding. My present work has two major foci. First, we have used regulatory principles revealed by recent experimental work to construct a model of the core genetic oscillator of the mammalian circadian system that captures key system-level behaviors. Second, we are exploring the possibility of a post-translational phosphorylation-based oscillator that is coupled to the core oscillator, conferring enhanced robustness and stability on the complete system. A simple model of this post-translational oscillator reveals key design constraints that must be satisfied by any such oscillator.

  5. Maintenance and Expression of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Claes M; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-06-02

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 proteins that are essential for the function of the oxidative phosphorylation system, which is composed of four respiratory-chain complexes and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase. Remarkably, the maintenance and expression of mtDNA depend on the mitochondrial import of hundreds of nuclear-encoded proteins that control genome maintenance, replication, transcription, RNA maturation, and mitochondrial translation. The importance of this complex regulatory system is underscored by the identification of numerous mutations of nuclear genes that impair mtDNA maintenance and expression at different levels, causing human mitochondrial diseases with pleiotropic clinical manifestations. The basic scientific understanding of the mechanisms controlling mtDNA function has progressed considerably during the past few years, thanks to advances in biochemistry, genetics, and structural biology. The challenges for the future will be to understand how mtDNA maintenance and expression are regulated and to what extent direct intramitochondrial cross talk between different processes, such as transcription and translation, is important.

  6. Ghrelin receptors in non-mammalian vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eKaiya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered three years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates.

  7. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  8. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Giovanni; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Catalano, Carlo [Sapienza Univ. Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology; De Berardinis, Ettore; Leonardo, Constantino [Sapienza Univ. Rome (Italy). Dept. of Gynaecological-Obstetric and Urological Sciences; Simone, Giuseppe; Gallucci, Michele [' ' Regina Elena' ' National Cancer Insitute, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Urology; Catto, James [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Aademic Urology Unit

    2017-09-15

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. (orig.)

  9. The Moreau Strain of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) for High-Risk Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: An Alternative during Worldwide BCG Shortage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Sebastian L; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Chade, Daher C; Sarkis, Alvaro S; Ribeiro-Filho, Leopoldo A; Nahas, Willian C; Klatte, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the standard of care for adjuvant intravesical instillation therapy for intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after complete transurethral resection. Increasing evidence suggests that there are marked differences in outcomes according to BCG substrains. BCG-Moreau was recently introduced to the European market to cover the issue of BCG shortage, but there are little data regarding the oncologic efficacy. We retrospectively analyzed 295 consecutive patients, who received adjuvant intravesical instillation therapy with BCG-Moreau for intermediate- and high-risk NMIBC between October 2007 and April 2013 at a single institution. The end points of this study were time to first recurrence and progression to muscle-invasive disease. Median age was 66 years (interquartile range 59-74, mean 65.9 years). According to the EAU risk group, 76 patients presented with intermediate-risk and 219 patients with high-risk NMIBC. The 5-year recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival rate was 64.8% (95% CI 52.8-74.4) and 81.4% (95% CI 65.2-90.2), respectively. BCG-Moreau is an effective substrain for adjuvant instillation therapies of NMIBC, and outcomes appear to be comparable to series using other substrains. During worldwide shortage of BCG-TICE, Connaught and RIVM, BCG-Moreau may serve as an equally effective alternative. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A clinical trial of neoadjuvant hyperthermic intravesical chemotherapy (HIVEC) for treating intermediate and high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Alejandro; Inman, Brant A; Piñeiro, Idelfonso; Monserrat, Victor; Pérez, Alberto; Aparici, Vincente; Gómez, Isabel; Neira, Pilar; Uribarri, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Ths paper reports a pilot/feasibility trial of neoadjuvant hyperthermic intravesical chemotherapy (HIVEC) prior to transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). A pilot/feasibility clinical trial was performed and 15 patients with intermediate to high-risk NMIBC received HIVEC prior to TURBT. HIVEC consisting of eight weekly instillations of intravesical MMC (80 mg in 50 mL) delivered with the novel Combat BRS® system at a temperature of 43 °C for 60 min. Treatment-related adverse effects were measured and patients were followed for 2 years for disease recurrence. A total of 119 HIVEC treatments occurred. Grade 1 adverse events consisted of irritative bladder symptoms (33%), bladder spasms (27%), pain (27%), haematuria (20%) and urinary tract infection (UTI; 14%). Grade 2 adverse events were bladder calcification (7%) and reduced bladder capacity (7%). No grade 3 or higher toxicity was observed. At TURBT, eight patients (53%) were complete responders (pT0) while seven (47%) were partial responders. With a median follow-up of 29 months, the 3-year cumulative incidence of recurrence was 15%. The Combat BRS® system achieved target bladder temperatures and delivered HIVEC with a favourable side-effect profile. Our pilot trial also provides preliminary evidence of treatment efficacy.

  11. Collagen remodeling by phagocytosis is determined by collagen substrate topology and calcium-dependent interactions of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA in cell adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P. D.; Wang, Y.; Bresnick, A.; Dawson, J.; Janmey, P. A.; McCulloch, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We examine how collagen substrate topography, free intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i, and the association of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMIIA) at collagen adhesions are regulated to enable collagen phagocytosis. Fibroblasts plated on planar, collagen-coated substrates show minimal increase of [Ca2+]i, minimal colocalization of gelsolin and NMMIIA in focal adhesions, and minimal intracellular collagen degradation. In fibroblasts plated on collagen-coated latex beads there are large increases of [Ca2+]i, time- and Ca2+-dependent enrichment of NMMIIA and gelsolin at collagen adhesions, and abundant intracellular collagen degradation. NMMIIA knockdown retards gelsolin recruitment to adhesions and blocks collagen phagocytosis. Gelsolin exhibits tight, Ca2+-dependent binding to full-length NMMIIA. Gelsolin domains G4–G6 selectively require Ca2+ to interact with NMMIIA, which is restricted to residues 1339–1899 of NMMIIA. We conclude that cell adhesion to collagen presented on beads activates Ca2+ entry and promotes the formation of phagosomes enriched with NMMIIA and gelsolin. The Ca2+ -dependent interaction of gelsolin and NMMIIA in turn enables actin remodeling and enhances collagen degradation by phagocytosis. PMID:23325791

  12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF PROSPIDINE AND CISPLATIN IN NEOADJUVANT INTRAVESICAL CHEMOTHERAPY FOR NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Shabunina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the antitumor efficiency of the intravesical administration of prospiridine versus cisplatin in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC.Subjects and methods. The therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant intravesical chemotherapy (CT was comparatively analyzed in 74 patients with transitional cell NMIBC. Thirty-four patients were given prospidine in a single dose of 200 mg to the total dose of 4000 mg; 40 patients received cisplatin in a single dose of 20 mg to the total dose of 500 mg.Results. There was a preponderance of moderate dysuretic manifestations (55 % during CH with prospidine and mild cystitis (62.5 % during that with cisplatin. In the prospidine group, mild leukopenia was observed in 5 (14.7 % patients receiving intravesical CT with prospidine and in none patients treated with cisplatin. In the same group, 11.7 and 23.5 % achieved complete or partial regression, respectively. The total effect of intravesical CT with prospidine was 32.4 % and that with cisplatin was 50 % (complete or partial regression was seen in 22.5 and 27.5 %, respectively.Conclusion. The study has demonstrated that intravesical CT with prospidine is effective and well tolerated and may be recommended for the treatment of NMIBC.

  13. [Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer : Current aspects of diagnostics, local therapy options and the update of the 2016 WHO classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, A; Grimm, T; Jokisch, F; Gaisa, N T; Stief, C G

    2016-09-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is known as one of most common malignant tumors in the urogenital tract. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in particular has a high recurrence rate and results in correspondingly high costs for the public health system. To improve the recurrence rate and the prognosis of NMIBC the diagnosis, resection technique, adjuvant instillation therapy and exact histopathological classification of tumor lesions are indispensable. This article gives an overview on the current developments in this field. The current European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines and the preliminary version of the German S3 guidelines on bladder cancer list photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and narrow band imaging (NBI) as diagnostic procedures for tumors of the bladder. The trend for resection of bladder tumors is towards the use of en bloc resection using various techniques. Furthermore, an update of the WHO classification aims at a better identification and prognosis of the different risk groups of NMIBC. The treatment of NMIBC can only be improved by the combination of optimized diagnosis, precise tumor resection, improved adjuvant intravesical therapy and correct histopathological evaluation of tumors.

  14. Growth of bifidobacteria in mammalian milk

    OpenAIRE

    Ročková, Š; Rada, V.; Havlik, J.; Švejstil, R.; Vlková, E.; Bunešová, V.; Janda, K.; Profousová, L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial colonization of the mammalian intestine begins at birth, when from a sterile state a newborn infant is exposed to an external environment rich in various bacterial species. An important group of intestinal bacteria comprises bifidobacteria. Bifidobacteria represent major intestinal microbiota during the breast-feeding period. Animal milk contains all crucial nutrients for babies’ intestinal microflora. The aim of our work was to test the influence of different mammalian milk on the ...

  15. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-06

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line.

  16. Baculovirus ETL promoter acts as a shuttle promoter between insect cells and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-kou; Chu, Chih-chieh; Wu, Tzong-yuan

    2006-03-01

    To identify a shuttle promoter that can mediate gene expression in both insect cells and mammalian cells to facilitate the development of a baculovirus vector-based mammalian cell gene delivery vehicle. Recombinant baculoviruses carrying the beta-galactosidase reporter gene under the control of an early to late (ETL) promoter of the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) or a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (CMV promoter) were constructed. COS1, HeLa, CHO-K1, hFob1.19, and MCF-7 mammalian cells were tested for the expression of b-galactosidase. ETL promoter activity was higher in bone-derived hFob1.19 than in COS1, HeLa, CHO-K1, or MCF-7 mammalian cells. The transient plasmid transfection assay indicated that ETL promoter activity in mammalian cells was dependent on baculovirus gene expression. ETL promoter activity in mammalian cells is baculovirus gene expression-dependent, and the shuttle promoter will facilitate the application of baculovirus expression vectors in mammalian cell expression systems and for gene therapy.

  17. Timing of circadian genes in mammalian tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenčič, Anja; Košir, Rok; Bordyugov, Grigory; Lehmann, Robert; Rozman, Damjana; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology. The cell-autonomous clock is governed by an interlocked network of transcriptional feedback loops. Hundreds of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) regulate tissue specific functions. Transcriptome studies reveal that different organs (e.g. liver, heart, adrenal gland) feature substantially varying sets of CCGs with different peak phase distributions. To study the phase variability of CCGs in mammalian peripheral tissues, we develop a core clock model for mouse liver and adrenal gland based on expression profiles and known cis-regulatory sites. ‘Modulation factors’ associated with E-boxes, ROR-elements, and D-boxes can explain variable rhythms of CCGs, which is demonstrated for differential regulation of cytochromes P450 and 12 h harmonics. By varying model parameters we explore how tissue-specific peak phase distributions can be generated. The central role of E-boxes and ROR-elements is confirmed by analysing ChIP-seq data of BMAL1 and REV-ERB transcription factors. PMID:25048020

  18. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  19. Wnt signalling pathway parameters for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Wee Tan

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signalling regulates cell fate, survival, proliferation and differentiation at many stages of mammalian development and pathology. Mutations of two key proteins in the pathway, APC and β-catenin, have been implicated in a range of cancers, including colorectal cancer. Activation of Wnt signalling has been associated with the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and consequential up-regulation of β-catenin/TCF gene transcription. In 2003, Lee et al. constructed a computational model of Wnt signalling supported by experimental data from analysis of time-dependent concentration of Wnt signalling proteins in Xenopus egg extracts. Subsequent studies have used the Xenopus quantitative data to infer Wnt pathway dynamics in other systems. As a basis for understanding Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, a confocal live cell imaging measurement technique is developed to measure the cell and nuclear volumes of MDCK, HEK293T cells and 3 human colorectal cancer cell lines and the concentrations of Wnt signalling proteins β-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK3β and E-cadherin. These parameters provide the basis for formulating Wnt signalling models for kidney/intestinal epithelial mammalian cells. There are significant differences in concentrations of key proteins between Xenopus extracts and mammalian whole cell lysates. Higher concentrations of Axin and lower concentrations of APC are present in mammalian cells. Axin concentrations are greater than APC in kidney epithelial cells, whereas in intestinal epithelial cells the APC concentration is higher than Axin. Computational simulations based on Lee's model, with this new data, suggest a need for a recalibration of the model.A quantitative understanding of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells, in particular human colorectal cancers requires a detailed understanding of the concentrations of key protein complexes over time. Simulations of Wnt signalling in mammalian cells can be initiated

  20. Identification of mouse Vps16 and biochemical characterization of mammalian class C Vps complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Yoon; Ueda, Mutsuaki; Kominami, Eiki; Akagawa, Kimio; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2003-11-21

    Many multiprotein complexes mediate the fusion of the intracellular membranes. The question how the specificity of the membrane fusion is controlled has not been fully elucidated. Here we report the identification of a mouse homologue Vps16p (mVps16), which exhibits a high homology to the yeast Vps16p, a component of Class C vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) complex implicated in the yeast vacuole membrane fusion. Northern and Western blot analyses reveal that mVps16 is ubiquitously expressed in the mouse peripheral tissues. Biochemical analyses show that mammalian Class C Vps proteins interact with multiple syntaxins and Vps45p, which localizes in the endosomal compartments. The internalization of transferrin (Tf) is not affected by the overexpression of mammalian class C Vps proteins, but the recycling was inhibited. Taken together, this study provides biochemical characteristics of mVps16p in mammalian cells and the potential roles of mammalian Class C Vps proteins in membrane trafficking.

  1. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chen, D.S. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  2. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chen, D.S. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  3. Decellularized zebrafish cardiac extracellular matrix induces mammalian heart regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, William C W; Wang, Zhouguang; Missinato, Maria Azzurra; Park, Dae Woo; Long, Daniel Ward; Liu, Heng-Jui; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A; Kim, Kang; Wang, Yadong

    2016-11-01

    Heart attack is a global health problem that leads to significant morbidity, mortality, and health care burden. Adult human hearts have very limited regenerative capability after injury. However, evolutionarily primitive species generally have higher regenerative capacity than mammals. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to this difference. Mammalian cardiac ECM may not be optimally inductive for cardiac regeneration because of the fibrotic, instead of regenerative, responses in injured adult mammalian hearts. Given the high regenerative capacity of adult zebrafish hearts, we hypothesize that decellularized zebrafish cardiac ECM (zECM) made from normal or healing hearts can induce mammalian heart regeneration. Using zebrafish and mice as representative species of lower vertebrates and mammals, we show that a single administration of zECM, particularly the healing variety, enables cardiac functional recovery and regeneration of adult mouse heart tissues after acute myocardial infarction. zECM-treated groups exhibit proliferation of the remaining cardiomyocytes and multiple cardiac precursor cell populations and reactivation of ErbB2 expression in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, zECM exhibits pro-proliferative and chemotactic effects on human cardiac precursor cell populations in vitro. These contribute to the structural preservation and correlate with significantly higher cardiac contractile function, notably less left ventricular dilatation, and substantially more elastic myocardium in zECM-treated hearts than control animals treated with saline or decellularized adult mouse cardiac ECM. Inhibition of ErbB2 activity abrogates beneficial effects of zECM administration, indicating the possible involvement of ErbB2 signaling in zECM-mediated regeneration. This study departs from conventional focuses on mammalian ECM and introduces a new approach for cardiac tissue regeneration.

  4. Clinical usefulness of random biopsies in diagnosis and treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, J D; Palou, J; Esquinas, C; Fernández Gómez, J M; Rodríguez Faba, O

    2017-11-20

    This systematic review of the literature has been focused on determining the clinical usefulness of random bladder biopsies (RB) in the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis was performed to establish the clinic and pathological factors associated to positive biopsies. A systematic review was performed using Pubmed/Medline database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Thirty-seven articles were included, recruiting a total of 12,657 patients, 10,975 were submitted to RB. The overall incidence of positive RB was 21.91%. Significant differences were found in the incidence of positive RB when patients were stratified according to urine cytology result, tumor multiplicity, tumor appearance, stage and grade. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that the presence of positive cytology, tumor multiplicity, non-papillary appearance tumors, stage T1 and histological grades G2 and G3 represent the risk factors to predict abnormalities in RB. The incidence of positive RB in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer was 21.91%. The maximum usefulness of RB was observed when these are performed in a standardized way. The results of the meta-analysis showed that besides positive cytology and non-papillary appearance tumors, tumor multiplicity and histological grades G2 and G3 represent risk factors associated to positive RB, suggesting that the use of RB might be extensive to the intermediate risk group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymorphisms in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain gene (MYH9 are associated with lower glomerular filtration rate in mixed ancestry diabetic subjects from South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandi Edith Matsha

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Though single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the non-muscle myosin gene (MYH9 have been reported to explain most of the excess risk of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD, in African-Americans, some studies have also shown associations with diabetic end-stage renal disease. We investigated the association of MYH9 SNPs with renal traits in a mixed-ancestry South African population prone to diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three SNPs known to be associated with CKD (rs4821480, rs5756152 and rs12107 were genotyped using Taqman assay in 716 adults (198 with diabetes from the Bellville-South community, Cape Town. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR assessed. Multivariable regressions were used to relate the SNPs with renal traits. RESULTS: Mean age was 53.6 years, with the expected differences observed in characteristics by diabetic status. Significant associations were found between rs575152 and serum creatinine, and eGFR in the total population, and in diabetic participants (all p≤0.003, but not in non-diabetics (all p≥0.16, with significant interactions by diabetes status (interaction-p≤0.009. The association with ACR was borderline in diabetic participants (p = 0.05 and non-significant in non-diabetics (p = 0.85, with significant interaction (interaction p = 0.02. rs12107 was associated with fasting-, 2-hour glucose and HbA1c in diabetic participants only (interaction-p≤0.003, but not with renal traits. CONCLUSION: MYH9 SNPs were associated with renal traits only in diabetic participants in this population. Our findings and other studies suggest that MYH9 may have a broader genetic risk effect on kidney diseases.

  6. Hypoxia regulates FGFR3 expression via HIF-1α and miR-100 and contributes to cell survival in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, C; Ramachandran, A; Wigfield, S; McCormick, R; Jubb, A; Buffa, F M; Turley, H; Knowles, M A; Cranston, D; Catto, J; Harris, A L

    2013-07-09

    Non-muscle invasive (NMI) bladder cancer is characterised by increased expression and activating mutations of FGFR3. We have previously investigated the role of microRNAs in bladder cancer and have shown that FGFR3 is a target of miR-100. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia on miR-100 and FGFR3 expression, and the link between miR-100 and FGFR3 in hypoxia. Bladder cancer cell lines were exposed to normoxic or hypoxic conditions and examined for the expression of FGFR3 by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blotting, and miR-100 by qPCR. The effect of FGFR3 and miR-100 on cell viability in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) was examined by transfecting siRNA or mimic-100, respectively. In NMI bladder cancer cell lines, FGFR3 expression was induced by hypoxia in a transcriptional and HIF-1α-dependent manner. Increased FGFR3 was also in part dependent on miR-100 levels, which decreased in hypoxia. Knockdown of FGFR3 led to a decrease in phosphorylation of the downstream kinases mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (PKB), which was more pronounced under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, transfection of mimic-100 also decreased phosphorylation of MAPK and PKB. Finally, knocking down FGFR3 profoundly decreased 2-D and 3-D cell growth, whereas introduction of mimic-100 decreased 3-D growth of cells. Hypoxia, in part via suppression of miR-100, induces FGFR3 expression in bladder cancer, both of which have an important role in maintaining cell viability under conditions of stress.

  7. FGFR3 mutation analysis in voided urine samples to decrease cystoscopies and cost in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer surveillance: a comparison of 3 strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Kim E M; Kompier, Lucie C; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W; Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2013-05-01

    We determined whether FGFR3 mutation analysis of voided urine samples would be cost-effective to partly replace cystoscopy in the surveillance of patients treated for nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. In this decision analytical study we analyzed data on 70 Dutch patients with FGFR3 positive primary tumors and a median followup of 8.8 years. Surveillance strategies were compared in a Markov model. Modified surveillance consisted of FGFR3 mutation analysis of voided urine samples every 3 months, and cystoscopy at 3, 12 and 24 months. Standard surveillance was defined as cystoscopy every 3 months and minimal surveillance was defined as cystoscopy at 3, 12 and 24 months. Analysis was stratified for 3 risk profiles, including surveillance after 1) the primary tumor, 2) the first to third recurrence and 3) the fourth recurrence or more. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of variations in cost, sensitivity and specificity. The probability of no recurrence after 2 years of surveillance after a primary tumor was higher for modified surveillance than for standard and minimal surveillance, eg after primary tumors (95.7% vs 95.0% and 93.9%, respectively). The total cost of surveillance after the primary tumor was lower for minimal and modified surveillance (€2,254 and €2,558, respectively) than for standard surveillance (€5,861). Results were robust to changing inputs over plausible ranges and consistent for each of the 3 risk profiles. Surveillance in which cystoscopy is partly replaced by FGFR3 mutation analysis of urine seems a safe, effective and cost-effective surveillance strategy. Further validation in larger cohorts is required. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Seth P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Dinney, Colin P.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Groshen, Susan; Hahn, Noah M.; Hansel, Donna; Kwiatkowski, David; O’Donnell, Michael; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Svatek, Robert; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Apolo, Andrea B.; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Callahan, Margaret; Cha, Eugene K.; Drake, Charles; Jarow, Jonathan; Kamat, Ashish; Kim, William; Knowles, Margaret; Mann, Bhupinder; Marchionni, Luigi; McConkey, David; McShane, Lisa; Ramirez, Nilsa; Sharabi, Andrew; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Solit, David; Tangen, Catherine M.; Amiri, Abdul Tawab; Van Allen, Eliezer; West, Pamela J.; Witjes, J. A.; Quale, Diane Zipursky

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from NCI, FDA, National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), advocacy and the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. The meeting goals and objectives were to: 1) create a collaborative environment in which the greater bladder research community can pursue future optimally designed novel clinical trials focused on the theme of molecular targeted and immune-based therapies in NMIBC; 2) frame the clinical and translational questions that are of highest priority; and 3) develop two clinical trial designs focusing on immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Despite successful development and implementation of large Phase II and Phase III trials in bladder and upper urinary tract cancers, there are no active and accruing trials in the NMIBC space within the NCTN. Disappointingly, there has been only one new FDA approved drug (Valrubicin) in any bladder cancer disease state since 1998. Although genomic-based data for bladder cancer are increasingly available, translating these discoveries into practice changing treatment is still to come. Recently, major efforts in defining the genomic characteristics of NMIBC have been achieved. Aligned with these data is the growing number of targeted therapy agents approved and/or in development in other organ site cancers and the multiple similarities of bladder cancer with molecular subtypes in these other cancers. Additionally, although bladder cancer is one of the more immunogenic tumors, some tumors have the ability to attenuate or eliminate host immune responses. Two trial concepts emerged from the meeting including a window of opportunity trial (Phase 0) testing an FGFR3 inhibitor and a second multi-arm multi-stage trial testing combinations

  9. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Serdar Gözen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Materials and methods: Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel. The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria score system. Results: Mean age was 72 (32-87 years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period. 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3% were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Conclusions: BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  10. Generation of potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes against in male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer by dendritic cells loaded with dying T24 bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eu Chang; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Je-Jung; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2017-01-01

    In order to induce a potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy for bladder cancer, various tumor antigens can be loaded onto DCs. The aim of this study was to establish a method of immunotherapy for male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using bladder cancer-specific CTLs generated in vitro by DCs. Monocyte-derived DCs from bladder cancer patients were induced to mature in a standard cytokine cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and PGE2: standard DCs, sDCs) or anα-type 1-polarized DC (αDC1) cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid) and loaded with the UVB-irradiated bladder cancer cell line, T24. Antigen-loaded αDC1s were evaluated by morphological and functional assays, and the bladder cancer-specific CTL response was analyzed by cytotoxic assay. The αDC1s significantly increased the expression of several molecules pertaining to DC maturation, regardless of whether or not the αDC1s were loaded with tumor antigens, relative to sDCs. The αDC1s demonstrated increased production of interleukin-12 both during maturation and after subsequent stimulation with CD40L that was not significantly affected by loading with tumor antigens as compared to that of sDCs. Bladder cancer-specific CTLs targeting autologous bladder cancer cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with dying T24 cells. Autologous αDC1s loaded with an allogeneic bladder cancer cell line resulted in increased bladder cancer-specific CTL responses as compared to that with sDCs, and therefore, may provide a novel source of DC-based vaccines that canbe used in immunotherapy for male patients with NMIBC. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  11. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; De Berardinis, Ettore; Barchetti, Giovanni; Simone, Giuseppe; Leonardo, Constantino; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Gallucci, Michele; Catto, James; Catalano, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. • A critical step in BCa staging is to differentiate NMIBC from MIBC. • Morphological and functional sequences are reliable techniques in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. • Diffusion tensor imaging could be an additional tool in BCa staging.

  12. Effect of Microgravity on Mammalian Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, H.; Blackshear, M.; Mahaffey, K.; Khan, A. A.; Delucas, L.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on mammalian system is an important and interesting topic for scientific investigation, since NASA s objective is to send manned flights to planets like Mars and eventual human colonization. The Astronauts will be exposed to microgravity environment for a long duration of time during these flights. Our objective of research is to conduct in vitro studies for the effect of microgravity on mammalian immune system and nervous system. We did our preliminary investigations by exposing mammalian lymphocytes and astrocyte cells to a microgravity simulator cell bioreactor designed by NASA and manufactured at Synthecon, Inc. (USA).Our initial results showed no significant change in cytokine expression in these cells up to a time period of 120 hours exposure. Our future experiments will involve exposure for a longer period of time.

  13. New tools for functional mammalian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummelkamp, T.R.; Bernards, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the function of individual genes that encode components of cellsignalling pathways is crucial to our understanding of normal growth control and its deregulation in cancer, but we have functional information for only ~15% of human genes at present. Several new technologies have

  14. Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.А. Ковальова

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

  15. Mammalian gastrointestinal parasites in rainforest remnants of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examined 349 faecal samples of 17 mammalian species and successfully identified 24 gastroin-testinal parasite taxa including 1 protozoan, 2 trematode, 3 cestode and 18 nematode taxa. Twenty of these parasites are known parasites of humans. We also found that as much as 73% of all infected samples were infected ...

  16. Molecular evolution of mammalian ribonucleases 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, J.Y; Ursing, B.M.; Kolkman, J.A.; Beintema, J.J

    There have been many studies on the chemistry of mammalian pancreatic ribonucleases (ribonucleases 1), but the functional biology of this family of homologous proteins is still largely unknown. Many studies have been performed on the molecular evolution and properties of this enzyme from species

  17. Architecture of mammalian respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Zhu, Jiapeng; Hirst, Judy

    2014-11-06

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is essential for oxidative phosphorylation in mammalian mitochondria. It couples electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with proton translocation across the energy-transducing inner membrane, providing electrons for respiration and driving ATP synthesis. Mammalian complex I contains 44 different nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded subunits, with a combined mass of 1 MDa. The 14 conserved 'core' subunits have been structurally defined in the minimal, bacterial complex, but the structures and arrangement of the 30 'supernumerary' subunits are unknown. Here we describe a 5 Å resolution structure of complex I from Bos taurus heart mitochondria, a close relative of the human enzyme, determined by single-particle electron cryo-microscopy. We present the structures of the mammalian core subunits that contain eight iron-sulphur clusters and 60 transmembrane helices, identify 18 supernumerary transmembrane helices, and assign and model 14 supernumerary subunits. Thus, we considerably advance knowledge of the structure of mammalian complex I and the architecture of its supernumerary ensemble around the core domains. Our structure provides insights into the roles of the supernumerary subunits in regulation, assembly and homeostasis, and a basis for understanding the effects of mutations that cause a diverse range of human diseases.

  18. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Engineering Iron Responses in Mammalian Cells by Signal-Induced Protein Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guihua; Li, Huanqiu; Wei, Yongyi; Xuan, Weimin; Zhang, Roushu; Breden, Larisa E; Wang, Wei; Liang, Fu-Sen

    2017-06-16

    A new synthetic biology engineering strategy integrating chemical reactivity sensing and small molecule induced protein dimerization has been developed to generate artificial Fe(2+) signaling circuitry to control tailored cellular events in mammalian cells. The dual function probe ABA-FE18 (Fe(2+)-sensing and protein dimerization) derived from ABA was developed and used to control gene activation, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal remodeling in response to Fe(2+). This technology was utilized to design signal circuitry incorporating "AND" and "OR" biologic gates that enables mammalian cells to translate different combinations of Fe(2+) and H2O2 signals into predefined biological outputs.

  20. Metabolic-flux analysis of mammalian-cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonarius, H.P.J.

    1998-01-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry mammalian cells are cultivated for the production of recombinant glycoproteins, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies. In contrast to other expression systems, such as prokaryotes or yeasts, mammalian cells are able to glycosylate and fold therapeutic

  1. Generation of potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes against in male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer by dendritic cells loaded with dying T24 bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background In order to induce a potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in dendritic cell (DC-based immunotherapy for bladder cancer, various tumor antigens can be loaded onto DCs. Objective The aim of this study was to establish a method of immunotherapy for male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC, using bladder cancer-specific CTLs generated in vitro by DCs. Materials and Methods Monocyte-derived DCs from bladder cancer patients were induced to mature in a standard cytokine cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and PGE2: standard DCs, sDCs or anα-type 1-polarized DC (αDC1 cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and loaded with the UVB-irradiated bladder cancer cell line, T24. Antigen-loaded αDC1s were evaluated by morphological and functional assays, and the bladder cancer-specific CTL response was analyzed by cytotoxic assay. Results The αDC1s significantly increased the expression of several molecules pertaining to DC maturation, regardless of whether or not the αDC1s were loaded with tumor antigens, relative to sDCs. The αDC1s demonstrated increased production of interleukin-12 both during maturation and after subsequent stimulation with CD40L that was not significantly affected by loading with tumor antigens as compared to that of sDCs. Bladder cancer-specific CTLs targeting autologous bladder cancer cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with dying T24 cells. Conclusion Autologous αDC1s loaded with an allogeneic bladder cancer cell line resulted in increased bladder cancer-specific CTL responses as compared to that with sDCs, and therefore, may provide a novel source of DC-based vaccines that canbe used in immunotherapy for male patients with NMIBC.

  2. Dose, duration and strain of bacillus Calmette-Guerin in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yongjun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kim, Hyung Suk; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2017-10-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation is widely used as an adjuvant therapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) in patients with intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, the effective dose, duration, and strain of BCG have not yet been clearly determined. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between dose, duration, and strain of BCG and clinical outcomes in NMIBC patients treated with TURBT. We conducted a literature search in Embase, Scopus, and PubMed databases for all relevant articles published up to October 2016 in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis guidelines. The relative risks of clinical outcomes, including recurrence, progression, cancer-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality according to dose (standard vs low), duration (induction vs maintenance), and strain of BCG were presented as the pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Nineteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were finally selected in this meta-analysis. The risk of recurrence was significantly highly observed in case of low-dose BCG (RR, 1.17; 95% CI 1.06-1.30) and induction BCG (RR, 1.33; 95% CI 1.17-1.50) only group without heterogeneity among the included studies. Although there were no significant differences between dose or duration and other clinical outcomes. On direct comparison in each study comparing BCG strains, the Tice stain showed a relatively high probability of recurrence compared with the Connaught (RR, 1.29; 95% CI 1.01-1.64) and RIVM (RR, 2.04, 95% CI 1.28-3.25) strains. Funnel plot testing revealed no significant publication bias. The use of standard dose and maintenance BCG instillation may be effective to reduce recurrence rate after TURBT for NMIBC. Further large scale, well-designed, and prospective studies, with stratification of the patients into risk group at randomization, will be required to determine the optimal

  3. Dynamic JUNQ inclusion bodies are asymmetrically inherited in mammalian cell lines through the asymmetric partitioning of vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodnik, Mikołaj; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Brown, Rachel; Turkowska, Joanna; Średniawa, Władysław; Pattabiraman, Sundararaghavan; Amen, Triana; Abraham, Ayelet-chen; Eichler, Noam; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2014-06-03

    Aging is associated with the accumulation of several types of damage: in particular, damage to the proteome. Recent work points to a conserved replicative rejuvenation mechanism that works by preventing the inheritance of damaged and misfolded proteins by specific cells during division. Asymmetric inheritance of misfolded and aggregated proteins has been shown in bacteria and yeast, but relatively little evidence exists for a similar mechanism in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate, using long-term 4D imaging, that the vimentin intermediate filament establishes mitotic polarity in mammalian cell lines and mediates the asymmetric partitioning of damaged proteins. We show that mammalian JUNQ inclusion bodies containing soluble misfolded proteins are inherited asymmetrically, similarly to JUNQ quality-control inclusions observed in yeast. Mammalian IPOD-like inclusion bodies, meanwhile, are not always inherited by the same cell as the JUNQ. Our study suggests that the mammalian cytoskeleton and intermediate filaments provide the physical scaffold for asymmetric inheritance of dynamic quality-control JUNQ inclusions. Mammalian IPOD inclusions containing amyloidogenic proteins are not partitioned as effectively during mitosis as their counterparts in yeast. These findings provide a valuable mechanistic basis for studying the process of asymmetric inheritance in mammalian cells, including cells potentially undergoing polar divisions, such as differentiating stem cells and cancer cells.

  4. Architectural Epigenetics: Mitotic Retention of Mammalian Transcriptional Regulatory Information ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Young, Daniel W.; Montecino, Martin; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory information must be retained during mammalian cell division to sustain phenotype-specific and physiologically responsive gene expression in the progeny cells. Histone modifications, DNA methylation, and RNA-mediated silencing are well-defined epigenetic mechanisms that control the cellular phenotype by regulating gene expression. Recent results suggest that the mitotic retention of nuclease hypersensitivity, selective histone marks, as well as the lineage-specific transcription factor occupancy of promoter elements contribute to the epigenetic control of sustained cellular identity in progeny cells. We propose that these mitotic epigenetic signatures collectively constitute architectural epigenetics, a novel and essential mechanism that conveys regulatory information to sustain the control of phenotype and proliferation in progeny cells by bookmarking genes for activation or suppression. PMID:20696837

  5. Architectural epigenetics: mitotic retention of mammalian transcriptional regulatory information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Young, Daniel W; Montecino, Martin; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Gary S

    2010-10-01

    Epigenetic regulatory information must be retained during mammalian cell division to sustain phenotype-specific and physiologically responsive gene expression in the progeny cells. Histone modifications, DNA methylation, and RNA-mediated silencing are well-defined epigenetic mechanisms that control the cellular phenotype by regulating gene expression. Recent results suggest that the mitotic retention of nuclease hypersensitivity, selective histone marks, as well as the lineage-specific transcription factor occupancy of promoter elements contribute to the epigenetic control of sustained cellular identity in progeny cells. We propose that these mitotic epigenetic signatures collectively constitute architectural epigenetics, a novel and essential mechanism that conveys regulatory information to sustain the control of phenotype and proliferation in progeny cells by bookmarking genes for activation or suppression.

  6. Rationally designed logic integration of regulatory signals in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Madeleine; Bleris, Leonidas; Lohmueller, Jason; Xie, Zhen; Benenson, Yaakov

    2010-09-01

    Molecular-level information processing is essential for `smart' in vivo nanosystems. Natural molecular computing, such as the regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis by special proteins called transcription factors, has inspired engineered systems that can control the levels of mRNA with certain combinations of transcription factors. Here, we show an alternative approach to achieving general-purpose control of mRNA and protein levels by logic integration of transcription factor input signals in mammalian cells. The transcription factors regulate synthetic genes coding for small regulatory RNAs (called microRNAs), which, in turn, control the mRNA of interest (the output) via an RNA interference pathway. The simplicity of these modular interactions makes it possible, in theory, to implement any arbitrary logic relation between the transcription factors and the output. We construct, test and optimize increasingly complex circuits with up to three transcription factor inputs, establishing a platform for in vivo molecular computing.

  7. Comparative analysis of the mammalian WNT4 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Geoffrey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WNT4 is a critical signalling molecule in embryogenesis and homeostasis, but the elements that control its transcriptional regulation are largely unknown. This study uses comparative cross species sequence and functional analyses between humans and a marsupial (the tammar wallaby,Macropus eugenii to refine the mammalian Wnt4 promoter. Results We have defined a highly conserved 89 bp minimal promoter region in human WNT4 by comparative analysis with the tammar wallaby. There are many conserved transcription factor binding sites in the proximal promoter region, including SP1, MyoD, NFκB and AP2, as well as highly conserved CpG islands within the human, mouse and marsupial promoters, suggesting that DNA methylation may play an important role in WNT4 transcriptional regulation. Conclusion Using a marsupial model, we have been able to provide new information on the transcriptional regulators in the promoter of this essential mammalian developmental gene, WNT4. These transcription factor binding sites and CpG islands are highly conserved in two disparate mammals, and are likely key controlling elements in the regulation of this essential developmental gene.

  8. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  9. Mammalian dental function and wear: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S. Ungar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a brief synopsis of work on relationships between mammalian tooth form and function, and considers the role of dental wear in studies of mammal teeth. Mammalian teeth function both as guides for chewing and as tools for initiating and propagating cracks through food items. They tend to vary in form and structure with the mechanical properties of foods a species has evolved to eat; and we can learn a lot about relationships between teeth and diet by comparing species. One area of special interest is tooth wear. Dental structure and chemistry combine in ways that lead wear to sculpt occlusal surfaces so a tooth can develop or maintain its functional efficiency. Dental wear, especially that on microscopic scales, can also serve as a proxy for diet in fossil species, as specific types of food leave distinctive patterns.

  10. Ricin Trafficking in Plant and Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Spooner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ricin is a heterodimeric plant protein that is potently toxic to mammalian and many other eukaryotic cells. It is synthesized and stored in the endosperm cells of maturing Ricinus communis seeds (castor beans. The ricin family has two major members, both, lectins, collectively known as Ricinus communis agglutinin ll (ricin and Ricinus communis agglutinin l (RCA. These proteins are stored in vacuoles within the endosperm cells of mature Ricinus seeds and they are rapidly broken down by hydrolysis during the early stages of post-germinative growth. Both ricin and RCA traffic within the plant cell from their site of synthesis to the storage vacuoles, and when they intoxicate mammalian cells they traffic from outside the cell to their site of action. In this review we will consider both of these trafficking routes.

  11. Scaling up the curvature of mammalian metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eBueno

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A curvilinear relationship between mammalian metabolic rate and body size on a log-log scale has been adopted in lieu of thelongstanding concept of a 3/4 allometric relationship (Kolokotrones et al. 2010. The central tenet of Metabolic Ecology (ME states that metabolism at the individual level scales-up to drive the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems. If this tenet is correct, the curvature of metabolism should be perceived in other ecological traits. By analyzing the size scaling allometry of eight different mammalian traits including basal and field metabolic rate, offspring biomass production, ingestion rate, costs of locomotion, life span, population growth rate and population density we show that the curvature affects most ecological rates and

  12. Structure and function of mammalian cilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren T

    2008-01-01

    In the past half century, beginning with electron microscopic studies of 9 + 2 motile and 9 + 0 primary cilia, novel insights have been obtained regarding the structure and function of mammalian cilia. All cilia can now be viewed as sensory cellular antennae that coordinate a large number...... of cellular signaling pathways, sometimes coupling the signaling to ciliary motility or alternatively to cell division and differentiation. This view has had unanticipated consequences for our understanding of developmental processes and human disease....

  13. Chromate-induced epimutations in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Catherine B.; Su, Lin; Bowser, Darlene; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing by aberrant DNA methylation of gene promoter regions is a nonmutagenic but heritable epigenetic mechanism that may mistakenly cause the silencing of important cancer-related tumor suppressor genes. Using a transgenic, V79-derived, mammalian cell line (G12) that contains a bacterial gpt reporter gene in its DNA, we can study carcinogen-induced gene inactivation by mutagenic as well as epigenetic DNA methylation mechanisms. Whereas numerous carcinogens have previously ...

  14. Mammalian evolution may not be strictly bifurcating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Björn M; Janke, Axel

    2010-12-01

    The massive amount of genomic sequence data that is now available for analyzing evolutionary relationships among 31 placental mammals reduces the stochastic error in phylogenetic analyses to virtually zero. One would expect that this would make it possible to finally resolve controversial branches in the placental mammalian tree. We analyzed a 2,863,797 nucleotide-long alignment (3,364 genes) from 31 placental mammals for reconstructing their evolution. Most placental mammalian relationships were resolved, and a consensus of their evolution is emerging. However, certain branches remain difficult or virtually impossible to resolve. These branches are characterized by short divergence times in the order of 1-4 million years. Computer simulations based on parameters from the real data show that as little as about 12,500 amino acid sites could be sufficient to confidently resolve short branches as old as about 90 million years ago (Ma). Thus, the amount of sequence data should no longer be a limiting factor in resolving the relationships among placental mammals. The timing of the early radiation of placental mammals coincides with a period of climate warming some 100-80 Ma and with continental fragmentation. These global processes may have triggered the rapid diversification of placental mammals. However, the rapid radiations of certain mammalian groups complicate phylogenetic analyses, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting and introgression. These speciation-related processes led to a mosaic genome and conflicting phylogenetic signals. Split network methods are ideal for visualizing these problematic branches and can therefore depict data conflict and possibly the true evolutionary history better than strictly bifurcating trees. Given the timing of tectonics, of placental mammalian divergences, and the fossil record, a Laurasian rather than Gondwanan origin of placental mammals seems the most parsimonious explanation.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of the mammalian cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Baverstock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding how mammalian cells are regulated epigenetically to express phenotype is a priority. The cellular phenotypic transition, induced by ionising radiation, from a normal cell to the genomic instability phenotype, where the ability to replicate the genotype accurately is compromised, illustrates important features of epigenetic regulation. Based on this phenomenon and earlier work we propose a model to describe the mammalian cell as a self assembled open system operating in an environment that includes its genotype, neighbouring cells and beyond. Phenotype is represented by high dimensional attractors, evolutionarily conditioned for stability and robustness and contingent on rules of engagement between gene products encoded in the genetic network. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We describe how this system functions and note the indeterminacy and fluidity of its internal workings which place it in the logical reasoning framework of predicative logic. We find that the hypothesis is supported by evidence from cell and molecular biology. CONCLUSIONS: Epigenetic regulation and memory are fundamentally physical, as opposed to chemical, processes and the transition to genomic instability is an important feature of mammalian cells with probable fundamental relevance to speciation and carcinogenesis. A source of evolutionarily selectable variation, in terms of the rules of engagement between gene products, is seen as more likely to have greater prominence than genetic variation in an evolutionary context. As this epigenetic variation is based on attractor states phenotypic changes are not gradual; a phenotypic transition can involve the changed contribution of several gene products in a single step.

  16. Comparison of amphibian and mammalian thyroperoxidase ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) catalyzes the production of thyroid hormones in the vertebrate thyroid gland by oxidizing iodide (I- ) to produce iodinated tyrosines on thyroglobulin, and further coupling of specific mono- or di-iodinated tyrosines to generate the triiodo- and tetra-iodothyronine, precursors to thyroid hormone. This enzyme is a target for thyroid disrupting chemicals. TPO-inhibition by xenobiotics is a molecular initiating event that is known to perturb the thyroid axis by preventing synthesis of thyroid hormone. Previous work on TPO-inhibition has been focused on mammalian TPO; specifically, the rat and pig. A primary objective of this experiment was to directly measure TPO activity in a non-mammalian system, in this case a thyroid gland homogenate from Xenopus laevis; as well as compare chemical inhibition from past mammalian studies to the amphibian data generated. Thyroid glands obtained from X. laevis tadpoles at NF stages 58-60, were pooled and homogenized by sonication in phosphate buffer. This homogenate was then used to test 24 chemicals for inhibition of TPO as measured by conversion of Amplex UltraRed (AUR) substrate to its fluorescent product. The test chemicals were selected based upon previous results from rat in vitro TPO assays, and X. laevis in vitro and in vivo studies for thyroid disrupting endpoints, and included both positive and negative chemicals in these assays. An initial screening of the chemicals was done at a single high con

  17. Mammalian membrane block to polyspermy: new insights into how mammalian eggs prevent fertilisation by multiple sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Allison J; Evans, Janice P

    2006-01-01

    To inhibit fertilisation by more than one sperm (a condition known as polyspermy), eggs have developed preventative mechanisms known as blocks to polyspermy. The block at the level of the egg extracellular coat (the zona pellucida in mammals, the vitelline envelope in non-mammals) has been well characterised in many different animal species and the block at the level of the egg plasma membrane is understood in some non-mammalian species. However, virtually nothing is known about the membrane block to polyspermy in mammalian eggs, despite data dating back 50-90 years that provide evidence for its existence. In the present review, we will discuss the background on blocks to polyspermy used by animal eggs and then focus on the membrane block to polyspermy in mammalian eggs. This will include a summary of classical studies that provide evidence for this block in mammalian eggs, assays used to study the mammalian membrane block and what has been elucidated from recent experimental studies about the cellular signalling events that lead to membrane block establishment and the mechanism of how the membrane block may prevent additional fertilisation.

  18. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-06

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  19. Chlorophacinone residues in mammalian prey at a black-tailed prairie dog colony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Hulse, Craig S.; Rice, Clifford P.

    2012-01-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (BTPDs), Cynomys ludovicianus, are an important prey for raptors; therefore, the use of the rodenticide Rozol (0.005% chlorophacinone active ingredient) to control BTPDs raises concern for secondary poisonings resulting from the consumption of contaminated prey by raptors. In the present study, the authors observed Rozol exposure and adverse effects to mammalian prey on 11 of 12 search days of the study. Mammalian hepatic chlorophacinone residues ranged from 0.44 to 7.56 µg/g. Poisoned prey availability was greater than previously reported.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in mammalian tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Ying; Prochazka, Jan; Goodwin, Alice F; Klein, Ophir D

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the central role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in mammalian tooth development. The FGF family consists of 22 members, most of which bind to four different receptor tyrosine kinases, which in turn signal through a cascade of intracellular proteins. This signaling regulates a number of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, cell adhesion and cell mobility. FGF signaling first becomes important in the presumptive dental epithelium at the initiation stage of tooth development, and subsequently, it controls the invagination of the dental epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Later, FGFs are critical in tooth shape formation and differentiation of ameloblasts and odontoblasts, as well as in the development and homeostasis of the stem cell niche that fuels the continuously growing mouse incisor. In addition, FGF signaling is critical in human teeth, as mutations in genes encoding FGF ligands or receptors result in several congenital syndromes characterized by alterations in tooth number, morphology or enamel structure. The parallel roles of FGF signaling in mouse and human tooth development demonstrate the conserved importance of FGF signaling in mammalian odontogenesis.

  1. Passaging protocols for mammalian neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSC) offer great promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. As a consequence of the large numbers of cells that will be needed for drug testing and transplantation studies, it is necessary to develop protocols for the large-scale expansion of mammalian NSC. Neural stem cells and early progenitor cells can be expanded in vitro as aggregates in controlled bioreactors using carefully designed media. The first objective of this study was to determine if it is possible to maintain a population of murine neural stem and progenitor cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors over extended periods of time. We discovered that serial passaging of a mixture of aggregates sizes resulted in high viabilities, high viable cell densities, and good control of aggregate diameter. When the NSC aggregates were serially subcultured three times without mechanical dissociation, a total multiplication ratio of 2.9 x 10(3) was achieved over a period of 12 days, whereas the aggregate size was controlled (mean diameter less than 150 microm) below levels at which necrosis would occur. Moreover, cell densities of 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL were repeatedly achieved in batch culture with viabilities exceeding 80%. The second objective was to examine the proliferative potential of single cells shed from the surface of these aggregates. We found that the single cells, when subcultured, retained the capacity to generate new aggregates, gave rise to cultures with high viable cell densities and were able to differentiate into all of the primary cell phenotypes in the central nervous system.

  2. Dedifferentiation and proliferation of mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqiang Zhang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available It has long been thought that mammalian cardiomyocytes are terminally-differentiated and unable to proliferate. However, myocytes in more primitive animals such as zebrafish are able to dedifferentiate and proliferate to regenerate amputated cardiac muscle.Here we test the hypothesis that mature mammalian cardiomyocytes retain substantial cellular plasticity, including the ability to dedifferentiate, proliferate, and acquire progenitor cell phenotypes. Two complementary methods were used: 1 cardiomyocyte purification from rat hearts, and 2 genetic fate mapping in cardiac explants from bi-transgenic mice. Cardiomyocytes isolated from rodent hearts were purified by multiple centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation steps, and the purity verified by immunostaining and RT-PCR. Within days in culture, purified cardiomyocytes lost their characteristic electrophysiological properties and striations, flattened and began to divide, as confirmed by proliferation markers and BrdU incorporation. Many dedifferentiated cardiomyocytes went on to express the stem cell antigen c-kit, and the early cardiac transcription factors GATA4 and Nkx2.5. Underlying these changes, inhibitory cell cycle molecules were suppressed in myocyte-derived cells (MDCs, while microRNAs known to orchestrate proliferation and pluripotency increased dramatically. Some, but not all, MDCs self-organized into spheres and re-differentiated into myocytes and endothelial cells in vitro. Cell fate tracking of cardiomyocytes from 4-OH-Tamoxifen-treated double-transgenic MerCreMer/ZEG mouse hearts revealed that green fluorescent protein (GFP continues to be expressed in dedifferentiated cardiomyocytes, two-thirds of which were also c-kit(+.Contradicting the prevailing view that they are terminally-differentiated, postnatal mammalian cardiomyocytes are instead capable of substantial plasticity. Dedifferentiation of myocytes facilitates proliferation and confers a degree of stemness

  3. Consequences of ongoing retrotransposition in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell PH

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrick H Maxwell Department of Biological Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA Abstract: Retrotransposons can have significant influences on gene expression and genome stability through their ability to integrate reverse-transcript copies of their sequences at new genomic locations by retrotransposition. These elements have been long known to retrotranspose in mammalian germ cells to give rise to inherited insertion alleles, but more recent work has also shown that retrotransposition can occur in mammalian somatic cells, particularly in brain tissue and tumors. Retrotransposition makes appreciable contributions to spontaneous disease-causing alleles in humans and a more significant contribution to spontaneous mutations in mice. Genome-wide studies have found high levels of polymorphic retrotransposon insertions in human populations that are consistent with ongoing retrotransposition. Many insertions do not disrupt exons, but insertions into introns or flanking genes can alter gene expression patterns, generate truncated or antisense gene transcripts, alter splicing patterns, or result in premature polyadenylation of gene transcripts. Furthermore, the very high genomic copy numbers of these elements can lead to nonallelic homologous recombination events that produce gene deletions/duplications and genome rearrangements, and can also lead to evolution of particular insertions or types of elements to have cellular functions through exaptation. Mobility of these elements occurs despite multiple epigenetic mechanisms to restrict their expression. While the potential for retrotransposons to significantly influence mammalian health and cellular functions is clear, substantial research efforts will be needed to fully elucidate the actual contributions of natural levels of mobility of endogenous elements to the health and development of humans and other mammals. Keywords: retrotransposon, human, mouse, mutations, epigenetics

  4. Genome Editing Using Mammalian Haploid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Horii

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haploid cells are useful for studying gene functions because disruption of a single allele can cause loss-of-function phenotypes. Recent success in generating haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs in mice, rats, and monkeys provides a new platform for simple genetic manipulation of the mammalian genome. Use of haploid ESCs enhances the genome-editing potential of the CRISPR/Cas system. For example, CRISPR/Cas was used in haploid ESCs to generate multiple knockouts and large deletions at high efficiency. In addition, genome-wide screening is facilitated by haploid cell lines containing gene knockout libraries.

  5. Acoustophoretic Synchronization of Mammalian Cells in Microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thévoz, P.; Adams, J.D.; Shea, H.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first use of ultrasonic standing waves to achieve cell cycle phase synchronization in mammalian cells in a high-throughput and reagent-free manner. The acoustophoretic cell synchronization (ACS) device utilizes volume-dependent acoustic radiation force within a microchannel...... to selectively purify target cells of desired phase from an asynchronous mixture based on cell cycle-dependent fluctuations in size. We show that ultrasonic separation allows for gentle, scalable, and label-free synchronization with high G1 phase synchrony (84%) and throughput (3 × 106 cells/h per microchannel)....

  6. Nutrient acquisition strategies of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Wilhelm; Thompson, Craig B

    2017-06-07

    Mammalian cells are surrounded by diverse nutrients, such as glucose, amino acids, various macromolecules and micronutrients, which they can import through transmembrane transporters and endolysosomal pathways. By using different nutrient sources, cells gain metabolic flexibility to survive periods of starvation. Quiescent cells take up sufficient nutrients to sustain homeostasis. However, proliferating cells depend on growth-factor-induced increases in nutrient uptake to support biomass formation. Here, we review cellular nutrient acquisition strategies and their regulation by growth factors and cell-intrinsic nutrient sensors. We also discuss how oncogenes and tumour suppressors promote nutrient uptake and thereby support the survival and growth of cancer cells.

  7. The terminal DNA structure of mammalian chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    McElligott, R; Wellinger, R J

    1997-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic organisms, telomeric DNA is composed of a variable number of short direct repeats. While the primary sequence of telomeric repeats has been determined for a great variety of species, the actual physical DNA structure at the ends of a bona fide metazoan chromosome with a centromere is unknown. It is shown here that an overhang of the strand forming the 3' ends of the chromosomes, the G-rich strand, is found at mammalian chromosome ends. Moreover, on at least some te...

  8. Sodium channels and mammalian sensory mechanotransduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Raouf, R.; Rugiero, F.; Kiesewetter, H.; Hatch, R.; Hummler, E; Nassar, M. A.; Wang, F.; Wood, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the degenerin/epithelial (DEG/ENaC) sodium channel family are mechanosensors in C elegans, and Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel knockout mice have major deficits in mechanosensation. β and γENaC sodium channel subunits are present with acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mammalian sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The extent to which epithelial or voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in transduction of mechanical stimuli is u...

  9. Mammalian developmental genetics in the twentieth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzt, Karen

    2012-12-01

    This Perspectives is a review of the breathtaking history of mammalian genetics in the past century and, in particular, of the ways in which genetic thinking has illuminated aspects of mouse development. To illustrate the power of that thinking, selected hypothesis-driven experiments and technical advances are discussed. Also included in this account are the beginnings of mouse genetics at the Bussey Institute, Columbia University, and The Jackson Laboratory and a retrospective discussion of one of the classic problems in developmental genetics, the T/t complex and its genetic enigmas.

  10. DNA computation in mammalian cells: microRNA logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, James; Deiters, Alexander

    2013-07-17

    DNA computation can utilize logic gates as modules to create molecular computers with biological inputs. Modular circuits that recognize nucleic acid inputs through strand hybridization activate computation cascades to produce controlled outputs. This allows for the construction of synthetic circuits that can be interfaced with cellular environments. We have engineered oligonucleotide AND gates to respond to specific microRNA (miRNA) inputs in live mammalian cells. Both single and dual-sensing miRNA-based computation devices were synthesized for the cell-specific identification of endogenous miR-21 and miR-122. A logic gate response was observed with miRNA expression regulators, exhibiting molecular recognition of miRNA profile changes. Nucleic acid logic gates that are functional in a cellular environment and recognize endogenous inputs significantly expand the potential of DNA computation to monitor, image, and respond to cell-specific markers.

  11. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  12. A code for transcription initiation in mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Martin C.; Valen, Eivind Dale; Krogh, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide detection of transcription start sites (TSSs) has revealed that RNA Polymerase II transcription initiates at millions of positions in mammalian genomes. Most core promoters do not have a single TSS, but an array of closely located TSSs with different rates of initiation. As a rule...... that initiation events are clustered on the chromosomes at multiple scales - clusters within clusters - indicating multiple regulatory processes. Within the smallest of such clusters, which can be interpreted as core promoters, the local DNA sequence predicts the relative transcription start usage of each...... nucleotide with a remarkable 91% accuracy, implying the existence of a DNA code that determines TSS selection. Conversely, the total expression strength of such clusters is only partially determined by the local DNA sequence. Thus, the overall control of transcription can be understood as a combination...

  13. Engineering Mammalian Mucin-type O-Glycosylation in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Drew, Damian P; Jørgensen, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    -glycans are attached to proteins, and which structures are formed, difficult. Because plants are devoid of GalNAc-type O-glycosylation, we have assessed requirements for establishing human GalNAc O-glycosylation de novo in plants with the aim of developing cell systems with custom-designed O-glycosylation capacity......Mucin-type O-glycosylation is an important post-translational modification that confers a variety of biological properties and functions to proteins. This post-translational modification has a particularly complex and differentially regulated biosynthesis rendering prediction and control of where O...... classes of proteins are hydroxylated and further substituted with plant-specific O-glycosylation; unsubstituted hydroxyprolines were identified in our MUC1 construct. In summary, this study demonstrates that mammalian type O-glycosylation can be established in plants and that plants may serve as a host...

  14. Calcium Signaling in Mammalian Eggs at Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Hideki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Ito, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The innovation and development of live-cell fluorescence imaging methods have revealed the dynamic aspects of intracellular Ca2+ in a wide variety of cells. The fertilized egg, the very first cell to be a new individual, has long been under extensive investigations utilizing Ca2+ imaging since its early days, and spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics and underlying mechanisms of Ca2+ mobilization, as well as physiological roles of Ca2+ at fertilization, have become more or less evident in various animal species. In this article, we illustrate characteristic patterns of Ca2+ dynamics in mammalian gametes and molecular basis for Ca2+ release from intracellular stores leading to the elevation in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, and describe the identity and properties of sperm-borne egg-activating factor in relation to the induction of Ca2+ waves and Ca2+ oscillations, referring to its potential use in artificial egg activation as infertility treatment. In addition, a possible Ca2+ influx-driven mechanism for slow and long-lasting Ca2+ oscillations characteristic of mammalian eggs is proposed, based on the recent experimental findings and mathematical modeling. Cumulative knowledge about the roles of Ca2+ in the egg activation leading to early embryogenesis is summarized, to emphasize the diversity of functions that Ca2+ can perform in a single type of cell.

  15. Peroxisome dynamics in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Sofie J; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Mannaerts, Guy P; Los, Georgyi V; Fransen, Marc

    2009-11-01

    Despite the identification and characterization of various proteins that are essential for peroxisome biogenesis, the origin and the turnover of peroxisomes are still unresolved critical issues. In this study, we used the HaloTag technology as a new approach to examine peroxisome dynamics in cultured mammalian cells. This technology is based on the formation of a covalent bond between the HaloTag protein--a mutated bacterial dehalogenase which is fused to the protein of interest--and a synthetic haloalkane ligand that contains a fluorophore or affinity tag. By using cell-permeable ligands of distinct fluorescence, it is possible to image distinct pools of newly synthesized proteins, generated from a single genetic HaloTag-containing construct, at different wavelengths. Here, we show that peroxisomes display an age-related heterogeneity with respect to their capacity to incorporate newly synthesized proteins. We also demonstrate that these organelles do not exchange their protein content. In addition, we present evidence that the matrix protein content of pre-existing peroxisomes is not evenly distributed over new organelles. Finally, we show that peroxisomes in cultured mammalian cells, under basal growth conditions, have a half-life of approximately 2 days and are mainly degraded by an autophagy-related mechanism. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  16. Genome size evolution: sizing mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, C A; Capanna, E

    2012-01-01

    The study of genome size (GS) and its variation is so fascinating to the scientific community because it constitutes the link between the present-day analytical and molecular studies of the genome and the old trunk of the holistic and synthetic view of the genome. The GS of several taxa vary over a broad range and do not correlate with the complexity of the organisms (the C-value paradox). However, the biology of transposable elements has let us reach a satisfactory view of the molecular mechanisms that give rise to GS variation and novelties, providing a less perplexing view of the significance of the GS (C-enigma). The knowledge of the composition and structure of a genome is a pre-requisite for trying to understand the evolution of the main genome signature: its size. The radiation of mammals provides an approximately 180-million-year test case for theories of how GS evolves. It has been found from data-mining GS databases that GS is a useful cyto-taxonomical instrument at the level of orders/superorders, providing genomic signatures characterizing Monotremata, Marsupialia, Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires. A hypothetical ancestral mammalian-like GS of 2.9-3.7 pg has been suggested. This value appears compatible with the average values calculated for the high systematic levels of the extant Monotremata (∼2.97 pg) and Marsupialia (∼4.07 pg), suggesting invasion of mobile DNA elements concurrently with the separation of the older clades of Afrotheria (∼5.5 pg) and Xenarthra (∼4.5 pg) with larger GS, leaving the Euarchontoglires (∼3.4 pg) and Laurasiatheria (∼2.8 pg) genomes with fewer transposable elements. However, the paucity of GS data (546 mammalian species sized from 5,488 living species) for species, genera, and families calls for caution. Considering that mammalian species may be vanished even before they are known, GS data are sorely needed to phenotype the effects brought about by their variation and to validate any

  17. Electrokinetic properties of the mammalian tectorial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Page, Scott L.; Farrahi, Shirin; Sellon, Jonathan B.; Freeman, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    The tectorial membrane (TM) clearly plays a mechanical role in stimulating cochlear sensory receptors, but the presence of fixed charge in TM constituents suggests that electromechanical properties also may be important. Here, we measure the fixed charge density of the TM and show that this density of fixed charge is sufficient to affect mechanical properties and to generate electrokinetic motions. In particular, alternating currents applied to the middle and marginal zones of isolated TM segments evoke motions at audio frequencies (1–1,000 Hz). Electrically evoked motions are nanometer scaled (∼5–900 nm), decrease with increasing stimulus frequency, and scale linearly over a broad range of electric field amplitudes (0.05–20 kV/m). These findings show that the mammalian TM is highly charged and suggest the importance of a unique TM electrokinetic mechanism. PMID:23440188

  18. A universal mammalian vaccine cell line substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackelyn Murray

    Full Text Available Using genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA screens for poliovirus, influenza A virus and rotavirus, we validated the top 6 gene hits PV, RV or IAV to search for host genes that when knocked-down (KD enhanced virus permissiveness and replication over wild type Vero cells or HEp-2 cells. The enhanced virus replication was tested for 12 viruses and ranged from 2-fold to >1000-fold. There were variations in virus-specific replication (strain differences across the cell lines examined. Some host genes (CNTD2, COQ9, GCGR, NDUFA9, NEU2, PYCR1, SEC16G, SVOPL, ZFYVE9, and ZNF205 showed that KD resulted in enhanced virus replication. These findings advance platform-enabling vaccine technology, the creation of diagnostic cells substrates, and are informative about the host mechanisms that affect virus replication in mammalian cells.

  19. Chromate-induced epimutations in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Catherine B; Su, Lin; Bowser, Darlene; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2002-10-01

    Epigenetic gene silencing by aberrant DNA methylation of gene promoter regions is a nonmutagenic but heritable epigenetic mechanism that may mistakenly cause the silencing of important cancer-related tumor suppressor genes. Using a transgenic, V79-derived, mammalian cell line (G12) that contains a bacterial gpt reporter gene in its DNA, we can study carcinogen-induced gene inactivation by mutagenic as well as epigenetic DNA methylation mechanisms. Whereas numerous carcinogens have previously been shown to be mutagenic in these cells, a few carcinogens, including nickel, diethylstilbestrol, and X-rays, are also capable of silencing the G12 cell gpt transgene by aberrant DNA methylation. Here we report for the first time that carcinogenic potassium chromate salts can also induce aberrant DNA methylation in this system. In contrast insoluble barium chromate produced significant level of mutations in these cells but did not cause DNA methylation changes associated with transgene expression.

  20. Structures of mammalian cytosolic quinone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C E; Bianchet, M A; Talalay, P; Faig, M; Amzel, L M

    2000-08-01

    The metabolism of quinone compounds presents one source of oxidative stress in mammals, as many pathways proceed by mechanisms that generate reactive oxygen species as by-products. One defense against quinone toxicity is the enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1), which metabolizes quinones by a two-electron reduction mechanism, thus averting production of radicals. QR1 is expressed in the cytoplasm of many tissues, and is highly inducible. A closely related homologue, quinone reductase type 2 (QR2), has been identified in several mammalian species. QR2 is also capable of reducing quinones to hydroquinones, but unlike QR1, cannot use NAD(P)H. X-ray crystallographic studies of QR1 and QR2 illustrate that despite their different biochemical properties, these enzymes have very similar three-dimensional structures. In particular, conserved features of the active sites point to the close relationship between these two enzymes.

  1. Convergent evolution between insect and mammalian audition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Jonsson, Thorin; Robson-Brown, Kate A; Postles, Matthew; Robert, Daniel

    2012-11-16

    In mammals, hearing is dependent on three canonical processing stages: (i) an eardrum collecting sound, (ii) a middle ear impedance converter, and (iii) a cochlear frequency analyzer. Here, we show that some insects, such as rainforest katydids, possess equivalent biophysical mechanisms for auditory processing. Although katydid ears are among the smallest in all organisms, these ears perform the crucial stage of air-to-liquid impedance conversion and signal amplification, with the use of a distinct tympanal lever system. Further along the chain of hearing, spectral sound analysis is achieved through dispersive wave propagation across a fluid substrate, as in the mammalian cochlea. Thus, two phylogenetically remote organisms, katydids and mammals, have evolved a series of convergent solutions to common biophysical problems, despite their reliance on very different morphological substrates.

  2. Mechanosensor Channels in Mammalian Somatosensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Delmas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanoreceptive sensory neurons innervating the skin, skeletal muscles andviscera signal both innocuous and noxious information necessary for proprioception, touchand pain. These neurons are responsible for the transduction of mechanical stimuli intoaction potentials that propagate to the central nervous system. The ability of these cells todetect mechanical stimuli impinging on them relies on the presence of mechanosensitivechannels that transduce the external mechanical forces into electrical and chemical signals.Although a great deal of information regarding the molecular and biophysical properties ofmechanosensitive channels in prokaryotes has been accumulated over the past two decades,less is known about the mechanosensitive channels necessary for proprioception and thesenses of touch and pain. This review summarizes the most pertinent data onmechanosensitive channels of mammalian somatosensory neurons, focusing on theirproperties, pharmacology and putative identity.

  3. Cenozoic climate change influences mammalian evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M; Pérez-Claros, Juan A; De Renzi, Miquel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2012-01-17

    Global climate change is having profound impacts on the natural world. However, climate influence on faunal dynamics at macroevolutionary scales remains poorly understood. In this paper we investigate the influence of climate over deep time on the diversity patterns of Cenozoic North American mammals. We use factor analysis to identify temporally correlated assemblages of taxa, or major evolutionary faunas that we can then study in relation to climatic change over the past 65 million years. These taxa can be grouped into six consecutive faunal associations that show some correspondence with the qualitative mammalian chronofaunas of previous workers. We also show that the diversity pattern of most of these chronofaunas can be correlated with the stacked deep-sea benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) curve, which strongly suggests climatic forcing of faunal dynamics over a large macroevolutionary timescale. This study demonstrates the profound influence of climate on the diversity patterns of North American terrestrial mammals over the Cenozoic.

  4. New consensus nomenclature for mammalian keratins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Jürgen; Bowden, Paul E.; Coulombe, Pierre A.; Langbein, Lutz; Lane, E. Birgitte; Magin, Thomas M.; Maltais, Lois; Omary, M. Bishr; Parry, David A.D.; Rogers, Michael A.; Wright, Mathew W.

    2006-01-01

    Keratins are intermediate filament–forming proteins that provide mechanical support and fulfill a variety of additional functions in epithelial cells. In 1982, a nomenclature was devised to name the keratin proteins that were known at that point. The systematic sequencing of the human genome in recent years uncovered the existence of several novel keratin genes and their encoded proteins. Their naming could not be adequately handled in the context of the original system. We propose a new consensus nomenclature for keratin genes and proteins that relies upon and extends the 1982 system and adheres to the guidelines issued by the Human and Mouse Genome Nomenclature Committees. This revised nomenclature accommodates functional genes and pseudogenes, and although designed specifically for the full complement of human keratins, it offers the flexibility needed to incorporate additional keratins from other mammalian species. PMID:16831889

  5. The architecture of mammalian ribosomal protein promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Robert P

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian ribosomes contain 79 different proteins encoded by widely scattered single copy genes. Coordinate expression of these genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is required to ensure a roughly equimolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins. To date, detailed studies of only a very few ribosomal protein (rp promoters have been made. To elucidate the general features of rp promoter architecture, I made a detailed sequence comparison of the promoter regions of the entire set of orthologous human and mouse rp genes. Results A striking evolutionarily conserved feature of most rp genes is the separation by an intron of the sequences involved in transcriptional and translational regulation from the sequences with protein encoding function. Another conserved feature is the polypyrimidine initiator, which conforms to the consensus (Y2C+1TY(T2(Y3. At least 60 % of the rp promoters contain a largely conserved TATA box or A/T-rich motif, which should theoretically have TBP-binding capability. A remarkably high proportion of the promoters contain conserved binding sites for transcription factors that were previously implicated in rp gene expression, namely upstream GABP and Sp1 sites and downstream YY1 sites. Over 80 % of human and mouse rp genes contain a transposable element residue within 900 bp of 5' flanking sequence; very little sequence identity between human and mouse orthologues was evident more than 200 bp upstream of the transcriptional start point. Conclusions This analysis has provided some valuable insights into the general architecture of mammalian rp promoters and has identified parameters that might coordinately regulate the transcriptional activity of certain subsets of rp genes.

  6. The DNA damage response in mammalian oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John eCarroll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is one of the most common insults that challenge all cells. To cope, an elaborate molecular and cellular response has evolved to sense, respond to and correct the damage. This allows the maintenance of DNA fidelity essential for normal cell viability and the prevention of genomic instability that can lead to tumour formation. In the context of oocytes, the impact of DNA damage is not one of tumour formation but of the maintenance of fertility. Mammalian oocytes are particularly vulnerable to DNA damage because physiologically they may lie dormant in the ovary for many years (>40 in humans until they receive the stimulus to grow and acquire the competence to become fertilized. The implication of this is that in some organisms, such as humans, oocytes face the danger of cumulative genetic damage for decades. Thus, the ability to detect and repair DNA damage is essential to maintain the supply of oocytes necessary for reproduction. Therefore, failure to confront DNA damage in oocytes could cause serious anomalies in the embryo that may be propagated in the form of mutations to the next generation allowing the appearance of hereditary disease. Despite the potential impact of DNA damage on reproductive capacity and genetic fidelity of embryos, the mechanisms available to the oocyte for monitoring and repairing such insults have remained largely unexplored until recently. Here, we review the different aspects of the response to DNA damage in mammalian oocytes. Specifically, we address the oocyte DNA damage response from embryonic life to adulthood and throughout oocyte development.

  7. RNAa is conserved in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Huang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA activation (RNAa is a newly discovered mechanism of gene activation triggered by small double-stranded RNAs termed 'small activating RNAs' (saRNAs. Thus far, RNAa has only been demonstrated in human cells and is unclear whether it is conserved in other mammals.In the present study, we evaluated RNAa in cells derived from four mammalian species including nonhuman primates (African green monkey and chimpanzee, mouse, and rat. Previously, we identified saRNAs leading to the activation of E-cadherin, p21, and VEGF in human cells. As the targeted sequences are highly conserved in primates, transfection of each human saRNA into African green monkey (COS1 and chimpanzee (WES cells also resulted in induction of the intended gene. Additional saRNAs targeting clinically relevant genes including p53, PAR4, WT1, RB1, p27, NKX3-1, VDR, IL2, and pS2 were also designed and transfected into COS1 and WES cells. Of the nine genes, p53, PAR4, WT1, and NKX3-1 were induced by their corresponding saRNAs. We further extended our analysis of RNAa into rodent cell types. We identified two saRNAs that induced the expression of mouse Cyclin B1 in NIH/3T3 and TRAMP C1 cells, which led to increased phosphorylation of histone H3, a downstream marker for chromosome condensation and entry into mitosis. We also identified two saRNAs that activated the expression of CXCR4 in primary rat adipose-derived stem cells.This study demonstrates that RNAa exists in mammalian species other than human. Our findings also suggest that nonhuman primate disease models may have clinical applicability for validating RNAa-based drugs.

  8. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abazari

    Full Text Available Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre. Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies.

  9. Romantic love: a mammalian brain system for mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Helen E; Aron, Arthur; Brown, Lucy L

    2006-12-29

    Mammals and birds regularly express mate preferences and make mate choices. Data on mate choice among mammals suggest that this behavioural 'attraction system' is associated with dopaminergic reward pathways in the brain. It has been proposed that intense romantic love, a human cross-cultural universal, is a developed form of this attraction system. To begin to determine the neural mechanisms associated with romantic attraction in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study 17 people who were intensely 'in love'. Activation specific to the beloved occurred in the brainstem right ventral tegmental area and right postero-dorsal body of the caudate nucleus. These and other results suggest that dopaminergic reward and motivation pathways contribute to aspects of romantic love. We also used fMRI to study 15 men and women who had just been rejected in love. Preliminary analysis showed activity specific to the beloved in related regions of the reward system associated with monetary gambling for uncertain large gains and losses, and in regions of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex associated with theory of mind, obsessive/compulsive behaviours and controlling anger. These data contribute to our view that romantic love is one of the three primary brain systems that evolved in avian and mammalian species to direct reproduction. The sex drive evolved to motivate individuals to seek a range of mating partners; attraction evolved to motivate individuals to prefer and pursue specific partners; and attachment evolved to motivate individuals to remain together long enough to complete species-specific parenting duties. These three behavioural repertoires appear to be based on brain systems that are largely distinct yet interrelated, and they interact in specific ways to orchestrate reproduction, using both hormones and monoamines. Romantic attraction in humans and its antecedent in other mammalian species play a primary role: this neural mechanism motivates

  10. Bioinformatic analyses of kappa casein gene in mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kappa casein (CSN3) gene is a variant of the milk protein highly conserved in mammalian species. Genetic variations in CSN3 gene of six mammalian livestock species were investigated using bioinformatics approach. A total of twenty-seven CSN3 gene sequences with corresponding amino acids belonging to the six ...

  11. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  12. Non - flying mammalian fauna of Ampijoroa, Ankarafantsika National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no list of the mammalian fauna of Ampijoroa Forest Station, a dry deciduous forest within Ankarafantsika National Park. We set Sherman traps and pitfall traps and carried out transect surveys to survey the non - flying mammalian fauna of Ampijoroa. In total, 19 species of mammals were recorded, comprising 10 ...

  13. Mammalian gastrointestinal parasites in rainforest remnants of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary table 1. Parasite prevalence (%) of nonhuman mammalian species of the tenstudy sites in Anamalai Tiger. Reserve, Western Ghats, India. Supplementary table 2. Percent prevalence of parasite taxa in 17 mammalian hosts from fragmented rainforest landscape of. Anamalai tiger reserve, Western Ghats, ...

  14. Edible Scaffolds Based on Non-Mammalian Biopolymers for Myoblast Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Enrione

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In vitro meat has recently emerged as a new concept in food biotechnology. Methods to produce in vitro meat generally involve the growth of muscle cells that are cultured on scaffolds using bioreactors. Suitable scaffold design and manufacture are critical to downstream culture and meat production. Most current scaffolds are based on mammalian-derived biomaterials, the use of which is counter to the desire to obviate mammal slaughter in artificial meat production. Consequently, most of the knowledge is related to the design and control of scaffold properties based on these mammalian-sourced materials. To address this, four different scaffold materials were formulated using non-mammalian sources, namely, salmon gelatin, alginate, and additives including gelling agents and plasticizers. The scaffolds were produced using a freeze-drying process, and the physical, mechanical, and biological properties of the scaffolds were evaluated. The most promising scaffolds were produced from salmon gelatin, alginate, agarose, and glycerol, which exhibited relatively large pore sizes (~200 μm diameter and biocompatibility, permitting myoblast cell adhesion (~40% and growth (~24 h duplication time. The biodegradation profiles of the scaffolds were followed, and were observed to be less than 25% after 4 weeks. The scaffolds enabled suitable myogenic response, with high cell proliferation, viability, and adequate cell distribution throughout. This system composed of non-mammalian edible scaffold material and muscle-cells is promising for the production of in vitro meat.

  15. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) in a mammalian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M; Patterson, Stacey S; Ripp, Steven; Baek, Seung J; Sanseverino, John; Sayler, Gary S

    2010-08-27

    The bacterial luciferase (lux) gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE) whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo. Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2)) was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp) from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2) supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background. The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  16. Autonomous bioluminescent expression of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux in a mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan M Close

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase (lux gene cassette consists of five genes (luxCDABE whose protein products synergistically generate bioluminescent light signals exclusive of supplementary substrate additions or exogenous manipulations. Historically expressible only in prokaryotes, the lux operon was re-synthesized through a process of multi-bicistronic, codon-optimization to demonstrate for the first time self-directed bioluminescence emission in a mammalian HEK293 cell line in vitro and in vivo.Autonomous in vitro light production was shown to be 12-fold greater than the observable background associated with untransfected control cells. The availability of reduced riboflavin phosphate (FMNH(2 was identified as the limiting bioluminescence substrate in the mammalian cell environment even after the addition of a constitutively expressed flavin reductase gene (frp from Vibrio harveyi. FMNH(2 supplementation led to a 151-fold increase in bioluminescence in cells expressing mammalian codon-optimized luxCDE and frp genes. When injected subcutaneously into nude mice, in vivo optical imaging permitted near instantaneous light detection that persisted independently for the 60 min length of the assay with negligible background.The speed, longevity, and self-sufficiency of lux expression in the mammalian cellular environment provides a viable and powerful alternative for real-time target visualization not currently offered by existing bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging technologies.

  17. Mammalian sleep dynamics: how diverse features arise from a common physiological framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J K Phillips

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian sleep varies widely, ranging from frequent napping in rodents to consolidated blocks in primates and unihemispheric sleep in cetaceans. In humans, rats, mice and cats, sleep patterns are orchestrated by homeostatic and circadian drives to the sleep-wake switch, but it is not known whether this system is ubiquitous among mammals. Here, changes of just two parameters in a recent quantitative model of this switch are shown to reproduce typical sleep patterns for 17 species across 7 orders. Furthermore, the parameter variations are found to be consistent with the assumptions that homeostatic production and clearance scale as brain volume and surface area, respectively. Modeling an additional inhibitory connection between sleep-active neuronal populations on opposite sides of the brain generates unihemispheric sleep, providing a testable hypothetical mechanism for this poorly understood phenomenon. Neuromodulation of this connection alone is shown to account for the ability of fur seals to transition between bihemispheric sleep on land and unihemispheric sleep in water. Determining what aspects of mammalian sleep patterns can be explained within a single framework, and are thus universal, is essential to understanding the evolution and function of mammalian sleep. This is the first demonstration of a single model reproducing sleep patterns for multiple different species. These wide-ranging findings suggest that the core physiological mechanisms controlling sleep are common to many mammalian orders, with slight evolutionary modifications accounting for interspecies differences.

  18. Transplantation of prokaryotic two-component signaling pathways into mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jonathan; Mailand, Erik; Swaminathan, Krishna Kumar; Schreiber, Joerg; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-11-04

    Signaling pathway engineering is a promising route toward synthetic biological circuits. Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are thought to have evolved in prokaryotes where they form the basis for two-component signaling. Tyrosine-serine-threonine phosphorelays, exemplified by MAP kinase cascades, are predominant in eukaryotes. Recently, a prokaryotic two-component pathway was implemented in a plant species to sense environmental trinitrotoluene. We reasoned that "transplantation" of two-component pathways into mammalian host could provide an orthogonal and diverse toolkit for a variety of signal processing tasks. Here we report that two-component pathways could be partially reconstituted in mammalian cell culture and used for programmable control of gene expression. To enable this reconstitution, coding sequences of histidine kinase (HK) and response regulator (RR) components were codon-optimized for human cells, whereas the RRs were fused with a transactivation domain. Responsive promoters were furnished by fusing DNA binding sites in front of a minimal promoter. We found that coexpression of HKs and their cognate RRs in cultured mammalian cells is necessary and sufficient to strongly induce gene expression even in the absence of pathways' chemical triggers in the medium. Both loss-of-function and constitutive mutants behaved as expected. We further used the two-component signaling pathways to implement two-input logical AND, NOR, and OR gene regulation. Thus, two-component systems can be applied in different capacities in mammalian cells and their components can be used for large-scale synthetic gene circuits.

  19. Edible Scaffolds Based on Non-Mammalian Biopolymers for Myoblast Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrione, Javier; Blaker, Jonny J; Brown, Donald I; Weinstein-Oppenheimer, Caroline R; Pepczynska, Marzena; Olguín, Yusser; Sánchez, Elizabeth; Acevedo, Cristian A

    2017-12-08

    In vitro meat has recently emerged as a new concept in food biotechnology. Methods to produce in vitro meat generally involve the growth of muscle cells that are cultured on scaffolds using bioreactors. Suitable scaffold design and manufacture are critical to downstream culture and meat production. Most current scaffolds are based on mammalian-derived biomaterials, the use of which is counter to the desire to obviate mammal slaughter in artificial meat production. Consequently, most of the knowledge is related to the design and control of scaffold properties based on these mammalian-sourced materials. To address this, four different scaffold materials were formulated using non-mammalian sources, namely, salmon gelatin, alginate, and additives including gelling agents and plasticizers. The scaffolds were produced using a freeze-drying process, and the physical, mechanical, and biological properties of the scaffolds were evaluated. The most promising scaffolds were produced from salmon gelatin, alginate, agarose, and glycerol, which exhibited relatively large pore sizes (~200 μm diameter) and biocompatibility, permitting myoblast cell adhesion (~40%) and growth (~24 h duplication time). The biodegradation profiles of the scaffolds were followed, and were observed to be less than 25% after 4 weeks. The scaffolds enabled suitable myogenic response, with high cell proliferation, viability, and adequate cell distribution throughout. This system composed of non-mammalian edible scaffold material and muscle-cells is promising for the production of in vitro meat.

  20. Towards regenerating the mammalian heart: challenges in evaluating experimentally induced adult mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrowski, David C; Becker, Robert; Engel, Felix B

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in research aimed at regenerating the mammalian heart by promoting endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation. Despite many encouraging successes, it remains unclear if we are any closer to achieving levels of mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation for regeneration as seen during zebrafish regeneration. Furthermore, current cardiac regenerative approaches do not clarify whether the induced cardiomyocyte proliferation is an epiphenomena or responsible for the observed improvement in cardiac function. Moreover, due to the lack of standardized protocols to determine cardiomyocyte proliferation in vivo, it remains unclear if one mammalian regenerative factor is more effective than another. Here, we discuss current methods to identify and evaluate factors for the induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation and challenges therein. Addressing challenges in evaluating adult cardiomyocyte proliferation will assist in determining 1) which regenerative factors should be pursued in large animal studies; 2) if a particular level of cell cycle regulation presents a better therapeutic target than another (e.g., mitogenic receptors vs. cyclins); and 3) which combinatorial approaches offer the greatest likelihood of success. As more and more regenerative studies come to pass, progress will require a system that not only can evaluate efficacy in an objective manner but can also consolidate observations in a meaningful way. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. A role for myosin II in mammalian mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Farida; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-02-17

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, undergoing both fission and fusion regularly in interphase cells. Mitochondrial fission is thought to be part of a quality-control mechanism whereby damaged mitochondrial components are segregated from healthy components in an individual mitochondrion, followed by mitochondrial fission and degradation of the damaged daughter mitochondrion. Fission also plays a role in apoptosis. Defects in mitochondrial dynamics can lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondrial fission requires the dynamin GTPase Drp1, which assembles in a ring around the mitochondrion and appears to constrict both outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. However, mechanisms controlling Drp1 assembly on mammalian mitochondria are unclear. Recent results show that actin polymerization, driven by the endoplasmic reticulum-bound formin protein INF2, stimulates Drp1 assembly at fission sites. Here, we show that myosin II also plays a role in fission. Chemical inhibition by blebbistatin or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated suppression of myosin IIA or myosin IIB causes an increase in mitochondrial length in both control cells and cells expressing constitutively active INF2. Active myosin II accumulates in puncta on mitochondria in an actin- and INF2-dependent manner. In addition, myosin II inhibition decreases Drp1 association with mitochondria. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic model in which INF2-mediated actin polymerization leads to myosin II recruitment and constriction at the fission site, enhancing subsequent Drp1 accumulation and fission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative mammalian cell cytotoxicity of wastewater with elevated bromide and iodide after chlorination, chloramination, or ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengkun; Nguyen, Thanh H; Plewa, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    Recycling wastewater is becoming more common as communities around the world try to better control their water resources against an increased frequency of either prolonged droughts or intense flooding. For communities in coastal areas, wastewaters may contain elevated levels of bromide (Br-) and iodide (I-) from seawater intrusion or high mineral content of source waters. Disinfection of such wastewater is mandatory to prevent the spread of pathogens, however little is known about the toxicity of wastewater after disinfection in the presence of Br- and I-. In this study we compared the induction of chronic cytotoxicity in mammalian cells in samples of municipal secondary wastewater effluent amended with elevated levels of Br-/I- after disinfection by chlorine, chloramines or ozone to identify which disinfection process generated wastewater with the lowest level of adverse biological response. Chlorination increased mammalian cell cytotoxicity by 5 times as compared to non-disinfected controls. Chloramination produced disinfected wastewater that expressed 6.3 times more cytotoxicity than the non-disinfected controls and was 1.3 times more cytotoxic than the chlorinated samples. Ozonation produced wastewater with cytotoxicity comparable to the non-disinfected controls and was at least 4 times less cytotoxic than the chlorine disinfected wastewaters. These results indicate that compared to chlorination and chloramination, ozonation of wastewater with high Br-/I- levels yielded the lowest mammalian cell cytotoxicity, suggesting its potential as a more favorable method to disinfect wastewater with minimizing the biological toxicity in mind. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Transcription Factor Zbtb20 Controls Regional Specification of Mammalian Archicortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenthal, Eva Helga

    2010-01-01

    . As Zbtb20 was observed to be expressed only after the accomplishment of early progenitor specification, the intrinsic area specification of cortical progenitors appeared unaltered. A second phenotype is the observed marked delay of the ossification in the Zbtb20-/- mutant mice. In Zbtb20 deficiency......, the detected defect in growth of hippocampus and DG as well as in skeletal ossification most probably involves modulation of Wnt signaling. In conclusion, the presented results in this work place Zbtb20 as the first known so far TF with a role in postmitotic acquisition of areal identity of the archicortex...

  4. Controlling apoptosis to optimize yields of proteins from mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zustiak, Matthew P; Dorai, Haimanti; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Sauerwald, Tina M

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is the foremost method of cell death in bioreactors and can be caused by nutrient limitation, toxin accumulation, and growth factor withdrawal. By delaying the onset of this form of programmed cell death, one can achieve longer sustained viabilities in culture, thereby increasing product yield. Described here is a genetic-based, step-by-step method to generate an apoptosis-resistant cell line. This cell line, then, can be used as a platform for biotherapeutic protein production. The key steps include antiapoptotic transgene selection and transfection followed by clonal isolation and screening. With the proper screening methods, one can obtain a robust cell line that resists the harsh conditions of late-stage and/or high-density culture.

  5. The Microprocessor controls the activity of mammalian retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heras, Sara R.; Macias, Sara; Plass, Mireya

    2013-01-01

    More than half of the human genome is made of transposable elements whose ongoing mobilization is a driving force in genetic diversity; however, little is known about how the host regulates their activity. Here, we show that the Microprocessor (Drosha-DGCR8), which is required for microRNA biogen......More than half of the human genome is made of transposable elements whose ongoing mobilization is a driving force in genetic diversity; however, little is known about how the host regulates their activity. Here, we show that the Microprocessor (Drosha-DGCR8), which is required for micro......RNA biogenesis, also recognizes and binds RNAs derived from human long interspersed element 1 (LINE-1), Alu and SVA retrotransposons. Expression analyses demonstrate that cells lacking a functional Microprocessor accumulate LINE-1 mRNA and encoded proteins. Furthermore, we show that structured regions...... of the LINE-1 mRNA can be cleaved in vitro by Drosha. Additionally, we used a cell culture-based assay to show that the Microprocessor negatively regulates LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposition in vivo. Altogether, these data reveal a new role for the Microprocessor as a post-transcriptional repressor...

  6. Annotation of mammalian primary microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Anton J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in development, differentiation and pathogenesis. Hundreds of miRNAs have been discovered in mammalian genomes. Approximately 50% of mammalian miRNAs are expressed from introns of protein-coding genes; the primary transcript (pri-miRNA is therefore assumed to be the host transcript. However, very little is known about the structure of pri-miRNAs expressed from intergenic regions. Here we annotate transcript boundaries of miRNAs in human, mouse and rat genomes using various transcription features. The 5' end of the pri-miRNA is predicted from transcription start sites, CpG islands and 5' CAGE tags mapped in the upstream flanking region surrounding the precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA. The 3' end of the pri-miRNA is predicted based on the mapping of polyA signals, and supported by cDNA/EST and ditags data. The predicted pri-miRNAs are also analyzed for promoter and insulator-associated regulatory regions. Results We define sets of conserved and non-conserved human, mouse and rat pre-miRNAs using bidirectional BLAST and synteny analysis. Transcription features in their flanking regions are used to demarcate the 5' and 3' boundaries of the pri-miRNAs. The lengths and boundaries of primary transcripts are highly conserved between orthologous miRNAs. A significant fraction of pri-miRNAs have lengths between 1 and 10 kb, with very few introns. We annotate a total of 59 pri-miRNA structures, which include 82 pre-miRNAs. 36 pri-miRNAs are conserved in all 3 species. In total, 18 of the confidently annotated transcripts express more than one pre-miRNA. The upstream regions of 54% of the predicted pri-miRNAs are found to be associated with promoter and insulator regulatory sequences. Conclusion Little is known about the primary transcripts of intergenic miRNAs. Using comparative data, we are able to identify the boundaries of a significant proportion of

  7. The roles of microRNAs and siRNAs in mammalian spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hilz, Stephanie; Modzelewski, Andrew J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Grimson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs and siRNAs, both of which are AGO-bound small RNAs, are essential for mammalian spermatogenesis. Although their precise germline roles remain largely uncharacterized, recent discoveries suggest that they function in mechanisms beyond microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional control, playing roles in DNA repair and transcriptional regulation within the nucleus. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding roles for AGO proteins and their associated small RNAs in the male germline. We...

  8. Ventricular Fibrillation in Mammalian Hearts: Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Flavio H.

    2002-03-01

    The computational approach to understanding the initiation and evolution of cardiac arrhythmias forms a necessary link between experiment and theory. Numerical simulations combine useful mathematical models and complex geometry while offering clean and comprehensive data acquisition, reproducible results that can be compared to experiments, and the flexibility of exploring parameter space systematically. However, because cardiac dynamics occurs on many scales (on the order of 10^9 cells of size 10-100 microns with more than 40 ionic currents and time scales as fast as 0.01ms), roughly 10^17 operations are required to simulate just one second of real time. These intense computational requirements lead to significant implementation challenges even on existing supercomputers. Nevertheless, progress over the last decade in understanding the effects of some spatial scales and spatio-temporal dynamics on cardiac cell and tissue behavior justifies the use of certain simplifications which, along with improved models for cellular dynamics and detailed digital models of cardiac anatomy, are allowing simulation studies of full-size ventricles and atria. We describe this simulation problem from a combined numerical, physical and biological point of view, with an emphasis on the dynamics and stability of scroll waves of electrical activity in mammalian hearts and their relation to tachycardia, fibrillation and sudden death. Detailed simulations of electrical activity in ventricles including complex anatomy, anisotropic fiber structure, and electrophysiological effects of two drugs (DAM and CytoD) are presented and compared with experimental results.

  9. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoku, Shigetoshi; Aramaki, Ryoji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Tanaka, Hisashi; Kusumoto, Naotoshi

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle`s minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO{sub 2} incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with {sup 14}C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleus rather than cytoplasm. (author)

  10. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  11. Apoptosis in mammalian oocytes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Meenakshi; Prasad, Shilpa; Tripathi, Anima; Pandey, Ashutosh N; Ali, Irfan; Singh, Arvind K; Shrivastav, Tulsidas G; Chaube, Shail K

    2015-08-01

    Apoptosis causes elimination of more than 99% of germ cells from cohort of ovary through follicular atresia. Less than 1% of germ cells, which are culminated in oocytes further undergo apoptosis during last phases of oogenesis and depletes ovarian reserve in most of the mammalian species including human. There are several players that induce apoptosis directly or indirectly in oocytes at various stages of meiotic cell cycle. Premature removal of encircling granulosa cells from immature oocytes, reduced levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, increased levels of calcium (Ca(2+)) and oxidants, sustained reduced level of maturation promoting factor, depletion of survival factors, nutrients and cell cycle proteins, reduced meiotic competency, increased levels of proapoptotic as well as apoptotic factors lead to oocyte apoptosis. The BH3-only proteins also act as key regulators of apoptosis in oocyte within the ovary. Both intrinsic (mitochondria-mediated) as well as extrinsic (cell surface death receptor-mediated) pathways are involved in oocyte apoptosis. BID, a BH3-only protein act as a bridge between both apoptotic pathways and its cleavage activates cell death machinery of both the pathways inside the follicular microenvironment. Oocyte apoptosis leads to the depletion of ovarian reserve that directly affects reproductive outcome of various mammals including human. In this review article, we highlight some of the important players and describe the pathways involved during oocyte apoptosis in mammals.

  12. Mitochondrial toxicity of triclosan on mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Ajao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of triclosan (5-chloro-2′-(2,4-dichlorophenoxyphenol on mammalian cells were investigated using human peripheral blood mono nuclear cells (PBMC, keratinocytes (HaCaT, porcine spermatozoa and kidney tubular epithelial cells (PK-15, murine pancreatic islets (MIN-6 and neuroblastoma cells (MNA as targets. We show that triclosan (1–10 μg ml−1 depolarised the mitochondria, upshifted the rate of glucose consumption in PMBC, HaCaT, PK-15 and MNA, and subsequently induced metabolic acidosis. Triclosan induced a regression of insulin producing pancreatic islets into tiny pycnotic cells and necrotic death. Short exposure to low concentrations of triclosan (30 min, ≤1 μg/ml paralyzed the high amplitude tail beating and progressive motility of spermatozoa, within 30 min exposure, depolarized the spermatozoan mitochondria and hyperpolarised the acrosome region of the sperm head and the flagellar fibrous sheath (distal part of the flagellum. Experiments with isolated rat liver mitochondria showed that triclosan impaired oxidative phosphorylation, downshifted ATP synthesis, uncoupled respiration and provoked excessive oxygen uptake. These exposure concentrations are 100–1000 fold lower that those permitted in consumer goods. The mitochondriotoxic mechanism of triclosan differs from that of valinomycin, cereulide and the enniatins by not involving potassium ionophoric activity.

  13. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  14. How does polyspermy happen in mammalian oocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hua; Day, Billy N; Wu, Guang-Ming

    2003-07-01

    Polyspermy is one of the most commonly observed abnormal types of fertilization in mammalian oocytes. In vitro fertilization (IVF) provides approaches to study the mechanisms by which oocytes block polyspermic fertilization. Accumulated data indicate that oocyte, sperm and insemination conditions are all related to the occurrence of polyspermic fertilization. A high proportion of immature and aged oocytes showed polyspermy as compared with mature oocytes. Preincubation of oocytes and/or sperm with oviductal epithelial cells or collected oviductal fluid before IVF reduces polyspermic penetration. Recently, it was found that an abnormal zona pellucida is one of main causes of polyspermy in human eggs. A high proportion of polyspermy has resulted from the use of a high concentration of capacitated spermatozoa at the site of fertilization, irrespective of in the in vivo or in vitro environment. Oviductal secretions or oviductal epithelial cells themselves can regulate the number of spermatozoa reaching or binding to the zona pellucida thus reducing multiple sperm penetration. Suboptimal in vitro conditions, such as supplementations in IVF media, pH, and temperature during IVF, also induce polyspermic fertilization in some mammals. Species-specific differences are present regarding the relationship between insemination conditions and polyspermy. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Modelling study of dimerization in mammalian defensins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Chandra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defensins are antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity functioning by non-specific binding to anionic phospholipids in bacterial membranes. Their cationicity, amphipathicity and ability to oligomerize are considered key factors for their action. Based on structural information on human β-defensin 2, we examine homologous defensins from various mammalian species for conserved functional physico-chemical characteristics. Results Based on homology greater than 40%, structural models of 8 homologs of HBD-2 were constructed. A conserved pattern of electrostatics and dynamics was observed across 6 of the examined defensins; models backed by energetics suggest that the defensins in these 6 organisms are characterized by dimerization-linked enhanced functional potentials. In contrast, dimerization is not energetically favoured in the sheep, goat and mouse defensins, suggesting that they function efficiently as monomers. Conclusion β-defensin 2 from some mammals may work as monomers while those in others, including humans, work as oligomers. This could potentially be used to design human defensins that may be effective at lower concentrations and hence have therapeutic benefits.

  16. Sodium channels and mammalian sensory mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, Ramin; Rugiero, Francois; Kiesewetter, Hannes; Hatch, Rachel; Hummler, Edith; Nassar, Mohammed A; Wang, Fan; Wood, John N

    2012-03-26

    Members of the degenerin/epithelial (DEG/ENaC) sodium channel family are mechanosensors in C elegans, and Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel knockout mice have major deficits in mechanosensation. β and γENaC sodium channel subunits are present with acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) in mammalian sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). The extent to which epithelial or voltage-gated sodium channels are involved in transduction of mechanical stimuli is unclear. Here we show that deleting β and γENaC sodium channels in sensory neurons does not result in mechanosensory behavioural deficits. We had shown previously that Nav1.7/Nav1.8 double knockout mice have major deficits in behavioural responses to noxious mechanical pressure. However, all classes of mechanically activated currents in DRG neurons are unaffected by deletion of the two sodium channels. In contrast, the ability of Nav1.7/Nav1.8 knockout DRG neurons to generate action potentials is compromised with 50% of the small diameter sensory neurons unable to respond to electrical stimulation in vitro. Behavioural deficits in Nav1.7/Nav1.8 knockout mice reflects a failure of action potential propagation in a mechanosensitive set of sensory neurons rather than a loss of primary transduction currents. DEG/ENaC sodium channels are not mechanosensors in mouse sensory neurons.

  17. Sources of Error in Mammalian Genetic Screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Magill Sack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic screens are invaluable tools for dissection of biological phenomena. Optimization of such screens to enhance discovery of candidate genes and minimize false positives is thus a critical aim. Here, we report several sources of error common to pooled genetic screening techniques used in mammalian cell culture systems, and demonstrate methods to eliminate these errors. We find that reverse transcriptase-mediated recombination during retroviral replication can lead to uncoupling of molecular tags, such as DNA barcodes (BCs, from their associated library elements, leading to chimeric proviral genomes in which BCs are paired to incorrect ORFs, shRNAs, etc. This effect depends on the length of homologous sequence between unique elements, and can be minimized with careful vector design. Furthermore, we report that residual plasmid DNA from viral packaging procedures can contaminate transduced cells. These plasmids serve as additional copies of the PCR template during library amplification, resulting in substantial inaccuracies in measurement of initial reference populations for screen normalization. The overabundance of template in some samples causes an imbalance between PCR cycles of contaminated and uncontaminated samples, which results in a systematic artifactual depletion of GC-rich library elements. Elimination of contaminating plasmid DNA using the bacterial endonuclease Benzonase can restore faithful measurements of template abundance and minimize GC bias.

  18. Angiogenesis is inhibitory for mammalian digit regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Yan, Mingquan; Simkin, Jennifer; Ketcham, Paulina D.; Leininger, Eric; Han, Manjong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The regenerating mouse digit tip is a unique model for investigating blastema formation and epimorphic regeneration in mammals. The blastema is characteristically avascular and we previously reported that blastema expression of a known anti‐angiogenic factor gene, Pedf, correlated with a successful regenerative response (Yu, L., Han, M., Yan, M., Lee, E. C., Lee, J. & Muneoka, K. (2010). BMP signaling induces digit regeneration in neonatal mice. Development, 137, 551–559). Here we show that during regeneration Vegfa transcripts are not detected in the blastema but are expressed at the onset of differentiation. Treating the amputation wound with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances angiogenesis but inhibits regeneration. We next tested bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9), another known mediator of angiogenesis, and found that BMP9 is also a potent inhibitor of digit tip regeneration. BMP9 induces Vegfa expression in the digit stump suggesting that regenerative failure is mediated by enhanced angiogenesis. Finally, we show that BMP9 inhibition of regeneration is completely rescued by treatment with pigment epithelium‐derived factor. These studies show that precocious angiogenesis is inhibitory for regeneration, and provide compelling evidence that the regulation of angiogenesis is a critical factor in designing therapies aimed at stimulating mammalian regeneration. PMID:27499862

  19. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  20. Mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesa, Marc; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    The meaning of the word mitochondrion (from the Greek mitos, meaning thread, and chondros, grain) illustrates that the heterogeneity of mitochondrial morphology has been known since the first descriptions of this organelle. Such a heterogeneous morphology is explained by the dynamic nature of mitochondria. Mitochondrial dynamics is a concept that includes the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, the regulation of mitochondrial architecture (morphology and distribution), and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission events. The relevance of these events in mitochondrial and cell physiology has been partially unraveled after the identification of the genes responsible for mitochondrial fusion and fission. Furthermore, during the last decade, it has been identified that mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause prevalent neurodegenerative diseases (Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and Kjer disease/autosomal dominant optic atrophy). In addition, other diseases such as type 2 diabetes or vascular proliferative disorders show impaired MFN2 expression. Altogether, these findings have established mitochondrial dynamics as a consolidated area in cellular physiology. Here we review the most significant findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian cells and their implication in human pathologies.

  1. Network features of the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Baggs

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is a cell-autonomous system that drives oscillations in behavior and physiology in anticipation of daily environmental change. To assess the robustness of a human molecular clock, we systematically depleted known clock components and observed that circadian oscillations are maintained over a wide range of disruptions. We developed a novel strategy termed Gene Dosage Network Analysis (GDNA in which small interfering RNA (siRNA-induced dose-dependent changes in gene expression were used to build gene association networks consistent with known biochemical constraints. The use of multiple doses powered the analysis to uncover several novel network features of the circadian clock, including proportional responses and signal propagation through interacting genetic modules. We also observed several examples where a gene is up-regulated following knockdown of its paralog, suggesting the clock network utilizes active compensatory mechanisms rather than simple redundancy to confer robustness and maintain function. We propose that these network features act in concert as a genetic buffering system to maintain clock function in the face of genetic and environmental perturbation.

  2. Fishing for mammalian paradigms in the teleost immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyer, J Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a renaissance in the study of fish immune systems. Such studies have greatly expanded the knowledge of the evolution and diversification of vertebrate immune systems. Several findings in those studies have overturned old paradigms about the immune system and led to the discovery of novel aspects of mammalian immunity. Here I focus on how findings pertaining to immunity in teleost (bony) fish have led to major new insights about mammalian B cell function in innate and adaptive immunity. Additionally, I illustrate how the discovery of the most ancient mucosal immunoglobulin described thus far will help resolve unsettled paradigms of mammalian mucosal immunity. PMID:23507645

  3. Functional evolution of mammalian odorant receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaylin A Adipietro

    Full Text Available The mammalian odorant receptor (OR repertoire is an attractive model to study evolution, because ORs have been subjected to rapid evolution between species, presumably caused by changes of the olfactory system to adapt to the environment. However, functional assessment of ORs in related species remains largely untested. Here we investigated the functional properties of primate and rodent ORs to determine how well evolutionary distance predicts functional characteristics. Using human and mouse ORs with previously identified ligands, we cloned 18 OR orthologs from chimpanzee and rhesus macaque and 17 mouse-rat orthologous pairs that are broadly representative of the OR repertoire. We functionally characterized the in vitro responses of ORs to a wide panel of odors and found similar ligand selectivity but dramatic differences in response magnitude. 87% of human-primate orthologs and 94% of mouse-rat orthologs showed differences in receptor potency (EC50 and/or efficacy (dynamic range to an individual ligand. Notably dN/dS ratio, an indication of selective pressure during evolution, does not predict functional similarities between orthologs. Additionally, we found that orthologs responded to a common ligand 82% of the time, while human OR paralogs of the same subfamily responded to the common ligand only 33% of the time. Our results suggest that, while OR orthologs tend to show conserved ligand selectivity, their potency and/or efficacy dynamically change during evolution, even in closely related species. These functional changes in orthologs provide a platform for examining how the evolution of ORs can meet species-specific demands.

  4. Xenografting of adult mammalian testis tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, Lucía; Rathi, Rahul; Zeng, Wenxian; Honaramooz, Ali; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S; Dobrinski, Ina

    2008-06-01

    Xenografting of testis tissue from immature males from several mammalian species to immunodeficient mouse hosts results in production of fertilization-competent sperm. However, the efficiency of testis tissue xenografting from adult donors has not been critically evaluated. Testis tissue xenografting from sexually mature animals could provide an option to preserve the genetic material from valuable males when semen for cryopreservation cannot be collected. To assess the potential use of this technique for adult individuals, testes from adult animals of six species (pig, goat, cattle, donkey, horse and rhesus monkey) were ectopically grafted to host mice. Grafts were recovered and analyzed at three time points: less than 12 weeks, between 12 and 24 weeks and more than 24 weeks after grafting. Histological analysis of the grafts revealed effects of species and donor tissue maturity: all grafts from species with greater daily sperm production (pig and goat) were found to have degenerated tubules or grafts were completely degenerated. None of the xenografts from mature adult bull and monkeys contained differentiated spermatogenic cells when examined more than 12 weeks post-grafting but tubules with Sertoli cells only remained. In grafts from a young adult bull, Sertoli cells persisted much longer than with the mature adult grafts. In grafts from a young adult horse, spermatogenesis proceeded to meiosis. In grafts from a young adult donkey and monkey, however, complete spermatogenesis was found in the grafts. These results show that testis tissue grafts from mature adult donors did not support germ cell differentiation but seminiferous tubules with Sertoli cells only survived in some species. The timing and progression of tubular degeneration after grafting of adult testis tissue appear to be related to the intensity of spermatogenesis at the time of grafting. Testis tissue from sub-adult donors survives better as xenograft than tissue from mature adult donors, and

  5. Identification of a mammalian silicon transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Sarah; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Vivancos, Julien; Marron, Alan; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Ma, Jian Feng; Mitani-Ueno, Namiki; Robertson, Jack; Wills, John; Boekschoten, Mark V; Müller, Michael; Mawhinney, Robert C; Kinrade, Stephen D; Isenring, Paul; Bélanger, Richard R; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-05-01

    Silicon (Si) has long been known to play a major physiological and structural role in certain organisms, including diatoms, sponges, and many higher plants, leading to the recent identification of multiple proteins responsible for Si transport in a range of algal and plant species. In mammals, despite several convincing studies suggesting that silicon is an important factor in bone development and connective tissue health, there is a critical lack of understanding about the biochemical pathways that enable Si homeostasis. Here we report the identification of a mammalian efflux Si transporter, namely Slc34a2 (also termed NaPiIIb), a known sodium-phosphate cotransporter, which was upregulated in rat kidney following chronic dietary Si deprivation. Normal rat renal epithelium demonstrated punctate expression of Slc34a2, and when the protein was heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, Si efflux activity (i.e., movement of Si out of cells) was induced and was quantitatively similar to that induced by the known plant Si transporter OsLsi2 in the same expression system. Interestingly, Si efflux appeared saturable over time, but it did not vary as a function of extracellular [Formula: see text] or Na+ concentration, suggesting that Slc34a2 harbors a functionally independent transport site for Si operating in the reverse direction to the site for phosphate. Indeed, in rats with dietary Si depletion-induced upregulation of transporter expression, there was increased urinary phosphate excretion. This is the first evidence of an active Si transport protein in mammals and points towards an important role for Si in vertebrates and explains interactions between dietary phosphate and silicon. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fyn kinase regulates translation in mammalian mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Emine C; Miller-Lee, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial translation machinery solely exists for the synthesis of 13 mitochondrially-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes in mammals. Therefore, it plays a critical role in mitochondrial energy production. However, regulation of the mitochondrial translation machinery is still poorly understood. In comprehensive proteomics studies with normal and diseased tissues and cell lines, we and others have found the majority of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) to be phosphorylated. Neither the kinases for these phosphorylation events nor their specific roles in mitochondrial translation are known. Mitochondrial kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of MRPs enriched from bovine mitoplasts by strong cation-exchange chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics analyses of kinase rich fractions. Phosphorylation of recombinant MRPs and 55S ribosomes was assessed by in vitro phosphorylation assays using the kinase-rich fractions. The effect of identified kinase on OXPHOS and mitochondrial translation was assessed by various cell biological and immunoblotting approaches. Here, we provide the first evidence for the association of Fyn kinase, a Src family kinase, with mitochondrial translation components and its involvement in phosphorylation of 55S ribosomal proteins in vitro. Modulation of Fyn expression in human cell lines has provided a link between mitochondrial translation and energy metabolism, which was evident by the changes in 13 mitochondrially encoded subunits of OXPHOS complexes. Our findings suggest that Fyn kinase is part of a complex mechanism that regulates protein synthesis and OXPHOS possibly by tyrosine phosphorylation of translation components in mammalian mitochondria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Does autophagy have a license to kill mammalian cells?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarlatti, F.; Granata, R.; Meijer, A. J.; Codogno, P.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an evolutionarily conserved vacuolar, self-digesting mechanism for cellular components, which end up in the lysosomal compartment. In mammalian cells, macroautophagy is cytoprotective, and protects the cells against the accumulation of damaged organelles or protein aggregates, the

  9. Genetic Analysis of a Mammalian Chromosomal Origin of Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altman, Amy

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin to understand the mechanism of replication initiation in mammalian cells in order to gain insight into how misregulation of initiation may lead to cancer progression...

  10. Brain size predicts problem-solving ability in mammalian carnivores

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah Benson-Amram; Ben Dantzer; Gregory Stricker; Eli M. Swanson; Kay E. Holekamp

    2016-01-01

    ... for it. Here, we designed an experiment to inquire whether specific neuroanatomical or socioecological measures predict success at solving a novel technical problem among species in the mammalian order Carnivora...

  11. MAMMALIAN RESPONSE TO GLOBAL WARMING ON VARIED TEMPORAL SCALES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anthony D. Barnosky; Elizabeth A. Hadly; Christopher J. Bell

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Paleontological information was used to evaluate and compare how Rocky Mountain mammalian communities changed during past global warming events characterized by different durations (350, ∼10,000...

  12. Sexing Mammalian Sperm - Where Do We Go from Here?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SEIDEL, Jr, George E

    2012-01-01

    The only commercially viable method of sexing mammalian sperm is to use a flow cytometer to measure sperm DNA content via fluorescence of the DNA-bound fluorophore Hoechst 33342, and then sort sperm...

  13. Mammalian 26S proteasomes remain intact during protein degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Seeger, Michael; Saeki, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that degradation of polyubiquitylated proteins is coupled to dissociation of 26S proteasomes. In contrast, using several independent types of experiments, we find that mammalian proteasomes can degrade polyubiquitylated proteins without disassembling. Thus, immobilized, (35)...

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of genome rearrangements among five mammalian orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiwei; Arndt, William; Zhang, Yiwei; Shi, Guanqun; Alekseyev, Max A; Tang, Jijun; Hughes, Austin L; Friedman, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Evolutionary relationships among placental mammalian orders have been controversial. Whole genome sequencing and new computational methods offer opportunities to resolve the relationships among 10 genomes belonging to the mammalian orders Primates, Rodentia, Carnivora, Perissodactyla and Artiodactyla. By application of the double cut and join distance metric, where gene order is the phylogenetic character, we computed genomic distances among the sampled mammalian genomes. With a marsupial outgroup, the gene order tree supported a topology in which Rodentia fell outside the cluster of Primates, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, and Artiodactyla. Results of breakpoint reuse rate and synteny block length analyses were consistent with the prediction of random breakage model, which provided a diagnostic test to support use of gene order as an appropriate phylogenetic character in this study. We discussed the influence of rate differences among lineages and other factors that may contribute to different resolutions of mammalian ordinal relationships by different methods of phylogenetic reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The truncated TrkB receptor influences mammalian sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Adam J.; Henson, Kyle; Dorsey, Susan G; Frank, Marcos G.

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin hypothesized to play an important role in mammalian sleep expression and regulation. In order to investigate the role of the truncated receptor for BDNF, TrkB.T1, in mammalian sleep, we examined sleep architecture and sleep regulation in adult mice constitutively lacking this receptor. We find that TrkB.T1 knockout mice have increased REM sleep time, reduced REM sleep latency, and reduced sleep continuity. These results demonstrate a ...

  16. An Analytical Study of Mammalian Bite Wounds Requiring Inpatient Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Geun Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMammalian bite injuries create a public health problem because of their frequency, potential severity, and increasing number. Some researchers have performed fragmentary analyses of bite wounds caused by certain mammalian species. However, little practical information is available concerning serious mammalian bite wounds that require hospitalization and intensive wound management. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to perform a general review of serious mammalian bite wounds.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of the medical charts of 68 patients who were referred to our plastic surgery department for the treatment of bite wounds between January 2003 and October 2012. The cases were analyzed according to the species, patient demographics, environmental factors, injury characteristics, and clinical course.ResultsAmong the 68 cases of mammalian bite injury, 58 (85% were caused by dogs, 8 by humans, and 2 by cats. Most of those bitten by a human and both of those bitten by cats were male. Only one-third of all the patients were children or adolescents. The most frequent site of injury was the face, with 40 cases, followed by the hand, with 16 cases. Of the 68 patients, 7 were treated with secondary intention healing. Sixty-one patients underwent delayed procedures, including delayed direct closure, skin graft, composite graft, and local flap.ConclusionsBased on overall findings from our review of the 68 cases of mammalian bites, we suggest practical guidelines for the management of mammalian bite injuries, which could be useful in the treatment of serious mammalian bite wounds.

  17. Phase description of the Huber-Braun neuron model for mammalian cold receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, J. A.; Finke, C.; Braun, H. A.; Feudel, U.

    2013-10-01

    The spiking activity of mammalian cold receptors is described by the Huber-Braun neuron model. Sweeping temperature as a control parameter across a biologically relevant range this model exhibits a complex bifurcation structure seen in the sequence of interspike intervals. The model's distinctive feature is the interaction between a fast spike generating dynamics and a slow subthreshold oscillation. Viewing the spike generation as a cycle, the dynamics may also be modeled phenomenologically by two phases, one for the spike cycle and the second for the slow subthreshold oscillation. In fact, a phase model of temperature-dependent mammalian cold receptors was already proposed by Roper et al. (2000). Here we follow their approach and investigate to what extent this model is able to reproduce the bifurcation patterns of the Huber-Braun model. Special attention is paid to the tonic firing to bursting transition observed in the low temperature range.

  18. Regulation of a Mammalian Gene Bearing a CpG Island Promoter and a Distal Enhancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Berrozpe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A quantitative nucleosome occupancy assay revealed rules for nucleosome disposition in yeast and showed how disposition affects regulation of the GAL genes. Here, we show how those findings apply to the control of Kit, a mammalian gene. The Kit promoter lies in a CpG island, and its enhancer (active in mast cells lies some 150 kb upstream. Nucleosomes form with especially high avidities at the Kit promoter, a reaction that, we surmise, ensures extremely low basal expression. In mast cells, transcriptional activators displace nucleosomes that are less tightly formed at the Kit enhancer. In turn, the active enhancer replaces a single Kit promoter nucleosome with the transcriptional machinery, thereby inducing transcription over 1,000-fold. As at the yeast GAL genes, the inhibitory effects of nucleosomes facilitate high factors of induction by mammalian activators working in the absence of specific repressors.

  19. Half-Octave Shift in Mammalian Hearing Is an Epiphenomenon of the Cochlear Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sripriya; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-01-01

    The cochlear amplifier is a hypothesized positive feedback process responsible for our exquisite hearing sensitivity. Experimental evidence for or against the positive feedback hypothesis is still lacking. Here we apply linear control theory to determine the open-loop gain and the closed-loop sensitivity of the cochlear amplifier from available measurements of basilar membrane vibration in sensitive mammalian cochleae. We show that the frequency of peak closed-loop sensitivity is independent of the stimulus level and close to the characteristic frequency. This implies that the half-octave shift in mammalian hearing is an epiphenomenon of the cochlear amplifier. The open-loop gain is consistent with positive feedback and suggests that the high-frequency cut-off of the outer hair cell transmembrane potential in vivo may be necessary for cochlear amplification. PMID:23049829

  20. Synthetic Biology Platform for Sensing and Integrating Endogenous Transcriptional Inputs in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelici, Bartolomeo; Mailand, Erik; Haefliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-08-30

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to develop programmable artificial gene networks that can transduce multiple endogenous molecular cues to precisely control cell behavior. Realizing this vision requires interfacing natural molecular inputs with synthetic components that generate functional molecular outputs. Interfacing synthetic circuits with endogenous mammalian transcription factors has been particularly difficult. Here, we describe a systematic approach that enables integration and transduction of multiple mammalian transcription factor inputs by a synthetic network. The approach is facilitated by a proportional amplifier sensor based on synergistic positive autoregulation. The circuits efficiently transduce endogenous transcription factor levels into RNAi, transcriptional transactivation, and site-specific recombination. They also enable AND logic between pairs of arbitrary transcription factors. The results establish a framework for developing synthetic gene networks that interface with cellular processes through transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

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    Paves Heiti

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area.

  2. Complexin I is required for mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

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    Zhao, Longmei; Burkin, Heather R; Shi, Xudong; Li, Lingjun; Reim, Kerstin; Miller, David J

    2007-09-15

    Regulated exocytosis in many cells is controlled by the SNARE complex, whose core includes three proteins that promote membrane fusion. Complexins I and II are highly related cytosolic proteins that bind tightly to the assembled SNARE complex and regulate neuronal exocytosis. Like somatic cells, sperm undergo regulated exocytosis; however, sperm release a single large vesicle, the acrosome, whose release has different characteristics than neuronal exocytosis. Acrosomal release is triggered upon sperm adhesion to the mammalian egg extracellular matrix (zona pellucida) to allow penetration of the egg coat. Membrane fusion occurs at multiple points within the acrosome but how fusion is activated and the formation and progression of fusion points is synchronized is unclear. We show that complexins I and II are found in acrosome-intact mature sperm, bind to SNARE complex proteins, and are not detected in sperm after acrosomal exocytosis (acrosome reaction). Although complexin-I-deficient sperm acrosome-react in response to calcium ionophore, they do not acrosome-react in response to egg zona pellucida proteins and have reduced fertilizing ability, in vitro. Complexin II is present in the complexin-I-deficient sperm and its expression is increased in complexin-I-deficient testes. Therefore, complexin I functions in exocytosis in two related but morphologically distinct secretory processes. Sperm are unusual because they express both complexins I and II but have a unique and specific requirement for complexin I.

  3. Beyond water homeostasis: Diverse functional roles of mammalian aquaporins.

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    Kitchen, Philip; Day, Rebecca E; Salman, Mootaz M; Conner, Matthew T; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C

    2015-12-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are best known as passive transporters of water that are vital for water homeostasis. AQP knockout studies in whole animals and cultured cells, along with naturally occurring human mutations suggest that the transport of neutral solutes through AQPs has important physiological roles. Emerging biophysical evidence suggests that AQPs may also facilitate gas (CO2) and cation transport. AQPs may be involved in cell signalling for volume regulation and controlling the subcellular localization of other proteins by forming macromolecular complexes. This review examines the evidence for these diverse functions of AQPs as well their physiological relevance. As well as being crucial for water homeostasis, AQPs are involved in physiologically important transport of molecules other than water, regulation of surface expression of other membrane proteins, cell adhesion, and signalling in cell volume regulation. Elucidating the full range of functional roles of AQPs beyond the passive conduction of water will improve our understanding of mammalian physiology in health and disease. The functional variety of AQPs makes them an exciting drug target and could provide routes to a range of novel therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Centriole movements in mammalian epithelial cells during cytokinesis.

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    Jonsdottir, Asta Björk; Dirks, Roeland W; Vrolijk, Johannes; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M; Tanke, Hans J; Eyfjörd, Jorunn E; Szuhai, Karoly

    2010-05-21

    In cytokinesis, when the cleavage furrow has been formed, the two centrioles in each daughter cell separate. It has been suggested that the centrioles facilitate and regulate cytokinesis to some extent. It has been postulated that termination of cytokinesis (abscission) depends on the migration of a centriole to the intercellular bridge and then back to the cell center. To investigate the involvement of centrioles in cytokinesis, we monitored the movements of centrioles in three mammalian epithelial cell lines, HeLa, MCF 10A, and the p53-deficient mouse mammary tumor cell line KP-7.7, by time-lapse imaging. Centrin1-EGFP and alpha-Tubulin-mCherry were co-expressed in the cells to visualize respectively the centrioles and microtubules. Here we report that separated centrioles that migrate from the cell pole are very mobile during cytokinesis and their movements can be characterized as 1) along the nuclear envelope, 2) irregular, and 3) along microtubules forming the spindle axis. Centriole movement towards the intercellular bridge was only seen occasionally and was highly cell-line dependent. These findings show that centrioles are highly mobile during cytokinesis and suggest that the repositioning of a centriole to the intercellular bridge is not essential for controlling abscission. We suggest that centriole movements are microtubule dependent and that abscission is more dependent on other mechanisms than positioning of centrioles.

  5. Centriole movements in mammalian epithelial cells during cytokinesis

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    Tanke Hans J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cytokinesis, when the cleavage furrow has been formed, the two centrioles in each daughter cell separate. It has been suggested that the centrioles facilitate and regulate cytokinesis to some extent. It has been postulated that termination of cytokinesis (abscission depends on the migration of a centriole to the intercellular bridge and then back to the cell center. To investigate the involvement of centrioles in cytokinesis, we monitored the movements of centrioles in three mammalian epithelial cell lines, HeLa, MCF 10A, and the p53-deficient mouse mammary tumor cell line KP-7.7, by time-lapse imaging. Centrin1-EGFP and α-Tubulin-mCherry were co-expressed in the cells to visualize respectively the centrioles and microtubules. Results Here we report that separated centrioles that migrate from the cell pole are very mobile during cytokinesis and their movements can be characterized as 1 along the nuclear envelope, 2 irregular, and 3 along microtubules forming the spindle axis. Centriole movement towards the intercellular bridge was only seen occasionally and was highly cell-line dependent. Conclusions These findings show that centrioles are highly mobile during cytokinesis and suggest that the repositioning of a centriole to the intercellular bridge is not essential for controlling abscission. We suggest that centriole movements are microtubule dependent and that abscission is more dependent on other mechanisms than positioning of centrioles.

  6. Roles of Grp78 in Female Mammalian Reproduction.

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    Zhang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) also referred to as immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (Bip) is one of the best characterized endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone proteins, which belongs to the heat-shock protein (HSP) family. GRP78 as a central regulator of ER stress (ERS) plays many important roles in cell survival and apoptosis through controlling the activation of transmembrane ERS sensors: PKR-like ER-associated kinase (PERK), inositol requiring kinase 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Many studies have reported that GRP78 is involved in the physiological and pathological process in female reproduction, including follicular development, corpus luteum (CL), oviduct, uterus, embryo, preimplantation development, implantation/decidualization, and the placenta. The present review summarizes the biological or pathological roles and signaling mechanisms of GRP78 during the reproductive processes. Further study on the functions and mechanisms of GRP78 may provide new insight into mammalian reproduction, which not only enhance the understanding of the physiological roles but also support therapy target against infertility.

  7. The mammalian circadian timing system: from gene expression to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachon, Frédéric; Nagoshi, Emi; Brown, Steven A; Ripperger, Juergen; Schibler, Ueli

    2004-09-01

    Many physiological processes in organisms from bacteria to man are rhythmic, and some of these are controlled by self-sustained oscillators that persist in the absence of external time cues. Circadian clocks are perhaps the best characterized biological oscillators and they exist in virtually all light-sensitive organisms. In mammals, they influence nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior, including sleep-wake cycles, cardiovascular activity, endocrinology, body temperature, renal activity, physiology of the gastro-intestinal tract, and hepatic metabolism. The master pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, two small groups of neurons in the ventral part of the hypothalamus. However, most peripheral body cells contain self-sustained circadian oscillators with a molecular makeup similar to that of SCN (suprachiasmatic nucleus) neurons. This organization implies that the SCN must synchronize countless subsidiary oscillators in peripheral tissues, in order to coordinate cyclic physiology. In this review, we will discuss some recent studies on the structure and putative functions of the mammalian circadian timing system, but we will also point out some apparent inconsistencies in the currently publicized model for rhythm generation.

  8. Brain size predicts problem-solving ability in mammalian carnivores.

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    Benson-Amram, Sarah; Dantzer, Ben; Stricker, Gregory; Swanson, Eli M; Holekamp, Kay E

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable interest in the forces shaping the relationship between brain size and cognitive abilities, it remains controversial whether larger-brained animals are, indeed, better problem-solvers. Recently, several comparative studies have revealed correlations between brain size and traits thought to require advanced cognitive abilities, such as innovation, behavioral flexibility, invasion success, and self-control. However, the general assumption that animals with larger brains have superior cognitive abilities has been heavily criticized, primarily because of the lack of experimental support for it. Here, we designed an experiment to inquire whether specific neuroanatomical or socioecological measures predict success at solving a novel technical problem among species in the mammalian order Carnivora. We presented puzzle boxes, baited with food and scaled to accommodate body size, to members of 39 carnivore species from nine families housed in multiple North American zoos. We found that species with larger brains relative to their body mass were more successful at opening the boxes. In a subset of species, we also used virtual brain endocasts to measure volumes of four gross brain regions and show that some of these regions improve model prediction of success at opening the boxes when included with total brain size and body mass. Socioecological variables, including measures of social complexity and manual dexterity, failed to predict success at opening the boxes. Our results, thus, fail to support the social brain hypothesis but provide important empirical support for the relationship between relative brain size and the ability to solve this novel technical problem.

  9. DNA Replication Origins and Fork Progression at Mammalian Telomeres

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    Higa, Mitsunori; Fujita, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are essential chromosomal regions that prevent critical shortening of linear chromosomes and genomic instability in eukaryotic cells. The bulk of telomeric DNA is replicated by semi-conservative DNA replication in the same way as the rest of the genome. However, recent findings revealed that replication of telomeric repeats is a potential cause of chromosomal instability, because DNA replication through telomeres is challenged by the repetitive telomeric sequences and specific structures that hamper the replication fork. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the mechanisms by which telomeres are faithfully and safely replicated in mammalian cells. Various telomere-associated proteins ensure efficient telomere replication at different steps, such as licensing of replication origins, passage of replication forks, proper fork restart after replication stress, and dissolution of post-replicative structures. In particular, shelterin proteins have central roles in the control of telomere replication. Through physical interactions, accessory proteins are recruited to maintain telomere integrity during DNA replication. Dormant replication origins and/or homology-directed repair may rescue inappropriate fork stalling or collapse that can cause defects in telomere structure and functions. PMID:28350373

  10. The identification of the endogenous ligands of natural killer T cells reveals the presence of mammalian α-linked glycosylceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Lisa; Webb, Bill; Anderson, Brian L; Deng, Shenglou; Holt, Marie; Costanzo, Anne; Constanzo, Anne; Zhao, Meng; Self, Kevin; Teyton, Anais; Everett, Chris; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Zajonc, Dirk M; Bendelac, Albert; Savage, Paul B; Teyton, Luc

    2014-10-16

    Glycosylceramides in mammalian species are thought to be present in the form of β-anomers. This conclusion was reinforced by the identification of only one glucosylceramide and one galactosylceramide synthase, both β-transferases, in mammalian genomes. Thus, the possibility that small amounts of α-anomers could be produced by an alternative enzymatic pathway, by an unfaithful enzyme, or spontaneously in unusual cellular compartments has not been examined in detail. We approached the question by taking advantage of the exquisite specificity of T and B lymphocytes and combined it with the specificity of catabolic enzymes of the sphingolipid pathway. Here, we demonstrate that mammalian immune cells produce constitutively very small quantities of α-glycosylceramides, which are the major endogenous ligands of natural killer T cells. Catabolic enzymes of the ceramide and glycolipid pathway tightly control the amount of these α-glycosylceramides. The exploitation of this pathway to manipulate the immune response will create new therapeutic opportunities.

  11. The Ca2+ influx through the mammalian skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor is irrelevant for muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Anamika; Schrötter, Kai; Pan, Yuan; Föhr, Karl; Melzer, Werner; Grabner, Manfred

    2017-09-07

    Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling is initiated by sarcolemmal depolarization, which is translated into a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), which in turn activates sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release to trigger muscle contraction. During EC coupling, the mammalian DHPR embraces functional duality, as voltage sensor and L-type Ca2+ channel. Although its unique role as voltage sensor for conformational EC coupling is firmly established, the conventional function as Ca2+ channel is still enigmatic. Here we show that Ca2+ influx via DHPR is not necessary for muscle performance by generating a knock-in mouse where DHPR-mediated Ca2+ influx is eliminated. Homozygous knock-in mice display SR Ca2+ release, locomotor activity, motor coordination, muscle strength and susceptibility to fatigue comparable to wild-type controls, without any compensatory regulation of multiple key proteins of the EC coupling machinery and Ca2+ homeostasis. These findings support the hypothesis that the DHPR-mediated Ca2+ influx in mammalian skeletal muscle is an evolutionary remnant.In mammalian skeletal muscle, the DHPR functions as a voltage sensor to trigger muscle contraction and as a Ca2+ channel. Here the authors show that mice where Ca2+ influx through the DHPR is eliminated display no difference in skeletal muscle function, suggesting that the Ca2+ influx through this channel is vestigial.

  12. Cultivation of mammalian cells using a single-use pneumatic bioreactor system.

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    Obom, Kristina M; Cummings, Patrick J; Ciafardoni, Janelle A; Hashimura, Yasunori; Giroux, Daniel

    2014-10-10

    Recent advances in mammalian, insect, and stem cell cultivation and scale-up have created tremendous opportunities for new therapeutics and personalized medicine innovations. However, translating these advances into therapeutic applications will require in vitro systems that allow for robust, flexible, and cost effective bioreactor systems. There are several bioreactor systems currently utilized in research and commercial settings; however, many of these systems are not optimal for establishing, expanding, and monitoring the growth of different cell types. The culture parameters most challenging to control in these systems include, minimizing hydrodynamic shear, preventing nutrient gradient formation, establishing uniform culture medium aeration, preventing microbial contamination, and monitoring and adjusting culture conditions in real-time. Using a pneumatic single-use bioreactor system, we demonstrate the assembly and operation of this novel bioreactor for mammalian cells grown on micro-carriers. This bioreactor system eliminates many of the challenges associated with currently available systems by minimizing hydrodynamic shear and nutrient gradient formation, and allowing for uniform culture medium aeration. Moreover, the bioreactor's software allows for remote real-time monitoring and adjusting of the bioreactor run parameters. This bioreactor system also has tremendous potential for scale-up of adherent and suspension mammalian cells for production of a variety therapeutic proteins, monoclonal antibodies, stem cells, biosimilars, and vaccines.

  13. Characterization of mammalian selenoprotein o: a redox-active mitochondrial protein.

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    Seong-Jeong Han

    Full Text Available Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO, the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells with 75Se, and it was abolished when selenocysteine was replaced with serine. A CxxU motif was identified in the C-terminal region of SelO. This protein was reversibly oxidized in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in HEK 293T cells when cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide. This treatment led to the formation of a transient 88 kDa SelO-containing complex. The formation of this complex was enhanced by replacing the CxxU motif with SxxC, but abolished when it was replaced with SxxS, suggesting a redox interaction of SelO with another protein through its Sec residue. SelO was localized to mitochondria and expressed across mouse tissues. Its expression was little affected by selenium deficiency, suggesting it has a high priority for selenium supply. Taken together, these results show that SelO is a redox-active mitochondrial selenoprotein.

  14. TRANSPLANTATION AND POTENTIAL IMMORTALITY OF MAMMALIAN TISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Leo

    1926-01-01

    1. Serial transplantation of tumors made it possible in 1901 and following years to draw the conclusion that various mammalian tissues have potential immortality. Serial transplantations of normal tissues did not succeed at first, because the homoioreaction on the part of the lymphocytes and connective tissue of the host injures the transplant. 2. In continuation of these experiments we found that cartilage of the rat can be transplanted serially to other rats at least for a period of 3 years. At the end of that time great parts of the transplanted cartilage and perichondrium are alive. 3. Not only the cartilage of young rats can be homoiotransplanted, but also the cartilage of very old rats which are nearing the end of life. By using such animals we have been able to obtain cartilage and perichondrium approaching an age of 6 years which is almost double the average age of a rat. 4. We found that cartilage can be homoiotransplanted more readily than other tissues for the following reasons: (a) While in principle the homoioreaction towards cartilage is the same as against other tissues, cartilage elicits this reaction with less intensity; (b) cartilage is better able to resist the invasion of lymphocytes and connective tissue than the majority of other tissues; (c) a gradual adaptation between transplant and host seems to take place in the case of cartilage transplantation, as a result of which the lymphocytic reaction on the part of the host tissue decreases progressively the longer the cartilage is kept in the strange host. 5. At time of examination we not only found living transplanted cartilage tissue, but also perichondrial tissue, which in response to a stimulus apparently originating in the necrotic central cartilage, had been proliferating and replacing it. These results suggest that it may perhaps be possible under favorable conditions to keep cartilage alive indefinitely through serial transplantations. 6. At the same time these experiments permit the

  15. Determination of mammalian deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in commercial vegetarian and vegan diets for dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakubo, K; Fascetti, A J; Larsen, J A

    2017-02-01

    The determination of undeclared ingredients in pet food using different analytical methods has been reported in recent years, raising concerns regarding adequate quality control, dietary efficacy and the potential for purposeful adulteration. The objective of this study was to determine the presence or absence of mammalian DNA using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on diets marketed as vegetarian or vegan for dogs and cats. The diets were tested in duplicate; two samples were purchased approximately 3 to 4 months apart with different lot numbers. Multiplex PCR-targeted mitochondrial DNA with two species-specific primers was used to amplify and sequence two sections of the cytochrome b gene for each of the 11 mammalian species. Half of the diets assessed (7/14) were positive for one or more undeclared mammalian DNA source (bovine, porcine, or ovine), and the result was repeatable for one or more species in six diets. While most of the detected DNA was found at both time points, in some cases, the result was positive only at one time point, suggesting the presence may have been due to unintentional cross-contact with animal-sourced ingredients. DNA from feline, cervine, canine, caprine, equine, murine (mouse and rat) and leporine was not identified in any samples. However, evidence of mammalian DNA does not confirm adulteration by the manufacturer nor elucidate its clinical significance when consumed by animals that may benefit from a vegetarian or vegan diet. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Protein Expression in Insect and Mammalian Cells Using Baculoviruses in Wave Bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadwell, Sue H; Overton, Laurie K

    2016-01-01

    Many types of disposable bioreactors for protein expression in insect and mammalian cells are now available. They differ in design, capacity, and sensor options, with many selections available for either rocking platform, orbitally shaken, pneumatically mixed, or stirred-tank bioreactors lined with an integral disposable bag (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). WAVE Bioreactors™ were among the first disposable systems to be developed (Singh, Cytotechnology 30:149-158, 1999). Since their commercialization in 1999, Wave Bioreactors have become routinely used in many laboratories due to their ease of operation, limited utility requirements, and protein expression levels comparability to traditional stirred-tank bioreactors. Wave Bioreactors are designed to use a presterilized Cellbag™, which is attached to a rocking platform and inflated with filtered air provided by the bioreactor unit. The Cellbag can be filled with medium and cells and maintained at a set temperature. The rocking motion, which is adjusted through angle and rock speed settings, provides mixing of oxygen (and CO2, which is used to control pH in mammalian cell cultures) from the headspace created in the inflated Cellbag with the cell culture medium and cells. This rocking motion can be adjusted to prevent cell shear damage. Dissolved oxygen and pH can be monitored during scale-up, and samples can be easily removed to monitor other parameters. Insect and mammalian cells grow very well in Wave Bioreactors (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). Combining Wave Bioreactor cell growth capabilities with recombinant baculoviruses engineered for insect or mammalian cell expression has proven to be a powerful tool for rapid production of a wide range of proteins.

  17. The clinical course of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer after transuretral resection of the tumor with or without subsequent intravesical application of bacillus Calmette-Guérin: The influence of patients gender and age

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    Milošević Radovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. The therapy with intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG after transurethral resection (TUR of tumor is the gold standard of treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. The role and importance of BCG intravesical therapy in various shape of tumors, were confirmed by our previous investigation. The aim of this study was to examine whether incidence of recurrence and tumor regression differs depending on sex and age of patients. Methods. This study included a total of 899 patients suffering from NIMBC, treated at our institution from January 1, 2007 to March 1, 2013. Two groups of patients were formed: patients underwent TUR + BCG therapy (the group I and the group II with patients in whom TUR was performed as only therapy. These two groups of patients were divided into subgroups of respondents male and female, age 60 years or younger and older than 60 years. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Results. This research suggests that if the frequency of recurrence is seen as the only parameter, considering all the subjects, the lowest recurrence rate was determined in the male subjects, aged 60 years and younger who had received BCG after TUR. A high statistical significance was found in the incidence of recurrence in patients younger than 60 years, depending on the response to the therapy, while in those older than 60 years, the difference was at the level of statistical significance. This can be attributed to a certain degree of infravesical obstruction in older men. Conclusions. Sex and age of patients may have a significant influence on the course and outcome of NMIBC. The disease has the most malignant and most aggressive behavior when present in males older than 60 years.

  18. The value of perioperative mitomycin C instillation in improving subsequent bacillus calmette-guerin instillation efficacy in intermediate and high-risk patients with non-muscle invasıve bladder cancer: a prospective randomized study

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    Ömer Gülpinar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We evaluated the efficacy of perioperative mitomycin C (MMC instillation to improve subsequent bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG instillation efficacy in intermediate and high risk patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From November 2004 to May 2006, 51 patients with intermediate or high risk NMIBC were enrolled in this prospective randomized trial. In group A, patients were treated with perioperative MMC (40 mg MMC in 40 mL saline was administered within 6 hours of surgery followed by delayed (at least 15 days from surgery BCG instillations (once a week for 6 weeks, 5 x 108 colony-forming units in 50 mL saline. Patients in group B were treated with delayed BCG instillations alone. The primary end points were recurrence-free interval and recurrence rate. RESULTS: There were 25 and 26 patients in groups A and B, respectively. Median follow-up was 41.3 months (range 8 to 64 in group A and 40.9 months (range 6 to 68 in group B. Recurrence rate was 36% (9 of 25 and 19.3% (5 of 26 in group A and B, respectively (p = 0.052. Median time to the first recurrence was 8 months in group A and 7 months in group B (p = 0.12. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed no statistically significant difference in terms of recurrence rate and median time to first recurrence between intermediate or high-risk patients with NMIBC who were treated with early single dose instillation of MMC plus delayed BCG and those who were treated with only BCG.

  19. Do Standardised Prognostic Algorithms Reflect Local Practice? Application of EORTC Risk Tables for Non-Muscle Invasive (pTa/pT1 Bladder Cancer Recurrence and Progression in a Local Cohort

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    Rajiv Pillai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A risk calculator algorithm to allow prediction of probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression rates in individuals with pTa/pT1 bladder cancer has been proposed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and was incorporated into the European Association of Urology guidelines in 2006. We attempted to validate this algorithm in a cohort of patients with known outcome. Prognostic data were collected from a consecutively presenting cohort of 109 patients with non-muscle invasive (pTa/pT1 transitional cell cancer (TCC at a single institution between 1983 and 1985. Using the same statistical models as in the EORTC original paper, predicted probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression were calculated. Patients were divided into four risk groups for recurrence (Ir-IVr and progression (Ip-IVp, respectively, using six prognostic criteria. These were then compared to the probabilities predicted in the EORTC algorithm. The predicted 1- and 5-year probabilities of recurrence were significantly higher in the study population as compared to the original EORTC algorithm for all four risk groups. The predicted 1-year probabilities for progression in groups Ip/IIIp and at 5-years for groups Ip/IIp were in accordance with the original algorithm, but were higher for the other progression groups. The concordance for the model of prediction using the study group for recurrence at 1 and 5 years was 62 and 63%, respectively, and for progression was 65 and 67, respectively. We were unable to validate the proposed algorithm in our group of patients. Although our study has limitations that prevent firm conclusions on the validity of the algorithm, it does expose some of the drawbacks of standardised nomograms when applied to local clinical practice.

  20. Functional similarities between pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk: induction of immune gene expression and modification of the microbiota.

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    Meagan J Gillespie

    Full Text Available Pigeon 'milk' and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon 'milk'. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon 'milk' on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon 'milk' had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon 'milk'-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon 'milk', as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon 'milk'. Our results demonstrate that pigeon 'milk' has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon 'lactation' and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products.

  1. Functional Similarities between Pigeon ‘Milk’ and Mammalian Milk: Induction of Immune Gene Expression and Modification of the Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Meagan J.; Stanley, Dragana; Chen, Honglei; Donald, John A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Moore, Robert J.; Crowley, Tamsyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Pigeon ‘milk’ and mammalian milk have functional similarities in terms of nutritional benefit and delivery of immunoglobulins to the young. Mammalian milk has been clearly shown to aid in the development of the immune system and microbiota of the young, but similar effects have not yet been attributed to pigeon ‘milk’. Therefore, using a chicken model, we investigated the effect of pigeon ‘milk’ on immune gene expression in the Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue (GALT) and on the composition of the caecal microbiota. Chickens fed pigeon ‘milk’ had a faster rate of growth and a better feed conversion ratio than control chickens. There was significantly enhanced expression of immune-related gene pathways and interferon-stimulated genes in the GALT of pigeon ‘milk’-fed chickens. These pathways include the innate immune response, regulation of cytokine production and regulation of B cell activation and proliferation. The caecal microbiota of pigeon ‘milk’-fed chickens was significantly more diverse than control chickens, and appears to be affected by prebiotics in pigeon ‘milk’, as well as being directly seeded by bacteria present in pigeon ‘milk’. Our results demonstrate that pigeon ‘milk’ has further modes of action which make it functionally similar to mammalian milk. We hypothesise that pigeon ‘lactation’ and mammalian lactation evolved independently but resulted in similarly functional products. PMID:23110233

  2. Quantitative genetic-interaction mapping in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roguev, Assen; Talbot, Dale; Negri, Gian Luca; Shales, Michael; Cagney, Gerard; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Panning, Barbara; Krogan, Nevan J

    2013-01-01

    Mapping genetic interactions (GIs) by simultaneously perturbing pairs of genes is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological phenomena. Here we describe an experimental platform for generating quantitative GI maps in mammalian cells using a combinatorial RNA interference strategy. We performed ~11,000 pairwise knockdowns in mouse fibroblasts, focusing on 130 factors involved in chromatin regulation to create a GI map. Comparison of the GI and protein-protein interaction (PPI) data revealed that pairs of genes exhibiting positive GIs and/or similar genetic profiles were predictive of the corresponding proteins being physically associated. The mammalian GI map identified pathways and complexes but also resolved functionally distinct submodules within larger protein complexes. By integrating GI and PPI data, we created a functional map of chromatin complexes in mouse fibroblasts, revealing that the PAF complex is a central player in the mammalian chromatin landscape. PMID:23407553

  3. Role of Actin Cytoskeleton During Mammalian Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romarowski, Ana; Luque, Guillermina M; La Spina, Florenza A; Krapf, Dario; Buffone, Mariano G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian sperm require to undergo an exocytotic process called acrosomal exocytosis in order to be able to fuse with the oocyte. This ability is acquired during the course of sperm capacitation. This review is focused on one aspect related to this acquisition: the role of the actin cytoskeleton. Evidence from different laboratories indicates that actin polymerization occurs during capacitation, and the detection of several actin-related proteins suggests that the cytoskeleton is involved in important sperm functions. In other mammalian cells, the cortical actin network acts as a dominant negative clamp which blocks constitutive exocytosis but, at the same time, is necessary to prepare the cell to undergo regulated exocytosis. Thus, F-actin stabilizes structures generated by exocytosis and supports the physiological progression of this process. Is this also the case in mammalian sperm? This review summarizes what is currently known about actin and its related proteins in the male gamete, with particular emphasis on their role in acrosomal exocytosis.

  4. Mycoplasma fermentans deacetylase promotes mammalian cell stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qingzhou; Wu, Lijuan; Tu, Rongfu; Wu, Jun; Kang, Wenqian; Su, Tong; Du, Runlei; Liu, Wenbin

    2017-08-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans is a pathogenic bacterium that infects humans and has potential pathogenic roles in respiratory, genital and rheumatoid diseases. NAD+-dependent deacetylase is involved in a wide range of pathophysiological processes and our studies have demonstrated that expression of mycoplasmal deacetylase in mammalian cells inhibits proliferation but promotes anti-starvation stress tolerance. Furthermore, mycoplasmal deacetylase is involved in cellular anti-oxidation, which correlates with changes in the proapoptotic proteins BIK, p21 and BIM. Mycoplasmal deacetylase binds to and deacetylates the FOXO3 protein, similar with mammalian SIRT2, and affects expression of the FOXO3 target gene BIM, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. Mycoplasmal deacetylase also alters the performance of cells under drug stress. This study expands our understanding of the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms of interaction between mycoplasmas and mammalian cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Developmental history of the mammalian oocyte: insight from mouse mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, A; McGaughey, R W; Wilson-Rawls, J

    2001-10-01

    Growth and differentiation of the mammalian oocyte is regulated with the coordinate development of the granulosa cells. The complex signaling pathways that regulate the growth and development of mammalian oocytes are beginning to be elucidated through the use of gene targeting. These technologies have provided new insight into the roles of specific genes during the development of the germ cells and gonads, as well as post-pubertal development of oocytes. In many cases, these studies have resulted in a new understanding of the function of certain genes, in others they have provided new genes and pathways to be studied in mammalian reproductive biology. Ultimately, these studies will shed light on human genetic disease and infertility.

  6. Systems Approaches for Synthetic Biology: A Pathway Toward Mammalian Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul eRekhi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We review methods of understanding cellular interactions through computation in order to guide the synthetic design of mammalian cells for translational applications, such as regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. In doing so, we argue that the challenges of engineering mammalian cells provide a prime opportunity to leverage advances in computational systems biology. We support this claim systematically, by addressing each of the principal challenges to existing synthetic bioengineering approaches—stochasticity, complexity, and scale—with specific methods and paradigms in systems biology. Moreover, we characterize a key set of diverse computational techniques, including agent-based modeling, Bayesian network analysis, graph theory, and Gillespie simulations, with specific utility towards synthetic biology. Lastly, we examine the mammalian applications of synthetic biology for medicine and health, and how computational systems biology can aid in the continued development of these applications.

  7. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  8. Analysis of gene regulatory networks in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm is fundamental in regulating a wide range of cellular, metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities in mammals. Although a small number of key circadian genes have been identified through extensive molecular and genetic studies in the past, the existence of other key circadian genes and how they drive the genomewide circadian oscillation of gene expression in different tissues still remains unknown. Here we try to address these questions by integrating all available circadian microarray data in mammals. We identified 41 common circadian genes that showed circadian oscillation in a wide range of mouse tissues with a remarkable consistency of circadian phases across tissues. Comparisons across mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and human showed that the circadian phases of known key circadian genes were delayed for 4-5 hours in rat compared to mouse and 8-12 hours in macaque and human compared to mouse. A systematic gene regulatory network for the mouse circadian rhythm was constructed after incorporating promoter analysis and transcription factor knockout or mutant microarray data. We observed the significant association of cis-regulatory elements: EBOX, DBOX, RRE, and HSE with the different phases of circadian oscillating genes. The analysis of the network structure revealed the paths through which light, food, and heat can entrain the circadian clock and identified that NR3C1 and FKBP/HSP90 complexes are central to the control of circadian genes through diverse environmental signals. Our study improves our understanding of the structure, design principle, and evolution of gene regulatory networks involved in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

  9. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Haberle, Vanja; Lassman, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J; Meehan, Terrence F; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A; Ishizu, Yuri; Young, Robert S; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M; Arakawa, Takahiro; Archer, John A C; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Rennie, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S B; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Favorov, Alexander V; Fisher, Malcolm E; Frith, Martin C; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furino, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B; Gibson, Andrew P; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J; Ho Sui, Shannan J; Hofmann, Oliver M; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Furni; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S; Kenna, Tony J; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S Peter; Knox, Alan J; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T; Laros, Jeroen F J; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; de Lima Morais, David A; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Noma, Shohei; Noazaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohimiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G D; Rackham, Owen J L; Ramilowski, Jordan A; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaai; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Naoko; Swoboda, Rolf K; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyodo, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Elvind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M; Verado, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A; Winteringham, Louise N; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Susan E; Zhang, Peter G; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B; Taylor, Martin S; Makeev, Vsevolod J; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and

  10. A promoter-level mammalian expression atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Regulated transcription controls the diversity, developmental pathways and spatial organization of the hundreds of cell types that make up a mammal. Using single-molecule cDNA sequencing, we mapped transcription start sites (TSSs) and their usage in human and mouse primary cells, cell lines and t...

  11. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N{sup +} beam on mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Huiyun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China)]. E-mail: huiyunf@yahoo.com.cn; Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China)]. E-mail: ljw@ipp.ac.cn; Yu Lixiang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Han Wei [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu Xuelan [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Yu Zengliang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China)]. E-mail: zlyu@ipp.ac.cn

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N{sup +}) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N{sup +} beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A{sub L} cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 x 10{sup 14} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2}), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 x 10{sup 14} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N{sup +} beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 x 10{sup 14} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59 {sup -} mutants induced by 5-20 keV N{sup +} beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various

  12. Modeling Exposure of Mammalian Predatorsto Anticoagulant Rodenticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topping, Christopher John; Elmeros, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR) are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very...... as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations...... and after the change in AR use. In most cases incidence of exposure to AR is predicted to be greater than 90%, although cessation of use in woodlots and Christmas tree plantations should reduce mean exposure concentrations. Model results suggest that the driver of high AR incidence in non-target small...

  13. Potential role of microRNAs in mammalian female fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Dawit; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Gebremedhn, Samuel; Sohel, Md Mahmodul Hasan; Pandey, Hari Om; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Since the first evidence for the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in various reproductive processes through conditional knockout of DICER, several studies have been conducted to investigate the expression pattern and role of miRNAs in ovarian follicular development, oocyte maturation, embryo development, embryo-maternal communication, pregnancy establishment and various reproductive diseases. Although advances in sequencing technology have fuelled miRNA studies in mammalian species, the presence of extracellular miRNAs in various biological fluids, including follicular fluid, blood plasma, urine and milk among others, has opened a new door in miRNA research for their use as diagnostic markers. This review presents data related to the identification and expression analysis of cellular miRNA in mammalian female fertility associated with ovarian folliculogenesis, oocyte maturation, preimplantation embryo development and embryo implantation. In addition, the relevance of miRNAs to female reproductive disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometritis and abnormal pregnancies, is discussed for various mammalian species. Most importantly, the mechanism of release and the role of extracellular miRNAs in cell-cell communication and their potential role as non-invasive markers in female fertility are discussed in detail. Understanding this layer of regulation in female reproduction processes will pave the way to understanding the genetic regulation of female fertility in mammalian species.

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers-Doets, Christine B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Treister, Nathaniel S.; Epstein, Joel B.; Arends, Anniek B. P.; Wiersma, Diede R.; Lalla, Rajesh V.; Logan, Richard M.; van Erp, Nielka P.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-01-01

    With the recent introduction of inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in oncology, distinct cutaneous and oral adverse events have been identified. In fact, stomatitis and rash are documented as the most frequent and potentially dose-limiting side effects. Clinically, mTOR

  15. Relevance of animal models for understanding mammalian copper homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Willianne I. M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van de Sluis, Bart

    2008-01-01

    As a trace element, copper has a crucial role in mammalian metabolism, but it can be toxic in excess. The importance of a balanced copper homeostasis is illustrated by several copper-associated disorders in man, such as Menkes and Wilson disease, and in a wide variety of animal models (eg, mice,

  16. Mammalian Toxicology Testing: Problem Definition Study, Personnel Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    supporting documents. The Contrzt title, MAMMALIAN TOXICO - LOGY TESTING: PROBLEM DEFINITION STUDY, is the main title for all the reports. Individual...Agency" (Conservation Founda- tion 1978) it was estimated that there are approximately 2,700 senior toxico - logists and a total of 5,000 toxicologists in

  17. Versatile epitope tagging vector for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosfield, T; Lu, Q

    1998-08-01

    We have constructed an epitope-tagging vector, pCMV-Tag1, for gene expression in mammalian cells. This vector, which allows for N-terminal, C-terminal and internal tagging of the gene product of interest with the FLAG and/or c-myc epitopes, enables researchers to rapidly and efficiently characterize gene products in vivo.

  18. Relative brain size in the mammalian carnivores of the Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relative brain sizes (encephalization quotients; EO) of the 30. Cape mammalian carnivores were calculated by regressing cranial volume against body mass. Within this taxon relative brain size appears to show no association with sociality, loco· motion, activity regimen or habitat, but is positively correlated with body mass.

  19. Biotransformation of sesaminol triglucoside to mammalian lignans by intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Kuo-Ching; Hwang, Lucy Sun; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2009-07-22

    Plant lignans occur widely in foods, with flaxseed recognized as their richest source. Some plant lignans can be converted by intestinal microbiota to the mammalian lignans, enterodiol and enterolactone, which may have protective effects against hormone-related diseases such as breast cancer. This study determined whether plant lignans in sesame seed, particularly sesaminol triglucoside (STG), could be metabolized to mammalian lignans. STG is a furofuran lignan with methylenedioxyphenyls. The transformation of furofuran lignans to mammalian lignans by intestinal microbiota involves the hydrolysis of glucoside, demethylenation of a methylene group, oxidation of dibenzylbutanediol to dibenzylbutyrolactone, and reductive cleavage of furofuran rings. STG has methylenedioxyphenyl moieties in their structures that may require additional oxidative demethylenation of the methylenedioxyphenyl ring for conversion to mammalian lignans. However, STG is metabolized, via intestinal microbiota, to a catechol moiety. The major STG metabolite was characterized as 4-[((3R,4R)-5-(6-hydroxybenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)-4-(hydroxymethyl)tetrahydrofuran-3-yl)methyl]benzene-1,2-diol using NMR and mass spectrometry, and STG could be converted to enterolactone and enterodiol by rat intestinal microflora.

  20. Identification of chikungunya virus interacting proteins in mammalian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pre-incubation with anti-HSP70 antibody and miRNA silencing of HSP70 significantly reduced the CHIKV production in HEK-293T and Vero-E6 cells at early time points. These results suggest that CHIKV exploits the housekeeping molecules such as actin, HSP70 and STAT-2 to establish infection in the mammalian cells.

  1. Scaling of Atrioventricular Transmission in Mammalian Species: An Evolutionary Riddle!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Strackee, J.; Stokhof, A.A.; Wassenaar, C.

    "Scaling deals with the structural and functional consequences of changes in size or scale among otherwise similar organisms." It plays a key role in all studies on comparative mammalian physiology and morphology. Heart weight is proportionally related to body weight and can be described by a

  2. Evolutionary discrimination of mammalian conserved non-genic sequences (CNGs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dermitzakis, ET; Reymond, A; Scamuffa, N; Ucla, C; Kirkness, E; Rossier, C; Antonarakis, SE

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of the human and mouse genomes identified an abundance of conserved non-genic sequences (CNGs). The significance and evolutionary depth of their conservation remain unanswered. We have quantified levels and patterns of conservation of 191 CNGs of human chromosome 21 in 14 mammalian species.

  3. Mammalian Prolactin – An Ancient But Still A Mysterious Hormone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Mammalian Prolactin – An Ancient But Still A Mysterious Hormone · Prolactin inhibits LHRH action during lactational ammenorrhoea · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · REDUCTIONIST VIEW OF HORMONES · CONCERN · PURIFICATION PROTOCOLS · CHARACTERIZATION OF HORMONES · Slide 9 · Slide 10.

  4. Hypothesis on the dual origin of the mammalian subplate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Montiel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of the mammalian neocortex relies heavily on subplate. The proportion of this cell population varies considerably in different mammalian species. Subplate is almost undetectable in marsupials, forms a thin, but distinct layer in mouse and rat, a larger layer in carnivores and big-brained mammals as pig and a highly developed embryonic structure in human and non-human primates. The evolutionary origin of subplate neurons is the subject of current debate. Some hypothesize that subplate represents the ancestral cortex of sauropsids, while others consider it to be an increasingly complex phylogenetic novelty of the mammalian neocortex. Here we review recent work on expression of several genes that were originally identified in rodent as highly and differentially expressed in subplate. We relate these observations to cellular morphology, birthdating and hodology in the dorsal cortex/dorsal pallium of several amniote species. Based on this reviewed evidence we argue for a third hypothesis according to which subplate contains both ancestral and newly derived cell populations. We propose that the mammalian subplate originally derived from a phylogenetically ancient structure in the dorsal pallium of stem amniotes, but subsequently expanded with additional cell populations in the synapsid lineage to support an increasingly complex cortical plate development. Further understanding of the detailed molecular taxonomy, somatodendritic morphology and connectivity of subplate in a comparative context should contribute to the identification of the ancestral and newly evolved populations of subplate neurons.

  5. Engineered mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to mammalian cells modified to provide for improved expression of a recombinant protein of interest. In particular, the invention relates to CHO cells and other host cells in which the expression of one or more endogenous secreted proteins has been disrupted, as well...... as to the preparation, identification and use of such cells in the production of recombinant proteins....

  6. Germ cells and the origins of mammalian pluripotent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, E.W.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian embryonic stem (ES) cells originate from preimplantation embryos and can be propagated indefinitely without loss of pluripotency; i.e. the potential to develop into any embryonic cell type. ES cells have been described for mouse, rhesus monkey, and human. There is considerable interest in

  7. Paired Chicken and Mammalian Erythrocyte Indicator Systems for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three levels of erythrocytes suspensions, 1.5%, 1% and 0.5% respectively from goat and guinea pig, were compared to conventional 0.5% chicken erythrocytes, in an attempt to investigate the suitability for the two sources of mammalian erythrocytes as indicators for Newcastle disease virus haemagglutination (HA) tests.

  8. The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, E.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834459; Lopes, S.M.; Geijsen, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194303403; Macklon, N.S.; Roelen, B.A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/109291859

    2011-01-01

    The different shades of mammalian pluripotent stem cells Abstract BACKGROUND Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from a variety of sources such as from the inner cell mass of preimplantation embryos, from primordial germ cells, from teratocarcinomas and from male germ cells. The recent

  9. Mammalian Vestibular Macular Synaptic Plasticity: Results from SLS-2 Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.D.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of exposure to microgravity were studied in rat utricular maculas collected inflight (IF, day 13), post-flight on day of orbiter landing (day 14, R+O) and after 14 days (R+ML). Controls were collected at corresponding times. The objectives were 1) to learn whether hair cell ribbon synapses counts would be higher in tissues collected in space than in tissues collected postflight during or after readaptation to Earth's gravity; and 2) to compare results with those of SLS-1. Maculas were fixed by immersion, micro-dissected, dehydrated and prepared for ultrastructural study by usual methods. Synapses were counted in 100 serial sections 150 nm thick and were located to specific hair cells in montages of every 7th section. Counts were analyzed for statistical significance using analysis of variance. Results in maculas of IF dissected rats, one 13 day control (IFC), and one R + 0 rat have been analyzed. Study of an R+ML macula is nearly completed. For type I cells, IF mean is 2.3 +/-1.6; IFC mean is 1.6 +/-1.0; R+O mean is 2.3 +/- 1.6. For type II cells, IF mean is 11.4 +/- 17.1; IFC mean is 5.5 +/-3.5; R+O mean is 10.1 +/- 7.4. The difference between IF and IFC means for type I cells is statistically significant (p less than 0.0464). For type It cells, IF compared to IFC means, p less than 0.0003; and for IFC to R+O means, p less than 0.0139. Shifts toward spheres (p less than 0.0001) and pairs (p less than 0.0139) were significant in type II cells of IF rats. The results are largely replicating findings from SLS-1 and indicate that spaceflight affects synaptic number, form and distribution, particularly in type II hair cells. The increases in synaptic number and in sphere-like ribbons are interpreted to improve synaptic efficacy, to help return afferent discharges to a more normal state. Findings indicate that a great capacity for synaptic plasticity exists in mammalian gravity sensors, and that this plasticity is more dominant in the local circuitry. The

  10. Modelling exposure of mammalian predators to anticoagulant rodenticide

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    Christopher John Topping

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant rodenticides (AR are a widespread and effective method of rodent control but there is concern about the impact these may have on non-target organisms, in particular secondary poisoning of rodent predators. Incidence and concentration of AR in free-living predators in Denmark is very high. We postulate that this is caused by widespread exposure due to widespread use of AR in Denmark in and around buildings. To investigate this theory a spatio-temporal model of AR use and mammalian predator distribution was created. This model was supported by data from an experimental study of mice as vectors of AR, and was used to evaluate likely impacts of restrictions imposed on AR use in Denmark banning the use of rodenticides for plant protection in woodlands and tree-crops. The model uses input based on frequencies and timings of baiting for rodent control for urban, rural and woodland locations and creates an exposure map based on spatio-temporal modelling of movement of mice-vectored AR (based on Apodemus flavicollis. Simulated predator territories are super-imposed over this exposure map to create an exposure index. Predictions from the model concur with field studies of AR prevalence both before and after the change in AR use. In most cases incidence of exposure to AR is predicted to be greater than 90%, although cessation of use in woodlots and Christmas tree plantations should reduce mean exposure concentrations. Model results suggest that the driver of high AR incidence in non-target small mammal predators is likely to be the pattern of use and not the distance AR is vectored. Reducing baiting frequency by 75% had different effects depending on the landscape simulated, but having a maximum of 12% reduction in exposure incidence, and in one landscape a maximum reduction of <2%. We discuss sources of uncertainty in the model and directions for future development of predictive models for environmental impact assessment of rodenticides. The

  11. Transcriptional architecture of the mammalian circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Joseph S

    2017-03-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators that control 24-hour physiological and behavioural processes in organisms. These cell-autonomous clocks are composed of a transcription-translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. With the development of next-generation sequencing approaches, biochemical and genomic insights into circadian function have recently come into focus. Genome-wide analyses of the clock transcriptional feedback loop have revealed a global circadian regulation of processes such as transcription factor occupancy, RNA polymerase II recruitment and initiation, nascent transcription, and chromatin remodelling. The genomic targets of circadian clocks are pervasive and are intimately linked to the regulation of metabolism, cell growth and physiology.

  12. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic

  13. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, C.R.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Vellenga, E.; Coffer, P.J.; Buitenhuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and

  14. Sensing the Heat Stress by Mammalian Cells

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    Cates Jordan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heat-shock response network controls the adaptation and survival of the cell against environmental stress. This network is highly conserved and is connected with many other signaling pathways. A key element of the heat-shock network is the heat-shock transcription factor-1 (HSF, which is transiently activated by elevated temperatures. HSF translocates to the nucleus upon elevated temperatures, forming homotrimeric complexes. The HSF homotrimers bind to the heat shock element on the DNA and control the expression of the hsp70 gene. The Hsp70 proteins protect cells from thermal stress. Thermal stress causes the unfolding of proteins, perturbing thus the pathways under their control. By binding to these proteins, Hsp70 allows them to refold and prevents their aggregation. The modulation of the activity of the hsp70-promoter by the intensity of the input stress is thus critical for cell's survival. The promoter activity starts from a basal level and rapidly increases once the stress is applied, reaches a maximum level and attenuates slowely back to the basal level. This phenomenon is the hallmark of many experimental studies and of all computational network analysis. Results The molecular construct used as a measure of the response to thermal stress is a Hsp70-GFP fusion gene transfected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. The time profile of the GFP protein depends on the transient activity, Transient(t, of the heat shock system. The function Transient(t depends on hsp70 promoter activity, transcriptional regulation and the translation initiation effects elicited by the heat stress. The GFP time profile is recorded using flow cytometry measurements, a technique that allows a quantitative measurement of the fluorescence of a large number of cells (104. The GFP responses to one and two heat shocks were measured for 261 conditions of different temperatures and durations. We found that: (i the response of the cell to two

  15. A Phase I study of an intravesically administered immunotoxin targeting EpCAM for the treatment of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer in BCG-refractory and BCG-intolerant patients

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    Mark Kowalski

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Mark Kowalski1, Joycelyn Entwistle2, Jeannick Cizeau2, Demi Niforos1, Shauna Loewen2, Wendy Chapman1, Glen C MacDonald21Viventia Biotechnologies Inc., Mississauga, ON, Canada; 2Viventia Biotechnologies Inc., Winnipeg, MB, CanadaPurpose: A Phase I dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD of the immunotoxin VB4-845 in patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC refractory to or intolerant of bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG. Secondary objectives included evaluation of the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and efficacy of VB4-845.Patients and methods: Sixty-four patients with Grade 2 or 3, stage Ta or T1 transitional cell carcinoma or in situ carcinoma, either refractory to or intolerant of BCG therapy, were enrolled. Treatment was administered in ascending dose cohorts ranging from 0.1 to 30.16 mg. After receiving weekly instillations of VB4-845 to the bladder via catheter for 6 consecutive weeks, patients were followed for 4–6 weeks post-therapy and assessed at week 12.Results: An MTD was not determined, as a dose-limiting toxicity was not identified over the dose range tested. VB4-845 therapy was safe and well tolerated with most adverse events reported as mild; as a result, no patients were removed from the study in response to toxicity. By the end of the study, the majority of patients had developed antibodies to the exotoxin portion of VB4-845. A complete response was achieved in 39% of patients at the 12-week time point.Conclusions: VB4-845 dosed on a weekly basis for 6 weeks was very well tolerated at all dose levels. Although an MTD was not determined at the doses administered, VB4-845 showed evidence of an antitumor effect that warrants further clinical investigation for the treatment of NMIBC in this patient population.Keywords: Pseudomonas exotoxin A, anti-EpCAM, fusion protein, targeted therapy

  16. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  17. The Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Insulin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mee-Sup

    2017-10-27

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that controls a wide spectrum of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes known as mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), which are characterized by the presence of raptor and rictor, respectively. mTOR controls insulin signaling by regulating several downstream components such as growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1), F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 8 (Fbw8), and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-IR/IR). In addition, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate each other through a feedback loop to control cell growth. This review outlines the current understanding of mTOR regulation in insulin signaling in the context of whole body metabolism.

  18. Molecular patterning of the mammalian dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu; Jia, Shihai; Jiang, Rulang

    2014-01-01

    Four conserved signaling pathways, including the bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmp), fibroblast growth factors (Fgf), Sonic hedgehog (Shh), and Wingless-related (Wnt) pathways, are each repeatedly used throughout tooth development. Inactivation of any of these resulted in early tooth developmental arrest in mice. The mutations identified thus far in human patients with tooth agenesis also affect these pathways. Recent studies show that these signaling pathways interact through positive and negative feedback loops to regulate not only morphogenesis of individual teeth but also tooth number, shape, and spatial pattern. Increased activity of each of the Fgf, Shh, and canonical Wnt signaling pathways revitalizes development of the physiologically arrested mouse diastemal tooth germs whereas constitutive activation of canonical Wnt signaling in the dental epithelium is able to induce supernumerary tooth formation even in the absence of Msx1 and Pax9, two transcription factors required for normal tooth development beyond the early bud stage. Bmp4 and Msx1 act in a positive feedback loop to drive sequential tooth formation whereas the Osr2 transcription factor restricts Msx1-mediated expansion of the mesenchymal odontogenic field along both the buccolingual and anteroposterior axes to pattern mouse molar teeth in a single row. Moreover, the ectodermal-specific ectodysplasin (EDA) signaling pathway controls tooth number and tooth shape through regulation of Fgf20 expression in the dental epithelium, whereas Shh suppresses Wnt signaling through a negative feedback loop to regulate spatial patterning of teeth. In this article, we attempt to integrate these exciting findings in the understanding of the molecular networks regulating tooth development and patterning. PMID:24355560

  19. Endogenous Methanol Regulates Mammalian Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Silachev, Denis N.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed that methanol emitted by wounded plants might function as a signaling molecule for plant-to-plant and plant-to-animal communications. In mammals, methanol is considered a poison because the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, the detection of methanol in the blood and exhaled air of healthy volunteers suggests that methanol may be a chemical with specific functions rather than a metabolic waste product. Using a genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain, we demonstrated that an increase in blood methanol concentration led to a change in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes primarily involved in detoxification processes and regulation of the alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenases gene cluster. To test the role of ADH in the maintenance of low methanol concentration in the plasma, we used the specific ADH inhibitor 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) and showed that intraperitoneal administration of 4-MP resulted in a significant increase in the plasma methanol, ethanol and formaldehyde concentrations. Removal of the intestine significantly decreased the rate of methanol addition to the plasma and suggested that the gut flora may be involved in the endogenous production of methanol. ADH in the liver was identified as the main enzyme for metabolizing methanol because an increase in the methanol and ethanol contents in the liver homogenate was observed after 4-MP administration into the portal vein. Liver mRNA quantification showed changes in the accumulation of mRNAs from genes involved in cell signalling and detoxification processes. We hypothesized that endogenous methanol acts as a regulator of homeostasis by controlling the mRNA synthesis. PMID:24587296

  20. The role of global histone post-translational modifications during mammalian hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Shannon N; Luu, Bryan E; Smith, Jeffrey C; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian hibernators must cope with hypothermia, ischemia-reperfusion, and finite fuel reserves during days or weeks of continuous torpor. One means of lowering ATP demands during hibernation involves substantial transcriptional controls. The present research analyzed epigenetic regulatory factors as a means of achieving transcriptional control over cycles of torpor-arousal. This study analyzes differential regulation of select histone modifications (e.g. phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation), and identifies post-translational modifications on purified histones using mass spectrometry from thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus). Post-translational modifications on histone proteins were responsive to torpor-arousal, suggesting a potential mechanism to dynamically alter chromatin structure. Furthermore, proteomic sequencing data of ground squirrel histones identified lysine 19 and 24 acetylation on histone H3, while acetylation sites identified on H2B were lysine 6, 47, 110, and 117. The present study provides a new glimpse into the epigenetic mechanisms which may play a role in transcriptional regulation during mammalian hibernation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mammalian Hippo signalling: a kinase network regulated by protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergovich, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The Hippo signal transduction cascade controls cell growth, proliferation, and death, all of which are frequently deregulated in tumour cells. Since initial studies in Drosophila melanogaster were instrumental in defining Hippo signalling, the machinery was named after the central Ste20-like kinase Hippo. Moreover, given that loss of Hippo signalling components Hippo, Warts, and Mats resulted in uncontrolled tissue overgrowth, Hippo signalling was defined as a tumour suppressor cascade. Significantly, all core factors of Hippo signalling have mammalian orthologues that functionally compensate for loss of their counterparts in flies. Furthermore, studies in flies and mammalian cell systems showed that Hippo signalling represents a kinase cascade that is tightly regulated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Several Hippo signalling molecules contain SARAH domains that mediate specific PPIs, thereby influencing the activities of MST1/2 kinases, the human Hippo orthologues. Moreover, WW domains are present in several Hippo factors, and these domains also serve as interaction surfaces for regulatory PPIs in Hippo signalling. Finally, the kinase activities of LATS1/2, the human counterparts of Warts, are controlled by binding to hMOB1, the human Mats. Therefore, Hippo signalling is regulated by PPIs on several levels. Here we review our current understanding of how these regulatory PPIs are regulated and contribute to the functionality of Hippo signalling. PMID:22260677

  2. Current and future assisted reproductive technologies for mammalian farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    technologies that have the potential to improve efficiency of livestock production. The focus will be on technologies that manipulate male and female gametes as well as the stem cells from which they are derived and the preimplantation embryo. While technology is crucial to other interventions in the reproductive process like control of seasonal breeding, hormonal regulation of ovulation, estrous cyclicity and pregnancy establishment, feeding to optimize reproduction, minimizing environmental stress, and selection of genes controlling reproduction, these will not be considered here. Rather the reader is directed to other chapters in this volume as well as some reviews on other aspects of artificial manipulation of reproduction (Reprod Fertil Dev 24:258-266, 2011; Reprod Domest Anim 43:40-47, 2008; Reprod Domest Anim 43:122-128, 2008; Soc Reprod Fertil Suppl 66:87-102, 2009; Comprehensive biotechnology, Amsterdam, pp 477-485; Dairy production medicine, Chichester, pp 153-163; Theriogenology 76:1619-1631, 2011; Theriogenology 76:1568-1582, 2011; Theriogenology 77:1-11, 2012). Given the large number of mammalian species used for production of products useful for man and the diversity in their biology and management, the review will not be comprehensive but instead will use results from species that are most illustrative of the opportunities generated by assisted reproductive technologies.

  3. The cancer paradigms of mammalian regeneration: can mammals regenerate as amphibians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarig, Rachel; Tzahor, Eldad

    2017-04-01

    Regeneration in mammals is restricted to distinct tissues and occurs mainly by expansion and maturation of resident stem cells. During regeneration, even subtle mutations in the proliferating cells may cause a detrimental effect by eliciting abnormal differentiation or malignant transformation. Indeed, cancer in mammals has been shown to arise through deregulation of stem cells maturation, which often leads to a differentiation block and cell transformation. In contrast, lower organisms such as amphibians retain a remarkable regenerative capacity in various organs, which occurs via de- and re-differentiation of mature cells. Interestingly, regenerating amphibian cells are highly resistant to oncogenic transformation. Therapeutic approaches to improve mammalian regeneration mainly include stem-cell transplantations; but, these have proved unsuccessful in non-regenerating organs such as the heart. A recently developed approach is to induce de-differentiation of mature cardiomyocytes using factors that trigger their re-entry into the cell cycle. This novel approach raises numerous questions regarding the balance between transformation and regeneration induced by de-differentiation of mature mammalian somatic cells. Can this balance be controlled artificially? Do de-differentiated cells acquire the protection mechanisms seen in regenerating cells of lower organisms? Is this model unique to the cardiac tissue, which rarely develops tumors? This review describes regeneration processes in both mammals and lower organisms and, particularly, the ability of regenerating cells to avoid transformation. By comparing the characteristics of mammalian embryonic and somatic cells, we discuss therapeutic strategies of using various cell populations for regeneration. Finally, we describe a novel cardiac regeneration approach and its implications for regenerative medicine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  4. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  5. Drosophila KCNQ channel displays evolutionarily conserved electrophysiology and pharmacology with mammalian KCNQ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available Of the five human KCNQ (Kv7 channels, KCNQ1 with auxiliary subunit KCNE1 mediates the native cardiac I(Ks current with mutations causing short and long QT cardiac arrhythmias. KCNQ4 mutations cause deafness. KCNQ2/3 channels form the native M-current controlling excitability of most neurons, with mutations causing benign neonatal febrile convulsions. Drosophila contains a single KCNQ (dKCNQ that appears to serve alone the functions of all the duplicated mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels sharing roughly 50-60% amino acid identity therefore offering a route to investigate these channels. Current information about the functional properties of dKCNQ is lacking therefore we have investigated these properties here. Using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology we compare the biophysical and pharmacological properties of dKCNQ with the mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels expressed in HEK cells. We show that Drosophila KCNQ (dKCNQ is a slowly activating and slowly-deactivating K(+ current open at sub-threshold potentials that has similar properties to neuronal KCNQ2/3 with some features of the cardiac KCNQ1/KCNE1 accompanied by conserved sensitivity to a number of clinically relevant KCNQ blockers (chromanol 293B, XE991, linopirdine and opener (zinc pyrithione. We also investigate the molecular basis of the differential selectivity of KCNQ channels to the opener retigabine and show a single amino acid substitution (M217W can confer sensitivity to dKCNQ. We show dKCNQ has similar electrophysiological and pharmacological properties as the mammalian KCNQ channels, allowing future study of physiological and pathological roles of KCNQ in Drosophila and whole organism screening for new modulators of KCNQ channelopathies.

  6. Unconventional Trafficking of Mammalian Phospholipase D3 to Lysosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carolina Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Variants in the phospholipase D3 (PLD3 gene have genetically been linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. We present a detailed biochemical analysis of PLD3 and reveal its endogenous localization in endosomes and lysosomes. PLD3 reaches lysosomes as a type II transmembrane protein via a (for mammalian cells uncommon intracellular biosynthetic route that depends on the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport machinery. PLD3 is sorted into intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes, and ESCRT-dependent sorting correlates with ubiquitination. In multivesicular endosomes, PLD3 is subjected to proteolytic cleavage, yielding a stable glycosylated luminal polypeptide and a rapidly degraded N-terminal membrane-bound fragment. This pathway closely resembles the delivery route of carboxypeptidase S to the yeast vacuole. Our experiments reveal a biosynthetic route of PLD3 involving proteolytic processing and ESCRT-dependent sorting for its delivery to lysosomes in mammalian cells.

  7. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  8. Mammalian cycles: internally defined periods and interaction-driven amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, CJ

    2015-01-01

    The cause of mammalian cycles—the rise and fall of populations over a predictable period of time—has remained controversial since these patterns were first observed over a century ago. In spite of extensive work on observable mammalian cycles, the field has remained divided upon what the true cause is, with a majority of opinions attributing it to either predation or to intra-species mechanisms. Here we unite the eigenperiod hypothesis, which describes an internal, maternal effect-based mechanism to explain the cycles’ periods with a recent generalization explaining the amplitude of snowshoe hare cycles in northwestern North America based on initial predator abundance. By explaining the period and the amplitude of the cycle with separate mechanisms, a unified and consistent view of the causation of cycles is reached. Based on our suggested theory, we forecast the next snowshoe hare cycle (predicted peak in 2016) to be of extraordinarily low amplitude. PMID:26339557

  9. Genetic modification of mammalian genome at chromosome level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLEG L. SEROV

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The review is concerned with a progress in genetic modification of a mammalian genome in vitro and in vivo at chromosomal level. Recently three new approaches for the chromosome biotechnology have been developed: Using Cre/loxP-system a researcher is able to produce targeted rearrangements of whole chromosomes or their segments or particular genes within the genome, and therefore to modify the set, position and copy number of the endogenous elements of the genome. Mammalian artificial chromosomes (MACs provide a possibility to introduce into genome relatively large segments of alien chromosome material, either artificially constructed or derived from the genome of different species. Using ES-somatic cell hybrids allows to transfer whole chromosomes or their fragments between different genomes within and between species. Advantages and limitations of these approaches are discussed.

  10. Mammalian cycles: internally defined periods and interaction-driven amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Ginzburg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The cause of mammalian cycles—the rise and fall of populations over a predictable period of time—has remained controversial since these patterns were first observed over a century ago. In spite of extensive work on observable mammalian cycles, the field has remained divided upon what the true cause is, with a majority of opinions attributing it to either predation or to intra-species mechanisms. Here we unite the eigenperiod hypothesis, which describes an internal, maternal effect-based mechanism to explain the cycles’ periods with a recent generalization explaining the amplitude of snowshoe hare cycles in northwestern North America based on initial predator abundance. By explaining the period and the amplitude of the cycle with separate mechanisms, a unified and consistent view of the causation of cycles is reached. Based on our suggested theory, we forecast the next snowshoe hare cycle (predicted peak in 2016 to be of extraordinarily low amplitude.

  11. Formation of mammalian erythrocytes: chromatin condensation and enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Murata-Hori, Maki; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-07-01

    In all vertebrates, the cell nucleus becomes highly condensed and transcriptionally inactive during the final stages of red cell biogenesis. Enucleation, the process by which the nucleus is extruded by budding off from the erythroblast, is unique to mammals. Enucleation has critical physiological and evolutionary significance in that it allows an elevation of hemoglobin levels in the blood and also gives red cells their flexible biconcave shape. Recent experiments reveal that enucleation involves multiple molecular and cellular pathways that include histone deacetylation, actin polymerization, cytokinesis, cell-matrix interactions, specific microRNAs and vesicle trafficking; many evolutionarily conserved proteins and genes have been recruited to participate in this uniquely mammalian process. In this review, we discuss recent advances in mammalian erythroblast chromatin condensation and enucleation, and conclude with our perspectives on future studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The truncated TrkB receptor influences mammalian sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Adam J; Henson, Kyle; Dorsey, Susan G; Frank, Marcos G

    2015-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin hypothesized to play an important role in mammalian sleep expression and regulation. In order to investigate the role of the truncated receptor for BDNF, TrkB.T1, in mammalian sleep, we examined sleep architecture and sleep regulation in adult mice constitutively lacking this receptor. We find that TrkB.T1 knockout mice have increased REM sleep time, reduced REM sleep latency, and reduced sleep continuity. These results demonstrate a novel role for the TrkB.T1 receptor in sleep expression and provide new insights into the relationship between BDNF, psychiatric illness, and sleep. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The evolution of gene expression levels in mammalian organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brawand, David; Soumillon, Magali; Necsulea, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are thought to underlie many of the phenotypic differences between species. However, large-scale analyses of gene expression evolution were until recently prevented by technological limitations. Here we report the sequencing of polyadenylated RNA from six organs across...... ten species that represent all major mammalian lineages (placentals, marsupials and monotremes) and birds (the evolutionary outgroup), with the goal of understanding the dynamics of mammalian transcriptome evolution. We show that the rate of gene expression evolution varies among organs, lineages...... and chromosomes, owing to differences in selective pressures: transcriptome change was slow in nervous tissues and rapid in testes, slower in rodents than in apes and monotremes, and rapid for the X chromosome right after its formation. Although gene expression evolution in mammals was strongly shaped...

  14. Signalling properties of inorganic polyphosphate in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, Kira M; Marina, Nephtali; Baev, Artyom Y; Wood, Nicholas W; Gourine, Alexander V; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate is known to be present in the mammalian brain at micromolar concentrations. Here we show that polyphosphate may act as a gliotransmitter, mediating communication between astrocytes. It is released by astrocytes in a calcium-dependent manner and signals to neighbouring astrocytes through P2Y(1) purinergic receptors, activation of phospholipase C and release of calcium from the intracellular stores. In primary neuroglial cultures, application of polyP triggers release of endogenous polyphosphate from astrocytes while neurons take it up. In vivo, central actions of polyphosphate at the level of the brainstem include profound increases in key homeostatic physiological activities, such as breathing, central sympathetic outflow and the arterial blood pressure. Together, these results suggest a role for polyphosphate as a mediator of astroglial signal transmission in the mammalian brain.

  15. Stability of resazurin in buffers and mammalian cell culture media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva; Nicolaisen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    The utility of a ferricyanide/ferrocyanide system used in the AlamarBlue(TM) (Serotec, Oxford, UK) vital. dye to inhibit the reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media is questioned. Resazurin was found to be relatively stable when dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The use...... of HEPES resulted in a huge immediate dye reduction, which was significantly enhanced by exposure to diffuse light from fluorescent tubes in the laboratory 8 h per day. The reduction of resazurin by various cell culture media was time and temperature dependent, and it was significantly enhanced......'s nutrient mixture F-10 and F-12. Fetal calf serum (5-20%) slightly decreased resazurin reduction during the first 2 days of incubation. The reduction of resazurin by mammalian cell culture media do not appear to be problematic under normal culture conditions, and it is primarily dependent upon the presence...

  16. Leadership in Mammalian Societies: Emergence, Distribution, Power, and Payoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer E; Gavrilets, Sergey; Mulder, Monique Borgerhoff; Hooper, Paul L; El Mouden, Claire; Nettle, Daniel; Hauert, Christoph; Hill, Kim; Perry, Susan; Pusey, Anne E; van Vugt, Mark; Smith, Eric Alden

    2016-01-01

    Leadership is an active area of research in both the biological and social sciences. This review provides a transdisciplinary synthesis of biological and social-science views of leadership from an evolutionary perspective, and examines patterns of leadership in a set of small-scale human and non-human mammalian societies. We review empirical and theoretical work on leadership in four domains: movement, food acquisition, within-group conflict mediation, and between-group interactions. We categorize patterns of variation in leadership in five dimensions: distribution (across individuals), emergence (achieved versus inherited), power, relative payoff to leadership, and generality (across domains). We find that human leadership exhibits commonalities with and differences from the broader mammalian pattern, raising interesting theoretical and empirical issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of gene and isoform regulation in Mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkin, Jason; Russell, Caitlin; Chen, Ping; Burge, Christopher B

    2012-12-21

    Most mammalian genes produce multiple distinct messenger RNAs through alternative splicing, but the extent of splicing conservation is not clear. To assess tissue-specific transcriptome variation across mammals, we sequenced complementary DNA from nine tissues from four mammals and one bird in biological triplicate, at unprecedented depth. We find that while tissue-specific gene expression programs are largely conserved, alternative splicing is well conserved in only a subset of tissues and is frequently lineage-specific. Thousands of previously unknown, lineage-specific, and conserved alternative exons were identified; widely conserved alternative exons had signatures of binding by MBNL, PTB, RBFOX, STAR, and TIA family splicing factors, implicating them as ancestral mammalian splicing regulators. Our data also indicate that alternative splicing often alters protein phosphorylatability, delimiting the scope of kinase signaling.

  18. Methylation status as a predictor of intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy response of high grade non-muscle invasive bladder tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husek, Petr; Pacovsky, Jaroslav; Chmelarova, Marcela; Podhola, Miroslav; Brodak, Milos

    2017-06-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations play an important role in urothelial cancer pathogenesis. Deeper understanding of these processes could help us achieve better diagnosis and management of this life-threatening disease. The aim of this research was to evaluate the methylation status of selected tumor suppressor genes for predicting BCG response in patients with high grade non-muscle-invasive bladder tumor (NMIBC). We retrospectively evaluated 82 patients with high grade non-muscle-invasive bladder tumor (stage Ta, T1, CIS) who had undergone BCG instillation therapy. We compared epigenetic methylation status in BCG-responsive and BCG-failure groups. We used the MS-MLPA (Methylation-Specific Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification probe sets ME001 and ME004. The control group was 13 specimens of normal urotel (bladder tissue)). Newly identified methylations in high grade NMIBC were found in MUS81a, NTRK1 and PCCA. The methylation status of CDKN2B (P=0.00312 ** ) and MUS81a (P=0.0191 * ) is associated with clinical outcomes of BCG instillation therapy response. CDKN2B and MUS81a unmethylation was found in BCG failure patients. The results show that the methylation status of selected tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) has the potential for predicting BCG response in patients with NMIBC high grade tumors. Tumor suppressor genes such as CDKN2b, MUS81a, PFM-1, MSH6 and THBS1 are very promising for future research.

  19. Mammalian Non-CpG Methylation: Stem Cells and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Pinney

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Although CpG dinucleotides remain the primary site for DNA methylation in mammals, there is emerging evidence that DNA methylation at non-CpG sites (CpA, CpT and CpC is not only present in mammalian cells, but may play a unique role in the regulation of gene expression. For some time it has been known that non-CpG methylation is abundant in plants and present in mammalian embryonic stem cells, but non-CpG methylation was thought to be lost upon cell differentiation. However, recent publications have described a role for non-CpG methylation in adult mammalian somatic cells including the adult mammalian brain, skeletal muscle, and hematopoietic cells and new interest in this field has been stimulated by the availability of high throughput sequencing techniques that can accurately measure this epigenetic modification. Genome wide assays indicate that non-CpG methylation is negligible in human fetal brain, but abundant in human adult brain tissue. Genome wide measurement of non-CpG methylation coupled with RNA-Sequencing indicates that in the human adult brain non-CpG methylation levels are inversely proportional to the abundance of mRNA transcript at the associated gene. Additionally specific examples where alterations in non-CpG methylation lead to changes in gene expression have been described; in PGC1α in human skeletal muscle, IFN-γ in human T-cells and SYT11 in human brain, all of which contribute to the development of human disease.

  20. Wave characterization for mammalian cell culture: residence time distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2012-02-15

    The high dose requirements of biopharmaceutical products led to the development of mammalian cell culture technologies that increase biomanufacturing capacity. The disposable Wave bioreactor is one of the most promising technologies, providing ease of operation and no cross-contamination, and using an innovative undulation movement that ensures good mixing and oxygen transfer without cell damage. However, its recentness demands further characterization. This study evaluated the residence time distribution (RTD) in Wave, allowing the characterization of mixing and flow and the comparison with ideal models and a Stirred tank reactor (STR) used for mammalian cell culture. RTD was determined using methylene blue with pulse input methodology, at three flow rates common in mammalian cell culture (3.3×10(-5)m(3)/h, 7.9×10(-5)m(3)/h, and 1.25×10(-4)m(3)/h) and one typical of microbial culture (5×10(-3)m(3)/h). Samples were taken periodically and the absorbance read at 660nm. It was observed that Wave behavior diverted from ideal models, but was similar to STR. Therefore, the deviations are not related to the particular Wave rocking mechanism, but could be associated with the inadequacy of these reactors to operate in continuous mode or to a possible inability of the theoretical models to properly describe the behavior of reactors designed for mammalian cell culture. Thus, the development of new theoretical models could better characterize the performance of these reactors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mammalian Bite Injuries to the Hand and Their Management

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Shilpa; Khan, Wasim S; Siddiqui, Nashat A

    2014-01-01

    Bite wounds are a common form of hand injury with the potential to lead to severe local and systemic sequelae and permanent functional impairment. Mammalian bite wounds may be caused by a variety of animal class and species; injuries resulting from dogs, cats and humans are the most widely discussed and reported in the literature. Bite wounds may be contaminated with aggressive pathogens and the anatomical vulnerability of structures within the hand means that without early recognition and tr...

  2. Dolphin insula reflects minicolumnar organization of mammalian isocortex

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, Manuel F.; Trippe, Juan; Tillquist, Christopher R.; Switala, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    The brain of the bottlenose dolphin exhibits patterns of isocortical parcellation and cytoarchitecture distinct from those seen in primates, yet cell clusters in anterior insula are comparable in scale to module-like cell arrangements found throughout isocortex in other placental mammalian species with long divergent evolutionary histories. This similarity may be due to common ancestry, or to convergence as a result of selective constraints on organization of connections within such modules. ...

  3. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  4. Global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity of mammalian carnivore habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Crooks, Kevin R.; Burdett, Christopher L.; Theobald, David M.; Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Although mammalian carnivores are vulnerable to habitat fragmentation and require landscape connectivity, their global patterns of fragmentation and connectivity have not been examined. We use recently developed high-resolution habitat suitability models to conduct comparative analyses and to identify global hotspots of fragmentation and connectivity for the world's terrestrial carnivores. Species with less fragmentation (i.e. more interior high-quality habitat) had larger geographical ranges...

  5. Chromosomal integration of transduced recombinant baculovirus DNA in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrihew, R V; Clay, W C; Condreay, J P; Witherspoon, S M; Dallas, W S; Kost, T A

    2001-01-01

    Our group and others have recently demonstrated the ability of recombinant baculoviruses to transduce mammalian cells at high frequency. To further characterize the use of baculovirus as a mammalian gene delivery system, we examined the status of transduced DNA stably maintained in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Four independent clones carrying two introduced markers, the genes for neomycin resistance (Neo) and green fluorescent protein (GFP), were selected. PCR analysis, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing showed that discrete portions of the 148-kb baculovirus DNA were present as single-copy fragments ranging in size from 5 to 18 kb. Integration into the CHO cell genome was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. For one clone, the left and right viral/chromosomal junctions were determined by DNA sequencing of inverse PCR products. Similarly, for a different clone, the left viral/chromosomal junction was determined; however, the right junction sequence revealed the joining to another viral fragment by a short homology (microhomology), a hallmark of illegitimate recombination. The random viral breakpoints and the lack of homology between the virus and flanking chromosomal sequences are also suggestive of an illegitimate integration mechanism. To examine the long-term stability of reporter gene expression, all four clones were grown continuously for 36 passages in either the presence or absence of selection for Neo. Periodic assays over a 5-month period showed no loss of GFP expression for at least two of the clones. This report represents the first detailed analysis of baculovirus integrants within mammalian cells. The potential advantages of the baculovirus system for the stable integration of genetic material into mammalian genomes are discussed.

  6. The TLC: A Novel Auditory Nucleus of the Mammalian Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Saldaña Fernández, Enrique; Viñuela, Antonio; Marshall, Allen F.; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C.; Aparicio Vaquero, María Auxiliadora

    2007-01-01

    [EN]We have identified a novel nucleus of the mammalian brain and termed it the tectal longitudinal column (TLC). Basic histologic stains, tract-tracing techniques and three-dimensional reconstructions reveal that the rat TLC is a narrow, elongated structure spanning themidbrain tectum longitudinally. This paired nucleus is located close to the midline, immediately dorsal to the periaqueductal gray matter.It occupies what has traditionally been considered the most medial region of the deep su...

  7. Prevalence of sexual dimorphism in mammalian phenotypic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Natasha A; Mason, Jeremy; Beaudet, Arthur L; Benjamini, Yoav; Bower, Lynette; Braun, Robert E; Brown, Steve D M; Chesler, Elissa J; Dickinson, Mary E; Flenniken, Ann M; Fuchs, Helmut; Angelis, Martin Hrabe de; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Shiying; Greenaway, Simon; Heller, Ruth; Herault, Yann; Justice, Monica J; Kurbatova, Natalja; Lelliott, Christopher J; Lloyd, K C Kent; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Mank, Judith E; Masuya, Hiroshi; McKerlie, Colin; Meehan, Terrence F; Mott, Richard F; Murray, Stephen A; Parkinson, Helen; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Santos, Luis; Seavitt, John R; Smedley, Damian; Sorg, Tania; Speak, Anneliese O; Steel, Karen P; Svenson, Karen L; Wakana, Shigeharu; West, David; Wells, Sara; Westerberg, Henrik; Yaacoby, Shay; White, Jacqueline K

    2017-06-26

    The role of sex in biomedical studies has often been overlooked, despite evidence of sexually dimorphic effects in some biological studies. Here, we used high-throughput phenotype data from 14,250 wildtype and 40,192 mutant mice (representing 2,186 knockout lines), analysed for up to 234 traits, and found a large proportion of mammalian traits both in wildtype and mutants are influenced by sex. This result has implications for interpreting disease phenotypes in animal models and humans.

  8. Germ cells and the origins of mammalian pluripotent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuijk, E.W.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian embryonic stem (ES) cells originate from preimplantation embryos and can be propagated indefinitely without loss of pluripotency; i.e. the potential to develop into any embryonic cell type. ES cells have been described for mouse, rhesus monkey, and human. There is considerable interest in human ES cells because of their potential role in future medicine to regenerate damaged tissues. Potential risks need to be investigated in adequate model species, before such therapies can be prac...

  9. Mammalian mitogenomic relationships and the root of the eutherian tree

    OpenAIRE

    Arnason, Ulfur; Adegoke, Joseph A.; Bodin, Kristina; Erik W Born; Esa, Yuzine B.; Gullberg, Anette; Nilsson, Maria; Short, Roger V.; Xu, Xiufeng; Janke, Axel

    2002-01-01

    The strict orthology of mitochondrial (mt) coding sequences has promoted their use in phylogenetic analyses at different levels. Here we present the results of a mitogenomic study (i.e., analysis based on the set of protein-coding genes from complete mt genomes) of 60 mammalian species. This number includes 11 new mt genomes. The sampling comprises all but one of the traditional eutherian orders. The previously unrepresented order Dermoptera (flying lemurs) fell within Primates as the sister ...

  10. The isochore patterns of mammalian genomes and their phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeur, G; Macaya, G; Kadi, F; Bernardi, G

    1993-08-01

    The compositional distributions of high molecular weight DNA fragments from 20 species belonging to 9 out of the 17 eutherian orders were investigated by analytical CsCl density gradient centrifugation and by preparative fractionation in Cs2SO4/BAMD density gradients followed by analysis of the fractions in CsCl. These compositional distributions reflect those of the isochores making up the corresponding genomes. A "general distribution" was found in species belonging to eight mammalian orders. A "myomorph distribution" was found in Myomorpha, but not in the other rodent infraorders Sciuromorpha and Histricomorpha, which share the general distribution. Two other distributions were found in a megachiropteran (but not in microchiropteran, which, again, shares the general distribution) and in pangolin (a species from the only genus of the order Pholidota), respectively. The main difference between the general distribution and all other distributions is that the former contains sizable amounts (6-10%) of GC-rich isochores (detected as DNA fragments equal to, or higher than, 1.710 g/cm3 in modal buoyant density), which are scarce, or absent, in the other distributions. This difference is remarkable because gene concentrations in mammalian genomes are paralleled by GC levels, the highest gene concentrations being present in the GC-richest isochores. The compositional distributions of mammalian genomes reported here shed light on mammalian phylogeny. Indeed, all orders investigated, with the exception of Pholidota, seem to share a common ancestor. The compositional patterns of the megachiropteran and of Myomorpha may be derived from the general pattern or have independent origins.

  11. Base Composition Characteristics of Mammalian miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short RNA sequences that repress protein synthesis by either inhibiting the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA or increasing mRNA degradation. Endogenous miRNAs have been found in various organisms, including animals, plants, and viruses. Mammalian miRNAs are evolutionarily conserved, are scattered throughout chromosomes, and play an important role in the immune response and the onset of cancer. For this study, the author explored the base composition characteristics of miRNA genes from the six mammalian species that contain the largest number of known miRNAs. It was found that mammalian miRNAs are evolutionarily conserved and GU-rich. Interestingly, in the miRNA sequences investigated, A residues are clearly the most frequent occupants of positions 2 and 3 of the 5′ end of miRNAs. Unlike G and U residues that may pair with C/U and A/G, respectively, A residues can only pair with U residues of target mRNAs, which may augment the recognition specificity of the 5′ seed region.

  12. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  13. Rheotaxis facilitates upstream navigation of mammalian sperm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Blayney, Martyn; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-05-27

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm maintain the correct swimming direction during various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Whilst chemotaxis may dominate near the ovum, it is unclear which cues guide spermatozoa on their long journey towards the egg. Hypothesized mechanisms range from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing and response to fluid flow variations (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about them. We report the first quantitative study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis, using microfluidic devices to investigate systematically swimming of human and bull sperm over a range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions, and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to stable upstream spiralling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilisation. A minimal mathematical model is presented that accounts quantitatively for the experimental observations.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02403.001. Copyright © 2014, Kantsler et al.

  14. Non-linear leak currents affect mammalian neuron physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei eHuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In their seminal works on squid giant axons, Hodgkin and Huxley approximated the membrane leak current as Ohmic, i.e. linear, since in their preparation, sub-threshold current rectification due to the influence of ionic concentration is negligible. Most studies on mammalian neurons have made the same, largely untested, assumption. Here we show that the membrane time constant and input resistance of mammalian neurons (when other major voltage-sensitive and ligand-gated ionic currents are discounted varies non-linearly with membrane voltage, following the prediction of a Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz-based passive membrane model. The model predicts that under such conditions, the time constant/input resistance-voltage relationship will linearize if the concentration differences across the cell membrane are reduced. These properties were observed in patch-clamp recordings of cerebellar Purkinje neurons (in the presence of pharmacological blockers of other background ionic currents and were more prominent in the sub-threshold region of the membrane potential. Model simulations showed that the non-linear leak affects voltage-clamp recordings and reduces temporal summation of excitatory synaptic input. Together, our results demonstrate the importance of trans-membrane ionic concentration in defining the functional properties of the passive membrane in mammalian neurons as well as other excitable cells.

  15. Review of Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationships for Acute Mammalian Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglika Lessigiarska

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR models for acute mammalian toxicity published in the last decade. A number of QSAR models based on cytotoxicity data from mammalian cell lines are also included because of their possible use as a surrogate system for predicting acute toxicity to mammals. On the basis of the review, the following conclusions can be made: i a relatively small number of models for in vivo toxicity are published in the literature. This is due to the nature of the endpoint - acute systemic toxicity is usually related to whole body phenomena and therefore is very complex. The complexity of the mechanisms involved leads to difficulties in the QSAR modelling; ii most QSAR models identify hydrophobicity as a parameter of high importance for the modelled toxicity. In addition, many models indicate the role of the electronic and steric effects; iii most of the literature-based models are restricted to single chemical classes. Models based on more heterogeneous data sets are those incorporated in expert systems. In general, the QSAR models for mammalian toxicity identified in this review are considered useful for investigating the mechanisms of toxicity of defined chemical classes. However, for predictive purposes in the regulatory assessment of chemicals most of the models require additional information to satisfy internationally agreed validation principles. In addition, the development of new models covering larger chemical domains would be useful for the regulatory assessment of chemicals.

  16. Mammalian animal models of psychosexual differentiation: when is 'translation' to the human situation possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Michael J

    2006-11-01

    Clinical investigators have been forced primarily to use experiments of nature (e.g., cloacal exstrophy; androgen insensitivity, congenital adrenal hyperplasia) to assess the contribution of fetal sex hormone exposure to the development of male- and female-typical profiles of gender identity and role behavior as well as sexual orientation. In this review, I summarize the results of numerous correlative as well as mechanistic animal experiments that shed significant light on general neuroendocrine mechanisms controlling the differentiation of neural circuits controlling sexual partner preference (sexual orientation) in mammalian species including man. I also argue, however, that results of animal studies can, at best, provide only indirect insights into the neuroendocrine determinants of human gender identity and role behaviors.

  17. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed.

  19. Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed.

  20. Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed. PMID:26555963

  1. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Influence of Dietary Protein Intake on Mammalian Tryptophan and Phenolic Metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Poesen

    Full Text Available Although there has been increasing interest in the use of high protein diets, little is known about dietary protein related changes in the mammalian metabolome. We investigated the influence of protein intake on selected tryptophan and phenolic compounds, derived from both endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism. Furthermore, potential inter-species metabolic differences were studied. For this purpose, 29 healthy subjects were allocated to a high (n = 14 or low protein diet (n = 15 for 2 weeks. In addition, 20 wild-type FVB mice were randomized to a high protein or control diet for 21 days. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for measurement of tryptophan and phenolic metabolites. In human subjects, we observed significant changes in plasma level and urinary excretion of indoxyl sulfate (P 0.004 and P 0.001, and in urinary excretion of indoxyl glucuronide (P 0.01, kynurenic acid (P 0.006 and quinolinic acid (P 0.02. In mice, significant differences were noted in plasma tryptophan (P 0.03, indole-3-acetic acid (P 0.02, p-cresyl glucuronide (P 0.03, phenyl sulfate (P 0.004 and phenylacetic acid (P 0.01. Thus, dietary protein intake affects plasma levels and generation of various mammalian metabolites, suggesting an influence on both endogenous and colonic microbial metabolism. Metabolite changes are dissimilar between human subjects and mice, pointing to inter-species metabolic differences with respect to protein intake.

  3. De novo formed satellite DNA-based mammalian artificial chromosomes and their possible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katona, Robert L

    2015-02-01

    Mammalian artificial chromosomes (MACs) are non-integrating, autonomously replicating natural chromosome-based vectors that may carry a vast amount of genetic material, which in turn enable potentially prolonged, safe, and regulated therapeutic transgene expression and render MACs as attractive genetic vectors for "gene replacement" or for controlling differentiation pathways in target cells. Satellite-DNA-based artificial chromosomes (SATACs) can be made by induced de novo chromosome formation in cells of different mammalian and plant species. These artificially generated accessory chromosomes are composed of predictable DNA sequences, and they contain defined genetic information. SATACs have already passed a number of obstacles crucial to their further development as gene therapy vectors, including large-scale purification, transfer of purified artificial chromosomes into different cells and embryos, generation of transgenic animals and germline transmission with purified SATACs, and the tissue-specific expression of a therapeutic gene from an artificial chromosome in the milk of transgenic animals. SATACs could be used in cell therapy protocols. For these methods, the most versatile target cell would be one that was pluripotent and self-renewing to address multiple disease target cell types, thus making multilineage stem cells, such as adult derived early progenitor cells and embryonic stem cells, as attractive universal host cells.

  4. Single molecule approaches for quantifying transcription and degradation rates in intact mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2016-04-01

    A key challenge in mammalian biology is to understand how rates of transcription and mRNA degradation jointly shape cellular gene expression. Powerful techniques have been developed for measuring these rates either genome-wide or at the single-molecule level, however these techniques are not applicable to assessment of cells within their native tissue microenvironment. Here we describe a technique based on single molecule Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization (smFISH) to measure transcription and degradation rates in intact mammalian tissues. The technique is based on dual-color libraries targeting the introns and exons of the genes of interest, enabling visualization and quantification of both nascent and mature mRNA. We present a software, TransQuant, that facilitates quantifying these rates from smFISH images. Our approach enables assessment of both transcription and degradation rates of any gene of interest while controlling for the inherent heterogeneity of intact tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endothelial cell tropism is a determinant of H5N1 pathogenesis in mammalian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smanla Tundup

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning the unusually high virulence of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses in mammalian species remains unknown. Here, we investigated if the cell tropism of H5N1 virus is a determinant of enhanced virulence in mammalian species. We engineered H5N1 viruses with restricted cell tropism through the exploitation of cell type-specific microRNA expression by incorporating microRNA target sites into the viral genome. Restriction of H5N1 replication in endothelial cells via miR-126 ameliorated disease symptoms, prevented systemic viral spread and limited mortality, despite showing similar levels of peak viral replication in the lungs as compared to control virus-infected mice. Similarly, restriction of H5N1 replication in endothelial cells resulted in ameliorated disease symptoms and decreased viral spread in ferrets. Our studies demonstrate that H5N1 infection of endothelial cells results in excessive production of cytokines and reduces endothelial barrier integrity in the lungs, which culminates in vascular leakage and viral pneumonia. Importantly, our studies suggest a need for a combinational therapy that targets viral components, suppresses host immune responses, and improves endothelial barrier integrity for the treatment of highly pathogenic H5N1 virus infections.

  6. Auxin induces cell proliferation in an experimental model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernaro, Valeria; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Leonello, Giuseppa; Buemi, Antoine; Kohnke, Franz Heinrich; Villari, Antonino; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the main auxin produced by plants and plays a key role in the plant growth and development. This hormone is also present in humans where it is considered as a uremic toxin deriving from tryptophan metabolism. However, beyond this peculiar aspect, the involvement of auxin in human pathophysiology has not been further investigated. Since it is a growth hormone, we evaluated its proliferative properties in an in vitro model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells. We employed an experimental model of renal tubular epithelial cells belonging to the LLC-PK1 cell line that is derived from the kidney of healthy male pig. Growth effects of auxin against LLC-PK1 cell lines were determined by a rapid colorimetric assay. Increasing concentrations of auxin (to give a final concentration from 1 to 1000 ng/mL) were added and microplates were incubated for 72 h. Each auxin concentration was assayed in four wells and repeated four times. Cell proliferation significantly increased, compared to control cells, 72 h after addition of auxin to cultured LLC-PK1 cells. Statistically significant values were observed when 100 ng/mL (p auxin influences cell growth not only in plants, where its role is well documented, but also in mammalian cell lines. This observation opens new scenarios in the field of tissue regeneration and may stimulate a novel line of research aiming at investigating whether this hormone really influences human physiology and pathophysiology and in particular, kidney regeneration.

  7. Intravesical immunotherapy in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Friedrich Jokisch

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The beneficial effect of BCG is well documented and established. To reduce the tumor specific mortality, it is essential to follow guideline-based treatment. In patients with BCG-failure, there are new promising alternatives other than BCG but BCG remains the gold standard at this stage.

  8. Multiplicity of steady states in glycolysis and shift of metabolic state in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Yongky, Andrew; Grimm, Simon; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Cultured mammalian cells exhibit elevated glycolysis flux and high lactate production. In the industrial bioprocesses for biotherapeutic protein production, glucose is supplemented to the culture medium to sustain continued cell growth resulting in the accumulation of lactate to high levels. In such fed-batch cultures, sometimes a metabolic shift from a state of high glycolysis flux and high lactate production to a state of low glycolysis flux and low lactate production or even lactate consumption is observed. While in other cases with very similar culture conditions, the same cell line and medium, cells continue to produce lactate. A metabolic shift to lactate consumption has been correlated to the productivity of the process. Cultures that exhibited the metabolic shift to lactate consumption had higher titers than those which didn't. However, the cues that trigger the metabolic shift to lactate consumption state (or low lactate production state) are yet to be identified. Metabolic control of cells is tightly linked to growth control through signaling pathways such as the AKT pathway. We have previously shown that the glycolysis of proliferating cells can exhibit bistability with well-segregated high flux and low flux states. Low lactate production (or lactate consumption) is possible only at a low glycolysis flux state. In this study, we use mathematical modeling to demonstrate that lactate inhibition together with AKT regulation on glycolysis enzymes can profoundly influence the bistable behavior, resulting in a complex steady-state topology. The transition from the high flux state to the low flux state can only occur in certain regions of the steady state topology, and therefore the metabolic fate of the cells depends on their metabolic trajectory encountering the region that allows such a metabolic state switch. Insights from such switch behavior present us with new means to control the metabolism of mammalian cells in fed-batch cultures.

  9. Toxicity studies using mammalian cells and impedance spectroscopy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a study of cell-based Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS sensors employed for testing toxicants in real-time. Mammalian cells are exposed to toxicants and information about cell viability are obtained from impedance measurements. The toxicants used are nicotine, phenol, ammonia and aldicarb. Two different adherent mammalian cells lines and cell culturewares were used to optimize the toxicity study. The cell lines used in this study were: bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPEC. The BAECs generated higher impedance values and formed cell monolayers at a faster rate compared to RFPECs. The two cell culturewares used in this study were simple open cell-culture wells and enclosed cell culturewares with microfluidic perfusion barriers. Experimental results indicated that the open wells are not suited for toxicity experiments. The turbulent flow created by pipetting media and toxicants in open cell culture wells disrupts the formation of the cell monolayer. When enclosed culture chambers were used, the flow of the cell culture medium and toxicant solutions were laminar on the cell monolayer. Both finite element simulations and experimental results showed that enclosed perfusion chamber have better performance due to the laminar flow of the solutions. The enclosed perfusion chamber also significantly shortens the response time of the cells when exposed to toxicants compared to the open cell culture wells. The experimental results demonstrated that ECIS biosensors seeded with BAECs inside enclosed cell culture chambers successfully assesses the effect of toxicants on mammalian cells in real-time.

  10. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  11. High-throughput physically based approach for mammalian cell encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiashing; Wu, Po-Chen; Huang, Chi-Hui; Yang, Chung-Yao; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-01

    Herein, we wish to tear down the traditional boundaries between physics and life sciences by demonstrating a physically based, flow-focusing method to encapsulate mammalian cells into alginate-based microspheres in a very short period of time. We paid particular attention to the physical properties of the alginate solution as it was critical to create a physiologically relevant environment within the alginate microspheres. The cells we cultured when re-culturing them on Petri dishes could still be maintained for at least 4 days after microsphere encapsulation. We believe that this study would provide interesting insight in biophysics, polymer physics, and applied physics.

  12. The role of mitochondrial DNA mutations in mammalian aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C Kujoth

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA accumulates both base-substitution mutations and deletions with aging in several tissues in mammals. Here, we examine the evidence supporting a causative role for mtDNA mutations in mammalian aging. We describe and compare human diseases and mouse models associated with mitochondrial genome instability. We also discuss potential mechanisms for the generation of these mutations and the means by which they may mediate their pathological consequences. Strategies for slowing the accumulation and attenuating the effects of mtDNA mutations are discussed.

  13. Patterns of positive selection in six Mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosiol, Carolin; Vinar, Tomás; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2008-01-01

    numbers of available genomes. Here we present the most comprehensive examination of mammalian PSGs to date, using the six high-coverage genome assemblies now available for eutherian mammals. The increased phylogenetic depth of this dataset results in substantially improved statistical power, and permits...... and taste perception. Several pathways were strongly enriched for PSGs, suggesting possible co-evolution of interacting genes. A novel Bayesian analysis of the possible "selection histories" of each gene indicated that most PSGs have switched multiple times between positive selection and nonselection...

  14. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  15. A comprehensive elementary model of the mammalian circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, G M; Olsen, D B; Kolff, W J

    1982-01-01

    Beginning with a set of simplifying assumptions and the statements for the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic processes involved, a comprehensive mathematical model for the mammalian circulatory system is developed and evaluated. Analytical relationships are derived and examined for the circulatory component pressures, flow rates, blood volumes, flow resistances, pumping power and pumping rate. The essential circulatory model parameters are identified and inspected for their influence upon circulatory behavior. A complete and consistent set of circulatory model parameters is given for the adult human male and the model response is examined. In general, agreement of the model predictions for man with experimental data is good.

  16. Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cell Regeneration and Ribbon Synapse Reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells (HCs are the sensory preceptor cells in the inner ear, which play an important role in hearing and balance. The HCs of organ of Corti are susceptible to noise, ototoxic drugs, and infections, thus resulting in permanent hearing loss. Recent approaches of HCs regeneration provide new directions for finding the treatment of sensor neural deafness. To have normal hearing function, the regenerated HCs must be reinnervated by nerve fibers and reform ribbon synapse with the dendrite of spiral ganglion neuron through nerve regeneration. In this review, we discuss the research progress in HC regeneration, the synaptic plasticity, and the reinnervation of new regenerated HCs in mammalian inner ear.

  17. Movement adds bite to the evolutionary morphology of mammalian teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Polly P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection and constraints put limits on morphological evolution. Mammalian teeth are no exception, and the need for them to meet precisely exerts exacting constraints on a staggering array of developmental and functional factors that must be integrated to maintain their performance as they evolve. A study in BMC Evolutionary Biology demonstrates that mandibular movement is an important component of this integration, and one that should not be neglected in the quantitiative study of the evolution of tooth morphology. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/12/146/

  18. Plasmodium ookinetes coopt mammalian plasminogen to invade the mosquito midgut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosh, Anil K; Coppens, Isabelle; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    inhibits oocyst development of both Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum, suggesting that enolase may act as an invasion ligand. Importantly, we demonstrate that surface enolase captures plasminogen from the mammalian blood meal via its lysine motif (DKSLVK) and that this interaction is essential...... for ookinete invasion. The results support the hypothesis that enolase on the surface of Plasmodium ookinetes plays a dual role in midgut invasion: by acting as a ligand that interacts with the midgut epithelium and, further, by capturing plasminogen, whose conversion to active plasmin promotes the invasion...

  19. Biocytin as a retrograde tracer in the mammalian visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço-Diniz, C W; Silveira, L C; Yamada, E S; Martin, K A

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully used biocytin as a retrograde tracer in the mammalian visual system. Retinal ganglion cells, pyramidal and stellate cortical neurons were labelled. Both pressure injections and gel implants were used successfully for retrograde labelling. Biocytin was detected using avidin conjugates and horseradish peroxidase histochemistry. Retrograde filling with biocytin proved to be more reliable and to allow better morphological resolution than other commonly used neurotracers such as horseradish peroxidase. The fine details of cell morphology observable by this method are comparable in many cases to the results obtained with intracellular tracer injections. The morphological resolution obtained with this method allows the study of brain microcircuits using extracellular deposits of biocytin.

  20. Characterization of the mammalian RNA exonuclease 5/NEF-sp as a testis-specific nuclear 3' → 5' exoribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sara; Homolka, David; Pillai, Ramesh S

    2017-09-01

    Ribonucleases catalyze maturation of functional RNAs or mediate degradation of cellular transcripts, activities that are critical for gene expression control. Here we identify a previously uncharacterized mammalian nuclease family member NEF-sp (RNA exonuclease 5 [REXO5] or LOC81691) as a testis-specific factor. Recombinant human NEF-sp demonstrates a divalent metal ion-dependent 3' → 5' exoribonuclease activity. This activity is specific to single-stranded RNA substrates and is independent of their length. The presence of a 2'-O-methyl modification at the 3' end of the RNA substrate is inhibitory. Ectopically expressed NEF-sp localizes to the nucleolar/nuclear compartment in mammalian cell cultures and this is dependent on an amino-terminal nuclear localization signal. Finally, mice lacking NEF-sp are viable and display normal fertility, likely indicating overlapping functions with other nucleases. Taken together, our study provides the first biochemical and genetic exploration of the role of the NEF-sp exoribonuclease in the mammalian genome. © 2017 Silva et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Behavioral responses to mammalian blood odor and a blood odor component in four species of large carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Sara; Sjöberg, Johanna; Amundin, Mats; Hartmann, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea; Laska, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Only little is known about whether single volatile compounds are as efficient in eliciting behavioral responses in animals as the whole complex mixture of a behaviorally relevant odor. Recent studies analysing the composition of volatiles in mammalian blood, an important prey-associated odor stimulus for predators, found the odorant trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal to evoke a typical "metallic, blood-like" odor quality in humans. We therefore assessed the behavior of captive Asian wild dogs (Cuon alpinus), African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus), South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), and Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica) when presented with wooden logs that were impregnated either with mammalian blood or with the blood odor component trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, and compared it to their behavior towards a fruity odor (iso-pentyl acetate) and a near-odorless solvent (diethyl phthalate) as control. We found that all four species displayed significantly more interactions with the odorized wooden logs such as sniffing, licking, biting, pawing, and toying, when they were impregnated with the two prey-associated odors compared to the two non-prey-associated odors. Most importantly, no significant differences were found in the number of interactions with the wooden logs impregnated with mammalian blood and the blood odor component in any of the four species. Only one of the four species, the South American bush dogs, displayed a significant decrease in the number of interactions with the odorized logs across the five sessions performed per odor stimulus. Taken together, the results demonstrate that a single blood odor component can be as efficient in eliciting behavioral responses in large carnivores as the odor of real blood, suggesting that trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal may be perceived by predators as a "character impact compound" of mammalian blood odor. Further, the results suggest that odorized wooden logs are a suitable manner of environmental enrichment

  2. Behavioral responses to mammalian blood odor and a blood odor component in four species of large carnivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nilsson

    Full Text Available Only little is known about whether single volatile compounds are as efficient in eliciting behavioral responses in animals as the whole complex mixture of a behaviorally relevant odor. Recent studies analysing the composition of volatiles in mammalian blood, an important prey-associated odor stimulus for predators, found the odorant trans-4,5-epoxy-(E-2-decenal to evoke a typical "metallic, blood-like" odor quality in humans. We therefore assessed the behavior of captive Asian wild dogs (Cuon alpinus, African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus, South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus, and Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica when presented with wooden logs that were impregnated either with mammalian blood or with the blood odor component trans-4,5-epoxy-(E-2-decenal, and compared it to their behavior towards a fruity odor (iso-pentyl acetate and a near-odorless solvent (diethyl phthalate as control. We found that all four species displayed significantly more interactions with the odorized wooden logs such as sniffing, licking, biting, pawing, and toying, when they were impregnated with the two prey-associated odors compared to the two non-prey-associated odors. Most importantly, no significant differences were found in the number of interactions with the wooden logs impregnated with mammalian blood and the blood odor component in any of the four species. Only one of the four species, the South American bush dogs, displayed a significant decrease in the number of interactions with the odorized logs across the five sessions performed per odor stimulus. Taken together, the results demonstrate that a single blood odor component can be as efficient in eliciting behavioral responses in large carnivores as the odor of real blood, suggesting that trans-4,5-epoxy-(E-2-decenal may be perceived by predators as a "character impact compound" of mammalian blood odor. Further, the results suggest that odorized wooden logs are a suitable manner of environmental

  3. Energy deposition in selected-mammalian cell for several-MeV single-proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K. [Beijing Jiaotong Univ., Institute of Biological Science and Technology, P.R. (China); Yu, Z. [Chinese Academy of Science, The Key Lab. of Ion-Beam Bioengineering, P.R. (China)

    2007-05-15

    The phenomena resulting from interaction between ion beam and mammalian cell pose important problems for biological applications. Classic Bethe-Bloch theory utilizing attached V79 mammalian cell has been conducted in order to establish the stopping powers of the mammalian cell for several-MeV single-proton microbeam. Based on the biological structure of the mammalian cell, a physical model is proposed which presumes that the attached cell is a simple MWM model. According to this model and Monte Carlo simulation, we studied the energy deposition and its ratio on the selected attached mammalian cell for MeV proton implantation. We found that the Bragg peak region of several-MeV energetic proton is beyond the thickness of the selected attached mammalian cell.

  4. The prevalence of Balantidium coli infection in fifty-six mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakauchi, K

    1999-01-01

    A total of 375 fecal samples of 56 mammalian species belonging to 17 families of 4 orders were examined for the detection of Balantidium coli from December 1994 to August 1995. As a result, B. coli was found from 6 species belonging to 4 families of 2 orders (Primates and Artiodactyla) of host animals examined. White-handed gibbon (Hylobates lar), squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciurea) and Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) were new hosts for B. coli. All the wild boar (Sus scrofa) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) examined were positive. The highest number of B. coli was obtained from a chimpanzee (1,230/g feces). No B. coli was detected from the animals of orders Rodentia and Carnivora including dogs and cats. The rarity of B. coli infection in breeding animals in Japan. suggests that there is no serious problem in controlling infections.

  5. Early mammalian development under conditions of reorientation relative to the gravity vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A clinostat was used to assess the effects of reorientation relative to the gravity vector on mammalian germ cells cultured in vitro. Previous studies using this system revealed an inhibition of meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes. In the present study, the effects of clinostat rotation on in vitro fertilization were examined. The frequency of fertilization of experimental cultures did not vary from that of the clinostat vertical control cultures at either of the rotation rates examined. Importantly, no abnormalities of fertilization, such as parthenogenetic activation, fragmentation, or polyspermy were seen. It is concluded that the initial events of fertilization were unaffected by this treatment, although the developmental potential of these embryos remains to be assessed.

  6. Host Responses to Malassezia spp. in the Mammalian Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Sparber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The skin of mammalian organisms is home for a myriad of microbes. Many of these commensals are thought to have beneficial effects on the host by critically contributing to immune homeostasis. Consequently, dysbiosis can have detrimental effects for the host that may manifest with inflammatory diseases at the barrier tissue. Besides bacteria, fungi make an important contribution to the microbiota and among these, the yeast Malassezia widely dominates in most areas of the skin in healthy individuals. There is accumulating evidence that Malassezia spp. are involved in a variety of skin disorders in humans ranging from non- or mildly inflammatory conditions such as dandruff and pityriasis versicolor to more severe inflammatory skin diseases like seborrheic eczema and atopic dermatitis. In addition, Malassezia is strongly linked to the development of dermatitis and otitis externa in dogs. However, the association of Malassezia spp. with such diseases remains poorly characterized. Until now, studies on the fungus–host interaction remain sparse and they are mostly limited to experiments with isolated host cells in vitro. They suggest a multifaceted crosstalk of Malassezia spp. with the skin by direct activation of the host via conserved pattern recognition receptors and indirectly via the release of fungus-derived metabolites that can modulate the function of hematopoietic and/or non-hematopoietic cells in the barrier tissue. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the host response to Malassezia spp. in the mammalian skin.

  7. Enhanced production of docosahexaenoic acid in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiming Zhu

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA. However, the accumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased production of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA.

  8. Growth of the Mammalian Golgi Apparatus during Interphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Alex T-W; Harrison, Rene E

    2016-09-15

    During the cell cycle, genetic materials and organelles are duplicated to ensure that there is sufficient cellular content for daughter cells. While Golgi growth in interphase has been observed in lower eukaryotes, the elaborate ribbon structure of the mammalian Golgi apparatus has made it challenging to monitor. Here we demonstrate the growth of the mammalian Golgi apparatus in its protein content and volume during interphase. Through ultrastructural analyses, physical growth of the Golgi apparatus was revealed to occur by cisternal elongation of the individual Golgi stacks. By examining the timing and regulation of Golgi growth, we established that Golgi growth starts after passage through the cell growth checkpoint at late G1 phase and continues in a manner highly correlated with cell size growth. Finally, by identifying S6 kinase 1 as a major player in Golgi growth, we revealed the coordination between cell size and Golgi growth via activation of the protein synthesis machinery in early interphase. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. An insight into maternal recognition of pregnancy in mammalian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Ayobami Raheem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy loss especially at the early state of gestation is a major cause of infertility in both human and animal species. This has been attributed to the impaired interaction between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo and/or inadequate hormonal support for the pregnancy continuation. Progesterone is the hormone of pregnancy and is essential for establishment and sustainance of pregnancy in most mammals. It is principally produced by the corpus luteum which undergoes regression mostly due to luteolytic action of prostaglandins F2alpha at certain period of the oestrous cycle. Maternal recognition of pregnancy (MRP is the phenomenon through which luteolysis of corpus luteum is abrogated for continuous production of progesterone in a conceptive cycle and is achieved by different agents in different mammalian species. It is interferon tau in ruminant, oestrogen in pig, while it is human chorionic gonadotropin in human. In mare, the MRP agent remains ambiguous and was speculated to be some protein and prostaglandins E2. It is the purpose of this review to highlight the MRP signals in domestic mammals with emphasis on ruminant while discussing their mechanisms of action. Given the importance of progesterone in supporting pregnancy in all mammalian species, understanding the physiology of these mechanisms through which luteolysis is nullified will aid approaches necessary to correct pregnancy loss associated with defective MRP in one hand and may also lead to developing a novel contraceptive on the other hand.

  10. Large-scale model of mammalian thalamocortical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M; Edelman, Gerald M

    2008-03-04

    The understanding of the structural and dynamic complexity of mammalian brains is greatly facilitated by computer simulations. We present here a detailed large-scale thalamocortical model based on experimental measures in several mammalian species. The model spans three anatomical scales. (i) It is based on global (white-matter) thalamocortical anatomy obtained by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of a human brain. (ii) It includes multiple thalamic nuclei and six-layered cortical microcircuitry based on in vitro labeling and three-dimensional reconstruction of single neurons of cat visual cortex. (iii) It has 22 basic types of neurons with appropriate laminar distribution of their branching dendritic trees. The model simulates one million multicompartmental spiking neurons calibrated to reproduce known types of responses recorded in vitro in rats. It has almost half a billion synapses with appropriate receptor kinetics, short-term plasticity, and long-term dendritic spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (dendritic STDP). The model exhibits behavioral regimes of normal brain activity that were not explicitly built-in but emerged spontaneously as the result of interactions among anatomical and dynamic processes. We describe spontaneous activity, sensitivity to changes in individual neurons, emergence of waves and rhythms, and functional connectivity on different scales.

  11. Colour As a Signal for Entraining the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Lauren; Hanna, Lydia; Mouland, Josh; Martial, Franck; West, Alexander; Smedley, Andrew R.; Bechtold, David A.; Webb, Ann R.; Lucas, Robert J.; Brown, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity (“irradiance”) and quality (“colour”) of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue–yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision. PMID:25884537

  12. Undetectable histone O-GlcNAcylation in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jessica; Daou, Salima; Zamorano, Natalia; Iannantuono, Nicholas VG; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Mashtalir, Nazar; Bonneil, Eric; Wurtele, Hugo; Thibault, Pierre; Affar, El Bachir

    2015-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the O-Linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) and reversed by O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Numerous transcriptional regulators, including chromatin modifying enzymes, transcription factors, and co-factors, are targeted by O-GlcNAcylation, indicating that this modification is central for chromatin-associated processes. Recently, OGT-mediated O-GlcNAcylation was reported to be a novel histone modification, suggesting a potential role in directly coordinating chromatin structure and function. In contrast, using multiple biochemical approaches, we report here that histone O-GlcNAcylation is undetectable in mammalian cells. Conversely, O-GlcNAcylation of the transcription regulators Host Cell Factor-1 (HCF-1) and Ten-Eleven Translocation protein 2 (TET2) could be readily observed. Our study raises questions on the occurrence and abundance of O-GlcNAcylation as a histone modification in mammalian cells and reveals technical complications regarding the detection of genuine protein O-GlcNAcylation. Therefore, the identification of the specific contexts in which histone O-GlcNAcylation might occur is still to be established. PMID:26075789

  13. Hydrolytic function of Exo1 in mammalian mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hongbing; Baitinger, Celia; Soderblom, Erik J.; Burdett, Vickers; Modrich, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have previously implicated exonuclease 1 (Exo1) in yeast and mammalian mismatch repair, with results suggesting that function of the protein in the reaction depends on both its hydrolytic activity and its ability to interact with other components of the repair system. However, recent analysis of an Exo1-E109K knockin mouse has concluded that Exo1 function in mammalian mismatch repair is restricted to a structural role, a conclusion based on a prior report that N-terminal His-tagged Exo1-E109K is hydrolytically defective. Because Glu-109 is distant from the nuclease hydrolytic center, we have compared the activity of untagged full-length Exo1-E109K with that of wild type Exo1 and the hydrolytically defective active site mutant Exo1-D173A. We show that the activity of Exo1-E109K is comparable to that of wild type enzyme in a conventional exonuclease assay and that in contrast to a D173A active site mutant, Exo1-E109K is fully functional in mismatch-provoked excision and repair. We conclude that the catalytic function of Exo1 is required for its participation in mismatch repair. We also consider the other phenotypes of the Exo1-E109K mouse in the context of Exo1 hydrolytic function. PMID:24829455

  14. Nucleologenesis and nucleolotransfer in mammalian oocytes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Benc

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An effort to improve development potential of early embryos is one of the main goals of biotechnology in the area of reproductive biology with application in veterinary or human medicine. Recent observations of the function of nucleolus or rather its forms before, during and after the fertilisation or parthenogenetic activation show the key role(s of nucleolus in the processes of early genome activation. The nucleolus is a subnuclear structure (organelle mainly involved in regulation of transcription and translation. This organelle has been characterized in detail by immunofluorescence, cell transfection and proteomics. This data was, however, mostly obtained in nucleoli of differentiated eukaryotic cells. Much less is known about the nucleolar structural changes and related functional processes in growing and fully grown mammalian oocytes, zygotes and early cleavage stage embryos, especially in the context of embryonic genome activation. It has been shown, that nucleoli in mammalian oocytes and early embryos have several forms and functions, which vary during the oocyte growth and embryonic development. Certain functions have not been fully described or explained, yet. The method of enucleolation, which allows to remove nucleoli from the oocytes or to exchange nucleoli between oocytes or zygotes, together with their proteomic and structural analyses brought new information about functions of nucleoli in oocytes and early cleavage-stage embryos and allowed to explain some new key roles of nucleoli during oocyte maturation and early embryonic development.

  15. CORUM: the comprehensive resource of mammalian protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruepp, Andreas; Brauner, Barbara; Dunger-Kaltenbach, Irmtraud; Frishman, Goar; Montrone, Corinna; Stransky, Michael; Waegele, Brigitte; Schmidt, Thorsten; Doudieu, Octave Noubibou; Stümpflen, Volker; Mewes, H Werner

    2008-01-01

    Protein complexes are key molecular entities that integrate multiple gene products to perform cellular functions. The CORUM (http://mips.gsf.de/genre/proj/corum/index.html) database is a collection of experimentally verified mammalian protein complexes. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Information about protein complexes includes protein complex names, subunits, literature references as well as the function of the complexes. For functional annotation, we use the FunCat catalogue that enables to organize the protein complex space into biologically meaningful subsets. The database contains more than 1750 protein complexes that are built from 2400 different genes, thus representing 12% of the protein-coding genes in human. A web-based system is available to query, view and download the data. CORUM provides a comprehensive dataset of protein complexes for discoveries in systems biology, analyses of protein networks and protein complex-associated diseases. Comparable to the MIPS reference dataset of protein complexes from yeast, CORUM intends to serve as a reference for mammalian protein complexes.

  16. A Unique Genetically Encoded FRET Pair in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Amanda L; Addy, Partha Sarathi; Chin, Melissa A; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2017-03-16

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two suitable fluorophores is a powerful tool to monitor dynamic changes in protein structure in vitro and in vivo. The ability to genetically encode a FRET pair represents a convenient "labeling-free" strategy to incorporate them into target protein(s). Currently, the only genetically encoded FRET pairs available for use in mammalian cells use fluorescent proteins. However, their large size can lead to unfavorable perturbations, particularly when two are used at the same time. Additionally, fluorescent proteins are largely restricted to a terminal attachment to the target, which might not be optimal. Here, we report the development of an alternative genetically encoded FRET pair in mammalian cells that circumvents these challenges by taking advantage of a small genetically encoded fluorescent unnatural amino acid as the donor and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as the acceptor. The small size of Anap relative to fluorescent proteins, and the ability to co-translationally incorporate it into internal sites on the target protein, endows this novel FRET pair with improved versatility over its counterparts that rely upon two fluorescent proteins. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hazen, M.J. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: mariajose.hazen@uam.es

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells.

  18. Unconventional Trafficking of Mammalian Phospholipase D3 to Lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adriana Carolina; Schweizer, Michaela; Jagdmann, Sebastian; Bernreuther, Christian; Reinheckel, Thomas; Saftig, Paul; Damme, Markus

    2018-01-23

    Variants in the phospholipase D3 (PLD3) gene have genetically been linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. We present a detailed biochemical analysis of PLD3 and reveal its endogenous localization in endosomes and lysosomes. PLD3 reaches lysosomes as a type II transmembrane protein via a (for mammalian cells) uncommon intracellular biosynthetic route that depends on the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery. PLD3 is sorted into intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes, and ESCRT-dependent sorting correlates with ubiquitination. In multivesicular endosomes, PLD3 is subjected to proteolytic cleavage, yielding a stable glycosylated luminal polypeptide and a rapidly degraded N-terminal membrane-bound fragment. This pathway closely resembles the delivery route of carboxypeptidase S to the yeast vacuole. Our experiments reveal a biosynthetic route of PLD3 involving proteolytic processing and ESCRT-dependent sorting for its delivery to lysosomes in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian W; Seabury, Christopher M; Brashear, Wesley A; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented "rule of speciation." We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the "Large X-Effect" in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Pangolin genomes and the evolution of mammalian scales and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Siew Woh; Rayko, Mike; Tan, Tze King; Hari, Ranjeev; Komissarov, Aleksey; Wee, Wei Yee; Yurchenko, Andrey A; Kliver, Sergey; Tamazian, Gaik; Antunes, Agostinho; Wilson, Richard K; Warren, Wesley C; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Minx, Patrick; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Kotze, Antoinette; Dalton, Desire L; Vermaak, Elaine; Paterson, Ian C; Dobrynin, Pavel; Sitam, Frankie Thomas; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J; Johnson, Warren E; Yusoff, Aini Mohamed; Luo, Shu-Jin; Karuppannan, Kayal Vizi; Fang, Gang; Zheng, Deyou; Gerstein, Mark B; Lipovich, Leonard; O'Brien, Stephen J; Wong, Guat Jah

    2016-10-01

    Pangolins, unique mammals with scales over most of their body, no teeth, poor vision, and an acute olfactory system, comprise the only placental order (Pholidota) without a whole-genome map. To investigate pangolin biology and evolution, we developed genome assemblies of the Malayan (Manis javanica) and Chinese (M. pentadactyla) pangolins. Strikingly, we found that interferon epsilon (IFNE), exclusively expressed in epithelial cells and important in skin and mucosal immunity, is pseudogenized in all African and Asian pangolin species that we examined, perhaps impacting resistance to infection. We propose that scale development was an innovation that provided protection against injuries or stress and reduced pangolin vulnerability to infection. Further evidence of specialized adaptations was evident from positively selected genes involving immunity-related pathways, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism, muscular and nervous systems, and scale/hair development. Olfactory receptor gene families are significantly expanded in pangolins, reflecting their well-developed olfaction system. This study provides insights into mammalian adaptation and functional diversification, new research tools and questions, and perhaps a new natural IFNE-deficient animal model for studying mammalian immunity. © 2016 Choo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Characterization of mammalian glucose transport proteins using photoaffinity labeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadzinski, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    A carrier-free radioiodinated phenylazide derivative of forskolin, 3-iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-O-succinyl-deacetyl-forskolin (({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin), has been shown to be a highly selective photoaffinity probe for the human erythrocyte glucose transported and the glucose transport proteins found in several mammalian tissues and cultured cells where the glucose transport protein is present at a low concentration. The photoincorporation of ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin into these glucose transporters was blocked by D- (but not L-) glucose, cytochalasin B, and forskolin. In addition to labeling the mammalian glucose transport proteins, ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin also labeled the L-arabinose transporter from E. coli. In muscle and adipose tissues, glucose transport is markedly increased in response to insulin. ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin was shown to selectivity tag the glucose transporter in membranes derived from these cells. In addition, the covalent derivatization of the transport protein in subcellular fractions of the adipocyte has provided a means to study the hormonal regulation of glucose transport. ({sup 125}I)IAPS-forskolin has also been used to label the purified human erythrocyte glucose transporter. The site of insertion has therefore been localized by analysis of the radiolabeled peptides which were produced following chemical and proteolytic digestion of the labeled transport protein.

  2. Radially oriented nanostrand electrodes to boost glucose sensing in mammalian blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Naeem; El-Safty, Sherif A; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh E; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    Architecture of nanoscale electrochemical sensors for ultra-trace detection of glucose in blood is important in real-life sampling and analysis. To broaden the application of electrochemical sensing of glucose, we fabricated, for the first time, a glucose sensor electrode based on radially oriented NiO nanostrands (NSTs) onto 3D porous Ni foam substrate for monitoring, as well as selective and sensitive sensing of glucose in mammalian blood. The simple, scalable one-pot fabrication of this NST-Ni sensor design enabled control of the pattern of radially oriented NSTs onto 3D porous Ni foam substrate. The radial orientation of NST-Ni electrode onto the interior of the 3D porous substrate with controlled crystal structure size and atomic arrangement along the axis of the strands, intrinsic surface defects, and superior surface properties, such as hydrophilicity, high surface energy, and high density led to highly exposed catalytic active sites. The hierarchical NST-Ni electrode was used to develop a sensitive and selective sensor over a wide range of glucose concentrations among actively competitive ions, chemical species and molecular agents, and multi-cyclic sensing assays. The NST-Ni electrode shows significant glucose sensing performance in terms of unimpeded diffusion pathways, a wide range of concentration detection, and lower limit of detection (0.186 µM) than NiO nanosheet (NS)-Ni foam electrode pattern, indicating the effectiveness of the shape-dependent structural architecture of NST-Ni electrode. In this study, the NST-Ni electrode is fabricated to develop a simple, selective method for detecting glucose in physiological fluids (e.g., mammalian blood). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Weekly excretion of the mammalian lignan enterolactone in milk of dairy cows fed flaxseed meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Nathalie; Côrtes, Cristiano; Petit, Hélène V

    2009-11-01

    Flaxseed meal (FM) is rich in the plant lignan secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) which is converted to the mammalian lignans enterodiol and enterolactone (EL) by ruminal microbiota. Feeding FM to dairy cows increases linearly EL concentration in milk but enterodiol is not detected. The objectives of the study were to determine the length of time to obtain peak EL concentration in the milk of dairy cows fed 20% FM and the length of time to return to EL baseline level in milk when cows are switched from high to low intake of flax SDG. A total of 12 multiparous lactating Holstein cows were assigned randomly to one of two feeding regimens: the control (CO) diet was fed for 6 weeks or the FM diet was fed from week 0 to 3 inclusive and then cows were switched to the control diet from week 3 to 6 inclusive. Milk samples were taken weekly for EL analysis. There was a significant interaction between feeding regimen and week for milk concentration of EL as a result of higher concentration of EL from week 1 to 3 for cows on the FM regimen compared with those on the CO regimen. Concentrations of milk EL on the FM regimen maintained uniform high levels from week 1 to 3 and they decreased significantly from week 3 to 4 when the CO diet was reintroduced in week 3. This study suggests that the conversion of SDG to the mammalian lignan EL and the transfer of EL to the mammary gland are well established after one week of feeding 20% FM in the diet of dairy cows and that milk concentration of EL returns to baseline level after one week of FM deprivation.

  4. Retroposed SNOfall--a mammalian-wide comparison of platypus snoRNAs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmitz, Jürgen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kuhl, Heiner; Grützner, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Brosius, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    .... The duck-billed platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and echidnas are the only potential contemporary witnesses of this period and, thereby, provide a unique insight into mammalian genome evolution...

  5. The Effects of Captivity on the Mammalian Gut Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Valerie J; Song, Se Jin; Delsuc, Frédéric; Prest, Tiffany L; Oliverio, Angela M; Korpita, Timothy M; Alexiev, Alexandra; Amato, Katherine R; Metcalf, Jessica L; Kowalewski, Martin; Avenant, Nico L; Link, Andres; Di Fiore, Anthony; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Feh, Claudia; Orlando, Ludovic; Mendelson, Joseph R; Sanders, Jon; Knight, Rob

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies increasingly note the effect of captivity or the built environment on the microbiome of humans and other animals. As symbiotic microbes are essential to many aspects of biology (e.g., digestive and immune functions), it is important to understand how lifestyle differences can impact the microbiome, and, consequently, the health of hosts. Animals living in captivity experience a range of changes that may influence the gut bacteria, such as diet changes, treatments, and reduced contact with other individuals, species and variable environmental substrates that act as sources of bacterial diversity. Thus far, initial results from previous studies point to a pattern of decreased bacterial diversity in captive animals. However, these studies are relatively limited in the scope of species that have been examined. Here we present a dataset that includes paired wild and captive samples from mammalian taxa across six Orders to investigate generalizable patterns of the effects captivity on mammalian gut bacteria. In comparing the wild to the captive condition, our results indicate that alpha diversity of the gut bacteria remains consistent in some mammalian hosts (bovids, giraffes, anteaters, and aardvarks), declines in the captive condition in some hosts (canids, primates, and equids), and increases in the captive condition in one host taxon (rhinoceros). Differences in gut bacterial beta diversity between the captive and wild state were observed for most of the taxa surveyed, except the even-toed ungulates (bovids and giraffes). Additionally, beta diversity variation was also strongly influenced by host taxonomic group, diet type, and gut fermentation physiology. Bacterial taxa that demonstrated larger shifts in relative abundance between the captive and wild states included members of the Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Overall, the patterns that we observe will inform a range of disciplines from veterinary practice to captive breeding efforts for biological

  6. Weak preservation of local neutral substitution rates across mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karro John E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate at which neutral (non-functional bases undergo substitution is highly dependent on their location within a genome. However, it is not clear how fast these location-dependent rates change, or to what extent the substitution rate patterns are conserved between lineages. To address this question, which is critical not only for understanding the substitution process but also for evaluating phylogenetic footprinting algorithms, we examine ancestral repeats: a predominantly neutral dataset with a significantly higher genomic density than other datasets commonly used to study substitution rate variation. Using this repeat data, we measure the extent to which orthologous ancestral repeat sequences exhibit similar substitution patterns in separate mammalian lineages, allowing us to ascertain how well local substitution rates have been preserved across species. Results We calculated substitution rates for each ancestral repeat in each of three independent mammalian lineages (primate – from human/macaque alignments, rodent – from mouse/rat alignments, and laurasiatheria – from dog/cow alignments. We then measured the correlation of local substitution rates among these lineages. Overall we found the correlations between lineages to be statistically significant, but too weak to have much predictive power (r2 5%. These correlations were found to be primarily driven by regional effects at the scale of several hundred kb or larger. A few repeat classes (e.g. 7SK, Charlie8, and MER121 also exhibited stronger conservation of rate patterns, likely due to the effect of repeat-specific purifying selection. These classes should be excluded when estimating local neutral substitution rates. Conclusion Although local neutral substitution rates have some correlations among mammalian species, these correlations have little predictive power on the scale of individual repeats. This indicates that local substitution rates have changed

  7. The mammalian PYHIN gene family: Phylogeny, evolution and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cridland Jasmyn A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of the mammalian PYHIN (IFI200/HIN-200 family are involved in defence against infection through recognition of foreign DNA. The family member absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2 binds cytosolic DNA via its HIN domain and initiates inflammasome formation via its pyrin domain. AIM2 lies within a cluster of related genes, many of which are uncharacterised in mouse. To better understand the evolution, orthology and function of these genes, we have documented the range of PYHIN genes present in representative mammalian species, and undertaken phylogenetic and expression analyses. Results No PYHIN genes are evident in non-mammals or monotremes, with a single member found in each of three marsupial genomes. Placental mammals show variable family expansions, from one gene in cow to four in human and 14 in mouse. A single HIN domain appears to have evolved in the common ancestor of marsupials and placental mammals, and duplicated to give rise to three distinct forms (HIN-A, -B and -C in the placental mammal ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses showed that AIM2 HIN-C and pyrin domains clearly diverge from the rest of the family, and it is the only PYHIN protein with orthology across many species. Interestingly, although AIM2 is important in defence against some bacteria and viruses in mice, AIM2 is a pseudogene in cow, sheep, llama, dolphin, dog and elephant. The other 13 mouse genes have arisen by duplication and rearrangement within the lineage, which has allowed some diversification in expression patterns. Conclusions The role of AIM2 in forming the inflammasome is relatively well understood, but molecular interactions of other PYHIN proteins involved in defence against foreign DNA remain to be defined. The non-AIM2 PYHIN protein sequences are very distinct from AIM2, suggesting they vary in effector mechanism in response to foreign DNA, and may bind different DNA structures. The PYHIN family has highly varied gene composition between

  8. Strategies for the enhancement of recombinant protein production from mammalian cells by growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunley, Kevin; Butler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Methods to increase the production of recombinant proteins in mammalian cell cultures have been developed which reduce in-culture growth through prohibiting progression of the cell cycle. This arrest increases the proportion of cells in the G1-phase of the cell cycle, and subsequently increases their specific productivity (Q(P)). Through careful balancing of the decreased growth rate with an increased Q(P), multi-fold increases in recombinant protein yield can be achieved. Induction of this arrest can occur through the addition of cytostatic chemical agents (NaBu or DMSO), over-expression of cell cycle inhibitory proteins (p21(Cip1) or p27(Kip1)), or through control of the culture environment (mild hypothermic temperatures). While all these controlled proliferation strategies have been developed independently, they all aim to control cell proliferation through a shared mechanism; the direct or indirect up-regulation of members of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) family. This review highlights the shared biology of these three controlled proliferation strategies, and their contribution towards bioprocess development for recombinant production from animal cell cultures. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of recombinant fluorescent mammalian cells as a toxicity biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E J; Lee, Y; Lee, J E; Gu, M B

    2002-01-01

    With respect to developing a more sensitive biosensor, a recombinant fluorescent Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line was used for the monitoring of various toxicants. Both cell lines, EFC-500 and KFC-A10, were able to detect toxicants sensitively. They were characterized with mitomycin C and gamma-ray as genotoxicants and bisphenol A, nonylphenol, ziram and methyl bromide as possible and known EDCs. When compared to each other, the response of KFC-A10 was generally more informative and sensitive. Compared to typical bacterial biosensor systems, these cell lines offered a sensitivity of 2- to 50-fold greater for the tested chemicals. Based on these results, the use of mammalian cells offers a sensitive biosensor system that is not only fast, cheap and reproducible but also capable of monitoring the endocrine-like characteristics of environmental toxicants.

  10. Diets of mammalian fossil fauna from Kanapoi, northwestern Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthi, Fredrick K; Cerling, Thure E; Chritz, Kendra L; Blumenthal, Scott A

    2017-10-12

    Carbon isotope ratios of mammalian teeth from the Kanapoi site in northern Kenya are interpreted in the context of C3 and C4 derived resources to investigate the paleoecology of Australopithecus anamensis. δ13C values of large mammals, when compared at the taxon level, show an ecosystem that is strongly biased towards mixed feeders and browsers. However, sufficient C4 resources were present such that some C4 dominated grazers were also present in the large mammal fauna. Analyses of micromammals shows that their diets were C3 dominated or C3-C4 mixed. Carbon isotope studies of primates shows that the major primate tribes-Colobini, Papioini, Hominini-all made some use of C4 resources in their respective diets; the Hominini had a higher fraction of C3 diet resources than the other primate tribes represented in the fossil record. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unresolved Questions Concerning Mammalian Sperm Acrosomal Exocytosis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Hirohashi, Noritaka; Gerton, George L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, the study of mammalian acrosomal exocytosis has produced some major advances that challenge the long-held, general paradigms in the field. Principally, the idea that sperm must be acrosome-intact to bind to the zona pellucida of unfertilized eggs, based largely on in vitro fertilization studies of mouse oocytes denuded of the cumulus oophorus, has been overturned by experiments using state-of-the-art imaging of cumulus-intact oocytes and fertilization experiments where eggs were reinseminated by acrosome-reacted sperm recovered from the perivitelline space of zygotes. In light of these results, this minireview highlights a number of unresolved questions and emphasizes the fact that there is still much work to be done in this exciting field. Future experiments using recently advanced technologies should lead to a more complete and accurate understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the fertilization process in mammals. PMID:24671881

  12. A wave dynamics criterion for optimization of mammalian cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Niema M; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-05-07

    The cardiovascular system in mammals follows various optimization criteria covering the heart, the vascular network, and the coupling of the two. Through a simple dimensional analysis we arrived at a non-dimensional number (wave condition number) that can predict the optimum wave state in which the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile power (LV workload) is minimized in a mammalian cardiovascular system. This number is also universal among all mammals independent of animal size maintaining a value of around 0.1. By utilizing a unique in vitro model of human aorta, we tested our hypothesis against a wide range of aortic compliance (pulse wave velocity). We concluded that the optimum value of the wave condition number remains to be around 0.1 for a wide range of aorta compliance that we could simulate in our in-vitro system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mottled Mice and Non-Mammalian Models of Menkes Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Krzeptowski, Wojciech; Lipiński, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    role in the maintenance of copper homeostasis in cells of the whole body. ATP7A participates in copper absorption in the small intestine and in copper transport to the central nervous system (CNS) across the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Cu is essential...... for synaptogenesis and axonal development. In cells, ATP7A participates in the incorporation of copper into Cu-dependent enzymes during the course of its maturation in the secretory pathway. There is a high degree of homology (>80%) between the human ATP7A and murine Atp7a genes. Mice with mutations in the Atp7a......-mammalian models of Menkes disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio mutants were used in experiments which would be technically difficult to carry out in mammals....

  14. Genetic variability, individuality and the evolution of the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, H P

    1995-12-01

    The neo-Darwinian theory of evolution has difficulty in explaining the rapid evolution of mammalian brain and behavior. I shall argue that the plasticity mechanisms of the brain (i.e., system homeostasis, developmental reorganization, structural adult plasticity, and cognition and learning) have evolved primarily as genetic buffer systems which protect subtle mutations influencing brain structures from natural selection. These buffer systems permit accumulation of genetic variation in the higher system levels of the brain (simply defined as structures with late differentiation), while low-level systems are kept constant by natural selection. The organization of this intrinsic genetic buffering system provides several features facilitating neo-Darwinian evolution: In conclusion, the evolutionary appearance of cognition and intelligence is an ordinary biological mechanism compensating evolutionary drags such as long lifespans and fewer offspring. The concept has heuristic value for identifying gene-brain-behavior relationships and for explaining behavioral consequences of artifical gene deletions.

  15. Phenotypic drug resistance in mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschure, P C; Simons, J W

    1982-05-01

    When mammalian cells are cultured at low concentrations of toxic drugs, they often become phenotypically resistant. We studied whether this phenotypic resistance is due to selection of preexisting variants. The drugs 8-azaguaine (AG) and 6-thioguanine (TG) were used and, as a parameter for resistance, the incorporation of hypoxanthine was determined. Preexisting variation among clones in the uptake of hypoxanthine was found, and this variation has a hereditary component. This transmission of aberrant incorporation of hypoxanthine does not appear a stable trait, and the aberrant cell lines returned gradually to the original steady state. There are indications that within a cell population cells with altered levels of incorporation of hypoxanthine arise continuously and at a high frequency. Treatment with marginally toxic concentrations of AG or TG indicates that, at least for AG, survival is not related to the preexisting variation in hypoxanthine uptake. The observed phenomena could be of importance for the selection of drugs to be used in cancer chemotherapy.

  16. RESTORATIVE ASPECT OF CASTOR PLANT ON MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Kádasi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The castor plant (Ricinus communis L. is a robust perennial shrub of Euphorbiaceae family and different parts of the plant are widely used by various communities and forest dwellers in many regions of the world for treating a variety of ailments. About 80% of world population is still dependent on traditional herbal medicines. The plant is documented to possess beneficial effects as anti-oxidant, antifertility, anti inflammatory, antimicrobial, central nervous system stimulant, anti diabetic, insecticidal and larvicidal and many other medicinal properties. The extracts or the isolated compounds of this plant have been found to have potent activity against various ailments. The aim of this paper is to scrutinize the available literature related to the restorative activity of the castor plant as a herbal medicine on mammalian physiology and to accumulate those scientifically valid data in a nut shell in the form of a mini review.

  17. Plasma long-chain free fatty acids predict mammalian longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Aledo, Juan Carlos; Cabré, Rosanna; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2013-11-28

    Membrane lipid composition is an important correlate of the rate of aging of animals and, therefore, the determination of their longevity. In the present work, the use of high-throughput technologies allowed us to determine the plasma lipidomic profile of 11 mammalian species ranging in maximum longevity from 3.5 to 120 years. The non-targeted approach revealed a specie-specific lipidomic profile that accurately predicts the animal longevity. The regression analysis between lipid species and longevity demonstrated that the longer the longevity of a species, the lower is its plasma long-chain free fatty acid (LC-FFA) concentrations, peroxidizability index, and lipid peroxidation-derived products content. The inverse association between longevity and LC-FFA persisted after correction for body mass and phylogenetic interdependence. These results indicate that the lipidomic signature is an optimized feature associated with animal longevity, emerging LC-FFA as a potential biomarker of longevity.

  18. Common circuit design in fly and mammalian motion vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Alexander; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Motion-sensitive neurons have long been studied in both the mammalian retina and the insect optic lobe, yet striking similarities have become obvious only recently. Detailed studies at the circuit level revealed that, in both systems, (i) motion information is extracted from primary visual information in parallel ON and OFF pathways; (ii) in each pathway, the process of elementary motion detection involves the correlation of signals with different temporal dynamics; and (iii) primary motion information from both pathways converges at the next synapse, resulting in four groups of ON-OFF neurons, selective for the four cardinal directions. Given that the last common ancestor of insects and mammals lived about 550 million years ago, this general strategy seems to be a robust solution for how to compute the direction of visual motion with neural hardware.

  19. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for treatment in tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Seop Kim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Korean J Pediatr 2011;54:241-5. &lt;a href='http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2011.54.6.241'&gt;http://dx.doi.org/10.3345/kjp.2011.54.6.241&lt;/a&gt;. PMID: 21949518 [PubMed] &lt;div style="border-top:1px solid #0092C8"&gt;&lt;/div&gt; The following article&lt;sup&gt;1&lt;/sup&gt; is being retracted as a part of the manuscript was plagiarized. Yeong-Ho Rha, MD, PhD Editor-in-Chief, Korean J Pediatr 1.Kim WS. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for treatment in tuberous sclerosis. Korean J Pediatr 2011;54:241-5.

  20. Mammalian comparative sequence analysis of the Agrp locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Kaelin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Agouti-related protein encodes a neuropeptide that stimulates food intake. Agrp expression in the brain is restricted to neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and is elevated by states of negative energy balance. The molecular mechanisms underlying Agrp regulation, however, remain poorly defined. Using a combination of transgenic and comparative sequence analysis, we have previously identified a 760 bp conserved region upstream of Agrp which contains STAT binding elements that participate in Agrp transcriptional regulation. In this study, we attempt to improve the specificity for detecting conserved elements in this region by comparing genomic sequences from 10 mammalian species. Our analysis reveals a symmetrical organization of conserved sequences upstream of Agrp, which cluster into two inverted repeat elements. Conserved sequences within these elements suggest a role for homeodomain proteins in the regulation of Agrp and provide additional targets for functional evaluation.

  1. Mammalian Merkel cells are descended from the epidermal lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kristin M.; Miesegaes, George R.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Maricich, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Merkel cells are specialized cells in the skin that are important for proper neural encoding of light touch stimuli. Conflicting evidence suggests that these cells are lineally descended from either the skin or the neural crest. To address this question, we used epidermal (Krt14Cre) and neural crest (Wnt1Cre) Cre-driver lines to conditionally delete Atoh1 specifically from the skin or neural crest lineages, respectively, of mice. Deletion of Atoh1 from the skin lineage resulted in loss of Merkel cells from all regions of the skin, while deletion from the neural crest lineage had no effect on this cell population. Thus, mammalian Merkel cells are derived from the skin lineage. PMID:19782676

  2. Bacterial deoxyribonucleoside kinases are poor suicide genes in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébrard, Claire; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Dumontet, Charles; Piskur, Jure; Jordheim, Lars Petter

    2009-11-01

    Transfer of deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) into cancer cells increases the activity of cytotoxic nucleoside analogues. It has been shown that bacterial dNKs, when introduced into Escherichia coli, sensitize this bacterium toward nucleoside analogues. We studied the possibility of using bacterial dNKs, for example deoxyadenosine kinases (dAKs), to sensitize human cancer cells to gemcitabine. Stable and transient transfections of bacterial dNKs into human cells showed that these were much less active than human and fruitfly dNKs. The fusion of dAK from Bacillus cereus to the green fluorescent protein induced a modest sensitization. Apparently, bacterial dNKs did not get properly expressed or are unstable in the mammalian cell.

  3. Genotoxic activity of caramel on Salmonella and cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y N; Chen, X R; Ding, C; Cai, Z N; Li, Q G

    1984-04-01

    The genetic activity of 2 commercial caramel preparations, manufactured either by heating the malt sugar solution directly (non-ammoniated caramel) or by heating it with ammonia (ammoniated caramel) was studied in the Salmonella mutagenicity test and UDS assay in cultured mammalian cells. The non-ammoniated caramel was found to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium TA100, while the ammoniated one was genetically active in all the tester strains used, namely TA100, TA97 and TA98. It was also demonstrated that non-ammoniated caramel was capable of inducing UDS in cultured human amnion FL cells, but for the ammoniated one, no such activity was observed. Furthermore, based on the results obtained in the DNA synthesis inhibition assay, it was suggested that the DNA synthesis inhibition seen in our experiments with the ammoniated caramel was probably not of DNA damage in origin. These data indicate that the mutagenic fractions formed during ammoniated and non-ammoniated caramelization were quite different.

  4. Rational design and evaluation of mammalian ribonuclease cytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Jo E; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian pancreatic-type ribonucleases (ptRNases) comprise an enzyme family that is remarkably well suited for therapeutic exploitation. ptRNases are robust and prodigious catalysts of RNA cleavage that can naturally access the cytosol. Instilling cytotoxic activity requires endowing them with the ability to evade a cytosolic inhibitor protein while retaining other key attributes. These efforts have informed our understanding of ptRNase-based cytotoxins, as well as the action of protein-based drugs with cytosolic targets. Here, we address the most pressing problems encountered in the design of cytotoxic ptRNases, along with potential solutions. In addition, we describe assays that can be used to evaluate a successful design in vitro, in cellulo, and in vivo. The emerging information validates the continuing development of ptRNases as chemotherapeutic agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

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    Tohru Fujiwara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+ and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin and storage (myoglobin and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis.

  6. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+) and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin) and storage (myoglobin) and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes) in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis. PMID:26557657

  7. Avian extinction and mammalian introductions on oceanic islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Tim M; Cassey, Phillip; Duncan, Richard P; Evans, Karl L; Gaston, Kevin J

    2004-09-24

    The arrival of humans on oceanic islands has precipitated a wave of extinctions among the islands' native birds. Nevertheless, the magnitude of this extinction event varies markedly between avifaunas. We show that the probability that a bird species has been extirpated from each of 220 oceanic islands is positively correlated with the number of exotic predatory mammal species established on those islands after European colonization and that the effect of these predators is greater on island endemic species. In contrast, the proportions of currently threatened species are independent of the numbers of exotic mammalian predator species, suggesting that the principal threat to island birds has changed through time as species susceptible to exotic predators have been driven extinct.

  8. Structure and permeation mechanism of a mammalian urea transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Elena J.; Cao, Yu; Enkavi, Giray; Quick, Matthias; Pan, Yaping; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Zhou, Ming (UIUC); (Columbia)

    2012-09-17

    As an adaptation to infrequent access to water, terrestrial mammals produce urine that is hyperosmotic to plasma. To prevent osmotic diuresis by the large quantity of urea generated by protein catabolism, the kidney epithelia contain facilitative urea transporters (UTs) that allow rapid equilibration between the urinary space and the hyperosmotic interstitium. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of a mammalian UT, UT-B, at a resolution of 2.36 {angstrom}. UT-B is a homotrimer and each protomer contains a urea conduction pore with a narrow selectivity filter. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the selectivity filter has two urea binding sites separated by an approximately 5.0 kcal/mol energy barrier. Functional studies showed that the rate of urea conduction in UT-B is increased by hypoosmotic stress, and that the site of osmoregulation coincides with the location of the energy barrier.

  9. Mammalian mitogenomic relationships and the root of the eutherian tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Ulfur; Adegoke, Joseph A; Bodin, Kristina; Born, Erik W; Esa, Yuzine B; Gullberg, Anette; Nilsson, Maria; Short, Roger V; Xu, Xiufeng; Janke, Axel

    2002-06-11

    The strict orthology of mitochondrial (mt) coding sequences has promoted their use in phylogenetic analyses at different levels. Here we present the results of a mitogenomic study (i.e., analysis based on the set of protein-coding genes from complete mt genomes) of 60 mammalian species. This number includes 11 new mt genomes. The sampling comprises all but one of the traditional eutherian orders. The previously unrepresented order Dermoptera (flying lemurs) fell within Primates as the sister group of Anthropoidea, making Primates paraphyletic. This relationship was strongly supported. Lipotyphla ("insectivores") split into three distinct lineages: Erinaceomorpha, Tenrecomorpha, and Soricomorpha. Erinaceomorpha was the basal eutherian lineage. Sirenia (dugong) and Macroscelidea (elephant shrew) fell within the African clade. Pholidota (pangolin) joined the Cetferungulata as the sister group of Carnivora. The analyses identified monophyletic Pinnipedia with Otariidae (sea lions, fur seals) and Odobenidae (walruses) as sister groups to the exclusion of Phocidae (true seals).

  10. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  11. Studies of copper transport in mammalian cells using copper radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camakaris, J.; Voskoboinik, I.; Brooks, H.; Greenough, M. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). Department of Genetics; Smith, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division; Mercer, J. [Deakin University, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Centre of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    1998-12-31

    The trace element copper poses a major problem for all organisms. It is essential as a number of vital enzymes require it. Copper deficiency can lead to neurological disorders, osteoporosis and weakening of arteries. However Cu is also highly toxic and homeostatic mechanisms have evolved to maintain Cu at levels which satisfy requirements but do not cause toxicity. Toxicity is mediated by the oxidative capacity of Cu and its ability to generate toxic free radicals. There are several acquired and inherited diseases due to either Cu toxicity or Cu deficiency. The study of these diseases facilitates identification of genes and proteins involved in copper homeostasis, and this in turn will provide rational therapeutic approaches. Using the copper radioisotopes {sup 64}Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 hr) and {sup 67}Cu (t1/2 = 61 hr) we have developed a number of systems for studying copper transport in mammalian cells. These include investigation of copper uptake, copper efflux and ligand blot assays for Cu-binding proteins. Our studies have focused on Menkes disease which is an inherited and usually lethal copper deficiency disorder in humans. We have demonstrated that the Menkes protein is directly involved as a copper efflux pump in mammalian cells. Using cells overexpressing the Menkes protein we have provided the first biochemical evidence that this functions as a Cu translocating (across the membrane) P-type ATPase (Voskoboinik et al., FEBS Letters, in press). These studies were carried out using purified plasma membrane vesicles. We are now carrying out structure- function studies on this protein using targeted mutations and assaying using the radiocopper vesicle assay. Recently we have commenced studies on the role of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in copper transport and relationship of this to Alzheimers disease

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of urban particulate matter in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumax-Vorzet, Audrey F; Tate, M; Walmsley, Richard; Elder, Rhod H; Povey, Andrew C

    2015-09-01

    Ambient air particulate matter (PM)-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a variety of altered cellular outcomes. In this study, three different PM samples from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), urban dust standard reference material SRM1649a and air collected in Manchester have been tested for their ability to oxidise DNA in a cell-free assay, to increase intracellular ROS levels and to induce CYP1A1 gene expression in mammalian cells. In addition, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of PM were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and alkaline comet assay, respectively. All PM samples catalysed the Fenton reaction in a cell-free assay, but only DEP resulted in the generation of ROS as measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate oxidation in mammalian cells. However, there was no evidence that increased ROS was a consequence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism via CYP1A1 induction as urban dust, the Manchester dust samples but not DEP-induced CYP1A1 expression. Urban dust was more cytotoxic in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) than the other PM samples and also induced expression of GADD45a in the GreenScreen Human Cell assay without S9 activation suggesting the presence of a direct-acting genotoxicant. Urban dust and DEP produced comparable levels of DNA damage, as assessed by the alkaline comet assay, in MEFs at higher levels than those induced by Manchester PM. In conclusion, results from the cytotoxic and genotoxic assays are not consistent with ROS production being the sole determinant of PM-induced toxicity. This suggests that the organic component can contribute significantly to this toxicity and that further work is required to better characterise the extent to which ROS and organic components contribute to PM-induced toxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society.

  13. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals. PMID:22088197

  14. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Min

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals.

  15. Mechanisms and evolutionary patterns of mammalian and avian dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Julien

    Full Text Available As a result of sex chromosome differentiation from ancestral autosomes, male mammalian cells only contain one X chromosome. It has long been hypothesized that X-linked gene expression levels have become doubled in males to restore the original transcriptional output, and that the resulting X overexpression in females then drove the evolution of X inactivation (XCI. However, this model has never been directly tested and patterns and mechanisms of dosage compensation across different mammals and birds generally remain little understood. Here we trace the evolution of dosage compensation using extensive transcriptome data from males and females representing all major mammalian lineages and birds. Our analyses suggest that the X has become globally upregulated in marsupials, whereas we do not detect a global upregulation of this chromosome in placental mammals. However, we find that a subset of autosomal genes interacting with X-linked genes have become downregulated in placentals upon the emergence of sex chromosomes. Thus, different driving forces may underlie the evolution of XCI and the highly efficient equilibration of X expression levels between the sexes observed for both of these lineages. In the egg-laying monotremes and birds, which have partially homologous sex chromosome systems, partial upregulation of the X (Z in birds evolved but is largely restricted to the heterogametic sex, which provides an explanation for the partially sex-biased X (Z expression and lack of global inactivation mechanisms in these lineages. Our findings suggest that dosage reductions imposed by sex chromosome differentiation events in amniotes were resolved in strikingly different ways.

  16. Transcriptomic insights into the genetic basis of mammalian limb diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Jennifer A; Rivas-Astroza, Marcelo; Deng, Jenny; Dowling, Anna; Oboikovitz, Paige; Cao, Xiaoyi; Behringer, Richard R; Cretekos, Chris J; Rasweiler, John J; Zhong, Sheng; Sears, Karen E

    2017-03-23

    From bat wings to whale flippers, limb diversification has been crucial to the evolutionary success of mammals. We performed the first transcriptome-wide study of limb development in multiple species to explore the hypothesis that mammalian limb diversification has proceeded through the differential expression of conserved shared genes, rather than by major changes to limb patterning. Specifically, we investigated the manner in which the expression of shared genes has evolved within and among mammalian species. We assembled and compared transcriptomes of bat, mouse, opossum, and pig fore- and hind limbs at the ridge, bud, and paddle stages of development. Results suggest that gene expression patterns exhibit larger variation among species during later than earlier stages of limb development, while within species results are more mixed. Consistent with the former, results also suggest that genes expressed at later developmental stages tend to have a younger evolutionary age than genes expressed at earlier stages. A suite of key limb-patterning genes was identified as being differentially expressed among the homologous limbs of all species. However, only a small subset of shared genes is differentially expressed in the fore- and hind limbs of all examined species. Similarly, a small subset of shared genes is differentially expressed within the fore- and hind limb of a single species and among the forelimbs of different species. Taken together, results of this study do not support the existence of a phylotypic period of limb development ending at chondrogenesis, but do support the hypothesis that the hierarchical nature of development translates into increasing variation among species as development progresses.

  17. Prokaryotic arsenate reductase enhances arsenate resistance in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tao, Xuanyu; Wu, Gaofeng; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known heavy metal toxicant in the environment. Bioremediation of heavy metals has been proposed as a low-cost and eco-friendly method. This article described some of recent patents on transgenic plants with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Further, to test whether genetic modification of mammalian cells could render higher arsenic resistance, a prokaryotic arsenic reductase gene arsC was transfected into human liver cancer cell HepG2. In the stably transfected cells, the expression level of arsC gene was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that arsC was expressed in HepG2 cells and the expression was upregulated by 3 folds upon arsenate induction. To further test whether arsC has function in HepG2 cells, the viability of HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells exposed to arsenite or arsenate was compared to that of HepG2-pCI cells without arsC gene. The results indicated that arsC increased the viability of HepG2 cells by 25% in arsenate, but not in arsenite. And the test of reducing ability of stably transfected cells revealed that the concentration of accumulated trivalent arsenic increased by 25% in HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells. To determine the intracellular localization of ArsC, a fusion vector with fluorescent marker pEGFP-N1-ArsC was constructed and transfected into.HepG2. Laser confocal microscopy showed that EGFP-ArsC fusion protein was distributed throughout the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that prokaryotic arsenic resistant gene arsC integrated successfully into HepG2 genome and enhanced arsenate resistance of HepG2, which brought new insights of arsenic detoxification in mammalian cells.

  18. Systematic transfer of prokaryotic sensors and circuits to mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Brynne C; Siciliano, Velia; Ghodasara, Amar; Wroblewska, Liliana; Clancy, Kevin; Trefzer, Axel C; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Weiss, Ron; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-12-19

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >10(5) members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics.

  19. Composition and evolution of the vertebrate and mammalian selenoproteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mariotti

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element in mammals due to its presence in proteins in the form of selenocysteine (Sec. Human genome codes for 25 Sec-containing protein genes, and mouse and rat genomes for 24.We characterized the selenoproteomes of 44 sequenced vertebrates by applying gene prediction and phylogenetic reconstruction methods, supplemented with the analyses of gene structures, alternative splicing isoforms, untranslated regions, SECIS elements, and pseudogenes. In total, we detected 45 selenoprotein subfamilies. 28 of them were found in mammals, and 41 in bony fishes. We define the ancestral vertebrate (28 proteins and mammalian (25 proteins selenoproteomes, and describe how they evolved along lineages through gene duplication (20 events, gene loss (10 events and replacement of Sec with cysteine (12 events. We show that an intronless selenophosphate synthetase 2 gene evolved in early mammals and replaced functionally the original multiexon gene in placental mammals, whereas both genes remain in marsupials. Mammalian thioredoxin reductase 1 and thioredoxin-glutathione reductase evolved from an ancestral glutaredoxin-domain containing enzyme, still present in fish. Selenoprotein V and GPx6 evolved specifically in placental mammals from duplications of SelW and GPx3, respectively, and GPx6 lost Sec several times independently. Bony fishes were characterized by duplications of several selenoprotein families (GPx1, GPx3, GPx4, Dio3, MsrB1, SelJ, SelO, SelT, SelU1, and SelW2. Finally, we report identification of new isoforms for several selenoproteins and describe unusually conserved selenoprotein pseudogenes.This analysis represents the first comprehensive survey of the vertebrate and mammal selenoproteomes, and depicts their evolution along lineages. It also provides a wealth of information on these selenoproteins and their forms.

  20. The calming effect of maternal carrying in different mammalian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eEsposito

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Attachment theory postulates that mothers and their infants possess some basic physiological mechanisms that favour their dyadic interaction and bonding. Many studies have focused on the maternal physiological mechanisms that promote attachment (e.g. mothers’ automatic responses to infant faces and/or cries, and relatively less have examined infant physiology. Thus, the physiological mechanisms regulating infant bonding behaviors remain largely undefined. This review elucidates some of the neurobiological mechanisms governing social bonding and cooperation in humans by focusing on maternal carrying and its beneficial effect on mother-infant interaction in mammalian species (e.g. in humans, big cats and rodents. These studies show that infants have a specific calming response to maternal carrying. A human infant carried by his/ her walking mother exhibits a rapid heart rate decrease, and immediately stops voluntary movement and crying compared to when he/ she is held in a sitting position. Furthermore, strikingly similar responses were identified in mouse rodents, who exhibit immobility, diminished ultra-sonic vocalizations and heart rate. In general, the studies described in the current review demonstrate the calming effect of maternal carrying to be comprised of a complex set of behavioral and physiological components, each of which has a specific postnatal time window and is orchestrated in a well-matched manner with the maturation of the infants. Such reactions could have been evolutionarily adaptive in mammalian mother-infant interactions. The findings have implications for parenting practices in developmentally normal populations. In addition, we propose that infants’ physiological response may be useful in clinical assessments as we discuss possible implications on early screening for child psychopathology (e.g. Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Perinatal Brain Disorders.

  1. Problems of allometric scaling analysis: examples from mammalian reproductive biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert D; Genoud, Michel; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K

    2005-05-01

    Biological scaling analyses employing the widely used bivariate allometric model are beset by at least four interacting problems: (1) choice of an appropriate best-fit line with due attention to the influence of outliers; (2) objective recognition of divergent subsets in the data (allometric grades); (3) potential restrictions on statistical independence resulting from phylogenetic inertia; and (4) the need for extreme caution in inferring causation from correlation. A new non-parametric line-fitting technique has been developed that eliminates requirements for normality of distribution, greatly reduces the influence of outliers and permits objective recognition of grade shifts in substantial datasets. This technique is applied in scaling analyses of mammalian gestation periods and of neonatal body mass in primates. These analyses feed into a re-examination, conducted with partial correlation analysis, of the maternal energy hypothesis relating to mammalian brain evolution, which suggests links between body size and brain size in neonates and adults, gestation period and basal metabolic rate. Much has been made of the potential problem of phylogenetic inertia as a confounding factor in scaling analyses. However, this problem may be less severe than suspected earlier because nested analyses of variance conducted on residual variation (rather than on raw values) reveals that there is considerable variance at low taxonomic levels. In fact, limited divergence in body size between closely related species is one of the prime examples of phylogenetic inertia. One common approach to eliminating perceived problems of phylogenetic inertia in allometric analyses has been calculation of 'independent contrast values'. It is demonstrated that the reasoning behind this approach is flawed in several ways. Calculation of contrast values for closely related species of similar body size is, in fact, highly questionable, particularly when there are major deviations from the best

  2. Functional divergence and evolutionary turnover in mammalian phosphoproteomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Freschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation is a key mechanism to regulate protein functions. However, the contribution of this protein modification to species divergence is still largely unknown. Here, we studied the evolution of mammalian phosphoregulation by comparing the human and mouse phosphoproteomes. We found that 84% of the positions that are phosphorylated in one species or the other are conserved at the residue level. Twenty percent of these conserved sites are phosphorylated in both species. This proportion is 2.5 times more than expected by chance alone, suggesting that purifying selection is preserving phosphoregulation. However, we show that the majority of the sites that are conserved at the residue level are differentially phosphorylated between species. These sites likely result from false-negative identifications due to incomplete experimental coverage, false-positive identifications and non-functional sites. In addition, our results suggest that at least 5% of them are likely to be true differentially phosphorylated sites and may thus contribute to the divergence in phosphorylation networks between mouse and humans and this, despite residue conservation between orthologous proteins. We also showed that evolutionary turnover of phosphosites at adjacent positions (in a distance range of up to 40 amino acids in human or mouse leads to an over estimation of the divergence in phosphoregulation between these two species. These sites tend to be phosphorylated by the same kinases, supporting the hypothesis that they are functionally redundant. Our results support the hypothesis that the evolutionary turnover of phosphorylation sites contributes to the divergence in phosphorylation profiles while preserving phosphoregulation. Overall, our study provides advanced analyses of mammalian phosphoproteomes and a framework for the study of their contribution to phenotypic evolution.

  3. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiau, Timothy H-C; Diaconu, Claudiu; Myers, Connie A; Lee, Jongwoo; Cepko, Constance L; Corbo, Joseph C

    2007-07-25

    The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs) mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  4. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H-C Hsiau

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  5. Simulating the mammalian blastocyst--molecular and mechanical interactions pattern the embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Krupinski

    2011-05-01

    mechanical simulations with genetic networks to explain mammalian embryogenesis. Such a framework provides the means to test hypotheses in a controlled in silico environment.

  6. Global parameter search reveals design principles of the mammalian circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westermark Pål O

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtually all living organisms have evolved a circadian (~24 hour clock that controls physiological and behavioural processes with exquisite precision throughout the day/night cycle. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, which generates these ~24 h rhythms in mammals, consists of several thousand neurons. Each neuron contains a gene-regulatory network generating molecular oscillations, and the individual neuron oscillations are synchronised by intercellular coupling, presumably via neurotransmitters. Although this basic mechanism is currently accepted and has been recapitulated in mathematical models, several fundamental questions about the design principles of the SCN remain little understood. For example, a remarkable property of the SCN is that the phase of the SCN rhythm resets rapidly after a 'jet lag' type experiment, i.e. when the light/dark (LD cycle is abruptly advanced or delayed by several hours. Results Here, we describe an extensive parameter optimization of a previously constructed simplified model of the SCN in order to further understand its design principles. By examining the top 50 solutions from the parameter optimization, we show that the neurotransmitters' role in generating the molecular circadian rhythms is extremely important. In addition, we show that when a neurotransmitter drives the rhythm of a system of coupled damped oscillators, it exhibits very robust synchronization and is much more easily entrained to light/dark cycles. We were also able to recreate in our simulations the fast rhythm resetting seen after a 'jet lag' type experiment. Conclusion Our work shows that a careful exploration of parameter space for even an extremely simplified model of the mammalian clock can reveal unexpected behaviours and non-trivial predictions. Our results suggest that the neurotransmitter feedback loop plays a crucial role in the robustness and phase resetting properties of the mammalian clock, even at the single

  7. Rescue the failed half-ZFN by a sensitive mammalian cell-based luciferase reporter system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifeng Zhang

    Full Text Available ZFN technology is a powerful research tool and has been used for genome editing in cells lines, animals and plants. The generation of functional ZFNs for particular targets in mammalian genome is still challenging for an average research group. The modular-assembly method is relatively fast, easy-to-practice but has a high failure rate. Some recent studies suggested that a ZFP with low binding activity might be able to form a working ZFN pair with another binding active half-ZFP. In order to unveil the potential ZFP candidates among those with low binding activities, this paper established a highly sensitive mammalian cell-based transcriptional reporter system to assess the DNA binding activities of ZFPs by inserting multiple copies of ZFN target sequence fragment (TSF of an interested gene (e. g., hPGRN or hVEGF. Our results showed that this system increased the screening sensitivity up to 50-fold and markedly amplified the differences in the binding activities between different ZFPs. We also found that the targeted chromosomal gene repair efficiency of each hPGRN or hVEGF ZFN pair was in proportion with the combination of the binding activities of the ZFL (Left zinc finger and ZFR (Right zinc finger. A hPGRN ZFR with low binding ability was able to form a biological active ZFN if combined with a hPGRN ZFL with relatively high binding ability. Lastly, site-specific genome editing by hPGRN ZFNs generated by this system was confirmed by sequencing, and the PGRN knock-out cell line showed significantly decreased cell growth compared with the control. Our system will provide a valuable tool for further optimizing the nucleases with regard to specificity and cytotoxicity.

  8. M-Type Pyruvate Kinase Isoforms and Lactate Dehydrogenase A in the Mammalian Retina: Metabolic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Robert J; Wood, John P M; Han, Guoge; Kittipassorn, Thaksaon; Peet, Daniel J; Chidlow, Glyn

    2016-01-01

    Like cancer cells, photoreceptor cells produce lactate aerobically, requiring lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A). Cancer cells also use glycolytic intermediates for biosynthesis. The molecular switch controlling glycolytic flow is thought to be an isoenzyme of pyruvate kinase (PKM2). Here, we determined the expression and localization of PKM2 and LDH-A in mammalian retina and make comparisons with the brain. Single- and double-labeling immunohistochemistry for PKM2, pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1), and LDH-A were performed using retinal sections from C57BL/6 mice, Sprague-Dawley rats, rabbits, marmosets, and humans. Pyruvate kinase M1 and PKM2 mRNA and protein expression levels were quantified in rodent retina and brain by using qPCR and immunoblotting. The quaternary forms of PKM2 in rat retina were also determined. Pyruvate kinase M2 was present in some glial cells and rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina of all species but was exclusively localized to glia in the brain. Pyruvate kinase M1 was confined to neurons in the retina and brain. Lactate dehydrogenase A was principally found in photoreceptors and inner portion of the avascular rabbit retina. Western blotting and qPCR confirmed high levels of PKM2 and LDH-A in the retina. There was a 6- to 9-fold greater expression of PKM2 mRNA in the rodent retina than in the brain. Both the dimeric (inactive, biosynthesis-driving form) and the active tetrameric (glycolytic-driving) forms of PKM2 were present in retina but not in brain. Mammalian photoreceptors contain dimeric and tetrameric PKM2 and LDH-A. This is consistent with the ability to switch between energy production and biosynthesis like a proliferating tissue, possibly due to demands of opsin synthesis.

  9. Nitrite as a physiological source of nitric oxide and a signalling molecule in the regulation of the cardiovascular system in both mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Daniela; Parisella, Maria L

    2010-06-01

    The circulating anion nitrite (NO(2)(-)) has long been considered an inert oxidative metabolite of nitric oxide (NO). Over the last decade several studies have identified inorganic nitrite as a key player in many biological processes because it acts both as a principal storage source of NO and as a signalling molecule distinct from its link with NO. This new field of research involves the exploration of the molecular, biochemical, and physiological activities of nitrite under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological states. As a signalling molecule, nitrite is involved in various biological responses, including hypoxic vasodilation, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, cytoprotection following ischemia/reperfusion and regulation of protein and gene expression. As a stored form of NO, since the cardiovascular system is under an important NO-mediated autocrine-paracrine control, intensive investigations involve nitrite effects on vessel and heart regulation. Recently, some authors have reported that nitrite, through both direct and indirect pathways, plays a fundamental role in vascular homeostasis and cardiac function not only in mammals but also in non-mammalian species (fish, amphibians). This review highlights some patents and the importance of the signalling properties of nitrite anion in a comparative vertebrate context for providing significant insights on "ancestral" functions of the nitrite-NO system, which may facilitate its potential use as a therapeutic agent of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Gelation, oxygen permeability, and mechanical properties of mammalian and fish gelatin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avena-Bustillos, R J; Chiou, B; Olsen, C W; Bechtel, P J; Olson, D A; McHugh, T H

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the gelation, thermal, mechanical, and oxygen permeability properties of different mammalian, warm- and cold-water fish gelatin solutions and films. Mammalian gelatin solutions had the highest gel set temperatures, followed by warm-water fish and then cold-water fish gelatin solutions. These differences were related to concentrations of imino acids present in each gelatin, with mammalian gelatin having the highest and cold-water fish gelatin having the lowest concentrations. Mammalian and warm-water fish gelatin films contained helical structures, whereas cold-water fish gelatin films were amorphous. This was due to the films being dried at room temperature (23 °C), which was below or near the gelation temperatures of mammalian and warm-water fish gelatin solutions and well above the gelation temperature of cold-water fish gelatin solutions. Tensile strength, percent elongation, and puncture deformation were highest in mammalian gelatin films, followed by warm-water fish gelatin film and then by cold-water fish gelatin films. Oxygen permeability values of cold-water fish gelatin films were significantly lower than those for mammalian gelatin films. These differences were most likely due to higher moisture sorption in mammalian gelatin films, leading to higher oxygen diffusivity. Journal of Food Science © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  11. Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan-Yaun

    2009-01-27

    “Molecular dissection of the roles of the SOD genes in mammalian response to low dose irradiation " was started on 09/01/03 and ended on 08/31/07. The primary objective of the project was to carry out mechanistic studies of the roles of the anti-oxidant SOD genes in mammalian cellular response to low dose ionizing radiation.

  12. Dual-function vector for protein expression in both mammalian cells and Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Grunnet, M; Angelo, K

    2002-01-01

    and oocytes. To address this problem, we have constructed a plasmid vector, pXOOM, that can function as a template for expression in both oocytes and mammalian cells. By including all the necessary RNA stability elements for oocyte expression in a standard mammalian expression vector, we have obtained a dual-function...... vector capable of supporting protein production in both Xenopus oocytes and CHO-K1 cells at an expression level equivalent to the levels obtained with vectors optimized for either oocyte or mammalian expression. Our functional studies have been performed with hERGI, KCNQ4, and Kv1.3 potassium channels....... will often engage both oocytes and mammalian cells. Efficient expression of a protein in both systems have thus far only been possible by subcloning the cDNA into two different vectors because several different molecular requirements should be fulfilled to obtain a high protein level in both mammalian cells...

  13. A carbon dioxide stripping model for mammalian cell culture in manufacturing scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zizhuo; Lewis, Amanda M; Borys, Michael C; Li, Zheng Jian

    2017-06-01

    Control of carbon dioxide within the optimum range is important in mammalian bioprocesses at the manufacturing scale in order to ensure robust cell growth, high protein yields, and consistent quality attributes. The majority of bioprocess development work is done in laboratory bioreactors, in which carbon dioxide levels are more easily controlled. Some challenges in carbon dioxide control can present themselves when cell culture processes are scaled up, because carbon dioxide accumulation is a common feature due to longer gas-residence time of mammalian cell culture in large scale bioreactors. A carbon dioxide stripping model can be used to better understand and optimize parameters that are critical to cell culture processes at the manufacturing scale. The prevailing carbon dioxide stripping models in literature depend on mass transfer coefficients and were applicable to cell culture processes with low cell density or at stationary/cell death phase. However, it was reported that gas bubbles are saturated with carbon dioxide before leaving the culture, which makes carbon dioxide stripping no longer depend on a mass transfer coefficient in the new generation cell culture processes characterized by longer exponential growth phase, higher peak viable cell densities, and higher specific production rate. Here, we present a new carbon dioxide stripping model for manufacturing scale bioreactors, which is independent of carbon dioxide mass transfer coefficient, but takes into account the gas-residence time and gas CO2 saturation time. The model was verified by CHO cell culture processes with different peak viable cell densities (7 to 12 × 106  cells mL-1 ) for two products in 5,000-L and 25,000-L bioreactors. The model was also applied to a next generation cell culture process to optimize cell culture conditions and reduce carbon dioxide levels at manufacturing scale. The model provides a useful tool to understand and better control cell culture carbon dioxide

  14. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is "mammalian-specific genomic functions", a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of "mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons", based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes.

  15. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    KANEKO-ISHINO, Tomoko; ISHINO, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is “mammalian-specific genomic functions”, a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of “mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons”, based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes. PMID:26666304

  16. Protein self-assembly following in situ expression in artificial and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migas, Urszula M; Quinn, Michelle K; McManus, Jennifer J

    2017-05-22

    The self-assembly of proteins has been widely studied in controlled in vitro conditions, and more recently in biological environments. The self-assembly of proteins in biology can be a feature of the pathogenesis of protein condensation disease, or can occur during normal physiological function, for example during the formation of intracellular non-membrane bound organelles. To determine the mechanisms for the assembly process fully, controlled in vitro experiments using purified protein solutions are often required. However, making direct connections between insights gathered from controlled experiments and those in complex biological environments remains a challenge. Using the P23T mutant of human γD-crystallin, a protein associated with congenital cataract, we have demonstrated that the equilibrium solubility boundary and solution behavior measured using phase diagrams of purified protein solutions is consistent with the assembly of the protein expressed in cell-free expression medium in artificial cells (without fluorescent labelling) and condensates formed in mammalian cells, thereby directly connecting in vitro measurements with those performed under physiological conditions.

  17. The Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR in Insulin Signaling

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    Mee-Sup Yoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that controls a wide spectrum of cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes known as mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2, which are characterized by the presence of raptor and rictor, respectively. mTOR controls insulin signaling by regulating several downstream components such as growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10, insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1, F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 8 (Fbw8, and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-IR/IR. In addition, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate each other through a feedback loop to control cell growth. This review outlines the current understanding of mTOR regulation in insulin signaling in the context of whole body metabolism.

  18. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  19. Tick-induced allergies: mammalian meat allergy, tick anaphylaxis and their significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nunen, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Serious tick-induced allergies comprise mammalian meat allergy following tick bites and tick anaphylaxis. Mammalian meat allergy is an emergent allergy, increasingly prevalent in tick-endemic areas of Australia and the United States, occurring worldwide where ticks are endemic. Sensitisation to galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal) has been shown to be the mechanism of allergic reaction in mammalian meat allergy following tick bite. Whilst other carbohydrate allergens have been identified, this allergen is unique amongst carbohydrate food allergens in provoking anaphylaxis. Treatment of mammalian meat anaphylaxis involves avoidance of mammalian meat and mammalian derived products in those who also react to gelatine and mammalian milks. Before initiating treatment with certain therapeutic agents (e.g., cetuximab, gelatine-containing substances), a careful assessment of the risk of anaphylaxis, including serological analysis for α-Gal specific-IgE, should be undertaken in any individual who works, lives, volunteers or recreates in a tick endemic area. Prevention of tick bites may ameliorate mammalian meat allergy. Tick anaphylaxis is rare in countries other than Australia. Tick anaphylaxis is secondarily preventable by prevention and appropriate management of tick bites. Analysis of tick removal techniques in tick anaphylaxis sufferers offers insights into primary prevention of both tick and mammalian meat anaphylaxis. Recognition of the association between mammalian meat allergy and tick bites has established a novel cause and effect relationship between an environmental exposure and subsequent development of a food allergy, directing us towards examining environmental exposures as provoking factors pivotal to the development of other food allergies and refocusing our attention upon causation of allergy in general.

  20. The footprint of metabolism in the organization of mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berná Luisa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present five evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed to explain the great variability of the genomic GC content among and within genomes: the mutational bias, the biased gene conversion, the DNA breakpoints distribution, the thermal stability and the metabolic rate. Several studies carried out on bacteria and teleostean fish pointed towards the critical role played by the environment on the metabolic rate in shaping the base composition of genomes. In mammals the debate is still open, and evidences have been produced in favor of each evolutionary hypothesis. Human genes were assigned to three large functional categories (as well as to the corresponding functional classes according to the KOG database: (i information storage and processing, (ii cellular processes and signaling, and (iii metabolism. The classification was extended to the organisms so far analyzed performing a reciprocal Blastp and selecting the best reciprocal hit. The base composition was calculated for each sequence of the whole CDS dataset. Results The GC3 level of the above functional categories was increasing from (i to (iii. This specific compositional pattern was found, as footprint, in all mammalian genomes, but not in frog and lizard ones. Comparative analysis of human versus both frog and lizard functional categories showed that genes involved in the metabolic processes underwent the highest GC3 increment. Analyzing the KOG functional classes of genes, again a well defined intra-genomic pattern was found in all mammals. Not only genes of metabolic pathways, but also genes involved in chromatin structure and dynamics, transcription, signal transduction mechanisms and cytoskeleton, showed an average GC3 level higher than that of the whole genome. In the case of the human genome, the genes of the aforementioned functional categories showed a high probability to be associated with the chromosomal bands. Conclusions In the light of different

  1. The footprint of metabolism in the organization of mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berná, Luisa; Chaurasia, Ankita; Angelini, Claudia; Federico, Concetta; Saccone, Salvatore; D'Onofrio, Giuseppe

    2012-05-08

    At present five evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed to explain the great variability of the genomic GC content among and within genomes: the mutational bias, the biased gene conversion, the DNA breakpoints distribution, the thermal stability and the metabolic rate. Several studies carried out on bacteria and teleostean fish pointed towards the critical role played by the environment on the metabolic rate in shaping the base composition of genomes. In mammals the debate is still open, and evidences have been produced in favor of each evolutionary hypothesis. Human genes were assigned to three large functional categories (as well as to the corresponding functional classes) according to the KOG database: (i) information storage and processing, (ii) cellular processes and signaling, and (iii) metabolism. The classification was extended to the organisms so far analyzed performing a reciprocal Blastp and selecting the best reciprocal hit. The base composition was calculated for each sequence of the whole CDS dataset. The GC3 level of the above functional categories was increasing from (i) to (iii). This specific compositional pattern was found, as footprint, in all mammalian genomes, but not in frog and lizard ones. Comparative analysis of human versus both frog and lizard functional categories showed that genes involved in the metabolic processes underwent the highest GC3 increment. Analyzing the KOG functional classes of genes, again a well defined intra-genomic pattern was found in all mammals. Not only genes of metabolic pathways, but also genes involved in chromatin structure and dynamics, transcription, signal transduction mechanisms and cytoskeleton, showed an average GC3 level higher than that of the whole genome. In the case of the human genome, the genes of the aforementioned functional categories showed a high probability to be associated with the chromosomal bands. In the light of different evolutionary hypotheses proposed so far, and contributing with

  2. Evolutionary patterns of RNA-based duplication in non-mammalian chordates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    Full Text Available The role of RNA-based duplication, or retroposition, in the evolution of new gene functions in mammals, plants, and Drosophila has been widely reported. However, little is known about RNA-based duplication in non-mammalian chordates. In this study, we screened ten non-mammalian chordate genomes for retrocopies and investigated their evolutionary patterns. We identified numerous retrocopies in these species. Examination of the age distribution of these retrocopies revealed no burst of young retrocopies in ancient chordate species. Upon comparing these non-mammalian chordate species to the mammalian species, we observed that a larger fraction of the non-mammalian retrocopies was under strong evolutionary constraints than mammalian retrocopies are, as evidenced by signals of purifying selection and expression profiles. For the Western clawed frog, Medaka, and Sea squirt, many retrogenes have evolved gonad and brain expression patterns, similar to what was observed in human. Testing of retrogene movement in the Medaka genome, where the nascent sex chrosomes have been well assembled, did not reveal any significant gene movement. Taken together, our analyses demonstrate that RNA-based duplication generates many functional genes and can make a significant contribution to the evolution of non-mammalian genomes.

  3. Cell Lineage Analysis of the Mammalian Female Germline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Judith; Jinich, Adrian; Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Nevo, Nava; Marx, Zipora; Horovitz, Inna; Wasserstrom, Adam; Mayo, Avi; Shur, Irena; Benayahu, Dafna; Skorecki, Karl; Segal, Eran; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote). We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development. PMID:22383887

  4. Global priorities for conservation across multiple dimensions of mammalian diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Fernanda T; Graham, Catherine H; Costa, Gabriel C; Hedges, S Blair; Penone, Caterina; Radeloff, Volker C; Rondinini, Carlo; Loyola, Rafael; Davidson, Ana D

    2017-07-18

    Conservation priorities that are based on species distribution, endemism, and vulnerability may underrepresent biologically unique species as well as their functional roles and evolutionary histories. To ensure that priorities are biologically comprehensive, multiple dimensions of diversity must be considered. Further, understanding how the different dimensions relate to one another spatially is important for conservation prioritization, but the relationship remains poorly understood. Here, we use spatial conservation planning to (i) identify and compare priority regions for global mammal conservation across three key dimensions of biodiversity-taxonomic, phylogenetic, and traits-and (ii) determine the overlap of these regions with the locations of threatened species and existing protected areas. We show that priority areas for mammal conservation exhibit low overlap across the three dimensions, highlighting the need for an integrative approach for biodiversity conservation. Additionally, currently protected areas poorly represent the three dimensions of mammalian biodiversity. We identify areas of high conservation priority among and across the dimensions that should receive special attention for expanding the global protected area network. These high-priority areas, combined with areas of high priority for other taxonomic groups and with social, economic, and political considerations, provide a biological foundation for future conservation planning efforts.

  5. Stable Isotope Tracer Analysis in Isolated Mitochondria from Mammalian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon-Pierre Gravel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are a focal point in metabolism, given that they play fundamental roles in catabolic, as well as anabolic reactions. Alterations in mitochondrial functions are often studied in whole cells, and metabolomics experiments using 13C-labeled substrates, coupled with mass isotopomer distribution analyses, represent a powerful approach to study global changes in cellular metabolic activities. However, little is known regarding the assessment of metabolic activities in isolated mitochondria using this technology. Studies on isolated mitochondria permit the evaluation of whether changes in cellular metabolic activities are due to modifications in the intrinsic properties of the mitochondria. Here, we present a streamlined approach to accurately determine 13C, as well as 12C enrichments in isolated mitochondria from mammalian tissues or cultured cells by GC/MS. We demonstrate the relevance of this experimental approach by assessing the effects of drugs perturbing mitochondrial functions on the mass isotopomer enrichment of metabolic intermediates. Furthermore, we investigate 13C and 12C enrichments in mitochondria isolated from cancer cells given the emerging role of metabolic alterations in supporting tumor growth. This original method will provide a very sensitive tool to perform metabolomics studies on isolated mitochondria.

  6. Mammalian fauna of the Temessos National Park, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna De Marinis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Park of Termessos, Southern Turkey, is one of the Turkey’s biggest national park not only with its archeological richness but also with its great natural wild life. We provided a checklist of the mammalian fauna of the park on the base of direct observations, interviews and a comparative analysis of the available literature. Sixteen species have been reported in the park. Hedgehogs, hares, porcupines and Persian squirrels and, among flying mammals, Egyptian rousette and Mouse-eared bat have been recorded. Carnivores are represented by Golden jackal, Wolf, Red fox, Stone marten, Badger, Otter and Wild cat. Very recently (2005 the presence of the Caracal in the park has been confirmed, whereas no signs of the presence of the Lynx were detected. The last Anatolian leopards seems to have definitively disappeared from the region. The occurrence in the area of striped hyaenas and brown bears is documented up to a few decades ago. The Park is regarded as the only geographical range in the whole world where the European or Common fallow deer has persisted as a native form. Other ungulates too, such as Wild goat and Wild boar are dispersed within the boundary of the park. Management implications are discussed.

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  9. The effect of ascetic acid on mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariana, Oana C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Antoinette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanders, Claire K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burnett, Kassidy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freyer, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mourant, Judith R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Effects of the contrast agent, acetic acid, on mammalian cells are studied using light scattering measurements, viability and fluorescence pH assays. Results depend on whether cells are in PBS or are live and metabolizing. Acetic acid is a contrast agent used to aid the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Typically 3% or 5% acetic acid is applied to the swface of the cervix and areas of the tissue that turn 'acetowhite' are considered more likely to be precancerous. The mechanism of action of acetic acid has never been understood in detail, although there are several hypotheses. One is that a decrease in pH causes cytokeratins in epithelial cells to polymerize. We will present data demonstrating that this is not the sole mechanism of acetowhitening. Another hypothesis is that a decrease in pH in the nucleus causes deacetylation of the histones which in turn results in a dense chromatin structure. Relevant to this hypothesis we have measured the internal pH of cells. Additional goals of this work are to understand what physical changes result in acetowhitening, to understand why there is variation in how cells respond to acetic acid, and to investigate how acetowhitening affects the light scatter properties measured by a fiber-optic probe we have developed for cervical cancer diagnostics.

  10. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system, the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes.

  11. Mammalian mesocarnivore visitation at tortoise burrows in a wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Mickey; Smith, Amanda L.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Delaney, David F.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Briggs, Jessica R.; Fleckenstein, Leo J.; Tennant, Laura A.; Puffer, Shellie R.; Walde, Andrew D.; Arundel, Terry; Price, Steven J.; Todd, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    There is little information on predator–prey interactions in wind energy landscapes in North America, especially among terrestrial vertebrates. Here, we evaluated how proximity to roads and wind turbines affect mesocarnivore visitation with desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and their burrows in a wind energy landscape. In 2013, we placed motion-sensor cameras facing the entrances of 46 active desert tortoise burrows in a 5.2-km2 wind energy facility near Palm Springs, California, USA. Cameras recorded images of 35 species of reptiles, mammals, and birds. Counts for 4 species of mesocarnivores at desert tortoise burrows increased closer to dirt roads, and decreased closer to wind turbines. Our results suggest that anthropogenic infrastructure associated with wind energy facilities could influence the general behavior of mammalian predators and their prey. Further investigation of proximate mechanisms that underlie road and wind turbine effects (i.e., ground vibrations, sound emission, and traffic volume) and on wind energy facility spatial designs (i.e., road and wind turbine configuration) could prove useful for better understanding wildlife responses to wind energy development. © 2017 The Wildlife Society.

  12. Structural characterization of mammalian bHLH-PAS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dalei; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2017-04-01

    The mammalian basic helix-loop-helix-PER-ARNT-SIM (bHLH-PAS) transcription factors share common architectural features that include a bHLH DNA-binding domain and tandemly positioned PAS domains. The sixteen members of this family include the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α), ARNT (also known as HIF-1β), CLOCK and BMAL1. Most bHLH-PAS proteins have been genetically linked to variety of diseases in humans, including cancers, metabolic syndromes and psychiatric conditions. To function as transcription factors, the bHLH-PAS proteins must form heterodimeric complexes. Recent crystallographic studies of HIF-α-ARNT and CLOCK-BMAL1 complexes have unveiled the organization of their multi-domain bHLH-PAS-A-PAS-B segments, revealing how these architectures can give rise to unique patterns of heterodimerization. As our structural understanding becomes better integrated with ligand-discovery and target gene identification, a more comprehensive picture of their architectural and functional properties will emerge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Electromechanical role of fixed charge in the mammalian tectorial membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Page, Scott; Farrahi, Shirin; Sellon, Jonathan B.; Freeman, Dennis M.

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian tectorial membrane (TM) is thought to play a purely mechanical role in stimulating cochlear sensory receptors, but the presence of glycosaminoglycans and associated fixed charge groups suggests that electromechanical properties also may be important. Here, we measure the fixed charge concentration of the TM (-7.1 mmol/L at physiological pH), and show that this concentration of fixed charge is sufficient to generate electrokinetic motions of the TM. Electrically-evoked TM motions were nanometer-scaled (5-200 nm), increased linearly with electric field amplitude (0.05-20 kV/m) and decreased with frequency (1-1000 Hz). This frequency dependence can be understood in terms of the interplay between electrophoresis and electro-osmosis. Although the electric fields applied in this study were large, they are comparable in amplitude to the electric fields generated near hair cell transduction channels. TM electrokinetics could thus play a role in the deflection of cochlear hair bundles in vivo.

  14. Quantitative determination of isopentenyl diphosphate in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Huaxiang; Kuder, Craig H; Wasko, Brian M; Hohl, Raymond J

    2013-02-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), an intermediate of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP), has several important biological functions, yet a method to determine its basal level has not been described. Here, we describe a nonradioactive and sensitive analytical method to isolate and specifically quantify IPP from cultured mammalian cells. This method applies an enzymatic coupling reaction to determine intracellular concentrations of IPP. In this reaction, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase catalyzes the formation of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) from IPP and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Subsequently, geranylgeranyl protein transferase I conjugates GGPP with a fluorescently labeled peptide. The geranylgeranylated peptide can be quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector, thereby allowing for IPP quantification. The detection lower limit of the fluorescence-labeled geranylgeranyl peptide is approximately 5 pg (~0.017 pmol). This method was used to examine the effects of IBP inhibitors such as lovastatin and zoledronate on intracellular levels of IPP. Inhibition of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) by lovastatin (50 nM) decreases IPP levels by 78% and 53% in K562 and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Whereas zoledronic acid (10 μM) increased IPP levels 12.6-fold when compared with untreated cells in the K562 cell line, an astonishing 960-fold increase was observed in the MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structural protein 4.1 is located in mammalian centrosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, S.W.; Chasis, J.A.; Rogers, C.; Mohandas, N.; Krockmalnic, G.; Penman, S.

    1997-07-01

    Structural protein 4.1 was first characterized as an important 80-kDa protein in the mature red cell membrane skeleton. It is now known to be a member of a family of protein isoforms detected at diverse intracellular sites in many nucleated mammalian cells. We recently reported that protein 4.1 isoforms are present at interphase in nuclear matrix and are rearranged during the cell cycle. Here we report that protein 4.1 epitopes are present in centrosomes of human and murine cells and are detected by using affinity-purified antibodies specific for 80-kDa red cell 4.1 and for 4.1 peptides. Immunofluorescence, by both conventional and confocal microscopy, showed that protein 4.1 epitopes localized in the pericentriolar region. Protein 4.1 epitopes remained in centrosomes after extraction of cells with detergent, salt, and DNase. Higher resolution electron microscopy of detergent-extracted cell whole mounts showed centrosomal protein 4.1 epitopes distributed along centriolar cylinders and on pericentriolar fibers, at least some of which constitute the filamentous network surrounding each centriole. Double-label electron microscopy showed that protein 4.1 epitopes were predominantly localized in regions also occupied by epitopes for centrosome-specific autoimmune serum 5051 but were not found on microtubules. Our results suggest that protein 4.1 is an integral component of centrosome structure, in which it may play an important role in centrosome function during cell division and organization of cellular architecture.

  16. Molecular characterization of flow-sorted mammalian centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamkalo, B.A.; Henschen, A.; Parseghian, M.H. [Univ. of Calfornia, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved experiments directed towards developing a molecular characterization of the centromere region of mammalian chromosomes. Attempts to purify this essential chromosomal locus by conventional methods have thus far been unsuccessful. However, preliminary data obtained in collaboration with the National Flow Cytometry Resource (NFCR) showed that it is possible to purify a chromosome fragment that is present in certain cultured mouse cell lines and has all the properties expected of an intact centromere region. To begin sorting this minichromosome for the identification of proteins preferentially associated with centromere regions, standard buffers utilized in chromosome sorting were evaluated for potential effects on maintenance of chromosomal proteins during sorting. The data indicate that the presence of several buffer constituents results in the extraction of all but a few chromosomal proteins. The subsequent use of a magnesium sulfate buffer resulted in the sorting of mouse chromosomes that do not suffer a significant loss of proteins. Several DNA stains were also evaluated for causing protein dissociation, but no significant losses were observed. Although flow-sorted chromosomes have been used extensively for DNA analysis and cloning, this is a pioneering effort by the NFCR, and its collaborators, to exploit chromosome sorting capabilities for the analysis of chromosomal proteins.

  17. Pseudotyping exosomes for enhanced protein delivery in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Conary; Losacco, Joseph; Stickney, Zachary; Li, Lingxuan; Marriott, Gerard; Lu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived nanovesicles that hold promise as living vehicles for intracellular delivery of therapeutics to mammalian cells. This potential, however, is undermined by the lack of effective methods to load exosomes with therapeutic proteins and to facilitate their uptake by target cells. Here, we demonstrate how a vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) can both load protein cargo onto exosomes and increase their delivery ability via a pseudotyping mechanism. By fusing a set of fluorescent and luminescent reporters with VSVG, we show the successful targeting and incorporation of VSVG fusions into exosomes by gene transfection and fluorescence tracking. We subsequently validate our system by live cell imaging of VSVG and its participation in endosomes/exosomes that are ultimately released from transfected HEK293 cells. We show that VSVG pseudotyping of exosomes does not affect the size or distributions of the exosomes, and both the full-length VSVG and the VSVG without the ectodomain are shown to integrate into the exosomal membrane, suggesting that the ectodomain is not required for protein loading. Finally, exosomes pseudotyped with full-length VSVG are internalized by multiple-recipient cell types to a greater degree compared to exosomes loaded with VSVG without the ectodomain, confirming a role of the ectodomain in cell tropism. In summary, our work introduces a new genetically encoded pseudotyping platform to load and enhance the intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins via exosome-based vehicles to target cells.

  18. Quantitative analyses of circadian gene expression in mammalian cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Izumo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The central circadian pacemaker is located in the hypothalamus of mammals, but essentially the same oscillating system operates in peripheral tissues and even in immortalized cell lines. Using luciferase reporters that allow automated monitoring of circadian gene expression in mammalian fibroblasts, we report the collection and analysis of precise rhythmic data from these cells. We use these methods to analyze signaling pathways of peripheral tissues by studying the responses of Rat-1 fibroblasts to ten different compounds. To quantify these rhythms, which show significant variation and large non-stationarities (damping and baseline drifting, we developed a new fast Fourier transform-nonlinear least squares analysis procedure that specifically optimizes the quantification of amplitude for circadian rhythm data. This enhanced analysis method successfully distinguishes among the ten signaling compounds for their rhythm-inducing properties. We pursued detailed analyses of the responses to two of these compounds that induced the highest amplitude rhythms in fibroblasts, forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase, and dexamethasone (an agonist of glucocorticoid receptors. Our quantitative analyses clearly indicate that the synchronization mechanisms by the cAMP and glucocorticoid pathways are different, implying that actions of different genes stimulated by these pathways lead to distinctive programs of circadian synchronization.

  19. Bioluminescent magnetic nanoparticles as potential imaging agents for mammalian spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Erick S; Feugang, Jean M; Willard, Scott T; Ryan, Peter L; Walters, Keisha B

    2016-03-17

    Nanoparticles have emerged as key materials for developing applications in nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, bioimaging and theranostics. Existing bioimaging technologies include bioluminescent resonance energy transfer-conjugated quantum dots (BRET-QDs). Despite the current use of BRET-QDs for bioimaging, there are strong concerns about QD nanocomposites containing cadmium which exhibits potential cellular toxicity. In this study, bioluminescent composites comprised of magnetic nanoparticles and firefly luciferase (Photinus pyralis) are examined as potential light-emitting agents for imaging, detection, and tracking mammalian spermatozoa. Characterization was carried out using infrared spectroscopy, TEM and cryo-TEM imaging, and ζ-potential measurements to demonstrate the successful preparation of these nanocomposites. Binding interactions between the synthesized nanoparticles and spermatozoon were characterized using confocal and atomic/magnetic force microscopy. Bioluminescence imaging and UV-visible-NIR microscopy results showed light emission from sperm samples incubated with the firefly luciferase-modified nanoparticles. Therefore, these newly synthesized luciferase-modified magnetic nanoparticles show promise as substitutes for QD labeling, and can potentially also be used for in vivo manipulation and tracking, as well as MRI techniques. These preliminary data indicate that luciferase-magnetic nanoparticle composites can potentially be used for spermatozoa detection and imaging. Their magnetic properties add additional functionality to allow for manipulation, sorting, or tracking of cells using magnetic techniques.

  20. Biochemical analysis of secretory trafficking in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roboti, Peristera; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Protein trafficking within the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is amenable to analysis by biochemical methods. This can be achieved by monitoring posttranslational modifications that occur naturally within the secretory pathway, or by measuring the delivery of cargo to the cell surface or extracellular medium. These approaches can be combined with additional manipulations such as specific temperature blocks that permit analysis of distinct trafficking steps. Biochemical analysis is advantageous in that it permits both a sensitive and quantitative measure of trafficking along the pathway. The methods discussed in this chapter permit the analysis of trafficking of both endogenous cargo proteins and ectopically expressed model cargos, which can be followed using either Western blotting or metabolic pulse-chase approaches. These methods are relatively straightforward and suitable for use in most modern cell biology laboratories. In addition to the well-established methods that we describe here in detail, we also refer to the development of more recent tailored approaches that add further to the arsenal of tools that can be used to assess trafficking in the secretory pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.