WorldWideScience

Sample records for control interaction force

  1. Automated boundary interaction force control of micromanipulators with in situ applications to microsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Jalili, Nader

    2012-12-01

    Most recent works on miniature tasks are concentrated on developing tools to take advantage of the visual servoing feedback to control the ultra-small interaction forces. This paper spans an extensive platform for automatic controlling of boundary interaction forces with high precision in the level of micro/nano-Newton with extensive micro/nanoengineering applications such as the microsurgery. To this end, a comprehensive piezoresistive microcantilever (PMC) model considering the shear deformation and rotary inertia effects treating as the distributed-parameters model along with the Hertzian contact force is presented. The purpose of considering the Hertzian contact force model is to investigate the dynamic response of the interaction force between the microcantilever's tip and the specimen. Afterward, a control platform is introduced to automatically manipulate the PMC to follow an ideal micro/nano-interaction force. By using the integrated PMC with the micromanipulator and a digital signal processor, an intuitive programming code is written to incorporate the micromanipulator and the controller in a real-time framework. To calibrate and verify the induced voltage in the PMC, a self-sensing experiment on the piezoelectric microcantilever is carried out to warrant the calibration procedure. Some experiments are established to affirm the validity of the proposed control for the autonomous real-time tasks on the boundary interaction force control. Unlike the conventional research studies, the measured force here contributes as the feedback source in contrast to the vision feedback while force sensors possess more precision, productivity and small size. This technique has several potential applications listed but not limited to the micro/nanomanipulation, developing artificial biological systems (e.g., fabricating hydrogel for the scaffold), and medicine such as microsurgery. As a result, using the proposed platform, we are able to manipulate and control the boundary

  2. Experimental study on the control interaction force coefficient; Soju ryutairyoku kansho keisu ni kansuru jikkenteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatake, K.; Oda, K.; Yoshitake, A.; Fujita, K.; Nakajima, A. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-04-10

    The interaction force induced to hull by steering is important for prediction of control performance of ships. The control interaction force coefficient dependent on the steering has been investigated through the rudder angle tests using three small model ships with a length of 2.5 m, i.e., mathematical type of ship, cargo type of ship, and tanker type of ship. The interaction forces acting on the hull, propeller, and rudder were determined by measuring the lateral force as well as the forward force of the hydrodynamic forces acting on the rudder. These forces were compared with the theoretically calculated values. Prior to the rudder angle tests, the self propulsion factor and the number of revolution of propeller were determined from the results of the open water tests, resistance tests, and self propulsion tests by the changing load method. The rudder angle tests were conducted under this number of revolution of propeller as a standard condition, and under those increasing and decreasing by 15%. Consequently, the interaction forces determined from the rudder angle tests agreed well with those determined from the other tests. When comparing the control hydrodynamic forces determined from the tests with those theoretically calculated, a similar trend was observed. Effectiveness of the theoretical model was confirmed. 4 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Force/position control of a robot manipulator for human-robot interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neranon Paramin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With regard to both human and robot capabilities, human-robot interaction provides several benefits, and this will be significantly developed and implemented. This work focuses on the development of real-time external force/position control used for human-robot interaction. The force-controlled robotic system integrated with proportional integral control was performed and evaluated to ensure its reliably and timely operational characteristics, in which appropriate proportional integral gains were experimentally adopted using a set of virtual crank-turning tests. The designed robotic system is made up of a robot manipulator arm, an ATI Gamma multi-axis force/torque sensor and a real-time external PC based control system. A proportional integral controller has been developed to provide stable and robust force control on unknown environmental stiffness and motion. To quantify its effectiveness, the robotic system has been verified through a comprehensive set of experiments, in which force measurement and ALTER real-time path control systems were evaluated. In summary, the results indicated satisfactorily stable performance of the robot force/position control system. The gain tuning for proportional plus integral control algorithm was successfully implemented. It can be reported that the best performance as specified by the error root mean square method of the radial force is observed with proportional and integral gains of 0.10 and 0.005 respectively.

  4. Visual information gain and task asymmetry interact in bimanual force coordination and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaogang; Newell, Karl M

    2011-08-01

    This study examined the question of whether and how the influence of visual information on force coordination patterns is dependent on the settings of a task asymmetry constraint. In a bimanual isometric force experiment, the task asymmetry was manipulated via imposing different coefficients on the index finger forces such that the weighted sum of the finger forces matched the target force. The environmental constraint was quantified by the visual performance error and was manipulated through the change of visual gain (number of pixels on the screen representing the unit of force). The constraint arising from the individual was quantified by the bilateral coupling effect (i.e., symmetric force production) between hands. The results revealed improved performance in terms of lower variability and performance error and more complex total force structure with higher visual gain. The influence of visual gain on the force coordination pattern, however, was found to be dependent on the task coefficients imposed on the finger forces. Namely, the force sharing between hands became more symmetric with high visual gain only when the right finger force had the higher coefficient, and an error-compensatory strategy was evident with high gain only when symmetric coefficients were imposed on the two fingers. The findings support the proposition that the motor coordination and control patterns are organized by the interactive influence of different categories of constraints where the functional influence of the information provided is dependent on the motor output.

  5. Coordination between digit forces and positions: interactions between anticipatory and feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Humans adjust digit forces to compensate for trial-to-trial variability in digit placement during object manipulation, but the underlying control mechanisms remain to be determined. We hypothesized that such digit position/force coordination was achieved by both visually guided feed-forward planning and haptic-based feedback control. The question arises about the time course of the interaction between these two mechanisms. This was tested with a task in which subjects generated torque (± 70 N·mm) on a virtual object to control a cursor moving to target positions to catch a falling ball, using a virtual reality environment and haptic devices. The width of the virtual object was varied between large (L) and small (S). These object widths result in significantly different horizontal digit relative positions and require different digit forces to exert the same task torque. After training, subjects were tested with random sequences of L and S widths with or without visual information about object width. We found that visual cues allowed subjects to plan manipulation forces before contact. In contrast, when visual cues were not available to predict digit positions, subjects implemented a "default" digit force plan that was corrected after digit contact to eventually accomplish the task. The time course of digit forces revealed that force development was delayed in the absence of visual cues. Specifically, the appropriate digit force adjustments were made 250-300 ms after initial object contact. This result supports our hypothesis and further reveals that haptic feedback alone is sufficient to implement digit force-position coordination.

  6. Parabolized Stability Equations analysis of nonlinear interactions with forced eigenmodes to control subsonic jet instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itasse, Maxime, E-mail: Maxime.Itasse@onera.fr; Brazier, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Brazier@onera.fr; Léon, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.Leon@onera.fr; Casalis, Grégoire, E-mail: Gregoire.Casalis@onera.fr [Onera - The French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-08-15

    Nonlinear evolution of disturbances in an axisymmetric, high subsonic, high Reynolds number hot jet with forced eigenmodes is studied using the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) approach to understand how modes interact with one another. Both frequency and azimuthal harmonic interactions are analyzed by setting up one or two modes at higher initial amplitudes and various phases. While single mode excitation leads to harmonic growth and jet noise amplification, controlling the evolution of a specific mode has been made possible by forcing two modes (m{sub 1}, n{sub 1}), (m{sub 2}, n{sub 2}), such that the difference in azimuth and in frequency matches the desired “target” mode (m{sub 1} − m{sub 2}, n{sub 1} − n{sub 2}). A careful setup of the initial amplitudes and phases of the forced modes, defined as the “killer” modes, has allowed the minimizing of the initially dominant instability in the near pressure field, as well as its estimated radiated noise with a 15 dB loss. Although an increase of the overall sound pressure has been found in the range of azimuth and frequency analyzed, the present paper reveals the possibility to make the initially dominant instability ineffective acoustically using nonlinear interactions with forced eigenmodes.

  7. Atomic force microscopy study of cellulose surface interaction controlled by cellulose binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Nigmatullin, R.; Lovitt, R.; Wright, C; Linder, M.; Nakari-Setälä, T; Gama, F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy has been used to study the interaction between model cellulose surfaces and the role of cellulose binding domain (CBD), peptides specifically binding to cellulose, in interfacial interaction of cellulose surfaces modified with CBDs. The interaction between pure cellulose surfaces in aqueous electrolyte solution is dominated by double layer repulsive forces with the range and magnitude of the net force dependent on electrolyte concentration. AFM imaging reve...

  8. The interaction of respiration and visual feedback on the control of force and neural activation of the agonist muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Neto, Osmar P; Christou, Evangelos A

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force variability and the neural activation of the agonist muscle during constant isometric contractions at different force levels when the amplitude of respiration and visual feedback were varied. Twenty young adults (20-32 years, 10 men and 10 women) were instructed to accurately match a target force at 15% and 50% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with abduction of the index finger while controlling their respiration at different amplitudes (85%, 100% and 125% normal) in the presence and absence of visual feedback. Each trial lasted 22s and visual feedback was removed from 8-12 and 16-20s. Each subject performed three trials with each respiratory condition at each force level. Force variability was quantified as the standard deviation of the detrended force data. The neural activation of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) was measured with bipolar surface electrodes placed distal to the innervation zone. Relative to normal respiration, force variability increased significantly only during high-amplitude respiration (∼63%). The increase in force variability from normal- to high-amplitude respiration was strongly associated with amplified force oscillations from 0 to 3 Hz (R(2) ranged from .68 to .84, phigh-amplitude respiration and visual feedback of force interact and amplify force variability in young adults during moderate levels of effort.

  9. Force decomposition in robot force control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  10. Role of interaction forces in controlling the stability and polishing performance of CMP slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basim, G Bahar; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Moudgil, Brij M

    2003-07-15

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is an essential step in metal and dielectric planarization in multilayer microelectronic device fabrication. In the CMP process it is necessary to minimize the extent of surface defect formation while maintaining good planarity and optimal material removal rates. These requirements are met through the control of chemical and mechanical interactions during the polishing process by engineering the slurry chemistry, particulate properties, and stability. In this study, the performance of surfactant-stabilized silica CMP slurries at high pH and high ionic strengths are investigated with particular emphasis on the particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions. It is shown that for the design of consistently high performing slurries, stability of abrasive particles must be achieved under the dynamic processing conditions of CMP while maintaining sufficient pad-particle-wafer interactions.

  11. Human-machine interaction force control:using a model-referenced adaptive impedance device to control an index finger exoskeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian BI; Can-jun YANG

    2014-01-01

    Exoskeleton robots and their control methods have been extensively developed to aid post-stroke rehabilitation. Most of the existing methods using linear controllers are designed for position control and are not suitable for human-machine interaction (HMI) force control, as the interaction system between the human body and exoskeleton is uncertain and nonlinear. We present an approach for HMI force control via model reference adaptive impedance control (MRAIC) to solve this problem in case of index finger exoskeleton control. First, a dynamic HMI model, which is based on a position control inner loop, is for-mulated. Second, the theoretical MRAC framework is implemented in the control system. Then, the adaptive controllers are designed according to the Lyapunov stability theory. To verify the performance of the proposed method, we compare it with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method in the time domain with real experiments and in the frequency domain with simu-lations. The results illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method in solving the nonlinear HMI force control problem in hand exoskeleton.

  12. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr [U1006 INSERM, Université Aix-Marseille, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  13. Interaction Force Estimation During Manipulation of Microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Metz, R.M.P.; Abelmann, L.; Misra, S.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the utilization of microparticles for the wireless sensing of interaction forces in magneticbased manipulation systems. The proposed force estimation approach allows for using microparticles in sensing the interaction forces at hard-to-reach regions to avoid the mechanical and

  14. Interaction Force Estimation During Manipulation of Microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Metz, R.M.P.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the utilization of microparticles for the wireless sensing of interaction forces in magneticbased manipulation systems. The proposed force estimation approach allows for using microparticles in sensing the interaction forces at hard-to-reach regions to avoid the mechanical and

  15. Classical Gravitational Interactions and Gravitational Lorentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In quantum gauge theory of gravity, the gravitational field is represented by gravitational gauge field.The field strength of gravitational gauge field has both gravitoelectric component and gravitomagnetic component. In classical level, gauge theory of gravity gives classical Newtonian gravitational interactions in a relativistic form. Besides,it gives gravitational Lorentz force, which is the gravitational force on a moving object in gravitomagnetic field The direction of gravitational Lorentz force is not the same as that of classical gravitational Newtonian force. Effects of gravitational Lorentz force should be detectable, and these effects can be used to discriminate gravitomagnetic field from ordinary electromagnetic magnetic field.

  16. Intermolecular forces: a solution to dispersion interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ken D

    2013-12-01

    London dispersion forces have been cited as an important factor in protein folding, drug–receptor interactions, and catalyst selectivities. However, careful analysis of a model system finds that the dispersion interactions are only minor contributors to the formation of complexes in solution.

  17. Interaction forces in bitumen extraction from oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2005-07-15

    Water-based extraction process (WBEP) has been successfully applied to bitumen recovery from Athabasca oil sand ore deposits in Alberta. In this process, two essential steps are involved. The bitumen first needs to be "liberated" from sand grains, followed by "aeration" with air bubbles. Bitumen "liberation" from the sand grains is controlled by the interaction between the bitumen and sand grains. Bitumen "aeration" is dependent, among other mechanical and hydrodynamic variables, on the hydrophobicity of the bitumen surface, which is controlled by water chemistry and interactions between bitumen and fine solids. In this paper, the interaction force measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) between bitumen-bitumen, bitumen-silica, bitumen-clays and bitumen-fines is summarized. The measured interaction force barrier coupled with the contacted adhesion force allows us to predict the coagulative state of colloidal systems. Zeta potential distribution measurements, in terms of heterocoagulation, confirmed the prediction of the measured force profiles using AFM. The results show that solution pH and calcium addition can significantly affect the colloidal interactions of various components in oil sand extraction systems. The strong attachment of fines from a poor processing ore on bitumen is responsible for the corresponding low bitumen flotation recovery. The identification of the dominant non-contact forces by fitting with the classical DLVO or extended DLVO theory provides guidance for controlling the interaction behavior of the oil sand components through monitoring the factors that could affect the non-contact forces. The findings provide insights into megascale industrial operations of oil sand extraction.

  18. EXOS research on force-reflecting controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberman, Brian S.; An, Bin

    1993-03-01

    EXOS has developed two state of the art prototype master controllers for controlling robot hands and manipulators under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program with NASA. One such device is a two degree-of-freedom Sensing and Force Reflecting Exoskeleton (SAFiRE) worn on the operator's hand. The device measures the movement of the index finger and reflects the interaction forces between the slave robot and the environment to the human finger. The second device is a position sensing Exoskeleton ArmMaster (EAM) worn by a human operator. The device simultaneously tracks the motions of the operator's three DOF shoulder and two DOF elbow. Both of these devices are currently used to control robots at NASA. We are currently developing a full fingered SAFiRE and a position sensing and force reflecting EAM under two second phase SBIR grants with NASA. This paper will include discussions of: (1) the design of the current prototypes, (2) kinematics of the EAM and force control of the SAFiRE, (3) design issues that must be addressed in developing more advanced versions, and (4) our progress to date in addressing these issues.

  19. Robust Force Control of Series Elastic Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Calanca

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Force-controlled series elastic actuators (SEA are widely used in novel human-robot interaction (HRI applications, such as assistive and rehabilitation robotics. These systems are characterized by the presence of the “human in the loop”, so that control response and stability depend on uncertain human dynamics, including reflexes and voluntary forces. This paper proposes a force control approach that guarantees the stability and robustness of the coupled human-robot system, based on sliding-mode control (SMC, considering the human dynamics as a disturbance to reject. We propose a chattering free solution that employs simple task models to obtain high performance, comparable with second order solutions. Theoretical stability is proven within the sliding mode framework, and predictability is reached by avoiding the reaching phase by design. Furthermore, safety is introduced by a proper design of the sliding surface. The practical feasibility of the approach is shown using an SEA prototype coupled with a human impedance in severe stress tests. To show the quality of the approach, we report a comparison with state-of-the-art second order SMC, passivity-based control and adaptive control solutions.

  20. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  1. Sensor Fusion of Force and Acceleration for Robot Force Control

    OpenAIRE

    Gámez García, Javier; Robertsson, Anders; Gómez Ortega, Juan; Johansson, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, robotic sensor fusion of acceleration and force measurement is considered. We discuss the problem of using accelerometers close to the end-effectors of robotic manipulators and how it may improve the force control performance. We introduce a new model-based observer approach to sensor fusion of information from various different sensors. During contact transition, accelerometers and force sensors play a very important role and it can overcome many of the difficulties of uncerta...

  2. Computer-Controlled Force Generator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research, Inc proposes to develop a compact, low power, high life-cycle computer controlled Programmable Force Generator (PFG) that can generate any force...

  3. Shape-Grinding by Direct Position/Force Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanghua; Xu, Weiwei; Minami, Mamoru

    Based on the analysis of the interaction between a manipulator's hand and a working object, a model representing the constrained dynamics of the robot is first discussed. The constrained forces are expressed by an algebraic function of states, input generalized forces, and the constraint condition, and then a direct position/force controller without force sensor is proposed based on the algebraic relation. To give a grinding system the ability to adapt to any object shape being changed by the grinding, we add a function estimating the constraint condition in real time for the adaptive position/force control. Evaluations through simulations, by fitting the changing constraint surface with spline functions, indicate that reliable position/force control and shape-grinding can be achieved by the proposed controller.

  4. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  5. FORCED OSCILLATIONS IN NONLINEAR FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since a nonlinear feedback control system may possess more than one type of forced oscillations, it is highly desirable to investigate the type of...method for finding the existence of forced oscillations and response curve characteristics of a nonlinear feedback control system by means of finding the...second order feedback control system are investigated; the fundamental frequency forced oscillation for a higher order system and the jump resonance

  6. Critical Casimir Interactions: New fluctuation forces in colloidal science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Casimir forces arise from the confinement of fluctuations between two walls. Critical Casimir forces provide thermodynamic analogues of quantum-mechanical Casimir forces and arise from the confinement of concentration fluctuations of a critical solvent. These forces act also between colloidal particles that are suspended in this solvent, giving rise to temperature-dependent attractive interactions between the particles. We use these temperature-dependent forces to control colloidal phase transitions. In this talk, I will present a new index and density-matched model system that allows direct observation of these phase transitions with confocal microscopy. In three dimensions and real time, we follow how a colloidal gas freezes into a colloidal liquid, and the colloidal liquid freezes into a solid, all driven by critical Casimir forces. We measure the critical Casimir particle pair potential directly from the pair correlation function, and use Monte Carlo simulations to map the complete gas-liquid-solid phase diagram. Excellent agreement with the experimental observations is obtained. Our measurements include microgravity experiments on board the International Space Station (ISS) to elucidate non-equilibrium assembly of the particles achieved by controlled temperature quench.

  7. Democratic Control of Military Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smail Ostrakovic

    2011-01-01

    The transition requirement for post communism countries, especially the part that is about military forces is to establish those civil-military relation that will have prepared projects for awareness...

  8. Effective force control by muscle synergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise J Berger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Muscle synergies have been proposed as a way for the central nervous system (CNS to simplify the generation of motor commands and they have been shown to explain a large fraction of the variation in the muscle patterns across a variety of conditions. However, whether human subjects are able to control forces and movements effectively with a small set of synergies has not been tested directly. Here we show that muscle synergies can be used to generate target forces in multiple directions with the same accuracy achieved using individual muscles. We recorded electromyographic (EMG activity from 13 arm muscles and isometric hand forces during a force reaching task in a virtual environment. From these data we estimated the force associated to each muscle by linear regression and we identified muscle synergies by non-negative matrix factorization. We compared trajectories of a virtual mass displaced by the force estimated using the entire set of recorded EMGs to trajectories obtained using 4 to 5 muscle synergies. While trajectories were similar, when feedback was provided according to force estimated from recorded EMGs (EMG-control on average trajectories generated with the synergies were less accurate. However, when feedback was provided according to recorded force (force-control we did not find significant differences in initial angle error and endpoint error. We then tested whether synergies could be used as effectively as individual muscles to control cursor movement in the force reaching task by providing feedback according to force estimated from the projection of the recorded EMGs into synergy space (synergy-control. Human subjects were able to perform the task immediately after switching from force-control to EMG-control and synergy-control and we found no differences between initial movement direction errors and endpoint errors in all control modes. These results indicate that muscle synergies provide an effective strategy for motor

  9. Effective force control by muscle synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Denise J; d'Avella, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Muscle synergies have been proposed as a way for the central nervous system (CNS) to simplify the generation of motor commands and they have been shown to explain a large fraction of the variation in the muscle patterns across a variety of conditions. However, whether human subjects are able to control forces and movements effectively with a small set of synergies has not been tested directly. Here we show that muscle synergies can be used to generate target forces in multiple directions with the same accuracy achieved using individual muscles. We recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity from 13 arm muscles and isometric hand forces during a force reaching task in a virtual environment. From these data we estimated the force associated to each muscle by linear regression and we identified muscle synergies by non-negative matrix factorization. We compared trajectories of a virtual mass displaced by the force estimated using the entire set of recorded EMGs to trajectories obtained using 4-5 muscle synergies. While trajectories were similar, when feedback was provided according to force estimated from recorded EMGs (EMG-control) on average trajectories generated with the synergies were less accurate. However, when feedback was provided according to recorded force (force-control) we did not find significant differences in initial angle error and endpoint error. We then tested whether synergies could be used as effectively as individual muscles to control cursor movement in the force reaching task by providing feedback according to force estimated from the projection of the recorded EMGs into synergy space (synergy-control). Human subjects were able to perform the task immediately after switching from force-control to EMG-control and synergy-control and we found no differences between initial movement direction errors and endpoint errors in all control modes. These results indicate that muscle synergies provide an effective strategy for motor coordination.

  10. Interaction forces drive the environmental transmission of pathogenic protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumètre, Aurélien; Aubert, Dominique; Puech, Pierre-Henri; Hohweyer, Jeanne; Azas, Nadine; Villena, Isabelle

    2012-02-01

    The protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Toxoplasma gondii are pathogens that are resistant to a number of environmental factors and pose significant risks to public health worldwide. Their environmental transmission is closely governed by the physicochemical properties of their cysts (Giardia) and oocysts (Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma), allowing their transport, retention, and survival for months in water, soil, vegetables, and mollusks, which are the main reservoirs for human infection. Importantly, the cyst/oocyst wall plays a key role in that regard by exhibiting a complex polymeric coverage that determines the charge and hydrophobic characteristics of parasites' surfaces. Interaction forces between parasites and other environmental particles may be, in a first approximation, evaluated following the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory of colloidal stability. However, due to the molecular topography and nano- to microstructure of the cyst/oocyst surface, non-DVLO hydrophobic forces together with additional steric attractive and/or repulsive forces may play a pivotal role in controlling the parasite behavior when the organism is subjected to various external conditions. Here, we review several parameters that enhance or hinder the adhesion of parasites to other particles and surfaces and address the role of fast-emerging techniques for mapping the cyst/oocyst surface, e.g., by measuring its topology and the generated interaction forces at the nano- to microscale. We discuss why characterizing these interactions could be a crucial step for managing the environmental matrices at risk of microbial pollution.

  11. Robust force control of a robot manipulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, D.M. (Clemson Univ., SC (United States)); Lewis, F.L. (Univ. of Texas, Fort Worth (United States)); Dorsey, J.F. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (United States))

    1992-08-01

    In this article, the authors develop a robust position/force controller based on the impedance approach without requiring exact knowledge of the robot dynamics. The controller is constructed so that a desired positional trajectory can be followed along the surface of the environment while the forces exerted on the environmental surface are regulated according to a target impedance. A global uniform ultimate boundedness result is obtained for the position tracking error and the force regulation error (i.e., the error between the actual manipulator impedance and desired target impedance). The controller only requires measurement of the end-effector force, joint velocity, and joint position.

  12. Evaluation of Polymer-Filler Interaction Characteristics by Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A

    2007-04-23

    Silicone polymers are frequently used as cushions and inserts between load bearing parts. In this capacity, they must act to position their associated parts and distribute mechanical force as appropriate. One type of failure is specific to silicones that are filled with high surface area particulates for purposes of tailoring the polymer compressive properties. Additives such as fumed silicon oxide are presumed to have a high degree of surface interaction with the polymer matrix, thus causing the polymer to stiffen and to display greater dimensional stability as a function of temperature. However, it has been observed that the compressive behavior of these materials is not always invariant over long times. There is evidence that suggests changes in humidity and temperature can irreversibly alter the silicone-filler interaction, thereby changing the overall characteristics of parts made from such materials. As before, changes in compressive or shear stability can have serious effects on the ability of these materials to effectively position precision parts or distribute high mechanical loads. We approach the analysis of the filled systems by creating controlled layers of silicone polymers attached to silicon oxide substrates. Straight chain vinyl-silicone polymers identical to those used in the formulation of pads for stockpile systems are chemically appended to a substrate surface, and cross-linked to form a three dimensional network. This type of structure serves as a model of silicone polymer coating a silicon oxide filler particle. We study these model systems first by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image the samples with nanometer resolution, and then by measuring the forces of interactions between single model silica filler particles and polymer-coated surfaces. We use normal longitudinal force AFM to measure adhesion, and a relatively newly developed technique, lateral force AFM, to determine the frictional forces between the silica particles and the

  13. Influence of biosurfactant on interactive forces between mutans streptococci and enamel measured by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoogmoed, CG; Dijkstra, RJB; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    Although interactive forces, influenced by environmental conditions, between oral bacteria and tooth surfaces are important for the development of plaque, they have never been estimated. It is hypothesized that interactive forces, as measured by atomic force microscopy, between enamel with or

  14. Force sensor free teleoperated robotic surgery : Interaction force estimation for realistic force feedback without force sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Nærum, Edvard

    2012-01-01

    List of papers. The papers are removed from the thesis due to copyright restrictions. Paper I E. Naerum, J. Cornellà and O.J. Elle. Wavelet networks for estimation of coupled friction in robotic manipulators Proc. IEEE Conference on Robotics and Automation, Pasadena, CA, USA, May 2008, pp. 862-867. doi:10.1109/ROBOT.2008.4543313 Paper II E. Naerum, J. Cornellà and O.J. Elle. Contact force estimation for backdrivable robotic manipulators with coupled friction IE...

  15. Modeling Robot Flexibility for Endpoint Force Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    SIDM 19. KE9Y WORDS fCntknu. OnPVOO&O 0401 It 00041000111O ed 0000#uF 6P 1111411 amA.w) robot force control * robot control / robot dynamics flexible...no. 3, pp. 62-75. [2] Eppinger, S.D. and Seering, W.P. On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on...W.P. Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on Robotics and Automation. IEEE, April 1987

  16. Construction robot force control in cleaning operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Skibniewski, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Basic surface treatment tasks on construction sites that can be performed by robots include the spraying, cleaning, and finishing of surfaces. In the present paper, a construction robot is proposed for accomplishing a variety of cleaning tasks in construction. Specifically, the force-control problem in cleaning a surface is studied. The paper shows that a force sensor can be used not only to monitor the force acting at the contact points, but also to identify the uncertainties of the unstructured construction environment. A different formulation for the external force is presented. With this formulation, the external force on the end-effector is presented as a function of the contact force, contact torque, and constraint conditions, but not the actuated torque in the joint space. Therefore, the force-control problem is simplified to compensate for the external force and to exert a desired force. One advantage fo this approach is that the original PID position control loop of an industrial robot is retained so that the time-consuming computed torque method is avoided. The proposed control scheme can be applied to numerous cleaning tasks with hard contact regardless of the different nature of the surface.

  17. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-07-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases.

  18. StringForce: A Forced Collaborative Interaction Game for Special Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barendregt, Wolmet; Börjesson, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the forced collaborative interaction game StringForce. StringForce is developed for a special education context to support training of collaboration skills, using readily available technologies and avoiding the creation of a "mobile bubble". In order to play String......Force to be an interesting demo for the IDC community, as it intertwines several relevant research fields, such as mobile interaction and collaborative gaming in the special education context....

  19. Bio-Molecular Interactions Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, O.H.; Snel, M.M.E.; Cambi, A.; Cambi, Alessandra; Greve, Jan; de Grooth, B.G.; Figdor, Carl

    2000-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is nowadays frequently applied to determine interaction forces between biological molecules. Starting with the detection of the first discrete unbinding forces between ligands and receptors by AFM only several years ago, measurements have become more and more

  20. The coordinate system for force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Devjani J; Hu, Xiao; Perreault, Eric; Murray, Wendy; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to establish the coordinate frame for force control by observing how parameters of force that are not explicitly specified by a motor task vary across the workspace. We asked subjects to apply a force of a specific magnitude with their hand. Subjects could complete the task by applying forces in any direction of their choice in the transverse plane. They were tested with the arm in seven different configurations. To estimate whether contact forces are represented in extrinsic or intrinsic coordinates, we applied the parallel transport method of differential geometry to the net joint torques applied during the task. This approach allowed us to compare the force variability observed at different arm configurations with the force variability that would be expected if the control system were applying an invariant pattern of joint torques at the tested configurations. The results indicate that for the majority of the subjects, the predominant pattern was consistent with an invariant representation in joint coordinates. However, two out of eleven subjects also demonstrated a preference for extrinsic representation. These findings suggest that the central nervous system can represent contact forces in both coordinate frames, with a prevalence toward intrinsic representations.

  1. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the inter-particle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe ...

  2. Controlling police (excessive force: The American case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakir Gül

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the issue of police abuse of power, particularly police use of excessive force. Since the misuse of force by police is considered a problem, some entity must discover a way to control and prevent the illegal use of coercive power. Unlike most of the previous studies on the use of excessive force, this study uses a path analysis. However, not all the findings are consistent with the prior studies and hypotheses. In general, findings indicate that training may be a useful tool in terms of decreasing the use of excessive force, thereby reducing civilians’ injuries and citizens’ complaints. The results show that ethics training in the academy is significantly related to the use of excessive force. Further, it was found that community-oriented policing training in the academy was associated with the citizens’ complaints. A national (secondary data, collected from the law enforcement agencies in the United States are used to explore the research questions.

  3. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  4. Muscular activity and physical interaction forces during lower limb exoskeleton use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Matthew; Rathore, Ashish; Morgado Ramirez, Dafne Zuleima; Loureiro, Rui C V; Carlson, Tom

    2016-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically manifests with a loss of sensorimotor control of the lower limbs. In order to overcome some of the disadvantages of chronic wheelchair use by such patients, robotic exoskeletons are an emerging technology that has the potential to transform the lives of patients. However, there are a number of points of contact between the robot and the user, which lead to interaction forces. In a recent study, the authors have shown that peak interaction forces are particularly prominent at the anterior aspect of the right leg. This study uses a similar experimental protocol with additional electromyography (EMG) analysis to examine whether such interaction forces are due to the muscular activity of the participant or the movement of the exoskeleton itself. Interestingly, the authors found that peak forces preceded peak EMG activity. This study did not find a significant correlation between EMG activity and force data, which would indicate that the interaction forces can largely be attributed to the movement of the exoskeleton itself. However, we also report significantly higher correlation coefficients in muscle/force pairs located at the anterior aspect of the right leg. In their previous research, the authors have shown peak interaction forces at the same locations, which suggests that muscular activity of the participant makes a more significant contribution to the interaction forces at these locations. The findings of this study are of significance for incomplete SCI patients, for whom EMG activity may provide an important input to an intuitive control schema.

  5. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed to provide a user friendly environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control systems. INCA is designed for use with both small and large order systems. Using the interactive graphics capability, the INCA user can quickly plot a root locus, frequency response, or time response of either a continuous time system or a sampled data system. The system configuration and parameters can be easily changed, allowing the INCA user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in a very convenient manner. A journal file capability is included. This stores an entire sequence of commands, generated during an INCA session into a file which can be accessed later. Also included in INCA are a context-sensitive help library, a screen editor, and plot windows. INCA is robust to VAX-specific overflow problems. The transfer function is the basic unit of INCA. Transfer functions are automatically saved and are available to the INCA user at any time. A powerful, user friendly transfer function manipulation and editing capability is built into the INCA program. The user can do all transfer function manipulations and plotting without leaving INCA, although provisions are made to input transfer functions from data files. By using a small set of commands, the user may compute and edit transfer functions, and then examine these functions by using the ROOT_LOCUS, FREQUENCY_RESPONSE, and TIME_RESPONSE capabilities. Basic input data, including gains, are handled as single-input single-output transfer functions. These functions can be developed using the function editor or by using FORTRAN- like arithmetic expressions. In addition to the arithmetic functions, special functions are available to 1) compute step, ramp, and sinusoid functions, 2) compute closed loop transfer functions, 3) convert from S plane to Z plane with optional advanced Z transform, and 4) convert from Z

  6. INCA- INTERACTIVE CONTROLS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed to provide a user friendly environment for the design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control systems. INCA is designed for use with both small and large order systems. Using the interactive graphics capability, the INCA user can quickly plot a root locus, frequency response, or time response of either a continuous time system or a sampled data system. The system configuration and parameters can be easily changed, allowing the INCA user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in a very convenient manner. A journal file capability is included. This stores an entire sequence of commands, generated during an INCA session into a file which can be accessed later. Also included in INCA are a context-sensitive help library, a screen editor, and plot windows. INCA is robust to VAX-specific overflow problems. The transfer function is the basic unit of INCA. Transfer functions are automatically saved and are available to the INCA user at any time. A powerful, user friendly transfer function manipulation and editing capability is built into the INCA program. The user can do all transfer function manipulations and plotting without leaving INCA, although provisions are made to input transfer functions from data files. By using a small set of commands, the user may compute and edit transfer functions, and then examine these functions by using the ROOT_LOCUS, FREQUENCY_RESPONSE, and TIME_RESPONSE capabilities. Basic input data, including gains, are handled as single-input single-output transfer functions. These functions can be developed using the function editor or by using FORTRAN- like arithmetic expressions. In addition to the arithmetic functions, special functions are available to 1) compute step, ramp, and sinusoid functions, 2) compute closed loop transfer functions, 3) convert from S plane to Z plane with optional advanced Z transform, and 4) convert from Z

  7. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force......-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...

  8. Measurements of human force control during a constrained arm motion using a force-actuated joystick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, J; Gurfinkel, E V; Lipshits, M I; Droulez, J; Gurfinkel, V S

    1995-03-01

    1. When interacting with the environment, human arm movements may be prevented in certain directions (i.e., when sliding the hand along a surface) resulting in what is called a "constrained motion." In the directions that the movement is restricted, the subject is instead free to control the forces against the constraint. 2. Control strategies for constrained motion may be characterized by two extreme models. Under the active compliance model, an essentially feedback-based approach, measurements of contact force may be used in real time to modify the motor command and precisely control the forces generated against the constraint. Under the passive compliance model the motion would be executed in a feedforward manner, using an internal model of the constraint geometry. The feedforward model relies on the compliant behavior of the passive mechanical system to maintain contact while avoiding excessive contact forces. 3. Subjects performed a task in which they were required to slide the hand along a rigid surface. This task was performed in a virtual force environment in which contact forces were simulated by a two-dimensional force-actuated joystick. Unknown to the subject, the orientation of the surface constraint was varied from trial to trial, and contact force changes induced by these perturbations were measured. 4. Subjects showed variations in contact force correlated with the direction of the orientation perturbation. "Upward" tilts resulted in higher contact forces, whereas "downward" tilts resulted in lower contact forces. This result is consistent with a feedforward-based control of a passively compliant system. 5. Subject responses did not, however, correspond exactly to the predictions of a static analysis of a passive, feedforward-controlled system. A dynamic analysis reveals a much closer resemblance between a passive, feedforward model and the observed data. Numerical simulations demonstrate that a passive, dynamic system model of the movement captures

  9. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control.

  10. Comparison of electromyography and force as interfaces for prosthetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Elaine A; Perreault, Eric J; Kuiken, Todd A

    2011-01-01

    The ease with which persons with upper-limb amputations can control their powered prostheses is largely determined by the efficacy of the user command interface. One needs to understand the abilities of the human operator regarding the different available options. Electromyography (EMG) is widely used to control powered upper-limb prostheses. It is an indirect estimator of muscle force and may be expected to limit the control capabilities of the prosthesis user. This study compared EMG control with force control, an interface that is used in everyday interactions with the environment. We used both methods to perform a position-tracking task. Direct-position control of the wrist provided an upper bound for human-operator capabilities. The results demonstrated that an EMG control interface is as effective as force control for the position-tracking task. We also examined the effects of gain and tracking frequency on EMG control to explore the limits of this control interface. We found that information transmission rates for myoelectric control were best at higher tracking frequencies than at the frequencies previously reported for position control. The results may be useful for the design of prostheses and prosthetic controllers.

  11. Reverse engineering of an affinity-switchable molecular interaction characterized by atomic force microscopy single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Dario; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Becker, Anke; Decker, Björn; Eckel, Rainer; McIntosh, Matthew; Mattay, Jochen; Plattner, Patrik; Ros, Robert; Schäfer, Christian; Sewald, Norbert

    2008-02-19

    Tunable and switchable interaction between molecules is a key for regulation and control of cellular processes. The translation of the underlying physicochemical principles to synthetic and switchable functional entities and molecules that can mimic the corresponding molecular functions is called reverse molecular engineering. We quantitatively investigated autoinducer-regulated DNA-protein interaction in bacterial gene regulation processes with single atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecule force spectroscopy in vitro, and developed an artificial bistable molecular host-guest system that can be controlled and regulated by external signals (UV light exposure and thermal energy). The intermolecular binding functionality (affinity) and its reproducible and reversible switching has been proven by AFM force spectroscopy at the single-molecule level. This affinity-tunable optomechanical switch will allow novel applications with respect to molecular manipulation, nanoscale rewritable molecular memories, and/or artificial ion channels, which will serve for the controlled transport and release of ions and neutral compounds in the future.

  12. Interaction forces between waterborne bacteria and activated carbon particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Langworthy, Don E.; Collias, Dimitris I.; Bjorkquist, David W.; Mitchell, Michael D.; Van der Mei, Henny C.

    2008-01-01

    Activated carbons remove waterborne bacteria from potable water systems through attractive Lifshitz-van der Waals forces despite electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged cells and carbon surfaces. In this paper we quantify the interaction forces between bacteria with negatively and positiv

  13. Cutting Characteristics of Force Controllable Milling Head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shirakashi; Takahiro; Shibuya; Wataru

    2002-01-01

    In order to control cutting force and its direction i n milling operation, a new milling head was developed. The head has two milling cutters, which are connected by a pair of gears and rotate in opposite direction respectively. Both up-cut and down-cut can be carried out simultaneously by t hese milling cutters. The each depth of cut, the ratio of up/down cutting depth , by these cutters can be also selected. The cutting force characteristics were experimentally discussed by changing the ratio. The cut...

  14. Remote Robot Control With High Force-Feedback Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.

    1993-01-01

    Improved scheme for force-reflecting hand control of remote robotic manipulator provides unprecedently high force-reflection gain, even when dissimilar master and slave arms used. Three feedback loops contained in remote robot control system exerting position-error-based force feedback and compliance control. Outputs of force and torque sensors on robot not used directly for force reflection, but for compliance control, while errors in position used to generate reflected forces.

  15. Interaction of Rate of Force Development and Duration of Rate in Isometric Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald

    A study attempted to determine whether force and duration parameters are programmed in an interactive or independent fashion prior to executing ballistic type isometric contractions of graded intensities. Four adult females each performed 360 trials of producing ballistic type forces representing 25, 40, 55, and 75 percent of their maximal…

  16. Multimodal Interaction Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskow, Jonas; Carlson, Rolf; Edlund, Jens; Granström, Björn; Heldner, Mattias; Hjalmarsson, Anna; Skantze, Gabriel

    No matter how well hidden our systems are and how well they do their magic unnoticed in the background, there are times when direct interaction between system and human is a necessity. As long as the interaction can take place unobtrusively and without techno-clutter, this is desirable. It is hard to picture a means of interaction less obtrusive and techno-cluttered than spoken communication on human terms. Spoken face-to-face communication is the most intuitive and robust form of communication between humans imaginable. In order to exploit such human spoken communication to its full potential as an interface between human and machine, we need a much better understanding of how the more human-like aspects of spoken communication work.

  17. Magnetically controllable Casimir force based on a superparamagnetic metametamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junming; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang

    2014-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the magnetically controllable Casimir force between a parallel metal plate and a superparamagnetic metametamaterial (MMM) plate based on Mie scattering and effective medium theory. A type of MMM composed of superparamagnetic nanoparticles is proposed to fulfill the high frequency magnetic effect to gain Casimir repulsion when interacting with the metal plate. The permeability of such MMM depends on an external magnetic field, which makes it possible to adjust the magnitude of Casimir force. The effects of size, filling ratio, and magnetic property of the superparamagnetic particles on the tuning range are also investigated. Construction of such MMM using the micro/nanofabrication technology is promising to achieve magnetically controllable repulsive Casimir force.

  18. Robot force control for hazardous drilling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Gursel; Daniel, R. W.

    The use of robot manipulators for tasks which are inherently risky for human beings, specifically hazardous drilling operations, is investigated. Although drilling is one of the simplest and most basic metal cutting processes, robot drilling is problematic and has resulted in extreme operator fatigue and shorter drill life under telemanipulator control due to a number of possible causes such as dynamic and static effects. Both originate from differences between a robot and a drilling machine. A detailed study of the task highlighted the fact that it is necessary to regulate the distance dependent force by closed loop force control. How the robot type force could be controlled together with the robot position to allow fast drilling but without too much drill wear was considered. The answer was found in further exploration of the tasks which generated a set of specifications and problems that were addressed using novel strategies rather than those usually adopted for robots. The possible solutions are given in terms of a new control strategy and the correct choice of coordinate system to be used within that strategy.

  19. A Force-Sensing System on Legs for Biomimetic Hexapod Robots Interacting with Unstructured Terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Wu, Rui; Li, Changle; Zang, Xizhe; Zhang, Xuehe; Jin, Hongzhe; Zhao, Jie

    2017-06-27

    The tiger beetle can maintain its stability by controlling the interaction force between its legs and an unstructured terrain while it runs. The biomimetic hexapod robot mimics a tiger beetle, and a comprehensive force sensing system combined with certain algorithms can provide force information that can help the robot understand the unstructured terrain that it interacts with. This study introduces a complicated leg force sensing system for a hexapod robot that is the same for all six legs. First, the layout and configuration of sensing system are designed according to the structure and sizes of legs. Second, the joint toque sensors, 3-DOF foot-end force sensor and force information processing module are designed, and the force sensor performance parameters are tested by simulations and experiments. Moreover, a force sensing system is implemented within the robot control architecture. Finally, the experimental evaluation of the leg force sensor system on the hexapod robot is discussed and the performance of the leg force sensor system is verified.

  20. Flow Interactions and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    Simulation Spectra inside nozzle shows similar behavior to spectra along upstream shear layer Controlled transverse jet mixing requires...Distribution 3D physics-based morphology analysis of flexible flapping wings Wing gaits analysis using SVD (Singular Value

  1. Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.

    1989-01-01

    Version 3.12 of INCA provides user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems. System configuration and parameters easily adjusted, enabling INCA user to create compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in convenient manner. Full complement of graphical routines makes output easy to understand. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  2. Interactive Controls Analysis (INCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.

    1989-01-01

    Version 3.12 of INCA provides user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems. System configuration and parameters easily adjusted, enabling INCA user to create compensation networks and perform sensitivity analysis in convenient manner. Full complement of graphical routines makes output easy to understand. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  3. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeney, Sylvia [M E Mueller Institute for Structural Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 70, Basel, 4056 (Switzerland); Mor, Flavio; Forro, Laszlo [Laboratory of Complex Matter Physics (LPMC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Koszali, Roland [Institute for Information and Communication Technologies (IICT), University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland (HEIG-VD), Rue Galilee 15, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-bains (Switzerland); Moy, Vincent T, E-mail: sylvia.jeney@unibas.ch, E-mail: vmoy@miami.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1600 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2010-06-25

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand-receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three-dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond, with the lifetime increasing tenfold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements, as tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from polystyrene beads.

  4. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between active force dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Golkov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their mechanical environment. We model live cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate their elastic interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. For purely dilational eigenstrains the elastic interaction energy between any two bodies vanishes. We identify mechanical interactions between active cells applying non isotropic displacements with a regulation mechanism designed so that they will preserve their spherical shape. We express the resultant non-isotropic deformation field by a multipole expansion in terms of spherical harmonics. Mechanical self-regulation of live cells is not fully understood, and we compare homeostatic (set point) force applied by the cells on their environment versus homeostatic displacements on their surface. By including or excluding the first term of the expansion...

  5. Controllability in protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchty, Stefan

    2014-05-13

    Recently, the focus of network research shifted to network controllability, prompting us to determine proteins that are important for the control of the underlying interaction webs. In particular, we determined minimum dominating sets of proteins (MDSets) in human and yeast protein interaction networks. Such groups of proteins were defined as optimized subsets where each non-MDSet protein can be reached by an interaction from an MDSet protein. Notably, we found that MDSet proteins were enriched with essential, cancer-related, and virus-targeted genes. Their central position allowed MDSet proteins to connect protein complexes and to have a higher impact on network resilience than hub proteins. As for their involvement in regulatory functions, MDSet proteins were enriched with transcription factors and protein kinases and were significantly involved in bottleneck interactions, regulatory links, phosphorylation events, and genetic interactions.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy of dynamic protein DNA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van Simon Johannes Theodorus

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis a dedicated Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) setup is used for imaging biochemical reactions with molecular resolution. The basis for the high resolution of AFM is the combination of a small probe, close proximity to the sample and a short-range interaction between the probe and the samp

  7. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Glauber T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair...

  8. Weibull analyses of bacterial interaction forces measured using AFM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, Henderina; de Vries, Jacob; Busscher, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    Statistically significant conclusions from interaction forces obtained by AFM are difficult to draw because of large data spreads. Weibull analysis, common in macroscopic bond-strength analyses, takes advantage of this spread to derive a Weibull distribution, yielding the probability of occurrence o

  9. How Student Teachers Understand Distance Force Interactions in Different Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotoglou, Petros; Spyrtou, Anna; Tselfes, Vassilis

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe empirical research on the recording of primary school and preschool student teacher conceptions of the concept of distant force interactions in different contexts related to the school curriculum for this subject. For this objective to be achieved, we undertook ten semi-structured interviews with student teachers. Based…

  10. Interaction between polystyrene spheres by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Looi, L

    2002-01-01

    The interaction between a single polystyrene particle and a polystyrene substrate has been previously reported by a number of investigators. However, the effects of relative humidity, applied load and contact time on the adhesion of polystyrene surfaces have not been investigated and these effects are poorly understood. It is the primary aim of the current work to characterise the effect of the aforementioned parameters on the adhesion of polystyrene surfaces using atomic force microscopy. The polystyrene used in this study contained 1% of di-vinyl benzene as a cross-linking agent. From the work conducted using the custom-built instrument, the dependency of adhesion forces on the relative humidity is greatest at relative humidities above 60% where capillary forces cause a sharp increase in adhesion with increasing relative humidity. Hysteresis was observed in the solid-solid contact gradient of the accompanying force curves, suggesting non-elastic behaviour at the contact area of the surfaces

  11. Development of isometric force and force control in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Fifty-six children between 5 and 12 years of age and 15 adults performed a task (pressing on a lever with the index finger of the preferred hand), in which a force had to be maintained constant at five levels with on-line visual feedback. Since this is a simple isometric task, the hypothesis is that

  12. Development of isometric force and force control in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Westenberg, Y.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-six children between 5 and 12 years of age and 15 adults performed a task (pressing on a lever with the index finger of the preferred hand), in which a force had to be maintained constant at five levels with on-line visual feedback. Since this is a simple isometric task, the hypothesis is that

  13. Magnetostatic interactions and forces between cylindrical permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokoun, David [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: vokoun@fzu.cz; Beleggia, Marco [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Heller, Ludek; Sittner, Petr [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2009-11-15

    Permanent magnets of various shapes are often utilized in magnetic actuators, sensors or releasable magnetic fasteners. Knowledge of the magnetic force is required to control devices reliably. Here, we introduce an analytical expression for calculating the attraction force between two cylindrical permanent magnets on the assumption of uniform magnetization. Although the assumption is not fulfilled exactly in cylindrical magnets, we obtain a very good agreement between the calculated and measured forces between two identical cylindrical magnets and within an array of NdFeB cylindrical magnets.

  14. Magnetostatic interactions and forces between cylindrical permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, Marco; Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr

    2009-11-01

    Permanent magnets of various shapes are often utilized in magnetic actuators, sensors or releasable magnetic fasteners. Knowledge of the magnetic force is required to control devices reliably. Here, we introduce an analytical expression for calculating the attraction force between two cylindrical permanent magnets on the assumption of uniform magnetization. Although the assumption is not fulfilled exactly in cylindrical magnets, we obtain a very good agreement between the calculated and measured forces between two identical cylindrical magnets and within an array of NdFeB cylindrical magnets.

  15. Chemical Force Microscopy of Chemical and Biological Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noy, A

    2006-01-02

    Interactions between chemical functionalities define outcomes of the vast majority of important events in chemistry, biology and materials science. Chemical Force Microscopy (CFM)--a technique that uses direct chemical functionalization of AFM probes with specific functionalities--allows researchers to investigate these important interactions directly. We review the basic principles of CFM, some examples of its application, and theoretical models that provide the basis for understanding the experimental results. We also emphasize application of modern kinetic theory of non-covalent interactions strength to the analysis of CFM data.

  16. Direct force measurement of single DNA-peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ji W; Shin, Dongjin; Kwak, June M; Seog, Joonil

    2013-06-01

    The selective interactions between DNA and miniature (39 residues) engineered peptide were directly measured at the single-molecule level by using atomic force microscopy. This peptide (p007) contains an α-helical recognition site similar to leucine zipper GCN4 and specifically recognizes the ATGAC sequence in the DNA with nanomolar affinity. The average rupture force was 42.1 pN, which is similar to the unbinding forces of the digoxigenin-antidigoxigenin complex, one of the strongest interactions in biological systems. The single linear fit of the rupture forces versus the logarithm of pulling rates showed a single energy barrier with a transition state located at 0.74 nm from the bound state. The smaller koff compared with that of other similar systems was presumably due to the increased stability of the helical structure by putative folding residues in p007. This strong sequence-specific DNA-peptide interaction has a potential to be utilized to prepare well-defined mechanically stable DNA-protein hybrid nanostructures.

  17. A hybrid Force Position Control for a Upper Limb Rehabilitation Robot of Series Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yali; Ji Linhong

    2016-01-01

    Interactive rehabilitation robot which has better interaction is one main method to improve the patients’ motion performance. The rehabilitation robot developed by Tsinghua University UECM for patients having weakness with shoulder and elbow should be improved by increasing interactive parts to adapt to patients’ state. This paper described one control strategy to increase the interaction between robot and patients. The hybrid force position control for the upper limb rehabilitation robot UEC...

  18. Interactive Control of Prototyping Process

    OpenAIRE

    Luqi; Lee, Yuh-jeng

    1989-01-01

    We present the use of CAPS (Computer-aided Prototyping System) for the interactive construction, execution, debugging, modification, and controlling of software prototypes. We discuss the current version of CAPS, explicate its user interface for monitoring and coordinating the prototype development process, and depict the functioning of each of the integrated software tools.

  19. Gemstone Grinding Process Improvement by using Impedance Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamprommarat Chumpol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chula Automatic Faceting Machine has been developed by The Advance Manufacturing Research Lab, Chulalongkorn University to support Thailand Gems-Industry. The machine has high precision motion control by using position and force control. A contact stiffness model is used to estimate grinding force. Although polished gems from the Faceting Machine have uniform size and acceptable shape, the force of the grinding and polishing process cannot be maintain constant and has some fluctuation due to indirect force control. Therefor this research work propose a new controller for this process based on an impedance direct force control to improve the gemstone grinding performance during polishing process. The grinding force can be measured through motor current. The results show that the polished gems by using impedance direct force control can maintain uniform size as well as good shape and high quality surface.

  20. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155 Section 23.155 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control...

  1. Feedback control of inertial microfluidics using axial control forces

    CERN Document Server

    Prohm, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Inertial microfluidics is a promising tool for many lab-on-a-chip applications. Particles in channel flows with Reynolds numbers above one undergo cross-streamline migration to a discrete set of equilibrium positions in square and rectangular channel cross sections. This effect has been used extensively for particle sorting and the analysis of particle properties. Using the lattice Boltzmann method, we determine equilibrium positions in square and rectangular cross sections and classify their types of stability for different Reynolds numbers, particle sizes, and channel aspect ratios. Our findings thereby help to design microfluidic channels for particle sorting. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an axial control force, which slows down the particles, shifts the stable equilibrium position towards the channel center. Ultimately, the particles then stay on the centerline for forces exceeding a threshold value. This effect is sensitive to particle size and channel Reynolds number and therefore suggests an efficie...

  2. Physics-Based Visual Characterization of Molecular Interaction Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosilla, Pedro; Estrada, Jorge; Guallar, Victor; Ropinski, Timo; Vinacua, Alvar; Vazquez, Pere-Pau

    2017-01-01

    Molecular simulations are used in many areas of biotechnology, such as drug design and enzyme engineering. Despite the development of automatic computational protocols, analysis of molecular interactions is still a major aspect where human comprehension and intuition are key to accelerate, analyze, and propose modifications to the molecule of interest. Most visualization algorithms help the users by providing an accurate depiction of the spatial arrangement: the atoms involved in inter-molecular contacts. There are few tools that provide visual information on the forces governing molecular docking. However, these tools, commonly restricted to close interaction between atoms, do not consider whole simulation paths, long-range distances and, importantly, do not provide visual cues for a quick and intuitive comprehension of the energy functions (modeling intermolecular interactions) involved. In this paper, we propose visualizations designed to enable the characterization of interaction forces by taking into account several relevant variables such as molecule-ligand distance and the energy function, which is essential to understand binding affinities. We put emphasis on mapping molecular docking paths obtained from Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, and provide time-dependent visualizations for different energy components and particle resolutions: atoms, groups or residues. The presented visualizations have the potential to support domain experts in a more efficient drug or enzyme design process.

  3. Vascular endothelium-leukocyte interaction; sticking shear force in venules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Schoenbein, G W; Fung, Y C; Zweifach, B W

    1975-01-01

    To determine the shear force acting on a white blood cell sticking to the endothelium of a blood vessel, the flow field about a single white blood cell in a venule was determined by hign-speed motion picture photomicrography. The force acting on the white blood cell was then calculated according to the principles of fluid mechanics. In this paper, the calculation was made using an experimentally determined dimensionless shear force coefficient obtained from a kinematically and dynamically similar model. The large physical model of the hemodynamic system could be easily instrumented, and the shear force acting on the model cell and the flow field around it were measured. The data were then used to calculate a shear force coefficient. On the basis of dynamic similarity, this shear force coefficient was applied to the white blood cell in the venule. The shear force coefficient was strongly influenced by the hematocrit, so in vivo hematocrits were measured from electron micrographs. It was found that in the venules of the rabbit omentum a white blood cell sticking to the endothelial wall was subjected to a shear force in the range of 4 times 10--5 dynes to 234 times 10--5 dynes; the exact value depended on the size and motion of the white blood cell, the size of the blood vessel, the velocity of the blood flow, and the local hematocrit, which varied between 20% and 40% in venules of about 40 mum in diameter. The contact area between the white blood cell and the endothelial cell was estimated, and the shear stress was found to range between 50 dynes/cm-2 and 1060 dynes/cm-2. The normal stress of interaction between the white blood cell and the endothelium had a maximum value that was of the same order of magnitude as the shear stress. The accumulated relative error of the experimental procedure was about 49%. The instantaneous shear force was a random function of time because of random fluctuations of the hematocrit.

  4. Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction in Forced Shock Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piotr Doerffer; Oskar Szulc; Franco Magagnato

    2003-01-01

    The flow in transonic diffusers as well as in supersonic air intakes becomes often unsteady due to shock wave boundary layer interaction. The oscillations may be induced by natural separation unsteadiness or may be forced by boundary conditions. Significant improvement of CFD tools, increase of computer resources as well as development of experimental methods have again.drawn the attention of researchers to this topic.To investigate the problem forced oscillations of transonic turbulent flow in asymmetric two-dimensional Laval nozzle were considered. A viscous, perfect gas flow, was numerically simulated using the Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes solver SPARC, employing a two-equation, eddy viscosity, turbulence closure in the URANS approach.For time-dependent and stationary flow simulations, Mach numbers upstream of the shock between 1.2 and 1.4 were considered. Comparison of computed and experimental data for steady states generally gave acceptable agreement. In the case of forced oscillations, a harmonic pressure variation was prescribed at the exit plane resulting in shock wave motion. Excitation frequencies between 0 Hz and 1024 Hz were investigated at the same pressure amplitude.The main result of the work carried out is the relation between the amplitude of the shock wave motion and the excitation frequency in the investigated range. Increasing excitation frequency resulted in decreasing amplitude of the shock movement. At high frequencies a natural mode of shock oscillation (of small amplitude) was observed which is not sensitive to forced excitement.

  5. Digital Control of Bonding Force for Gold Wire Bonding Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to digitally control the bonding force of a wire bonder precisely, this paper uses a DC solenoid as a force source, and by controlling the solenoid’s current, which causes the electromagnetic force, we can control the bonding force that capillary applies. The bonding force control system in this paper is composed of PC (Personal Computer and hypogyny MCU (Micro Controller Unit, which communicate using a RS485 interface. The digital value of a given bonding force is given by the PC to the MCU. By comparing the sampling current of the solenoid, and through PID regulation, D/A converter of the digital potentiometer and the solenoid driver circuit, the half-closed loop control system of bonding force is accomplished. Tuning of the PID parameters is accomplished with fuzzy adaptive control theory and simulated by Matlab simulink. The control system is tested by comparing the desired bonding force and the force actually applied and examming the relationship between bonding quality and bonding force.

  6. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  7. Computer-Controlled Force Generator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TDA Research, Inc. is developing a compact, low power, Next-Generation Exercise Device (NGRED) that can generate any force between 5 and 600 lbf. We use a closed...

  8. Interacting Stochastic Processes: From Viciousness to Caging to Force Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shiliyang

    the heterogeneous force network present in amorphous solids near the onset of rigidity, or jamming. The onset of rigidity can, in some sense, be viewed an interacting stochastic process with added constraints to enforce force-balance on each particle, for example. Our analysis yields string-like correlations in the locally-large forces in the system. Such correlations are reminiscent of force chains. While force chains have been readily observed in experiments, it is the first time these correlations have been observed in conjugate gradient simulations of repulsive soft spheres. We also study the contact geometry of the force network and explore a link with spin systems, namely spin glasses, to search for signatures of chaos due to marginal stability, for instance. Connections between jamming systems and spin glass systems will hopefully open up new avenues of theoretical investigation for both systems. Finally, we explore the quantum version of an individual stochastic process, namely the fractional Schrodinger equation. We prove that previously claimed exact solutions for certain potentials are incorrect and determine a new exact solution for a Levy index of unity and the harmonic oscillator potential. While our results contribute to the realm of mathematical physics, a physical realization of the fractional Schrodinger equation will indeed launch a new subfield of quantum mechanics.

  9. Classical and fluctuation-induced electromagnetic interactions in micronscale systems: designer bonding, antibonding, and Casimir forces

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Woolf, David N; Johnson, Steven G; Loncar, Marko; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Whether intentionally introduced to exert control over particles and macroscopic objects, such as for trapping or cooling, or whether arising from the quantum and thermal fluctuations of charges in otherwise neutral bodies, leading to unwanted stiction between nearby mechanical parts, electromagnetic interactions play a fundamental role in many naturally occurring processes and technologies. In this review, we survey recent progress in the understanding and experimental observation of optomechanical and quantum-fluctuation forces. Although both of these effects arise from exchange of electromagnetic momentum, their dramatically different origins, involving either real or virtual photons, lead to different physical manifestations and design principles. Specifically, we describe recent predictions and measurements of attractive and repulsive optomechanical forces, based on the bonding and antibonding interactions of evanescent waves, as well as predictions of modified and even repulsive Casimir forces between n...

  10. Motivating forces of human actions. Neuroimaging reward and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Henrik; Abler, Birgit; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Erk, Susanne

    2005-11-15

    In neuroeconomics, reward and social interaction are central concepts to understand what motivates human behaviour. Both concepts are investigated in humans using neuroimaging methods. In this paper, we provide an overview about these results and discuss their relevance for economic behaviour. For reward it has been shown that a system exists in humans that is involved in predicting rewards and thus guides behaviour, involving a circuit including the striatum, the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala. Recent studies on social interaction revealed a mentalizing system representing the mental states of others. A central part of this system is the medial prefrontal cortex, in particular the anterior paracingulate cortex. The reward as well as the mentalizing system is engaged in economic decision-making. We will discuss implications of this study for neuromarketing as well as general implications of these results that may help to provide deeper insights into the motivating forces of human behaviour.

  11. Probing anisotropic surface properties and interaction forces of chrysotile rods by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dingzheng; Xie, Lei; Bobicki, Erin; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the surface properties and interactions of nonspherical particles is of both fundamental and practical importance in the rheology of complex fluids in various engineering applications. In this work, natural chrysotile, a phyllosilicate composed of 1:1 stacked silica and brucite layers which coil into cylindrical structure, was chosen as a model rod-shaped particle. The interactions of chrysotile brucite-like basal or bilayered edge planes and a silicon nitride tip were measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The force-distance profiles were fitted using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which demonstrates anisotropic and pH-dependent surface charge properties of brucite-like basal plane and bilayered edge surface. The points of zero charge (PZC) of the basal and edge planes were estimated to be around pH 10-11 and 6-7, respectively. Rheology measurements of 7 vol % chrysotile (with an aspect ratio of 14.5) in 10 mM NaCl solution showed pH-dependent yield stress with a local maximum around pH 7-9, which falls between the two PZC values of the edge and basal planes of the rod particles. On the basis of the surface potentials of the edge and basal planes obtained from AFM measurements, theoretical analysis of the surface interactions of edge-edge, basal-edge, and basal-basal planes of the chrysotile rods suggests the yield stress maximum observed could be mainly attributed to the basal-edge attractions. Our results indicate that the anisotropic surface properties (e.g., charges) of chrysotile rods play an important role in the particle-particle interaction and rheological behavior, which also provides insight into the basic understanding of the colloidal interactions and rheology of nonspherical particles.

  12. Force Control Strategies in Hydraulically Actuated Legged Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Montes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, several strategies of force control have been proposed to be implemented and evaluated in ROBOCLIMBER, a quadruped robot of large dimensions. A first group of strategies proposed in this paper is based on impedance control, which is intended to adapt the foot-ground contact forces according to the experimentally specified damping ratio and the undamped natural frequency. A second control strategy of interest for many practical cases is called the parallel force/position control, which has one inner loop position control and two external control loops, one of force and another of position. A third group of control strategies is the posture stabilization for ROBOCLIMBER using the feedback of the ZMP calculation and the position of its legs. Finally, a control strategy for the control of a quasi-static gait using ZMP feedback is proposed and tested by simulation.

  13. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain.

  14. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  15. The Tip-Sample Interaction in Atomic Force Microscopy and its Implications for Biological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselt, David Randall

    This thesis describes the construction of an atomic force microscope and its application to the study of tip -sample interactions, primarily through the use of friction and hardness (elasticity) imaging. Part one describes the atomic force microscope, which consists of a scanned-cantilever stage (chapter 2); a versatile digital signal processor-based control system with self-optimizing feedback, lock-in amplifier emulation (for hardness imaging), and macro programmability (chapter 3); and image processing software (chapter 4). Part two describes a number of results that have helped to characterize the tip-sample interaction and the contact imaging modes used for its study. Meniscus forces act laterally as well as normally, and that they vary with position (chapter 5). Friction measurements couple with scanner position and feedback, and the meniscus effects friction images (chapter 6). Sliding of the tip over the sample surface introduces slope-dependence into hardness measurements (chapter 7). Dull tips can create prominent topography artifacts even on very flat surfaces (chapter 8). In an investigation of collagen fibrils, AFM has revealed the characteristic 65 nm banding pattern, a second, minor banding pattern, and microfibrils that run along the fibril axis. The distribution of proteoglycans along the fibrils creates a characteristic pattern in friction images. Although imaging in water reduces interaction forces, water can also make biological samples more sensitive to force. However, for robust biological samples imaged in air, tip shape presents a greater obstacle than tip -sample interaction forces to obtaining high-resolution images. Tip contamination increases tip-sample friction and can occasionally improve resolution (chapter 9). For a separate project I have designed a general -purpose nearfield scanning optical microscope (chapter 10).

  16. Dynamic control of aerodynamic forces on a moving platform using active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Daniel P.

    The unsteady interaction between trailing edge aerodynamic flow control and airfoil motion in pitch and plunge is investigated in wind tunnel experiments using a two degree-of-freedom traverse which enables application of time-dependent external torque and forces by servo motors. The global aerodynamic forces and moments are regulated by controlling vorticity generation and accumulation near the trailing edge of the airfoil using hybrid synthetic jet actuators. The dynamic coupling between the actuation and the time-dependent flow field is characterized using simultaneous force and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements that are taken phase-locked to the commanded actuation waveform. The effect of the unsteady motion on the model-embedded flow control is assessed in both trajectory tracking and disturbance rejection maneuvers. The time-varying aerodynamic lift and pitching moment are estimated from a PIV wake survey using a reduced order model based on classical unsteady aerodynamic theory. These measurements suggest that the entire flow over the airfoil readjusts within 2--3 convective time scales, which is about two orders of magnitude shorter than the characteristic time associated with the controlled maneuver of the wind tunnel model. This illustrates that flow-control actuation can be typically effected on time scales that are commensurate with the flow's convective time scale, and that the maneuver response is primarily limited by the inertia of the platform.

  17. Precision Force Control for an Electro-Hydraulic Press Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ming Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This thesis is primarily intended to design a PC-based control system to control the force of an electro-hydraulic servo press system for implementing precision force control. The main feature is to develop a composite control by using the relief valve and the flow servo valve. Using feedback from a force sensor, a fuzzy controller was designed with LabVIEW software as the system control core for achieving a precision force control for the hydraulic cylinder on its travel and output. The weakness of hydraulic systems is that hydraulic oil is compressible and prone to leaking, and its characteristics can vary with oil temperature, thus making it difficult for a general linear controller to achieve accurate control. Therefore, a fuzzy controller was designed with LabVIEW along with a NI-PCI_6221 interface card and a load cell to control the servo valve flow and the relief valve to control the pressure source. The testing results indicate that accurate force control output of an electro-hydraulic servo press system can be obtained.

  18. A methodology for controlling motion and constraint forces in holonomically constrained systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapio, Vincent De, E-mail: vdesapio@hrl.com; Srinivasa, Narayan, E-mail: nsrinivasa@hrl.com [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Information and Systems Sciences Laboratory (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Holonomic constraints are ubiquitous in multibody systems. We present an approach to effectively address the control of holonomically constrained systems using a novel decomposition of task, constraint, and posture space. In addition to providing a natural approach for motion control in the presence of constraints, this scheme also allows for concurrent specification of desired constraint forces, given sufficient actuation. It does this by exposing both motion coordinates and constraint forces within the control formalism, allowing for substantial flexibility in control synthesis. Implementations are presented based on a partitioning of the constraint forces into controlled and uncontrolled subsets, as well as a specification of implicit conditions on the constraint forces. A number of examples demonstrate the practical efficacy of the approach. Finally, a system-level methodology for constraint management during robot interactions with the environment is presented.

  19. Hybrid Force Motion Synchronization Control of Robot Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Fikkan, Kristoffer

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to combine the theory on synchronization of robot manipulators with the concept of hybrid force/motion control; resulting in a controller capable of following both the trajectory of another robot and a desired force trajectory at the same time. This report includes a short introduction to synchronization theory for robot manipulators, and a more thorough summary of existing hybrid control schemes. An intuitive method for describing constraints caused...

  20. Force controller design and evaluation for robot-assisted die and mould polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvenç, Levent; Srinivasan, Krishnaswamy

    1995-01-01

    A significant portion of the total manufacturing time for a die or a mould, both used extensively in producing complex shaped parts, is spent on surface finishing operations following the primary machining of the die or mould cavity. Hence, there is considerable incentive in pursuing even partial automation of die or mould surface finishing operations. This paper concentrates on the control issues that arise during automation of die and mould surface finishing using industrial robot held tools, with particular attention being devoted to the design and evaluation of force controllers to maintain the desired tool-workpiece interaction. Simplified models of the polishing process including the effect of robot structural compliance are presented first, for analysing and designing controllers. A through-the-arm robot force control implementation using off-the-shelf tooling is discussed next. However, the major focus of this paper is on active end effector force control since there are limitations in the performance of the through-the-arm force control loop. Active end effector force controller design requirements and a simple robust stability test in the face of model uncertainty are given and applied to several design examples. Results of force controller analysis and design are verified by experiments where force regulation during polishing and trajectory tracking are demonstrated.

  1. Interaction Tasks and Controls for Public Display Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C. S. Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Public displays are becoming increasingly interactive and a broad range of interaction mechanisms can now be used to create multiple forms of interaction. However, the lack of interaction abstractions forces each developer to create specific approaches for dealing with interaction, preventing users from building consistent expectations on how to interact across different display systems. There is a clear analogy with the early days of the graphical user interface, when a similar problem was addressed with the emergence of high-level interaction abstractions that provided consistent interaction experiences to users and shielded developers from low-level details. This work takes a first step in that same direction by uncovering interaction abstractions that may lead to the emergence of interaction controls for applications in public displays. We identify a new set of interaction tasks focused on the specificities of public displays; we characterise interaction controls that may enable those interaction tasks to be integrated into applications; we create a mapping between the high-level abstractions provided by the interaction tasks and the concrete interaction mechanisms that can be implemented by those displays. Together, these contributions constitute a step towards the emergence of programming toolkits with widgets that developers could incorporate into their public display applications.

  2. A novel adaptive force control method for IPMC manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lina; Sun, Zhiyong; Li, Zhi; Su, Yunquan; Gao, Jianchao

    2012-07-01

    IPMC is a type of electro-active polymer material, also called artificial muscle, which can generate a relatively large deformation under a relatively low input voltage (generally speaking, less than 5 V), and can be implemented in a water environment. Due to these advantages, IPMC can be used in many fields such as biomimetics, service robots, bio-manipulation, etc. Until now, most existing methods for IPMC manipulation are displacement control not directly force control, however, under most conditions, the success rate of manipulations for tiny fragile objects is limited by the contact force, such as using an IPMC gripper to fix cells. Like most EAPs, a creep phenomenon exists in IPMC, of which the generated force will change with time and the creep model will be influenced by the change of the water content or other environmental factors, so a proper force control method is urgently needed. This paper presents a novel adaptive force control method (AIPOF control—adaptive integral periodic output feedback control), based on employing a creep model of which parameters are obtained by using the FRLS on-line identification method. The AIPOF control method can achieve an arbitrary pole configuration as long as the plant is controllable and observable. This paper also designs the POF and IPOF controller to compare their test results. Simulation and experiments of micro-force-tracking tests are carried out, with results confirming that the proposed control method is viable.

  3. Interaction of cationic hydrophobic surfactants at negatively charged surfaces investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Higashitani, Ko; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kappl, Michael

    2009-10-06

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the adsorption of the surfactant octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C18TAC) at a low concentration (0.03 mM) to negatively charged surfaces in water. Atomic force microscopy tips were functionalized with dimethyloctadecyl(3-tripropyl)ammonium chloride (C18TAC-si) or N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammomium chloride (hydrophilpos-si) to facilitate imaging of the adsorbed surfactant without artifacts. Tapping mode images and force measurements revealed C18TAC patches, identified as partial surfactant bilayers or hemimicelles. The forces controlling the adsorption process of the C18TAC to a negatively charged surface were investigated by measuring the forces between a C18TAC-si or a hydrophilpos-si tip and a silica surface in the presence of varying concentrations of either NaCl or NaNO3. Screening of forces with an increasing NaCl concentration was observed for the C18TAC-si and hydrophilpos-si tips, proving an electrostatic contribution. Screening was also observed for the hydrophilpos-si tip in NaNO3, whereas a long-range attraction was observed for the C18TAC-si tip for all NaNO3 concentrations. These results indicate that screening of the forces for the C18TAC-si tip depended on the type and/or size of the anion, possibly due to a different probability of the anions to enter the silane layers. The interaction of C18TAC patches with C18TAC-si tips in the presence of NaCl and the interaction of the patches with hydrophilpos-si tips in either NaCl or NaNO3 were repulsive and independent of the number of force curves measured, indicating a stable, positively charged C18TAC patch. However, the forces measured between the patches and a C18TAC-si tip in NaNO3 depended on the number of force curves measured, indicating a change in patch structure induced by the first interaction.

  4. Controlled Interactions between Two Dimensional Layered Inorganic Nanosheets and Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    polymers . 2. Introduction . Research objectives: This research aims to study the physical (van der Waals forces: crystal epitaxy and π-π...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0071 Controlled Interactions between Two Dimensional Layered Inorganic Nanosheets and Polymers Cheolmin Park YONSEI UNIVERSITY...Interactions between Two Dimensional Layered Inorganic Nanosheets and Polymers 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4054 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT

  5. Force Characteristics in Continuous Path Controlled Crankpin Grinding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Manchao; YAO Zhenqiang

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the grinding force involved in cylindrical plunge grinding has focused mainly on steady-state conditions. Unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the conditions between the grinding wheel and the crankpin change periodically in path controlled grinding because of the eccentricity of the crankpin and the constant rotational speed of the crankshaft. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of various grinding conditions on the characteristics of the grinding force during continuous path controlled grinding. Path controlled plunge grinding is conducted at a constant rotational speed using a cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheel. The grinding force is determined by measuring the torque. The experimental results show that the force and torque vary sinusoidally during dry grinding and load grinding. The variations in the results reveal that the resultant grinding force and torque decrease with higher grinding speeds and increase with higher peripheral speeds of the pin and higher grinding depths. In path controlled grinding, unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the axial grinding force cannot be disregarded. The speeds and speed ratios of the workpiece and wheel are also analyzed, and the analysis results show that up-grinding and down-grinding occur during the grinding process. This paper proposes a method for describing the force behavior under varied process conditions during continuous path controlled grinding, which provides a beneficial reference for describing the material removal mechanism and for optimizing continuous controlled crankpin grinding.

  6. Intermittent gear rattle due to interactions between forcing and manufacturing errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottewill, James R.; Neild, Simon A.; Wilson, R. Eddie

    2009-04-01

    The interaction between eccentricity and an external forcing fluctuation in gear rattle response is investigated experimentally. The experimental rig consists of a 1:1 ratio steel spur gear pair, the input gear being controlled in displacement and the output gear being under no load. Gear transmission errors recorded using high accuracy encoders are presented. Large variations in backlash oscillation amplitude are observed as the relative phase of the input forcing and the sinusoidal static transmission error due to eccentricity is varied. A simplified mathematical model incorporating eccentricity is developed. It is compared with experimental findings for three different gear eccentricity alignments by way of plots relating backlash oscillation amplitude to forcing amplitude and phase relative to eccentricity sinusoid. It is shown that eccentricity does not fully account for the experimentally observed large variations in amplitude. Through analysis of the experimental data, it is suggested that further tooth profiling errors may explain the discrepancies.

  7. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  8. Force and Acceleration Sensor Fusion for Compliant Robot Motion Control

    OpenAIRE

    Gámez García, Javier; Robertsson, Anders; Gómez Ortega, Juan; Johansson, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we present implementation and experiment of the theory of dynamic force sensing for robotic manipulators, which uses a sensor fusion technique in order to extract the contact force exerted by the end-effector of the manipulator from those measured by a wrist force sensor, which are corrupted by the inertial forces on the end-effector. We propose a new control strategy based on multisensor fusion with three different sensors that is, encoders mounted at each joint of the robot wi...

  9. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  10. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bruegger, Georges; Scheffold, Frank; Saenz, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with "optical tweezers" as well as to induce significant "optical binding" forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light induced interactions open a path towards...

  11. Prosthetic Leg Control in the Nullspace of Human Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Robert D.; Martin, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has extended the control method of virtual constraints, originally developed for autonomous walking robots, to powered prosthetic legs for lower-limb amputees. Virtual constraints define desired joint patterns as functions of a mechanical phasing variable, which are typically enforced by torque control laws that linearize the output dynamics associated with the virtual constraints. However, the output dynamics of a powered prosthetic leg generally depend on the human interaction forces, which must be measured and canceled by the feedback linearizing control law. This feedback requires expensive multi-axis load cells, and actively canceling the interaction forces may minimize the human's influence over the prosthesis. To address these limitations, this paper proposes a method for projecting virtual constraints into the nullspace of the human interaction terms in the output dynamics. The projected virtual constraints naturally render the output dynamics invariant with respect to the human interaction forces, which instead enter into the internal dynamics of the partially linearized prosthetic system. This method is illustrated with simulations of a transfemoral amputee model walking with a powered knee-ankle prosthesis that is controlled via virtual constraints with and without the proposed projection. PMID:27746585

  12. Wireless control and selection of forces and torques - towards wireless engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyvat, M.; Hafner, C.; Leuthold, J.

    2014-07-01

    Powering and manipulating translational and rotational motions of objects wirelessly, and controlling several objects independently is of significant importance in numerous fields such as robotics, medicine, biology, fluid dynamics, optics. We propose a method based on coupled LC resonators, to control objects selectively by steering the frequency of an external magnetic field. This concept does not need any magnetic materials and it brings a rich variety of features concerning forces and torques. We theoretically and experimentally show that the forces can be enhanced by the interaction of resonators and that both direction and magnitude of forces can be controlled by the frequency of the applied external magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate interesting rotational effects, such as bi-directionally controllable torques, controllable stable orientations, and spinning, which leads to a wirelessly powered motor.

  13. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chibum [Department of Mechanical System Design Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Salapaka, Srinivasa M., E-mail: salapaka@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  14. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  15. Vibration control of an elastic strip by a singular force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Erol Uzal; Banu Korbahti

    2010-04-01

    Vibration characteristics of an elastic plate in the shape of an infinite strip are changed by applying a lateral concentrated force to the plate. The homogeneous, isotropic, elastic plate is infinite in the -direction and the sides are simply supported. The size of the force is changed in proportion to the displacement measured at a certain point of the plate. The proportionality constant serves as the control parameter. The mathematical formulation of this distributed control problem and its analytical solution in terms of the vibration frequencies of the plate are given. The vibration frequencies are plotted as a function of the control parameter.

  16. Myoelectric hand prosthesis force control through servo motor current feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sono, Tálita Saemi Payossim; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the prehension force closed-loop control design of a mechanical finger commanded by electromyographic signal (EMG) from a patient's arm. The control scheme was implemented and tested in a mechanical finger prototype with three degrees of freedom and one actuator, driven by arm muscles EMG of normal volunteers. Real-time indirect estimation of prehension force was assessed by measuring the DC servo motor actuator current. A model of the plant comprising finger, motor, and grasped object was proposed. Model parameters were identified experimentally and a classical feedback phase-lead compensator was designed. The controlled mechanical finger was able to provide a more accurate prehension force modulation of a compliant object when compared to open-loop control.

  17. Control of the collapse of a Bose Condensate by Optical Dipole Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付海翔; 罗有华; 李明哲; 高波; 王育竹

    2003-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme of using the far-off resonance optical dipole force to control tunable collapse of Bose-Einstein condensation with attractive interactions. This scheme can conveniently alter collapse phenomena while keeping interatomic processes unchanged. Effects on the critical interaction strength and time delay are studied with numerical simulation. We show that for the blue-detuning case those two quantities are increased while for the red-detuning case they are decreased.

  18. Forced dynamic position control of PMSM with DTC utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Michal

    2012-11-01

    Almost one and a half century after the publication of Maxwell’s On Governors, feedback theory with PID controllers in cascade structure is still an essential part of control structures of most controlled electric drives. There are a few control strategies which are “ready” to replace it but they usually miss one of the essential fundamentals of every successful approach - simplicity hand in hand with lucidity. But there is one close relative which is simple and powerful at the same time, is not excessively abstract and without complicated mathematics. The name of this technique is Forced Dynamic Control. In this paper forced dynamic control is presented together with direct torque controlled PMSM drive as unique combination of simple algorithms for inner and outer loop of cascade structure.

  19. System Identification Tools for Control Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    DT! FILE COPY AL-TR-89-054 AD: 00 Final Report System Identification Tools for O for the period - September 1988 to Control Structure Interaction May...Classification) System Identification Tools for Control Structure Interaction (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kosut, Robert L.; Kabuli, Guntekin M. 13a. TYPE OF...identification, dynamics, 22 01 system identification , robustness, dynamic modeling, robust 22 02 control design, control design procedure 19. ABSTRACT

  20. Controls of interaction dynamics of orbital assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Renjeng

    1991-01-01

    Building structures and spacecraft in orbit will require technologies for positioning, docking/berthing, and joining orbital structures. A fundamental problem underlying the operation of docking and berthing is that of controlling the contact dynamics of mechanical structures actuated by active mechanisms such as robotic devices. Control systems must be designed to control these active mechanisms so that both the free space motions and contact motions are stable and satisfy specifications on position accuracy and bounds on contact forces. For the large orbital structures of the future, the problem of interactive dynamics and control is fundamentally different in several ways than it was for spacecraft docking in the past. First, future space structures must be treated as flexible structures - the operations of docking, berthing, and assembly will need to respect the vibrations of the structures. Second, the assembly of these structures will require multiple-point contact, rather than the essentially single-point positioning of conventional spacecraft docking. Third, some assembly operations require the subassemblies to be brought and held in contact so that successful joining can be accomplished. A preliminary study of contact stability and compliance control design has resulted in the development of an analytical method and a design method to analyze stability. The analytical method analyzes the problem of stability when an actively-controlled structure contacts a passive structure. This method makes it possible to accurately estimate the stiffness of the passive structures with which the contact motion will become unstable. The analytic results suggest that passivity is neither achievable in practice, nor necessary as a design concept. A contact control system need only be passive up to a certain frequency; beyond that frequency the system can be stabilized with sufficiently small gains. With this concept the Center developed a design methodology for achieving

  1. Control of a Robot Dancer for Enhancing Haptic Human-Robot Interaction in Waltz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongbo Wang; Kosuge, K

    2012-01-01

    Haptic interaction between a human leader and a robot follower in waltz is studied in this paper. An inverted pendulum model is used to approximate the human's body dynamics. With the feedbacks from the force sensor and laser range finders, the robot is able to estimate the human leader's state by using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). To reduce interaction force, two robot controllers, namely, admittance with virtual force controller, and inverted pendulum controller, are proposed and evaluated in experiments. The former controller failed the experiment; reasons for the failure are explained. At the same time, the use of the latter controller is validated by experiment results.

  2. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. A drawback of active prostheses is that they detach the subject from the produced forces, thereby preventing direct mechanical feedback. This can be compensated by providing somatosensory feedback to the user through mechanical or electrical stimulation, which in turn may improve the utility, sense of embodiment, and thereby increase the acceptance rate. Approach. In this study, we compared a novel approach to closing the loop, namely EMG feedback (emgFB), to classic force feedback (forceFB), using electrotactile interface in a realistic task setup. Eleven intact-bodied subjects and one transradial amputee performed a routine grasping task while receiving emgFB or forceFB. The two feedback types were delivered through the same electrotactile interface, using a mixed spatial/frequency coding to transmit 8 discrete levels of the feedback variable. In emgFB, the stimulation transmitted the amplitude of the processed myoelectric signal generated by the subject (prosthesis input), and in forceFB the generated grasping force (prosthesis output). The task comprised 150 trials of routine grasping at six forces, randomly presented in blocks of five trials (same force). Interquartile range and changes in the absolute error (AE) distribution (magnitude and dispersion) with respect to the target level were used to assess precision and overall performance, respectively. Main results. Relative to forceFB, emgFB significantly improved the precision of myoelectric commands (min/max of the significant levels) for 23%/36% as well as the precision of force control for 12%/32%, in intact-bodied subjects. Also, the magnitude and dispersion of the AE distribution were reduced. The results were similar in the amputee, showing considerable improvements. Significance. Using emgFB, the subjects therefore decreased the uncertainty of the forward pathway. Since there is a correspondence between the EMG and force, where the former anticipates the latter, the emgFB allowed for

  3. Formation control of robotic swarm using bounded artificial forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Long; Zha, Yabing; Yin, Quanjun; Peng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions.

  4. Formation Control of Robotic Swarm Using Bounded Artificial Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions.

  5. A rigorous framework for interactive robot control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramigioli, S; Fasse, ED; Willems, JC

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a rigorous, analytical framework for interactive control methods such as stiffness and impedance control. This paper does not present a novel synthesis method for robot control design. Rather, it presents a proper framework to analyse controllers for robots whose purpose is to in

  6. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  7. Co-robotic ultrasound imaging: a cooperative force control approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchi, Rodolfo; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Fang, Ting Yun; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging remains one of the most commonly used imaging modalities in medical practice. However, due to the physical effort required to perform US imaging tasks, 63-91% of ultrasonographers develop musculoskeletal disorders throughout their careers. The goal of this work is to provide ultrasonographers with a system that facilitates and reduces strain in US image acquisition. To this end, we propose a system for admittance force robot control that uses the six-degree-of-freedom UR5 industrial robot. A six-axis force sensor is used to measure the forces and torques applied by the sonographer on the probe. As the sonographer pushes against the US probe, the robot complies with these forces, following the user's desired path. A one-axis load cell is used to measure contact forces between the patient and the probe in real time. When imaging, the robot augments the axial forces applied by the user, lessening the physical effort required. User studies showed an overall decrease in hand tremor while imaging at high forces, improvements in image stability, and a decrease in difficulty and strenuousness.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF GRIP FORCE CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorij Kurillo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The majority of hand functionality tests are based on qualitative assessment which largely depends on the experience of the therapist. Computer-assisted methods can provide more objective and accurate measurements of the grip force and other parameters related to grasping.Methods. We analysed the grip force control in 12 patients with muscular dystrophy using the tracking system developed. The system consists of a grip-measuring device with endobjects assessing the force applied in different grips. The device was used as input to a tracking task where the patient applied the grip force according to the visual feedback from the computer screen. Each patient performed two tasks which consisted of tracking a ramp and sinus target.Results. We analysed the maximal grip force as assessed in the ramp task and the tracking accuracy of the sinus task. The results are compared among five different grips (cylindrical, lateral, palmar, pinch and spherical grip, applied with dominant and non-dominant hand. The results show no significant difference in tracking accuracy between the dominant and non-dominant hand.Conclusions. The results obtained in tracking the ramp target showed that the method could be used for the assessment of the muscle fatigue, providing quantitative information on muscle capacity. The results of the sinus-tracking task showed that the method can evaluate the grip force control in different types of grips, providing information on hand dexterity, muscle activation patterns or tremor.

  9. Method and apparatus for adaptive force and position control of manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The described and improved multi-arm invention of this application presents three strategies for adaptive control of cooperative multi-arm robots which coordinate control over a common load. In the position-position control strategy, the adaptive controllers ensure that the end-effector positions of both arms track desired trajectories in Cartesian space despite unknown time-varying interaction forces exerted through a load. In the position-hybrid control strategy, the adaptive controller of one arm controls end-effector motions in the free directions and applied forces in the constraint directions; while the adaptive controller of the other arm ensures that the end-effector tracks desired position trajectories. In the hybrid-hybrid control strategy, the adaptive controllers ensure that both end-effectors track reference position trajectories while simultaneously applying desired forces on the load. In all three control strategies, the cross-coupling effects between the arms are treated as disturbances which are compensated for by the adaptive controllers while following desired commands in a common frame of reference. The adaptive controllers do not require the complex mathematical model of the arm dynamics or any knowledge of the arm dynamic parameters or the load parameters such as mass and stiffness. Circuits in the adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers are varied by novel adaptation laws.

  10. A force commanded impedance control for a robot finger with uncertain kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doulgeri, Z.; Arimoto, Suguru

    1999-10-01

    The authors consider the problem of impedance control for the physical interaction between the soft tip of a robot finger, where the nonlinear characteristics of the reproducing force and the finger dynamic parameters are unknown, and a rigid object or environment under kinematic uncertainties arising from both uncertain contact point location and uncertain rigid object geometry. An adaptive controller is proposed, and the asymptotic stability of the force regulation problem is shown for the planar case even when finger kinematics and rigid surface orientation are uncertain. Confirmation of the theoretical findings is done through simulation of a 3-degree-of-freedom planar robotic finger.

  11. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  12. Acoustic interaction forces and torques acting on suspended spheres in an ideal fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Lopes, J Henrique; Silva, G T

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N spheres suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. In so doing, we utilize the partial-wave expansion method to solve the related multiple scattering problem. The acoustic interaction force and torque are computed for a sphere using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e. Mie scattering regime). The results show that the radiation force may considerably deviates from that exerted solely by the external incident wave. In addition, we find that acoustic interaction torques arise on the droplets when a nonsymmetric effective incident wave interacts with the droplets.

  13. Interaction forces for symmetric hydrophilic and hydrophobic systems in aqueous isopropanol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupka, Lukasz; Nalaskowski, Jakub; Miller, Jan D

    2010-02-16

    Interaction force measurements were performed for a silica-silica hydrophilic system and for a silanated silica-silanated silica hydrophobic system using the atomic force microscopy colloidal probe technique. The influence of the solution composition on interaction forces was investigated. The hydrophilic silica-silica interactions were found to be described as a typical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) system in solutions of various compositions, whereas silanated silica-silanated silica interactions were dominated by a long-range hydrophobic force. An increase in the isopropyl alcohol content of the solution diminishes both the repulsive forces in the case of the hydrophilic system and the attractive interactions in the case of the hydrophobic system.

  14. Optimal Release Control of Companion Satellite System Using Electromagnetic Forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengwen Xu,Peng Shi; Yushan Zhao∗

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic forces generated by the inter⁃action of component satellites can be used to release companion satellites. Optimal release trajectories for companion satellite system using inter⁃electromagnetic forces were investigated. Firstly, nonlinear relative motion dynamic equations of a two⁃craft electromagnetic companion satellite system were derived in spatial polar coordinates. Then principles of electromagnetic satellite formation flying were introduced. Secondly, the characteristics of the electromagnetic companion satellites release were analyzed and optimal release trajectories of companion satellites using electromagnetic forces were obtained using Gauss pseudospectral method. Three performance criteria were chosen as minimum time, minimum acceleration of the separation distance and minimum control acceleration. Finally, three release examples including expansion along separation distance, rotation in orbital plane and stable formation reconfiguration were given to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Results indicated that the release trajectories can converge to optimal solutions effectively and the concept of release companion satellites using electromagnetic forces is practicable.

  15. Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies of fibrin 'A-a' polymerization interactions via the atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, Laurel E.

    Fibrin, the polymerized form of the soluble plasma protein fibrinogen, plays a critical role in hemostasis as the structural scaffold of blood clots. The primary functions of fibrin are to withstand the shear forces of blood flow and provide mechanical stability to the clot, protecting the wound. While studies have investigated the mechanical properties of fibrin constructs, the response to force of critical polymerization interactions such as the 'A--a' knob--hole interaction remains unclear. Herein, the response of the 'A--a' bond to force was examined at the single-molecule level using the atomic force microscope. Force spectroscopy methodology was developed to examine the 'A--a' interaction while reducing the incidence of both nonspecific and multiple molecule interactions. The rupture of this interaction resulted in a previously unreported characteristic force profile comprised of up to four events. We hypothesized that the first event represented reorientation of the fibrinogen molecule, the second and third represented unfolding of structures in the D region of fibrinogen, and the last event was the rupture of the 'A--a' bond weakened by prior structural unfolding. The configuration, molecular extension, and kinetic parameters of each event in the characteristic pattern were examined to compare the unfolding of fibrin to other proteins unfolded by force. Fitting the pattern with polymer models showed that the D region of fibrinogen could lengthen by ˜50% of the length of a fibrin monomer before rupture of the 'A--a' bond. Analysis showed that the second and third events had kinetic parameters similar to other protein structures unfolded by force. Studies of the dependence of the characteristic pattern on calcium, concentration of sodium chloride, pH, and temperature demonstrated that the incidence of the last event was affected by solution conditions. However, only low pH and high temperatures reduced the probability that an interaction was characteristic

  16. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A.; Wiener, Diane M.; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level.

  17. Nonlinear control techniques for an atomic force microscope system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongchun FANG; Matthew FEEMSTER; Darren DAWSON; Nader M.JALILI

    2005-01-01

    Two nonlinear control techniques are proposed for an atomic force microscope system.Initially,a learning-based control algorithm is developed for the microcantilever-sample system that achieves asymptotic cantilever tip tracking for periodic trajectories.Specifically,the control approach utilizes a learning-based feedforward term to compensate for periodic dynamics and high-gain terms to account for non-periodic dynamics.An adaptive control algorithm is then developed to achieve asymptotic cantilever tip tracking for bounded tip trajectories despite uncertainty throughout the system parameters.Simulation results are provided to illustrate the efficacy and performance of the control strategies.

  18. An Improved Force Feedback Control Algorithm for Active Tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Cai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An active tendon, consisting of a displacement actuator and a co-located force sensor, has been adopted by many studies to suppress the vibration of large space flexible structures. The damping, provided by the force feedback control algorithm in these studies, is small and can increase, especially for tendons with low axial stiffness. This study introduces an improved force feedback algorithm, which is based on the idea of velocity feedback. The algorithm provides a large damping ratio for space flexible structures and does not require a structure model. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated on a structure similar to JPL-MPI. The results show that large damping can be achieved for the vibration control of large space structures.

  19. Tractor controls actuating force limits for Indian operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, C R; Pandey, M M; Tiwari, P S; Gite, L P; Khadatkar, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    In four-wheel tractors, proper design of controls is important for comfortable and safe operation of the tractor. The design involves location and dimensions of controls as well as strength limits for operating these controls. The present study was aimed to quantify human strength for operation of tractor controls and to recommend the maximum control actuating forces for normal operation of tractors based on strength capability of 3,423 Indian male agricultural workers. The 5th percentile values of strength parameters i.e. leg strength sitting (left and right), foot strength sitting (right), torque strength (both hands) sitting, push strength (left hand and right hand) sitting and pull strength (left hand and right hand) sitting of agricultural workers collected using a strength measurement set-up were taken into consideration for the study. It was recommended that the maximum actuating forces for normal operation of frequently operated brake and clutch pedals of tractors should not exceed 260 N and 125 N based on 5th percentile values of right and left leg strength of male agricultural workers, respectively. The maximum actuating force required in steering wheel operation should not exceed 51 N based on 5th percentile value of torque strength (both hands) sitting of workers. The maximum actuating forces required for operating frequently operated levers viz. gear selection, speed selection, hydraulic control and hand throttle of Indian tractors should not exceed 46 N, 46 N, 25 N and 25 N, respectively. It may be concluded that the maximum actuating force limits as given in Bureau of Indian Standards IS 10703 are very high as compared to the findings of the study based on strength data of Indian male operators, which highlight the need to revise the standard.

  20. Offshore Structural Control Considering Fluid Structure Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Myung KIM; Dong Hyawn KIM; Gyu Won LEE

    2006-01-01

    Tuned Mass Damper (TMD) was applied to an offshore structure to control ocean wave-induced vibration. In the analysis of the dynamic response of the offshore structure, fluid-structure interaction is considered and the errors, which occur in the linearization of the interaction, are investigated. For the investigation of the performance of TMD in controlling the vibration, both regular waves with different periods and irregular waves with different significant wave heights are used. Based on the numerical analysis it is concluded that the fluid-structure interaction should be considered in the evaluation of the capability of TMD in vibration control of offshore structures.

  1. Past and ongoing researches for magnetic force control technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, T.; Nishijima, Shigehiro [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The technologies using magnetic force control have been investigated toward application in various fields. Some of them have been put into practical use as the results of technological development. This paper introduces our technical development in the field of water processing, scale removal, magnetic drug delivery system, decontamination of radioactive substances and resources recycling.

  2. Controlling propulsive forces in gait initiation in transfemoral amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keeken, Helco G.; Vrieling, Aline H.; Hof, At L.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2008-01-01

    During prosthetic gait initiation, transfemoral (TF) amputees control the spatial and temporal parameters that modulate the propulsive forces, the positions of the center of pressure (CoP), and the center of mass (CoM). Whether their sound leg or the prosthetic leg is leading, the TF amputees reach

  3. Hybrid viscous damper with filtered integral force feedback control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan; Brodersen, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    In hybrid damper systems active control devices are usually introduced to enhance the performance of otherwise passive dampers. In the present paper a hybrid damper concept is comprised of a passive viscous damper placed in series with an active actuator and a force sensor. The actuator motion...

  4. Force Feedback Control of Robotic Forceps for Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Chiharu; Kamei, Yusuke

    2008-06-01

    Recently, the robotic surgical support systems are in clinical use for minimally invasive surgery. For improvement in operativity and safety of minimally invasive surgery, the development of haptic forceps manipulator is in demand to help surgeon's immersion and dexterity. We have developed a multi-DOF robotic forceps manipulator using a novel omni-directional bending mechanism, so far. In this paper, in order to control the developed robotic forceps as a slave manipulator, joy-stick type master manipulator with force feedback mechanism for remote control is designed and built, and force feedback bilateral control system was constructed for grasping and bending motions of the robotic forceps. Experimental works were carried out and experimental results showed the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  5. Sensitivity and chaos control for the forced nonlinear oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina [Department of Mathematics, Ural State University, 620083 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ryashko, Lev [Department of Mathematics, Ural State University, 620083 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)] e-mail: lev.ryashko@usu.ru

    2005-12-01

    This paper is devoted to study the problem of controlling chaos for forced nonlinear dynamic systems. We suggest a new control technique based on sensitivity analysis. With the help of approximation of nonequilibrium quasipotential, stochastic sensitivity function (SSF) is constructed. This function is used as basic tool of a quantitative description for a system response on the random external disturbances. The possibilities of SSF to predict chaotic dynamics for the periodic and stochastic forced Brusselator are shown. The problem of chaos control based on SSF is considered. A design of attractors with the desired features by feedback regulator is discussed. Analysis of controllability and effective technique for regulator synthesis is presented. An example of suppressing chaos for Brusselator is considered.

  6. Active Control of Contact Force for a Pantograph-Catenary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiqiang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the high speed trains depends critically on the quality of the contact in the pantograph-catenary interaction. Maintaining a constant contact force needs taking special measures and one of the methods is to utilize active control to optimize the contact force. A number of active control methods have been proposed in the past decade. However, the primary objective of these methods has been to reduce the variation of the contact force in the pantograph-catenary system, ignoring the effects of locomotive vibrations on pantograph-catenary dynamics. Motivated by the problems in active control of vibration in large scale structures, the author has developed a geometric framework specifically targeting the remote vibration suppression problem based only on local control action. It is the intention of the paper to demonstrate its potential in the active control of the pantograph-catenary interaction, aiming to minimize the variation of the contact force while simultaneously suppressing the vibration disturbance from the train. A numerical study is provided through the application to a simplified pantograph-catenary model.

  7. Interaction between force production and cognitive performance in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijdewind, Inge; van Duinen, Hiske; Zielman, R; Lorist, MM

    2006-01-01

    Objective: A dual task paradigm was used to examine the effects of the generation of force on cognitive performance. Methods: Subjects (n = 22) were asked to respond to auditory stimuli with their left middle or index finger and concurrently maintain a sub-maximal contraction with their right index

  8. Friction-controlled traction force in cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Tilo; Kaufmann, Martin; Kasimir, Maria; Johne, Stephanie; Glorius, Stefan; Renner, Lars; Bobeth, Manfred; Pompe, Wolfgang; Werner, Carsten

    2011-10-19

    The force balance between the extracellular microenvironment and the intracellular cytoskeleton controls the cell fate. We report a new (to our knowledge) mechanism of receptor force control in cell adhesion originating from friction between cell adhesion ligands and the supporting substrate. Adherent human endothelial cells have been studied experimentally on polymer substrates noncovalently coated with fluorescent-labeled fibronectin (FN). The cellular traction force correlated with the mobility of FN during cell-driven FN fibrillogenesis. The experimental findings have been explained within a mechanistic two-dimensional model of the load transfer at focal adhesion sites. Myosin motor activity in conjunction with sliding of FN ligands noncovalently coupled to the surface of the polymer substrates is shown to result in a controlled traction force of adherent cells. We conclude that the friction of adhesion ligands on the supporting substrate is important for mechanotransduction and cell development of adherent cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Controlling adsorbate interactions for advanced chemical patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra Garcia, Hector M.

    Molecules designed to have specific interactions were used to influence the structural, physical, and chemical properties of self-assembled monolayers. In the case of 1-adamantanethiolate monolayers, the molecular structure influences lability, enabling alkanethiol molecules in solution to displace the 1-adamantanethiolate monolayers, ultimately leading to complete molecular exchange. The similar Au-S bond environments measured for both n-alkanethiolate and 1-adamantanethiolate monolayers indicate that displacement is not a result of weakened Au-S bonds. Instead, it was hypothesized that the density differences in the two monolayers provide a substantial enthalpic driver, aided by differences in van der Waals forces, ultimately leading to complete displacement of the 1-adamantenthiol molecules. Additionally, it was discovered that displacement occurs via fast insertion of n-dodecanethiolate at the defects in the original 1-adamantanethiolate monolayer, which nucleates an island growth phase and is followed by slow ordering of the n-dodecanethiolate domains into a denser and more crystalline form. Langmuir-based kinetics, which describe alkanethiolate adsorption on bare Au{111}, fail to model this displacement reaction. Instead, a model of perimeter-dependent island growth yields good agreement with kinetic data over a 100-fold variation in n-dodecanethiol concentration. Rescaling the growth rate at each concentration collapses all the data onto a single universal curve, suggesting that displacement is a scale-free process. Exploiting the knowledge gained by studying 1-adamantethiolate monolayer displacement, a reversible molecular resist was developed, in which displacement is controlled via external stimuli. This methodology for the fabrication of controllably displaceable monolayers relies on carboxyl-functionalized self-assembled monolayers and in-situ Fischer esterification. Using an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid monolayer as a model system, it was shown that in

  10. Control of grid interactive AC microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Guerrero, Josep M.; Chen, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    and reliability, becomes an attractive candidate for the configuration of future electrical power system. This paper gives a brief review of grid interactive ac microgrid configurations. Control methods for power electronics interfaced DER units in grid interactive ac microgrids are discussed. In addition......, microgrid controls and power management strategies are presented. Future trends of microgrid are discussed pointing out how this concept can be a key to achieve a more intelligent and flexible AC grid....

  11. Fuzzy logic algorithm to extract specific interaction forces from atomic force microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasas, Sandor; Riederer, Beat M.; Catsicas, Stefan; Cappella, Brunero; Dietler, Giovanni

    2000-05-01

    The atomic force microscope is not only a very convenient tool for studying the topography of different samples, but it can also be used to measure specific binding forces between molecules. For this purpose, one type of molecule is attached to the tip and the other one to the substrate. Approaching the tip to the substrate allows the molecules to bind together. Retracting the tip breaks the newly formed bond. The rupture of a specific bond appears in the force-distance curves as a spike from which the binding force can be deduced. In this article we present an algorithm to automatically process force-distance curves in order to obtain bond strength histograms. The algorithm is based on a fuzzy logic approach that permits an evaluation of "quality" for every event and makes the detection procedure much faster compared to a manual selection. In this article, the software has been applied to measure the binding strength between tubuline and microtubuline associated proteins.

  12. Topographical control of multiple cell adhesion molecules for traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polio, Samuel R; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Canović, Elizabeth P; Gaut, Carolynn M; Aksyonova, Diana; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Smith, Michael L

    2014-03-01

    Cellular traction forces are important quantitative measures in cell biology as they have provided much insight into cell behavior in contexts such as cellular migration, differentiation, and disease progression. However, the complex environment in vivo permits application of cell traction forces through multiple types of cell adhesion molecules. Currently available approaches to differentiate traction forces among multiple cell adhesion molecules are limited to specialized approaches to decouple cell-cell from cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) tractions. Here, we present a technique which uses indirect micropatterning onto a polyacrylamide gel to pattern multiple, spatially distinct fluorescently labeled ECM proteins, specifically gelatin and fibronectin (Fn), and confine the area to which cells can adhere. We found that cells interacting with both gelatin and Fn altered their traction forces significantly in comparison to cells on Fn-only substrates. This crosstalk interaction resulted in a decrease in overall traction forces on dual-patterned substrates as compared to cells on Fn-only substrates. This illustrates the unique need to study such interactions and demonstrates great potential in future studies in multi-ligand environments. Current micropatterning techniques on glass can easily be adapted to present other protein classes, such as cadherins, while maintaining control of adhesion spacing, cell spread area, and stiffness, each of which are important regulators of cell mechanobiology.

  13. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A

    2014-01-01

    The attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of the gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to...

  14. Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, J.; Sheridan, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2005-08-01

    The wake states from a circular cylinder undergoing controlled sinusoidal oscillation transverse to the free stream are examined. As the frequency of oscillation passes through the natural Kármán frequency there is a transition between two distinctly different wake states: the low- and high-frequency states. The transition corresponds to a change in the structure of the near wake and is also characterized by a jump in the phase and amplitude of both the total and vortex lift. Over the range of flow and oscillation parameters studied the wake states exhibit a number of universal features. The phases of the vortex lift and drag forces have characteristic values for the low- and high-frequency states, which appear to be directly related to the phase of vortex shedding. A split force concept is employed, whereby instantaneous force traces and images allow discrimination between the actual loading and the physics, and their conventional time-averaged representations. The wake states for the forced oscillations show some remarkable similarities to the response branches of elastically mounted cylinders. The equivalence between forced and self-excited oscillations is addressed in detail using concepts of energy transfer.

  15. When wings touch wakes: understanding locomotor force control by wake wing interference in insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the fluid dynamics of force control in flying insects requires the exploration of how oscillating wings interact with the surrounding fluid. The production of vorticity and the shedding of vortical structures within the stroke cycle thus depend on two factors: the temporal structure of the flow induced by the wing's own instantaneous motion and the flow components resulting from both the force production in previous wing strokes and the motion of other wings flapping in close proximity. These wake-wing interactions may change on a stroke-by-stroke basis, confronting the neuro-muscular system of the animal with a complex problem for force control. In a single oscillating wing, the flow induced by the preceding half stroke may lower the wing's effective angle of attack but permits the recycling of kinetic energy from the wake via the wake capture mechanism. In two-winged insects, the acceleration fields produced by each wing may strongly interact via the clap-and-fling mechanism during the dorsal stroke reversal. Four-winged insects must cope with the fact that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. In these animals, a phase-shift between the stroke cycles of fore- and hindwing modulates aerodynamic performance of the hindwing via leading edge vortex destruction and changes in local flow condition including wake capture. Moreover, robotic wings demonstrate that phase-lag during peak performance and the strength of force modulation depend on the vertical spacing between the two stroke planes and the size ratio between fore- and hindwing. This study broadly summarizes the most prominent mechanisms of wake-wing and wing-wing interactions found in flapping insect wings and evaluates the consequences of these processes for the control of locomotor forces in the behaving animal.

  16. Fountain pen nanochemistry: Atomic force control of chrome etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron; Kheifetz, Yuri; Shambrodt, Efim; Radko, Anna; Khatchatryan, Edward; Sukenik, Chaim

    1999-10-01

    In this report we demonstrate a general method for affecting chemical reactions with a high degree of spatial control that has potentially wide applicability in science and technology. Our technique is based on complexing the delivery of liquid or gaseous materials through a cantilevered micropipette with an atomic force microscope that is totally integrated into a conventional optical microscope. Controlled etching of chrome is demonstrated without detectable effects on the underlying glass substrate. This simple combination allows for the nanometric spatial control of the whole world of chemical reactions in defined regions of surfaces. Applications of the technique in critical areas such as mask repair are likely.

  17. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Shimada, Shogo; Okada, Tomoko

    2017-06-29

    The interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The platinum dichloride complex, di-dimethylsulfoxide-dichloroplatinum (II) (Pt(DMSO)2Cl2), was immobilized on an AFM probe by coordinating the platinum to two amino groups to form a complex similar to Pt(en)Cl2, which is structurally similar to cisplatin. The retraction forces were measured between the platinum complex and DNA molecules immobilized on mica plates using force curve measurements. The histogram of the retraction force for λ-DNA showed several peaks; the unit retraction force was estimated to be 130 pN for a pulling rate of 60 nm/s. The retraction forces were also measured separately for four single-base DNA oligomers (adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine). Retraction forces were frequently observed in the force curves for the DNA oligomers of guanine and adenine. For the guanine DNA oligomer, the most frequent retraction force was slightly lower than but very similar to the retraction force for λ-DNA. A higher retraction force was obtained for the adenine DNA oligomer than for the guanine oligomer. This result is consistent with a higher retraction activation energy of adenine with the Pt complex being than that of guanine because the kinetic rate constant for retraction correlates to exp(FΔx - ΔE) where ΔE is an activation energy, F is an applied force, and Δx is a displacement of distance.

  18. Application of Tuning Fork Sensors for In-situ Studies of Dynamic Force Interactions Inside Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana ANDZANE

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of nanoscale contacts have been probed in-situ by specially developed force sensor based on a quartz tuning fork resonator (TF. Additional control is provided by observation of process in scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. A piezoelectric manipulator allows precise positioning of atomic force microscope (AFM probe in contact with another electrode and recording of the TF oscillation amplitude and phase while simultaneously visualizing the contact area in electron microscope. Electrostatic control of interaction between the electrodes is demonstrated during observation of the experiment in SEM. In the TEM system the TF sensor operated in shear force mode: Use of TEM allowed for direct control of separation between electrodes. New opportunities for in situ studies of nanomechanical systems using these instruments are discussed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1927

  19. Mechanically implementable accommodation matrices for passive force control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, A. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Center for Human Modeling and Simulation; Peshkin, M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-08-01

    Robot force control implemented by means of passive mechanical devices has inherent advantages over active implementations with regard to stability, response rapidity, and physical robustness. The class of devices considered in this paper consists of a Stewart platform-type mechanism interconnected with a network of adjustable mechanical elements such as springs and dampers. The control law repertoire of such a device, imagined as a robot wrist, is given by the range of admittance matrices that it may be programmed to possess. This paper focuses on wrists incorporating damper networks for which the admittance matrices reduce to accommodation or inverse-damping matrices. The authors show that a hydraulic network of fully adjustable damper elements may attain any diagonally dominant accommodation matrix. They describe the technique of selecting the individual damping coefficients to design a desired matrix. They identify the set of dominant matrices as a polyhedral convex cone in the space of matrix entries, and show that each dominant matrix can be composed of a positive linear combination of a fixed set of basis matrices. The overall wrist-accommodation matrix is obtained by projecting the accommodation matrix of the damper network through the wrist kinematics. The linear combination of the dominant basis matrices projected through the wrist kinematics generates the entire space of mechanically implementable force-control laws. The authors quantify the versatility of mechanically implementable force-control laws by comparing this space to the space of all matrices.

  20. A method to study precision grip control in viscoelastic force fields using a robotic gripper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambercy, Olivier; Metzger, Jean-Claude; Santello, Marco; Gassert, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Instrumented objects and multipurpose haptic displays have commonly been used to investigate sensorimotor control of grasping and manipulation. A major limitation of these devices, however, is the extent to which the experimenter can vary the interaction dynamics to fully probe sensorimotor control mechanisms. We propose a novel method to study precision grip control using a grounded robotic gripper with two moving, mechanically coupled finger pads instrumented with force sensors. The device is capable of stably rendering virtual mechanical properties with a wide dynamic range of achievable impedances. Eight viscoelastic force fields with different combinations of stiffness and damping parameters were implemented, and tested on eight healthy subjects performing 30 consecutive repetitions of a grasp, hold, and release task with time and position constraints. Rates of thumb and finger force were found to be highly correlated (r>0.9) during grasping, revealing that, despite the mechanical coupling of the two finger pads, subjects performed grasping movements in a physiological fashion. Subjects quickly adapted to the virtual dynamics (within seven trials), but, depending on the presented force field condition, used different control strategies to correctly perform the task. The proof of principle presented in this paper underscores the potential of such a one-degree-of-freedom robotic gripper to study neural control of grasping, and to provide novel insights on sensorimotor control mechanisms.

  1. Design and control of a macro-micro robot for precise force applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulun; Mangaser, Amante; Laby, Keith; Jordan, Steve; Wilson, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    Creating a robot which can delicately interact with its environment has been the goal of much research. Primarily two difficulties have made this goal hard to attain. The execution of control strategies which enable precise force manipulations are difficult to implement in real time because such algorithms have been too computationally complex for available controllers. Also, a robot mechanism which can quickly and precisely execute a force command is difficult to design. Actuation joints must be sufficiently stiff, frictionless, and lightweight so that desired torques can be accurately applied. This paper describes a robotic system which is capable of delicate manipulations. A modular high-performance multiprocessor control system was designed to provide sufficient compute power for executing advanced control methods. An 8 degree of freedom macro-micro mechanism was constructed to enable accurate tip forces. Control algorithms based on the impedance control method were derived, coded, and load balanced for maximum execution speed on the multiprocessor system. Delicate force tasks such as polishing, finishing, cleaning, and deburring, are the target applications of the robot.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  3. Combined Adaptive and Predictive Control for a Teleoperation System with Force Disturbance and Input Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Franco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new discrete-time adaptive-predictive control algorithm for a system with force disturbance and input delay. This scenario is representative of a mechatronic device for percutaneous intervention with pneumatic actuation and long supply lines which is controlled remotely in the presence of an unknown external force resulting from needle-tissue interaction or gravity. The ultimate goal of this research is the robotic-assisted percutaneous intervention of the liver under Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI guidance. Since the control algorithm is intended for a digital microcontroller, it is presented in the discrete-time form. The controller design is illustrated for a 1 degree-of-freedom (DOF system and is conducted with a modular approach combining position control, adaptive disturbance compensation, and predictive control. The controller stability is analyzed and the effect of the input delay and of the tuning parameters is discussed. The controller performance is assessed with simulations considering a disturbance representative of needle insertion forces. The results indicate that the adaptive-predictive controller is effective in the presence of a variable disturbance and of a known or variable input delay.

  4. Predicting wind farm wake interaction with RANS: an investigation of the Coriolis force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Sørensen, Niels N.;

    2015-01-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code is used to simulate the interaction of two neighboring wind farms. The influence of the Coriolis force is investigated by modeling the atmospheric surface/boundary layer with three different methodologies. The results show that the Coriolis force is negligible...

  5. Normal and friction stabilization techniques for interactive rigid body constraint-based contact force computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel, yet simple, method for stabilization of normal forces. A normal stabilization term, carefully designed from hypotheses about interactive usability, is added to the contact force problem. Further, we propose friction stabilization as a completely new stabilization paradigm in i...

  6. Transmission and Reproduction of Force Sensation by Bilateral Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) which thinks a great deal of patient’s quality of life (QOL) has attracted attention during about ten years. In this paper, it aims at development of the technology for transmitting force sensation required in medical treatment especially through surgical instruments, such as forceps. In bilateral control, it is a problem how master and slave robots realize the law of action and reaction to the environment. Mechanism of contact with environment and bilateral controller based on stiffness are shown. Master arm in contact with human and slave arm in contact with environment are given compliance, and stable contact with environment can be realized. The proposed method is applied to 3-link master-slave manipulators. As a result, transmission and reproduction of force sensation can be realized. The experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  7. Evaluation of Chemical Interactions between Small Molecules in the Gas Phase Using Chemical Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Ju, Soomi; Kim, In Tae; Jung, Sun-Hwa; Min, Sun-Joon; Kim, Chulki; Sim, Sang Jun; Kim, Sang Kyung

    2015-12-04

    Chemical force microscopy analyzes the interactions between various chemical/biochemical moieties in situ. In this work we examined force-distance curves and lateral force to measure the interaction between modified AFM tips and differently functionalized molecular monolayers. Especially for the measurements in gas phase, we investigated the effect of humidity on the analysis of force-distance curves and the images in lateral force mode. Flat chemical patterns composed of different functional groups were made through micro-contact printing and lateral force mode provided more resolved analysis of the chemical patterns. From the images of 1-octadecanethiol/11-mercapto-1-undecanoic acid patterns, the amine group functionalized tip brought out higher contrast of the patterns than an intact silicon nitride tip owing to the additional chemical interaction between carboxyl and amine groups. For more complex chemical interactions, relative chemical affinities toward specific peptides were assessed on the pattern of 1-octadecanethiol/phenyl-terminated alkanethiol. The lateral image of chemical force microscopy reflected specific preference of a peptide to phenyl group as well as the hydrophobic interaction.

  8. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  9. Electron dynamics controlled via self-interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of an electron in a strong laser field can be significantly altered by radiation reaction. This usually results in a strongly damped motion, with the electron losing a large fraction of its initial energy. Here we show that the electron dynamics in a bichromatic laser pulse can be indirectly controlled by a comparatively small radiation reaction force through its interplay with the Lorentz force. By changing the relative phase between the two frequency components of the bichromatic laser field, an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head-on with the laser pulse can be deflected in a controlled way, with the deflection angle being independent of the initial electron energy. The effect is predicted to be observable with intensities available at upcoming laser facilities.

  10. A Multiposture Locomotor Training Device with Force-Field Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Sui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a multiposture locomotor training device (MPLTD with a closed-loop control scheme based on joint angle feedback, which is able to overcome various difficulties resulting from mechanical vibration and the weight of trainer to achieve higher accuracy trajectory. By introducing the force-field control scheme used in the closed-loop control, the device can obtain the active-constrained mode including the passive one. The MPLTD is mainly composed of three systems: posture adjusting and weight support system, lower limb exoskeleton system, and control system, of which the lower limb exoskeleton system mainly includes the indifferent equilibrium mechanism with two degrees of freedom (DOF and the driving torque is calculated by the Lagrangian function. In addition, a series of experiments, the weight support and the trajectory accuracy experiment, demonstrate a good performance of mechanical structure and the closed-loop control.

  11. Adaptive GPU-accelerated force calculation for interactive rigid molecular docking using haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakovou, Georgios; Hayward, Steven; Laycock, Stephen D

    2015-09-01

    Molecular docking systems model and simulate in silico the interactions of intermolecular binding. Haptics-assisted docking enables the user to interact with the simulation via their sense of touch but a stringent time constraint on the computation of forces is imposed due to the sensitivity of the human haptic system. To simulate high fidelity smooth and stable feedback the haptic feedback loop should run at rates of 500Hz to 1kHz. We present an adaptive force calculation approach that can be executed in parallel on a wide range of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) for interactive haptics-assisted docking with wider applicability to molecular simulations. Prior to the interactive session either a regular grid or an octree is selected according to the available GPU memory to determine the set of interatomic interactions within a cutoff distance. The total force is then calculated from this set. The approach can achieve force updates in less than 2ms for molecular structures comprising hundreds of thousands of atoms each, with performance improvements of up to 90 times the speed of current CPU-based force calculation approaches used in interactive docking. Furthermore, it overcomes several computational limitations of previous approaches such as pre-computed force grids, and could potentially be used to model receptor flexibility at haptic refresh rates.

  12. Extraction of user's navigation commands from upper body force interaction in walker assisted gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pons José L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advances in technology make possible the incorporation of sensors and actuators in rollators, building safer robots and extending the use of walkers to a more diverse population. This paper presents a new method for the extraction of navigation related components from upper-body force interaction data in walker assisted gait. A filtering architecture is designed to cancel: (i the high-frequency noise caused by vibrations on the walker's structure due to irregularities on the terrain or walker's wheels and (ii the cadence related force components caused by user's trunk oscillations during gait. As a result, a third component related to user's navigation commands is distinguished. Results For the cancelation of high-frequency noise, a Benedict-Bordner g-h filter was designed presenting very low values for Kinematic Tracking Error ((2.035 ± 0.358·10-2 kgf and delay ((1.897 ± 0.3697·101ms. A Fourier Linear Combiner filtering architecture was implemented for the adaptive attenuation of about 80% of the cadence related components' energy from force data. This was done without compromising the information contained in the frequencies close to such notch filters. Conclusions The presented methodology offers an effective cancelation of the undesired components from force data, allowing the system to extract in real-time voluntary user's navigation commands. Based on this real-time identification of voluntary user's commands, a classical approach to the control architecture of the robotic walker is being developed, in order to obtain stable and safe user assisted locomotion.

  13. Comparison of atomic force microscopy interaction forces between bacteria and silicon nitride substrata for three commonly used immobilization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; De Vries, Joop; Dijkstra, René J B; Stokroos, Ietse; Van Der Mei, Henny C

    2004-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for mapping the surface morphology of biological specimens, including bacterial cells. Besides creating topographic images, AFM enables us to probe both physicochemical and mechanical properties of bacterial cell surfaces on a nanometer scale. For AFM, bacterial cells need to be firmly anchored to a substratum surface in order to withstand the friction forces from the silicon nitride tip. Different strategies for the immobilization of bacteria have been described in the literature. This paper compares AFM interaction forces obtained between Klebsiella terrigena and silicon nitride for three commonly used immobilization methods, i.e., mechanical trapping of bacteria in membrane filters, physical adsorption of negatively charged bacteria to a positively charged surface, and glutaraldehyde fixation of bacteria to the tip of the microscope. We have shown that different sample preparation techniques give rise to dissimilar interaction forces. Indeed, the physical adsorption of bacterial cells on modified substrata may promote structural rearrangements in bacterial cell surface structures, while glutaraldehyde treatment was shown to induce physicochemical and mechanical changes on bacterial cell surface properties. In general, mechanical trapping of single bacterial cells in filters appears to be the most reliable method for immobilization.

  14. Interaction of two walkers: wave-mediated energy and force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, Christian; Moukhtar, Julien; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

    2014-12-01

    A bouncing droplet, self-propelled by its interaction with the waves it generates, forms a classical wave-particle association called a "walker." Previous works have demonstrated that the dynamics of a single walker is driven by its global surface wave field that retains information on its past trajectory. Here we investigate the energy stored in this wave field for two coupled walkers and how it conveys an interaction between them. For this purpose, we characterize experimentally the "promenade modes" where two walkers are bound and propagate together. Their possible binding distances take discrete values, and the velocity of the pair depends on their mutual binding. The mean parallel motion can be either rectilinear or oscillating. The experimental results are recovered analytically with a simple theoretical framework. A relation between the kinetic energy of the droplets and the total energy of the standing waves is established.

  15. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  16. Human-Machine Interaction Control Based on Force Myograph and Electrical Stimulation Sensory Feedback for Multi-DOF Robotic Hand%基于肌力信号与电刺激感觉反馈的多自由度机械手人机交互控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠; 刘波; 霍宏; 叶玉璇; 姜力

    2015-01-01

    为使操作者能够灵活控制多自由度机械手并能感受到机械手的抓取力,提出了一种具有双向信息传输能力的可穿戴式人机交互系统及控制方法.该系统利用压力传感器(FSR)阵列采集与操作者手部动作对应的前臂肌力信号,基于SVM(支持向量机)多类分类器算法实现对手部动作的识别,通过发送动作模式码控制机械手动作.另外,基于经皮神经电刺激(TENS)原理,将机械手抓取力信号转变为电刺激信号刺激体表皮肤,实现机械手抓握力向人体的感觉反馈.实验表明,基于肌力信号和SVM分类器的动作模式识别方法可实现对10种手部动作的识别,成功率不低于95%;电刺激感觉反馈可向人体准确反馈抓取力感并实现盲抓取.%A wearable bi-directional human-machine interaction (HMI) system and its control methods are proposed to enable the user to control multi-DOF robotic hand freely and feel the gripping force from the robotic hand. A force sensory resistor (FSR) array is built to measure the forearm force myographic (FMG) signals corresponding to different hand motions of the user. A multiclass classifier is designed based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm to recognize the hand motions and generate motion codes to control the robotic hand movements. Moreover, sensory feedback is achieved by transforming the gripping force signals of the robotic hand into electrical stimulation signals of skin based on the principle of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Experimental results show that the motion mode recognition method based on FMG and SVM can identify 10 typical hand motions with the accuracy of above 95%. The electrical stimulation method can feed back the perception of gripping force to the body accurately and help the user to grip objects without vision.

  17. Controller Design for EMA in TVC Incorporating Force Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinstock, Dale E.; Scott, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop control schemes and control design procedures for electromechanical actuators (EMA) in thrust vector control (TVC) applications. For a variety of reasons, there is a tendency within the aerospace community to use electromechanical actuators in applications where hydraulics have traditionally been employed. TVC of rocket engines is one such application. However, there is considerable research, development, and testing to be done before EMA will be accepted by the community at large for these types of applications. Besides the development of design procedures for the basic position controller, two major concerns are dealt with in this research by incorporating force feedback: 1) the effects of resonance on the performance of EMA-TVC-rocket-engine systems, and 2) the effects of engine start transients on EMA. This report only highlights the major contributions of this research.

  18. Muscle force generation and force control of finger movements in children with spastic hemiplegia during isometric tasks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.; Rameckers, E.A.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Force control ability was investigated in 10 males and 10 females, between 5 and 15 years old with spastic hemiplegia (mild and moderate hand dysfunction), and an aged-matched control group (eight males, 12 females). An isometric force production task at five different levels of maximum voluntary co

  19. Particle-fluid interaction forces as the source of acceleration PDF invariance in particle size

    CERN Document Server

    Meller, Yosef

    2014-01-01

    The conditions allowing particle suspension in turbulent flow are of interest in many applications, but understanding them is complicated both by the nature of turbulence and by the interaction of flow with particles. Observations on small particles indicate an invariance of acceleration PDFs of small particles independent of size. We show to be true the postulated role of particle/fluid interaction forces in maintaining suspension. The 3D-PTV method, applied for two particle phases (tracers and inertial particles) simultaneously, was used to obtain velocity and acceleration data, and through the use of the particle's equation of motion the magnitude of forces representing either the flow or the particle interaction were derived and compared. The invariance of PDFs is shown to extend to the component forces, and lift forces are shown to be significant.

  20. Gamma globulins-induced interaction between two red blood cells: forces measurement with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kisung; Muravyov, Alexei; Semenov, Alexei; Wagner, Christian; Priezzhev, Alexander; Lyubin, Eugeny; Fedyanin, Andrey

    2017-03-01

    The protein contribution to the red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is studied using the in-house made two-channeled optical tweezers. The cells interaction was characterized using two forces: the force required for separating two cells (FD - disaggregating force) and the force required for holding them from their spontaneous aggregation (FA - aggregating force). The gamma globulin solutions with/without albumin were used to induce the RBC aggregation. The strong interaction (3-10 pN) between the cells was measured within the contact formed using optical tweezers. We found that FD becomes stronger as the gamma globulin concentration increases, while the addition of albumin to the solution led to the significant (few fold) enhancement of the cells interaction forces. However, despite of the strong interaction between the cells their spontaneous overlapping was not observed, unlike the case in plasma, where the cells did increase their overlapping surface, when attached with small interacting surface and released from optical traps. This work in addition to our previous work with model solutions of fibrinogen allows us to conclude that the synergy of blood components is one of the most important features that contribute to the reversible RBC aggregation.

  1. A Comparison between Two Force-Position Controllers with Gravity Compensation Simulated on a Humanoid Arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Gerardo Muscolo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose a comparison between two force-position controllers with gravity compensation simulated on the DEXTER bioinspired robotic arm. The two controllers are both constituted by an internal proportional-derivative (PD closed-loop for the position control. The force control of the two systems is composed of an external proportional (P closed-loop for one system (P system and an external proportional-integrative (PI closed-loop for the other system (PI system. The simulation tests performed with the two systems on a planar representation of the DEXTER, an eight-DOF bioinspired arm, showed that by varying the stiffness of the environment, with a correct setting of parameters, both systems ensure the achievement of the desired force regime and with great precision the desired position. The two controllers do not have large differences in performance when interacting with a lower stiffness environment. In case of an environment with greater rigidity, the PI system is more stable. The subsequent implementation of these control systems on the DEXTER robotic bioinspired arm gives guidance on the design and control optimisation of the arms of the humanoid robot named SABIAN.

  2. Temperature control of colloidal phases by Critical Casimir forces -- a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triet Dang, Minh; Nguyen, Van Duc; Vila Verde, Ana; Bolhuis, Peter; Schall, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces arising from the confinement of critical solvent fluctuations between the surfaces of colloidal particles have recently been shown a promising route to control colloidal assembly. Such forces are strongly temperature dependent, and thus allow for direct temperature control of colloidal interactions. However, colloidal phase transitions controlled by this highly temperature-dependent potential are still poorly understood. Here, we report Monte Carlo simulations of critical Casimir-driven colloidal phase behavior using input potentials directly measured in experiments. We map the gas-liquid coexistence region using Gibbs ensemble simulations and the solid-fluid coexistence boundaries using Gibbs-Duhem integration, and determine the gas-liquid critical point by applying scaling theory. The constructed gas-liquid-solid phase diagram agrees quantitatively with that observed in experiments. Remarkably, the simulated gas-liquid coexistence curve exhibits 3D Ising scaling despite the strong temperature dependence of the pair potentials.

  3. Research on Robot Surface Tracking Motion Based on Force Control of Six-Axis Wrist Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the environmental contact force and make the operation task completed successfully, the robot is frequently required with force perception and active compliance control. Based on the six-axis wrist force sensor measuring, a robot model of surface tracking motion is proposed, and its force control algorithm and experiment are studied. The measurement principle of the six-axis wrist force sensor and the inadequacy of the sensor measuring the six-dimensional force online are introduced firstly. The surface tracking motion model and its coordinate system are established. On this basis, the relationship between the pose adjustment of surface tracking motion and the measuring results of the six-axis wrist force sensor is deduced. At last, the experimental study of the surface tracking robot system that applied the force control algorithm is conducted. The experiment shows that the robot can adjust the current position and orientation in real time according to the six-axis wrist force sensor measuring, which demonstrates the feasibility of the surface tracking motion model and the correctness of the force control algorithm.

  4. Passive hybrid force-position control for tele-operation based on real-time simulation of a virtual mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, L.; Andriot, C.

    1995-12-31

    Hybrid force-position control aims at controlling position and force in separate directions. It is particularly useful to perform certain robotic tasks. In tele-operation context, passivity is important because it ensures stability when the system interacts with any passive environment. In this paper, we propose an original approach to hybrid force-position control of a force reflecting tele-robot system. It is based on real-time simulation of a virtual mechanism corresponding to the task. the resulting control law is passive. Experiments on a 6 degrees of freedom tele-operation system consisting in following a bent pipe under several control modes validate the approach. (authors). 12 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Normal force controlled rheology applied to agar gelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bosi; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous polymer solutions. During the sol-gel transition, such materials may experience a volume contraction which is traditionally overlooked as rheological measurements are usually performed in geometries of constant volume. In this article, we revisit the formation of 1.5\\% wt. agar gels through a series of benchmark rheological experiments performed with a plate-plate geometry. We demonstrate on that particular gel of polysaccharides that the contraction associated with the sol/gel transition cannot be neglected. Indeed, imposing a constant gap width during the gelation results in the strain hardening of the sample, as evidenced by the large negative normal force that develops. Such hardening leads to the slow drift in time of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ towards ever larger values, and thus to an erroneous estimate of $G'$. As an alternative, we show that imposing a constant normal force equals to zero during the gelation, instead of a constant gap width, suppresses the hardening as the decrease of the gap compensates for the sample contraction. Using normal force controlled rheology, we then investigate the impact of thermal history on 1.5\\% wt. agar gels. We show that neither the value of the cooling rate, nor the introduction of a constant temperature stage during the cooling process influence the gel elastic properties. Instead, $G'$ only depends on the terminal temperature reached at the end of the cooling ramp, as confirmed by direct imaging of the gel microstructure by cryoelectron microscopy. The present work offers an extensive review of the technical difficulties associated with the rheology of hydrogels and paves the way for a systematic use of normal force controlled rheology to monitor non-isochoric processes.

  6. Students' Understanding on Newton's Third Law in Identifying the Reaction Force in Gravity Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaona; Zhang, Chunbin; Xiao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In the past three decades, previous researches showed that students had various misconceptions of Newton's Third Law. The present study focused on students' difficulties in identifying the third-law force pair in gravity interaction situations. An instrument involving contexts with gravity and non-gravity associated interactions was designed and…

  7. Students' Understanding on Newton's Third Law in Identifying the Reaction Force in Gravity Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaona; Zhang, Chunbin; Xiao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In the past three decades, previous researches showed that students had various misconceptions of Newton's Third Law. The present study focused on students' difficulties in identifying the third-law force pair in gravity interaction situations. An instrument involving contexts with gravity and non-gravity associated interactions was designed and…

  8. Control of forced vibrations of mechanical structures by an electromagnetic controller with a permanent magnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, George Juraj; Darula, Radoslav; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of an electromagnetic vibration controller is presented. The analyzed device consists of a pot-type iron core with a coil and a permanent magnet as a source of constant magnetic flux. The magnetic circuit is closed by a yoke, excited by an external harmonic mechanical force....... Due to the hysteretic effects in the magnetic material the internal losses influence the overall system’s performance. A mathematical model of the force balance in the oscillatory system is derived in a simplified, linearised form. The electric as well as mechanical system is modelled using lumped......-parameter approach and the actuating principle for control of forced vibration is investigated....

  9. Adhesion forces in interactive mixtures for dry powder inhalers--evaluation of a new measuring method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrmann, Maike; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Urbanetz, Nora Anne; Lippold, Bernhard Christian

    2007-09-01

    Dry powder inhalers mostly contain carrier based formulations where micronized drug particles are adhered to coarse carrier particles. The performance of the dry powder inhaler depends on the inhaler device, the inhalation manoeuvre and the formulation. The most important factor influencing the behaviour of the formulation is the adhesion force acting between the active ingredient and the carrier particles, which can be measured using different methods, for example the centrifuge technique or atomic force microscopy. In this study the tensile strength method, usually applied to determine cohesion forces between powder particles of one material, is optimized for adhesion force measurements between powder particles of unlike materials. Adhesion force measurements between the carrier materials lactose or mannitol and the drug substance salbutamol sulphate using the tensile strength method and the atomic force microscopy show higher values with increasing relative humidity. Consequently, the fine particle fraction determined using the Next Generation Impactor decreases with increasing relative humidity as a result of the enhanced interparticle interactions.

  10. Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II Parachute Simulation with Interacting Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories of multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed, tested and validated. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2). The standard version of POST 2 allows trajectory simulation of multiple bodies without force interaction. In the current implementation, the force interaction between the parachute and the suspended bodies has been modeled using flexible lines, allowing accurate trajectory simulation of the individual bodies in flight. The POST 2 multibody capability is intended to be general purpose and applicable to any parachute entry trajectory simulation. This research paper explains the motivation for multibody parachute simulation, discusses implementation methods, and presents validation of this capability.

  11. Dependency of micro particle adhesion of dispersive and nondispersive interactions analyzed by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kawal, A; Andoh, E

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion behaviour of a micro semi-sphere tip (radius of curvature of 18 nm) after making contact with various inorganic solid surfaces is analyzed. Measurement force by the AFM tip corresponds to the interactive force estimated $9 using surface energy components, dispersion and nondispersion, based on van der Waal's interaction. These components can be obtained by measuring the contact angle of standard liquids on a material surface. By using two kinds of tip $9 with different component values, analysis of the interactive mechanism and prediction of macro tip (particle) adhesion can be made. (6 refs).

  12. Force control of a tri-layer conducting polymer actuator using optimized fuzzy logic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itik, Mehmet; Sabetghadam, Mohammadreza; Alici, Gursel

    2014-12-01

    Conducting polymers actuators (CPAs) are potential candidates for replacing conventional actuators in various fields, such as robotics and biomedical engineering, due to their advantageous properties, which includes their low cost, light weight, low actuation voltage and biocompatibility. As these actuators are very suitable for use in micro-nano manipulation and in injection devices in which the magnitude of the force applied to the target is of crucial importance, the force generated by CPAs needs to be accurately controlled. In this paper, a fuzzy logic (FL) controller with a Mamdani inference system is designed to control the blocking force of a trilayer CPA with polypyrrole electrodes, which operates in air. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method is employed to optimize the controller’s membership function parameters and therefore enhance the performance of the FL controller. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model, which can capture the nonlinear dynamics of the actuator, is utilized in the optimization process. The optimized Mamdani FL controller is then implemented on the CPA experimentally, and its performance is compared with a non-optimized fuzzy controller as well as with those obtained from a conventional PID controller. The results presented indicate that the blocking force at the tip of the CPA can be effectively controlled by the optimized FL controller, which shows excellent transient and steady state characteristics but increases the control voltage compared to the non-optimized fuzzy controllers.

  13. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  14. The Experience of Force: The Role of Haptic Experience of Forces in Visual Perception of Object Motion and Interactions, Mental Simulation, and Motion-Related Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Forces are experienced in actions on objects. The mechanoreceptor system is stimulated by proximal forces in interactions with objects, and experiences of force occur in a context of information yielded by other sensory modalities, principally vision. These experiences are registered and stored as episodic traces in the brain. These stored…

  15. Damping Force Tracking Control of MR Damper System Using a New Direct Adaptive Fuzzy Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Phu Do

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new direct adaptive fuzzy controller and its effectiveness is verified by investigating the damping force tracking control of magnetorheological (MR fluid based damper (MR damper in short system. In the formulation of the proposed controller, a model of interval type 2 fuzzy controller is combined with the direct adaptive control to achieve high performance in vibration control. In addition, H∞ (H infinity tracking technique is used in building a model of the direct adaptive fuzzy controller in which an enhanced iterative algorithm is combined with the fuzzy model. After establishing a closed-loop control structure to achieve high control performance, a cylindrical MR damper is adopted and damping force tracking results are obtained and discussed. In addition, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, two existing controllers are modified and tested for comparative work. It has been demonstrated from simulation and experiment that the proposed control scheme provides much better control performance in terms of damping force tracking error. This leads to excellent vibration control performance of the semiactive MR damper system associated with the proposed controller.

  16. Control of fracture reduction robot using force/torque measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douke, T; Nakajima, Y; Mori, Y; Onogi, S; Sugita, N; Mitsuishi, M; Bessho, M; Ohhashi, S; Tobita, K; Ohnishi, I; Sakuma, I; Dohi, T; Maeda, Y; Koyama, T; Sugano, N; Yonenobu, K; Matsumoto, Y; Nakamura, K

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a surgical robotic system for femoral fracture reduction employing indirect traction. Indirect traction in fracture reduction is a generally used surgical method for preventing complications such as bone splits caused by high stress on bones. For traction, a patient's foot is gripped by a jig and pulled to the distal side. Indirect traction has the advantage of distributing bone stress by utilizing a strong traction force; however, this procedure does not accurately control the proper positioning of fractured fragments when a surgical robot is used. The human leg has knee and an ankle joints, and thus robotic motion presents problems in not being able to directly propagate reduction motion to a fractured femoral fragment, rendering control of bone position difficult. We propose a control method for fracture reduction robots using external force/torque measurements of the human leg to achieve precise fracture reduction. Results showed that the proposed method reduced repositioning error from 6.8 mm and 15.9 degrees to 0.7 mm and 5.3 degrees, respectively.

  17. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft using geomagnetic Lorentz force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A.; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Attitude stabilization of a charged rigid spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit using torques due to Lorentz force in pitch and roll directions is considered. A spacecraft that generates an electrostatic charge on its surface in the Earth's magnetic field will be subject to perturbations from the Lorentz force. The Lorentz force acting on an electrostatically charged spacecraft may provide a useful thrust for controlling a spacecraft's orientation. We assume that the spacecraft is moving in the Earth's magnetic field in an elliptical orbit under the effects of gravitational, geomagnetic and Lorentz torques. The magnetic field of the Earth is modeled as a non-tilted dipole. A model incorporating all Lorentz torques as a function of orbital elements has been developed on the basis of electric and magnetic fields. The stability of the spacecraft orientation is investigated both analytically and numerically. The existence and stability of equilibrium positions is investigated for different values of the charge to mass ratio (α*). Stable orbits are identified for various values of α*. The main parameters for stabilization of the spacecraft are α* and the difference between the components of the moment of inertia for the spacecraft.

  18. MULTIPOINT BLANK HOLDER FORCE CONTROL IN HYDROFORMING OF FUEL TANK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yousheng; WANG Xinyun; XIA Juchen; HU Guoan; SUN Yousong; YANG Lin

    2006-01-01

    The study of multipoint blank holder force(BHF) control is carried out for hydroforming a complicated shape motorcycle fuel tank. By finite element method (FEM) simulation, the configuration of multipoint blank holder cylinders and the setting of local BHF are optimized, and the influences of the multipoint BHF on the hydromechanical deep drawing and conventional hydroforming processes are studied. The desired fluid pressure and whole BHF are predicted for hydromechanical deep drawing process. Finally, simulation results are testified by forming experiment, and they are in agreement very well.

  19. Controlled manipulation of nanoparticles with an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junno, T.; Deppert, K.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.

    1995-06-01

    We report on the application of the atomic force microscope (AFM) to manipulate and position nanometer-sized particles with nanometer precision. The technique, which can be regarded as a nanometer-scale analogy to atomic level manipulation with the scanning tunneling microscope, allowed us to form arbitrary nanostructures, under ambient conditions, by controlled manipulation of individual 30 nm GaAs particles. A whole new set of nanodevices can be fabricated particle-by-particle for studies of quantum effects and single electron tunneling. We also demonstrate a method, based on the AFM manipulation, to determine the true lateral dimensions of nano-objects, in spite of the tip-sample convolution.

  20. Resonance in Interacting Induced-Dipole Polarizing Force Fields: Application to Force-Field Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Torrens

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Silberstein model of the molecular polarizability of diatomic molecules, generalized by Applequist et al. for polyatomic molecules, is analyzed. The atoms are regarded as isotropically polarizable points located at their nuclei, interacting via the fields of their induced dipoles. The use of additive values for atom polarizabilities gives poor results, in some cases leading to artificial predictions of absorption bands. The molecular polarizability of methane and its derivative are computed. The agreement with experimental mean molecular polarizabilities is within 1–5%. A hypothesis is indispensable for a suitable representation of polarizability derivative.

  1. Controls-structures-electromagnetics interaction program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantham, William L.; Bailey, Marion C.; Belvin, Wendell K.; Williams, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development program is described involving Controls Structures Electromagnetics Interaction (CSEI) for large space structures. The CSEI program was developed as part of the continuing effort following the successful kinematic deployment and RF tests of the 15 meter Hoop/Column antenna. One lesson learned was the importance of making reflector surface adjustment after fabrication and deployment. Given are program objectives, ground based test configuration, Intelsat adaptive feed, reflector shape prediction model, control experiment concepts, master schedule, and Control Of Flexible Structures-II (COFS-II) baseline configuration.

  2. Mapping the distribution of specific antibody interaction forces on individual red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Natasha; Tabor, Rico F.; Garnier, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Current blood typing methods rely on the agglutination of red blood cells (RBCs) to macroscopically indicate a positive result. An indirect agglutination mechanism is required when blood typing with IgG forms of antibodies. To date, the interaction forces between anti-IgG and IgG antibodies have been poorly quantified, and blood group related antigens have never been quantified with the atomic force microscope (AFM). Instead, the total intensity resulting from fluorescent-tagged antibodies adsorbed on RBC has been measured to calculate an average antigen density on a series of RBCs. In this study we mapped specific antibody interaction forces on the RBC surface. AFM cantilever tips functionalized with anti-IgG were used to probe RBCs incubated with specific IgG antibodies. This work provides unique insight into antibody-antigen interactions in their native cell-bound location, and crucially, on a per-cell basis rather than an ensemble average set of properties. Force profiles obtained from the AFM directly provide not only the anti-IgG – IgG antibody interaction force, but also the spatial distribution and density of antigens over a single cell. This new understanding might be translated into the development of very selective and quantitative interactions that underpin the action of drugs in the treatment of frontier illnesses. PMID:28157207

  3. Mapping the distribution of specific antibody interaction forces on individual red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, Natasha; Tabor, Rico F.; Garnier, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Current blood typing methods rely on the agglutination of red blood cells (RBCs) to macroscopically indicate a positive result. An indirect agglutination mechanism is required when blood typing with IgG forms of antibodies. To date, the interaction forces between anti-IgG and IgG antibodies have been poorly quantified, and blood group related antigens have never been quantified with the atomic force microscope (AFM). Instead, the total intensity resulting from fluorescent-tagged antibodies adsorbed on RBC has been measured to calculate an average antigen density on a series of RBCs. In this study we mapped specific antibody interaction forces on the RBC surface. AFM cantilever tips functionalized with anti-IgG were used to probe RBCs incubated with specific IgG antibodies. This work provides unique insight into antibody-antigen interactions in their native cell-bound location, and crucially, on a per-cell basis rather than an ensemble average set of properties. Force profiles obtained from the AFM directly provide not only the anti-IgG – IgG antibody interaction force, but also the spatial distribution and density of antigens over a single cell. This new understanding might be translated into the development of very selective and quantitative interactions that underpin the action of drugs in the treatment of frontier illnesses.

  4. Acoustic Interaction Forces and Torques Acting on Suspended Spheres in an Ideal Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, J Henrique; Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Silva, Glauber T

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic interaction forces and torques exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on a set of N objects suspended in an inviscid fluid are theoretically analyzed. We utilize the partial-wave expansion method with translational addition theorem and re-expansion of multipole series to solve the related multiple scattering problem. We show that the acoustic interaction force and torque can be obtained using the farfield radiation force and torque formulas. To exemplify the method, we calculate the interaction forces exerted by an external traveling and standing plane wave on an arrangement of two and three olive-oil droplets in water. The droplets' radii are comparable to the wavelength (i.e., Mie scattering regime). The results show that the acoustic interaction forces present an oscillatory spatial distribution which follows the pattern formed by interference between the external and rescattered waves. In addition, acoustic interaction torques arise on the absorbing droplets whenever a nonsymmetric wavefront is formed by the external and rescattered waves' interference.

  5. Modelling the effect of rail dampers on wheel-rail interaction forces and rail roughness growth rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, B. E.; Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    2009-06-01

    Trains generate rolling noise because of the roughness of the wheel and rail running surfaces. Special acoustic grinding programmes have been introduced on some railways specifically to control rolling noise. Rail dampers are also used to reduce rolling noise; this paper studies rail damping as a possible mechanism to slow the rate of development of roughness on the surface of rails. This would reduce noise further over time or reduce the required frequency of grinding. High roughness growth on the rail occurs in situations with stiff vertical structural dynamics of the track. In particular the antiresonance above a sleeper at the pinned-pinned frequency has been identified as a wavelength fixing mechanism for short pitch corrugation. Rail dampers change the dynamic response of the rail, shifting the pinned-pinned frequency and smoothing the track receptance. Here, a simple time-stepping model is applied to calculate the interaction forces between wheel and rail for a track with and without rail dampers. The calculations show that rail dampers reduce dynamic interaction forces and shift the force spectrum to longer wavelengths. The interaction forces are used as input to an abrasive wear model to predict the roughness growth rate and the change in roughness after many wheel passages. Track without rail dampers is predicted to develop corrugation at the wavelength corresponding to the pinned-pinned frequency. With rail dampers the corrugation growth is reduced and shifted to a longer wavelength where its significance is diminished.

  6. Nanobiosensors exploiting specific interactions between an enzyme and herbicides in atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Aline C N; Deda, Daiana K; Bueno, Carolina C; Moraes, Ariana S; Da Roz, Alessandra L; Yamaji, Fabio M; Prado, Rogilene A; Viviani, Vadim; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Leite, Fábio L

    2014-09-01

    The development of sensitive methodologies for detecting agrochemicals has become important in recent years due to the increasingly indiscriminate use of these substances. In this context, nanosensors based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips are useful because they provide higher sensitivity with operation at the nanometer scale. In this paper we exploit specific interactions between AFM tips functionalized with the enzyme acetolactate synthase (ALS) to detect the ALS-inhibitor herbicides metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin. Using atomic force spectroscopy (AFS) we could measure the adhesion force between tip and substrate, which was considerably higher when the ALS-functionalized tip (nanobiosensor) was employed. The increase was approximately 250% and 160% for metsulfuron-methyl and imazaquin, respectively, in comparison to unfunctionalized probes. We estimated the specific enzyme-herbicide force by assuming that the measured force comprises an adhesion force according to the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model, the capillary force and the specific force. We show that the specific, biorecognition force plays a crucial role in the higher sensitivity of the nanobiosensor, thus opening the way for the design of similarly engineered tips for detecting herbicides and other analytes.

  7. Noncontact manipulation of microflow by photothermal control of viscous force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motosuke, Masahiro, E-mail: mot@rs.kagu.tus.ac.j [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, 1-14-6 Kudankita, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shimakawa, Jun; Akutsu, Dai; Honami, Shinji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, 1-14-6 Kudankita, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In this paper, we investigate a potential of local control of the viscous force in a microfluidic device for a noncontact microflow manipulation method. Photothermal effect and temperature dependence of the liquid viscosity play a key role to induce an inhomogeneous viscosity distribution in the flow field in a microchannel. Absorption of focused laser beam generates the local change in the viscosity of liquid corresponding to the temperature change. The velocity and temperature fields are measured by the micron-resolution particle image velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence, respectively. Measurement results indicate that the local reduction of the fluid viscosity due to the temperature rise can cause the change of the flow structure in the microchannel. At the focused area of heating laser beam, namely high temperature area, the flow velocity was increased. The accompanying fluid behavior around the heated region was also recognized. In addition, the agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulation clarifies that the primary factor for the change of the microflow structure is the locally controlled viscous force.

  8. Position Control of Linear Synchronous Motor Drives with Exploitation of Forced Dynamics Control Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vittek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Closed-loop position control of mechanisms directly driven by linear synchronous motors with permanent magnets is presented. The control strategy is based on forced dynamic control, which is a form of feedback linearisation, yielding a non-liner multivariable control law to obtain a prescribed linear speed dynamics together with the vector control condition of mutal orthogonality between the stator current and magnetic flux vectors (assuming perfect estimates of the plant parameters. Outer position control loop is closed via simple feedback with proportional gain. Simulations of the design control sysstem, including the drive with power electronic switching, predict the intended drive performance.

  9. Hand-tool-tissue interaction forces in neurosurgery for haptic rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggravi, Marco; De Momi, Elena; DiMeco, Francesco; Cardinale, Francesco; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Riva, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Haptics provides sensory stimuli that represent the interaction with a virtual or tele-manipulated object, and it is considered a valuable navigation and manipulation tool during tele-operated surgical procedures. Haptic feedback can be provided to the user via cutaneous information and kinesthetic feedback. Sensory subtraction removes the kinesthetic component of the haptic feedback, having only the cutaneous component provided to the user. Such a technique guarantees a stable haptic feedback loop, while it keeps the transparency of the tele-operation system high, which means that the system faithfully replicates and render back the user's directives. This work focuses on checking whether the interaction forces during a bench model neurosurgery operation can lie in the solely cutaneous perception of the human finger pads. If this assumption is found true, it would be possible to exploit sensory subtraction techniques for providing surgeons with feedback from neurosurgery. We measured the forces exerted to surgical tools by three neurosurgeons performing typical actions on a brain phantom, using contact force sensors, while the forces exerted by the tools to the phantom tissue were recorded using a load cell placed under the brain phantom box. The measured surgeon-tool contact forces were 0.01-3.49 N for the thumb and 0.01-6.6 N for index and middle finger, whereas the measured tool-tissue interaction forces were from six to 11 times smaller than the contact forces, i.e., 0.01-0.59 N. The measurements for the contact forces fit the range of the cutaneous sensitivity for the human finger pad; thus, we can say that, in a tele-operated robotic neurosurgery scenario, it would possible to render forces at the fingertip level by conveying haptic cues solely through the cutaneous channel of the surgeon's finger pads. This approach would allow high transparency and high stability of the haptic feedback loop in a tele-operation system.

  10. Probing the interaction of individual amino acids with inorganic surfaces using atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvag, Yair; Gutkin, Vitaly; Reches, Meital

    2013-08-13

    This article describes single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements of the interaction between individual amino acid residues and inorganic surfaces in an aqueous solution. In each measurement, there is an amino acid residue, lysine, glutamate, phenylalanine, leucine, or glutamine, and each represents a class of amino acids (positively or negatively charged, aromatic, nonpolar, and polar). Force-distance curves measured the interaction of the individual amino acid bound to a silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with a silcon substrate, cut from a single-crystal wafer, or mica. Using this method, we were able to measure low adhesion forces (below 300 pN) and could clearly determine the strength of interactions between the individual amino acid residues and the inorganic substrate. In addition, we observed how changes in the pH and ionic strength of the solution affected the adsorption of the residues to the substrates. Our results pinpoint the important role of hydrophobic interactions among the amino acids and the substrate, where hydrophobic phenylalanine exhibited the strongest adhesion to a silicon substrate. Additionally, electrostatic interactions also contributed to the adsorption of amino acid residues to inorganic substrates. A change in the pH or ionic strength values of the buffer altered the strength of interactions among the amino acids and the substrate. We concluded that the interplay between the hydrophobic forces and electrostatic interactions will determine the strength of adsorption among the amino acids and the surface. Overall, these results contribute to our understanding of the interaction at the organic-inorganic interface. These results may have implications for our perception of the specificity of peptide binding to inorganic surfaces. Consequently, it would possibly lead to a better design of composite materials and devices.

  11. Evolution of Neogene Mammals in Eurasia: Environmental Forcing and Biotic Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortelius, Mikael; Eronen, Jussi T.; Kaya, Ferhat; Tang, Hui; Raia, Pasquale; Puolamäki, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The relative weights of physical forcing and biotic interaction as drivers of evolutionary change have been debated in evolutionary theory. The recent finding that species, genera, clades, and chronofaunas all appear to exhibit a symmetrical pattern of waxing and waning lends support to the view that biotic interactions shape the history of life. Yet, there is similarly abundant evidence that these primary units of biological evolution arise and wane in coincidence with major climatic change. We review these patterns and the process-level explanations offered for them. We also propose a tentative synthesis, characterized by interdependence between physical forcing and biotic interactions. We suggest that species with evolutionary novelties arise predominantly in "species factories" that develop under harsh environmental conditions, under dominant physical forcing, whereas exceptionally mild environments give rise to "oases in the desert," characterized by strong competition and survival of relics.

  12. Measurement of interaction force between small distances sandwiched with magnetic fluid under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, T.; Shibayama, A.; Sato, T.; Fujita, T. E-mail: fujita@ipc.akita-u.ac.jp

    2002-11-01

    In this contribution, the interactive force measurement between 10 nm distance under magnetic field is carried out. Previous measurement of the interactive force is reported by Israelachivili et al. However, its measurement under magnetic field has not been performed. The methodology described in this paper is easier as the distance between two surfaces is not measured optically but dynamically. Therefore, it is different from the previous reported studies. Based on the results of the measurement of the interactive force, the diameter of the particle suspended in a solution under magnetic field is also estimated. Moreover, it may be predictable how the clusters have been formed. The method described will be very useful for new productions based on magnetic fluid.

  13. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al2O3 or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO2 due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al2O3, MgO and SiO2 decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  14. Virtual grasping: closed-loop force control using electrotactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgovanovic, Nikola; Dosen, Strahinja; Djozic, Damir J; Krajoski, Goran; Farina, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Closing the control loop by providing somatosensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is a well-known, long standing challenge in the field of prosthetics. Various approaches have been investigated for feedback restoration, ranging from direct neural stimulation to noninvasive sensory substitution methods. Although there are many studies presenting closed-loop systems, only a few of them objectively evaluated the closed-loop performance, mostly using vibrotactile stimulation. Importantly, the conclusions about the utility of the feedback were partly contradictory. The goal of the current study was to systematically investigate the capability of human subjects to control grasping force in closed loop using electrotactile feedback. We have developed a realistic experimental setup for virtual grasping, which operated in real time, included a set of real life objects, as well as a graphical and dynamical model of the prosthesis. We have used the setup to test 10 healthy, able bodied subjects to investigate the role of training, feedback and feedforward control, robustness of the closed loop, and the ability of the human subjects to generalize the control to previously "unseen" objects. Overall, the outcomes of this study are very optimistic with regard to the benefits of feedback and reveal various, practically relevant, aspects of closed-loop control.

  15. The history of IFMFC - The accumulated knowledge and experience of the magnetic force control with IFMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tsueo [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The history of IFMFC (International Forum on Magnetic Force Control) shows the usefulness of the magnetic force control in the fields of the environment and material resource in Japan, Korea and China. The IFMFC started in 2010 and has been organized in every year. This paper shows the application of the magnetic force control in each countries with the accumulated knowledge and experience of the magnetic force control with IFMFC.

  16. Damping-controlled fluidelastic instability forces in multi-span tubes with loose supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Marwan A., E-mail: hassanm@unb.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Rogers, Robert J.; Gerber, Andrew G. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    This paper presents simulations of a loosely supported multi-span tube subjected to turbulence and fluidelastic instability forces in order to compare several time-domain fluid force models simulating the damping-controlled fluidelastic instability mechanism in tube arrays. These models include the negative damping model based on the Connors equation, fluid force coefficient-based models (Chen; Tanaka and Takahara), and two semi-analytical models (Price and Paidoussis; and Lever and Weaver). Time domain modelling challenges for each of these theories are discussed. The implemented models are validated against available experimental data. The linear simulations (without tube/support clearance) show that the Connors-equation based model exhibits the most conservative prediction of the critical flow velocity when the recommended design values for the Connors equation are used. The models are then utilized to simulate the nonlinear response of a three-span cantilever tube in a lattice bar support subjected to air crossflow. The tube is subjected to a single-phase flow passing over the spans where the flow velocity and the support clearance are varied. Special attention is paid to the tube/support interaction parameters that affect wear, such as impact forces, contact ratio, and normal work rate. As was seen for the linear cases, the reduced flow velocity at the instability threshold differs for the fluid force models considered. The investigated models do, however, exhibit similar response characteristics for the impact force, tip lift response, and work rate, except for the Connors-based model that overestimates the response and the tube/support interaction parameters for the loose support case, especially at large clearances.

  17. Estimating needle-tissue interaction forces for hollow needles using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saurabh; Shrikanth, V.; Bharadwaj, Amrutur; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Bobji, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    Brachytherapy and neurological procedures can benefit from real-time estimation of needle-tissue interaction forces, specifically for robotic or robot-assisted procedures. Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors provide advantages of very small size and electromagnetic immunity for use in measurement of the forces directly at the needle tip. This has advantages compared to measurements at the needle shaft which require extensive models of the friction between needle and tissues with varying depth. This paper presents the measurement of tip forces for a hollow needle and compensation for bending when encountering regions of varying stiffness in phantoms with multiple layers prepared using Polydimethylsiloxane.

  18. Single-cell force spectroscopy of the medically important Staphylococcus epidermidis-Candida albicans interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Herman, Philippe; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Lipke, Peter N.; Kucharíková, Soňa; van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-10-01

    Despite the clinical importance of bacterial-fungal interactions, their molecular details are poorly understood. A hallmark of such medically important interspecies associations is the interaction between the two nosocomial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, which can lead to mixed biofilm-associated infections with enhanced antibiotic resistance. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the forces engaged in bacterial-fungal co-adhesion, focusing on the poorly investigated S. epidermidis-C. albicans interaction. Force curves recorded between single bacterial and fungal germ tubes showed large adhesion forces (~5 nN) with extended rupture lengths (up to 500 nm). By contrast, bacteria poorly adhered to yeast cells, emphasizing the important role of the yeast-to-hyphae transition in mediating adhesion to bacterial cells. Analysis of mutant strains altered in cell wall composition allowed us to distinguish the main fungal components involved in adhesion, i.e. Als proteins and O-mannosylations. We suggest that the measured co-adhesion forces are involved in the formation of mixed biofilms, thus possibly as well in promoting polymicrobial infections. In the future, we anticipate that this SCFS platform will be used in nanomedicine to decipher the molecular mechanisms of a wide variety of pathogen-pathogen interactions and may help in designing novel anti-adhesion agents.

  19. DURIP: Piezoresponse Force Microscope (PFM) with Controlled Environment for Characterization of Flexoelectric Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-21

    DURIP: Piezoresponse Force Microscope (PFM) with Controlled Environment for Characterization of Flexoelectric Nanostructures A piezo-force... microscope (PFM) system was acquired under this support for characterization of flexoelectric micro/nanostructures in a controlled environment. The system...published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: DURIP: Piezoresponse Force Microscope (PFM) with Controlled Environment for Characterization of

  20. Force control is related to low-frequency oscillations in force and surface EMG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwasil Moon

    Full Text Available Force variability during constant force tasks is directly related to oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force. However, it is unknown whether such oscillations exist in muscle activity. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was to determine whether oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force are evident in the activation of muscle. Fourteen young adults (21.07 ± 2.76 years, 7 women performed constant isometric force tasks at 5% and 30% MVC by abducting the left index finger. We recorded the force output from the index finger and surface EMG from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle and quantified the following outcomes: 1 variability of force using the SD of force; 2 power spectrum of force below 2 Hz; 3 EMG bursts; 4 power spectrum of EMG bursts below 2 Hz; and 5 power spectrum of the interference EMG from 10-300 Hz. The SD of force increased significantly from 5 to 30% MVC and this increase was significantly related to the increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.82. For both force levels, the power spectrum for force and EMG burst was similar and contained most of the power from 0-0.5 Hz. Force and EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz were highly coherent (coherence = 0.68. The increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz from 5 to 30% MVC was related to an increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.51. Finally, there was a strong association between the increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz and the interference EMG from 35-60 Hz (R(2 = 0.95. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that bursting of the EMG signal contains low-frequency oscillations below 0.5 Hz, which are associated with oscillations in force below 0.5 Hz.

  1. Highly asymmetric interaction forces induced by acoustic waves in coupled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xiying; Zhang, Shenwei; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-01-01

    Mutual forces can be induced between coupled structures when illuminated by external acoustic waves. In this Letter, we propose a concept of asymmetric interaction between two coupled plate-like structures, which is generated by oppositely incident plane waves. Besides the striking contrast in magnitude, the mutual force induced by one of the incidences can be tuned extremely strong due to the resonant excitation of the flexural plate modes. The highly asymmetric interaction with enhanced strength in single side should be potentially useful, such as in designing ultrasound instruments and sensors.

  2. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-12-16

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  3. Exact Casimir energies at nonzero temperature: Validity of proximity force approximation and interaction of semitransparent spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A; Wagner, Jef; Shajesh, K V

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, dedicated to the career of Tom Erber, we consider the Casimir interaction between weakly coupled bodies at nonzero temperature. For the case of semitransparent bodies, that is, ones described by delta-function potentials, we first examine the interaction between an infinite plane and an arbitrary curved surface. In weak coupling, such an interaction energy coincides with the exact form of the proximity force approximation obtained by summing the interaction between opposite surface elements at arbitrary temperature. This result generalizes a theorem proved recently by Decca et al. We also obtain exact closed-form results for the Casimir energy at arbitrary temperature for weakly coupled semitransparent spheres.

  4. Traction Control of Electric Vehicles Using Sliding-Mode Controller with Tractive Force Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwat Kuntanapreeda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traction control is an important element in modern vehicles to enhance drive efficiency, safety, and stability. Traction is produced by friction between tire and road, which is a nonlinear function of wheel slip. In this paper, a sliding-mode control approach is used to design a robust traction controller. The control objective is to operate vehicles such that a desired wheel slip ratio is achieved. A nonlinearity observer is employed to estimate tire tractive forces, which are used in the control law. Simulation and experimental results have illustrated the success of the proposed observer-based controller.

  5. Molecular theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhari, M I; Asthagiri, D; Tan, L; Pratt, L R

    2015-01-01

    We consider the local molecular field (LMF) theory for the effects of solute attractive forces on hydrophobic interactions. The principal result of LMF theory is outlined, then tested by obtaining radial distribution functions (rdfs) for Ar atoms in water, with and without attractive interactions distinguished by the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) separation. Change from purely repulsive atomic solute interactions to include realistic attractive interactions substantially \\emph{diminishes} the strength of hydrophobic bonds. Since attractions make a big contribution to hydrophobic interactions, Pratt-Chandler theory, which did not include attractions, should not be simply comparable to computer simulation results with general physical interactions, including attractions. The rdfs permit evaluation of osmotic second virial coefficients $B_2$. Those $B_2$ are consistent with the conclusion that incorporation of attractive interactions leads to more positive (repulsive) values. In all cases here, $B_2$ becomes mor...

  6. Mechanoresponsive materials for drug delivery: Harnessing forces for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Julia; Kaplan, Jonah A; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    Mechanically-activated delivery systems harness existing physiological and/or externally-applied forces to provide spatiotemporal control over the release of active agents. Current strategies to deliver therapeutic proteins and drugs use three types of mechanical stimuli: compression, tension, and shear. Based on the intended application, each stimulus requires specific material selection, in terms of substrate composition and size (e.g., macrostructured materials and nanomaterials), for optimal in vitro and in vivo performance. For example, compressive systems typically utilize hydrogels or elastomeric substrates that respond to and withstand cyclic compressive loading, whereas, tension-responsive systems use composites to compartmentalize payloads. Finally, shear-activated systems are based on nanoassemblies or microaggregates that respond to physiological or externally-applied shear stresses. In order to provide a comprehensive assessment of current research on mechanoresponsive drug delivery, the mechanical stimuli intrinsically present in the human body are first discussed, along with the mechanical forces typically applied during medical device interventions, followed by in-depth descriptions of compression, tension, and shear-mediated drug delivery devices. We conclude by summarizing the progress of current research aimed at integrating mechanoresponsive elements within these devices, identifying additional clinical opportunities for mechanically-activated systems, and discussing future prospects.

  7. Van der Waals interaction torque and force between dielectrically anisotropic layered media

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Bing-Sui

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the van der Waals interaction for a pair of dielectrically anisotropic plane-layered media interacting across a dielectrically isotropic medium. We investigate the van der Waals torque and force for the following cases: (i) a pair of single anisotropic layers, (ii) a single anisotropic layer interacting with a multilayered slab consisting of alternating anisotropic and isotropic layers, and (iii) a pair of multilayered slabs each consisting of alternating anisotropic and isotropic layers, looking at the cases where the optical axes lie parallel and/or perpendicular to the plane of the layers. For the first case, the optical axes of the oppositely facing anisotropic layers of the two interacting slabs generally have an angular mismatch, and within each multilayered slab the optical axes may either be the same, or undergo constant angular increments across the anisotropic layers. In particular, we examine how the behaviors of the van der Waals torque and force can be "tuned" by adjusting the layer th...

  8. Force rebalance control for a MEMS gyroscope using ascending frequency drive and generalized PI control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a novel force rebalance control method for a MEMS gyroscope using ascending frequency drive and generalized PI control. Theoretical analyses of ascending frequency drive and force rebalance control methods are illustrated in detail. Experimental results demonstrate that the electrical anti-resonant peaks are located at the frequency responses in the RFD system, which seriously deteriorates the original response characteristics. However, they are eliminated in the AFD system, and the electrical coupling signal is also suppressed. Besides, as for the force rebalance control system, the phase margins approximate to 60deg, gain margins are larger than 13dB, and sensitivity margins are smaller than 3.2dB, which validates the control system is stable and robust. The bandwidth of the force rebalance control system is measured to be about 103.2Hz, which accords with the simulation result. The bias instability and angle random walk are evaluated to be 1.65deg/h and 0.06deg/√h, respectively, which achieves the tactical level.

  9. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  10. Interactive formation control in complex environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Joseph; Shum, Hubert P H; Komura, Taku

    2014-02-01

    The degrees of freedom of a crowd is much higher than that provided by a standard user input device. Typically, crowd-control systems require multiple passes to design crowd movements by specifying waypoints, and then defining character trajectories and crowd formation. Such multi-pass control would spoil the responsiveness and excitement of real-time control systems. In this paper, we propose a single-pass algorithm to control a crowd in complex environments. We observe that low-level details in crowd movement are related to interactions between characters and the environment, such as diverging/merging at cross points, or climbing over obstacles. Therefore, we simplify the problem by representing the crowd with a deformable mesh, and allow the user, via multitouch input, to specify high-level movements and formations that are important for context delivery. To help prevent congestion, our system dynamically reassigns characters in the formation by employing a mass transport solver to minimize their overall movement. The solver uses a cost function to evaluate the impact from the environment, including obstacles and areas affecting movement speed. Experimental results show realistic crowd movement created with minimal high-level user inputs. Our algorithm is particularly useful for real-time applications including strategy games and interactive animation creation.

  11. The effect of aircraft control forces on pilot performance during instrument landings in a flight simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D J; McNair, P J; Marshall, R N

    2001-07-01

    Pilots may have difficulty controlling aircraft at both high and low force levels due to larger variability in force production at these force levels. The aim of this study was to measure the force variability and landing performance of pilots during an instrument landing in a flight simulator. There were 12 pilots who were tested while performing 5 instrument landings in a flight simulator, each of which required different control force inputs. Pilots can produce the least force when pushing the control column to the right, therefore the force levels for the landings were set relative to each pilot's maximum aileron-right force. The force levels for the landings were 90%, 60%, and 30% of maximal aileron-right force, normal force, and 25% of normal force. Variables recorded included electromyographic activity (EMG), aircraft control forces, aircraft attitude, perceived exertion and deviation from glide slope and heading. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for differences between landings. Pilots were least accurate in landing performance during the landing at 90% of maximal force (p < 0.05). There was also a trend toward decreased landing performance during the landing at 25% of normal force. Pilots were more variable in force production during the landings at 60% and 90% of maximal force (p < 0.05). Pilots are less accurate at performing instrument landings when control forces are high due to the increased variability of force production. The increase in variability at high force levels is most likely associated with motor unit recruitment, rather than rate coding. Aircraft designers need to consider the reduction in pilot performance at high force levels, as well as pilot strength limits when specifying new standards.

  12. Logarithmic interaction under periodic boundary conditions: closed form formulas for energy and forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Sandeep

    A method is given to obtain closed form formulas for the energy and forces for an aggregate of charges interacting via a logarithmic interaction under periodic boundary conditions. The work done here is a generalization of Glasser's results [J. Math. Phys., 15, 188 (1974)] and is obtained with a different and simpler method than that by Stremler [J. Math. Phys., 45, 3584 (2004)]. The simplicity of the formulas derived here makes them extremely convenient in a computer simulation.

  13. Logarithmic interaction under periodic boundary conditions: Closed form formulas for energy and forces

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    A method is given to obtain closed form formulas for the energy and forces for an aggregate of charges interacting via a logarithmic interaction under periodic boundary conditions. The work done here is a generalization of Glasser's results [M. L. Glasser, J. Math. Phys. 15, 188 (1974)] and is obtained with a different and simpler method than that by Stremler [M. A. Stremler, J. Math. Phys. 45, 3584 (2004)]. The simplicity of the formulas derived here makes them extremely convenient in a comp...

  14. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  15. INTERACTIONS: DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR TEACHING INTERMOLECULAR FORCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Geraldo Barbosa; Jair Mafezoli; Mary Anne Sousa Lima; Francisco Serra Oliveira Alexandre; Diego Macedo de Almeida; Antonio José Melo Leite Junior; José Nunes da Silva Júnior

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular forces are a useful concept that can explain the attraction between particulate matter as well as numerous phenomena in our lives such as viscosity, solubility, drug interactions, and dyeing of fibers. However, studies show that students have difficulty understanding this important concept, which has led us to develop a free educational software in English and Portuguese. The software can be used interactively by teachers and students, thus facilitating better understanding. Pr...

  16. In-depth Study on Cylinder Wake Controlled by Lorentz Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张辉; 范宝春; 陈志华

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of the electromagnetic control of cylinder wake are investigated and discussed.The effects of Lorentz force are found to be composed of two parts,one is its direct action on the cylinder(the wall Lorentz force)and the other is applied to the fluid(called the field Lorentz force)near the cylinder surface.Our results show that the wall Lorentz force can generate thrust and reduce the drag; the field Lorentz force increases the drag.However,the cylinder drag is dominated by the wall Lorentz force.In addition,the field Lorentz force above the upper surface decreases the lift,while the upper wall Lorentz force increases it.The total lift is dominated by the upper wall Lorentz force.%The underlying mechanisms of the electromagnetic control of cylinder wake are investigated and discussed. The effects of Lorentz force are found to be composed of two parts, one is its direct action on the cylinder (the wall Lorentz force) and the other is applied to the fluid (called the field Lorentz force) near the cylinder surface. Our results show that the wall Lorentz force can generate thrust and reduce the drag; the Geld Lorentz force increases the drag. However, the cylinder drag is dominated by the wall Lorentz force. In addition, the field Lorentz force above the upper surface decreases the lift, while the upper wall Lorentz force increases it. The total lift is dominated by the upper wall Lorentz force.

  17. Small forces that differ with prior motor experience can communicate movement goals during human-human physical interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, Andrew; Bhattacharjee, Tapomayukh; McKay, J Lucas; Hackney, Madeleine E; Kemp, Charles C; Ting, Lena H

    2017-01-31

    Physical interactions between two people are ubiquitous in our daily lives, and an integral part of many forms of rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated forces arising from physical interactions between humans during a cooperative motor task, particularly during overground movements. As such, the direction and magnitude of interaction forces between two human partners, how those forces are used to communicate movement goals, and whether they change with motor experience remains unknown. A better understanding of how cooperative physical interactions are achieved in healthy individuals of different skill levels is a first step toward understanding principles of physical interactions that could be applied to robotic devices for motor assistance and rehabilitation. Interaction forces between expert and novice partner dancers were recorded while performing a forward-backward partnered stepping task with assigned "leader" and "follower" roles. Their position was recorded using motion capture. The magnitude and direction of the interaction forces were analyzed and compared across groups (i.e. expert-expert, expert-novice, and novice-novice) and across movement phases (i.e. forward, backward, change of direction). All dyads were able to perform the partnered stepping task with some level of proficiency. Relatively small interaction forces (10-30N) were observed across all dyads, but were significantly larger among expert-expert dyads. Interaction forces were also found to be significantly different across movement phases. However, interaction force magnitude did not change as whole-body synchronization between partners improved across trials. Relatively small interaction forces may communicate movement goals (i.e. "what to do and when to do it") between human partners during cooperative physical interactions. Moreover, these small interactions forces vary with prior motor experience, and may act primarily as guiding cues that convey information about

  18. Canonical Force Distributions in Pairwise Interatomic Interactions from the Perspective of the Hellmann-Feynman Theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Jay R; Rivera-Rivera, Luis A; Lucchese, Robert R; Bevan, John W

    2016-05-26

    Force-based canonical approaches have recently given a unified but different viewpoint on the nature of bonding in pairwise interatomic interactions. Differing molecular categories (covalent, ionic, van der Waals, hydrogen, and halogen bonding) of representative interatomic interactions with binding energies ranging from 1.01 to 1072.03 kJ/mol have been modeled canonically giving a rigorous semiempirical verification to high accuracy. However, the fundamental physical basis expected to provide the inherent characteristics of these canonical transformations has not yet been elucidated. Subsequently, it was shown through direct numerical differentiation of these potentials that their associated force curves have canonical shapes. However, this approach to analyzing force results in inherent loss of accuracy coming from numerical differentiation of the potentials. We now show that this serious obstruction can be avoided by directly demonstrating the canonical nature of force distributions from the perspective of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. This requires only differentiation of explicitly known Coulombic potentials, and we discuss how this approach to canonical forces can be used to further explain the nature of chemical bonding in pairwise interatomic interactions. All parameter values used in the canonical transformation are determined through explicit physical based algorithms, and it does not require direct consideration of electron correlation effects.

  19. Interactions between Rotavirus and Suwannee River Organic Matter: Aggregation, Deposition, and Adhesion Force Measurement

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2012-08-21

    Interactions between rotavirus and Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) were studied by time-resolved dynamic light scattering, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy. In NOM-containing NaCl solutions of up to 600 mM, rotavirus suspension remained stable for over 4 h. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurement for interaction force decay length at different ionic strengths showed that nonelectrostatic repulsive forces were mainly responsible for eliminating aggregation in NaCl solutions. Aggregation rates of rotavirus in solutions containing 20 mg C/L increased with divalent cation concentration until reaching a critical coagulation concentration of 30 mM CaCl2 or 70 mM MgCl2. Deposition kinetics of rotavirus on NOM-coated silica surface was studied using quartz crystal microbalance. Experimental attachment efficiencies for rotavirus adsorption to NOM-coated surface in MgCl2 solution were lower than in CaCl2 solution at a given divalent cation concentration. Stronger adhesion force was measured for virus-virus and virus-NOM interactions in CaCl2 solution compared to those in MgCl2 or NaCl solutions at the same ionic strength. This study suggested that divalent cation complexation with carboxylate groups in NOM and on virus surface was an important mechanism in the deposition and aggregation kinetics of rotavirus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  20. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytell, Eric D; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L; Cohen, Avis H; Fauci, Lisa J

    2010-11-16

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed.

  1. Asymmetric electrostatic and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interaction forces between mica surfaces and silicone polymer thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Stephen H; Das, Saurabh; Gebbie, Matthew A; Rapp, Michael; Jones, Louis C; Roiter, Yuri; Koenig, Peter H; Gizaw, Yonas; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-11-26

    We have synthesized model hydrophobic silicone thin films on gold surfaces by a two-step covalent grafting procedure. An amino-functionalized gold surface reacts with monoepoxy-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via a click reaction, resulting in a covalently attached nanoscale thin film of PDMS, and the click chemistry synthesis route provides great selectivity, reproducibility, and stability in the resulting model hydrophobic silicone thin films. The asymmetric interaction forces between the PDMS thin films and mica surfaces were measured with the surface forces apparatus in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. At an acidic pH of 3, attractive interactions are measured, resulting in instabilities during both approach (jump-in) and separation (jump-out from adhesive contact). Quantitative analysis of the results indicates that the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory alone, i.e., the combination of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attraction, cannot fully describe the measured forces and that the additional measured adhesion is likely due to hydrophobic interactions. The surface interactions are highly pH-dependent, and a basic pH of 10 results in fully repulsive interactions at all distances, due to repulsive electrostatic and steric-hydration interactions, indicating that the PDMS is negatively charged at high pH. We describe an interaction potential with a parameter, known as the Hydra parameter, that can account for the extra attraction (low pH) due to hydrophobicity as well as the extra repulsion (high pH) due to hydrophilic (steric-hydration) interactions. The interaction potential is general and provides a quantitative measure of interfacial hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity for any set of interacting surfaces in aqueous solution.

  2. Lateral hydrodynamic interactions between an emulsion droplet and a flat surface evaluated by frictional force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Higashitani, Ko; Grieser, Franz

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a lateral atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to measure the hydrodynamic drag force acting on a microscopic emulsion droplet moving parallel to a flat surface. A tetradecane oil droplet formed in an aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulfate was attached to a V-shaped atomic force microscopy cantilever, and lateral hydrodynamic interactions between the droplet and a flat glass surface were measured using a range of scanning velocities. The droplet was positioned either far from the oscillating surface or was pressed to the surface under a constant applied load. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using AFM to study lateral hydrodynamic interactions and lubricity between soft matter materials relevant to a large number of applications in areas as diverse as flavor delivery in foods to the applications of emulsions or emollients in personal care products.

  3. Interactions between synaptic vesicle fusion proteins explored by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersin, A; Hirling, H; Steiner, P; Magnin, S; Regazzi, R; Hüni, B; Huguenot, P; De los Rios, P; Dietler, G; Catsicas, S; Kasas, S

    2003-07-22

    Measuring the biophysical properties of macromolecular complexes at work is a major challenge of modern biology. The protein complex composed of vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, and syntaxin 1 [soluble N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex] is essential for docking and fusion of neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. To better understand the fusion mechanisms, we reconstituted the synaptic SNARE complex in the imaging chamber of an atomic force microscope and measured the interaction forces between its components. Each protein was tested against the two others, taken either individually or as binary complexes. This approach allowed us to determine specific interaction forces and dissociation kinetics of the SNAREs and led us to propose a sequence of interactions. A theoretical model based on our measurements suggests that a minimum of four complexes is probably necessary for fusion to occur. We also showed that the regulatory protein neuronal Sec1 injected into the atomic force microscope chamber prevented the complex formation. Finally, we measured the effect of tetanus toxin protease on the SNARE complex and its activity by on-line registration during tetanus toxin injection. These experiments provide a basis for the functional study of protein microdomains and also suggest opportunities for sensitive screening of drugs that can modulate protein-protein interactions.

  4. Influence of atomic force microscope tip-sample interaction on the study of scaling behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aue, J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1997-01-01

    Images acquired with atomic force microscopy are based on tip-sample interaction. It is shown that using scanning probe techniques for determining scaling parameters of a surface leads to an underestimate of the actual scaling dimension, due to the dilation of tip and surface. How much we underestim

  5. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Belt-Gritter, van de B.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Norde, W.; Mei, van der H.C.; Busscher, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and witho

  6. Force spectroscopy studies on protein-ligand interactions: a single protein mechanics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaotang; Li, Hongbin

    2014-10-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous and play important roles in almost every biological process. The direct elucidation of the thermodynamic, structural and functional consequences of protein-ligand interactions is thus of critical importance to decipher the mechanism underlying these biological processes. A toolbox containing a variety of powerful techniques has been developed to quantitatively study protein-ligand interactions in vitro as well as in living systems. The development of atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy techniques has expanded this toolbox and made it possible to directly probe the mechanical consequence of ligand binding on proteins. Many recent experiments have revealed how ligand binding affects the mechanical stability and mechanical unfolding dynamics of proteins, and provided mechanistic understanding on these effects. The enhancement effect of mechanical stability by ligand binding has been used to help tune the mechanical stability of proteins in a rational manner and develop novel functional binding assays for protein-ligand interactions. Single molecule force spectroscopy studies have started to shed new lights on the structural and functional consequence of ligand binding on proteins that bear force under their biological settings. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction forces between salivary proteins and Streptococcus mutans with and without antigen I/II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Chun-Ping; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2007-01-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific binding to, among others, salivary films. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction forces between salivary proteins and S. mutans with (LT11) and

  8. Neuro fuzzy force control for soft dry contact Hertzian ultrasonic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, E.; Baltazar, A.; Treesatayapun, C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the use of a cartesian robotic manipulator as scanner for the automated identification of hidden defects in an aluminum test plate is proposed. The robotic manipulator includes a custom made soft deformable ultrasonic probe and a force sensor for the recollection of the ultrasonic signals and force feedback. The contact between the soft probe and the test plate is regulated using a Neuro Fuzzy controller in order to avoid the complex mathematical model produced by the interaction. Finally the use of the correlation coefficient is proposed for the post processing of the obtained ultrasonic signals and identification of hidden defects inside the test plate. Experimental studies demonstrated the efficiency of the method.

  9. Protein Adsorption into Mesopores: A Combination of Electrostatic Interaction, Counterion Release and van der Waals Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Moerz, Sebastian T

    2015-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c has been immobilized into the mesoporous silica host material SBA-15 in both its native folded and urea-unfolded state. The comparison of the two folding states' behavior casts doubt on the commonly used explanation of cytochrome c adsorption, i.e. the electrostatic interaction model. A detailed investigation of the protein binding as a function of pH and ionic strength of the buffer solution reveals the complex nature of the protein-silica interaction. Electrostatic interaction, van der Waals forces and entropic contributions by counterion release each contribute to adsorption on the silica pore walls.

  10. Profile of the intermolecular forces governing the interaction of drugs with mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Giulia; Visentin, Sonja; Pontremoli, Carlotta; Ermondi, Giuseppe

    2015-07-05

    The study highlights the balance of the intermolecular forces governing the interaction between drugs and mucin. The interaction strength is expressed as a retention factor k (data retrieved from the literature (Gargano et al., 2014)) obtained by a new bio-affinity chromatographic method in which the stationary phase is based on covalently immobilized mucin (porcine gastric mucin, PGM). A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) between logk and 82 VolSurf+ descriptors was established and mechanistically interpreted. Results evidence that all blocks contribute similarly to the model; moreover, hydrogen bonding donor (HBD) properties of solutes favor the interaction with mucin; and thus, support their detrimental role on drug permeability.

  11. Atoms and Forces of Interaction Between Elementary Particles in the Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbatenko, M V

    2011-01-01

    The earlier developed algorithm for constructing a self-conjugate Hamiltonian in the representation for Dirac particles interacting with a general gravitational field is extended to the case of electromagnetic fields. This Hamiltonian is applied to the case when the gravitational field describes the spatially flat Friedmann model, and the electromagnetic field is the Coulomb potential extended to the case of this model. The analysis of atomic systems and electromagnetic forces of interaction under the conditions of spatially flat expansion of the universe has demonstrated that the system of atomic levels does not change with cosmological time. Spectral lines of atoms in the spatially flat Friedmann model are identical at different points of cosmological time. In this case the redshift is stipulated entirely by the growth of wavelength of photons at movement in the expending universe. At the same time force of interaction between elementary particles can change with expansion of the universe.

  12. Real Time Vibration Control of Active Suspension System with Active Force Control using Iterative Learning Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalaivani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents concurrent vibration control of a laboratory scaled vibration isolator platform with Active Force Control (AFC using Iterative Learning Algorithm (ILA. The work investigates the performance of the traditional Proportional Integral Derivative Controller (PIDC with and without AFC using ILA for vibration suppression. The physical single degree of freedom quarter car has been interfaced with a personal computer using a National Instruments data acquisition card NI USB 6008. The controllers are designed and simulated using LabVIEW simulation software. The results infer that the PIDC with AFC using ILA works superior than the PIDC.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  14. A bio-inspired force control for cyclic manipulation of prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, A L; Barone, R; Zollo, L; Carpino, G; Davalli, A; Sacchetti, R; Guglielmelli, E

    2015-01-01

    The human hand is considered as the highest example of dexterous system capable of interacting with different objects and adapting its manipulation abilities to them. The control of poliarticulated prosthetic hands represents one important research challenge, typically aiming at replicating the manipulation capabilities of the natural hand. For this reason, this paper wants to propose a bio-inspired learning architecture based on parallel force/position control for prosthetic hands, capable of learning cyclic manipulation capabilities. To this purpose, it is focused on the control of a commercial biomechatronic hand (the IH2 hand) including the main features of recent poliarticulated prosthetic hands. The training phase of the hand was carried out in simulation, the parallel force/position control was tested in simulation whereas preliminary tests were performed on the real IH2 hand. The results obtained in simulation and on the real hand provide an important evidence of the applicability of the bio-inspired neural control to real biomechatronic hand with the typical features of a hand prosthesis.

  15. Hybrid force-velocity sliding mode control of a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeberg, Erik D; Meek, Sanford G; Minor, Mark A

    2008-05-01

    Four different methods of hand prosthesis control are developed and examined experimentally. Open-loop control is shown to offer the least sensitivity when manipulating objects. Force feedback substantially improves upon open-loop control. However, it is shown that the inclusion of velocity and/or position feedback in a hybrid force-velocity control scheme can further improve the functionality of hand prostheses. Experimental results indicate that the sliding mode controller with force, position, and velocity feedback is less prone to unwanted force overshoot when initially grasping objects than the other controllers.

  16. Interplay of Multiple Interaction Forces: Binding of Norfloxacin to Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan K; Ghosh, Narayani; Mukherjee, Saptarshi

    2015-10-15

    Herein, the binding interaction of a potential chemotherapeutic antibacterial drug norfloxacin (NOF) with a serum transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA), is investigated. The prototropic transformation of the drug (NOF) is found to be remarkably modified following interaction with the protein as manifested through significant modulations of the photophysics of the drug. The predominant zwitterionic form of NOF in aqueous buffer phase undergoes transformation to the cationic form within the protein-encapsulated state. This implies the possible role of electrostatic interaction force in NOF-HSA binding. This postulate is further substantiated from the effect of ionic strength on the interaction process. To this end, the detailed study of the thermodynamics of the drug-protein interaction process from isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) experiments is found to unfold the signature of electrostatic as well as hydrophobic interaction forces underlying the binding process. Thus, interplay of more than one interaction forces is argued to be responsible for the overall drug-protein binding. The ITC results reveal an important finding in terms of enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) characterizing the NOF-HSA binding. The effect of drug-binding on the native protein conformation has also been evaluated from circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy which unveils partial rupture of the protein secondary structure. In conjunction to this, the functionality of the native protein (in terms of esterase-like activity) is found to be lowered as a result of binding with NOF. The AutoDock-based docking simulation unravels the probable binding location of NOF within the hydrophilic subdomain IA of HSA. The present program also focuses on exploring the dynamical aspects of the drug-protein interaction scenario. The rotational-relaxation dynamics of the protein-bound drug reveals the not-so-common "dip-and-rise" pattern.

  17. Interaction of Volcanic Forcing and El Nino: Sensitivity to the Eruption Magnitude and El Nino Intensity

    KAUST Repository

    Predybaylo, Evgeniya

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic aerosols formed in the stratosphere after strong explosive eruptions influence Earth\\'s radiative balance, affecting atmospheric and oceanic temperatures and circulation. It was observed that the recent volcanic eruptions frequently occurred in El Nino years. Analysis of the paleo data confirms that the probability of a sequent El Nino occurrence after the eruption increases. To better understand the physical mechanism of this interaction we employed ocean-atmosphere coupled climate model CM2.1, developed in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, and conducted a series of numerical experiments using initial conditions with different El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) strengths forced by volcanic eruptions of different magnitudes, Pinatubo of June 1991 and Tambora of April 1815: (i) strong ENSO/Pinatubo, (ii) weak ENSO/Pinatubo, (iii) strong ENSO/Tambora. The amount of ejected material from the Tambora eruption was about three times greater than that of the Pinatubo eruption. The initial conditions with El Nino were sampled from the CM2.1 long control run. Our simulations show the enhancement of El Nino in the second year after an eruption. We found that the spatial-temporal structure of model responses is sensitive to both the magnitude of an eruption and the strength of El Nino. We analyzed the ocean dynamic in the tropical Pacific for all cases to uncover the physical mechanism, resulting in the enhanced and/or prolonged El Nino.

  18. IM-UFF: Extending the universal force field for interactive molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillet, Léonard; Artemova, Svetlana; Redon, Stephane

    2017-09-05

    The universal force field (UFF) is a broadly applicable classical force field that contains parameters for almost every atom type of the periodic table. This force field is non-reactive, i.e. the topology of the system under study is considered as fixed and no creation or breaking of covalent bonds is possible. This paper introduces interactive modeling-UFF (IM-UFF), an extension of UFF that combines the possibility to significantly modify molecular structures (as with reactive force fields) with a broad diversity of supported systems thanks to the universality of UFF. Such an extension lets the user easily build and edit molecular systems interactively while being guided by physics based inter-atomic forces. This approach introduces weighted atom types and weighted bonds, used to update topologies and atom parameterizations at every time step of a simulation. IM-UFF has been evaluated on a large set of benchmarks and is proposed as a self-contained implementation integrated in a new module for the SAMSON software platform for computational nanoscience available at http://www.samson-connect.net. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Probing nanoscale graphene-liquid interfacial interactions via ultrasonic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Benjamin J; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2014-09-21

    We probe the interfacial forces in graphene-air and graphene-liquid environments with nanoscale resolution. Experimentally, probe 'snap-in' to contact, in scanning probe microscopy, is overcome by combining the ultrasonic force spectroscopy (UFS) approach and MHz frequency range harmonic oscillation of the sample thereby sweeping the tip-surface dynamically from separated to indented state across the region of intimate interface contact. We measured the force interaction between nanoscale probe tip and graphene, graphite and reference SiO₂ surface in ambient, polar and non-polar liquid environments. Via modelling we estimated the decay length of the force interaction in water to be 0.25-0.75 nm, equivalent to 1-3 monolayers, and interfacial effective stiffness at these distances associated with the liquid layer was an order of magnitude greater for non-polar than for polar liquid environment. During the elastic indentation at increased forces, the effective Young's modulus of graphene was shown only to be slightly reduced in ambient environment while experiencing significant reduction by a factor of 3 in non-polar dodecane environment.

  20. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate.

  1. Stall force of a cargo driven by N interacting motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Deepak; Gopalakrishnan, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    We study a generic one-dimensional model for an intracellular cargo driven by N motor proteins against an external applied force. The model includes motor-cargo and motor-motor interactions. The cargo motion is described by an over-damped Langevin equation, while motor dynamics is specified by hopping rates which follow a local detailed balance condition with respect to the change in energy per hopping event. Based on this model, we show that the stall force, the mean external force corresponding to zero mean cargo velocity, is completely independent of the details of the interactions and is, therefore, always equal to the sum of the stall forces of the individual motors. This exact result is arrived on the basis of a simple assumption: the (macroscopic) state of stall of the cargo is analogous to a state of thermodynamic equilibrium, and is characterized by vanishing net probability current between any two microstates, with the latter specified by motor positions relative to the cargo. The corresponding probability distribution of the microstates under stall is also determined. These predictions are in complete agreement with numerical simulations, carried out using specific forms of interaction potentials.

  2. Three-dimensional traction force microscopy: a new tool for quantifying cell-matrix interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Franck

    Full Text Available The interactions between biochemical processes and mechanical signaling play important roles during various cellular processes such as wound healing, embryogenesis, metastasis, and cell migration. While traditional traction force measurements have provided quantitative information about cell matrix interactions in two dimensions, recent studies have shown significant differences in the behavior and morphology of cells when placed in three-dimensional environments. Hence new quantitative experimental techniques are needed to accurately determine cell traction forces in three dimensions. Recently, two approaches both based on laser scanning confocal microscopy have emerged to address this need. This study highlights the details, implementation and advantages of such a three-dimensional imaging methodology with the capability to compute cellular traction forces dynamically during cell migration and locomotion. An application of this newly developed three-dimensional traction force microscopy (3D TFM technique to single cell migration studies of 3T3 fibroblasts is presented to show that this methodology offers a new quantitative vantage point to investigate the three-dimensional nature of cell-ECM interactions.

  3. Three-dimensional traction force microscopy: a new tool for quantifying cell-matrix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Christian; Maskarinec, Stacey A; Tirrell, David A; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2011-03-29

    The interactions between biochemical processes and mechanical signaling play important roles during various cellular processes such as wound healing, embryogenesis, metastasis, and cell migration. While traditional traction force measurements have provided quantitative information about cell matrix interactions in two dimensions, recent studies have shown significant differences in the behavior and morphology of cells when placed in three-dimensional environments. Hence new quantitative experimental techniques are needed to accurately determine cell traction forces in three dimensions. Recently, two approaches both based on laser scanning confocal microscopy have emerged to address this need. This study highlights the details, implementation and advantages of such a three-dimensional imaging methodology with the capability to compute cellular traction forces dynamically during cell migration and locomotion. An application of this newly developed three-dimensional traction force microscopy (3D TFM) technique to single cell migration studies of 3T3 fibroblasts is presented to show that this methodology offers a new quantitative vantage point to investigate the three-dimensional nature of cell-ECM interactions.

  4. Hydrodynamic Interactions between Two Forced Objects of Arbitrary Shape: II Relative Translation

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfriend, Tomer; Witten, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    We study the relative translation of two arbitrarily shaped objects, caused by their hydrodynamic interaction as they are forced through a viscous fluid in the limit of zero Reynolds number. It is well known that in the case of two rigid spheres in an unbounded fluid, the hydrodynamic interaction does not produce relative translation. More generally such an effective pair-interaction vanishes in configurations with spatial inversion symmetry, for example, an enantiomorphic pair in mirror image positions has no relative translation. We show that the breaking of inversion symmetry by boundaries of the system accounts for the interactions between two spheres in confined geometries, as observed in experiments. The same general principle also provides new predictions for interactions in other object configurations near obstacles. We examine the time-dependent relative translation of two self-aligning objects, extending the numerical analysis of our preceding publication [Goldfriend, Diamant and Witten, arXiv:1502....

  5. Probing molecular interaction between transferrin and anti-transferrin by atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between transferrin (Tf) and its antibody was investigated by atomic force microscope. Tf-antibody was immobilized on the Au-coated glass slide, and the specific combination between antibody and antigen was also characterized by AFM. The results showed that holo-transferrin was jogged with anti-transferrin, and binded anti-tran- sferrin more tightly than apo-transferrin. The force- distance curves revealed that the affinity of anti-trans- ferrin and holo-transferrin was much stronger than that of apo-transferrin.

  6. ADAPTIVE CONTROLLER AND ITS APPLICATION IN FORCE SYSTEM OF ASYMMETRIC CYLINDER CONTROLLED BY SYMMETRIC VALVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Partial pressure, system vibration and asymmetric system dynamic performance exit in asymmetric cylinder controller by symmetric valve hydraulic system. To solve this problem in the force control system, model reference adaptive controller is designed using equilibrium point stability theory and output error equation polynomial. The reference model is selected in such a way that it meets the system dynamic performance. Hardware configuration of asymmetric cylinder controlled by asymmetric valve hydraulic system is replaced by intelligent control algorithm, thus the cost is lowered and easy to application. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed adaptive control sheme has good adaptive ability and well solves asymmetric dynamic performance problem. The designed adaptive controller is fairly robust to load disturbance and system parameter variation.

  7. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschauer, Stefan; Haidenbauer, Johann; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  8. Quantifying the adhesion and interaction forces between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Lail, Laila I; Liu, Yatao; Atabek, Arzu; Camesano, Terri A

    2007-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize interactions between natural organic matter (NOM), and glass or bacteria. Poly(methacrylic acid) (PMA), soil humic Acid (SHA), and Suwannee River humic Acid (SRHA), were adsorbed to silica AFM probes. Adhesion forces (Fadh) for the interaction of organic-probes and glass slides correlated with organic molecular weight (MW), but not with radius of the organic aggregate (R), charge density (Q), or zeta potential (zeta). Two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with different lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were chosen: PAO1 (A+B+), whose LPS have common antigen (A-band) + O-antigen (B-band); and mutant AK1401 (A+B-). Fadh between bacteria and organics correlated with organic MW, R, and Q, but not zeta. PAO1 had lower Fadh with silica than NOM, which was attributed to negative charges from the B-band polymers causing electrostatic repulsion. AK1401 adhered stronger to silica than to the organics, perhaps because the absence of the B-band exposed underlying positively charged proteins. DLVO calculations could not explain the differences in the two bacteria or predict qualitative or quantitative trends in interaction forces in these systems. Molecular-level information from AFM studies can bring us closer to understanding the complex nature of bacterial-NOM interactions.

  9. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  10. ADJUSTMENT ERRORS IN ASCENDING AND DESCENDING PHASES OF TARGET LEVEL IN CONTROLLED FORCE EXERTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Demura, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    Hand grip force adjustment errors to ascending and descending phases of a sinusoidal target force in a controlled force exertion (CFE) test were measured and the laterality of responses evaluated. 75 men (M age = 19.6 yr., SD = 1.6) performed the CFE test after one practice trial by matching handgrip force to target level (5-25% of maximal grip force). The CFE errors in ascending and descending phases of the target force were calculated as the absolute differences between actual force and target force in each phase. There were significantly smaller CFE errors in the ascending phase for both dominant and non-dominant hands, but CFE error for the dominant hand was significantly smaller in both phases. Therefore, error in force exertion in the ascending and descending phases of the target force differed, and laterality influenced error in both phases.

  11. Control/structure interaction conceptual design tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1990-01-01

    The JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program is developing new analytical methods for designing micro-precision spacecraft with controlled structures. One of these, the Conceptual Design Tool, will illustrate innovative new approaches to the integration of multi-disciplinary analysis and design methods. The tool will be used to demonstrate homogeneity of presentation, uniform data representation across analytical methods, and integrated systems modeling. The tool differs from current 'integrated systems' that support design teams most notably in its support for the new CSI multi-disciplinary engineer. The design tool will utilize a three dimensional solid model of the spacecraft under design as the central data organization metaphor. Various analytical methods, such as finite element structural analysis, control system analysis, and mechanical configuration layout, will store and retrieve data from a hierarchical, object oriented data structure that supports assemblies of components with associated data and algorithms. In addition to managing numerical model data, the tool will assist the designer in organizing, stating, and tracking system requirements.

  12. The Casimir force control in nano and micro electromechanical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we deal with the analysis and measurement of dispersive surface forces, specifically the Casimir force. Applying Lifshitz theory makes it possible to take into account the material optical property and consequently the obtained results are more realistic. We used contact mode atomic f

  13. Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parteli, Eric J R; Schmidt, Jochen; Blümel, Christina; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Peukert, Wolfgang; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2014-09-02

    We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

  14. Interaction of red blood cells with a polarized electrode: evidence of long-range intermolecular forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingell, D; Fornes, J A

    1976-10-01

    We have investigated the electrostatic interaction of glutaraldehyde-fixed human red cells with a polarizable electrode carrying a defined surface charge density which can be varied continuously through a wide range. Cells in a dilute salt solution are unable to adhere to the electrode at high negative charge, but at lower negative charge densities they are reversibly adherent and can be forced off by increasing the negative polarization. Near zero electrode charge they become irreversibly stuck to the electrode and cannot be evicted even at maximum electrode polarization. Calculation of the electrostatic repulsive force using measured charge densities indicates the existence of an attractive force which may be acting over several hundred angstroms.

  15. Simultaneous Characterization of Nanoparticle Size and Particle-Surface Interactions with Three-Dimensional Nanophotonic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Dakota; Schein, Perry; Erickson, David

    2016-09-01

    The behavior of a nanoparticle in solution depends strongly on the particle's physical and chemical characteristics, most notably the particle size and the surface properties. Accurately characterizing these properties is critical for quality control in a wide variety of industries. To understand a complex and polydisperse nanoparticle suspension, however, ensemble averaging is not sufficient, and there is a great need for direct measurements of size and surface properties at the individual nanoparticle level. In this work, we present an analysis technique for simultaneous characterization of particle-surface interactions and size using near-field light scattering and verify it using Brownian-dynamics simulations. Using a nanophotonic waveguide, single particles can be stably held near the waveguide's surface by strongly localized optical forces. By tracking the dynamic 3D motion of the particle under the influence of these forces using an optical microscope, it is possible to extract the particle-surface interaction forces, as well as to estimate the size and refractive index of the nanoparticle. Because of the strong light-scattering signal, this method is viable for high-throughput characterization of particles as small as 100 nm in only a few seconds each.

  16. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  17. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Knaepen

    Full Text Available In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support. Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning.

  18. Human-Robot Interaction: Does Robotic Guidance Force Affect Gait-Related Brain Dynamics during Robot-Assisted Treadmill Walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Swinnen, Eva; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Michielsen, Marc; Kerckhofs, Eric; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine optimal training parameters for robot-assisted treadmill walking, it is essential to understand how a robotic device interacts with its wearer, and thus, how parameter settings of the device affect locomotor control. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of different levels of guidance force during robot-assisted treadmill walking on cortical activity. Eighteen healthy subjects walked at 2 km.h-1 on a treadmill with and without assistance of the Lokomat robotic gait orthosis. Event-related spectral perturbations and changes in power spectral density were investigated during unassisted treadmill walking as well as during robot-assisted treadmill walking at 30%, 60% and 100% guidance force (with 0% body weight support). Clustering of independent components revealed three clusters of activity in the sensorimotor cortex during treadmill walking and robot-assisted treadmill walking in healthy subjects. These clusters demonstrated gait-related spectral modulations in the mu, beta and low gamma bands over the sensorimotor cortex related to specific phases of the gait cycle. Moreover, mu and beta rhythms were suppressed in the right primary sensory cortex during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking with 100% guidance force, indicating significantly larger involvement of the sensorimotor area during treadmill walking compared to robot-assisted treadmill walking. Only marginal differences in the spectral power of the mu, beta and low gamma bands could be identified between robot-assisted treadmill walking with different levels of guidance force. From these results it can be concluded that a high level of guidance force (i.e., 100% guidance force) and thus a less active participation during locomotion should be avoided during robot-assisted treadmill walking. This will optimize the involvement of the sensorimotor cortex which is known to be crucial for motor learning.

  19. Parallel Processing Based on Ship Maneuvering in Identification of Interaction Force Coefficients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-jian; HUANG Guo-liang; DENG De-heng

    2008-01-01

    The parallel processing based on the free running model test was adopted to predict the interac-tion force coefficients (flow straightening coefficient and wake fraction) of ship maneuvering. And the multi-population genetic algorithm (MPGA) based on real coding that can contemporarily process the data of freerunning model and simulation of ship maneuvering was applied to solve the problem. Accordingly the optimalindividual was obtained using the method of genetic algorithm. The parallel processing of multi-populationsolved the prematurity in the identification for single population, meanwhile, the parallel processing of the dataof ship maneuvering (turning motion and zigzag motion) is an attempt to solve the coefficient drift problem.In order to validate the method, the interaction force coefficients were verified by the procedure and thesecoefficients measured were compared with those ones identified. The maximum error is less than 5%, and theidentification is an effective method.

  20. Interactive Multimedia Software on Fundamental Particles and Forces. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Sculley

    1999-04-27

    Research in the SBIR Phase 2 grant number 95 ER 81944 centered on creating interactive multimedia software for teaching basic concepts in particle physics on fundamental particles and forces. The work was undertaken from February 1997 through July 1998. Overall the project has produced some very encouraging results in terms of product development, interest from the general public and interest from potential Phase 3 funders. Although the original Phase 3 publisher, McGraw Hill Home Interactive, was dissolved by its parent company, and other changes in the CD-ROM industry forced them to change their focus from CD-ROM to the Internet, there has been substantial interest from software publishers and online content providers in the content developed in the course of the Phase 2 research. Results are summarized.

  1. INTERACTIONS: DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR TEACHING INTERMOLECULAR FORCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Geraldo Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular forces are a useful concept that can explain the attraction between particulate matter as well as numerous phenomena in our lives such as viscosity, solubility, drug interactions, and dyeing of fibers. However, studies show that students have difficulty understanding this important concept, which has led us to develop a free educational software in English and Portuguese. The software can be used interactively by teachers and students, thus facilitating better understanding. Professors and students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned about the software quality and its intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and pedagogical application using a Likert scale. The results led to the conclusion that the developed computer application can be characterized as an auxiliary tool to assist teachers in their lectures and students in their learning process of intermolecular forces.

  2. Interactive Multimedia Software on Fundamental Particles and Forces. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Sculley

    1999-04-27

    Research in the SBIR Phase 2 grant number 95 ER 81944 centered on creating interactive multimedia software for teaching basic concepts in particle physics on fundamental particles and forces. The work was undertaken from February 1997 through July 1998. Overall the project has produced some very encouraging results in terms of product development, interest from the general public and interest from potential Phase 3 funders. Although the original Phase 3 publisher, McGraw Hill Home Interactive, was dissolved by its parent company, and other changes in the CD-ROM industry forced them to change their focus from CD-ROM to the Internet, there has been substantial interest from software publishers and online content providers in the content developed in the course of the Phase 2 research. Results are summarized.

  3. Corrections to the Casimir Force Due to Interactions of Plasmons and Electromagnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Considering the interaction between the electromagnetic field and matter field, a concise method is used to calculate the ground-state energy of the interacting system. With the assumption of squeezed-like state, a new vacuum state is obtained for the interacting system. The energy of the new vacuum state is obviously lower than that of unperturbed vacuum state. Based on the new vacuum state, the correction to the Casimir force is obtained.The result shows that the contribution of the interaction is a repulsive one and the Casimir effect is attributed to both electromagnetic field and matter field. On the basis of the obtained results, the recent experimental data can be explained reasonably.

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  5. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  6. The Effect of Transmission Design on Force-Controlled Manipulator Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Seering, W.P., "On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control ," proc. 1986 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, San Francisco, b 9 ph...Measurement, and Control, vol. 99, no. 2, June 1977, pp. 91-97. Whitney, D.E., "Historical Perspective and State of the Art in Robot Force Control ," proc

  7. Measuring the interaction force between a high temperature superconductor and a permanent magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, S. O.; Jorge, G. A.; Rodriguez, E.

    1999-01-01

    Repulsive and attractive forces are both possible between a superconducting sample and a permanent magnet, and they can give place to magnetic levitation or free-suspension phenomena, respectively. We show experiments to quantify this magnetic interaction which represents a promising field regarding to short-term technological applications of high temperature superconductors. The measuring technique employs an electronic balance and a rare-earth magnet that induces a magnetic moment in a melt...

  8. Digit forces bias sensorimotor transformations underlying control of fingertip position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Daisuke; Kappers, Astrid M L; Santello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Humans are able to modulate digit forces as a function of position despite changes in digit placement that might occur from trial to trial or when changing grip type for object manipulation. Although this phenomenon is likely to rely on sensing the position of the digits relative to each other and the object, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To address this question, we asked subjects (n = 30) to match perceived vertical distance between the center of pressure (CoP) of the thumb and index finger pads (dy ) of the right hand ("reference" hand) using the same hand ("test" hand). The digits of reference hand were passively placed collinearly (dy = 0 mm). Subjects were then asked to exert different combinations of normal and tangential digit forces (Fn and Ftan , respectively) using the reference hand and then match the memorized dy using the test hand. The reference hand exerted Ftan of thumb and index finger in either same or opposite direction. We hypothesized that, when the tangential forces of the digits are produced in opposite directions, matching error (1) would be biased toward the directions of the tangential forces; and (2) would be greater when the remembered relative contact points are matched with negligible digit force production. For the test hand, digit forces were either negligible (0.5-1 N, 0 ± 0.25 N; Experiment 1) or the same as those exerted by the reference hand (Experiment 2).Matching error was biased towards the direction of digit tangential forces: thumb CoP was placed higher than the index finger CoP when thumb and index finger Ftan were directed upward and downward, respectively, and vice versa (p < 0.001). However, matching error was not dependent on whether the reference and test hand exerted similar or different forces. We propose that the expected sensory consequence of motor commands for tangential forces in opposite directions overrides estimation of fingertip position through haptic sensory feedback.

  9. Digit forces bias sensorimotor transformations underlying control of fingertip position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eShibata

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to modulate digit forces as a function of position despite changes in digit placement that might occur from trial to trial or when changing grip type for object manipulation. Although this phenomenon is likely to rely on sensing the position of the digits relative to each other and the object, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To address this question, we asked subjects (n = 30 to match perceived vertical distance between the center of pressure (CoP of the thumb and index finger pads (dy of the right hand (reference hand using the same hand (test hand. The digits of reference hand were passively placed collinearly (dy = 0 mm. Subjects were then asked to exert different combinations of normal and tangential digit forces (Fn and Ftan, respectively using the reference hand and then match the memorized dy using the test hand. The reference hand exerted Ftan of thumb and index finger in either same or opposite direction. We hypothesized that, when the tangential forces of the digits are produced in opposite directions, matching error (1 would be biased toward the directions of the tangential forces, and (2 would be greater when the remembered relative contact points are matched with negligible digit force production. For the test hand, digit forces were either negligible (0.5-1 N, 0 ± 0.25 N; Experiment 1 or the same as those exerted by the reference hand (Experiment 2. Matching error was biased towards the direction of digit tangential forces: thumb CoP was placed higher than the index finger CoP when thumb and index finger Ftan were directed upward and downward, respectively, and vice versa (p < 0.001. However, matching error was not dependent on whether the reference and test hand exerted similar or different forces. We propose that the expected sensory consequence of motor commands for tangential forces in opposite directions overrides estimation of fingertip position through haptic sensory feedback.

  10. Conformational mechanics, adsorption, and normal force interactions of lubricin and hyaluronic acid on model surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Debby P; Abu-Lail, Nehal I; Guilak, Farshid; Jay, Gregory D; Zauscher, Stefan

    2008-02-19

    Glycoproteins, such as lubricin, and hyaluronic acid (HA) play a prominent role in the boundary lubrication mechanism in diarthrodial joints. Although many studies have tried to elucidate the lubrication mechanisms of articular cartilage, the molecular details of how lubricin and HA interact with cartilage surfaces and mediate their interaction still remain poorly understood. Here we used model substrates, functionalized with self-assembled monolayers terminating in hydroxyl or methyl groups, (1) to determine the effect of surface chemistry on lubricin and HA adsorption using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and (2) to study normal force interactions between these surfaces as a function of lubricin and HA concentration using colloidal probe microscopy. We found that lubricin is amphiphilic and adsorbed strongly onto both methyl- and hydroxyl-terminated surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, lubricin likely adopts a compact, looplike conformation in which its hydrophobic domains at the N and C termini serve as surface anchors. On hydrophilic surfaces, lubricin likely adsorbs anywhere along its hydrophilic central domain and adopts, with increasing solution concentration, an extended tail-like conformation. Overall, lubricin develops strong repulsive interactions when compressing two surfaces into contact. Furthermore, upon surface separation, adhesion occurs between the surfaces as a result of molecular bridging and chain disentanglement. This behavior is in contrast to that of HA, which does not adsorb appreciably on either of the model surfaces and does not develop significant repulsive interactions. Adhesive forces, particularly between the hydrophobic surfaces, are large and not appreciably affected by HA. For a mixture of lubricin and HA, we observed slightly larger adsorptions and repulsions than those found for lubricin alone. Our experiments suggest that this interaction depends on unspecific physical rather than chemical interactions between lubricin and HA. We

  11. Influence of Emotion on the Control of Low-Level Force Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, Kelly M.; Coombes, Stephen A.; Cauraugh, James H.; Janelle, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy and variability of a sustained low-level force contraction (2% of maximum voluntary contraction) was measured while participants viewed unpleasant, pleasant, and neutral images during a feedback occluded force control task. Exposure to pleasant and unpleasant images led to a relative increase in force production but did not alter the…

  12. Force nanoscopy of hydrophobic interactions in the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Derclaye, Sylvie; Alsteens, David; Kucharíková, Soňa; Van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2015-02-24

    Candida glabrata is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which binds to surfaces mainly through the Epa family of cell adhesion proteins. While some Epa proteins mediate specific lectin-like interactions with human epithelial cells, others promote adhesion and biofilm formation on plastic surfaces via nonspecific interactions that are not yet elucidated. We report the measurement of hydrophobic forces engaged in Epa6-mediated cell adhesion by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we found that C. glabrata wild-type (WT) cells attach to hydrophobic surfaces via strongly adhesive macromolecular bonds, while mutant cells impaired in Epa6 expression are weakly adhesive. Nanoscale mapping of yeast cells using AFM tips functionalized with hydrophobic groups shows that Epa6 is massively exposed on WT cells and conveys strong hydrophobic properties to the cell surface. Our results demonstrate that Epa6 mediates strong hydrophobic interactions, thereby providing a molecular basis for the ability of this adhesin to drive biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces.

  13. Infection control hazards associated with the use of forced-air warming in operating theatres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A M; Moss, C; Keenan, A; Reed, M R; Leaper, D J

    2014-11-01

    A review is presented of the published experimental and clinical research into the infection control hazards of using forced air-warming (FAW) in operating theatres to prevent inadvertent hypothermia. This evidence has been reviewed with emphasis on the use of ultra-clean ventilation, any interaction it has with different types of patient warming (and FAW in particular), and any related increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). We conclude that FAW does contaminate ultra-clean air ventilation; however, there appears to be no definite link to an increased risk of SSI based on current research. Nevertheless, whereas this remains unproven, we recommend that surgeons should at least consider alternative patient-warming systems in areas where contamination of the operative field may be critical. Although this is not a systematic review of acceptable randomized controlled clinical trials, which do not exist, it does identify that there is a need for definitive research in this field.

  14. CONTACT: An Air Force technical report on military satellite control technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weakley, Christopher K.

    1993-07-01

    This technical report focuses on Military Satellite Control Technologies and their application to the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN). This report is a compilation of articles that provide an overview of the AFSCN and the Advanced Technology Program, and discusses relevant technical issues and developments applicable to the AFSCN. Among the topics covered are articles on Future Technology Projections; Future AFSCN Topologies; Modeling of the AFSCN; Wide Area Communications Technology Evolution; Automating AFSCN Resource Scheduling; Health & Status Monitoring at Remote Tracking Stations; Software Metrics and Tools for Measuring AFSCN Software Performance; Human-Computer Interface Working Group; Trusted Systems Workshop; and the University Technical Interaction Program. In addition, Key Technology Area points of contact are listed in the report.

  15. Fuzzy force control of constrained robot manipulators based on impedance model in an unknown environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongyi; WANG Lei; WANG Fei

    2007-01-01

    To precisely implement the force control of robot manipulators in an unknown environment,a control strategy based on fuzzy prediction of the reference trajectory in the impedance model is developed.The force tracking experiments are executed in an open-architecture control system with different tracking velocities,different desired forces,different contact stiffnesses and different surface figurations.The corresponding force control results are compared and analyzed.The influences of unknown parameters of the environment on the contact force are analyzed based on experimental data,and the tunings of predictive scale factors are illustrated.The experimental results show that the desired trajectory in the impedance model is predicted exactly and rapidly in the cases that the contact surface is unknown,the contact stiffness changes,and the fuzzy force control algorithm has high adaptability to the unknown environment.

  16. Characteristics of magnetic force control device with magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Toshiyuki; Qiu, Jinhao; Tani, Junji

    2003-08-01

    A magnetic force control device with laminate composite of giant magnetostrictive material (GMM) and piezo-electric material (PZT) is proposed. This magnetic force control is based on inverse magnetostrictive effect of a magnetic material, whereby the variation of stress applied on the material is converted to that of magnetic force via magnetic circuits. For the purpose of realizing the method in practical applications, disks of GMM and PZT are laminated to control the stress of GMM by electric field on PZT. Due to the capacitive properties of PZT, the device requires little electric energy hence generates no heat to maintain constant force. Furthermore compared with conventional electromagnetics, the device can be fabricated easily and in small size to be suitable for microactuators. This paper presents the principle of the magnetic force control by the lamination of GMM and PZT and investigates the static and dynamic characteristics of several devices to demonstrate their capabilities of the magnetic force control.

  17. Workspace Safe Operation of a Force- or Impedance-Controlled Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Yamokoski, John D. (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of controlling a robotic manipulator of a force- or impedance-controlled robot within an unstructured workspace includes imposing a saturation limit on a static force applied by the manipulator to its surrounding environment, and may include determining a contact force between the manipulator and an object in the unstructured workspace, and executing a dynamic reflex when the contact force exceeds a threshold to thereby alleviate an inertial impulse not addressed by the saturation limited static force. The method may include calculating a required reflex torque to be imparted by a joint actuator to a robotic joint. A robotic system includes a robotic manipulator having an unstructured workspace and a controller that is electrically connected to the manipulator, and which controls the manipulator using force- or impedance-based commands. The controller, which is also disclosed herein, automatically imposes the saturation limit and may execute the dynamic reflex noted above.

  18. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations.

  19. Resonant Optical Gradient Force Interaction for Nano-Imaging and-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    perspective for further resonant enhancement and control of optical forces. 1. Introduction The combination of scanning probemicroscopywith optics... relatively small force variation between 23 fN to 25 fN across the resonance is due to the large broadband offset as a result of  1 2, which is a...ismuchweaker than the case of R6Gbut exhibits a larger relative spectral variation across the resonance from0.2 fN to 1 fN (for z= 2 nm). Irrespective

  20. Robust Motion Control for Mobile Manipulator Using Resolved Acceleration and Proportional-Integral Active Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Mailah

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A resolved acceleration control (RAC and proportional-integral active force control (PIAFC is proposed as an approach for the robust motion control of a mobile manipulator (MM comprising a differentially driven wheeled mobile platform with a two-link planar arm mounted on top of the platform. The study emphasizes on the integrated kinematic and dynamic control strategy in which the RAC is used to manipulate the kinematic component while the PIAFC is implemented to compensate the dynamic effects including the bounded known/unknown disturbances and uncertainties. The effectivenss and robustness of the proposed scheme are investigated through a rigorous simulation study and later complemented with experimental results obtained through a number of experiments performed on a fully developed working prototype in a laboratory environment. A number of disturbances in the form of vibratory and impact forces are deliberately introduced into the system to evaluate the system performances. The investigation clearly demonstrates the extreme robustness feature of the proposed control scheme compared to other systems considered in the study.

  1. Closed-loop control of grasping with a myoelectric hand prosthesis: which are the relevant feedback variables for force control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninu, Andrei; Dosen, Strahinja; Muceli, Silvia; Rattay, Frank; Dietl, Hans; Farina, Dario

    2014-09-01

    In closed-loop control of grasping by hand prostheses, the feedback information sent to the user is usually the actual controlled variable, i.e., the grasp force. Although this choice is intuitive and logical, the force production is only the last step in the process of grasping. Therefore, this study evaluated the performance in controlling grasp strength using a hand prosthesis operated through a complete grasping sequence while varying the feedback variables (e.g., closing velocity, grasping force), which were provided to the user visually or through vibrotactile stimulation. The experiments were conducted on 13 volunteers who controlled the Otto Bock Sensor Hand Speed prosthesis. Results showed that vibrotactile patterns were able to replace the visual feedback. Interestingly, the experiments demonstrated that direct force feedback was not essential for the control of grasping force. The subjects were indeed able to control the grip strength, predictively, by estimating the grasping force from the prosthesis velocity of closing. Therefore, grasping without explicit force feedback is not completely blind, contrary to what is usually assumed. In our study we analyzed grasping with a specific prosthetic device, but the outcomes are also applicable for other devices, with one or more degrees-of-freedom. The necessary condition is that the electromyography (EMG) signal directly and proportionally controls the velocity/grasp force of the hand, which is a common approach among EMG controlled prosthetic devices. The results provide important indications on the design of closed-loop EMG controlled prosthetic systems.

  2. An intelligent active force control algorithm to control an upper extremity exoskeleton for motor recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbullah Mohd Isa, Wan; Taha, Zahari; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Fikri Muhammad, Khairul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton by means of an intelligent active force control (AFC) mechanism. The Newton-Euler formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometry based human upper extremity as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives. An intelligent AFC algorithm is also incorporated into the PD to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. The Mamdani Fuzzy based rule is employed to approximate the estimated inertial properties of the system to ensure the AFC loop responds efficiently. It is found that the IAFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system as compared to the conventional PD control architecture in performing the desired trajectory tracking.

  3. Multi-sensorial interaction with a nano-scale phenomenon : the force curve

    CERN Document Server

    Marliere, Sylvain; Florens, Jean-Loup; Marchi, Florence

    2010-01-01

    Using Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) to manipulate nano-objects is an actual challenge for surface scientists. Basic haptic interfacesbetween the AFM and experimentalists have already been implemented. Themulti-sensory renderings (seeing, hearing and feeling) studied from acognitive point of view increase the efficiency of the actual interfaces. Toallow the experimentalist to feel and touch the nano-world, we add mixedrealities between an AFM and a force feedback device, enriching thus thedirect connection by a modeling engine. We present in this paper the firstresults from a real-time remote-control handling of an AFM by our ForceFeedback Gestural Device through the example of the approach-retract curve.

  4. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.1186/1743-0003-8-16

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG) signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with th...

  5. High-resolution friction force microscopy under electrochemical control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Paul, William; Pietrobon, Brendan; Lennox, R. Bruce; Grütter, Peter H.; Bennewitz, Roland

    2010-08-01

    We report the design and development of a friction force microscope for high-resolution studies in electrochemical environments. The design choices are motivated by the experimental requirements of atomic-scale friction measurements in liquids. The noise of the system is analyzed based on a methodology for the quantification of all the noise sources. The quantitative contribution of each noise source is analyzed in a series of lateral force measurements. Normal force detection is demonstrated in a study of the solvation potential in a confined liquid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane. The limitations of the timing resolution of the instrument are discussed in the context of an atomic stick-slip measurement. The instrument is capable of studying the atomic friction contrast between a bare Au(111) surface and a copper monolayer deposited at underpotential conditions in perchloric acid.

  6. Three Axis Force Override Rate Control of a PUMA 560 Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    and Intelligence, p. 242, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1987. 8. Whitney, D.E., "Historical Perspective and State of the Art in Robot Force Control ," Proceedings... Force Control ," Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Robotics and Automation, (1987), pp.904-909. 12. Syvertsen, J. M., Force Override Rate...the IEEE Conference on Robotics and Automation, (1989), p. 102. 110 11. Eppinger, S.D., and Seering, W.P., "Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot

  7. THE ANALYSIS FOR THE AIRFLOW EXCITING-VIBRATION FORCE OF CONTROL STAGE OF STEAM TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴山; 张耀明; 马浩; 曲庆文; 赵又群

    2001-01-01

    Based on the hydrodynamics, the airflow exciting-vibration force of control stage of steam turbine is studied by using the momentum theorem. A formulation for calculating the air exciting-vibration force of the control stage of steam turbine is deduced first by using theoretical analysis method and taking all the design factors of vane and nozzles into consideration. Moreover, the exciting-vibration forces in different load cases are discussed respectively.

  8. Study of the interactions between endolysin and bacterial peptidoglycan on S. aureus by dynamic force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Xuejie; Yang, Hang; Yuan, Jinghe; Wei, Hongping; Yu, Junping; Fang, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The cell wall binding domain (CBD) of bacteriophage lysins can recognize target bacteria with extraordinary specificity through binding to bacterial peptidoglycan, thus it is a promising new probe to identify the corresponding bacterial pathogen. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the CBD of lysin PlyV12 (PlyV12C) and pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The binding forces of PlyV12C with S. aureus have been measured, and the dissociation process of their binding complex has been characterized. Furthermore, we compared the interactions of PlyV12C-S. aureus and antibody-S. aureus. It is revealed that PlyV12C has a comparable affinity to bacterial peptidoglycans as that of the S. aureus antibody. The results provide new information on the binding properties of lysin CBD with bacterium, and the application of lysin CBD in bacterium detection.

  9. Structures and orientation-dependent interaction forces of titania nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, George; Antony, S. Joseph; Hammond, Robert B.; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    Engineering nanowires to develop new products and processes is highly topical due to their ability to provide highly enhanced physical, chemical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In this work, using molecular dynamics simulations, we report fundamental information, about the structural and thermodynamic properties of individual anatase titania (TiO2) nanowires with cross-sectional diameters between 2 and 6 nm, and aspect ratio (length to diameter) of 6:1 at temperatures ranging from 300 to 3000 K. Estimates of the melting transition temperature of the nanowires are between 2000 and 2500 K. The melting transition temperature predicted from the radial distribution functions (RDFs) shows strong agreement with those predicted from the total energy profiles. Overall, the transition temperature is in reasonable agreement with melting points predicted from experiments and simulations reported in the literature for spherical nanoparticles of similar sizes. Hence, the melting transition temperature of TiO2 nanowires modelled here can be considered as shape independent. Furthermore, for the first time based on MD simulations, interaction forces between two nanowires are reported at ambient temperature (300 K) for different orientations: parallel, perpendicular and end-to-end. It is observed that end-to-end orientations manifested the strongest attraction forces, while the parallel and perpendicular orientations displayed weaker attractions. The results reported here could form a foundation in future multiscale modelling studies of the structured titania nanowire assemblies, depending on the inter-wire interaction forces.

  10. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site.

  11. What causes periodic beating in sperm flagella: synchronized internal forcing or fluid-structure interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Nandagiri, Ashwin; Jadhav, Sameer

    2016-11-01

    Eucaryotic cells such as sperm propel themselves using internally driven flagella. Two different models for the origin of the whip-like beating observed in such flagella are compared. The first model assumes that internal protein motors actuate synchronously to cause a traveling active-force wave within the filament. The forcing wave is chosen such that its resultant and the total torque on the filament are zero. In contrast, the second model assumes that forces and torques exerted by the motors locally sum to zero across the scale of the filament diameter. The only effect of the motor activity is to give rise to a stresslet distribution across the filament length. In either model, the slender filament is modeled as a bead-spring chain with hydrodynamic interactions. Flagellar waveforms and trajectory patterns obtained are compared systematically while keeping the dissipation rates the same for the two models. Periodic beating emerges in freely swimming filaments with the second model without any imposed periodicity in the stresslet distribution. This suggests that periodic waveforms in eucaryotic flagella can emerge by fluid-structure interactions alone without significant internal synchronization of protein motor activity.

  12. Study of the interactions between endolysin and bacterial peptidoglycan on S. aureus by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Xuejie; Yang, Hang; Yuan, Jinghe; Wei, Hongping; Yu, Junping; Fang, Xiaohong

    2015-10-07

    The cell wall binding domain (CBD) of bacteriophage lysins can recognize target bacteria with extraordinary specificity through binding to bacterial peptidoglycan, thus it is a promising new probe to identify the corresponding bacterial pathogen. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the CBD of lysin PlyV12 (PlyV12C) and pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The binding forces of PlyV12C with S. aureus have been measured, and the dissociation process of their binding complex has been characterized. Furthermore, we compared the interactions of PlyV12C-S. aureus and antibody-S. aureus. It is revealed that PlyV12C has a comparable affinity to bacterial peptidoglycans as that of the S. aureus antibody. The results provide new information on the binding properties of lysin CBD with bacterium, and the application of lysin CBD in bacterium detection.

  13. Mapping force of interaction between PLGA nanoparticle with cell membrane using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajed, Suyash; Gu, Ling; Homayoni, Homa; Nguyen, Kytai; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    Drug delivery using magnetic (Fe 3 O4) Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles is finding increasing usage in therapeutic applications due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility and targeted localization. Since optical tweezers allow non-contact, highly sensitive force measurement, we utilized optical tweezers for studying interaction forces between the Fe 3 O4 -PLGA nanoparticles with prostate cancer PC3 cells. Presence of Fe 3 O4 within the PLGA shell allowed efficient trapping of these nanoparticles in near-IR optical tweezers. The conglomerated PLGA nanoparticles could be dispersed by use of the optical tweezers. Calibration of trapping stiffness as a function of laser beam power was carried out using equipartition theorem method, where the mean square displacement was measured with high precision using time-lapse fluorescence imaging of the nanoparticles. After the trapped PLGA nanoparticle was brought in close vicinity of the PC3 cell membrane, displacement of the nanoparticle from trap center was measured as a function of time. In short time scale (30 sec) , whiletheforceofinteractionwaswithin 0.2 pN , theforceincreasedbeyond 1 pNatlongertimescales (~ 10 min). We will present the results of the time-varying force of interactions between PLGA nanoparticles with PC3 cells using optical tweezers.

  14. Numerical calculation of interaction forces between paramagnetic colloids in two-dimensional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Di; Toffoletto, Frank; Biswal, Sibani Lisa

    2014-04-01

    Typically the force between paramagnetic particles in a uniform magnetic field is described using the dipolar model, which is inaccurate when particles are in close proximity to each other. Instead, the exact force between paramagnetic particles can be determined by solving a three-dimensional Laplace's equation for magnetostatics under specified boundary conditions and calculating the Maxwell stress tensor. The analytical solution to this multi-boundary-condition Laplace's equation can be obtained by using a solid harmonics expansion in conjunction with the Hobson formula. However, for a multibody system, finite truncation of the Hobson formula does not lead to convergence of the expansion at all points, which makes the approximation physically unrealistic. Here we present a numerical method for solving this Laplace's equation for magnetostatics. This method uses a smoothed representation to replace all the boundary conditions. A two-step propagation is used to dramatically accelerate the calculation without losing accuracy. Using this method, we calculate the force between two paramagnetic particles in a uniform and a rotational external field and compare our results with other models. Furthermore, the many-body effects for three-particle, ten-particle, and 24-particle systems are examined using the same method. We also calculate the interaction between particles with different magnetic susceptibilities and particle diameters. The Laplace's equation solver method described in this article that is used to determine the force between paramagnetic particles is shown to be very useful for dynamic simulations for both two-particle systems and a large cluster of particles.

  15. Sedimentation of concentrated monodisperse colloidal suspensions: role of collective particle interaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesaratchanon, Jan S; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh T

    2008-06-01

    The sedimentation velocities and concentration profiles of low-charge, monodisperse hydroxylate latex particle suspensions were investigated experimentally as a function of the particle concentration to study the effects of the collective particle interactions on suspension stability. We used the Kossel diffraction technique to measure the particle concentration profile and sedimentation rate. We conducted the sedimentation experiments using three different particle sizes. Collective hydrodynamic interactions dominate the particle-particle interactions at particle concentrations up to 6.5 vol%. However, at higher particle concentrations, additional collective particle-particle interactions resulting from the self-depletion attraction cause particle aggregation inside the suspension. The collective particle-particle interaction forces play a much more important role when relatively small particles (500 nm in diameter or less) are used. We developed a theoretical model based on the statistical particle dynamics simulation method to examine the role of the collective particle interactions in concentrated suspensions in the colloidal microstructure formation and sedimentation rates. The theoretical results agree with the experimentally-measured values of the settling velocities and concentration profiles.

  16. On nonlinear controllability and series expansions for Lagrangian systems with dissipative forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes, J.; Martinez, S.; Bullo, F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents series expansions and nonlinear controllability results for Lagrangian systems subject to dissipative forces. The treatment relies on the assumption of dissipative forces of linear isotropic nature. The approach is based on the affine connection formalism for Lagrangian control s

  17. Quantitative characterization of biomolecular assemblies and interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Hong; Erie, Dorothy A

    2003-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in many biological investigations in the past 15 years. This review focuses on the application of AFM for quantitatively characterizing the structural and thermodynamic properties of protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. AFM can be used to determine the stoichiometries and association constants of multiprotein assemblies and to quantify changes in conformations of proteins and protein-nucleic acid complexes. In addition, AFM in solution permits the observation of the dynamic properties of biomolecular complexes and the measurement of intermolecular forces between biomolecules. Recent advances in cryogenic AFM, AFM on two-dimensional crystals, carbon nanotube probes, solution imaging, high-speed AFM, and manipulation capabilities enhance these applications by improving AFM resolution and the dynamic and operative capabilities of the AFM. These developments make AFM a powerful tool for investigating the biomolecular assemblies and interactions that govern gene regulation.

  18. Three-quark interaction: The driving force in the inhomogeneous evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, E.A.; Namyslowski, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Using perturbative QCD on the light cone (A/sub +/ = 0 gauge), and the Brodsky-Lepage collinear projection, we make a partial-wave projection (in the l/sub z/ component) of the Weinberg equation, and find a set of evolution equations for distribution amplitudes. For l/sub z/not =0 our equations are inhomogeneous, and their solutions show an increasing QCD perturbative effect for the currently available momentum transfers. The driving force of the inhomogenous evolution equations is a three-quark irreducible interaction, which gives terms approx.(1-x)/sup 3/ in the proton's deep-inelastic structure function, breaks the SU(6) symmetry, and contributes to the deviation of the d/u ratio for proton from the value 1/2. That force couples a qq-bar pair to one transverse gluon and one Coulomb gluon.

  19. Measuring the interaction force between a high temperature superconductor and a permanent magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, S. O.; Jorge, G. A.; Rodríguez, E.

    1999-11-01

    Repulsive and attractive forces are both possible between a superconducting sample and a permanent magnet, and they can give rise to magnetic levitation or free-suspension phenomena, respectively. We show experiments to quantify this magnetic interaction, which represents a promising field with regard to short-term technological applications of high temperature superconductors. The measuring technique employs an electronic balance and a rare-earth magnet that induces a magnetic moment in a melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7 superconductor immersed in liquid nitrogen. The simple design of the experiments allows a fast and easy implementation in the advanced physics laboratory with a minimum cost. Actual levitation and suspension demonstrations can be done simultaneously as a help to interpret magnetic force measurements.

  20. Numerical investigation on feedback control of flow around an oscillating hydrofoil by Lorentz force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zongkai; Zhou Benmou; Liu Huixing; Ji Yanliang; Huang Yadong, E-mail: kfliukai@126.com [Science and Technology on Transient Physics Laboratory, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-06-15

    In order to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of a hydrofoil (NACA0012), this paper investigates an oscillating hydrofoil immersed in seawater (an electrically poorly conducting fluid) with feedback control of electromagnetic force (Lorentz force). This method is used in the iterative process, by forecasting the location of boundary layer separation points and attack angle at the next time step and figuring out the optimal force distribution function based on these parameters, then returns to the current time step and applies the optimal force onto the leeside to control the flow separation. Based on the basic flow governing equations, the flow field structures, lift evolutions and energy consumptions (the input impulse of Lorentz force) have been numerically investigated. Numerical results show that with this control, the flow separation could be fully suppressed. Meanwhile, the lift increases dramatically and oscillation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, under similar lift improvement and control effects, the feedback control optimal ratio is 72.58%. (paper)

  1. Study on Characteristics of Hydraulic Servo System for Force Control of Hydraulic Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo-gon; Han, Changsoo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-won [Korea University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sangdeok [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Because a hydraulic actuator has high power and force densities, this allows the weight of the robot's limbs to be reduced. This allows for good dynamic characteristics and high energy efficiency. Thus, hydraulic actuators are used in some exoskeleton robots and quadrupedal robots that require high torque. Force control is useful for robot compliance with a user or environment. However, force control of a hydraulic robot is difficult because a hydraulic servo system is highly nonlinear from a control perspective. In this study, a nonlinear model was used to develop a simulation program for a hydraulic servo system consisting of a servo valve, transmission lines, and a cylinder. The problems and considerations with regard to the force control performance for a hydraulic servo system were investigated. A force control method using the nonlinear model was proposed, and its effect was evaluated with the simulation program.

  2. Numerical investigation on feedback control of flow around an oscillating hydrofoil by Lorentz force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Zhou, Ben-Mou; Liu, Hui-Xing; Ji, Yan-Liang; Huang, Ya-Dong

    2013-06-01

    In order to improve the hydrodynamic characteristics of a hydrofoil (NACA0012), this paper investigates an oscillating hydrofoil immersed in seawater (an electrically poorly conducting fluid) with feedback control of electromagnetic force (Lorentz force). This method is used in the iterative process, by forecasting the location of boundary layer separation points and attack angle at the next time step and figuring out the optimal force distribution function based on these parameters, then returns to the current time step and applies the optimal force onto the leeside to control the flow separation. Based on the basic flow governing equations, the flow field structures, lift evolutions and energy consumptions (the input impulse of Lorentz force) have been numerically investigated. Numerical results show that with this control, the flow separation could be fully suppressed. Meanwhile, the lift increases dramatically and oscillation is suppressed successfully. Furthermore, under similar lift improvement and control effects, the feedback control optimal ratio is 72.58%.

  3. Top-down and bottom-up forces interact at thermal range extremes on American lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Stephanie A; Anderson, Sean C; Worm, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Exploited marine populations are thought to be regulated by the effects of fishing, species interactions and climate. Yet, it is unclear how these forces interact and vary across a species' range. We conducted a meta-analysis of American lobster (Homarus americanus) abundance data throughout the entirety of the species' range, testing competing hypotheses about bottom-up (climate, temperature) vs. top-down (predation, fishing) regulation along a strong thermal gradient. Our results suggest an interaction between predation and thermal range - predation effects dominated at the cold and warm extremes, but not at the centre of the species' range. Similarly, there was consistent support for a positive climate effect on lobster recruitment at warm range extremes. In contrast, fishing effort followed, rather than led changes in lobster abundance over time. Our analysis suggests that the relative effects of top-down and bottom-up forcing in regulating marine populations may intensify at thermal range boundaries and weaken at the core of a species' range.

  4. Analysis of bit-rock interaction during stick-slip vibrations using PDC cutting force model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, P.A.; Teodoriu, C. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). ITE

    2013-08-01

    Drillstring vibration is one of the limiting factors maximizing the drilling performance and also causes premature failure of drillstring components. Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit enhances the overall drilling performance giving the best rate of penetrations with less cost per foot but the PDC bits are more susceptible to the stick slip phenomena which results in high fluctuations of bit rotational speed. Based on the torsional drillstring model developed using Matlab/Simulink for analyzing the parametric influence on stick-slip vibrations due to drilling parameters and drillstring properties, the study of relations between weight on bit, torque on bit, bit speed, rate of penetration and friction coefficient have been analyzed. While drilling with the PDC bits, the bit-rock interaction has been characterized by cutting forces and the frictional forces. The torque on bit and the weight on bit have both the cutting component and the frictional component when resolved in horizontal and vertical direction. The paper considers that the bit is undergoing stick-slip vibrations while analyzing the bit-rock interaction of the PDC bit. The Matlab/Simulink bit-rock interaction model has been developed which gives the average cutting torque, T{sub c}, and friction torque, T{sub f}, values on cutters as well as corresponding average weight transferred by the cutting face, W{sub c}, and the wear flat face, W{sub f}, of the cutters value due to friction.

  5. Modeling and Application of Series Elastic Actuators for Force Control Multi Legged Robots

    CERN Document Server

    S, Arumugom; V, Ponselvan

    2009-01-01

    Series Elastic Actuators provide many benefits in force control of robots in unconstrained environments. These benefits include high force fidelity, extremely low impedance, low friction, and good force control bandwidth. Series Elastic Actuators employ a novel mechanical design architecture which goes against the common machine design principal of "stiffer is better". A compliant element is placed between the gear train and driven load to intentionally reduce the stiffness of the actuator. A position sensor measures the deflection, and the force output is accurately calculated using Hooke's Law (F=Kx). A control loop then servos the actuator to the desired output force. The resulting actuator has inherent shock tolerance, high force fidelity and extremely low impedance. These characteristics are desirable in many applications including legged robots, exoskeletons for human performance amplification, robotic arms, haptic interfaces, and adaptive suspensions. We describe several variations of Series Elastic Ac...

  6. ANALYSIS of Control Force Grasping for a Multifunctional Five Fingered Robot to Pick-up Various of Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widhiada W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-fingered robot gripper has become popular in the major research topics as grasping an object in robotic systems. The author considers a matter of style-based control model for a multi-fingered robot hand grasping an object with a known geometric characteristics. This paper introduces design process and analysis of contact force the five fingered gripper suitable to handle several of objects. The author applied Simulink/SimMechanics, Support package Arduino and Inventor software packages to facilatate and integrated the design of contact force gripper systems. The advance of PID control is used to control dynamics motions of the five fingered gripper systems. The multifunction finger’s gripper is developed to handle the various components. Contact force between fingertips and object surface is computed using the Hooke law concept. The analysis of experiment result shows the optimum of contact forces are achieved to hold the object. The spring and damper algorithm is used to compute the interaction of force between fingertips and object surface.

  7. An Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Force Control System of a Robotic Pruning Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hashemi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there has been an increasing application of pruning robots for planted forests due to the growing concern on the efficiency and safety issues. Power consumption and working time of agricultural machines have become important issues due to the high value of energy in modern world. In this study, different multi-layer back-propagation networks were utilized for mapping the complex and highly interactive of pruning process parameters and to predict power consumption and cutting time of a force control equipped robotic pruning machine by knowing input parameters such as: rotation speed, stalk diameter, and sensitivity coefficient. Results showed significant effects of all input parameters on output parameters except rotational speed on cutting time. Therefore, for reducing the wear of cutting system, a less rotational speed in every sensitivity coefficient should be selected.

  8. Research of a New 6-Dof Force Feedback Hand Controller System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of teleoperation with force telepresence has expanded its scope to include manipulation at different scales and in virtual worlds, and the key component of which is force feedback hand controller. This paper presents a novel force feedback hand controller system, including a 3-dof translational and 3-dof rotational hand controllers, respectively, to implement position and posture teleoperation of the robot end effector. The 3-dof translational hand controller adopts innovative three-axes decoupling structure based on the linear motor; the 3-dof rotational hand controller adopts serial mechanism based on three-axes intersecting at one point, improving its overall stiffness. Based on the kinematics, statics, and dynamics analyses for two platforms separately, the system applies big closed-loop force control method based on the zero force/torque, improving the feedback force/torque accuracy effectively. Experimental results show that self-developed 6-dof force feedback hand controller has good mechanical properties. The translational hand controller has the following advantages: simple kinematics solver, fast dynamic response, and better than 0.05 mm accuracy of three-axis end positioning, while the advantages of the rotational hand controller are wide turning space, larger than 1 Nm feedback, greater than 180 degrees of operating space of three axes, respectively, and high operation precision.

  9. An experimental study of force control of an IPMC actuated two-link manipulator using time-delay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeok Kim, Min; Kim, Kwan Young; Lee, Joon Hwan; Jho, Jae Young; Kim, Dong Min; Rhee, Kyehan; Lee, Soo Jin

    2016-11-01

    This study focuses on the force control of an ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuator and a two-link manipulator actuated by the IPMC. As a polymer actuator that transforms electric energy into mechanical energy, IPMC has been applied to various mechanical devices. The time-varying property of IPMC makes it difficult to control the tip force of an IPMC actuator with a strip form, which requires a force control scheme with considerable robustness. In this study, time-delay control (TDC), which has shown exceptional robustness in various control systems, was applied to the force control of an IPMC actuator and a two-link manipulator actuated by IPMC strips. The experiments demonstrated that TDC could control the tip force of an IPMC strip so that, in spite of its time-varying characteristics, it closely follows the designed reference force with exceptional robustness. Moreover, the contact force of a two-link manipulator actuated by IPMC strips could be successfully controlled with the TDC law including the kinematic relation of the manipulator.

  10. Visualization of interaction between ribosome-inactivating proteins and supercoiled DNA with an atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓华; 刘望夷; 欧阳振乾; 李民乾

    1997-01-01

    The interaction between ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) and supercoiled DNA was observed with an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that RIPs can bind to both supercoiled DNA and the unwound double stranded loop region in supercoiled DNA. The RIPs hound to the supercoils can induce the conformational change of supercoiled DNA. Furthermore, the supercoiled DNA was relaxed and cleaved into nick or linear form by RIPs. It indicated that RIP seemed to be a supercoil-dependent DNA binding protein and exhibited the activity of su-percoil-dependent DNA endonuclease.

  11. The interaction of two collinear cracks in a rectangular superconductor slab under an electromagnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Zhiwen, E-mail: gaozhw@lzu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zhou Youhe [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Western Disaster and Environment, Ministry of Education (China); Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Lee, Kang Yong, E-mail: KYL2813@yonsei.ac.k [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of two collinear cracks is obtained for a type-II superconducting under electromagnetic force. Fracture analysis is performed by means of finite element method and the magnetic behavior of superconductor is described by the critical-state Bean model. The stress intensity factors at the crack tips can be obtained and discussed for decreasing field after zero-field cooling. It is revealed that the stress intensity factor decreases as applied field increases. The crack-tip stress intensity factors decrease when the distance between the two collinear cracks increases and the superconductors with smaller crack has more remarkable shielding effect than those with larger cracks.

  12. The compensatory interaction between motor unit firing behavior and muscle force during fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Paola; De Luca, Carlo J; Kline, Joshua C

    2016-10-01

    Throughout the literature, different observations of motor unit firing behavior during muscle fatigue have been reported and explained with varieties of conjectures. The disagreement amongst previous studies has resulted, in part, from the limited number of available motor units and from the misleading practice of grouping motor unit data across different subjects, contractions, and force levels. To establish a more clear understanding of motor unit control during fatigue, we investigated the firing behavior of motor units from the vastus lateralis muscle of individual subjects during a fatigue protocol of repeated voluntary constant force isometric contractions. Surface electromyographic decomposition technology provided the firings of 1,890 motor unit firing trains. These data revealed that to sustain the contraction force as the muscle fatigued, the following occurred: 1) motor unit firing rates increased; 2) new motor units were recruited; and 3) motor unit recruitment thresholds decreased. Although the degree of these adaptations was subject specific, the behavior was consistent in all subjects. When we compared our empirical observations with those obtained from simulation, we found that the fatigue-induced changes in motor unit firing behavior can be explained by increasing excitation to the motoneuron pool that compensates for the fatigue-induced decrease in muscle force twitch reported in empirical studies. Yet, the fundamental motor unit control scheme remains invariant throughout the development of fatigue. These findings indicate that the central nervous system regulates motor unit firing behavior by adjusting the operating point of the excitation to the motoneuron pool to sustain the contraction force as the muscle fatigues. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Kohei, E-mail: kohei@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko, E-mail: yoko-ak@qb.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic Archimedes separation method. •In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used. •We succeeded to separate HP and developed the continuous separation system. •The separation system enables successive separation and recovery of HP. -- Abstract: The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  14. Osmotic Force-Controlled Microrheometry of Entangled Actin Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhde, Jorg; Feneberg, Wolfgang; Ter-Oganessian, N.; Sackmann, Erich; Boulbitch, Alexei

    2005-05-01

    In studying a magnetic bead’s creep response to force pulses in an entangled actin network we have found a novel regime where the bead motion obeys a power law x(t)˜t1/2 over two decades in time. It is flanked by a short-time regime with x(t)˜t3/4 and a viscous with x(t)˜t. In the intermediate regime the creep compliance depends on the actin concentration c as c-β with β≈1.1±0.3. We explain this behavior in terms of osmotic restoring force generated by the piling up of filaments in front of the moving bead. A model based on this concept predicts intermediate x(t)˜t1/2 and long-time regimes x(t)˜t in which the compliance varies as c-4/3, in agreement with experiment.

  15. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipkens, Bart, E-mail: blipkens@wne.edu [Mechanical Engineering, Western New England University, Springfield, Massachusetts, 01119 (United States); Ilinskii, Yurii A., E-mail: ilinskii@gmail.com; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A., E-mail: zheniazabolotskaya@gmail.com [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78713–8029 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  16. Force encoding in stick insect legs delineates a reference frame for motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Sasha N; Schmitz, Josef; Chaudhry, Sumaiya; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-09-01

    The regulation of forces is integral to motor control. However, it is unclear how information from sense organs that detect forces at individual muscles or joints is incorporated into a frame of reference for motor control. Campaniform sensilla are receptors that monitor forces by cuticular strains. We studied how loads and muscle forces are encoded by trochanteral campaniform sensilla in stick insects. Forces were applied to the middle leg to emulate loading and/or muscle contractions. Selective sensory ablations limited activities recorded in the main leg nerve to specific receptor groups. The trochanteral campaniform sensilla consist of four discrete groups. We found that the dorsal groups (Groups 3 and 4) encoded force increases and decreases in the plane of movement of the coxo-trochanteral joint. Group 3 receptors discharged to increases in dorsal loading and decreases in ventral load. Group 4 showed the reverse directional sensitivities. Vigorous, directional responses also occurred to contractions of the trochanteral depressor muscle and to forces applied at the muscle insertion. All sensory discharges encoded the amplitude and rate of loading or muscle force. Stimulation of the receptors produced reflex effects in the depressor motoneurons that could reverse in sign during active movements. These data, in conjunction with findings of previous studies, support a model in which the trochanteral receptors function as an array that can detect forces in all directions relative to the intrinsic plane of leg movement. The array could provide requisite information about forces and simplify the control and adaptation of posture and walking.

  17. Position and force control of a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    When a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels is traveling in a circle, the motion of the wheels is constrained. The wheel translational velocity divided by the radius to the center of rotation must be the same for all wheels. When the drive wheels are controlled independently using position control, the motion of the wheels may violate the constraints and the wheels may slip. Consequently, substantial errors can occur in the orientation of the vehicle. A vehicle with N drive wheels has (N - 1) constraints and one degree of freedom. We have developed a new approach to the control of a vehicle with N steerable drive wheels. The novel aspect of our approach is the use of force control. To control the vehicle, we have one degree of freedom for the position on the circle and (N - 1) forces that can be used to reduce errors. Recently, Kankaanranta and Koivo developed a control architecture that allows the force and position degrees of freedom to be decoupled. In the work of Kankaanranta and Koivo the force is an exogenous input We have made the force endogenous by defining the force in terms of the errors in satisfying the rigid body kinematic constraints. We have applied the control architecture to the HERMIES-M robot and have measured a dramatic reduction in error (more than a factor of 20) compared to rations without force control.

  18. Position and force control of a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.

    1992-11-01

    When a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels is traveling in a circle, the motion of the wheels is constrained. The wheel translational velocity divided by the radius to the center of rotation must be the same for all wheels. When the drive wheels are controlled independently using position control, the motion of the wheels may violate the constraints and the wheels may slip. Consequently, substantial errors can occur in the orientation of the vehicle. A vehicle with N drive wheels has (N - 1) constraints and one degree of freedom. We have developed a new approach to the control of a vehicle with N steerable drive wheels. The novel aspect of our approach is the use of force control. To control the vehicle, we have one degree of freedom for the position on the circle and (N - 1) forces that can be used to reduce errors. Recently, Kankaanranta and Koivo developed a control architecture that allows the force and position degrees of freedom to be decoupled. In the work of Kankaanranta and Koivo the force is an exogenous input We have made the force endogenous by defining the force in terms of the errors in satisfying the rigid body kinematic constraints. We have applied the control architecture to the HERMIES-M robot and have measured a dramatic reduction in error (more than a factor of 20) compared to rations without force control.

  19. Position and force control of a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    When a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels is traveling in a circle, the motion of the wheels is constrained. The wheel translational velocity divided by the radius to the center of rotation must be the same for all wheels. When the drive wheels are controlled independently using position control, the motion of the wheels may violate the constraints and the wheels may slip. Consequently, substantial errors can occur in the orientation of the vehicle. A vehicle with N drive wheels has (N - 1) constraints and one degree of freedom. We have developed a new approach to the control of a vehicle with N steerable drive wheels. The novel aspect of our approach is the use of force control. To control the vehicle, we have one degree of freedom for the position on the circle and (N - 1) forces that can be used to reduce errors. Recently, Kankaanranta and Koivo developed a control architecture that allows the force and position degrees of freedom to be decoupled. In the work of Kankaanranta and Koivo the force is an exogenous input. We have made the force endogenous by defining the force in terms of the errors in satisfying the rigid body kinematic constraints. We have applied the control architecture to the HERMIES-III robot and have measured a dramatic reduction in error (more than a factor of 20) compared to motions without force control.

  20. Analytic nuclear forces and molecular properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Robert E; Overy, Catherine; Knowles, Peter J; Alavi, Ali; Booth, George H

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased stochastic sampling of the one- and two-body reduced density matrices is achieved in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo with the introduction of a second, "replica" ensemble of walkers, whose population evolves in imaginary time independently from the first, and which entails only modest additional computational overheads. The matrices obtained from this approach are shown to be representative of full configuration-interaction quality, and hence provide a realistic opportunity to achieve high-quality results for a range of properties whose operators do not necessarily commute with the hamiltonian. A density-matrix formulated quasi-variational energy estimator having been already proposed and investigated, the present work extends the scope of the theory to take in studies of analytic nuclear forces, molecular dipole moments and polarisabilities, with extensive comparison to exact results where possible. These new results confirm the suitability of the sampling technique and, where suf...

  1. Robot Physical Interaction through the combination of Vision, Tactile and Force Feedback Applications to Assistive Robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Prats, Mario; Sanz, Pedro J

    2013-01-01

    Robot manipulation is a great challenge; it encompasses versatility -adaptation to different situations-, autonomy -independent robot operation-, and dependability -for success under modeling or sensing errors. A complete manipulation task involves, first, a suitable grasp or contact configuration, and the subsequent motion required by the task. This monograph presents a unified framework by introducing task-related aspects into the knowledge-based grasp concept, leading to task-oriented grasps. Similarly, grasp-related issues are also considered during the execution of a task, leading to grasp-oriented tasks which is called framework for physical interaction (FPI). The book presents the theoretical framework for the versatile specification of physical interaction tasks, as well as the problem of autonomous planning of these tasks. A further focus is on sensor-based dependable execution combining three different types of sensors: force, vision and tactile. The FPI approach allows to perform a wide range of ro...

  2. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  3. Improving Air Force Command and Control Through Enhanced Agile Combat Support Planning, Execution, Monitoring, and Control Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    assess, plan, execute [ MAPE ] model) are an integral part of Air Force enterprise and joint command and control capability. In the revised copy of Air...operations. 2 Similar in construct, the Air Force uses the MAPE model when discussing ACS processes. 3 In the revised copy of AFDD 1, dated November 12, 2010...MAJCOM major command xliv Improving Air Force C2 Through Enhanced Agile Combat Support Processes MAJCOM/CC commander, major command MAPE monitor, assess

  4. Los sistemas de control de la fuerza de ventas (the sales force control systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Miguel Molina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este análisis es estudiar qué sistemas son utilizados para controlar a la fuerza de ventas y cuáles son más adecuados, si aquellos basados en el resultado o los basados en el comportamiento. Los directores de ventas deben combinar una cantidad elevada de diferentes elementos de control que podrán afectar al comportamiento de los vendedores de forma diferente. La combinación individual en un sistema integrado de supervisión es un ejercicio de gran complejidad que debe indicar a los vendedores cómo se supone que deben realizar su trabajo (Oliver y Anderson, 1994. La selección de herramientas y procesos depende de los objetivos que se quieran conseguir. Para analizar las ventajas e inconvenientes de cada uno de estos sistemas se ha realizado una revisión de la literatura. Tras este análisis se deduce que lo más aconsejable, en el caso de la fuerza de ventas, es utilizar un sistema híbrido. En un trabajo posterior, se podrían identificar las variables más adecuadas en función de los objetivos que quiera lograr cada empresa, lo que en concreto puede ser de gran utilidad para las pymes que carecen de sistemas de control. Su aplicación podrá permitir valorar la eficacia de las variables seleccionadas.(The objective of this paper is to analyze the suitability of the systems used to control the sales force: those that use the results as a reference and those that take into account aspects related to the behavior of sellers, to determine if they meet the objectives established by the company. It is therefore a complex issue that should guide the vendors in terms of how they are supposed to do their work (Oliver and Anderson, 1994. The literature review indicates that in most cases, hybrid systems are used with a predominance of one or another component, depending on the type of company, product and purpose. This study aims to facilitate the managers how to identify the variables that best suit the goals each company wants

  5. Interaction Forces Between Microfluidic Droplets in a Hele-Shaw Cell

    CERN Document Server

    Sarig, Itai; Gat, Amir D

    2015-01-01

    Various microfluidic systems, such as chemical and biological lab-on-a-chip devices, involve motion of multiple droplets within an immersing fluid in shallow micro-channels. Modeling the dynamics of such systems requires calculation of the forces of interaction between the moving droplets. These forces are commonly approximated by superposition of dipoles solutions, which requires an assumption of sufficiently large distance between the droplets. In this work we obtain exact solutions (in the Hele-Shaw limit) for two moving droplets, and a droplet within a droplet, located within a moving immersing fluid, without limitation on the distance between the droplets. This is achieved by solution of the pressure field in a bi-polar coordinate system and calculation of the force in a Cartesian coordinate system. Our results are compared with numerical computations, experimental data and the existing dipole-based models. We utilize the results to calculate the dynamics of a droplet within a droplet, and of two close d...

  6. Propagation of the state change induced by external forces in local interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianjun; Tokinaga, Shozo

    2016-10-01

    This paper analyses the propagation of the state changes of agents that are induced by external forces applied to a plane. In addition, we propose two models for the behavior of the agents placed on a lattice plane, both of which are affected by local interactions. We first assume that agents are allowed to move to another site to maximise their satisfaction. Second, we utilise a model in which the agents choose activities on each site. The results show that the migration (activity) patterns of agents in both models achieve stability without any external forces. However, when we apply an impulsive external force to the state of the agents, we then observe the propagation of the changes in the agents' states. Using simulation studies, we show the conditions for the propagation of the state changes of the agents. We also show the propagation of the state changes of the agents allocated in scale-free networks and discuss the estimation of the agents' decisions in real state changes. Finally, we discuss the estimation of the agents' decisions in real state temporal changes using economic and social data from Japan and the United States.

  7. Interaction forces between microfluidic droplets in a Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarig, I.; Starosvetsky, Y.; Gat, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Various microfluidic systems, such as chemical and biological lab-on-a-chip devices, involve motion of multiple droplets within an immersing fluid in shallow micro-channels. Modeling the dynamics of such systems requires calculation of the forces of interaction between the moving droplets. These forces are commonly approximated by superposition of dipoles solutions, which requires an assumption of sufficiently large distance between the droplets. In this work we obtain exact solutions (in the Hele-Shaw limit) for two moving droplets, and a droplet within a droplet, located within a moving immersing fluid, without limitation on the distance between the droplets. This is achieved by solution of the pressure field in a bi-polar coordinate system and calculation of the force in a Cartesian coordinate system. Our results are compared with numerical computations, experimental data and the existing dipole-based models. We utilize the results to calculate the dynamics of a droplet within a droplet, and of two close droplets, located within an immersing fluid with oscillating speed. The obtained results may be used to study the dynamics of dense droplet lattices, common to many microfluidic systems.

  8. Hydrophobic pore array surfaces: wetting and interaction forces in water/ethanol mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Petra M; Hormozan, Yashar; Brandner, Birgit D; Linnros, Jan; Claesson, Per M; Swerin, Agne; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C; Thormann, Esben

    2013-04-15

    Interactions between and wetting behavior of structured hydrophobic surfaces using different concentrations of water/ethanol mixtures have been investigated. Silica surfaces consisting of pore arrays with different pore spacings and pore depths were made hydrophobic by silanization. Their static and dynamic contact angles were found to be independent of the pore depth while fewer pores on the surface, i.e. a closer resemblance to a flat surface, gave a lower contact angle. As expected, a higher amount of ethanol facilitated wetting on all the surfaces tested. Confocal Raman microscopy measurements proved both water and ethanol to penetrate into the pores. AFM colloidal probe force measurements clearly showed that formation of air cavitation was hindered between the hydrophobic surfaces in presence of ethanol, and an increase in ethanol concentration was followed by a smaller jump-in distance and a weaker adhesion force. On separation, an immediate jump-out of contact occurred. The measured forces were interpreted as being due to capillary condensation of ethanol between the surfaces giving rise to very unstable cavities immediately rupturing on surface separation.

  9. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Hiramatsu

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17 held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function.

  10. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    CERN Document Server

    Petschauer, Stefan; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the Lambda-nucleon in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the ...

  11. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen [Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, An Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Zuo, Tingting [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Deptarment of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Zhang, Yong [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Deptarment of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States)

    2016-05-09

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  12. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  13. An Approach to Simultaneous Force/Position Control of Robot Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Filaretov; Alexander Zuev

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the new approach to high-quality simultaneous force/position control for robot manipulators is proposed based on the division of actuator's total torque of manipulator for each degree of freedom onto two components: position (which provides the position and orientation of the end-effector) and force (which provides the force and moment from end-effector on environment), and on the further simultaneous minimization of the errors of this two component with the help of the quadr...

  14. Dynamic Characterization and Interaction Control of the CBM-Motus Robot for Upper-Limb Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Zollo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents dynamic characterization and control of an upper-limb rehabilitation machine aimed at improving robot performance in the interaction with the patient. An integrated approach between mechanics and control is the key issue of the paper for the development of a robotic machine with desirable dynamic properties. Robot inertial and acceleration properties are studied in the workspace via a graphical representation based on ellipses. Robot friction is experimentally retrieved by means of a parametric identification procedure. A current-based impedance control is developed in order to compensate for friction and enhance control performance in the interaction with the patient by means of force feedback, without increasing system inertia. To this end, servo-amplifier motor currents are monitored to provide force feedback in the interaction, thus avoiding the need for force sensors mounted at the robot end-effector. Current-based impedance control is implemented on the robot; experimental results in free space as well as in constrained space are provided.

  15. Surface mediated cooperative interactions of drugs enhance mechanical forces for antibiotic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Bailey, Joe; Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Cooper, Matthew A.; Abell, Chris; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    The alarming increase of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics is now recognized as a major health issue fuelling demand for new drugs. Bacterial resistance is often caused by molecular changes at the bacterial surface, which alter the nature of specific drug-target interactions. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which drug-target interactions in resistant bacteria can be enhanced. We examined the surface forces generated by four antibiotics; vancomycin, ristomycin, chloroeremomycin and oritavancin against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant targets on a cantilever and demonstrated significant differences in mechanical response when drug-resistant targets are challenged with different antibiotics although no significant differences were observed when using susceptible targets. Remarkably, the binding affinity for oritavancin against drug-resistant targets (70 nM) was found to be 11,000 times stronger than for vancomycin (800 μM), a powerful antibiotic used as the last resort treatment for streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using an exactly solvable model, which takes into account the solvent and membrane effects, we demonstrate that drug-target interactions are strengthened by pronounced polyvalent interactions catalyzed by the surface itself. These findings further enhance our understanding of antibiotic mode of action and will enable development of more effective therapies.

  16. Surface mediated cooperative interactions of drugs enhance mechanical forces for antibiotic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W.; Bailey, Joe; Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Cooper, Matthew A.; Abell, Chris; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The alarming increase of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics is now recognized as a major health issue fuelling demand for new drugs. Bacterial resistance is often caused by molecular changes at the bacterial surface, which alter the nature of specific drug-target interactions. Here, we identify a novel mechanism by which drug-target interactions in resistant bacteria can be enhanced. We examined the surface forces generated by four antibiotics; vancomycin, ristomycin, chloroeremomycin and oritavancin against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant targets on a cantilever and demonstrated significant differences in mechanical response when drug-resistant targets are challenged with different antibiotics although no significant differences were observed when using susceptible targets. Remarkably, the binding affinity for oritavancin against drug-resistant targets (70 nM) was found to be 11,000 times stronger than for vancomycin (800 μM), a powerful antibiotic used as the last resort treatment for streptococcal and staphylococcal bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Using an exactly solvable model, which takes into account the solvent and membrane effects, we demonstrate that drug-target interactions are strengthened by pronounced polyvalent interactions catalyzed by the surface itself. These findings further enhance our understanding of antibiotic mode of action and will enable development of more effective therapies. PMID:28155918

  17. Control, interaction mitigation and location for FACTS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liangying

    This dissertation focuses on the investigation and mitigation of the potential dynamic control interactions among multiple UPFC controllers installed in power systems and the optimal location of UPFC for system stability improvement. Two different interaction phenomena are highlighted by their distinctive frequency characteristics: low frequency modal interaction and high frequency interaction. Due to the difference between the interaction phenomena, two approaches are proposed respectively to eliminate these adverse interactions. By introducing a series of additional global control signals, low frequency modal interactions can be effectively alleviated to improve system dynamic stability performance. Also, a nonlinear hybrid fuzzy logic PI controller is developed in this dissertation, which is shown to be effective in mitigating the high frequency interactions. It is indicated that the effectiveness of the FACTS device control in improving the stability mainly depends on the location of devices in the network. This dissertation develops a placement sensitivity index, which is derived from the controllability and observability factors of the system to evaluate the interaction phenomena severity. In addition, this dissertation presents the schematic and basic controls of a reconfigurable FACTS system that can be used to realize the major voltage-sourced-converter FACTS topologies. Furthermore, performance indices are developed for different FACTS devices with Energy Storage System (ESS) and dynamic responses of different FACTS combinations are presented to support the validity of the developed indices and increased controller flexibility introduced by integrating the ESS.

  18. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions and control within a point absorber array on electrical output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nambiar, Anup J.; Forehand, David I.M.; Kramer, Morten

    2015-01-01

    the WECs and the total power extracted by the array can be modified. In this paper, different resistive and reactive PTO control strategies, applied to a time-domain wave-to-wire model of a three-float Danish Wavestar device, are compared. The time-domain modelling approach, as opposed to the frequency...... and farms of WECs. The total power extracted by an array of WECs is influenced by the hydrodynamic interactions between them, especially when the WECs are spaced very closely. By control of the power take-off (PTO) forces and moments acting on the WECs within the array, the hydrodynamic interactions between...

  19. Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony L. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the user’s palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the user’s fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hand’s characteristics just into the system’s mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interface’s controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

  20. Exoskeleton master controller with force-reflecting telepresence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James B.; Bartholet, Stephen J.; Nelson, David K.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the requirements for successful master-slave robotic systems is becoming increasingly desirable. Such systems can aid in the accomplishment of tasks that are hazardous or inaccessible to humans. Although a history of use has proven master-slave systems to be viable, system requirements and the impact of specifications on the human factors side of system performance are not well known. In support of the next phase of teleoperation research being conducted at the Armstrong Research Laboratory, a force-reflecting, seven degree of freedom exoskeleton for master-slave teleoperation has been concepted, and is presently being developed. The exoskeleton has a unique kinematic structure that complements the structure of the human arm. It provides a natural means for teleoperating a dexterous, possibly redundant manipulator. It allows ease of use without operator fatigue and faithfully follows human arm and wrist motions. Reflected forces and moments are remotely transmitted to the operator hand grip using a cable transmission scheme. This paper presents the exoskeleton concept and development results to date. Conceptual design, hardware, algorithms, computer architecture, and software are covered.

  1. Flow pattern and lift evolution of hydrofoil with control of electro-magnetic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The initial responses and evolutions of the flow pattern and lift coefficient of a hydrofoil under the action of electro-magnetic (Lorentz) force have been studied experimentally and numerically, and trace particle methods are employed for them. With the introduction of BVF (boundary vortex flux), the quantitative relation among Lorentz forces, BVF and lifts is deduced. The influences of flow patterns on the hydrofoil lift coefficient have been discussed based on the BVF distribution, and the flow control mechanism of Lorentz force for a hydrofoil has been elucidated. Our results show that the flow pattern and lift of the hydrofoil vary periodically without any force. However, with the action of streamwise Lorentz forces, the separation point on the hydrofoil surface moves backward with a certain velocity, which makes the flow field steady finally. The streamwise Lorentz force raises the foil lift due to the increase of BVF intensity. On the other hand, Lorentz force also increases the hydrofoil surface pressure, which makes the lift decrease. However, the factor leading to the lift enhancement is determinant, therefore, the Lorentz force on the suction side can increase the lift, and the stronger the Lorentz force, the larger the lift enhancement. Our results also show that the localized Lorentz force can also both suppress the flow separation and increase the hydrofoil lift coefficient, furthermore, the Lorentz force located on the tail acts better than that located on the front.

  2. Decentralized adaptive neural network sliding mode position/force control of constrained reconfigurable manipulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李元春; 丁贵彬; 赵博

    2016-01-01

    A decentralized adaptive neural network sliding mode position/force control scheme is proposed for constrained reconfigurable manipulators. Different from the decentralized control strategy in multi-manipulator cooperation, the proposed decentralized position/force control scheme can be applied to series constrained reconfigurable manipulators. By multiplying each row of Jacobian matrix in the dynamics by contact force vector, the converted joint torque is obtained. Furthermore, using desired information of other joints instead of their actual values, the dynamics can be represented as a set of interconnected subsystems by model decomposition technique. An adaptive neural network controller is introduced to approximate the unknown dynamics of subsystem. The interconnection and the whole error term are removed by employing an adaptive sliding mode term. And then, the Lyapunov stability theory guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system. Finally, two reconfigurable manipulators with different configurations are employed to show the effectiveness of the proposed decentralized position/force control scheme.

  3. A computed torque method based attitude control with optimal force distribution for articulated body mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Edwardo F.; Hirose, Shigeo [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    This paper introduces an attitude control scheme based in optimal force distribution using quadratic programming which minimizes joint energy consumption. This method shares similarities with force distribution for multifingered hands, multiple coordinated manipulators and legged walking robots. In particular, an attitude control scheme was introduced inside the force distribution problem, and successfully implemented for control of the articulated body mobile robot KR-II. This is an actual mobile robot composed of cylindrical segments linked in series by prismatic joints and has a long snake-like appearance. These prismatic joints are force controlled so that each segment's vertical motion can automatically follow the terrain irregularities. An attitude control is necessary because this system acts like a system of wheeled inverted pendulum carts connected in series, being unstable by nature. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by computer simulation and experiments with the robot KR-II. (author)

  4. Quantifying feedforward control: a linear scaling model for fingertip forces and object weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; Bilaloglu, Seda; Aluru, Viswanath

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict the optimal fingertip forces according to object properties before the object is lifted is known as feedforward control, and it is thought to occur due to the formation of internal representations of the object's properties. The control of fingertip forces to objects of different weights has been studied extensively by using a custom-made grip device instrumented with force sensors. Feedforward control is measured by the rate of change of the vertical (load) force before the object is lifted. However, the precise relationship between the rate of change of load force and object weight and how it varies across healthy individuals in a population is not clearly understood. Using sets of 10 different weights, we have shown that there is a log-linear relationship between the fingertip load force rates and weight among neurologically intact individuals. We found that after one practice lift, as the weight increased, the peak load force rate (PLFR) increased by a fixed percentage, and this proportionality was common among the healthy subjects. However, at any given weight, the level of PLFR varied across individuals and was related to the efficiency of the muscles involved in lifting the object, in this case the wrist and finger extensor muscles. These results quantify feedforward control during grasp and lift among healthy individuals and provide new benchmarks to interpret data from neurologically impaired populations as well as a means to assess the effect of interventions on restoration of feedforward control and its relationship to muscular control. PMID:25878151

  5. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  6. Exploration of plasma-based control for low-Reynolds number airfoil/gust interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzetta, Donald P.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the use of plasma-based actuation for the control of a vortical gust interacting with a wing section at a low Reynolds number. Flow about the SD7003 airfoil section at 4° angle of attack and a chord-based Reynolds number of 60,000 is considered in the simulation, which typifies micro air vehicle (MAV) applications. Solutions are obtained to the Navier-Stokes equations that were augmented by source terms used to represent body forces imparted by the plasma actuator on the fluid. A simple phenomenological model provided these body forces resulting from the electric field generated by the plasma. The numerical method is based upon a high-fidelity time-implicit scheme and an implicit LES approach which are used to obtain solutions on a locally refined overset mesh system. A Taylor-like vortex model is employed to represent a gust impinging upon the wing surface, which causes a substantial disruption to the undisturbed flow. It is shown that the fundamental impact of the gust on unsteady aerodynamic forces is due to an inviscid process, corresponding to variation in the effective angle of attack, which is not easily overcome. Plasma control is utilised to mitigate adverse effects of the interaction and improve aerodynamic performance. Physical characteristics of the interaction are described, and several aspects of the control strategy are explored. Among these are uniform and non-uniform spanwise variations of the control configuration, co-flow and counter-flow orientations of the directed force, pulsed and continuous operations of the actuator and strength of the plasma field. Results of the control situations are compared with regard to their effect upon aerodynamic forces. It was found that disturbances to the moment coefficient produced by the gust can be greatly reduced, which may be significant for stability and handling of MAV operations.

  7. Proximity effect on hydrodynamic interaction between a sphere and a plane measured by force feedback microscopy at different frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Simon; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joël

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we measure the viscous damping G″, and the associated stiffness G', of a liquid flow in sphere-plane geometry over a large frequency range. In this regime, the lubrication approximation is expected to dominate. We first measure the static force applied to the tip. This is made possible thanks to a force feedback method. Adding a sub-nanometer oscillation of the tip, we obtain the dynamic part of the interaction with solely the knowledge of the lever properties in the experimental context using a linear transformation of the amplitude and phase change. Using a Force Feedback Microscope (FFM), we are then able to measure simultaneously the static force, the stiffness, and the dissipative part of the interaction in a broad frequency range using a single AFM probe. Similar measurements have been performed by the Surface Force Apparatus (SFA) with a probe radius hundred times bigger. In this context, the FFM can be called nano-SFA.

  8. Proximity effect on hydrodynamic interaction between a sphere and a plane measured by Force Feedback Microscopy at different frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Simon; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Chevrier, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we measure the viscous damping $G'',$ and the associated stiffness $G',$ of a liquid flow in sphere-plane geometry in a large frequency range. In this regime, the lubrication approximation is expected to dominate. We first measure the static force applied to the tip. This is made possible thanks to a force feedback method. Adding a sub-nanometer oscillation of the tip, we obtain the dynamic part of the interaction with solely the knowledge of the lever properties in the experimental context using a linear transformation of the amplitude and phase change. Using a Force Feedback Microscope (FFM)we are then able to measure simultaneously the static force, the stiffness and the dissipative part of the interaction in a broad frequency range using a single AFM probe. Similar measurements have been performed by the Surface Force Apparatus with a probe radius hundred times bigger. In this context the FFM can be called nano-SFA.

  9. Force control in the absence of visual and tactile feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugge, W.; Abbink, D.A.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Arendzen, J.H.; Meskers, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Motor control tasks like stance or object handling require sensory feedback from proprioception, vision and touch. The distinction between tactile and proprioceptive sensors is not frequently made in dynamic motor control tasks, and if so, mostly based on signal latency. We previously found that

  10. Evaluating interaction forces between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA in sulphathiazole sodium, tylosin and levofloxacin solution by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congzhou; Wang, Jianhua; Deng, Linhong

    2011-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in numerous biological processes. However, it is still challenging to evaluate the protein-protein interactions, such as antigen and antibody, in the presence of drug molecules in physiological liquid. In this study, the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rabbit anti-BSA was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the presence of various antimicrobial drugs (sulphathiazole sodium, tylosin and levofloxacin) under physiological condition. The results show that increasing the concentration of tylosin decreased the single-molecule-specific force between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA. As for sulphathiazole sodium, it dramatically decreased the specific force at a certain critical concentration, but increased the nonspecific force as its concentration increasing. In addition, the presence of levofloxacin did not greatly influence either the specific or nonspecific force. Collectively, these results suggest that these three drugs may adopt different mechanisms to affect the interaction force between BSA and rabbit anti-BSA. These findings may enhance our understanding of antigen/antibody binding processes in the presence of drug molecules, and hence indicate that AFM could be helpful in the design and screening of drugs-modulating protein-protein interaction processes.

  11. Controlling chaos with localized heterogeneous forces in oscillator chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Ricardo

    2006-10-01

    The effects of decreasing the impulse transmitted by localized periodic pulses on the chaotic behavior of homogeneous chains of coupled nonlinear oscillators are studied. It is assumed that when the oscillators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the chains display chaotic dynamics. It is shown that decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses of the two free end oscillators results in regularization with the whole array exhibiting frequency synchronization, irrespective of the chain size. A maximum level of amplitude desynchrony as the pulses of the two end oscillators narrow is typically found, which is explained as the result of two competing universal mechanisms: desynchronization induced by localized heterogeneous pulses and oscillation death of the complete chain induced by drastic decreasing of the impulse transmitted by such localized pulses. These findings demonstrate that decreasing the impulse transmitted by localized external forces can suppress chaos and lead to frequency-locked states in networks of dissipative systems.

  12. Impaired anticipatory control of force sharing patterns during whole-hand grasping in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Lisa M; McIsaac, Tara L; Gordon, Andrew M; Santello, Marco

    2008-02-01

    We examined the coordination of multi-digit grasping forces as they developed during object grasping and lifting. Ten subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD; OFF and ON medication) and ten healthy age-matched control subjects lifted a manipulandum that measured normal forces at each digit and the manipulandum's position. The center of mass (CM) was changed from trial to trial in either a predictable (blocked) or unpredictable (random) order. All subjects modulated individual fingertip forces to counterbalance forces exerted by the thumb and minimize object tilt after lift-off. However, subjects with PD OFF exhibited an impaired ability to use anticipatory mechanisms resulting in less differentiated scaling of individual finger forces to the object CM location. Remarkably, these between-group differences in force modulation dissipated as subjects reached peak grip forces during object lift, although these occurred significantly later in subjects with PD OFF than controls and PD ON. Analysis of the tilt of the object during lift revealed all subjects had similar deviations of the object from the vertical, the direction of which depended on CM location. Thus these findings in subjects with PD indicate that: (a) PD-induced impairments in anticipatory force mechanisms appear to be greatly increased in multi-digit grasping as opposed to previous reports from two-digit grasping; (b) inaccurate scaling of fingertip force amplitude and sharing patterns before object lift is recovered during object lift; (c) the implementation of appropriate force amplitude and sharing among the digits during the lift occurs significantly later than for controls; (d) medication improves the temporal recovery of multi-digit force coordination. These results are discussed within the framework of PD-related deficits in sensorimotor integration and control of multi-degrees of freedom movement.

  13. Interaction control of an UAV endowed with a manipulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Jasper L.J; Fumagalli, Matteo; Stramigioli, Stefano; Carloni, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design, simulation and experimental validation of a control architecture for an unmanned aerial vehicle endowed with a manipulation system and interacting with a remote environment. The goal of this work is to show that the interaction control allows the ma- nipulator t

  14. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armend Gazmeno Håti

    Full Text Available Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase-polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ, lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0 and free energies (ΔG# were determined for the different epimerase-alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate

  15. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase-polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase-alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the

  16. Energy Landscape of Alginate-Epimerase Interactions Assessed by Optical Tweezers and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håti, Armend Gazmeno; Aachmann, Finn Lillelund; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Sletmoen, Marit

    2015-01-01

    Mannuronan C-5 epimerases are a family of enzymes that catalyze epimerization of alginates at the polymer level. This group of enzymes thus enables the tailor-making of various alginate residue sequences to attain various functional properties, e.g. viscosity, gelation and ion binding. Here, the interactions between epimerases AlgE4 and AlgE6 and alginate substrates as well as epimerization products were determined. The interactions of the various epimerase–polysaccharide pairs were determined over an extended range of force loading rates by the combined use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. When studying systems that in nature are not subjected to external forces the access to observations obtained at low loading rates, as provided by optical tweezers, is a great advantage since the low loading rate region for these systems reflect the properties of the rate limiting energy barrier. The AlgE epimerases have a modular structure comprising both A and R modules, and the role of each of these modules in the epimerization process were examined through studies of the A- module of AlgE6, AlgE6A. Dynamic strength spectra obtained through combination of atomic force microscopy and the optical tweezers revealed the existence of two energy barriers in the alginate-epimerase complexes, of which one was not revealed in previous AFM based studies of these complexes. Furthermore, based on these spectra estimates of the locations of energy transition states (xβ), lifetimes in the absence of external perturbation (τ0) and free energies (ΔG#) were determined for the different epimerase–alginate complexes. This is the first determination of ΔG# for these complexes. The values determined were up to 8 kBT for the outer barrier, and smaller values for the inner barriers. The size of the free energies determined are consistent with the interpretation that the enzyme and substrate are thus not tightly locked at all times but are able to relocate. Together with the

  17. Zero forcing, linear and quantum controllability for systems evolving on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Burgarth, Daniel; Hogben, Leslie; Severini, Simone; Young, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We study the dynamics of systems on networks from a linear algebraic perspective. The control theoretic concept of controllability describes the set of states that can be reached for these systems. Under appropriate conditions, there is a connection between the quantum (Lie theoretic) property of controllability and the linear systems (Kalman) controllability condition. We investigate how the graph theoretic concept of a zero forcing set impacts the controllability property. In particular, we prove that if a set of vertices is a zero forcing set, the associated dynamical system is controllable. The results open up the possibility of further exploiting the analogy between networks, linear control systems theory, and quantum systems Lie algebraic theory. This study is motivated by several quantum systems currently under study, including continuous quantum walks modeling transport phenomena. Additionally, it proposes zero forcing as a new notion in the analysis of complex networks.

  18. Hybrid Force Control Based on ICMAC for an Astronaut Rehabilitative Training Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixun Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel Astronaut Rehabilitative Training Robot (ART based on a cable‐driven mechanism is represented in this paper. ART, a typical passive force servo system, can help astronauts to bench press in a microgravity environment. The purpose of this paper is to design controllers to eliminate the surplus force caused by an astronaut’s active movements. Based on the dynamics modelling of the cable‐driven unit, a hybrid force controller based on improved credit assignment CMAC (ICMAC is presented. A planning method for the cable tension is proposed so that the dynamic load produced by the ART can realistically simulate the gravity and inertial force of the barbell in a gravity environment. Finally, MATLAB simulation results of the man‐machine cooperation system are provided in order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy. The simulation results show that the hybrid control method based on the structure invariance principle can inhibit the surplus force and that ICMAC can improve the dynamic performance of the passive force servo system. Furthermore, the hybrid force controller based on ICMAC can ensure the stability of the system.

  19. On Virtual Force Control of Exoskeleton Suit%骨骼服虚拟力控制方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨智勇; 归丽华; 杨秀霞; 顾文锦

    2009-01-01

    针对骨骼服运动中摔制指令信息难以获取这一问题,提出了一种利用安装在操作者和骨骼服之间的多维力/力矩传感器来估计骨骼服参考轨迹的方法.为了控制骨骼服跟随操作者的运动,并保持人机之间的作用力最小,以达到辅助承重的目的,提出了一种虚拟力控制策略.该方法首先利用力/力矩传感器的测最信息构建骨骼服在关节空间的关节控制力矩,然后产生控制骨骼服在操作空间运动的虚拟力,从而控制骨骼服在操作空间的轨迹跟随操作者的运动.证明了其稳定性,并给出了仿真结果.仿真结果表明,所设计的控制器能实现骨骼服对人体运动的跟踪,并有效降低人机之间的作用力.%When the exoskeleton suit moves, it is hard to get the control instructions. In order to solve this problem, a reference trajectory estimation method for the exoskeleton suit is proposed which can be realized by installing some malti-axis force/torque sensors between the pilot and the exoskeleton suit. A virtual force control method is proposed to control the exoskeleton suit to follow the pilot's locomotion and to minimize the human-machine interaction force, which means the exoskeleton suit assisting the pilot to take heavy load. This method first generates the joint control torque of exoskeleton suit in joint space by the measurement information of the force/torque sensors, and then generates the virtual control force in task space to enable the exoskeleton suit to follow the pilot's motion. Stability of the presented method is proved and simulation result is given. The simulation result shows the designed controller can control the exoskeleton suit tracking the pilot's motion as well as decreasing the human-machine interaction force effectively.

  20. Damping force control of a vehicle MR damper using a Preisach hysteretic compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Min-Sang; Choi, Seung-Bok; Han, Young-Min

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents damping force control performances of a magnetorheological (MR) damper via a new control strategy considering hysteretic behavior of the field-dependent damping force. In order to achieve this goal, a commercial MR damper, Delphi Magneride™ which is applicable to a high-class passenger vehicle is adopted and its field-dependent damping force is experimentally evaluated. The MR damper has two types of damping force hysteretic behavior. The first is velocity-dependent hysteresis and the other is field-dependent hysteresis. Since the magnetic field is directly connected with control input, the field-dependent hysteresis largely affects the control performances of the MR damper system. To consider the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper, a Preisach hysteresis model is established and its first-order descending (FOD) curves are experimentally identified. Subsequently, a feedforward hysteretic compensator associated with the biviscous model and inverse Bingham model is formulated to achieve the desired damping force. The control algorithm is experimentally implemented and damping force controllability for sinusoidal and arbitrary trajectories is evaluated in terms of accuracy and input magnitude. In addition, vibration control performances of the MR suspension system are experimentally evaluated with a quarter-vehicle test facility.

  1. Plant neighbour identity matters to belowground interactions under controlled conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Armas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Root competition is an almost ubiquitous feature of plant communities with profound effects on their structure and composition. Far beyond the traditional view that plants interact mainly through resource depletion (exploitation competition, roots are known to be able to interact with their environment using a large variety of mechanisms that may inhibit or enhance access of other roots to the resource or affect plant growth (contest interactions. However, an extensive analysis on how these contest root interactions may affect species interaction abilities is almost lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a common garden experiment with ten perennial plant species we forced pairs of plants of the same or different species to overlap their roots and analyzed how belowground contest interactions affected plant performance, biomass allocation patterns, and competitive abilities under abundant resource supply. Our results showed that net interaction outcome ranged from negative to positive, affecting total plant mass and allocation patterns. A species could be a strong competitor against one species, weaker against another one, and even facilitator to a third species. This leads to sets of species where competitive hierarchies may be clear but also to groups where such rankings are not, suggesting that intransitive root interactions may be crucial for species coexistence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The outcome of belowground contest interactions is strongly dependent on neighbours' identity. In natural plant communities this conditional outcome may hypothetically help species to interact in non-hierarchical and intransitive networks, which in turn might promote coexistence.

  2. Exploring the consequences of attractive and repulsive interaction regimes in tapping mode atomic force microscopy of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, Andrew N.; Miles, Mervyn J.

    2004-04-01

    Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) in an ambient environment is a widely employed tool in the field of characterization of materials at the nanoscale. Significant advances have recently been made in the understanding of the physics behind some of the complexities of its operation, the most profound being the prediction and demonstration of the existence of the attractive and repulsive regimes of tip-sample interaction. In this paper we present an investigation of the criteria required for accessing the two imaging regimes, a simple method for controlling the transition between them in situ, and an assessment of their consequences for topographic and phase shift images of DNA. We find that the transition from repulsive to attractive regime imaging is characterized by a large increase in topographic height and concomitant decrease and sign inversion of the phase shift recorded over single molecules of DNA on mica. By varying the frequency at which the cantilever is driven, we can select which regime we wish to operate in routinely and reproducibly. Controlling the tip-sample interaction in this way greatly improves images of fragile nanoscale structures such as single molecules.

  3. Conventional forces and arms control: Technology and strategy in a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, J.F.; White, P.C.

    1990-06-01

    To address the implications of changes for future roles of conventional forces and to assess the technology implications of future strategies, force requirements, and conventional arms control agreements, the Center for National Security Studies in cooperation with the Defense Research and Applications Directorate of the Los Alamos National Laboratory held a conference on Conventional Forces and Arms Control: Technology and Strategy in a Changing World'' at Los Alamos from September 25--27, 1989. The distinguished participants from government, industry, and academia in the United States and Western Europe addressed such issues as: What are the implications of geopolitical and technological trends for international security and stability How will these global changes affect US and allied strategies and force structure, especially the requirements for conventional, nonnuclear forces What will be the role of and rationale for conventional forces in the context of current and prospective allied security requirements How can the West assure it will have the forces necessary for its security How will technological developments influence the structure of tomorrow's conventional forces What impacts will arms reductions have on future systems and force structures What are the prospects for the development and deployment in weapon systems of future conventional military technologies, in light of existing and potential political, economic, bureaucratic, and other impediments

  4. Anticipatory planning and control of grasp positions and forces for dexterous two-digit manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiushi; Zhang, Wei; Santello, Marco

    2010-07-07

    Dexterous object manipulation requires anticipatory control of digit positions and forces. Despite extensive studies on sensorimotor learning of digit forces, how humans learn to coordinate digit positions and forces has never been addressed. Furthermore, the functional role of anticipatory modulation of digit placement to object properties remains to be investigated. We addressed these questions by asking human subjects (12 females, 12 males) to grasp and lift an inverted T-shaped object using precision grip at constrained or self-chosen locations. The task requirement was to minimize object roll during lift. When digit position was not constrained, subjects could have implemented many equally valid digit position-force coordination patterns. However, choice of digit placement might also have resulted in large trial-to-trial variability of digit position, hence challenging the extent to which the CNS could have relied on sensorimotor memories for anticipatory control of digit forces. We hypothesized that subjects would modulate digit placement for optimal force distribution and digit forces as a function of variable digit positions. All subjects learned to minimize object roll within the first three trials, and the unconstrained device was associated with significantly smaller grip forces but larger variability of digit positions. Importantly, however, digit load force modulation compensated for position variability, thus ensuring consistent object roll minimization on each trial. This indicates that subjects learned object manipulation by integrating sensorimotor memories with sensory feedback about digit positions. These results are discussed in the context of motor equivalence and sensorimotor integration of grasp kinematics and kinetics.

  5. PRESSURE FORCE CONTROL FOR FABRICATION OF PLASTIC MICROFLUIDIC CHIPS WITH HOT EMBOSSING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chong; LIAO Junfeng; WANG Xiaodong; WANG Liding

    2007-01-01

    A pressure force control system for hot embossing of microfluidic chips is designed with a moment motor and a ball bearing lead screw. Based on the numeric PID technique, the algorithm of pulsant integral accelerated PID control is presented and the negative effects of nonlinearity from friction, clearance and saturation are eliminated. In order to improve the quick-response characteristic, independent thread technique is adopted. The method of pressure force control based on pulsant integral accelerated PID control and independent thread technique is applied with satisfactory control performance.

  6. An Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions Involving Polymers and Silane Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo L. Oréfice

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Silane coupling agents have been frequently used as interfacial agents in polymer composites to improve interfacial strength and resistance to fluid migration. Although the capability of these agents in improving properties and performance of composites has been reported, there are still many uncertainties regarding the processing-structure-property relationships and the mechanisms of coupling developed by silane agents. In this work, an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM was used to measure interactions between polymers and silica substrates, where silane networks with a series of different structures were processed. The influence of the structure of silane networks on the interactions with polymers was studied and used to determine the mechanisms involved in the coupling phenomenon. The AFM results showed that phenomena such as chain penetration, entanglements, intersegment bonding, chain conformation in the vicinities of rigid surfaces were identified as being relevant for the overall processes of adhesion and adsorption of polymeric chains within a silane network. AFM adhesion curves showed that penetration of polymeric chains through a more open silane network can lead to higher levels of interactions between polymer and silane agents.

  7. Deciphering the energy landscape of the interaction uranyl-DCP with antibodies using dynamic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO(2)-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO(2) and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands.

  8. Potential-of-mean-force description of ionic interactions and structural hydration in biomolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummer, G.; Garcia, A.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group; Soumpasis, D.M. [Max-Planck-Inst for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany). Biocomputation Group

    1994-10-01

    To understand the functioning of living organisms on a molecular level, it is crucial to dissect the intricate interplay of the immense number of biological molecules. Most of the biochemical processes in cells occur in a liquid environment formed mainly by water and ions. This solvent environment plays an important role in biological systems. The potential-of-mean-force (PMF) formalism attempts to describe quantitatively the interactions of the solvent with biological macromolecules on the basis of an approximate statistical-mechanical representation. At its current status of development, it deals with ionic effects on the biomolecular structure and with the structural hydration of biomolecules. The underlying idea of the PMF formalism is to identify the dominant sources of interactions and incorporate these interactions into the theoretical formalism using PMF`s (or particle correlation functions) extracted from bulk-liquid systems. In the following, the authors shall briefly outline the statistical-mechanical foundation of the PMF formalism and introduce the PMF expansion formalism, which is intimately linked to superposition approximations for higher-order particle correlation functions. The authors shall then sketch applications, which describe the effects of the ionic environment on nucleic-acid structure. Finally, the authors shall present the more recent extension of the PMF idea to describe quantitatively the structural hydration of biomolecules. Results for the interface of ice and water and for the hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) will be discussed.

  9. Development and Applications for the Remote Controllable Atomic Force Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, P.; Guggisberg, M.; Gyalog, T.; Wattinger, Ch.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    2003-12-01

    We present a fully remote controllable AFM, featuring a motorized four-axis sample stage. The low cost robotics allows a fast and accurate change of pre-defined positions. Due to the software interface the instrument can be programmed to perform sequences of measurements. This allows the automated acquisition of large scale high resolution images. The instrument can be controlled and monitored from various locations using a standard network interface.

  10. Trajectory and Force Control of a Direct Drive Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    fixed-point arithmetic. Written in the C lan- guage, the controller, including the full computation of the robot dynamics , runs at a 133 Hz sampling...Featherstone, R, 1984, Robot Dynamics Algorithms, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Edinburgh. Franklin, G.F. and Powel, J.D., 1980, Digital Control of Dynamic...Proceedings, 64, pp. 1198-1208. Neuman, C.P., and Khosla, P.K., 1985, "Identification of robot dynamics : an ap- plication of recursive estimation

  11. Vehicle Sliding Mode Control with Adaptive Upper Bounds: Static versus Dynamic Allocation to Saturated Tire Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tavasoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear vehicle control allocation is achieved through distributing the task of vehicle control among individual tire forces, which are constrained to nonlinear saturation conditions. A high-level sliding mode control with adaptive upper bounds is considered to assess the body yaw moment and lateral force for the vehicle motion. The proposed controller only requires the online adaptation of control gains without acquiring the knowledge of upper bounds on system uncertainties. Static and dynamic control allocation approaches have been formulated to distribute high-level control objectives among the system inputs. For static control allocation, the interior-point method is applied to solve the formulated nonlinear optimization problem. Based on the dynamic control allocation method, a dynamic update law is derived to allocate vehicle control to tire forces. The allocated tire forces are fed into a low-level control module, where the applied torque and active steering angle at each wheel are determined through a slip-ratio controller and an inverse tire model. Computer simulations are used to prove the significant effects of the proposed control allocation methods on improving the stability and handling performance. The advantages and limitations of each method have been discussed, and conclusions have been derived.

  12. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Shuzhi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Methods Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with that of the experimental results from the human and prosthetic finger phalanges. The simulation models were used to investigate the effects of (a varying the internal topology of the finger phalanx and (b varying different materials for the internal and external layers. Results and Conclusions During handshake, the high magnitudes of contact forces were observed at the areas where the full grasping enclosure of the other person's hand can be achieved. From these areas, the middle phalanges of the (a little, (b ring, and (c middle fingers were selected. The indentation experiments on these areas showed that a 2 N force corresponds to skin tissue displacements of more than 2 mm. The results from the simulation model show that introducing an open pocket with 2 mm height on the internal structure of synthetic finger phalanges increased the skin compliance of the silicone material to 235% and the polyurethane material to

  13. Knee Muscle Forces during Walking and Running in Patellofemoral Pain Patients and Pain-Free Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, Thor F.; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n=27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n=16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p=0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (pjoint contact forces and joint stresses than pain-free subjects. PMID:19268945

  14. Interaction between pheromone and its receptor of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe examined by a force spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasuga, Shintaro; Abe, Ryohei; Nikaido, Osamu; Kiyosaki, Shoichi; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Ikai, Atsushi; Osada, Toshiya

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between P-factor, a peptide pheromone composed of 23 amino acid residues, and its pheromone receptor, Mam2, on the cell surface of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined by an atomic force microscope (AFM). An AFM tip was modified with P-factor derivatives to perform force curve measurements. The specific interaction force between P-factor and Mam2 was calculated to be around 120 pN at a probe speed of 1.74 μm/s. When the AFM tip was modified with truncated P-factor derivative lacking C-terminal Leu, the specific interaction between the tip and the cell surface was not observed. These results were also confirmed with an assay system using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to monitor the activation level of signal transduction following the interaction of Mam2 with P-factor.

  15. Interaction between Pheromone and Its Receptor of the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Examined by a Force Spectroscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Sasuga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between P-factor, a peptide pheromone composed of 23 amino acid residues, and its pheromone receptor, Mam2, on the cell surface of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was examined by an atomic force microscope (AFM. An AFM tip was modified with P-factor derivatives to perform force curve measurements. The specific interaction force between P-factor and Mam2 was calculated to be around 120 pN at a probe speed of 1.74 μm/s. When the AFM tip was modified with truncated P-factor derivative lacking C-terminal Leu, the specific interaction between the tip and the cell surface was not observed. These results were also confirmed with an assay system using a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene to monitor the activation level of signal transduction following the interaction of Mam2 with P-factor.

  16. Interactions between the L1 cell adhesion molecule and ezrin support traction-force generation and can be regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Gil, Orlando D; Whittard, John D; Gazdoiu, Mihaela; Joseph, Todd; Wu, James; Waksman, Adam; Benson, Deanna L; Salton, Stephen R; Felsenfeld, Dan P

    2008-09-01

    An Ig superfamily cell-adhesion molecule, L1, forms an adhesion complex at the cell membrane containing both signaling molecules and cytoskeletal proteins. This complex mediates the transduction of extracellular signals and generates actin-mediated traction forces, both of which support axon outgrowth. The L1 cytoplasmic region binds ezrin, an adapter protein that interacts with the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we analyzed L1-ezrin interactions in detail, assessed their role in generating traction forces by L1, and identified potential regulatory mechanisms controlling ezrin-L1 interactions. The FERM domain of ezrin binds to the juxtamembrane region of L1, demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid interaction traps and protein binding analyses in vitro. A lysine-to-leucine substitution in this domain of L1 (K1147L) shows reduced binding to the ezrin FERM domain. Additionally, in ND7 cells, the K1147L mutation inhibits retrograde movement of L1 on the cell surface that has been linked to the generation of the traction forces necessary for axon growth. A membrane-permeable peptide consisting of the juxtamembrane region of L1 that can disrupt endogenous L1-ezrin interactions inhibits neurite extension of cerebellar cells on L1 substrates. Moreover, the L1-ezrin interactions can be modulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of the L1 cytoplasmic region, namely, Y1151, possibly through Src-family kinases. Replacement of this tyrosine together with Y1176 with either aspartate or phenylalanine changes ezrin binding and alters colocalization with ezrin in ND7 cells. Collectively, these data suggest that L1-ezrin interactions mediated by the L1 juxtamembrane region are involved in traction-force generation and can be regulated by the phosphorylation of L1. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Comparision of atomic force microscopy interaction forces between bacteria and silicon nitride substrata for three commonly used immobilization methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; de Vries, Joop; Dijkstra, René JB; Stokroos, Ietse; van der Mei, Henderina

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for mapping the surface morphology of biological specimens, including bacterial cells. Besides creating topographic images, AFM enables us to probe both physicochemical and mechanical properties of bacterial cell surfaces on a nanomet

  18. Comparison of Atomic Force Microscopy interaction forces between bacteria and silicon nitride substrata for three commonly used immobilization methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, V.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.; Vries, de J.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Stokroos, I.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for mapping the surface morphology of biological specimens, including bacterial cells. Besides creating topographic images, AFM enables us to probe both physicochemical and mechanical properties of bacterial cell surfaces on a nanomet

  19. Comparision of atomic force microscopy interaction forces between bacteria and silicon nitride substrata for three commonly used immobilization methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; de Vries, Joop; Dijkstra, René JB; Stokroos, Ietse; van der Mei, Henderina

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for mapping the surface morphology of biological specimens, including bacterial cells. Besides creating topographic images, AFM enables us to probe both physicochemical and mechanical properties of bacterial cell surfaces on a nanomet

  20. Comparison of Atomic Force Microscopy interaction forces between bacteria and silicon nitride substrata for three commonly used immobilization methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, V.; Busscher, H.J.; Norde, W.; Vries, de J.; Dijkstra, R.J.B.; Stokroos, I.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for mapping the surface morphology of biological specimens, including bacterial cells. Besides creating topographic images, AFM enables us to probe both physicochemical and mechanical properties of bacterial cell surfaces on a nanomet

  1. Compliant landing of a trotting quadruped robot based on hybrid motion/force robust control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎琳; 王剑; 韦庆; 马宏绪

    2016-01-01

    A compliant landing strategy for a trotting quadruped robot on unknown rough terrains based on contact force control is presented. Firstly, in order to lower the disturbance caused by the landing impact force, a landing phase is added between the swing phase and the stance phase, where the desired contact force is set as a small positive constant. Secondly, the joint torque optimization of the stance legs is formulated as a quadratic programming (QP) problem subject to equality and inequality/bound constraints. And a primal-dual dynamical system solver based on linear variational inequalities (LVI) is applied to solve this QP problem. Furthermore, based on the optimization results, a hybrid motion/force robust controller is designed to realize the tracking of the contact force, while the constraints of the stance feet landing angles are fulfilled simultaneously. Finally, the experiments are performed to validate the proposed methods.

  2. The Civil Democratic Control on the Army Forces in Romania 1989-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Octavian SOFRONEA

    2016-01-01

    The end of the Cold War meant for the South-Eastern European countries an increased effort for establishing a market based economy and democratic institutions. One raised issue regarding democratization was the reform of the army forces and the democratization of the relationship between the military and the civil society. The civil control on the army forces and the creation of a democratic control system represents key indicators for the process of democratization and stabilizing and legiti...

  3. Quality Control Review of Air Force Audit Agency’s Special Access Program Audits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-09

    22350-1500 December 9, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR AUDITOR GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SUBJECT: Quality Control Review of Air Force Audit Agency’s...appropriate internal quality control system in place and undergo an external peer review at least once every three years by reviewers independent of the...in all matters relating to the audit work, the audit organization and the individual auditor whether government or public must be independent. AFAA

  4. Measurement of the Interaction Force between Dust Particles within a Glass Box in a GEC RF Reference Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mudi; Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Harris, Brandon; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2013-10-01

    A wide variety of structural states (for example, Coulomb balls, one-dimensional vertically aligned dust particle chains, helical dust structures, etc.) have been observed for dust particles confined within a glass box placed on the lower electrode of a GEC rf reference cell. Both the interparticle interaction force and the confinement force play important roles in the formation of these structures. Unfortunately, since the exact nature of the confinement force produced by the walls of the glass box is yet unclear, it is difficult to differentiate between the effects produced by the interparticle interaction force and the effects created by the confinement force. In this experiment, a free-falling dust particle in the box acts as an in-situ probe, providing information on the structure of the confinement force. It will be shown that the data provided by this mapping procedure allows the interaction force between particles within various dust particle structures to be measured through perturbation of individual particles employing a diode pumped solid state laser (Coherent VERDI).

  5. Collision avoidance for a mobile robot based on radial basis function hybrid force control technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Shu-Huan

    2009-01-01

    Collision avoidance is always difficult in the planning path for a mobile robot. In this paper, the virtual force field between a mobile robot and an obstacle is formed and regulated to maintain a desired distance by hybrid force control algorithm. Since uncertainties from robot dynamics and obstacle degrade the performance of a collision avoidance task, intelligent control is used to compensate for the uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used to regulate the force field of an accurate distance between a robot and an obstacle in this paper and then simulation studies are conducted to confirm that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  6. GENERAL: Collision avoidance for a mobile robot based on radial basis function hybrid force control technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shu-Huan

    2009-10-01

    Collision avoidance is always difficult in the planning path for a mobile robot. In this paper, the virtual force field between a mobile robot and an obstacle is formed and regulated to maintain a desired distance by hybrid force control algorithm. Since uncertainties from robot dynamics and obstacle degrade the performance of a collision avoidance task, intelligent control is used to compensate for the uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used to regulate the force field of an accurate distance between a robot and an obstacle in this paper and then simulation studies are conducted to confirm that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  7. Combining spanwise morphing, inline motion and model based optimization for force magnitude and direction control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Johannes; Braza, Marianna; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Bats and other animals rapidly change their wingspan in order to control the aerodynamic forces. A NACA0013 type airfoil with dynamically changing span is proposed as a simple model to experimentally study these biomimetic morphing wings. Combining this large-scale morphing with inline motion allows to control both force magnitude and direction. Force measurements are conducted in order to analyze the impact of the 4 degree of freedom flapping motion on the flow. A blade-element theory augmented unsteady aerodynamic model is then used to derive optimal flapping trajectories.

  8. Stability of Hand Force Production: I. Hand Level Control Variables and Multi-Finger Synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschechtko, Sasha; Latash, Mark L

    2017-09-13

    We combined the theory of neural control of movement with referent coordinates and the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis to explore synergies stabilizing the hand action in accurate four-finger pressing tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis on two classes of synergies - those among the four fingers and those within a pair of control variables - stabilizing hand action under visual feedback and disappearing without visual feedback. Subjects performed four-finger total force and moment production tasks under visual feedback; the feedback was later partially or completely removed. The "inverse piano" device was used to lift and lower the fingers smoothly at the beginning and at the end of each trial. These data were used to compute pairs of hypothetical control variables. Inter-trial analysis of variance within the finger force space was used to quantify multi-finger synergies stabilizing both force and moment. A data permutation method was used to quantify synergies among control variables. Under visual feedback, synergies in the spaces of finger forces and hypothetical control variables were found to stabilize total force. Without visual feedback, the subjects showed a force drift to lower magnitudes and a moment drift toward pronation. This was accompanied by disappearance of the four-finger synergies and strong attenuation of the control-variable synergies. The indices of the two types of synergies correlated with each other. The findings are interpreted within the scheme with multiple levels of abundant variables. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  9. Control of grip force and vertical posture while holding an object and being perturbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Lee, Yun-Ju; Aruin, Alexander S

    2016-11-01

    We investigated motor control perspectives of coordinating maintenance of posture and application of grip force when holding an object and being perturbed. Ten subjects stood on the force platform holding an instrumented object in their dominant hand and were exposed to an external perturbation applied to their shoulders. Task demands were manipulated by positioning a slippery cap on top of the instrumented object. Grip force applied to the object, the object acceleration and the center of pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed during the time intervals typical for the anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) components of postural control. Onsets of grip force were seen before the onsets of the COP displacement and initiation of movements of the handheld object during the APA phase of postural control, while the onsets of maximum grip force preceded the maximum COP displacement during the CPA phase. When the task demands increased by holding a handheld object with the slippery cap, subjects tended to generate grip force earlier and of a smaller magnitude; also, the COP displacement in the APA phase was smaller as compared to holding a handheld object only. The outcome provides a foundation for future studies of maintenance of vertical posture in people with impairments of balance and grip force control when holding an object and being perturbed.

  10. Hybrid-mode Impedance Control for Position/force Tracking in Motor-system Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngwoo Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new robot controller for motor-system rehabilitation. The proposed controller simultaneously realizes rehabilitation motion tracking and force generation, as predefined through a musculoskeletal model-based optimization process. We introduce control parameters of weighted control action priorities for the motion-tracking and force generation tasks, based on the position-tracking error. With the weighted control action priorities, the robot accords higher priority to motion tracking at the robot end point when the position-tracking error is larger than a threshold value, and to force generation when the position-tracking error is smaller than a threshold value. Smooth motion trajectory has to be designed and applied in robot-based rehabilitation. Through simulations and experimental results, we show the usefulness of the proposed control method.

  11. Measurement of interaction force between RGD-peptide and Hela cell surface by optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mincheng Zhong; Guosheng Xue; Jinhua Zhou; Ziqiang Wang; Yinmei Li

    2012-01-01

    Since RGD peptides (R:arginine; G:glycine; D:aspartic acid) are found to promote cell adhesion,they are modified at numerous materials surface for medical applications such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine.Peptide-cell surface interactions play a key role in the above applications.In this letter,we study the adhesion force between the RGD-coated bead and Hela cell surface by optical tweezes.The adhesion is dominated by the binding of α5β1 and RGD-peptide with higher adhesion probability and stronger adhesion strength compared with the adhesion of bare bead and cell surface.The binding force for a single α5β1-GRGDSP pair is determined to be 16.8 pN at a loading rate of 1.5 nN/s.The unstressed off-rate is 1.65 × 10-2 s-1 and the distance of transition state for the rigid binding model is 3.0 nm.

  12. Combined Position & Force Control for a robotic manipulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijs, J.; Liefhebber, F.; Römer, G.W.R.B.E.

    2007-01-01

    The ARM is a 6 DOF robotic manipulator used by disabled people with a severe handicap at the upper extremities The present ARM is position and velocity controlled. The desired position of the robot is given by the user. However, in constraint scenario's, manipulation becomes too difficult and an ass

  13. Combined Position & Force Control for a robotic manipulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijs, J.; Liefhebber, F.; Römer, G.W.R.B.E.

    2007-01-01

    The ARM is a 6 DOF robotic manipulator used by disabled people with a severe handicap at the upper extremities The present ARM is position and velocity controlled. The desired position of the robot is given by the user. However, in constraint scenario's, manipulation becomes too difficult and an

  14. Air Force Command and Control: The Need for Increased Adaptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    nally, the establishing authority must stay involved and, when necessary, arbitrate and resolve conflicting understanding of priorities or revise...unintended cascading effects is one area that could help decentralize control over their use. An ethical cyberweapon could (1) encrypt vital

  15. Interaction forces between red cells agglutinated by antibody. IV. Time and force dependence of break-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tees, D F; Coenen, O; Goldsmith, H L

    1993-09-01

    We report on an extension of a previously described method to measure the hydrodynamic force to separate doublets of fixed, sphered and swollen red cells cross-linked by antibody (S. P. Tha, J. Shuster, and H. L. Goldsmith. 1986. Biophys. J. 50:1117-1126). With a traveling microtube apparatus, doublets are tracked and videotaped in a slowly accelerating Poiseuille flow in 150-microns-diameter tubes, and the hydrodynamic normal force at break-up, Fn, is computed from the measured doublet velocity and radial position. Previous results showed a large range of Fn, the mean of which increased with [antiserum], and an absence of clustering at discrete values of Fn. Since it was assumed that the cells separate the instant a critical force to break all crossbridges was reached, lack of clustering could have been due to the use of a polyclonal antiserum. We therefore studied the effect of monoclonal IgM or IgA antibody on the distribution of Fn. The results showed that the data are as scattered as ever, with Fn varying from 2 to 200 pN, and exhibit no evidence of clustering. However, the scatter in Fn could be due to the stochastic nature of intercellular bonds (E. Evans, D. Berk, and A. Leung. 1991a. Biophys. J. 59:838-848). We therefore studied the force dependence of the time to break-up under constant shear stress (Fn from 30 to 200 pN), both in Poiseuille and Couette flow, the latter by using a counter-rotating cone and plate rheoscope. When 280 doublets were rapidly accelerated in the traveling microtube and then allowed to coast in steady flow for up to 180 s, 91% survived into the constant force region; 16% of these broke up after time intervals, tP, of 2-30s. Of 340 doublets immediately exposed to constant shear in the rheoscope, 37% broke after time intervals, tc, from 5. In the rheoscope, the time intervals and number of rotations to break-up, tc, were quite well reproduced assuming (Nb) = 4. The similarity of (Fn) for monoclonal IgM and IgA for doublet break

  16. Reactive Control of Distributed Interactive Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    San Deigo, CA. [50] Kohn, W. and T. Skillman , "Hierarchical Control Systems for Autonomous Space Robots," Proceedings of AIAA Conference in...1988. [60] Robinson, J.A., Logic: Form and Function, North Holland, NY, 1979. [61] Skillman , T. and Kohn, W., et.al., "Class of Hierarchical

  17. Robust Operation of Tendon-Driven Robot Fingers Using Force and Position-Based Control Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E (Inventor); Platt, Jr., Robert J. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A (Inventor); Strawser, Philip A (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven finger and a control system. The system controls the finger via a force-based control law when a tension sensor is available, and via a position-based control law when a sensor is not available. Multiple tendons may each have a corresponding sensor. The system selectively injects a compliance value into the position-based control law when only some sensors are available. A control system includes a host machine and a non-transitory computer-readable medium having a control process, which is executed by the host machine to control the finger via the force- or position-based control law. A method for controlling the finger includes determining the availability of a tension sensor(s), and selectively controlling the finger, using the control system, via the force or position-based control law. The position control law allows the control system to resist disturbances while nominally maintaining the initial state of internal tendon tensions.

  18. Use of force-measuring transducers in manipulator control. I - Theory. II - Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, John; Kress, Reid

    Two types of control structures for teleoperated manipulators are investigated using force-measuring transducers with each type targeting specific properties of the manipulator. One approach is to measure torque in the drive train of the manipulator to increase backdriveability, sensitivity, and stiffness. The second is to measure the forces and torques at the wrist of the manipulator. This force/torque vector is then employed in a stiffness control algorithm which resolves dissimilar kinematics and increases sensitivity. It is shown that torque feedback can be used to reduce the apparent friction in a manipulator drive train caused by gear boxes, bearings, and transmissions. For teleoperated systems, drive-train torque feedback yields improved backdriveability, better sensitivity, and improved stiffness. Cartesian stiffness control allows the operator to specify the relationship between force and displacement in any direction at the manipulator end effector.

  19. Prioritized motion-force control of constrained fully-actuated robots: "Task Space Inverse Dynamics"

    OpenAIRE

    Del Prete, Andrea; Nori, Francesco; Metta, Giorgio; Natale, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We present a new framework for prioritized multi-task motion-force control of fully-actuated robots. This work is established on a careful review and comparison of the state of the art. Some control frameworks are not optimal, that is they do not find the optimal solution for the secondary tasks. Other frameworks are optimal, but they tackle the control problem at kinematic level, hence they neglect the robot dynamics and they do not allow for force control. Still other frameworks are optimal...

  20. Identification and Resolution of Feature Interactions in Greenhouse Climate Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan Corfixen

    The slow adoption pace of new control strategies for sustainable greenhouse climate control by industrial growers, is mainly due to the complexity of identifying and resolving potentially conflicting climate control requirements. When separate climate control strategies are composed they become...... coupled through the shared environment resources. As a consequence, the greenhouse climate control system requirements may no longer be entailed when independent climate control strategies try to control the same shared environment phenomena. The problem emerges when control strategies interfere with one...... another causing unexpected or undesirable climate control outputs. Malfunctioning behavior as a consequence of control strategy interference is know in the literature as the feature interaction problem. This PhD dissertation presents a feature interaction manager (FIM) that uses an evolutionary search...

  1. Design of a new adaptive fuzzy controller and its implementation for the damping force control of a magnetorheological damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phu, Do Xuan; Shah, Kruti; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new adaptive fuzzy controller and its implementation for the damping force control of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper in order to validate the effectiveness of the control performance. An interval type 2 fuzzy model is built, and then combined with modified adaptive control to achieve the desired damping force. In the formulation of the new adaptive controller, an enhanced iterative algorithm is integrated with the fuzzy model to decrease the time of calculation (D Wu 2013 IEEE Trans. Fuzzy Syst. 21 80-99) and the control algorithm is synthesized based on the {{H}^{\\infty }} tracking technique. In addition, for the verification of good control performance of the proposed controller, a cylindrical MR damper which can be applied to the vibration control of a washing machine is designed and manufactured. For the operating fluid, a recently developed plate-like particle-based MR fluid is used instead of a conventional MR fluid featuring spherical particles. To highlight the control performance of the proposed controller, two existing adaptive fuzzy control algorithms proposed by other researchers are adopted and altered for a comparative study. It is demonstrated from both simulation and experiment that the proposed new adaptive controller shows better performance of damping force control in terms of response time and tracking accuracy than the existing approaches.

  2. Controlling cell-matrix traction forces by extracellular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2013-03-01

    We present a minimal continuum model of strongly adhering cells as active contractile isotropic media and use the model for studying the effect of the geometry of the adhesion patch in controlling the spatial distribution of traction and cellular stresses. Activity is introduced as a contractile, hence negative, spatially homogeneous contribution to the pressure. The model shows that patterning of adhesion regions can be used to control traction stress distribution and yields several results consistent with experimental observations. Specifically, the cell spread area is found to increase with substrate stiffness and an analytic expression of the dependence is obtained for circular cells. The correlation between the magnitude of traction stresses and cell boundary curvature is also demonstrated and analyzed.

  3. Drug interactions in controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, S

    1982-12-01

    As much information as possible should be obtained in clinical trials to assess possible interactions between test drugs and concomitant medications prescribed for other medical indications. Side effect profiles were compared in patients taking buspirone, mean = 20 mg/day; diazepam, 20 mg/day; clorazepate, 23 mg/day; and placebo, with or without concomitant medications. Approximately 1,000 anxious patients were included in the analysis; 700 received buspirone. The use of a variety of common medications did not affect the side effect profile in the buspirone, clorazepate, and placebo groups, but did increase the incidence of side effects in the diazepam group. The increased incidence of sedation noted with diazepam and clorazepate, however, was not due to concomitant medication.

  4. Imaging the interaction between dengue 2 virus and human blood platelets using atomic force and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Gangodkar, Shobha; Jain, Preksha; Shetty, Shrimati; Ramjee, Sandhya; Poddar, Pankaj; Basu, Atanu

    2008-06-01

    Thrombocytopenia is frequently associated with dengue virus infection. Host factors such as anti-platelet immunopathogenic processes have been implicated in the origin of dengue-associated thrombocytopenia but the role of dengue virus in directly interacting with platelets and altering their hemostatic property remains incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of dengue 2 virus on the morphology and physiological activation profile of normal human platelets using atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy and flowcytometry. Platelets obtained from healthy donors were exposed to a cell culture-adapted 10(4) LD(50) dengue 2 virus isolate in vitro and the subsequent effect on morphology and activation biology studied. Our results show that dengue 2 virus exposure at doses comparable to natural viremic states in human infections can activate platelets with an increase in P-selectin expression and fibrinogen-binding property. Atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopy also showed typical activation-related morphological changes such as altered platelet membrane architecture, degranulation, presence of filopodia and dilatation of the open canalicular system in the dengue 2 virus-exposed platelets but not in the controls. Importantly, Japanese encephalitis virus exposure at the same dose did not activate platelets or show any morphological changes. Our findings suggest that dengue 2 virus may directly interact with and activate platelets - an event that might be important in the origin of dengue-associated thrombocytopenia. Detailed molecular characterization of this effect might provide key knowledge toward better prophylaxis of the hemostatic complications of dengue disease.

  5. Control of dynamical self-assembly of strongly Brownian nanoparticles through convective forces induced by ultrafast laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilday, Serim; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Tokel, Onur; Makey, Ghaith; Yavuz, Ozgun; Yavuz, Koray; Pavlov, Ihor; Ilday, F. Omer; Gulseren, Oguz

    We report a new dynamical self-assembly mechanism, where judicious use of convective and strong Brownian forces enables effective patterning of colloidal nanoparticles that are almost two orders of magnitude smaller than the laser beam. Optical trapping or tweezing effects are not involved, but the laser is used to create steep thermal gradients through multi-photon absorption, and thereby guide the colloids through convective forces. Convective forces can be thought as a positive feedback mechanism that helps to form and reinforce pattern, while Brownian motion act as a competing negative feedback mechanism to limit the growth of the pattern, as well as to increase the possibilities of bifurcation into different patterns, analogous to the competition observed in reaction-diffusion systems. By steering stochastic processes through these forces, we are able to gain control over the emergent pattern such as to form-deform-reform of a pattern, to change its shape and transport it spatially within seconds. This enables us to dynamically initiate and control large patterns comprised of hundreds of colloids. Further, by not relying on any specific chemical, optical or magnetic interaction, this new method is, in principle, completely independent of the material type being assembled.

  6. The unification of the fundamental interaction within Maxwell electromagnetism: Model of hydrogen atom. Gravity as the secondary electric force. Calculation of the unified inertia force

    CERN Document Server

    Neslusan, L

    2010-01-01

    Considering two static, electrically charged, elementary particles, we demonstrate a possible way of proving that all known fundamental forces in the nature are the manifestations of the single, unique interaction. We re-define the gauging of integration constants in the Schwarzschild solution of Einstein field equations. We consider the potential energy in this context regardless it is gravitational or electric potential energy. With the newly gauged constants, we sketch how the unique interaction can be described with the help of an appropriate solution of the well-known Maxwell equations. According the solution, there are two zones, in the system of two oppositely charged particles, where the force is oscillating. The first particle can be in a stable, constant distance from the second particle, between the neighbouring regions of repulsion and attraction. In an outer oscillation zone, the corresponding energy levels in the proton-electron systems are identical (on the level of accuracy of values calculate...

  7. Nonlinear control of multiple spacecraft formation flying using the constraint forces in Lagrangian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Getting inspiration from the constraint forces in the classical mechanics, we presented the nonlinear control method of multiple spacecraft formation flying to accurately keep the desired formation arrays. Considering nonlinearity and perturbation, we changed the question of the formation array control to the Lagrange equations with the holonomic constraints and the differential algebraic equations (DAE), and developed the nonlinear control for design of the follower spacecraft tracking control laws by solving the DAE. Because of using the idea of the constraint forces, this approach can adequately utilize the characteristic of the dynamic equations, i.e., the space natural forces, and accurately keep the arbitrary formation array. Simulation results of the circular formation keeping with the linear and nonlinear dynamical equations were included to illuminate the control performance.

  8. DNA interaction with DAPI fluorescent dye: Force spectroscopy decouples two different binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, L A; Rocha, M S

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we use force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the DAPI fluorescent dye and the λ-DNA molecule under high (174 mM) and low (34 mM) ionic strengths. Firstly, we have measured the changes on the mechanical properties (persistence and contour lengths) of the DNA-DAPI complexes as a function of the dye concentration in the sample. Then, we use recently developed models in order to connect the behavior of both mechanical properties to the physical chemistry of the interaction. Such analysis has allowed us to identify and to decouple two main binding modes, determining the relevant physicochemical (binding) parameters for each of these modes: minor groove binding, which saturates at very low DAPI concentrations ( CT ∼ 0.50 μM) and presents equilibrium binding constants of the order of ∼10(7) M(-1) for the two ionic strengths studied; and intercalation, which starts to play a significant role only after the saturation of the first mode, presenting much smaller equilibrium binding constants (∼10(5) M(-1) ).

  9. Analytic nuclear forces and molecular properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert E; Opalka, Daniel; Overy, Catherine; Knowles, Peter J; Alavi, Ali; Booth, George H

    2015-08-07

    Unbiased stochastic sampling of the one- and two-body reduced density matrices is achieved in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo with the introduction of a second, "replica" ensemble of walkers, whose population evolves in imaginary time independently from the first and which entails only modest additional computational overheads. The matrices obtained from this approach are shown to be representative of full configuration-interaction quality and hence provide a realistic opportunity to achieve high-quality results for a range of properties whose operators do not necessarily commute with the Hamiltonian. A density-matrix formulated quasi-variational energy estimator having been already proposed and investigated, the present work extends the scope of the theory to take in studies of analytic nuclear forces, molecular dipole moments, and polarisabilities, with extensive comparison to exact results where possible. These new results confirm the suitability of the sampling technique and, where sufficiently large basis sets are available, achieve close agreement with experimental values, expanding the scope of the method to new areas of investigation.

  10. Different patterns of collagen-proteoglycan interaction: a scanning electron microscopyand atomic force microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ruggeri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix of unfixed, unstained rat corneal stroma, visualized with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after minimal preliminary treatment, appears composed of straight, parallel, uniform collagen fibrils regularly spaced by a three-dimensional, irregular network of thin, delicate proteoglycan filaments. Rat tail tendon, observed under identical conditions, appears instead made of heterogeneous, closely packed fibrils interwoven with orthogonal proteoglycan filaments. Pre-treatment with cupromeronic blue just thickens the filaments without affecting their spatial layout. Digestion with chondroitinase ABC rids the tendon matrix of all its interconnecting filaments while the corneal stroma architecture remains virtually unaffected, its fibrils always being separated by an evident interfibrillar spacing which is never observed in tendon. Our observations indicate that matrix proteoglycans are responsible for both the highly regular interfibrillar spacing which is distinctive of corneal stroma, and the strong interfibrillar binding observed in tendon. These opposite interaction patterns appear to be distinctive of different proteo- glycan species. The molecular details of proteoglycan interactions are still incompletely understood and are the subject of ongoing research.

  11. Modeling Robot Dynamic Performance for Endpoint Force Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Task Dynamics 55 2.5.1 The Dynamic Workpiece Model 55 2.5.2 Adding Robot Dynamics 56 2.5.3 Adding Actuator Dynamics 56 Tabie I o iiau 6 2.6 Grip...motion control system. Robot dynamics couple with the task dynamics in a very complex way. When the robot makes contact with the environment, the impact...robot flexibility or actuator dynamics. 2.5.2 Adding Robot Dynamics Figure 2.29 shows the robot now represented by two lumped masses, as in the robot

  12. Polyelectrolyte Building Blocks for Nanotechnology: Atomic Force Microscopy Investigations of Polyelectrolyte-Lipid Interactions, Polyelectrolyte Brushes and Viral Cages

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The work presented here has a multidisciplinary character, having as a common factor the characterization of self-assembled nanostructures through force spectroscopy. Exploring AFM as a tool for characterizing self-assembly and interaction forces in soft matter nanostructures, three different Bio and nonbiological systems where investigated, all of them share the common characteristic of being soft matter molecular structures at the nanoscale. The studied systems in question are: a) Polyelect...

  13. Linear servo-controlled pressure generator for forced oscillation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, P L; Werneck, M M; Giannella-Neto, A

    1998-01-01

    In respiratory input impedance measurements, the low-frequency range contains important clinical and physiological information. However, the patient's spontaneous ventilation can contaminate the data in this range, leading to unreliable results. Unbiased estimators are a good alternative to overcome this problem, provided that the generator is considered linear. This condition is not fulfilled by most existing generators as they are based on loudspeakers, which have strong nonlinearities. The present work aims to contribute to the solution of this problem, and describes a pressure generator that minimises the nonlinearities by an optical sensor placed in a position feedback loop. The static evaluation shows a high linearity for the optical system. The well known frequency response of pressure transducers is used in the dynamic evaluation of the instrument. The analysis of the generator shows that the use of position feedback improved the frequency response. The total harmonic distortion (THD) measurement shows that closed loop resulted in an effective decrease in the nonlinearities. The reduction of THD achieved by the servo-controlled generator can contribute to the practical implementation of the unbiased estimators, increasing the reliability of the impedance data, especially in the low-frequency range. This system is compared with conventional generators and with another servo-controlled system.

  14. Nanofibre optic force transducers with sub-piconewton resolution via near-field plasmon-dielectric interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Lee, Joon; Arce, Fernando Teran; Yoon, Ilsun; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Liu, Justin; Shi, Yuesong; Villanueva, Josh; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Ma, Xuanyi; Zhang, Liangfang; Chen, Shaochen; Lal, Ratnesh; Sirbuly, Donald J.

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasensitive nanomechanical instruments, including the atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical and magnetic tweezers, have helped shed new light on the complex mechanical environments of biological processes. However, it is difficult to scale down the size of these instruments due to their feedback mechanisms, which, if overcome, would enable high-density nanomechanical probing inside materials. A variety of molecular force probes including mechanophores, quantum dots, fluorescent pairs and molecular rotors have been designed to measure intracellular stresses; however, fluorescence-based techniques can have short operating times due to photo-instability and it is still challenging to quantify the forces with high spatial and mechanical resolution. Here, we develop a compact nanofibre optic force transducer (NOFT) that utilizes strong near-field plasmon-dielectric interactions to measure local forces with a sensitivity of <200 fN. The NOFT system is tested by monitoring bacterial motion and heart-cell beating as well as detecting infrasound power in solution.

  15. van der Waals interactions between nanotubes and nanoparticles for controlled assembly of composite nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Graham A; Marsh, Dan H; Bourne, Stephen J; Reade, Thomas J; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2010-08-24

    We have demonstrated that ubiquitous van der Waals forces are significant in controlling the interactions between nanoparticles and nanotubes. The adsorption of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on nanotubes (MWNTs) obeys a simple quadratic dependence on the nanotube surface area, regardless of the source of AuNPs and MWNTs. Changes in the geometric parameters of the components have pronounced effects on the affinity of nanoparticles for nanotubes, with larger, more polarizable nanostructures exhibiting stronger attractive interactions, the impact of which changes in the following order MWNT diameter > AuNP diameter > MWNT length.

  16. End-Point Contact Force Control with Quantitative Feedback Theory for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhuan Wen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Robot force control is an important issue for intelligent mobile robotics. The end‐point stiffness of a robot is a key and open problem in the research community. The control strategies are mostly dependent on both the specifications of the task and the environment of the robot. Due to the limited stiffness of the end‐effector, we may adopt inherent torque to feedback the oscillations of the controlled force. This paper proposes an effective control strategy which contains a controller using quantitative feedback theory. The nested loop controllers take into account the physical limitation of the system’s inner variables and harmful interference. The biggest advantage of the method is its simplicity in both the design process and the implementation of the control algorithm in engineering practice. Taking the one‐link manipulator as an example, numerical experiments are carried out to verify the proposed control method. The results show the satisfactory performance.

  17. End-Point Contact Force Control with Quantitative Feedback Theory for Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhuan Wen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Robot force control is an important issue for intelligent mobile robotics. The end-point stiffness of a robot is a key and open problem in the research community. The control strategies are mostly dependent on both the specifications of the task and the environment of the robot. Due to the limited stiffness of the end-effector, we may adopt inherent torque to feedback the oscillations of the controlled force. This paper proposes an effective control strategy which contains a controller using quantitative feedback theory. The nested loop controllers take into account the physical limitation of the system's inner variables and harmful interference. The biggest advantage of the method is its simplicity in both the design process and the implementation of the control algorithm in engineering practice. Taking the one-link manipulator as an example, numerical experiments are carried out to verify the proposed control method. The results show the satisfactory performance.

  18. Force-controlled balance perturbations associated with falls in older people: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daina L Sturnieks

    Full Text Available Balance recovery from an unpredictable postural perturbation can be a challenging task for many older people and poor recovery could contribute to their risk of falls. This study examined associations between responses to unpredictable perturbations and fall risk in older people. 242 older adults (80.0 ± 4.4 years underwent assessments of stepping responses to multi-directional force-controlled waist-pull perturbations. Participants returned monthly falls calendars for the subsequent 12 months. Future falls were associated with lower force thresholds for stepping in the posterior and lateral but not anterior directions. Those with lower posterior force thresholds for stepping were 68% more likely to fall at home than those with higher force thresholds for stepping. These results suggest that amount of force that can be withstood following an unpredictable balance perturbation predicts future falls in community-dwelling older adults. Perturbations in the posterior direction best discriminated between future fallers and non-fallers.

  19. Self-Assembly and Intermolecular Forces When Cellulose and Water Interact Using Molecular Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Chami Khazraji

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose chains are linear and aggregation occurs via both intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Cellulose has a strong affinity to itself and toward materials containing hydroxyls groups. Based on the preponderance of hydroxyl functional groups, cellulose is very reactive with water. At room temperature, cellulose chains will have at least a monomolecular layer of water associated to it. The formation of hydrogen bonds at the cellulose/water interface is shown to depend essentially on the adsorption site, for example, the equatorial hydroxyls or OH moieties pointing outward from the cellulose chains. The vdW forces also contribute significantly to the adsorption energy. They are a considerable cohesive energy into the cellulose network. At the surface of the cellulose chains, many intermolecular hydrogen bonds of the cellulose chains are lost. However, they are compensated by hydrogen bonds with water molecules. Electronic clouds can be distorted and create electrostatic dipoles. The large antibonding electron cloud that exists around the glucosidic bonds produces an induced polarization at the approach of water molecules. The electron cloud can be distorted and create an electrostatic dipole. It applies to the total displacement of the atoms within the material. Orbitals play a special role in reaction mechanism. Hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of cellulose is based on its structural anisotropy. Cellulose-water interactions are exothermic reactions. These interactions may occur spontaneously and result in higher randomness of the system. They are denoted by a negative heat flow (heat is lost to the surroundings. Energy does not need to be inputted in order for cellulose-water interactions to occur.

  20. Multi-digit force control during unconstrained grasping in response to object perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naceri, Abdeldjallil; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Haschke, Robert; Ritter, Helge; Santello, Marco; Ernst, Marc O

    2017-02-22

    Because of the complex anatomy of the human hand, in the absence of external constraints a large number of postures and force combinations can be used to attain a stable grasp. Motor synergies provide a viable strategy to solve this problem of motor redundancy. In this study, we exploited the technical advantages of an innovative sensorized object to study unconstrained hand grasping within the theoretical framework of motor synergies. Participants were required to grasp, lift, and hold the sensorized object. During the holding phase, we repetitively applied external disturbance forces and torques and recorded the spatiotemporal distribution of grip forces produced by each digit. We found that the time to reach the maximum grip force during each perturbation was roughly equal across fingers, consistently with a synchronous, synergistic stiffening across digits. We further evaluated this hypothesis by comparing the force distribution of human grasping versus robotic grasping, where the control strategy was set by the experimenter. We controlled the global hand stiffness of the robotic hand and we found that this control algorithm produced a force pattern qualitatively similar to human grasping performance. Our results suggest that the nervous system uses a default whole-hand synergistic control to maintain a stable grasp regardless of the number of digits involved in the task, their position on the objects, and the type and frequency of external perturbations.

  1. iCub Whole-body Control through Force Regulation on Rigid Noncoplanar Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eNori

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the implementation on the humanoid robot iCub of state-of-the-art algorithms for whole-body control. We regulate the forces between the robot and its surrounding environment to stabilize a desired robot posture. We assume that the forces and torques are exerted on rigid contacts. The validity of this assumption is guaranteed by constraining the contact forces and torques, e.g. the contact forces must belong to the associated friction cones. The implementation of this control strategy requires to estimate the external forces acting on the robot, and the internal joint torques. We then detail algorithms to obtain these estimations when using a robot with an iCub-like sensor set, i.e. distributed six-axis force-torque sensors and whole-body tactile sensors. A general theory for identifying the robot inertial parameters is also presented. From an actuation standpoint, we show how to implement a joint torque control in the case of DC brushless motors. In addition, the coupling mechanism of the iCub torso is investigated. The soundness of the entire control architecture is validated in a real scenario involving the robot iCub balancing and making contacts at both arms.

  2. Tunable degree of localization in random lasers with controlled interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Leonetti, Marco; Lopez, Cefe

    2012-01-01

    We show that the degree of localization for the modes of a random laser (RL) is affected by the inter mode interaction that is controlled by shaping the spot of the pump laser. By experimentally investigating the spatial properties of the lasing emission we infer that strongly localized modes are activated in the low interacting regime while in the strongly interacting one extended modes are found lasing. Thus we demonstrate that the degree o localization may be finely tuned at the micrometer level.

  3. An Analysis of Retaining or Replacing Air Force Command and Control Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    control aircraft perform, as well as the importance of maintaining the capability. Current command and control aircraft , as well as potential aircraft that...can replace the existing command and control aircraft , were researched to determine the cost and performance specifications. The current and...completed product identifies if the Air Force should retain or replace command and control aircraft . Additional areas for further research were listed

  4. Reduction of Flight Control System/Structural Mode Interaction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel approach is proposed for reducing the degree of interaction of a high gain flight control system with the airframe structural vibration modes, representing a...

  5. Interaction framework for loosely-coupled controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Simon

    2011-01-01

    will aim to present both theoretical and practical work that can help reduce this waste by fostering reuse, simplicity and the use of a consistent, common terminology. Through a quick analysis of a few ad-hoc systems already implemented at the university, a number of undesirable characteristics...... of programmable logic for flexible interfacing. The terms used to describe the various core aspects of the Node-on-Chip architecture are fully defined and arranged into taxonomies, to help provide a consistent vocabulary for work in robotic controllers. The TosNet protocol, network and framework are presented...... to support and implement the Node-on-Chip architecture. The TosNet protocol is an isochronous, real-time protocol supporting up to 15 nodes connected in a ring. The TosNet network is an FPGA-based implementation of this protocol, used for the infrastructure of the TosNet framework. The various revisions...

  6. The Interaction between Negative Emotionality and Effortful Control in Early

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lyndsey R.; Lengua, Liliana J.; Zalewski, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between reactive and regulatory dimensions of temperament may be particularly relevant to children's adjustment but are examined infrequently. This study investigated these interactions by examining effortful control as a moderator of the relations of fear and frustration reactivity to children's social competence, internalizing, and…

  7. Quantum control without access to the controlling interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Janzing, D; Zeier, R; Beth, T; Janzing, Dominik; Armknecht, Frederik; Zeier, Robert; Beth, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    In our model a fixed Hamiltonian acts on the joint Hilbert space of a quantum system and its controller. We show under which conditions measurements, state preparations, and unitary implementations on the system can be performed by quantum operations on the controller only. It turns out that a measurement of the observable A and an implementation of the one-parameter group exp(iAr) can be performed by almost the same sequence of control operations. Furthermore measurement procedures for A+B, for (AB+BA), and for i[A,B] can be constructed from measurements of A and B. This shows that the algebraic structure of the set of observables can be explained by the Lie group structure of the unitary evolutions on the joint Hilbert space of the measuring device and the measured system. A spin chain model with nearest neighborhood coupling shows that the border line between controller and system can be shifted consistently.

  8. Flow pattern and lift evolution of hydrofoil with control of electro-magnetic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN YaoHui; FAN BaoChun; CHEN ZhiHua; LI HongZhi

    2009-01-01

    The Initial responses and evolutions of the flow pattern and lift coefficient of a hydrofoil under the ac-tion of electro-magnetic (Lorentz) force have been studied experimentally and numerically,and trace particle methods are employed for them.With the introduction of BVF (boundary vortex flux),the quantitative relation among Lorentz forces,BVF and lifts is deduced.The influences of flow patterns on the hydrofoil lift coefficient have been discussed based on the BVF distribution,and the flow control mechanism of Lorentz force for a hydrofoil has been elucidated.Our results show that the flow pattern and lift of the hydrofoil vary periodically without any force.However,with the action of streamwise Lorentz forces,the separation point on the hydrofoil surface moves backward with a certain velocity,which makes the flow field steady finally.The streamwise Lorentz force raises the foil lift due to the Increase of BVF intensity.On the other hand,Lorentz force also increases the hydrofoil surface pres-sure,which makes the lift decrease.However,the factor leading to the lift enhancement is determinant,therefore,the Lorentz force on the suction side can increase the lift,and the stronger the Lorentz force,the larger the lift enhancement.Our results also show that the localized Lorentz force can also both suppress the flow separation and increase the hydrofoil lift coefficient,furthermore,the Lorentz force located on the tail acts better than that located on the front.

  9. Optimal control of an influenza model with seasonal forcing and age-dependent transmission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jungeun; Kwon, Hee-Dae

    2013-01-21

    This study considers an optimal intervention strategy for influenza outbreaks. Variations in the SEIAR model are considered to include seasonal forcing and age structure, and control strategies include vaccination, antiviral treatment, and social distancing such as school closures. We formulate an optimal control problem by minimizing the incidence of influenza outbreaks while considering intervention costs. We examine the effects of delays in vaccine production, seasonal forcing, and age-dependent transmission rates on the optimal control and suggest some optimal strategies through numerical simulations.

  10. Performance optimization of force feedback control system in virtual vascular intervention surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi; Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control.

  11. Performance Optimization of Force Feedback Control System in Virtual Vascular Intervention Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ping; Qin, Peng; Xie, Le

    2014-01-01

    In virtual surgery of minimally invasive vascular intervention, the force feedback is transmitted through the flexible guide wire. The disturbance caused by the flexible deformation would affect the fidelity of the VR (virtual reality) training. SMC (sliding mode control) strategy with delayed-output observer is adopted to suppress the effect of flexible deformation. In this study, the control performance of the strategy is assessed when the length of guide wire between actuator and the operating point changes. The performance assessment results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and find the optimal length of guide wire for the force feedback control. PMID:25254063

  12. An active optimal control strategy of rotor vibrations using external forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Castelazo, I.; Nelson, H. D.

    1989-01-01

    An active control strategy for lateral rotor vibrations using external forces is proposed. An extended state observer is used to reconstruct the full states and the unbalance distribution. An optimal controller which accommodates persistent unbalance excitation is derived with feedback of estimated states and unbalances. Numerical simulations were conducted for two separate four degree of freedom rotor systems. These simulations indicated that the proposed strategy can achieve almost complete vibration cancellation. This was shown to be true even when the number of external control forces was less than the system order so long as coordinate coupling was present. Both steady state and transient response at a constant speed are presented.

  13. Ride Control Systems - Reduced Motions on the Cost of Increased Sectional Forces ?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folsø, R.; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Torti, F.

    2003-01-01

    Implementation of passive and active ride control systems into both linear frequency and non-linear time domain strip theories is described. The ride control systems considered can consist of T-foils, fins or a combination of these. These appendages are taken into account by considering the lift...... by adding the lift forces to the exciting forces in the equations of motion. One of the advantages in the time domain is that the angle of attack can be limited easily, as is often the case in real full scale ride control systems. This way cavitation and finally stalling can be avoided. In the frequency...... domain limits on the angle of attack cannot be set. Since the lift coefficient is treated linearly the calculated lift force is severely overestimated in rough sea. Secondly the effect of including ride control systems in the calculations is demonstrated through comparisons of RMS values and of response...

  14. Toward hybrid force/position control for the Cerberus epicardial robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, Macauley S; Costanza, Adam D; Wood, Nathan A; Passineau, Michael J; Riviere, Cameron N

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapies have emerged as a promising treatment for congestive heart failure, yet they lack a method for minimally invasive, uniform delivery. To address this need we developed Cerberus, a minimally invasive parallel wire robot for cardiac interventions. Prior work on Cerberus was limited to controlling the device using only position feedback. In order to ensure safety for both the patient and the device, as well as to improve the performance of the device, this paper presents work on enhancing the existing system with force feedback capabilities. By modeling the statics of the system and developing a tension distribution optimization technique, existing position control schemes were modified to a hybrid force/position controller. Experimental results show that using a hybrid force-position control scheme as opposed to position decreases positioning error by 38%.

  15. Virtual Control of Prosthetic Hand Based on Grasping Patterns and Estimated Force from Semg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Gao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoelectric prosthetic hands aim to serve upper limb amputees. The myoelectric control of the hand grasp action is a kind of real-time or online method. Thus it is of great necessity to carry on a study of online prosthetic hand electrical control. In this paper, the strategy of simultaneous EMG decoding of grasping patterns and grasping force was realized by controlling a virtual multi-degree-freedom prosthetic hand and a real one-degree-freedom prosthetic hand simultaneously. The former realized the grasping patterns from the recognition of the sEMG pattern. The other implemented the grasping force from sEMG force decoding. The results show that the control method is effective and feasible.

  16. Controlling Second Harmonic Efficiency of Laser Beam Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling second harmonic efficiency of laser beam interactions. A laser system generates two laser beams (e.g., a laser beam with two polarizations) for incidence on a nonlinear crystal having a preferred direction of propagation. Prior to incidence on the crystal, the beams are optically processed based on the crystal's beam separation characteristics to thereby control a position in the crystal along the preferred direction of propagation at which the beams interact.

  17. Pore-polymer interaction reveals non-universality in forced polymer translocation

    CERN Document Server

    Lehtola, V V; Linna, R P

    2010-01-01

    We present a numerical study of forced polymer translocation by using two separate pore models. Both of them have been extensively used in previous forced translocation studies. We show that variations in the pore model affect the forced translocation characteristics significantly in the biologically relevant pore force, i.e. driving force, range. Details of the model are shown to change even the obtained scaling relations, which is a strong indication of strongly out-of-equilibrium dynamics in the computational studies which have not yet succeeded in addressing the characteristics of the forced translocation for biopolymers at realistic length scale.

  18. Force-feedback control of a spherical haptic device featuring an electrorheological fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Min; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the force-feedback performance of an active type of haptic device featuring an electrorheological (ER) fluid via a sliding mode controller (SMC), which is very robust to external disturbances and parameter uncertainties. In order to generate a 2-degrees-of-freedom (2-DOF) active force, a spherical ER joint is designed based on the mathematical torque model. The ER joint is then manufactured by adopting two bi-directional clutch actuators and the spherical geometry of the electrode, and its field-dependent generating force is experimentally evaluated. Subsequently, the 2-DOF force display is manufactured by integrating the ER joint with AC motors. The force response of the manufactured haptic device is experimentally evaluated, and expressed by a second-order dynamic equation. In order to achieve the desired force trajectories, the SMC is formulated and experimentally realized by imposing an Euler angle relationship. Tracking control performances for various force trajectories are presented in the time domain, and their tracking errors are evaluated.

  19. Dynamics of dissipative self-assembly of particles interacting through oscillatory forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliazucchi, M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering; Department of Chemistry and Chemistry of Life Processes Institute; Northwestern University; Evanston, USA; INQUIMAE-CONICET; Szleifer, I. [Department of Biomedical Engineering; Department of Chemistry and Chemistry of Life Processes Institute; Northwestern University; Evanston, USA

    2016-01-01

    Dissipative self-assembly is the formation of ordered structures far from equilibrium, which continuously uptake energy and dissipate it into the environment. Due to its dynamical nature, dissipative self-assembly can lead to new phenomena and possibilities of self-organization that are unavailable to equilibrium systems. Understanding the dynamics of dissipative self-assembly is required in order to direct the assembly to structures of interest. In the present work, Brownian dynamics simulations and analytical theory were used to study the dynamics of self-assembly of a mixture of particles coated with weak acids and bases under continuous oscillations of the pH. The pH of the system modulates the charge of the particles and, therefore, the interparticle forces oscillate in time. This system produces a variety of self-assembled structures, including colloidal molecules, fibers and different types of crystalline lattices. The most important conclusions of our study are: (i) in the limit of fast oscillations, the whole dynamics (and not only those at the non-equilibrium steady state) of a system of particles interacting through time-oscillating interparticle forces can be described by an effective potential that is the time average of the time-dependent potential over one oscillation period; (ii) the oscillation period is critical to determine the order of the system. In some cases the order is favored by very fast oscillations while in others small oscillation frequencies increase the order. In the latter case, it is shown that slow oscillations remove kinetic traps and, thus, allow the system to evolve towards the most stable non-equilibrium steady state.

  20. FORCE FEEDBACK MODEL OF ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC SERVO TELE-OPERATION ROBOT BASED ON VELOCITY CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The tele-operation robotic system which consists of an excavator as the construction robot, and two joysticks for operating the robot from a safe place are useful for performing restoration in damaged areas. In order to accomplish a precise task, the operator needs to feel a realistic sense of task force brought about from a feedback force between the fork glove of slave robot and unfamiliar environment. A novel force feedback model is proposed based on velocity control of cylinder to determine environment force acting" on fork glove. Namely, the feedback force is formed by the error of displacement of joystick with velocity and driving force of piston, and the gain is calculated by the driving force and threshold of driving force of hydraulic cylinder. Moreover, the variable gain improved algorithm is developed to overcome the defect for grasping soft object. Experimental results for fork glove freedom of robotic system are provided to demonstrate the developed algorithm is available for grasping soft object.

  1. Grip Force Control Is Dependent on Task Constraints in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one…

  2. Control of thumb force using surface functional electrical stimulation and muscle load sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, A.J.; Schouten, A.C.; Veltink, P.H.; Van der Kooij, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke survivors often have difficulties in manipulating objects with their affected hand. Thumb control plays an important role in object manipulation. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) can assist movement. We aim to control the 2D thumb force by predicting the sum of indiv

  3. A Force-Controllable Macro-Micro Manipulator and its Application to Medical Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Uecker, Darrin R.; Wang, Yulun

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes an 8-degrees-of-freedom macro-micro robot. This robot is capable of performing tasks that require accurate force control, such as polishing, finishing, grinding, deburring, and cleaning. The design of the macro-micro mechanism, the control algorithms, and the hardware/sofware implemtation of the algotithms are described in this paper. Initial experimental results are reported.

  4. Control of thumb force using surface functional electrical stimulation and muscle load sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, Ard; Westerveld, Ard J.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Veltink, Petrus H.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stroke survivors often have difficulties in manipulating objects with their affected hand. Thumb control plays an important role in object manipulation. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) can assist movement. We aim to control the 2D thumb force by predicting the sum of

  5. Control of thumb force using surface functional electrical stimulation and muscle load sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, A.J.; Schouten, A.C.; Veltink, P.H.; Van der Kooij, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke survivors often have difficulties in manipulating objects with their affected hand. Thumb control plays an important role in object manipulation. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) can assist movement. We aim to control the 2D thumb force by predicting the sum of

  6. Active dynamic balancing unit for controlled shaking force and shaking moment balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Herder, Justus Laurens

    2010-01-01

    For a mechanism with many elements that needs to be shaking-force and shaking-moment balanced with a low addition of mass, a low addition of inertia, and a low addition of complexity, the use of actively computer-controlled balancing elements is promising. With these actively controlled elements the

  7. Optimization of Process Parameters of Edge Robotic Deburring with Force Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, A.; Szybicki, D.; Kurc, K.; Muszyńska, M.

    2016-12-01

    The issues addressed in the paper present a part of the scientific research conducted within the framework of the automation of the aircraft engine part manufacturing processes. The results of the research presented in the article provided information in which tolerances while using a robotic control station with the option of force control we can make edge deburring.

  8. Operator Performance in Undersea Manipulator Systems: Studies of Control Performance with Visual Force Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    vi) - ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors extend their appreciation to Mr. Gerald Malecki and Dr. Martin Tolcott of the Office on Naval Research for their...would increase aplied forces another order of maqnitude, It i- of note that the applied forces recorded during the tasks feil well beiow the maxirum of...Simulation", 1973, Martin Marietta Corp., Denver, Colo. Flatau, C.R., et al. "Some Preliminary Correlation Between Control Modes of Manipulator

  9. Quantitative modeling assesses the contribution of bond strengthening, rebinding and force sharing to the avidity of biomolecule interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lo Schiavo

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is mediated by numerous membrane receptors. It is desirable to derive the outcome of a cell-surface encounter from the molecular properties of interacting receptors and ligands. However, conventional parameters such as affinity or kinetic constants are often insufficient to account for receptor efficiency. Avidity is a qualitative concept frequently used to describe biomolecule interactions: this includes incompletely defined properties such as the capacity to form multivalent attachments. The aim of this study is to produce a working description of monovalent attachments formed by a model system, then to measure and interpret the behavior of divalent attachments under force. We investigated attachments between antibody-coated microspheres and surfaces coated with sparse monomeric or dimeric ligands. When bonds were subjected to a pulling force, they exhibited both a force-dependent dissociation consistent with Bell's empirical formula and a force- and time-dependent strengthening well described by a single parameter. Divalent attachments were stronger and less dependent on forces than monovalent ones. The proportion of divalent attachments resisting a force of 30 piconewtons for at least 5 s was 3.7 fold higher than that of monovalent attachments. Quantitative modeling showed that this required rebinding, i.e. additional bond formation between surfaces linked by divalent receptors forming only one bond. Further, experimental data were compatible with but did not require stress sharing between bonds within divalent attachments. Thus many ligand-receptor interactions do not behave as single-step reactions in the millisecond to second timescale. Rather, they exhibit progressive stabilization. This explains the high efficiency of multimerized or clustered receptors even when bonds are only subjected to moderate forces. Our approach provides a quantitative way of relating binding avidity to measurable parameters including bond

  10. Modelling of Nonlinear Dynamic of Mechanic Systems with the Force Tribological Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Nuzhdin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the mechanisms with different structure: tribometric device and a mechanism for handling of optical glasses. In the first device, the movement of the upper platform is due to a reciprocating friction interaction. In the second device, the processing of the optical element or group of elements occurs due to the rotational motion. Modelling of the dynamic of these systems with Matlab/Simmechanic allowed carrying out the analysis of dynamic of mechanisms, considering nonlinearity tribological interactions for these systems. The article shows that using of the computer models can effectively carry out the selection of the control parameters to create the desired mode of operation, as well as to investigate the behaviour of systems with nonlinear parameters and processes of self-oscillations. The organization of the managed self-oscillation process is realized to create the relevant high-performance manufacturing, for example, for the processing of optical glasses.

  11. A Unified Theory of Interaction: Gravitation, Electrodynamics and the Strong Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified model of gravitation and electromagnetism is extended to derive the Yukawa potential for the strong force. The model satisfies the fundamental characteristics of the strong force and calculates the mass of the pion.

  12. Control of interaction-induced dephasing of Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, M; Haller, E; Mark, M J; Danzl, J G; Rojas-Kopeinig, G; Nägerl, H-C

    2008-02-29

    We report on the control of interaction-induced dephasing of Bloch oscillations for an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice. We quantify the dephasing in terms of the width of the quasimomentum distribution and measure its dependence on time for different interaction strengths which we control by means of a Feshbach resonance. For minimal interaction, the dephasing time is increased from a few to more than 20 thousand Bloch oscillation periods, allowing us to realize a BEC-based atom interferometer in the noninteracting limit.

  13. A novel feedback control system – Controlling the material flow in deep drawing using distributed blank-holder force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endelt, Benny Ørtoft; Tommerup, Søren; Danckert, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The performance of a feedback control system is often limited by the quality of the model on which it is based, and often the controller design is based on trial and error due to insufficient modeling capabilities. A framework is proposed where the controller design is based on classical state...... on a deep drawing operation where the objective was to control material flow throughout the part using only spatial information regarding flange draw-in. The control system controls both the magnitude and distribution of the blank-holder force. The methodology proved stable and flexible with respect...

  14. To the Problem of Electromechanical Interaction in Elevators with Controlled Electric Drive and Fuzzy Speed Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Koval

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems concerning electromechanical interaction in elevators with an adjustable asynchronous electric drive equipped with the vector control systems under direct torque control and direct torque control with pulse-width modulator. A mathematical description of electromechanical elevator system with due account of nonlinearity of the worm gear is given in the paper. The paper presents a simplified circuit design of a control system with a fuzzy speed controller. It has been established that the factor of electromechanical interaction in electromechanical system with the adjustable asynchronous electric drive and an fuzzy speed controller is within the range which corresponds to existence of the essential electromechanical interaction.

  15. Modes of Escherichia coli Dps Interaction with DNA as Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V Melekhov

    Full Text Available Multifunctional protein Dps plays an important role in iron assimilation and a crucial role in bacterial genome packaging. Its monomers form dodecameric spherical particles accumulating ~400 molecules of oxidized iron ions within the protein cavity and applying a flexible N-terminal ends of each subunit for interaction with DNA. Deposition of iron is a well-studied process by which cells remove toxic Fe2+ ions from the genetic material and store them in an easily accessible form. However, the mode of interaction with linear DNA remained mysterious and binary complexes with Dps have not been characterized so far. It is widely believed that Dps binds DNA without any sequence or structural preferences but several lines of evidence have demonstrated its ability to differentiate gene expression, which assumes certain specificity. Here we show that Dps has a different affinity for the two DNA fragments taken from the dps gene regulatory region. We found by atomic force microscopy that Dps predominantly occupies thermodynamically unstable ends of linear double-stranded DNA fragments and has high affinity to the central part of the branched DNA molecule self-assembled from three single-stranded oligonucleotides. It was proposed that Dps prefers binding to those regions in DNA that provide more contact pads for the triad of its DNA-binding bundle associated with one vertex of the protein globule. To our knowledge, this is the first study revealed the nucleoid protein with an affinity to branched DNA typical for genomic regions with direct and inverted repeats. As a ubiquitous feature of bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, such structural elements should be of particular care, but the protein system evolutionarily adapted for this function is not yet known, and we suggest Dps as a putative component of this system.

  16. Research on Key Factors and Their Interaction Effects of Electromagnetic Force of High-Speed Solenoid Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liyun; Xu, De; Ma, Xiuzhen; Song, Enzhe

    2014-01-01

    Analysis consisting of numerical simulations along with lab experiments of interaction effects between key parameters on the electromagnetic force based on response surface methodology (RSM) has been also proposed to optimize the design of high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) and improve its performance. Numerical simulation model of HSV has been developed in Ansoft Maxwell environment and its accuracy has been validated through lab experiments. Effect of change of core structure, coil structure, armature structure, working air gap, and drive current on the electromagnetic force of HSV has been analyzed through simulation model and influence rules of various parameters on the electromagnetic force have been established. The response surface model of the electromagnetic force has been utilized to analyze the interaction effect between major parameters. It has been concluded that six interaction factors including working air gap with armature radius, drive current with armature thickness, coil turns with side pole radius, armature thickness with its radius, armature thickness with side pole radius, and armature radius with side pole radius have significant influence on the electromagnetic force. Optimal match values between coil turns and side pole radius; armature thickness and side pole radius; and armature radius and side pole radius have also been determined. PMID:25243217

  17. Insights into the Interactions of Amino Acids and Peptides with Inorganic Materials Using Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Priyadip; Duanias-Assaf, Tal; Reches, Meital

    2017-03-06

    The interactions between proteins or peptides and inorganic materials lead to several interesting processes. For example, combining proteins with minerals leads to the formation of composite materials with unique properties. In addition, the undesirable process of biofouling is initiated by the adsorption of biomolecules, mainly proteins, on surfaces. This organic layer is an adhesion layer for bacteria and allows them to interact with the surface. Understanding the fundamental forces that govern the interactions at the organic-inorganic interface is therefore important for many areas of research and could lead to the design of new materials for optical, mechanical and biomedical applications. This paper demonstrates a single-molecule force spectroscopy technique that utilizes an AFM to measure the adhesion force between either peptides or amino acids and well-defined inorganic surfaces. This technique involves a protocol for attaching the biomolecule to the AFM tip through a covalent flexible linker and single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements by atomic force microscope. In addition, an analysis of these measurements is included.

  18. Characterization of Folic Acid and Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimer Interactions with Folate Binding Protein: A Force-Pulling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroueil, Pascale R; DiMaggio, Stassi; Leistra, Abigail N; Blanchette, Craig D; Orme, Christine; Sinniah, Kumar; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2015-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy force-pulling experiments have been used to measure the binding forces between folic acid (FA) conjugated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers and folate binding protein (FBP). The generation 5 (G5) PAMAM conjugates contained an average of 2.7, 4.7, and 7.2 FA per dendrimer. The most probable rupture force was measured to be 83, 201, and 189 pN for G5-FA2.7, G5-FA4.7, and G5-FA7.2, respectively. Folic acid blocking experiments for G5-FA7.2 reduced the frequency of successful binding events and increased the magnitude of the average rupture force to 274 pN. The force data are interpreted as arising from a network of van der Waals and electrostatic interactions that form between FBP and G5 PAMAM dendrimer, resulting in a binding strength far greater than that expected for an interaction between FA and FBP alone.

  19. Learning-based force servoing control of a robot with vision in an unknown environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖南峰

    2004-01-01

    A learning-based control approach is presented for force servoing of a robot with vision in an unknown environment. Firstly, mapping relationships between image features of the servoing object and the joint angles of the robot are derived and learned by a neural network. Secondly, a learning controller based on the neural network is designed for the robot to trace the object. Thirdly, a discrete time impedance control law is obtained for the force servoing of the robot,the on-line learning algorithms for three neural networks are developed to adjust the impedance parameters of the robot in the unknown environment. Lastly, wiping experiments are carried out by using a 6 DOF industrial robot with a CCD camera and a force/torque sensor in its end effector, and the experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the approach.

  20. Normative values for a video-force plate assessment of postural control in athletic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David R; Meehan, William P

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to provide normative data for young athletes during the three stances of the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS) using an objective video-force plate system. Postural control was measured in 398 athletes between 8 and 18 years of age during the three stances of the mBESS using a video-force plate rating system. Girls exhibited better postural control than boys during each stance of the mBESS. Age was not significantly associated with postural control. We provide normative data for a video-force plate assessment of postural stability in pediatric athletes during the three stances of the mBESS.

  1. Cytoplasmic membrane protonmotive force energizes periplasmic interactions between ExbD and TonB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollis, Anne A; Manning, Marta; Held, Kiara G; Postle, Kathleen

    2009-08-01

    The TonB system of Escherichia coli (TonB/ExbB/ExbD) transduces the protonmotive force (pmf) of the cytoplasmic membrane to drive active transport by high-affinity outer membrane transporters. In this study, chromosomally encoded ExbD formed formaldehyde-linked complexes with TonB, ExbB and itself (homodimers) in vivo. Pmf was required for detectable cross-linking between TonB-ExbD periplasmic domains. Consistent with that observation, the presence of inactivating transmembrane domain mutations ExbD(D25N) or TonB(H20A) also prevented efficient formaldehyde cross-linking between ExbD and TonB. A specific site of periplasmic interaction occurred between ExbD(A92C) and TonB(A150C) and required functional transmembrane domains in both proteins. Conversely, neither TonB, ExbB nor pmf were required for ExbD dimer formation. These data suggest two possible models where either dynamic complex formation occurred through transmembrane domains or the transmembrane domains of ExbD and TonB configure their respective periplasmic domains. Analysis of T7-tagged ExbD with anti-ExbD antibodies revealed that a T7 tag was responsible both for our previous failure to detect T7-ExbD-ExbB and T7-ExbD-TonB formaldehyde-linked complexes and for the concomitant artefactual appearance of T7-ExbD trimers.

  2. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  3. About the Interactions Controlling Nafion's Viscoelastic Properties and Morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchior, Jan-Patrick; Bräuniger, Thomas; Wohlfarth, Andreas; Portale, Giuseppe; Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Interactions controlling the viscoelastic properties of Nafion are identified by investigating morphological changes induced through stretching at a wide range of controlled temperature and relative humidity. H-2-goniometer NMR exploiting the pseudonematic effect in D2O-containing membranes provides

  4. ICONGRAPH - Program package for interactive controller design by graphical plotting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuschak, R.; Bars, R.; Habemayer, M.; Kovacs, T.; Vajk, I.; Vajta, Miklos

    1984-01-01

    ICONGRAPH is an interactive program package for CAD of control systems. The system under investigation has to be basically a linear single-loop one with lumped parameters. ICONGRAPH covers the following subjects: identification, design of controllers in the frequency and operator domains by

  5. Development and precision position/force control of a new flexure-based microgripper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-ling; Wei, Yan-ding; Lou, Jun-qiang; Xie, Feng-ran; Fu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling and position/force control of a new piezo-driven microgripper with integrated position and force sensors. The structural design of the microgripper is based on double amplification mechanisms employing the bridge-type mechanism and the parallelogram mechanism. The microgripper can generate a large gripping range and pure translation of the gripping arm. Through the pseudorigid-body-model method, theoretical models are derived. By means of several finite-element analysis simulations, the optimal structural parameters for the microgripper are acquired and the theoretical models are analyzed and validated. Furthermore, to improve the performance of the microgripper, a new hybrid position/force control scheme employing a nonlinear fuzzy logic controller combined with an incremental proportional-integral controller is presented. The control scheme is capable of regulating the position and the gripping force of the microgripper simultaneously. Experimental investigation and validation were performed and the experimental results verify the effectiveness of the developed structural design and the proposed hybrid control scheme.

  6. Digit Position and Forces Covary during Anticipatory Control of Whole-Hand Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneweck, Michelle; Lee-Miller, Trevor; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical perspectives on anticipatory planning of object manipulation have traditionally been informed by studies that have investigated kinematics (hand shaping and digit position) and kinetics (forces) in isolation. This poses limitations on our understanding of the integration of such domains, which have recently been shown to be strongly interdependent. Specifically, recent studies revealed strong covariation of digit position and load force during the loading phase of two-digit grasping. Here, we determined whether such digit force-position covariation is a general feature of grasping. We investigated the coordination of digit position and forces during five-digit whole-hand manipulation of an object with a variable mass distribution. Subjects were instructed to prevent object roll during the lift. As found in precision grasping, there was strong trial-to-trial covariation of digit position and force. This suggests that the natural variation of digit position that is compensated for by trial-to-trial variation in digit forces is a fundamental feature of grasp control, and not only specific to precision grasp. However, a main difference with precision grasping was that modulation of digit position to the object's mass distribution was driven predominantly by the thumb, with little to no modulation of finger position. Modulation of thumb position rather than fingers is likely due to its greater range of motion and therefore adaptability to object properties. Our results underscore the flexibility of the central nervous system in implementing a range of solutions along the digit force-to-position continuum for dexterous manipulation.

  7. Lateral and perpendicular interaction forces involved in mobile and immobile adhesion of microorganism on model solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, HJ; Poortinga, AT; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Gliding and near-surface swimming of microorganisms are described as a mobile form of microbial adhesion that need not necessarily be reversible. It is argued that the reversibility of microbial adhesion depends on the depth of the secondary interaction minimum, calculated from the forces between an

  8. Single Molecule Science for Personalized Nanomedicine: Atomic Force Microscopy of Biopolymer-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Carlin

    Nanotechnology has a unique and relatively untapped utility in the fields of medicine and dentistry at the level of single-biopolymer and -molecule diagnostics. In recent years atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest due to its ability to obtain atomic-resolution of molecular structures and probe biophysical behaviors of biopolymers and proteins in a variety of biologically significant environments. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the nanoscale manipulation and observation of biopolymers to develop an innovative technology for personalized medicine while understanding complex biological systems. These studies described here primarily use AFM to observe biopolymer interactions with proteins and its surroundings with unprecedented resolution, providing a better understanding of these systems and interactions at the nanoscale. Transcriptional profiling, the measure of messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance in a single cell, is a powerful technique that detects "behavior" or "symptoms" at the tissue and cellular level. We have sought to develop an alternative approach, using our expertise in AFM and single molecule nanotechnology, to achieve a cost-effective high throughput method for sensitive detection and profiling of subtle changes in transcript abundance. The technique does not require amplification of the mRNA sample because the AFM provides three-dimensional views of molecules with unprecedented resolution, requires minimal sample preparation, and utilizes a simple tagging chemistry on cDNA molecules. AFM images showed collagen polymers in teeth and of Drebrin-A remodeling of filamentous actin structure and mechanics. AFM was used to image collagen on exposed dentine tubules and confirmed tubule occlusion with a desensitizing prophylaxis paste by Colgate-Palmolive. The AFM also superseded other microscopy tools in resolving F-actin helix remodeling and possible cooperative binding by a neuronal actin binding protein---Drebrin-A, an

  9. Polarizable simulations with second order interaction model (POSSIM) force field: developing parameters for protein side-chain analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Sa, Qina; Sigalovsky, Daniel L; Kaminski, George A

    2013-05-30

    A previously introduced polarizable simulations with second-order interaction model (POSSIM) force field has been extended to include parameters for small molecules serving as models for peptide and protein side-chains. Parameters have been fitted to permit reproducing many-body energies, gas-phase dimerization energies, and geometries and liquid-phase heats of vaporization and densities. Quantum mechanical and experimental data have been used as the target for the fitting. The POSSIM framework combines accuracy of a polarizable force field and computational efficiency of the second-order approximation of the full-scale induced point dipole polarization formalism. The resulting parameters can be used for simulations of the parameterized molecules themselves or their analogues. In addition to this, these force field parameters are currently being used in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins.

  10. A force feedback joystick and control algorithm for wheelchair obstacle avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienza, D M; Angelo, J

    1996-03-01

    Many powered wheelchair users have difficulty manoeuvring in confined spaces. Common tasks such as traversing through doorways, turning around in halls or travelling on a straight path are complicated by an inability to accurately and reliably control the wheelchair with a joystick or other common input device, or by a sensory impairment that prevents the user from receiving feedback from the environment. An active joystick with force feedback to indicate obstacles in the environment has been developed. Two force feedback schemes designed to assist a powered wheelchair user have been developed and implemented using the active joystick. The development of the joystick and associated control algorithms are described.

  11. Stable force-myographic control of a prosthetic hand using incremental learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Ghosh, Rohan; Lee, Wang Wei; Thakor, Nitish V; Kukreja, Sunil

    2015-08-01

    Force myography has been proposed as an appealing alternative to electromyography for control of upper limb prosthesis. A limitation of this technique is the non-stationary nature of the recorded force data. Force patterns vary under influence of various factors such as change in orientation and position of the prosthesis. We hereby propose an incremental learning method to overcome this limitation. We use an online sequential extreme learning machine where occasional updates allow continual adaptation to signal changes. The applicability and effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated for predicting the hand status from forearm muscle forces at various arm positions. The results show that incremental updates are indeed effective to maintain a stable level of performance, achieving an average classification accuracy of 98.75% for two subjects.

  12. External Periodic Force Control of a Single-Degree-of-Freedom Vibroimpact System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyue Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-degree-of-freedom mechanical model of vibro-impact system is established. Bifurcation and chaos in the system are revealed with the time history diagram, phase trajectory map, and Poincaré map. According to the bifurcation and chaos of the actual vibro-impact system, the paper puts forward external periodic force control strategy. The method of controlling chaos by external periodic force feedback controller is developed to guide chaotic motions towards regular motions. The stability of the control system is also analyzed especially by theory. By selecting appropriate feedback coefficients, the unstable periodic orbits of the original chaotic orbit can be stabilized to the stable periodic orbits. The effectiveness of this control method is verified by numerical simulation.

  13. Evaluation of medicine effects on the interaction of myoglobin and its aptamer or antibody using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Liu, Lin; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Chen, Nandi; Zhou, Chenchen; Luo, Bianxia; Du, Shasha

    2015-02-17

    The effects of medicine on the biomolecular interaction have been given increasing attention in biochemistry and affinity-based analytics since the environment in vivo is complex especially for the patients. Herein, myoglobin, a biomarker of acute myocardial infarction, was used as a model, and the medicine effects on the interactions of myoglobin/aptamer and myoglobin/antibody were systematically investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. The results showed that the average binding force and the binding probability of myoglobin/aptamer almost remained unchanged after myoglobin-modified gold substrate was incubated with promazine, amoxicillin, aspirin, and sodium penicillin, respectively. These parameters were changed for myoglobin/antibody after the myoglobin-modified gold substrate was treated with these medicines. For promazine and amoxicillin, they resulted in the change of binding force distribution of myoglobin/antibody (i.e., from unimodal distribution to bimodal distribution) and the increase of binding probability; for aspirin, it only resulted in the change of the binding force distribution, and for sodium penicillin, it resulted in the increase of the average binding force and the binding probability. These results may be attributed to the different interaction modes and binding sites between myoglobin/aptamer and myoglobin/antibody, the different structures between aptamer and antibody, and the effects of medicines on the conformations of myoglobin. These findings could enrich our understanding of medicine effects on the interactions of aptamer and antibody to their target proteins. Moreover, this work will lay a good foundation for better research and extensive applications of biomolecular interaction, especially in the design of biosensors in complex systems.

  14. Volcanic tremors and magma wagging: gas flux interactions and forcing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Jellinek, A. Mark; Michaut, Chloé; Roman, Diana C.; Morse, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Volcanic tremor is an important precursor to explosive eruptions and is ubiquitous across most silicic volcanic systems. Oscillations can persist for days and occur in a remarkably narrow frequency band (i.e. 0.5-7 Hz). The recently proposed magma-wagging model of Jellinek & Bercovici provides a basic explanation for the emergence and frequency evolution of tremor that is consistent with observations of many active silicic and andesitic volcanic systems. This model builds on work suggesting that the magma column rising in the volcanic conduit is surrounded by a permeable vesicular annulus of sheared bubbles. The magma-wagging model stipulates that the magma column rattles within the spring like foam of the annulus, and predicts oscillations at the range of observed tremor frequencies for a wide variety of volcanic environments. However, the viscous resistance of the magma column attenuates the oscillations and thus a forcing mechanism is required. Here we provide further development of the magma-wagging model and demonstrate that it implicitly has the requisite forcing to excite wagging behaviour. In particular, the extended model allows for gas flux through the annulus, which interacts with the wagging displacements and induces a Bernoulli effect that amplifies the oscillations. This effect leads to an instability involving growing oscillations at the lower end of the tremor frequency spectrum, and that drives the system against viscous damping of the wagging magma column. The fully non-linear model displays tremor oscillations associated with pulses in gas flux, analogous to observations of audible `chugging'. These oscillations also occur in clusters or envelopes that are consistent with observations of sporadic tremor envelopes. The wagging model further accurately predicts that seismic signals on opposite sides of a volcano are out of phase by approximately half a wagging or tremor period. Finally, peaks in gas flux occur at the end of the growing instability

  15. Forces required to operate controls on farm tractors: implications for young operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah, F A; Chang, J H; Berg, R L; Pickett, W; Marlenga, B

    2008-07-01

    Farm tractors account for the majority of fatal injuries to adolescents working in agriculture and therefore remain a leading occupational priority. The question of whether these injuries occur because adolescents are assigned tractor jobs beyond their physical capabilities has not been answered. The purpose of this study was to estimate the activation forces required to operate controls on 40 tractors in common use in the US and compare them with existing estimates of physical strength for children of varying ages and with recommended ergonomic force limits for repeatedly engaging controls. Activation forces for steering, brakes and clutch were measured on each tractor. The main study finding was that the activation forces required to operate tractors typically exceeded the physical abilities of most children aged 13 to 17 years. This raises serious questions about the ability of children to safely operate tractors in common use on US farms. This study provides an ergonomic approach for evaluating the potential mismatch between young people's strength capabilities and forces required in operating farm tractors. This approach could be used in similar situations where adolescents may operate vehicles (e.g. all-terrain vehicles), machinery or other mechanical devices requiring activation of levers and controls. Study findings potentially inform the establishment of occupational policies surrounding tractor operation by young people.

  16. Seismic Proofing Capability of the Accumulated Semiactive Hydraulic Damper as an Active Interaction Control Device with Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of natural disasters has increased recently, causing buildings’ damages which need to be reinforced to prevent their destruction. To improve the seismic proofing capability of Accumulated Semiactive Hydraulic Damper, it is converted to an Active Interaction Control device and synchronous control and predictive control methods are proposed. The full-scale shaking table test is used to test and verify the seismic proofing capability of the proposed AIC with these control methods. This study examines the shock absorption of test structure under excitation by external forces, influences of prediction time, stiffness of the auxiliary structure, synchronous switching, and asynchronous switching on the control effects, and the influence of control locations of test structure on the control effects of the proposed AIC. Test results show that, for the proposed AIC with synchronous control and predictive control of 0.10~0.13 seconds, the displacement reduction ratios are greater than 71%, the average acceleration reduction ratios are, respectively, 36.2% and 36.9%, at the 1st and 2nd floors, and the average base shear reduction ratio is 29.6%. The proposed AIC with suitable stiffeners for the auxiliary structure at each floor with synchronous control and predictive control provide high reliability and practicability for seismic proofing of buildings.

  17. Wheel-slip Control Method for Seeking Maximum Value of Tangential Force between Wheel and Rail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keiichiro; Yasuoka, Ikuo; Yamazaki, Osamu; Toda, Shinichi; Nakazawa, Yosuke

    A method for reducing motor torque in proportion to wheel slip is applied to an inverter-driven electric locomotive. The motor torque at wheel-slip speed is less than the torque at the maximum tangential force or the adhesion force. A novel anti-slip control method for seeking the maximum value of the tangential force between the wheel and rail is proposed in this paper. The characteristics of the proposed method are analyzed theoretically to design the torque reduction ratio and the rate of change of the pattern between the wheel-slip speed and motor current. In addition, experimental tests are also carried out to verify that the use of the proposed method increases the traction force of an electric locomotive driven by induction motors and inverters. The experimental test results obtained by using the proposed control method are compared with the experimental results obtained by using a conventional control method. The averaged operational current when using the proposed control method is 10% more than that when using the conventional control method.

  18. The Effect of Shared Information on Pilot/Controller And Controller/Controller Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, R. John

    1999-01-01

    In order to respond to the increasing demand on limited airspace system resources, a number of applications of information technology have been proposed, or are under investigation, to improve the efficiency, capacity and reliability of ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) operations. Much of the attention in advanced ATM technology has focused on advanced automation systems or decision aiding systems to improve the performance of individual Pilots or Controllers. However, the most significant overall potential for information technology appears to he in increasing the shared information between human agents such as Pilots, Controllers or between interacting Controllers or traffic flow managers. Examples of proposed shared information systems in the US include; Controller Pilot Databank Communication (CPDLC), Traffic Management Advisor (TMA); Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS); Collaborative Decision Making (CDM) and NAS Level Common Information Exchange. Air Traffic Management is fundamentally a human centered process consisting of the negotiation, execution and monitoring of contracts between human agents for the allocation of limited airspace, runway and airport surface resources. The decision processes within ATM tend to be Semistructured. Many of the routine elements in ATM decision making on the part of the Controllers or Pilots are well Structured and can be represented by well defined rules or procedures. However in disrupted conditions, the ATM decision processes are often Unstructured and cannot be reduced to a set of discrete rules. As a consequence, the ability to automate ATM processes will be limited and ATM will continue to be a human centric process where the responsibility and the authority for the negotiation will continue to rest with human Controllers and Pilots. The use of information technology to support the human decision process will therefore be an important aspect of ATM modernization. The premise of many of the proposed shared

  19. Architectural study of the design and operation of advanced force feedback manual controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Delbert; Kim, Whee-Kuk

    1990-01-01

    A teleoperator system consists of a manual controller, control hardware/software, and a remote manipulator. It was employed in either hazardous or unstructured, and/or remote environments. In teleoperation, the main-in-the-loop is the central concept that brings human intelligence to the teleoperator system. When teleoperation involves contact with an uncertain environment, providing the feeling of telepresence to the human operator is one of desired characteristics of the teleoperator system. Unfortunately, most available manual controllers in bilateral or force-reflecting teleoperator systems can be characterized by their bulky size, high costs, or lack of smoothness and transparency, and elementary architectures. To investigate other alternatives, a force-reflecting, 3 degree of freedom (dof) spherical manual controller is designed, analyzed, and implemented as a test bed demonstration in this research effort. To achieve an improved level of design to meet criteria such as compactness, portability, and a somewhat enhanced force-reflecting capability, the demonstration manual controller employs high gear-ratio reducers. To reduce the effects of the inertia and friction on the system, various force control strategies are applied and their performance investigated. The spherical manual controller uses a parallel geometry to minimize inertial and gravitational effects on its primary task of transparent information transfer. As an alternative to the spherical 3-dof manual controller, a new conceptual (or parallel) spherical 3-dof module is introduced with a full kinematic analysis. Also, the resulting kinematic properties are compared to those of other typical spherical 3-dof systems. The conceptual design of a parallel 6-dof manual controller and its kinematic analysis is presented. This 6-dof manual controller is similar to the Stewart Platform with the actuators located on the base to minimize the dynamic effects. Finally, a combination of the new 3-dof and 6-dof

  20. A novel feedback control system – Controlling the material flow in deep drawing using distributed blank-holder force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endelt, Benny Ørtoft; Tommerup, Søren; Danckert, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    on a deep drawing operation where the objective was to control material flow throughout the part using only spatial information regarding flange draw-in. The control system controls both the magnitude and distribution of the blank-holder force. The methodology proved stable and flexible with respect......The performance of a feedback control system is often limited by the quality of the model on which it is based, and often the controller design is based on trial and error due to insufficient modeling capabilities. A framework is proposed where the controller design is based on classical state...... space control theory and time series. The system plant has been modeled using non-linear finite element and the gain factors for the control loop were identified by solving the optimal control problem using a non-linear least square optimization algorithm. The proposed design method has been applied...