WorldWideScience

Sample records for control industrial radioactive

  1. Control of radioactive sources in industry through regulatory inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.; Pinho, A.S.; Lourenco, M.M.J.; Nicola, M.S.; D'Avila, R.L.; Melo, I.F.; Cucco, A.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    In Brazil, the applications of ionizing radiation in industry are accomplished about 900 radioactive facilities, which handle approximately 3.000 radiation sources. The control of radioactive sources used in industrial installations authorized by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) is accomplished by Servico de Radioprotecao na Industria Radiativa (SERIR) of the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. This service carries out regulatory inspections in the practices of industrial radiography, nuclear gauges, industrial irradiators and oil wells logging. The frequency of inspections depends on the type of practice, ranging from a year to 5 years, depending on the risk involved. This paper presents a brief description of the situation of radiation safety in the use of radioactive sources in the industries of the country. The results obtained with regulatory inspections at industrial installations demonstrate that the conditions of safety and radiation protection in these facilities are satisfactory when compared with the technical regulations, both national and international

  2. Regulatory inspection: a powerful tool to control industrial radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C.A. da; Leocadio, J.C.; Ramalho, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    An important contribution for Brazilian development, especially for the quality control of products, is the use of radiation sources by conventional industries. There are in Brazil roughly 3,000 radioactive sources spread out among 950 industries. The main industrial practices involved are: industrial radiography, industrial irradiators, industrial accelerators, well logging petroleum and nuclear gauges. More than 1,800 Radiation Protection Officers (RPOs) were qualified to work in these practices. The present work presents a brief description of the safety control over industrial radioactive installations performed by the Brazilian Regulatory Authority, i.e. the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN). This paper also describes the national system for radiation safety inspections, the regulation infrastructure and the national inventory of industrial installations. The inspections are based on specific indicators, and their periodicity depends on the risk and type of installation. The present work discusses some relevant aspects that must be considered during the inspections, in order to make the inspections more efficient in controlling the sources. One of these aspects regards the evaluation of the storage place for the sources, a very important parameter for preventing future risky situations. (author)

  3. EPA proposes options for control of industrial radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency on February 28 proposed four alternative approaches for controlling radionuclides from a dozen industrial sources. The proposal outlines four alternatives for regulating toxic air pollutant. The proposal is designed to elicit comment on such regulatory issues as: What are acceptable health risks? What are appropriate criteria for establishing a margin of safety? What are the technological feasibility and the costs of regulatory controls? How should uncertainty by considered? EPA intends to use the approach finally selected as the framework for future hazardous-air pollutant-control decisions. Industry uses hundreds of distinct radionuclides in solid, liquid and gaseous forms. Industrial radionuclide emissions occur either as a result of an inability to contain the radioactive materials or as an unintended consequence of other activity, such as radionuclide emissions from mining or milling

  4. The importance of governmental control of radioactive sources used in industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anna Firpo Fuerth, Q.F.; Beatriz Souto Ameigenda, Q.F.

    1998-01-01

    Industrial applications of radioactive sources require good management practices dealing with control and registration. In the following case, a special event occurred between two routine inspections: trading. Then a new human factor came into scene: workers with no specific training and knowledge related to radioactive sources. The up going situation triggered emergency procedures. Finally, there were no negative consequences. (author)

  5. Radioactive wastes of Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This conference studies the radioactive waste of nuclear industry. Nine articles and presentations are exposed here; the action of the direction of nuclear installations safety, the improvement of industrial proceedings to reduce the waste volume, the packaging of radioactive waste, the safety of radioactive waste disposal and environmental impact studies, a presentation of waste coming from nuclear power plants, the new waste management policy, the international panorama of radioactive waste management, the international transport of radioactive waste, finally an economic analysis of the treatment and ultimate storage of radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  6. Radioactive wastes. Their industrial management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper introduces a series that will review the present situation in the field of long-term management of radioactive wastes. Both the meaning and the purposes of an industrial management of radioactive wastes are specified. This short introduction is complemented by outline of data on the French problem [fr

  7. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-09-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  8. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as … well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  9. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  10. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  11. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives

  12. Industrial management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This article deals with the present situation in France concerning radioactive waste management. For the short and medium term, that is to say processing and disposal of low and medium level radioactive wastes, there are industrial processes giving all the guarantees for a safe containment, but improvements are possible. For the long term optimization of solution requires more studies of geologic formations. Realization emergency comes less from the waste production than the need to optimize the disposal techniques. An international cooperation exists. All this should convince the public opinion and should develop planning and realization [fr

  13. Controlling radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtinger, W.

    1992-01-01

    The guideline of the Ministry for Environmental Protection for controlling radioactive waste with a negligible development of heat defines in detail what data are relevant to the control of radioactive waste and should be followed up on and included in a system of documentation. By introducing the AVK (product control system for tracing the course of waste disposal) the operators of German nuclear power plants have taken the requirements of this guideline into account. In particular, possibilities for determining the degree of radioactivity of radioactive waste, which the BMU-guidelines call for, were put into practice by means of the programming technology of the product control system's module MOPRO. (orig.) [de

  14. Zeolites applications in pollution control; radioactive-, municipal-, industrial- and agricultural-waste water treatments: part-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbar, S.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolite cations exchangers provide a unique combination of selectivity, capacity and stability not available in other ion-exchangers. In this era of environmental concern, the attractive physical and chemical properties of zeolites have been utilized worldwide in the solution to this problem. The desirable characteristics of high ion-exchange selectivity and resistance to radiolytic degradation have made certain zeolites quite useful for the separation and purification of radioisotopes from radioactive wastewater. Zeolites have also been effectively used in nuclear industry for treatment of radioactive wastes and selectively removing ammonium ions from wastewater. (author)

  15. Radioactive legacies from medicine and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, R.; Rodriguez, J.

    2005-01-01

    Due to the unintended disposal of radioactive legacies (waste from medicine, industry or private persons) radioactive material occasionally enters the disposal ways of conventional waste. The Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) and the Swiss accident Insurance Fund (Swiss) are the licensing authorities and regulatory agencies of the handling with radioactive materials for non-nuclear use. The aim is to avoid such incidents with concrete measures and so to preserve men and environment from the negative effect of not correctly disposed radioactive waste. (orig.)

  16. Security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, Andrew; Murray, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the need and new requirements to ensure the security of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. We describe the discussions and issues arising during the september 2010 regional workshop held in Sydney on the application of security measures to industrial radiography practices. The workshop provided the perspectives of both radiation regulators and industry practitioners, including those from the Philippines. We describe the outputs of the workshop, and how they were developed, and make suggestions for further consideration and applications of security measures in the practice of industrial radiography. (author)

  17. Uses of Radioactive Isotopes in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plata, A.; Val Cob, M. del; Gamboa, J. M.

    1962-01-01

    The present report contains a list of some of the most important problems in industry that have been approached so far by the use of radioactive isotopes. The list has been compiled trough the experience gained by the authors in revising for several years the most important scientific journal and other sources of information on this subject. The classification of industries has been done in an arbitrary way, choosing those isotope uses that have reached a higher degree of development. (Author)

  18. The control of water radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, P.; Graubey, A.

    1962-01-01

    This report presents the different apparatuses and devices used to control and adjust routine releases, to detect accidental pollutions, and to identify the origins of an increased radioactivity. The objective is to perform permanent and continuous sampling and measurement. Samplers and measurement devices (Geiger probes, resin-based integrators, dry aerosol radioactivity recorders and dry sample radioactivity recorders) are presented. Water control stations are presented: these stations are either fixed, or mobile or floating

  19. Radioactive sealed sources production process for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de S.; Ngunga, Daniel M.G.; Camara, Julio R.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S.

    2017-01-01

    providing products and services to the private and governmental Brazilian users of industrial radiography and nucleonic control systems. Radioactive sealed sources are commonly used in nondestructive tests as radiography to make inspections and verify the internal structure and integrity of materials and in nucleonic gauges to control level, density, viscosity, etc. in on-line industrial processes. One of the most important activities carried out by this laboratory is related to the inspection of source projectors devices used in industrial radiography and its constituent parts as well as remote handle control assembly drive cable and guide tube systems. The laboratory also provide for the users iridium-192, cobalt-60 and selenium-75 sealed sources and performs quality control tests replacing spent or contaminated radiative sources. All discard of radioactive source is treated as radioactive waste. Additionally, administrative and commercial processes and protocols for exportation and transport of radioactive material are developed by specialized departments. In this work are presented the mean processes and procedures used by the Sealed Source Production Laboratory such as the arrival of the radioactive material to the laboratory and the source projectors, mechanical inspections, source loading, source leaking tests, etc. (author)

  20. Radioactive sealed sources production process for industrial radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Paulo de S.; Ngunga, Daniel M.G.; Camara, Julio R.; Vasquez, Pablo A.S., E-mail: psantos@ipen.br, E-mail: hobeddaniel@gmail.com, E-mail: jrcamara@ipen.br, E-mail: pavsalva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    providing products and services to the private and governmental Brazilian users of industrial radiography and nucleonic control systems. Radioactive sealed sources are commonly used in nondestructive tests as radiography to make inspections and verify the internal structure and integrity of materials and in nucleonic gauges to control level, density, viscosity, etc. in on-line industrial processes. One of the most important activities carried out by this laboratory is related to the inspection of source projectors devices used in industrial radiography and its constituent parts as well as remote handle control assembly drive cable and guide tube systems. The laboratory also provide for the users iridium-192, cobalt-60 and selenium-75 sealed sources and performs quality control tests replacing spent or contaminated radiative sources. All discard of radioactive source is treated as radioactive waste. Additionally, administrative and commercial processes and protocols for exportation and transport of radioactive material are developed by specialized departments. In this work are presented the mean processes and procedures used by the Sealed Source Production Laboratory such as the arrival of the radioactive material to the laboratory and the source projectors, mechanical inspections, source loading, source leaking tests, etc. (author)

  1. Radioactivity in the zircon industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    In a presentation from the Zircon Industry, it was shown that zircon sand contains significant concentrations of uranium, 3,500 to 4,500 Bq/kg, and thorium, 400 to 600 Bq/kg. Deposits mainly occur in South Africa, Australia, India and the USA. The mining is done by dredging or by just shoveling the sand onto trucks. The separation could be done by dry or wet concentration. Also the milling could be by dry or wet processes. The dry process has the highest risk of dust generation. The maximum potential annual dose for the milling process has been assessed to be about 5mSv. Measurements from South Africa and Australia indicate lower doses, 0.2 to 1 mSv/y

  2. Radioactive sources in trade and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vroom, H.; Bolt, R.; Lange, H. de.

    1989-04-01

    An inventory has been drawn up of the most important applications of radioactive sources in the Netherlands, with emphasis on nuclear measuring instruments for industrial use. This inventory has been supplemented with a brief survey of the most important legal demand (among which, the 'decree radiation protection') with regard to the use of such instruments and some data about the construction of the radioactive source present in the instrument. Also the processing of exhausted sources is discussed briefly. (author). 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 6 tabs

  3. Government/Industry Partnership on the Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cefus, Greg; Colhoun, Stefan C.; Freier, Keith D.; Wright, Kyle A.; Herdes, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    In the past, industry radiation protection programs were built almost exclusively around radiation safety and the minimization of radiation dose exposure to employees. Over the last decade, and especially the last few years, the emphasis has shifted to include the physical security and enhanced control of radioactive materials. The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism is a genuine international security concern. In May 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy/U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration unveiled the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to respond to a growing international concern for the proper control and security of radioactive and nuclear materials. An integral part of the GTRI, the International Radiological Threat Reduction (IRTR) Program, was established in February 2002, originally as a Task Force. The IRTR Program is foremost a government-to-government cooperative program with the mission to reduce the risk posed by vulnerable radioactive materials that could be used in a Radioactive Dispersal Device (RDD). However, governments alone cannot prevent the misuse and illicit trafficking of radioactive sources. By expanding the role of private industry as a partner, existing government regulatory infrastructures can be enhanced by formulating and adopting industry self-regulation and self-policing measures. There is international concern regarding the security and control of the vast number of well-logging sources used during oil exploration operations. The prevalence of these sources, coupled with their portability, is a legitimate security concern. The energy exploration industry has well established safety and security protocols and the IRTR Program seeks to build on this foundation. However, the IRTR Program does not have sufficient resources to address the issue without industry assistance, so it is looking to the oil and gas industry to help identify alternative means for accomplishing our mutual objectives. This paper describes

  4. Responsibility on using Radioactive Sources in Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Baroudy, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Present study aims at explaining the role of the state, through legislations and regulatory decisions, in defining the responsible for implementing the Basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiations, which should be followed when applying radioactive sources in industry. This study deals with the objectives of protection of the workers, the public and the environment against radiation hazards, as well as the role of the International community and the national legislations in providing for such protection. The study also addressed the responsibility, defining the responsible parties in the different practices. Finally, some radiation accidents in foreign countries and some cases handled in Egyptian courts are discussed concerning accidents that occurred on using radioactive sources in industry. The study concluded that unification of regulatory bodies in Egypt is needed and that the regulatory body should be completely separated from the applications facilities in such a way that the regulators would be completely independent in their judgement and in decision making. (Author)

  5. Environmental radioactivity: A perspective on industrial contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    This essay aims to show how many non-nuclear industries contributed significantly to natural radioactivity. The examples given include the release of radon-220 and radon-222, as well as other radioisotopes, from the combustion of fossil fuels. Furthermore, edible mussels in the Irish Sea have been found to concentrate polonium-210 from seawater: the original source of the isotope was found to be the waste from a phosphate processing plant. These contributions should be taken into account when the environmental impacts of different industrial activities are compared. 3 tabs

  6. Environmental radioactivity: A perspective on industrial contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, M S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab.

    1993-06-01

    This essay aims to show how many non-nuclear industries contributed significantly to natural radioactivity. The examples given include the release of radon-220 and radon-222, as well as other radioisotopes, from the combustion of fossil fuels. Furthermore, edible mussels in the Irish Sea have been found to concentrate polonium-210 from seawater: the original source of the isotope was found to be the waste from a phosphate processing plant. These contributions should be taken into account when the environmental impacts of different industrial activities are compared. 3 tabs.

  7. Airborne radioactive emission control technology. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoski, L.; Berlin, R.; Corby, D.; Clancy, J.; Hoopes, G.

    1980-03-01

    This report reviews the current and future control technology for airborne emissions from a wide variety of industries/facilities, including uranium mining and milling, other nuclear fuel cycle facilities, other NRC-licensed and DOE facilities, fossil fuel facilities, selected metal and non-metal extraction industries, and others. Where specific radioactivity control technology is lacking, a description of any existing control technology is given. Future control technology is assessed in terms of improvements to equipment performance and process alterations. A catalogue of investigated research on advanced control technologies is presented

  8. Airborne radioactive emission control technology. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoski, L.; Berlin, R.; Corby, D.; Clancy, J.; Hoopes, G.

    1980-03-01

    This report reviews the current and future control technology for airborne emissions from a wide variety of industries/facilities, including uranium mining and milling, other nuclear fuel cycle facilities, other NRC-licensed and DOE facilities, fossil fuel facilities, selected metal and non-metal extraction industries, and others. Where specific radioactivity control technology is lacking, a description of any existing control technology is given. Future control technology is assessed in terms of improvements to equipment performance and process alterations. A catalogue of investigated research on advanced control technologies is presented

  9. Airborne radioactive emission control technology. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoski, L.; Berlin, R.; Corby, D.; Clancy, J.; Hoopes, G.

    1980-03-01

    This report reviews the current and future control technology for airborne emissions from a wide variety of industries/facilities, includimg uranium mining and milling, other nuclear fuel cycle facilities, other NRC-licensed and DOE facilities, fossil fuel facilities, selected metal and non-metal extraction industries, and others. Where specific radioactivity control technology is lacking a description of any existing control technology is given. Future control technology is assessed in terms of improvements to equipment performance and process alterations. A catalogue of investigated research on advanced control technologies is presented

  10. Quality control in the radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive waste management as in industrial activities must mantain in all steps a quality control programme. This control extended from materials acquisition, for waste treatment, to the package deposition is one of the most important activities because it aims to observe the waste acceptance criteria in repositories and allows to guarantee the security of the nuclear facilities. In this work basic knowledges about quality control in waste management and some examples of adopted procedures in other countries are given. (author) [pt

  11. Radioactivity control after Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, D.; Mitrovic, R.; Vicentijevic, M.; Pantelic, G.

    2011-01-01

    Fukushima nuclear accident has influence on more attention when radioactivity of fish were controlled. Sea fish, freshwater fish, fish products and fish flour were analysed ( 95 samples). All products were safe for use with radiation-hygienic aspects. [sr

  12. Radioactivity measurements and control solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, D.; Ciobanu, M.; Constantin, F.; Petcu, M.; Rusu, Al.

    2003-01-01

    In our department, in the last years, a new line of production has been developed devoted to the radioactivity measurements (portal monitor, gamma source detector, neutron monitor). Instruments of different design (hand-held, portals or steady-state) are intended for detection and locating of radioactive sources. Monitors are intended to detect radioactive and special nuclear materials in vehicles, pedestrians, luggage, as well as for illegal traffic prevention of radioactive sources. Monitors provide audio and visual alarm signals when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. Neutron dosimeters are designed for the determination of dose equivalent rate around neutron generators or sources. All devices can be recommended for use to officers of customs, border guard and emergency services, civil defense, fire brigades, police and military departments, nuclear research or power facilities. Incorporating micro controllers and new design, our products span almost all the spectra of radioactivity detection (gamma, beta, X and neutrons). No special knowledge is needed to operate these instruments as all service functions are performed automatically (self-tests, background updating and threshold calculation). The Portal monitor is intended to be a checkpoint in contamination control or in unauthorized traffic of radioactive materials. The portal monitor can be installed both in open, unprotected to environmental conditions areas or in enclosed areas. It may be used at pedestrian cross border points, at check points of Nuclear Power Plants, enterprises of nuclear industry, weapons manufacturing and storage plants, nuclear waste disposal and storage sites, at the entrances to steel plants, the post-offices and airports, the governmental offices, banks, private companies etc. The monitor provides audio alarming signals when radioactive and/or special nuclear materials are detected. The monitor consists in a portal frame, which sustains 5 detectors. Each

  13. Industrial-Scale Processes For Stabilizing Radioactively Contaminated Mercury Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, T. E.; Grondin, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes two industrial-scaled processes now being used to treat two problematic mercury waste categories: elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides and radioactive solid wastes containing greater than 260-ppm mercury. The stabilization processes were developed by ADA Technologies, Inc., an environmental control and process development company in Littleton, Colorado. Perma-Fix Environmental Services has licensed the liquid elemental mercury stabilization process to treat radioactive mercury from Los Alamos National Laboratory and other DOE sites. ADA and Perma-Fix also cooperated to apply the >260-ppm mercury treatment technology to a storm sewer sediment waste collected from the Y-12 complex in Oak Ridge, TN

  14. Customs control of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causse, B.

    1998-01-01

    Customs officers take part in the combat against illicit traffic od radioactive materials by means of different regulations dealing with nuclear materials, artificial radiation sources or radioactive wastes. The capability of customs officers is frequently incomplete and difficult to apply due to incompatibility of the intervention basis. In case of contaminated materials, it seems that the customs is not authorised directly and can only perform incidental control. In order to fulfil better its mission of fighting against illicit traffic of radioactive materials customs established partnership with CEA which actually includes practical and theoretical training meant to augment the capabilities of customs officers

  15. An investigation on natural radioactivity from mining industry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation on natural radioactivity from mining industry # ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Mining originating industries such as the coal industries, petroleum extraction and processing and natural gas, mining enrichment waste, phosphate, ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  16. Some applications of natural radioactivity in industry and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yonghe; Xu Qiujing

    1992-01-01

    There are natural radioactivity isotopes of uranium, thorium and potassium everywhere in nature. The characteristics of these isotopes form the basis of various applications. Some applications of natural radioactivity in industry and agriculture are introduced

  17. The control of radioactive sources in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.M.V.; Menezes, C.F.; Alves Filho, A.D.; Xavier, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The radiological accident of Goiania in 1987 brought to light several deficiencies in the licensing of medical, industrial and research facilities, which handle radioisotopes, as well as in the control of radioactive sources in Brazil. The article describes some of the technical and administrative measures taken to ensure the adoption of appropriate radiological safety standards throughout the country and thereby reduce the incidence of radiological accidents. (author)

  18. Summary of industrial impacts from recycled radioactive scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmel, J.-C.; Harrop, J.; MacKinney, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    During operation, decontamination, and dismantlement, nuclear facilities are generating significant quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM). Future decommissioning will generate even more RSM. The petroleum industry also generates RSM in the form of equipment contaminated with naturally occurring radioactivity. Finally, the accidental melting of radioactive sources in steel mills has generated smaller amounts of contaminated metals. Steel mills, smelters, and foundries could recycle these materials, which might then appear in finished products or as feedstocks used by other industries. If introduced in this manner, residual radioactivity can adversely affect the performance of certain products. Such products include computers and other devices that rely on integrated circuits. The most important effect of residual radioactivity on integrated circuits is a phenomenon known as 'single event upsets or soft errors.' Radioactivity can also adversely affect the performance of products such as photographic film and components designed to measure the presence of radioactivity. Radioactivity that raises background count-rates to higher levels could affect the performance of radiation monitoring systems and analytical equipment. Higher background count-rates would lead to reduced sensitivity and lower resolution in spectroscopic systems. The computer, photographic, and radiation measurement industries have taken steps to minimize the impact of residual radioactivity on their products. These steps include monitoring manufacturing processes, specifying material acceptance standards, and screening suppliers. As RSM is recycled, these steps may become more important and more costly. This paper characterizes potentially impacted industries and vulnerability and effects due to the presence of residual radioactivity. Finally, the paper describes practices used to limit the impact of residual radioactivity. (J.P.N.)

  19. Radioactive waste management in the VS military nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobal'chuk, O.V.; Kruglov, A.K.; Sokolova, I.D.; Smirnov, Yu.V.

    1989-01-01

    Organization and plans of radioactive waste management in the US military nuclear industry, determining transition from the policy of temporal waste storage to their final and safe disposal are presented. Programs of long-term management of high-level, transuranium and low-level wastes, the problems of the work financing and the structure of management activities related to the radioactive waste processing military nuclear industry enterprises are considered

  20. Classification of radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This document first indicates the origins of radioactive wastes (mainly electronuclear industry), and the composition of spent fuel, and that only fission products and minor actinides are considered as radioactive wastes whereas uranium and plutonium can be used as new fuel after recycling. The classification of radioactive wastes is indicated in terms of radioactivity level and radionuclide half-life: high level (0.2 per cent of the total waste volume but 96 per cent of total waste radioactivity), medium level long life (3 per cent of volume, 4 per cent of radioactivity), low level long life (7 per cent of volume, 0.1 per cent of radioactivity), low and medium level and short life (63 per cent of volume and 0.02 per cent of radioactivity), very low level (27 per cent of volume and less than 0.01 per cent of radioactivity). An overview of radioactive waste processing and storage in France is presented for each category. Current and predicted volumes are indicated for each category. The main challenges are briefly addressed: spent fuel recycling, waste valorisation by fourth-generation reactors. Processing locations in France and in the World are indicated. Some key figures are provided: 2 kg of radioactive waste are produced per inhabitant and per year, and waste management costs represent 5 per cent of the total cost of produced electricity

  1. Survey on industrial applications of radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Yoo, Young Soo; Lee, Jong Doo; Awh, Ok Doo; Kim, Jun Hyung

    1986-12-01

    Current status and future feasibilities of industrial tracer applications in the Republic of Korea have been surveyed. Microleak detection using Krypton-85 in eight electronics industrial companies, and efficiency tests of steam generators in four nuclear power plants using Sodium-24 are the principal applications in Korea. Future applications are expected for mercury inventory in one soda industrial company, and alkali movement studies in two cement industrial companies. Korean industries expressed deep interest in leak detection in underground pipelines, abrasion/corrosion studies, mixing rate and residence time measurements. (Author)

  2. An Assessment of Radioactivity of Selected Industrial Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwait, M. A.; ElMongy, S.A.; Abdo, A.A.A.; Hassan, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    phosphogypsum (phph) is a by-product in the manufacture of phosphoric acid for the artificial fertilizer industry. In the present work, qualitative and quantitative radioactive analysis are carried for phph of National Company of Abuzabal for chemical fertilizers. Gamma ray spectroscopy techniques are applied. The present study reveals that the radioactivity resulted from these wastes is out of the international standards, and it is strongly not recommended to be used as a construction material or for dwellings

  3. Control of Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal and Semi-finished Products of the Metal Recycling Industries. Results of the Meetings Conducted to Develop a Draft Code of Conduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, the IAEA initiated the development of a code of conduct on the transboundary movement of radioactive material inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal and semi- finished products of the metal recycling industries (Metal Recycling Code of Conduct). The Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was intended to harmonize the approaches of Member States in relation to the discovery of radioactive material that may inadvertently be present in scrap metals and semi-finished products subject to transboundary movement, and their safe handling and management to facilitate regulatory control. The Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was envisaged as being complementary to the Safety Guide on Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-17), which provides recommendations, principally within a national context, on the protection of workers, members of the public and the environment in relation to the control of radioactive material inadvertently incorporated in scrap metal. In February 2013, the third open-ended meeting of technical and legal experts to develop the Metal Recycling Code of Conduct was organized. The objective of this meeting was to address the comments received from Member States and to finalize the text of the draft Metal Recycling Code of Conduct. Representatives from 55 Member States, one non-Member State and the EU, together with seven observers from the metal recycling industry, reviewed the comments and revised the draft accordingly. In September 2013, in Resolution GC(57)/RES/9, the IAEA General Conference recorded that it 'Appreciates the intensive efforts undertaken by the Secretariat to develop a code of conduct on the transboundary movement of scrap metal, or materials produced from scrap metal, that may inadvertently contain radioactive material, and encourages the Secretariat to make the results of the discussion conducted on this issue available to

  4. Design of automatic control and measurement software for radioactive aerosol continuity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yong; Li Aiwu

    1997-01-01

    The radioactive aerosol continuity measurement is very important for the development of nuclear industry, and it is the major method to measure and find out the leakage of radioactive material. Radioactive aerosol continuity monitor is the advanced method for the radioactive aerosol continuity measurement. With the development of nuclear industry and nuclear power station, it is necessary to design and automatic continuity measurement device. Because of this reason, the authors developed the first unit of radioactive aerosol continuity monitor and adopted the ministry appraisal. The design idea and method of automatic control and measurement for radioactive aerosol continuity monitor are discussed

  5. Management of radioactive waste of scientific and industrial centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Barinov, A.S.; Ojovan, M.I.; Timofeev, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Available for the time being in the Russian Federation, a system of management of institutional and industrial radioactive waste (e.g. radioactive waste from industry, medicine, scientific organizations and other, which are not related to the nuclear fuel cycle or defense) provides for its collection, transportation, storage, treatment, immobilization and disposal by a network of special enterprises. Russia has 16 such enterprises. Moscow Scientific and Industrial Association Radon deals with the problems of radioactive waste from Central European part of Russia, which includes Moscow, Moscow Region and also Tverskaya, Yaroslavskaya, Vladimirskaya, Kostromskaya, Kaluzhskaya, Bryanskaya, Smolenskaya, Tulskaya, Ryazanskaya regions. The population of the central part of Russia constitutes about 40 million people. At the same time about 80% of the radioactive waste, which is collected for treatment and disposal from the territory of Russia, is included in this region. The average volume of the waste to be treated at SIA Radon is 3,000 m 3 per year for solid waste and 350 m 3 per year for liquid waste. Total radioactivity of processed waste is up to 4 PBq per year

  6. Long term industrial management of radioactive wastes in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.

    1981-01-01

    All human activities including energy generation entail the wastes. This definitely applies also to nuclear power generation. Currently the nuclear power program is very extensive, and the plans of fuel reprocessing proceed along this line. In consequence, the Government has decided on tackling the problem of industrial radioactive waste management in earnest. For the purpose, the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) was created in November, 1979, within the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). Its main functions are the design, siting and construction of waste disposal centers and their management, the establishment of waste treatment and disposal standards, and the research and development. The following matters are described: the need for comprehensive industrial approach, the concept of industrial management, ANDRA business program, the industrial policy on waste disposal, and ANDRA financing. (J.P.N.)

  7. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojkind, Roberto Hector [Autoridade Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-12-31

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and as early as in 1956 established a Regulatory Authority. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations had been set in Argentina, before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from that accident encouraged in Argentina the improvement of some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain improved. Some lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania and the main characteristics of an effective enforcement program helpful to prevent radiological accidents in industrial, medical, research and teaching uses of radioactive sources are presented. (author) 9 refs; e-mail: rrojkind at sede.arn.gov.br

  8. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and had established a Regulatory Authority as early as in 1956. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations were in force in Argentina before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from the Goiania accident encouraged the Argentine authorities to improve some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. As a result, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain have improved. Lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania are presented as well as the main characteristics of an effective enforcement programme to prevent radiological accidents when radioactive sources are used for industrial, medical, research and teaching purposes. (author)

  9. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkind, Roberto Hector

    1997-01-01

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and as early as in 1956 established a Regulatory Authority. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations had been set in Argentina, before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from that accident encouraged in Argentina the improvement of some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. Therefore, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain improved. Some lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania and the main characteristics of an effective enforcement program helpful to prevent radiological accidents in industrial, medical, research and teaching uses of radioactive sources are presented. (author)

  10. Water Pollution Control Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A special report on the state of the water pollution control industry reveals that due to forthcoming federal requirements, sales and the backlogs should increase; problems may ensue because of shortages of materials and inflation. Included are reports from various individual companies. (MLB)

  11. Thermoexoemission detectors for monitoring radioactive contamination of industrial waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obukhov, V.T.; Sobolev, I.A.; Khomchik, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Detectors on base of BeO(Na) monocrystals with thermoemission to be used for monitoring radioactive contamination of industrial waste waters are suggested. The detectors advantages are sensitivity to α and low-ehergy β radiations, high mechanical strength and wide range of measurements. The main disadvantage is the necessity of working in red light

  12. Identifying industrial best practices for the waste minimization of low-level radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, V.

    1996-04-01

    In US DOE, changing circumstances are affecting the management and disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste (LLW). From 1977 to 1991, the nuclear power industry achieved major reductions in solid waste disposal, and DOE is interested in applying those practices to reduce solid waste at DOE facilities. Project focus was to identify and document commercial nuclear industry best practices for radiological control programs supporting routine operations, outages, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The project team (DOE facility and nuclear power industry representatives) defined a Work Control Process Model, collected nuclear power industry Best Practices, and made recommendations to minimize LLW at DOE facilities.

  13. Natural radioactivity in mining and hydrocarbon extraction industry. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, C; Desideri, D; Meli, M A; Roselli, C [General Chemistry Institute, Urbino University, 61029 Urbino, (Italy)

    1996-03-01

    Water and soil natural radioactivity is a well known phenomenon which can produced by variable concentrations of uranium and thorium series radionuclides. Generally, the relevant radiological hazard is not important; however, some radiation protection problems can occur in particular industrial processes involving the treatment of large quantities of materials. In this case a high concentration of radioactive substance (NORM: nationally occurring radioactive materials) can be found at special points of the plant, in the manufacture by-products and in the waters. Sometimes the national radioactivity concentration can be so high to raise radiation protection problems which can be assimilated in a sense to the ones faced in the presence, handling, and disposal of non-sealed radioactive sources. In this paper the following mining and hydrocarbon extraction plants were particularly taken into account: (a) industries using zircon sands to produce refractory and ceramic materials; (b) phosphorites manufacture to prepare phosphoric acids, plasters and fertilizers (c) hydrocarbon extraction and treatment processes where formations of low specific activity (L.S.A.) scales and sludges are produced. The relevant results and the possible radiation protection risks for the professional exposed staff will be reported. A special emphasis will be given to some african phosphorites (boucraa, togo, morocco), and L.S.A. scales (tunisia, congo, Egypt). 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Natural radioactivity in mining and hydrocarbon extraction industry. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testa, C.; Desideri, D.; Meli, M.A.; Roselli, C.

    1996-01-01

    Water and soil natural radioactivity is a well known phenomenon which can produced by variable concentrations of uranium and thorium series radionuclides. Generally, the relevant radiological hazard is not important; however, some radiation protection problems can occur in particular industrial processes involving the treatment of large quantities of materials. In this case a high concentration of radioactive substance (NORM: nationally occurring radioactive materials) can be found at special points of the plant, in the manufacture by-products and in the waters. Sometimes the national radioactivity concentration can be so high to raise radiation protection problems which can be assimilated in a sense to the ones faced in the presence, handling, and disposal of non-sealed radioactive sources. In this paper the following mining and hydrocarbon extraction plants were particularly taken into account: a) industries using zircon sands to produce refractory and ceramic materials; b) phosphorites manufacture to prepare phosphoric acids, plasters and fertilizers c) hydrocarbon extraction and treatment processes where formations of low specific activity (L.S.A.) scales and sludges are produced. The relevant results and the possible radiation protection risks for the professional exposed staff will be reported. A special emphasis will be given to some african phosphorites (boucraa, togo, morocco), and L.S.A. scales (tunisia, congo, Egypt). 4 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Use of radioactive tracers in the semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akerman, Karol

    1975-01-01

    Manufacture of the semiconductor materials comprises production and purification of the raw materials (GeC14 or SiHC13), purification of the elemental semiconductors by metallurgical methods (including zone melting), production and doping of single crystals, dividing the crystals into slices of suitable size, formation of p-n junctions and fabrication of the finished semiconductor devices. In the sequence of operations, the behavior of very small quantities of an element must be monitored, and radioactive tracers are often used to solve these problems. Examples are given of the use of radioactive tracers in the semiconductor industry

  16. Radioactive contamination in metal recycling industry - an environmental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    Metal recycling has become an important industrial activity worldwide; it is seen as being socially and environmentally beneficial because it conserves natural ore resources and saves energy. However, there have been several accidents over the past decades involving orphan radioactive sources or other radioactive material that were inadvertently collected as metal scrap that was destined for recycling. The consequences of these accidents have been serious with regard to the protection of people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation as well as from an economic point of view. India produces and exports steel products to various countries. In the recent years there were rejection and return of steel products as they were found to be contaminated with trace quantities of radioactive materials. During investigation of incidents of radioactive contamination in steel products exported from India, it was observed that steel products are contaminated with low level radioactivity. Though radioactivity level in steel products is found to be too low to pose any significant hazards to the handling personnel or to the users or the public at large, its presence is undesirable and need to be probed as to how it has entered in the steel products. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) has investigated the incidents of such nature in the recent past and it is gathered that the steel products are made out of steel produced in a foundry where metal scrap containing radioactive material has been used. In this talk, incidents of radioactive contamination, its roots cause, and its radiological impact on person, property and environment, lessons learnt, remedial measures and international concerns will be discussed

  17. A development of radioactive material tracking and location control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Gwang Tae; Jung Seung Yong; Song, Jung Ho

    2005-01-01

    As the whole industry fields such as construction, chemistry, machine, medicine including nuclear-related field have extended the range of radioactive material uses, it is tendency that domestic uses of radioactive material have been increased in quantity and number. In addition, as the transportation, transfer and use of radioactive material have been frequent, its loss, robbery, and carelessness of handling may cause not only employees in charge but the public to worry about damage of explosion and put an obstacle to increase trust in nuclear-related industry. At present, though the transportation, use and storage of radioactive material conform to the institution and standard of the atomic energy law, if we tracking radioactive material in real time, we can take immediate actions to prevent its loss, robbery. As our research institute developed a terminal that control location and tracking real time location for gamma-ray projector used in transporting, transferring, and using nondestructive test, we take a good look at utilities by using GPS-Cell ID bases location control

  18. Natural radioactivity in industry, medicine, dentistry, hobbies, and camping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, M.

    1996-01-01

    A recent enquiry asked about the potential hazards of radioactivity in gas lamp mantles. This has prompted a quick review of uses, for other reasons, of materials which are incidentally radioactive. Thorium and uranium are the two highest atomic number elements which occur naturally in commercial quantities. They are both naturally radioactive. Both have been used for a variety of purposes utilising their chemical and physical, rather than radioactive properties. They have been incorporated in specialised industrial items and in some materials encountered in everyday life. While the properties of uranium and thorium make these materials useful for a variety of purposes, the fact that they are also incidentally radioactive materials means that any potential radiological hazards should also be taken into accoutnt. The use of these materials for medical and dental purposes has been discontiunued for these reasons. The only readily availabe consumer product which uses these materials on any scale is the thoriated gas lamp mantle. The radiological consequences of this use are small. (author). 2 refs

  19. Naturally occurring radioactive material in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steingraber, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has been found in the Earth's crust and soil, the water we drink, the food we eat, the air we breathe, and the tissues of every living organism. It is relatively easy to determine open-quotes concentrationsclose quotes, or specific activity levels, in the range of 1 part per trillion for radioactive materials. With radioactive elements so abundant and detection possible at such low levels, the presence of NORM in oil and gas operations shouldn't be surprising. In fact, this presence has been recognized since at least the 1930's, but the phenomenon received only minimal attention in the United States until the mid-1980's. At that time regulatory agencies in several oil- and gas-producing states began to focus on NORM in the exploration and production segment of the industry, expressing concern over potential health and safety implications. The most significant aspects of NORM in oil production operations include original source, transport media, composition/radionuclides present, measurement methods, health/safety issues, waste classification, and waste disposal. In addition, I will summarize industry-sponsored NORM data collection and analysis efforts being conducted to aid in development of sound policies and procedures to address environmental, health, and safety issues. Current activities by state and federal regulatory agencies relevant to NORM in the oil and gas industry will also be reviewed

  20. Strengthening the control on radioactive sources - Cernavoda NPP operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daian, I.; Simionov, V.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the national legal frame governing the radioactive source management, legislative requirements introduced during last years and current status of controlled radioactive sources program at Cernavoda NPP. Romania has only one nuclear power plant, Cernavoda NPP, equipped with five PHWR - CANDU-6 Canadian type reactors - with a 700 MW(e) gross capacity each, in different implementation stages. The legal representative of the nuclear power production sector in Romania is 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. National Company (SNN). SNN is a governmental company controlled by the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The company has headquarters in Bucharest and three subsidiaries: - CNE-PROD Cernavoda (CNE-PROD), operating the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - CNE-INVEST Cernavoda, in charge with the completion of Unit 2 and with the preservation of Units 3,4,5; - Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti (FCN). Unit 1 is in commercial operation since December 2, 1996, Unit 2 is under construction (80% completed) and Units 3, 4, 5 are under preservation. The operation of Cernavoda NPP implies use of radioactive sources that may present a significant risk to health, property and the environment when control is lost. Within the last years CNCAN issued new regulations stating clear responsibilities for the different institutions involved in radioactive materials control programs. To manage radioactive sources in a safe way CNE-PROD established and revised the Controlled Radioactive Sources Program, as part of Station Radiation Protection Regulation, ensuring strict recording of the radioactive sources and their usage, ensuring physical and radiological security, protecting the personnel, members of the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation during the life cycle of the plant, including decommissioning. (authors)

  1. Strengthening the control on radioactive sources - Cernavoda NPP operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daian, I.; Simionov, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This paper presents the national legal frame governing the radioactive source management, legislative requirements introduced during last years and current status of controlled radioactive sources program at Cernavoda NPP. Romania has only one nuclear power plant, Cernavoda NPP, equipped with five PHWR - CANDU-6 Canadian type reactors - with a 700 MW(e) gross capacity each, in different implementation stages. The legal representative of the nuclear power production sector in Romania is 'Nuclearelectrica' S.A. National Company (SNN). SNN is a governmental company controlled by the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The company has headquarters in Bucharest and three subsidiaries: - CNE-PROD Cernavoda (CNE-PROD), operating the Cernavoda NPP - Unit 1; - CNE-INVEST Cernavoda, in charge with the completion of Unit 2 and with the preservation of Units 3,4,5; - Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti (FCN). Unit 1 is in commercial operation since December 2, 1996, Unit 2 is under construction (80% completed) and Units 3, 4, 5 are under preservation. The operation of Cernavoda NPP implies use of radioactive sources that may present a significant risk to health, property and the environment when control is lost. Within the last years CNCAN issued new regulations stating clear responsibilities for the different institutions involved in radioactive materials control programs. To manage radioactive sources in a safe way CNE-PROD established and revised the Controlled Radioactive Sources Program, as part of Station Radiation Protection Regulation, ensuring strict recording of the radioactive sources and their usage, ensuring physical and radiological security, protecting the personnel, members of the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation during the life cycle of the plant. (authors)

  2. Radioactivity analysis of food and accuracy control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    From the fact that radioactive substances have been detected from the foods such as agricultural and livestock products and marine products due to the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare stipulated new standards geared to general foods on radioactive cesium by replacing the interim standards up to now. Various institutions began to measure radioactivity on the basis of this instruction, but as a new challenge, a problem of the reliability of the data occurred. Therefore, accuracy control to indicate the proof that the quality of the data can be retained at an appropriate level judging from an objective manner is important. In order to consecutively implement quality management activities, it is necessary for each inspection agency to build an accuracy control system. This paper introduces support service, as a new attempt, for establishing the accuracy control system. This service is offered jointly by three organizations, such as TUV Rheinland Japan Ltd., Japan Frozen Foods Inspection Corporation, and Japan Chemical Analysis Center. This service consists of the training of radioactivity measurement practitioners, proficiency test for radioactive substance measurement, and personal authentication. (O.A.)

  3. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  4. Presence of radioactivity in a sewage system: a proposal for radioactivity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serradell, Vicente; Ballesteros, Luisa; Ortiz, Josefina

    2008-01-01

    Most hospitals use radioisotopes in diagnostics and to a lesser extent in therapy. The liquid residues thus generated are usually subjected to treatment before being discharged into the sewage system. Nevertheless, a certain amount of these residues escape from the treatment system and are poured directly into the sewer. In addition, other radioactive products used for research and industrial purposes may also be disposed of in the same way. The waste waters in many sewage systems can therefore be expected to be radiologically contaminated and the need for at least a basic control system in such situations seems obvious. When designing a procedure to measure radioactivity, certain conditions should be borne in mind: 1) The control program has to be simple and inexpensive; 2) Samples must be taken from the appropriate places; 3) Short life radionuclides will probably be present in significant amounts, so that specific recipes should be prepared; 4) Iodine is also frequently present. Special precautions should be taken to keep it in solution. In recent years, the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain) has carried out a series of tests on the Valencia city sewage system and sewage treatment plant in order to design a permanent program to control radioactive contamination of the city's sewage system. This paper presents a proposal which we believe can provide the answer to this problem. (author)

  5. Radioactive wastes: origin, classification and medium and long dated industrial management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.M.; Faussat, A.; Pradel, J.

    1982-01-01

    Virtually all the radioactive waste is produced by the fuel cycle, the remainder comes from radioelements used in industry, in medicine, teaching and research. They are classified into low, medium and high activity. The aim of the control is to ensure the protection of individuals and the public against radiological hazards and to safeguard the environment. The production, control, treatment and storage of mining wastes and those produced by the fuel cycle are examined [fr

  6. Radioactive waste: the poisoned legacy of the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselet, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear industry produces a huge amount of radioactive waste from one end to the other of the nuclear cycle: i.e. from mining uranium to uranium enrichment through reactor operating, waste reprocessing and dismantling nuclear power plants. Nuclear power is now being 'sold' to political leaders and citizens as an effective way to deal with climate change and ensure security of energy supplies. Nonetheless, nuclear energy is not a viable solution and is thus a major obstacle to the development of clean energy for the future. In addition to safety and security issues, the nuclear industry is, above all, faced with the huge problem of how to deal with the waste it produces and for which it has no solution. This ought to put a brake on the nuclear industry, but instead, against all expectations, its development continues to gather pace. (author)

  7. Manufacturing radioactive material for medical, research and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Hospitals, clinics and other medical complexes are among the most extensive users of radioactive material. Nuclear medicine uses radioactive solutions of Tc-99m, Tl-201, Ga-67, I-123, Xe-133 and other radiopharmaceuticals as diagnostic tools to evaluate dynamic functions of various organs in the body, detect cancerous tumors, sites of infection or other bodily dysfunctions. Examples of monitoring blood flow to the brain of a cocaine addict will be shown. Many different radionuclides are also produced for life science research and industrial applications. Some require long irradiations and are needed only periodically. Radiopharmaceutical manufactures look for reliable suppliers that can produce quality product at a reasonable cost. Worldwide production of the processed and unprocessed radionuclides and the enriched stable nuclides that are the target materials used in the accelerators and reactors around the world will be discussed. (author)

  8. Regulation of naturally occurring radioactive materials in non-nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The volume and concentrations of naturally occurring radioactive material is large across a variety of industries commonly thought not to involve radioactive material. The regulation of naturally occurring radioactive material in the United States is in a state of flux. Inventory of naturally occurring radioactive materials is given, along with a range of concentrations. Current and proposed regulatory limits are presented. (author)

  9. The conceptual design of waste repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities containing comparatively high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Naro

    2002-02-01

    Advisory Committee on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy reported the basic approach to the RI and Institute etc. wastes on March 2002. According to it, radioactive waste form medical, industrial and research facilities should be classified by their radioactivity properties and physical and chemical properties, and should be disposed in the appropriate types of repository with that classification. For the radioactive waste containing comparatively high radioactivity generated from reactors, NSC has established the Concentration limit for disposal. NSC is now discussing about the limit for the radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities containing comparatively high radioactivity. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) preliminary studied about the repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities and discussed about the problems for design on H12. This study was started to consider those problems, and to develop the conceptual design of the repository for radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities. Safety assessment for that repository is also performed. The result of this study showed that radioactive waste from medical, industrial and research facilities of high activity should be disposed in the repository that has higher performance of barrier system comparing with the vault type near surface facility. If the conditions of the natural barrier and the engineering barrier are clearer, optimization of the design will be possible. (author)

  10. Regulatory Control of Radioactive Sources in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.; Martin, J.L., E-mail: mrm@csn.es [Nuclear Safety Council, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    The arrangements for the regulatory control of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources in Spain are described. Emphasis is given to the situations which are most likely to result in the loss of control of sources and on the procedures introduced to reduce the likelihood of losses in these cases. Finally, the strategy for locating sources which have been lost from control (orphan sources) is described. (author)

  11. Control of sealed radioactive sources in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Quijada, R.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the inventory of radioactive sources in Peru and assesses the control. Three groups of source conditions are established: controlled sources, known sources, and lost and orphan sources. The potential risk, described as not significant, for producing accidents is established and the needed measures are discussed. The paper concludes that, while the control on sealed sources is good, there is still room for improvement. (author)

  12. The IAEA and Control of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation discusses the authoritative functions and the departments of the IAEA, especially the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and its Safety and Security of Radiation Sources Unit. IAEA safety series and IAEA safety standards series inform about international standards, provide underlying principles, specify obligations and responsibilities and give recommendations to support requirements. Other IAEA relevant publications comprise safety reports, technical documents (TECDOCs), conferences and symposium papers series and accident reports. Impacts of loss of source control is discussed, definitions of orphan sources and vulnerable sources is given. Accidents with orphan sources, radiological accidents statistic (1944-2000) and its consequences are discussed. These incidents lead to development of the IAEA guidance. The IAEA's action plan for the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive material was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors and the General Conference in September 1999. This led to the 'Categorization of Radiation Sources' and the 'Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources'. After 0911 the IAEA developed a nuclear security plan of activities including physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities, detection of malicious activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials, state systems for nuclear material accountancy and control, security of radioactive material other than nuclear material, assessment of safety and security related vulnerability of nuclear facilities, response to malicious acts, or threats thereof, adherence to and implementation of international agreements, guidelines and recommendations and nuclear security co-ordination and information management. The remediation of past problems comprised collection and disposal of known disused sources, securing vulnerable sources and especially high-risk sources (Tripartite initiative), searching for

  13. Safety and security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollah, A. S.; Nazrul, M. Abdullah [Industrial Inspection Service Limited, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2013-07-01

    Malicious use of radioactive sources can involve dispersal of that material through an explosive device. There has been recognition of the threat posed by the potential malicious misuse of NDT radioactive source by terrorists. The dispersal of radioactive material using conventional explosives, referred to as a 'dirty bomb', could create considerable panic, disruption and area access denial in an urban environment. However, as it is still a relatively new topic among regulators, users, and transport and storage operators worldwide, international assistance and cooperation in developing the necessary regulatory and security infrastructure is required. The most important action in reducing the risk of radiological terrorism is to increase the security of radioactive sources. This paper presents safety and security considerations for the transport and site storage of the industrial radiography sources as per national regulations entitled 'Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Rules-1997'.The main emphasis was put on the stages of some safety and security actions in order to prevent theft, sabotage or other malicious acts during the transport of the packages. As a conclusion it must be mentioned that both safety and security considerations are very important aspects that must be taking in account for the transport and site storage of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. (authors)

  14. Safety and security of radioactive sources in industrial radiography in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A. S.; Nazrul, M. Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Malicious use of radioactive sources can involve dispersal of that material through an explosive device. There has been recognition of the threat posed by the potential malicious misuse of NDT radioactive source by terrorists. The dispersal of radioactive material using conventional explosives, referred to as a 'dirty bomb', could create considerable panic, disruption and area access denial in an urban environment. However, as it is still a relatively new topic among regulators, users, and transport and storage operators worldwide, international assistance and cooperation in developing the necessary regulatory and security infrastructure is required. The most important action in reducing the risk of radiological terrorism is to increase the security of radioactive sources. This paper presents safety and security considerations for the transport and site storage of the industrial radiography sources as per national regulations entitled 'Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control Rules-1997'.The main emphasis was put on the stages of some safety and security actions in order to prevent theft, sabotage or other malicious acts during the transport of the packages. As a conclusion it must be mentioned that both safety and security considerations are very important aspects that must be taking in account for the transport and site storage of radioactive sources used in the practice of industrial radiography. (authors)

  15. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algalhoud, K. A.; AL-Fawaris, B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Oil and gas industry in the Great Jamahiriya is one of those industries that were accompanied with generation of some solid and liquid waste, which associated with risks that might lead to harmful effects to the man and the environment. Among those risks the continuous increase of radioactivity levels above natural radioactive background around operating oil fields, due to accumulation of solid and liquid radioactive scales and sludge as well as contaminated produced water that contain some naturally occurring radioactive materials ( NORM/TE-NORM). Emergence of NORM/TE-NORM in studied area noticed when the natural background radioactivity levels increased around some oil fields during end of 1998, For this study, six field trips and a radiation surveys were conducted within selected oil fields that managed and owned by six operating companies under NOC, in order to determine the effective radiation dose in contrast with dose limits set by International Counsel of Radiation Protection(ICRP),and International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA) Additionally solid samples in a form of scales and liquid samples were also taken for further investigation and laboratory analysis. Results were tabulated and discussed within the text .However to be more specific results pointed out to the fact that existence of NORM/TE-NORM as 226 Ra, 228 Ra, within some scale samples from surface equipment in some oil and gas fields in Jamahiriya were significant. As a result of that, the workers might receive moderate radiation dose less than the limits set by ICRP,IAEA, and other parts of the world producing oil and gas. Results predicted that within the investigated oil fields if workers receive proper training about handling of NORM/TE-NORM and follow the operating procedure of clean ups, work over and maintenance plane carefully, their committed exposure from NORM/TE-NORM will be less than the set limits by ICRP and IAEA. In a trend to estimate internal radiation dose as a result of possible

  16. Characterisation of Radioactive Waste located at Shelter Industrial Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.D.; Billon, F.; Rudko, V.M.; Batiy, V.G.; Panasyuk, N.I.

    2001-04-01

    As a result of the accident at the unit 4 reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on the 26 April 1986 there was widespread radioactive contamination of the surrounding area. The area immediately surrounding Unit 4, referred to as the Industrial Site, was very heavily contaminated with fuel and core debris ejected from the reactor. Immediate action was undertaken to reduce the local radiation hazard and mitigate the potential of secondary contamination of the environment. This action involved (a) the removal and collection of fuel fragments (b) removal of the top layer of soil around unit 4 and (c) preparation of a new surface over the Industrial Site. This new surface is referred to colloquially as the Techno-genic Layer. This report provides an overview of a project undertaken for DG-Environment of European Commission by a Consortium consisting of SGN (France) and AEA Technology (UK) working in collaboration with the Organisation, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine; the Interdisciplinary Scientific and Technical Centre Shelter''. The project consisted of 3 Phases and a total of 14 Tasks. The main purpose of Phase 1 was to review previous work and available information and data on the contamination of the Industrial Site, construction of the Techno-genic Layer, Buttress and Pioneer Walls. Phase 2 was directed at additional measurements being carried out on existing boreholes and core samples to improve and/or substantiate existing information and data. Estimation of likely radioactive waste arisings, recovery procedures and a generalised strategy with indicative costs for the management of the waste was also covered by Phase 2. In Phase 3 new boreholes (3 off) were drilled and subsequently investigated. The justification behind Phase 3 was the desire/need to obtain more reliable information on the so-called high-active waste buried in the Industrial Site. (author)

  17. Session 1984-85. Radioactive waste. Minutes of evidence, Monday 17 June 1985. Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Environment Select Committee of the House of Commons received a memorandum from the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive, on the management and disposal of radioactive waste arising in the UK, under the headings: introduction; the structure of NIREX; the nature of radioactive waste; plans for the disposal of low and intermediate level wastes. Representatives of NIREX were examined on the subject of the memorandum and the minutes of evidence are recorded. (U.K.)

  18. Product control of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Giller, H.

    1989-09-01

    The aim of the seminar was to give a survey of product quality control and to find out whether the producers/conditioners of waste set and fulfil requirements for the quality of the waste. The program included the following main areas: Random sample tests; Container tests; Process qualification and inspection, and Inspections of waste from fuel element reprocessing abroad. In other lectures, there are reports on measures for producers of waste for guaranteeing the final storage requirements, on quality assurance measurements in the conditioning of waste from large research establishments and from fuel element manufacture. The calling up of waste containers and the documentation of waste data is also introduced. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Transport of radioactive source of cobalt-60 for the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paulo de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used in the fields of medicine, industry, research and nuclear power production. The use of radioactive material may involve transportation and this implies in the application of safety measures to the workers, public and the environment. Many types of radioactive material are produced all over the world and some modes of transport are involved. The IAEA regulations are based on the philosophy that radioactive material being transported should be adequately packaged to provide protection against the hazards of the material under all conditions of transport. Some Brazilian steel industries control the levels of liquid steel in continuous casting systems by means of sealed sources of cobalt-60. The Center for Development of Nuclear Technology-CDNT produces several of these sources to meet these industries and these sources must be transported in packages designed and tested as requirements of the rules of carriage of radioactive materials. For the transportation of seven sources of cobalt-60 with total activity of 1 GBq since CDNT to the applicant industries was designed, built and tested a Type A package. The thickness of the shield to meet the surface dose rate and the index of transport was calculated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code-Version 5) and practical values were compatible. The sealed sources of cobalt-60 were tested as to leak through the tightness test conducted according to ISO 9978:1992 (E) and the tests to demonstrate the capability of resistance of packaged under normal conditions of transport were made on the facilities of CDNT. (author)

  20. Radioactive waste disposal on a non-industrial scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    A 13 minute videotape deals with the following points: 1) Exposure pathways for solid, liquid and gaseous effleunt; 2) Critical pathways; 3) Critical groups; 4) Controlling authorities; 5) Principles of disposal, including a) concentrate and contain or b) delay and decay or c) dilute and disperse and 6) record keeping. The possible effects on Man and the Environment, of the release of radioactive wastes are discussed, and the principles underlying safe disposal of such wastes are explained. There are illustrations of procedures used in Imperial College for dealing with both high and low activity waste, and methods suitable for disposal of solid, liquid and gaseous forms are described. The programme gives a useful introduction to an important aspect of work with radioactive materials, but is only intended as a supplement to practical training. (author)

  1. The security of medical and industrial radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielefeld, Tom; Fischer, Helmut W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent foiled and successful terrorist plots in Europe and the US (including two cases in the UK and Germany which included plans to design radiological dispersal devices in 2004 and 2005), clearly demonstrate that domestic or locally acting terrorist cells have become an important part of the terrorist threat picture. The uncovered 'dirty bomb'-plots involved radioactive material of type or quantity that would not have caused much damage. Still, these observations underscore the necessity to revisit the issue of radioactive sources security in countries which may become the target of a radiological attack. This includes in particular countries in Europe, many of which in the past relied on sophisticated - but safety centred - regulations and functioning oversight institutions. In a pilot study, we have developed plausible attack scenarios involving medical and industrial sources used in Germany. Special emphasis was put on how such sources could be obtained by a locally acting terrorist group using criminal tactics and non-specialized equipment only. To this end, sources storage and handling as well as daily work procedures in hospitals and companies have been analysed to find weak points which could be discovered and exploited by terrorist groups. Publicly available technical information has been used to assess under which circumstances terrorists could obtain various types of sources or whole instruments. Calculations have been performed to estimate the radiation burden to a person handling these sources with improvised equipment. Our study shows that, even in a country with already high regulatory standards, hospitals and industrial facilities still need to introduce improvements to sources security. We therefore discuss and propose a number of affordable security upgrades. Many of our findings in Germany apply to other western countries as well. Hence, we call for a change of mentality of users and manufacturers to take into account not only the safety but

  2. Inadequate control of world's radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The radioactive materials needed to build a 'dirty bomb' can be found in almost any country in the world, and more than 100 countries may have inadequate control and monitoring programs necessary to prevent or even detect the theft of these materials. The IAEA points out that while radioactive sources number in the millions, only a small percentage have enough strength to cause serious radiological harm. It is these powerful sources that need to be focused on as a priority. In a significant recent development, the IAEA, working in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Russian Federation's Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM), have established a tripartite working group on 'Securing and Managing Radioactive Sources'. Through its program to help countries improve their national infrastructures for radiation safety and security, the IAEA has found that more than 100 countries may have no minimum infrastructure in place to properly control radiation sources. However, many IAEA Member States - in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Europe - are making progress through an IAEA project to strengthen their capabilities to control and regulate radioactive sources. The IAEA is also concerned about the over 50 countries that are not IAEA Member States (there are 134), as they do not benefit from IAEA assistance and are likely to have no regulatory infrastructure. The IAEA has been active in lending its expertise to search out and secure orphaned sources in several countries. More than 70 States have joined with the IAEA to collect and share information on trafficking incidents and other unauthorized movements of radioactive sources and other radioactive materials. The IAEA and its Member States are working hard to raise levels of radiation safety and security, especially focusing on countries known to have urgent needs. The IAEA has taken the leading role in the United Nations system in establishing standards of safety, the most significant of

  3. Control of radioactivity at the Luxembourg steel-making facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, C.

    1999-01-01

    The Luxembourg steel industry has a yearly capacity of close to 3 million tonnes of raw steel produced from scrap at three electric arc furnace steel-making plants. It has introduced in 1994 a comprehensive system of measuring devices to prevent radioactive material from being introduced into its meltshops. Detection equipment has been installed at the road and railroad accesses to the three plants. Further to the controls of incoming scrap, radioactivity is monitored on both the steel and the slag samples of each heat produced at the plants. This measure is taken in order to detect any incident involving the melting of a radioactive source that might have escaped the controls of incoming material as soon as possible. The triple purpose of these controls is: (i) to protect the personnel of the steel making plants from radiation hazards; (ii) to maintain the integrity of the equipment; and (iii) to assure integrity of the products. The presentation describes the possible origins of radioactive contamination in steel scrap as well as the behaviour in the steel making process of the different radionuclides that can be expected to be introduced into the steel making vessels through steel scrap. Together with the government agency for radiation protection, procedures have been developed for the management of any event of detection of radioactivity in the plants and to assure optimum availability of the measuring equipment. These procedures are described and commented in the presentation. The presentation includes also a report on the experience from 4 years of monitoring, during which more than 10 million tonnes of scrap have passed the gates of the steel-making plants of ProfilARBED and ARES. (author)

  4. Exemption and clearance of radioactive waste from non-nuclear industry: A UK regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    In the UK radioactive substances are regulated by means of registrations and authorizations issued under the Radioactive Substances Act. For certain practices and types of radioactive materials, there are orders which allow exemption from registration/authorization, conditionally or unconditionally. The seventeen Exemption Orders in force cover a wide variety of types of radioactive materials and practices. Conditional Exemption Orders allow a degree of regulatory control without imposing undue burdens on users of radioactivity. For most orders, radiation doses to individuals would be about 1OμSv or less, and collective doses would be less than 1 man - Sievert. The UK is reviewing the exemption orders against the requirements of the 1996 Euratom Basic Safety Standards Directive. It intends to develop a coherent strategy for exemption and to rationalize the current orders. Recently there has been a degree of public concern over the release of items from the nuclear industry. Careful presentation of exemption and clearance concepts is necessary if public confidence in the regulatory system is to be maintained. (author)

  5. Radioactive waste: the Nuclear Industry's response to the Environment Committee's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This paper represents the nuclear industry's response to the Environmental Committee's report on the handling and disposal of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include the historical aspects of the management of radioactive wastes, technical problems, comparisons with overseas management methods, liquid effluents, reprocessing problems, and public attitudes and perceptions of radioactive waste. Responses to the Environmental Committee's recommendations form an appendix. (U.K.)

  6. Control of radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Smith, P.K.; Hrma, P.; Bowan, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radioactive waste-glass melters require physical control limits and redox control of glass to assure continuous operation, and maximize production rates. Typical waste-glass melter operating conditions, and waste-glass chemical reaction paths are discussed. Glass composition, batching and melter temperature control are used to avoid the information of phases which are disruptive to melting or reduce melter life. The necessity and probable limitations of control for electric melters with complex waste feed compositions are discussed. Preliminary control limits, their bases, and alternative control methods are described for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant (SRP), and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). Slurries of simulated high level radioactive waste and ground glass frit or glass formers have been isothermally reacted and analyzed to identify the sequence of the major chemical reactions in waste vitrification, and their effect on waste-glass production rates. Relatively high melting rates of waste batches containing mixtures of reducing agents (formic acid, sucrose) and nitrates are attributable to exothermic reactions which occur at critical stages in the vitrification process. The effect of foaming on waste glass production rates is analyzed, and limits defined for existing waste-glass melters, based upon measurable thermophysical properties. Through balancing the high nitrate wastes of the WVDP with reducing agents, the high glass melting rates and sustained melting without foaming required for successful WVDP operations have been demonstrated. 65 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs

  7. Guide for the control and recording of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This guide present the aspects related to the control and recording of radioactive wastes in their points of origin. Then it is of great importance to fulfill these instructions so as to achieve a successful management of radioactive waste

  8. Method of controlling radioactive waste processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikawa, Hiroji; Sato, Takao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To minimize the pellet production amount, maximize the working life of a solidifying device and maintaining the mechanical strength of pellets to a predetermined value irrespective of the type and the cycle of occurrence of the secondary waste in the secondary waste solidifying device for radioactive waste processing systems in nuclear power plants. Method: Forecasting periods for the type, production amount and radioactivity level of the secondary wastes are determined in input/output devices connected to a control system and resulted signals are sent to computing elements. The computing elements forecast the production amount of regenerated liquid wastes after predetermined days based on the running conditions of a condensate desalter and the production amounts of filter sludges and liquid resin wastes after predetermined days based on the liquid waste processing amount or the like in a processing device respectively. Then, the mass balance between the type and the amount of the secondary wastes presently stored in a tank are calculated and the composition and concentration for the processing liquid are set so as to obtain predetermined values for the strength of pellets that can be dried to solidify, the working life of the solidifying device itself and the radioactivity level of the pellets. Thereafter, the running conditions for the solidifying device are determined so as to maximize the working life of the solidifying device. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Nucleonic level control in industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eapen, A.C.; Rao, S.S.; Nair, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper elicits the particular advantages of nucleonic level control methods in certain applications. The technique used is described briefly. Normal radioactive sources used and their selection for any application based on their characteristic emissions is explained. Level controller developed by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, is described including details regarding electronic circuitry and the radiation detector used. Its application in zinc powder plant to measure powder level in a hopper is described. Some of the typical applications of gamma-ray level controllers are mentioned. (auth.)

  10. INSTRUMENTATION CONTROLLING INDUSTRIAL PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Марина Владимировна Чувашлова

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze theoretical and practical basis of controlling and to provide implementation guidelines for enterprise controlling. The problem of controlling implementation was considered by two criteria: sphere of application and time of validity.Taking into account sphere of application criterion the objectives can be achieved by certain tools, namely: management accounting in the form of profit and loss statement; information flow in the form of workflow system and mapping of business processes; planning which includes budgeting and monitoring that could in turn allow to compare performance to predetermined standards, plans or objectives; responsibility accounting.The second criterion that is time of validity is considered as strategic.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-39

  11. Radioactive hospital wastes. Radiations under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondeelle, A.; Delmotte, H.; Gauron, C.

    2006-07-01

    A set of articles proposes an overview of legal and regulatory evolutions regarding radioactive hospital wastes. These legal measures and evolutions are notably present in the Public Health code, in the Labour code. An article outlines the role of the radiation protection expert in the process of elimination of contaminated wastes (four major steps for this elimination are indicated; peculiarities of the hospital are outlined, as well as control procedures and the importance of training and information). An article describes the specific activity of the Creteil incinerator which comprises a unit for the incineration of care activity wastes under a very constraining regulation

  12. Radiation Protection and the Management of Radioactive Waste in the Oil and Gas Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The oil and gas industry, a global industry operating in many Member States, makes extensive use of radiation generators and sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, some of which are potentially dangerous to human health and the environment if not properly controlled. In addition, significant quantities of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) originating from the reservoir rock are encountered during production, maintenance and decommissioning. The oil and gas industry operates in all climates and environments, including the most arduous conditions, and is continuously challenged to achieve high efficiency of operation while maintaining a high standard of safety and control - this includes the need to maintain control over occupational exposures to radiation, as well as to protect the public and the environment through proper management of wastes that may be radiologically and chemically hazardous. The oil and gas industry is organizationally and technically complex, and relies heavily on specialized service and supply companies to provide the necessary equipment and expertise, including expertise in radiation safety. This training manual is used by the IAEA as the basis for delivering its training course on radiation protection and the management of radioactive waste in the oil and gas industry. Enclosed with this manual is a CD-ROM that contains the presentational material used in the training course, the course syllabus and additional notes for course presenters. The course material is based principally on IAEA Safety Reports Series No. 34 Radiation Protection and the Management of Radioactive Waste in the Oil and Gas Industry, published by the IAEA in 2003. The training course is aimed at regulatory bodies; oil and gas field operators and support companies; workers and their representatives; health, safety and environmental professionals; and health and safety training officers. A pilot training course was held in the Syrian Arab Republic in 2000 as

  13. Radiation Protection and the Management of Radioactive Waste in the Oil and Gas Industry. Additional Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The oil and gas industry, a global industry operating in many Member States, makes extensive use of radiation generators and sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, some of which are potentially dangerous to human health and the environment if not properly controlled. In addition, significant quantities of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) originating from the reservoir rock are encountered during production, maintenance and decommissioning. The oil and gas industry operates in all climates and environments, including the most arduous conditions, and is continuously challenged to achieve high efficiency of operation while maintaining a high standard of safety and control - this includes the need to maintain control over occupational exposures to radiation, as well as to protect the public and the environment through proper management of wastes that may be radiologically and chemically hazardous. The oil and gas industry is organizationally and technically complex, and relies heavily on specialized service and supply companies to provide the necessary equipment and expertise, including expertise in radiation safety. This training manual is used by the IAEA as the basis for delivering its training course on radiation protection and the management of radioactive waste in the oil and gas industry. Enclosed with this manual is a CD-ROM that contains the presentational material used in the training course, the course syllabus and additional notes for course presenters. The course material is based principally on IAEA Safety Reports Series No. 34 Radiation Protection and the Management of Radioactive Waste in the Oil and Gas Industry, published by the IAEA in 2003. The training course is aimed at regulatory bodies; oil and gas field operators and support companies; workers and their representatives; health, safety and environmental professionals; and health and safety training officers. A pilot training course was held in the Syrian Arab Republic in 2000 as

  14. Industrial radioactive wastes: what are we talking about?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The subject of radioactive wastes is developed through their origin, their classification, their scale of size. The different storage centers are given and the new channels of radioactive wastes management are tackled. The particular case of high level and long term radioactive wastes is detailed. (N.C.)

  15. Control of Orphan Sources and Other Radioactive Material in the Metal Recycling and Production Industries. Specific Safety Guide (Spanish Edition); Control de fuentes huérfanas y otros materiales radiactivos en las industrias de reciclado y producción de metales. Guía de seguridad específica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    Accidents involving orphan sources and other radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries have resulted in serious radiological accidents as well as in harmful environmental, social and economic impacts. This Safety Guide provides recommendations, the implementation of which should prevent such accidents and provide confidence that scrap metal and recycled products are safe. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of people and the environment; 3. Responsibilities; 4. Monitoring for radioactive material; 5. Response to the discovery of radioactive material; 6. Remediation of contaminated areas; 7. Management of recovered radioactive material; Annex I: Review of events involving radioactive material in the metal recycling and production industries; Annex II: Categorization of radioactive sources; Annex III: Some examples of national and international initiatives.

  16. Industrial aspects of radioactive waste management in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.R.; Seynaeve, F.

    1977-01-01

    In 1980 about 120 nuclear power reactors with 70,000MW(e) will be in operation in Western Europe, and this number will be doubled by the second half of the 1980s, when the nuclear capacity in operation is expected to be 180,000MW(e). Predictions are made of the waste management requirements resulting from this nuclear expansion. Until a few years ago nuclear research and the use of isotopes in medicine have been the dominating source of radioactive waste. Now there is a much larger proportion from the day-to-day operation of nuclear power reactors. The amount of waste from reprocessing spent reactor fuel will rise more slowly. Waste production in other fuel cycle industries is relatively insignificant. Approximately 30 reactors and other nuclear plants will be taken out of operation in Western Europe by about 1990. The large-scale handling of these wastes calls for overall management schemes based on clear policies for storage and disposal. Questions are identified which will have to be answered within the next few years in order to allow the orderly development of such large-scale waste management. These questions deal with (i) rules and regulations, (ii) new technical evidence, (iii) administrative framework and responsibilities. Several areas of waste management are well suited to commercial waste operating firms already established in a number of European countries. The scope for waste operators may include transport of waste, operation of own or government-owned treatment and storage installations, and disposal operations. Development requirements originally suggested by the Foratom waste study group are discussed in the light of the latest developments as seen by European industry. (author)

  17. Strategies for Industrial Multivariable Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangstrup, M.

    dynamics and gains strongly depend upon one or more physical parameters characterizing the operating point. This class covers many industrial systems such as airplanes, ships, robots and process control systems. Power plant boilers are representatives for process control systems in general. The dynamics...

  18. Radioactive demonstration of DWPF product control strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of the product and process control strategies that will be utilized by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was demonstrated during a campaign in the Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The remotely operated process included the preparation of the melter feed, vitrification in a slurry-fed 1/100th scale melter and analysis of the glass product both for its composition and durability. The campaign processed approximately 10 kg (on a dry basis) of radioactive sludge from Tank 51. This sludge is representative of the first batch of sludge that will be sent to the DWPF for immobilization into borosilicate glass. Additions to the sludge were made based on calculations using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Analysis of the glass produced during the campaign showed that a durable glass was produced with a composition similar to that predicted using the PCCS

  19. Environmental radioactive contamination and its control for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhongqi; Qu Jingyuan; Cui Yongli

    1998-01-01

    The environmental radioactive releases and exposure to human being due to operation of nuclear power plants in the world and in China, environmental contamination and consequences caused by severe nuclear power plant accidents in the history, control of the radioactive contamination in China, and some nuclear laws on the radioactive contamination control established by international organizations and USA etc. are described according to literature investigation and research. Some problems and comments in radioactive contamination control for nuclear power plants in China are presented. Therefore, perfecting laws and regulations and enhancing surveillances on the contamination control are recommended

  20. Environmental radioactivity from natural, industrial, and military sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbud, M.

    1987-01-01

    This document is the third edition of a book generally considered a standard in the field of radioactive materials in the environment. Topics include radiation protection standards, transport mechanisms, terrestrial and aquatic pathways, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, radioactive waste management, the fallout from nuclear explosions, nuclear accidents, and risk assessment

  1. Prevention of radioactivity in steel. Necessity of an international co-operation between industry and government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amedro, G.

    1999-01-01

    European steel companies will not melt radioactive contaminated scrap, even if it would be allowed to do so by legislation and proposed clearance levels. Scrap delivering companies as well as steel producing companies are well armed with scrap charge control. Additional control during steelmaking is given by analysing a crude steel sample of each heat. Regulations regarding health criteria are available on national and European level (RP43 and RP89) but are not usable in practice for the control of scrap. Problems which are at present left to be solved by each site equipped with a means of detection cover principally the following areas: Definition and detection of abnormal radioactivity without identification of the radioactive element; Common definition of alarm thresholds by suppliers and customers; Emergency isolation measures for suspect vehicles (e.g. immediate return or quarantine), notably involving illicit material from a third country; Identification, isolation, handling and destination of discovered radioactive products; Financing of associated costs; Public relations; Preventive actions. It seems to be necessary to produce a benchmark for the activity level in finished steel to determine the actual level of 'normal radioactivity' in the European steel pool. A comparison of the actual state of the art in the European steel industry due to the measures already taken would be useful. The present situation can only be efficiently improved by action in common. Industry has made large investments in detection equipment and in staff training. It has now practical experience. Additional regulatory provisions and appropriate logistical means are now awaited from government, i.e. concerning technical know-how and expertise, properly adapted equipment and in certain cases financial intervention. European directives should not constitute an impediment and should, if necessary, be adapted to needs. When the situation is clarified, future regular checks will be an

  2. Method of treating radioactive waste waters from uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priban, V.; Novak, L.; Zubcek, L.; Hinterholzinger, O.

    1987-01-01

    radioactive mine waters with suspended solid particles and acid salinated solutions from the process of underground leaching of radioactive ores with sulfuric acid, are discharged in a specified ratio to a common sump. The acid salinated solutions are used as a coagulation agent for the treatment of radioactive mine waters. Both solutions are mixed at simultaneous addition of lime milk suspension. In a sedimentation tank, the precipitate thus produced is sedimented and the clarified water is carried from the tank to a public water flow. The advantages of the method include the treatment of an over-balance 3 m 3 /min of acid salinated solutions from the process of underground leaching of radioactive ores with sulfuric acid, and reduction in the cost of radioactive mine water treatment. (E.S.)

  3. Radioactive demonstration of DWPF product control strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, N.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will vitrify high-level nuclear waste into borosilicate glass. The waste will be mixed with properly formulated glass-making frit and fed to a melter at 1150 degrees C. Process reliability and product quality are ensured by proper control of the melter feed composition. The effectiveness of the product and process control strategies that will be utilized by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was demonstrated during a campaign in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The remotely operated process included the preparation of the melter feed, vitrification in a slurry-fed 1/100th scale melter an analysis of the glass product both for its composition an durability. The campaign processed approximately 10 kg (on a dry basis) of radioactive sludge from Tank 51. This sludge is representative of the first batch of sludge that will be sent to the DWPF for immobilization into borosilicate glass. Additions to the sludge were made based on calculations using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Analysis of the glass produced during the campaign showed that a durable glass was produced with a composition very close to that predicted using the PCCS. 10 refs., 4 tabs

  4. National policy for control of radioactive sources and radioactive waste from non-power applications in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevinskas, G.; Mastauskas, A.

    2001-01-01

    According to the Law on Radiation Protection of the Republic of Lithuania (passed in 1999), the Radiation Protection Centre of the Ministry of Health is the regulatory authority responsible for the radiation protection of public and of workers using sources of ionizing radiation in Lithuania. One of its responsibilities is the control of radioactive sources from the beginning of their 'life cycle', when they are imported in, used, transported and placed as spent into the radioactive waste storage facilities. For the effective control of sources there is national authorization system (notification- registration-licensing) based on the international requirements and recommendations introduced, which also includes keeping and maintaining the Register of Sources, controlling and investigating events while illegally carrying on or in possession of radioactive material, decision making and performing the state radiation protection supervision and control of users of radioactive sources, controlling, within the limits of competence, the radioactive waste management activities in nuclear and non-nuclear power applications. According to the requirements set out in the Law on Radiation Protection and the Government Resolution 'On Establishment of the State Register of the Sources of Ionizing Radiation and Exposure of Workers' (1999) and supplementary legal acts, all licence-holders conducting their activities with sources of ionizing radiation have to present all necessary data to the State Register after annual inventory of sources, after installation of new sources, after decommissioning of sources, after disposal of spent sources, after finishing the activities with the generators of ionizing radiation. The information to the Radiation Protection Centre has to be presented every week from the Customs Department of the Ministry of Finance about all sources of ionizing radiation imported to or exported from Lithuania and the information about the companies performed these

  5. 10 CFR 39.69 - Radioactive contamination control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive contamination control. 39.69 Section 39.69... Radiation Safety Requirements § 39.69 Radioactive contamination control. (a) If the licensee detects evidence that a sealed source has ruptured or licensed materials have caused contamination, the licensee...

  6. The automatic control in industry

    OpenAIRE

    Milla Lostaunau, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The advancement of technology has made essential use of the computer industry as a herrameinta control. {on your application is becoming more intensive, and for that reason this article points out the historical development of its application, and the potential to be had in the future. el avance de la tecnología ha hecho imprescindible el uso de la computadora en la industria como una herrameinta de control. su aplicaci{on es cada vez más intensiva, y por tal motivo este artículo señala ...

  7. SIAM symposium on control problems in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This symposium focused on industrial control applications that have benefited from recent mathematical and technological developments. The themes featured included: applications of control techniques in aerospace industry, automotive industry, environmental sciences, manufacturing processes, and petroleum industry; optimal shape design in aerospace applications; optimal design of micro-optics; robust control and H-infinity methods.

  8. Controlling low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This series of information sheets describes at a popular level the sources of low-level radioactive wastes, their associated hazards, methods of storage, transportation and disposal, and the Canadian regulations that cover low-level wastes

  9. Physical protection of mobile radioactive sources commonly used in the well logging and industrial radiography industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, Maegon E.

    2016-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Radiological Security (ORS) is to protect high-activity radiological materials around the globe. ORS works domestically within the United States and collaborates with over 80 countries to protect medical, industrial, research and other radiological sources from being used by malicious actors in a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or radiation exposure device (RED). One area of specific concern is mobile radioactive sources, such as those used in radiography to inspect welds or metal integrity, and those in the oil and gas industry to characterize exploration and production wells in pursuit of oil caches. These mobile radiological sources are of sufficient Curie quantities to be categorized as desirable sources for malicious actors. This presentation will provide an overview of a mobile source tracking system developed by ORS in conjunction with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and will discuss how the system can contribute to source security, as well as next steps to pilot this technology

  10. Environmental Radioactivity from Natural, Industrial, and Military Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarouf, B. H.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a translation of the fourth edition of the original book which was written as a reference source for the scientist, engineer, or administrator with a professional interest in the subject, but it may also be a value to the reader who wishes to understand the technical facts behind the public debate. The subject of environmental radioactivity has aspects of vast dimensions. The text of the book concerns primarily with the behavior of radioactive substances when they enter the environment. The important and elaborate technology by which passage of radioactive materials to the environment may be prevented and the equally important field of health physics that is concerned with protecting the atomic energy worker were thus placed beyond the bounds of this work.

  11. Characterization of radioactive mixed wastes: The industrial perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leasure, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of Radioactive Mixed Wastes (RMW) is necessary for determination of appropriate treatment options and to satisfy environmental regulations. Radioactive mixed waste can be classified as two main categories; contact-handled (low level) RMW and remote-handled RMW. Ibis discussion will focus mainly on characterization of contact handled RMW. The characterization of wastes usually follows one of two pathways: (1) characterization to determine necessary parameters for treatment or (2) characterization to determine if the material is a hazardous waste. Sometimes, however, wastes can be declared as hazardous waste without testing and then treated as hazardous waste. Characterization of radioactive mixed wastes pose some unique issues, however, that will require special solutions. Below, five issues affecting sampling and analysis of RMW will be discussed

  12. Main Activities to Improve the Control of Radioactive Sources and Maintain an Effective Regulatory Nuclear Systems in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2006, the Directorate of Nuclear Safety and Security, DRS, of National Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, has gone through many improvements. In 2006 CNEN signed the commitment to the recommendations of the Code of Conduct on The Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources and the Guidance on The Import and Export of Radioactive Sources. The DRS is responsible for the licensing and control of nuclear facilities, fuel cycle, waste management and the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations. In 2009 the department responsible for the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations implemented an “Electronic Management System” in which this System integrates the transport department and waste management department. The Electronic Management System is linked to the register of radioactive sources and facilities and there is an access on line to the Customs, making the control of import and export of radioactive sources robust, efficient and fast. During the period from 2006 until 2015 the most relevant regulations related to the control of radioactive sources and authorizations of medical and industrial installations were reviewed and some were elaborated and issued. These documents were in line with the Categorization of Radioactive Sources and the International Basic Safety Standards, issued in the IAEA Safety Standard Series as General Safety Requirements Part 3 (GSR Part 3). The paper describes all the steps that were adopted in order to implement these systems and the improvements on our Nuclear Regulatory Systems. (author)

  13. Fundamentals of gas flow in shale; What the unconventional reservoir industry can learn from the radioactive waste industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuss, Robert; Harrington, Jon; Graham, Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Tight formations, such as shale, have a wide range of potential usage; this includes shale gas exploitation, hydrocarbon sealing, carbon capture & storage and radioactive waste disposal. Considerable research effort has been conducted over the last 20 years on the fundamental controls on gas flow in a range of clay-rich materials at the British Geological Survey (BGS) mainly focused on radioactive waste disposal; including French Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, Belgian Boom Clay, Swiss Opalinus Clay, British Oxford Clay, as well as engineered barrier material such as bentonite and concrete. Recent work has concentrated on the underlying physics governing fluid flow, with evidence of dilatancy controlled advective flow demonstrated in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. This has resulted in a review of how advective gas flow is dealt with in Performance Assessment and the applicability of numerical codes. Dilatancy flow has been shown in Boom clay using nano-particles and is seen in bentonite by the strong hydro-mechanical coupling displayed at the onset of gas flow. As well as observations made at BGS, dilatancy flow has been shown by other workers on shale (Cuss et al., 2012; Angeli et al. 2009). As well as experimental studies using cores of intact material, fractured material has been investigated in bespoke shear apparatus. Experimental results have shown that the transmission of gas by fractures is highly localised, dependent on normal stress, varies with shear, is strongly linked with stress history, is highly temporal in nature, and shows a clear correlation with fracture angle. Several orders of magnitude variation in fracture transmissivity is seen during individual tests. Flow experiments have been conducted using gas and water, showing remarkably different behaviour. The radioactive waste industry has also noted a number of important features related to sample preservation. Differences in gas entry pressure have been shown across many laboratories and these may be

  14. Using radioactive tracers for the evaluation of industrial equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Luis Eduardo Barreira; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de; Sousa, Alvaro Serafim F. de

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the radioactive tracer technique, giving as example some cases of the possible utilization developed by the Nuclear Engineering Institute, RJ, BR (Argonaut reactor) and through charged particle (CV-28 cyclotron), and also his production and aspects of radiological safety

  15. A comparative analysis of managing radioactive waste in the Canadian nuclear and non-nuclear industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batters, S.; Benovich, I.; Gerchikov, M. [AMEC NSS Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Management of radioactive waste in nuclear industries in Canada is tightly regulated. The regulated nuclear industries include nuclear power generation, uranium mining and milling, nuclear medicine, radiation research and education and industrial users of nuclear material (e.g. radiography, thickness gauges, etc). In contrast, management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) waste is not regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), with the exception of transport above specified concentrations. Although these are radioactive materials that have always been present in various concentrations in the environment and in the tissues of every living animal, including humans, the hazards of similar quantities of NORM radionuclides are identical to those of the same or other radionuclides from regulated industries. The concentration of NORM in most natural substances is so low that the associated risk is generally regarded as negligible, however higher concentrations may arise as the result of industrial operations such as: oil and gas production, mineral extraction and processing (e.g. phosphate fertilizer production), metal recycling, thermal electric power generation, water treatment facilities. Health Canada has published the Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM). This paper presents a comparative analysis of the requirements for management of radioactive waste in the regulated nuclear industries and of the guidelines for management of NORM waste. (author)

  16. A comparative analysis of managing radioactive waste in the Canadian nuclear and non-nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batters, S.; Benovich, I.; Gerchikov, M.

    2011-01-01

    Management of radioactive waste in nuclear industries in Canada is tightly regulated. The regulated nuclear industries include nuclear power generation, uranium mining and milling, nuclear medicine, radiation research and education and industrial users of nuclear material (e.g. radiography, thickness gauges, etc). In contrast, management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) waste is not regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), with the exception of transport above specified concentrations. Although these are radioactive materials that have always been present in various concentrations in the environment and in the tissues of every living animal, including humans, the hazards of similar quantities of NORM radionuclides are identical to those of the same or other radionuclides from regulated industries. The concentration of NORM in most natural substances is so low that the associated risk is generally regarded as negligible, however higher concentrations may arise as the result of industrial operations such as: oil and gas production, mineral extraction and processing (e.g. phosphate fertilizer production), metal recycling, thermal electric power generation, water treatment facilities. Health Canada has published the Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM). This paper presents a comparative analysis of the requirements for management of radioactive waste in the regulated nuclear industries and of the guidelines for management of NORM waste. (author)

  17. Methodological guide: management of industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the Ministries of Health and the Environment, IPSN is preparing and publishing the first version of the methodological guide devoted to managing industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances. This guide describes a procedure for defining and choosing strategies for rehabilitating such industrial sites. (author)

  18. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in a broad range of activities involving the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. The amounts of waste generated from these activities are often limited in volume and activity. However, they have to be managed as radioactive waste. While the principles and safety requirements are the same for managing any amount of radioactive waste, a number of issues have to be considered specifically in organizations conducting activities in which only small amounts of waste are generated. This is the case in particular in respect of spent and disused sealed radioactive sources. For activities involving the generation and management of small amounts of radioactive waste, the types of facilities concerned and the arrangements for waste management vary considerably. Furthermore, the types of radioactive waste differ from facility to facility. The safe management of small amounts of radioactive waste should therefore be given specific consideration. The nature of the radioactive waste generated in the various activities under consideration also varies greatly. It may be in the form of discrete sealed or unsealed radiation sources or process materials or consumable materials. Waste arises as a result of many activities, including: diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications in medicine. Process control and measurement in industry. And numerous uses of radioactive material in agriculture, geological exploration, construction and other fields. The radioactive waste under consideration can be in solid, liquid or gaseous form. Solid waste can include: spent or disused sealed sources. Contaminated equipment, glassware, gloves and paper. And animal carcasses, excreta and other biological waste. Liquid waste can include: aqueous and organic solutions resulting from research and production processes. Excreta. Liquids arising from the decontamination of laboratory equipment or facilities. And liquids from

  19. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in a broad range of activities involving the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education. The amounts of waste generated from these activities are often limited in volume and activity. However, they have to be managed as radioactive waste. While the principles and safety requirements are the same for managing any amount of radioactive waste, a number of issues have to be considered specifically in organizations conducting activities in which only small amounts of waste are generated. This is the case in particular in respect of spent and disused sealed radioactive sources. For activities involving the generation and management of small amounts of radioactive waste, the types of facilities concerned and the arrangements for waste management vary considerably. Furthermore, the types of radioactive waste differ from facility to facility. The safe management of small amounts of radioactive waste should therefore be given specific consideration. The nature of the radioactive waste generated in the various activities under consideration also varies greatly. It may be in the form of discrete sealed or unsealed radiation sources or process materials or consumable materials. Waste arises as a result of many activities, including: diagnostic, therapeutic and research applications in medicine. Process control and measurement in industry. And numerous uses of radioactive material in agriculture, geological exploration, construction and other fields. The radioactive waste under consideration can be in solid, liquid or gaseous form. Solid waste can include: spent or disused sealed sources. Contaminated equipment, glassware, gloves and paper. And animal carcasses, excreta and other biological waste. Liquid waste can include: aqueous and organic solutions resulting from research and production processes. Excreta. Liquids arising from the decontamination of laboratory equipment or facilities. And liquids from

  20. Radioactive waste industrial management in France for medium- and long-term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.-M.

    1981-01-01

    The context within which the industrial scale management of radioactive wastes takes place is briefly outlined. The regulations already in force or envisaged in France in this field are exposed. Emphasis is given to the activities of the National Agency for the management of radioactive wastes (ANDRA). The reasons why this organization was created are discussed together with the type of work conferred to it, its present workload, the industrial management concepts it applies, its present and future potential, the costs envisaged for waste disposal and the financial solutions adopted. The industrial technical assistance policy of ANDRA is presented [fr

  1. Control of radioactive material transport in sodium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, W.F.

    1980-03-01

    The Radioactivity Control Technology (RCT) program was established by the Department of Energy to develop and demonstrate methods to control radionuclide transport to ex-core regions of sodium-cooled reactors. This radioactive material is contained within the reactor heat transport system with any release to the environment well below limits established by regulations. However, maintenance, repair, decontamination, and disposal operations potentially expose plant workers to radiation fields arising from radionuclides transported to primary system components. This paper deals with radioactive material generated and transported during steady-state operation, which remains after 24 Na decay. Potential release of radioactivity during postulated accident conditions is not discussed. The control methods for radionuclide transport, with emphasis on new information obtained since the last Environmental Control Symposium, are described. Development of control methods is an achievable goal

  2. Problems of control of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kazumi

    2000-01-01

    The isolation period of high level radioactive waste from human biotope is some ten thousand years or more. Especially, many crustal movement zones are located in our country, so that very careful measures should be taken. Isolation of high level radioactive waste in lithosphere needs to confirm good isolation site. Boring is a chief method to determine the location conditions for radioactive waste. In order to study crack of rock and behavior of groundwater, high density of drilling must be necessary. However, high density drilling should be avoided. In place of it, a geophysical exploration is an ideal method, one of non-destructive inspection. It is important for many countries to establish the technologies to determine the conditions of crack and groundwater by this method. A large amount of data about the contact condition of radionuclide and minerals, pH, oxidative-reduction potential and temperature are needed. (S.Y.)

  3. Control of Radioactive Lightning-Conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, E.

    2004-01-01

    The radioactive lightning-conductor production in Brazil was started in 1970 and after a period of 19 years of commercialization of these devices, the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), based in studies done in Brazil and abroad, proved that the radioactive lightning-conductor performance wasn't superior to the conventional one, so the use of radioactive source is not justified. Thence, the authorization for its production was suspended and the installation of this type of lightning-conductor was forbidden. The radioactive material that results from the dismount of these devices must be immediately sent to CNEN, for treatment and temporary storage. After this prohibition and its publication in several specialized magazines, CNEN was searched for several institutions, factories, churches, etc, interested in obtaining information about the handling and shipment procedures of radioactive lightning-conductors that are inoperative and that must be sent to CNEN's Institutes, in a correct and secure form. From this moment CNEN technicians realize that the owners of radioactive lightning-conductors didn't have any knowledge and training in radiation protection, neither in equipment to monitoring the radiation. The radioactive material from these sources is, in almost all cases, the radioisotope 241Am which has a maximum activity of an order of 5 mCi (1,85 x 10-2 TBq); as the radiation emitted by 241Am is of alpha type, whose range in the air, is just few centimeters and the gamma rays are of low energy, an irradiation offer small risk. However, there is a contamination risk on someone hands, by the contact with the source. Aiming to attend, in an objective way, the users' interests in obtaining some pertinent technical information about the shipping of radioactive lightning-conductor that is inoperative or is being replaced and also to optimize its receipt in CNEN's Institutes, because there still has a great number of these lightning-conductors installed and still

  4. Container for processing and disposing radioactive wastes and industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kunio; Kasahara, Yuko; Kasai, Noboru; Sudo, Giichi; Ishizaki, Kanjiro.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the performance of containers for radioactive wastes for ocean disposal and on-land disposal such as impact strength, chemical resistance, fire resistance, corrosion resistance, water impermeability and the like. Constitution: Steel fiber-reinforced concrete previously molded in a shape of a container is impregnated with polymerizable impregnating agent selected from the group consisting of a polymerizable monomer, liquid mixture of a polymerizable monomer and an oligomer, a polymer solution, a copolymer solution and the liquid mixture thereof. Then, the polymerizable impregnating agent is polymerized to solidify in the concrete by way of heat-polymerization or radiation-induced polymerization to form a waste container. The container thus obtained can be improved with the impact resistance and wear resistance and further improved with salt water resistance, acid resistance, corrosion resistance and solidity by the impregnation of the polymer, as well as can effectively be prevented from leaching out of radioactive substances. (Furukawa, Y.)

  5. Radioactive wastes and residues: government participation in a control policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelli, Guido

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the politic aspects of the State participation in inspection and control of the radioactive wastes residues with the supervise of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), by a national program

  6. Method for controlling incineration in combustor for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoku, Y.; Uehara, A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for controlling incineration in a combustor for low-level radioactive wastes. In particular, it relates to a method for economizing in the consumption of supplemental fuel while maintaining a stable incineration state by controlling the amount of fuel and of radioactive wastes fed to the combustor. The amount of fuel supplied is determined by the outlet gas temperature of the combustor. (L.L.)

  7. Safety protection suggestion of naturally occurring radioactive materials in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaojian; Zhou Qifu; Wang Xiaotao; Xu Zhongyang; Song Peifeng

    2014-01-01

    It's not enough concern about the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) of oil and gas industry in China. NORM with radium and radon mainly exist in the scale, sludge and production water, and they tend to deposit on the pipe wall, wellhead equipment and so on. These materials are a threat to the health of workers, so it is very important to have the safe disposal of them. This paper introduces the radioactive hazards and puts for-ward the safe disposal measures so as to provide the reference for the safe disposal of radioactive materials. Some management and technical advices are presented too. (authors)

  8. Industrial aspects of radioactive waste management in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.R.

    1976-01-01

    Various aspects of waste management are discussed from the viewpoint of the nuclear industry. Future amounts of waste generated in the 15 Foratom countries in Western Europe are estimated. Industrial waste questions--as seen by electricity producers, reprocessors, and waste operators--are discussed; questions concerning decommissioning are also dealt with. A number of recommendations for further action, primarily on the part of national authorities and international organizations, are put forward. One conclusion of the study is that there is no reason for waste-management problems to impede the timely development of nuclear energy as a large-scale industrial activity in Western Europe

  9. Guidance on radioactive waste management legislation for application to users of radioactive materials in medicine, research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This document, addressed primarily to developing countries, is restricted to management of radioactive wastes arising from uses of radionuclides in medicine, industry and research. It does not deal with wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle. Safeguards and physical protection are also outside the scope even though in some special cases it may be relevant; for instance, when fissile material is handled at research establishments. Information on nuclear fuel cycle waste management and waste transport can be found in a number of IAEA publications. The main aim of this document is to give guidance on legislation required for safe handling, treatment, conditioning and release or disposal of radioactive waste. It covers all steps from the production or import of radioactive material, through use, treatment, storage and transport, to the release or disposal of the waste either as exempted material or in special repositories. Management of radioactive wastes as a whole is optimized and kept at acceptable levels in accordance with the basic ICRP recommendations and the IAEA Basic Safety Standards. As a result of the new ICRP recommendations of 1991, the Agency is revising its Basic Safety Standards, the results of which may have some impact on the national regulations and necessitate updating of this document. 16 refs, 1 fig

  10. Radioactive material inventory control at a waste characterization facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, L.K.; Chapman, J.A.; Schultz, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to the recent introduction of more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and requirements pertaining to nuclear and criticality safety, the control of radioactive material inventory has emerged as an important facet of operations at DOE nuclear facilities. In order to comply with nuclear safety regulations and nuclear criticality requirements, radioactive material inventories at each nuclear facility have to be maintained below limits specified for the facility in its safety authorization basis documentation. Exceeding these radioactive material limits constitutes a breach of the facility's nuclear and criticality safety envelope and could potentially result in an accident, cause a shut-down of the facility, and bring about imminent regulatory repercussions. The practice of maintaining control of radioactive material, especially sealed and unsealed sources, is commonplace and widely implemented; however, the requirement to track the entire radioactivity inventory at each nuclear facility for the purpose of ensuring nuclear safety is a new development. To meet the new requirements, the Applied Radiation Measurements Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an information system, called the open-quotes Radioactive Material Inventory Systemclose quotes (RMIS), to track the radioactive material inventory at an ORNL facility, the Waste Examination and Assay Facility (WEAF). The operations at WEAF, which revolve around the nondestructive assay and nondestructive examination of waste and related research and development activities, results in an ever-changing radioactive material inventory. Waste packages and radioactive sources are constantly being brought in or taken out of the facility; hence, use of the RMIS is necessary to ensure that the radioactive material inventory limits are not exceeded

  11. An approach to detecting delayed effects of radioactive contamination on industrial-urban-area dwellers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Privalova, L.I.; Katsnelson, B.A.; Polzik, E.V.; Kazantsev, V.S.; Lipatov, G.Ya.; Beikin, Y.B.

    1994-01-01

    Detecting changes in humans that result from radioactive contamination of the area of residence many years after an incident (i.e., when the radiation has substantially decayed) presents a difficult epidemiological problem. Problems of this kind are even more complicated in areas where the population is continually exposed to other harmful man-made factors. The city of Kamensk-Uralsky (Sverdlovsk region, Russia) is a good case in point. In 1957, part of Kamensk-Uralsky was contaminated as the result of an accident at the Kyshtym nuclear plant. In addition, the population of the contaminated area is being exposed to atmospheric emissions from several industrial enterprises. Two comparable groups of residents were formed: one in the contaminated area and another in a control area within the same city characterized by similar levels of chemical pollution but substantially lower radioactive contamination. The groups were composed of only those people who had been living in these areas continually since time of the accident and who were under 15 years of age at the time of the accident. The groups were matched by sex, age, and socio-occupational characteristics. For each subject, data were gathered on more than 50 parameters including hematological, immunological, and biochemical indices of the health status. All these data were obtained from blood tests taken in the fall of 1992. Data processing was carried out with the help of a computerized mathematical pattern recognition methodology, which ensured reliable discrimination between the generalized health status in the areas under study. We found that the health status of inhabitants of the area more contaminated with radioactive fallouts were adversely affected by radiation

  12. Radioactive and industrial waste water collection system study, Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Phase I of the Radioactive Liquid Waste (RLW) Collection System Study has been completed, and the deliverables for this portion of the study are enclosed. The deliverables include: The Work Break-down Structure (WBS) for Phase II; The Annotated Outline for the Collection Study Report; The Process Flow Diagrams (PFD) of the RLW collection system based on current literature and knowledge; The Configuration database; The Reference Index, listing all currently held documents of the RLW collection system; The Reference Drawing Index listing all currently held, potentially applicable, drawings reviewed during the PFD development; The Regulation Identification Document for RCRA and CWA; The Regulation Database for RCRA and CWA; The Regulation Review Log, including statements justifying the non-applicability of certain regulations; Regulation Library, including the photocopied regulations with highlighted text for RCRA and CWA; The summary of RTG's waste water treatment plant design experience and associated regulations on which RTG based the design of these treatment facilities; TA-50 Influent Database; Radioactive Liquid Waste Stream Characterization Database

  13. design of a decoupler controller for forced circulation evaporator used in a radioactive treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Halim, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    evaporation is a proven method for a treatment of liquid radioactive wastes providing both good decontamination and high concentration . in a radioactive waste treatment plant, an evaporator is used to reduce the volume of medium radioactive liquid waste arising from different applications of nuclear industries. the control system objective is to limit the composition of the liquid waste at a prescribed value. for the safe operation, without damaging the installed equipment, a good control for the evaporator operating pressure and the level of liquid waste inside the separator part has been required. evaporator equipment is a complex process, which is a multivariable, nonlinear and has many disturbances. therefore, design a control strategy for the evaporator is bit difficult. the solution method is based on system decoupling eliminating the parasite interactions between input-output pairing variables and converting multi-inputs multi-outputs (MIMO) system to several single-inputs single-outputs (SISO) systems

  14. Assessment of radiation exposures from naturally occurring radioactive materials in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlat, M.S.; Djeffal, S.; Kadi, H.

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive deposits, often referred to as naturally occurring radioactive material scale, can, because of incompatibility of formation and injection waters, be formed inside production equipment of the oil and gas industry. These scales contain mainly 226 Ra and its daughter products, which can cause an exposure risk. The gamma ray dose rates, with the associated occupational doses in the oil and gas industry, and 226 Ra concentration in production water, crude oil and hard/soft scale samples were determined. Results obtained are discussed and compared to those from other studies

  15. What about radioactive waste management in the reorganization of the Russian nuclear industry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krone, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    Even in the light of rising government revenues, the expansion of the Russian nuclear industry cannot be considered on safe grounds as far as funding is concerned. Decisions about new investments depend on proof that nuclear power is by far more profitable than investments into the development of new gas fields. For a long time, the way in which the unsolved issues of radioactive waste management were to be integrated into the reorganization of the Russian nuclear industry was an open question. Current developments demonstrate the efforts made by the Rosatom management to establish a sound basis for the sustainable management of radioactive waste. In late June 2008, the committees of the Russian parliament started deliberations of the draft legislation introduced by Rosatom about the management of radioactive waste, which includes the legal prerequisites for a sustainable national waste management system. The government-operated waste management company, FGUP 'RosRAO' (Sole Federal Government Enterprise, 'Russian Radioactive Waste'), was founded as a Rosatom subsidiary henceforth to be responsible also for the final storage of radioactive waste. Mainly recommendations of the R4.04/04, 'Strategy Definition for Russian Federation NPP Back End Radioactive Waste Management, including Draft Legislation and Institutional Framework', Tacis project were taken up, which had been elaborated by a consortium of 6 West European waste management organizations in close cooperation with Russian experts from Rosatom. The analysis conducted is described in an outline of the present situation of radioactive waste management in Russia and the recommendations derived from it. In addition, the most recent steps towards building a sustainable government-operated management system for radioactive waste of the Russian nuclear industry are explained. (orig.)

  16. Radioactive contamination of ingredients used in sweets industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodnar, Jozsef

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of samples tested in 1983-1987, the activity concentrations relative to unit dry matter are 2,5-3,5-times higher in cocoa shell than in cocoa beans, but the samples have only a small overall radioactive contamination within the total β activity, the 40 K activity ratio in cocoa beans is 72%, in cocoa shells 79%. The respective ratio of 87 Rb can be 20% in the two samples. The activity concentration contribution of 90 Sr and 137 Cs contamination in cocoa beans and cocoa shells is together 2%. The data of the samples from different locations do not show any significant differences. In samples from 1986-1987 the increase of cesium activity concentration can be observed. (author)

  17. Quality control of radioactive waste disposal container for borehole project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Suhairy Sani; Azhar Azmi; Ilham Mukhriz Zainal Abidin

    2014-01-01

    This paper explained quality control of radioactive disposal container for the borehole project. Non-destructive Testing (NDT) is one of the quality tool used for evaluating the product. The disposal container is made of 316L stainless steel. The suitable NDT method for this object is radiography, ultrasonic, penetrant and eddy current testing. This container will be filled with radioactive capsules and cement mortar is grouted to fill the gap. The results of NDT measurements are explained and discussed. (author)

  18. The radioactive wastes management of the little nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Among the ANDRA customers, more than one million are little producers: hospital, research centers and industries. They are called little producers because of the low volume of produced wastes. Meanwhile these wastes management need an appropriate technology which is presented in this document. (A.L.B.)

  19. Effective Regulatory Control of Radioactive Sources in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.; Yuan, C.; Fan, S.; Su, S.

    2004-01-01

    Since the incident of radioactively contaminated buildings first surfaced in Taiwan in 1992, efforts have been made by AEC (Atomic Energy Council) of Taiwan to prevent recurrence of similar incidents involving radioactive materials and to achieve effective regulatory control over radioactive sources. The most important milestone is when AEC began to enforce IRPA he Ionizing Radiation Protection Act with the promulgation of 18 relevant regulations on Feb. 1, 2003. In order to enhance accountability of radioactive material and equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation, AEC develops and begins implementing a RPCS Radiation Protection Control System which is a powerful tool in controlling radiation safety and security. In addition, AEC develops a monthly registration program via internet, an o n-line reporting system f or owners/operators of radioactive sources, to improve monitoring of sealed sources (in-use and not-in-use). The registration requirement applies to 469 licensees possessing about 3,000 sealed sources in Taiwan. Because of the threat of orphan sources, AEC has made great efforts in preventing their contamination of construction steel material by establishing and enforcing the RPMMPIRCB Regulation for Preventive Measures and Management Plans for Incident of Radioactively Contaminated Buildings. To comply with this regulation, all 19 of Taiwan's steel factories with melting furnace have installed portal-type radiation detection system to monitor incoming scrap metal. (Author)

  20. Sealed Radioactive Sources. Information, Resources, and Advice for Key Groups about Preventing the Loss of Control over Sealed Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    Among its many activities to improve the safety and security of sealed sources, the IAEA has been investigating the root causes of major accidents and incidents since the 1980's and publishes findings so that others can learn from them. There are growing concerns today about the possibility that an improperly stored source could be stolen and used for malicious purposes. To improve both safety and security, information needs to be in the hands of those whose actions and decisions can prevent a source from being lost or stolen in the first place. The IAEA developed this booklet to help improve communication with key groups about hazards that may result from the loss of control over sealed radioactive sources and measures that should be implemented to prevent such loss of control. Many people may benefit from the information contained in this booklet, particularly those working with sources and those likely to be involved if control over a source is lost; especially: officials in government agencies, first responders, medical users, industrial users and the metal recycling industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety. This booklet is comprised of several stand-alone chapters intended to communicate with these key groups. Various accidents that are described and information that is provided are relevant to more than one key group and therefore, some information is repeated throughout the booklet. This booklet seeks to raise awareness of the importance of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. However, it is not intended to be a comprehensive 'how to' guide for implementing safety and security measures for sealed radioactive sources. For more information on these measures, readers are encouraged to consult the key IAEA safety and security-related publications identified in this booklet

  1. Occupational exposure to natural radioactivity in the zirconium mineral manufacturing industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros, L.; Zarza, I.; Ortiz, J.; Serradell, V.

    2006-01-01

    The spanish 'Real Decatur 783/2001', published as result of the adaptation of the European Council directive 96/29/EURATOM (B.S.S. directive), regulates in Spain the use of natural radioactive substances. This decree establishes the need to study and control those activities in which significant increases of the exposure of workers or members of the public could take place. One of these natural radioactive substances are zirconium minerals. They are widely employed in some industrial activities, such as the production of zirconia and zirconium chemicals, glazed ceramic products manufacture, refractories, foundry sands (including investment casting) and zirconium mineral manufacturing. Its major end uses are fine ceramics where it acts as an opacifier in glazes and enamels and also as an additive in special glass (i.e. TV glass). This paper provides a description of a measurement campaign carried out to estimate the risk of occupational exposure to natural radioactivity in the zirconium mineral manufacturing industries. Zirconium raw sands have generally a granular size of 100 to 200 μm, which may be reduced to around 2 μm for use in ceramics and paint applications by milling to flour. These sands contain varying concentrations of natural radionuclides: 232 Th, 235 U, and mostly 238 U, together with their progenies. The first part of the study is to identify situations and areas where worker s are exposed to radiation. Five pathways of exposure were found: inhalation of dust, ingestion of dust, inhalation of radon, skin contamination and external irradiation. Samples from raw materials and from the environment at the work areas are performed; both where the zircon sands are unloaded and stored and at the milling area. Secondly, collected samples are analysed to evaluate activities on those natural radionuclides. Gamma spectrometry analysis is performed for the whole of the samples. For this purpose, a Ge-HP detector (high purity Ge detectors) is used. Dust samples

  2. Uses of Radioactive Isotopes in Industry; Aplicacion es de los isotopos radiactivos en la industria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plata, A; Val Cob, M del; Gamboa, J M

    1962-07-01

    The present report contains a list of some of the most important problems in industry that have been approached so far by the use of radioactive isotopes. The list has been compiled trough the experience gained by the authors in revising for several years the most important scientific journal and other sources of information on this subject. The classification of industries has been done in an arbitrary way, choosing those isotope uses that have reached a higher degree of development. (Author)

  3. 75 FR 45130 - Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201, Silver... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0125] Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research Without an...

  4. Radioactive waste management of nuclear materials used in medicine, industry and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.; Miyamoto, H.

    1990-01-01

    Appropriate radioactive waste management applied to wastes resulting from the use of radionuclides for medical, research, or industrial purposes is to important as those from the nuclear fuel cycle, even considering their lower volumes. The strategy permitting reach the safety standards use procedures and administrative practices based in accumulated experience of various countries during many years. (author) [pt

  5. Mercury material-balance in industrial electrolytic cells, by using radioactive mercury (203Hg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caras, I.; Pasi, M.

    1976-01-01

    A material-balance test for industrial mercury electrolytic cells is described. The test uses the radioactive dilution technique with 203 Hg. The preparation of the 203 Hg from irradiated mercuric oxide is also described. The accuracy of the test is shown to be +-1% for each cell. (author)

  6. Control of radioactive materials on the medical science campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, C.H.; Vandergrift, J.F.; Slayden, S.A.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1977-01-01

    There are persistent and difficult control problems associated with the large scale use of radionuclides: nowhere are these more apparent than in a large university medical center. If a safe environment is to be maintained with respect to employees, students, patients, and the general public, a program must be devised for effective supervision and control of radioactive sources. An automated system has been developed for the inventory and control of radioactive materials that has proven a valuable asset in a large institution. The reports generated have assisted in making responsible judgements, as well as assuring the continuation of single licensure for the medical science campus. (author)

  7. Radioactive waste control at the reprocessing facility in fiscal 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    At the fuel reprocessing facility of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), the release of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes are controlled so as not to exceed the specific levels. Concentrated low and high level liquid wastes, sludge, etc. are contained in storage tanks. Low and high level solid wastes are stored in appropriate containers. In fiscal 1980 (April to March), the release of gaseous and liquid wastes was below the specific levels (as in the previous years). Based on the report made by PNC in accordance with the law concerning the regulation of reactors, etc., the following data are presented in tables: the released quantity of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes in fiscal 1980, the cumulative stored quantity of radioactive liquid wastes up to fiscal 1980; the cumulative stored quantity of radioactive solid wastes up to fiscal 1980 and the quantity of the same stored in fiscal 1980. (J.P.N.)

  8. Control System Radioactive Contamination in Food Samples in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, D.; Kurowski, W.; Muszynski, W.; Rubel, B.; Smagala, G.; Swietochowska, J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The analyses of the level of radioactive contamination in food samples are carried out by the Service for Measurements of Radioactive Contamination (SMRC) in Poland. The Service was brought into existence in 1961. The Service comprises of a network of measurement stations and the Centre of Radioactive Contamination Measurements (CRCM). The duty of the Centre is being executed by the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection (CLRP). The uniform methods of sampling are used in measurement stations. All important foodstuff: milk, meat, vegetables, fruit, cereals are controlled in the Service stations. The radiochemical and spectrometric methods are used to determine the activity of radioactive isotopes. The standard equipment of the measurement station is the measurement system type SAPOS-90 and multichannel analyser with scintillation or germanium detector. The structure of the Service, kinds of samples tested by each station, program of sampling in normal and during accident situation are presented in this paper. (author)

  9. Determination of radioactive scales in oil industry using naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.

    2006-06-01

    In the present study, naturally occurring radioactive materials (Radium isotopes) present in produced water and radiation measurements have been used to study the formation of scales, evaluate their age, determination of geological formations and between wells interactions. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed monthly for 5 months from 11 oil wells in three Syrian oil fields. Analysis includes radium isotopes and anions and cations concentrations in addition to radiation measurements at the well heads. The highest mean values of radium 226, Radium 228 and Radium 224 concentration in produced were 41 Bq/1, 57.1 Bq/1 and 1.1 Bq/1, respectively. The values obtained for Radium 226, Radium 228 and the activity ratio were statistically evaluated and the results were presented using the box plot method. The mean value of the activity ration of Radium 226 and Radium 228 was used to determine the age of scales accumulated inside tubulars. (author)

  10. Application of fuzzy logic control in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Wal, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    An overview is given of the various ways fuzzy logic can be used to improve industrial control. The application of fuzzy logic in control is illustrated by two case studies. The first example shows how fuzzy logic, incorporated in the hardware of an industrial controller, helps to finetune a PID controller, without the operator having any a priori knowledge of the system to be controlled. The second example is from process industry. Here, fuzzy logic supervisory control is implemented in software and enhances the operation of a sintering oven through a subtle combination of priority management and deviation-controlled timing

  11. Control measures in industrial and medical applications of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinloye, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and radioactive substances are natural and permanent features of the environment; additionally the use of human made radiation is widespread. Sources of radiation are essential to modern health care, disposable medical supplies sterilized by intense radiation have been central to combating disease, radiology is a vital diagnostic tool and radiotherapy is commonly part of the treatment of malignancies. Nuclear techniques are in growing use in industry, agriculture, medicine and many fields of research, benefiting hundreds of millions of people and giving employment to millions of people in the related occupations, Irradiation is used around the world to preserve and reduce wastage and sterilization techniques have been used to eradicate disease carrying insects and pests. Industrial radiography is in routine use, for example to examine welds and detect cracks and help prevent the failure of engineered structures. It is also known that exposure to ionizing radiation can result to injuries that manifest themselves in the individual and his descendants. It is therefore imperative that the use of radiation sources be accompanied with the methods necessary for the prevention of the harmful effects of the radiation. These methods are referred to as control measures. Control measures that have been applied in establishments can be classified into physical control measures and administrative control measures. Physical control measures involve the technical aspects while administrative control measures augment physical measures. The guidelines and recommendations for the safe use of radiation and radioactive materials are provided through legislative and regulatory controls

  12. The Cigeo project: an industrial storage site for radioactive wastes in deep underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieguer, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, France has decided to store its high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes, mostly issued from the nuclear industry, in a deep geological underground disposal site. This document presents the Cigeo project, a deep underground disposal site (located in the East of France) for such radioactive wastes, which construction is to be started in 2021 (subject to authorization in 2018). After a brief historical review of the project, started 20 years ago, the document presents the radioactive waste disposal context, the ethical choice of underground storage (in France and elsewhere) for these types of radioactive wastes, the disposal site safety and financing aspects, the progressive development of the underground facilities and, of most importance, its reversibility. In a second part, the various works around the site are presented (transport, buildings, water and power supply, etc.) together with a description of the various radioactive wastes (high and intermediate level and long-lived wastes and their packaging) that will be disposed in the site. The different steps of the project are then reviewed (the initial design and initial construction phases, the pilot industrial phase (expected in 2030), the operating phase, and the ultimate phases that will consist in the definitive closure of the site and its monitoring), followed by an extensive description of the various installations of surface and underground facilities, their architecture and their equipment

  13. Industrial aspects of radioactive waste management in Western Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.R.; Seynaeve, F.

    1977-01-01

    In 1980 there will be about 120 nuclear power reactors with 70,000 MWe in operation in Western Europe, and this number will be doubled by 1985, when the nuclear capacity in operation is expected to be 180,000 MWe. Predictions are made of the waste management requirements resulting from this nuclear expansion. Until a few years ago waste from nuclear research and from the use of isotopes in medicine has been the dominating source. Now there is a much larger proportion from the day to day operation of nuclear power reactors. Waste amounts from reprocessing of spent reactor fuel will rise more slowly. Waste production in other fuel cycle industries is relatively insignificant. There will be around 30 reactors and other nuclear plants to take out of operation in Western Europe around 1990. The large-scale handling of these wastes calls for overall management schemes, based on clear policies for storage and disposal. Questions are identified which have to be answered within the next few years in order to allow the orderly development of such large-scale waste management. These questions deal with: (i) rules and regulations, (ii) new technical evidence, (iii) administrative frameworks and responsibilities. Several areas of waste management are well suited to commercial waste operating firms, already established at present in a number of European countries. The scope for waste operators may include waste transportation, operating of own or government owned treatment and storage installations, and the carrying out of disposal operations. In the paper, development needs originally suggested by the Foratom waste study group will be discussed in the light of a late 1976 review to be carried through by European industry

  14. Characteristics of Airborne Particulates Containing Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Monazite Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Geon; Choi, Cheol Kyu; Park, Il; Kim, Min Jun; Go, A Ra; Ji, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Bon Cheol [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize physicochemical properties of airborne particulates at a monazite pulverization industry. The properties included particulate size distribution, concentration, shape, density, and radioactivity concentration. Monazite is one of the minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Therefore, external and internal exposure can be occurred to the workers in monazite industry. The major exposure pathway of the workers is internal exposure due to inhalation of airborne particulates. According to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), radiation dose due to inhaled particulates containing NORM depends on particulate properties. Therefore, ICRP recommended the internal dose assessment using measured physicochemical properties of the airborne particulates. In the absence of specific information, ICRP provided default reference values. In this study, we characterized physicochemical properties of airborne particulates at a monazite pulverization industry. The databases of particulate information can be used for accurate internal dose assessment of worker.

  15. Fuzzy Control in the Process Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Verbruggen, Henk; Østergaard, Jens-Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    Control problems in the process industry are dominated by non-linear and time-varying behaviour, many inner loops, and much interaction between the control loops. Fuzzy controllers have in some cases nevertheless mimicked the control actions of a human operator. Simple fuzzy controllers can...... be designed starting from PID controllers, and in more complex cases these can be used in connection with model-based predictive control. For high level control and supervisory control several simple controllers can be combined in a priority hierarchy such as the one developed in the cement industry...

  16. Environmental and occupational impacts of natural radioactivity from some non-nuclear industries in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans, C.W.M.; Steen, J. van der

    1996-01-01

    The existence of natural radioactivity in ores and other raw materials and in their products and wastes has long been recognized. National governments have imposed certain levels, above which the use of radioactive materials is restricted. In the Netherlands, the levels are laid down in the Implementing Orders of the Nuclear Energy Act. In general, the present levels are such that they are not exceeded when the primordial radioactive materials are present only in the form of contaminants. However, the concentration of radioactive materials can be such that somewhere in the raw material-product-waste chain or at releases, these levels might be exceeded. Under such circumstances, the industries have to apply for a licence under the Nuclear Energy Act. Part of the application for a licence is that the industry has to demonstrate that the dose to the workers and to the public is ALARA and below certain dose and risk constraints. In some industries compliance with the individual risk criterion for members of the public (10 -6 year -1 as a maximum risk for dying as a consequence of the practice) can be problematic. Direct irradiation from stock piles and contamination of the environment by releases in the atmosphere or surface waters might give rise to risks around the constraint value. In this paper some examples are given. (author)

  17. Control in the Chemical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses various control techniques used in chemical processes, including measuring devices, controller functions, control valves, and feedforward and feedback actions. Applications of control to a real chemical plant are exemplified. (CC)

  18. Some discussions on micrometeorology and atmospheric diffusion of classic and radioactive industrial pollutions. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veverka, O.; Valenta, V.; Vlachovsky, K.

    1977-01-01

    The vertical motion of an industrial plume, either conventional or radioactive is discussed and the respective formulas are given. The solution is given for the vertical rise of the plume and for the bent-over semi-horizontal plume under neutral, stable, and unstable atmospheric conditions. A theoretical model is described for the continuous rise of the radioactive plume under stable atmospheric conditions. The effective height is defined of the plume with regard to the shape of terrain and wind velocity. (J.P.)

  19. Safety control and minimization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinming; Rong Feng; Li Jinyan; Wang Xin

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the developed countries, the safety control and minimization of the radwastes in China are under-developed. The research of measures for the safety control and minimization of the radwastes is very important for the safety control of the radwastes, and the reduction of the treatment and disposal cost and environment radiation hazards. This paper has systematically discussed the safety control and the minimization of the radwastes produced in the nuclear fuel circulation, nuclear technology applications and the process of decommission of nuclear facilities, and has provided some measures and methods for the safety control and minimization of the radwastes. (authors)

  20. Regulatory control of radioactivity and nuclear fuel cycle in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.; Jennekens, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The mining of pitchblende for the extraction of radium some four decades ago resulted in a largely unwanted by-product, uranium, which set the stage for Canada to be one of the first countires in the world to embark upon a nuclear energy program. From this somewhat unusual beginning, the Canadian program expanded beyond mining of uranium-bearing ores to include extensive research and development in the field of radio-isotope applications, research and power reactors, nuclear-fuel conversion and fabrication facilities, heavy-water production plants and facilities for the management of radioactive wastes. As in the case of any major technological development, nuclear energy poses certain risks on the part of those directly engaged in the industry and on the part of the general public. What characterizes these risks is not so much their physical nature as the absence of long-term experience and the confidence resulting from it. The early development of regulatory controls in the nuclear field in Canada was very much influenced by security considerations but subsequently evolved to include radiological protection and safety requirements commensurate with the expanding application of nuclear energy to a wide spectrum of peaceful uses. A review of Canadian nuclear regulatory experience will reveal that the risks posed by the peaceful uses of nuclear energy can be controlled in such a manner as to ensure a high level of safety. Recent events and development have shown however that emphasis on the risks associated with low-probability, high-consequence events must not be allowed to mask the importance of health and safety measures covering the entire fuel cycle

  1. Accident consequence analysis models applied to licensing process of nuclear installations, radioactive and conventional industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senne Junior, Murillo; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    The industrial accidents happened in the last years, particularly in the eighty's decade, had contributed in a significant way to call the attention to government authorities, industry and society as a whole, demanding mechanisms for preventing episodes that could affect people's safety and environment quality. Techniques and methods already thoroughly used in the nuclear, aeronautic and war industries were then adapted for performing analysis and evaluation of the risks associated to other industrial activities, especially in the petroleum, chemistry and petrochemical areas. Some models for analyzing the consequences of accidents involving fire and explosion, used in the licensing processes of nuclear and radioactive facilities, are presented in this paper. These models have also application in the licensing of conventional industrial facilities. (author)

  2. The management of radioactive materials and its control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, D.; Charles, T.

    1998-01-01

    The present work is destined to present the arrangements taken by users of radioactive materials to follow them and to manage them efficiency; it takes stock of the different control systems that work towards checking the efficiency of these arrangements. Some particular cases are evoked relative to nuclear facilities. (N.C.)

  3. Quality control of radioactive waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martens, B.R.; Warnecke, E.; Odoj, R.

    1986-01-01

    The variety of incoming untreated wastes, treatment methods, waste forms and containers requires a great variety of controlling methods and principles to be applied both during waste treatment and on the final product. The paper describes product control schemes and methods, sampling systems and transportable testing equipment for waste drums, and equipment for waste cementation using in-drum stirring and subsequent fixation of solid wastes in the flowable product. (DG) [de

  4. Cost-benefit analysis of the industrial evaluations employing radioactive tracer techniques in the sugar-cane industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguila, D.; Jerez, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    A practice with radioactivity is justifiable if the benefit that she brings is greater than the detriment to the health that provokes. This is achieved with an optimization of the radiological protection on the base of the principle ALARA (the dose must be at botommost level that reasonably could be reached). The cost-benefit analysis helps to take a decision of practice optimized to use. Based on the cost-benefit criterion in the framework of the industrial radioprotection, was accomplished an industrial evaluations study employing 99mT c and 1 31 I in industry Cuban sugar-bowl. The results of the analysis demonstrated that the use of the 99mT c as radiotracer is the better option to take

  5. Methodological guide: management of industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances; Guide methodologique: gestion des sites industriels potentiellement contamines par des substances radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    At the request of the Ministries of Health and the Environment, IPSN is preparing and publishing the first version of the methodological guide devoted to managing industrial sites potentially contaminated by radioactive substances. This guide describes a procedure for defining and choosing strategies for rehabilitating such industrial sites. (author)

  6. Survey of product quality control of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.

    1989-01-01

    The PTB has developed basic procedures with regard to deriving final storage conditions and product quality control. After this, requirements for radioactive waste are derived via safety analysers, in which information about the radioactive waste, the geological overall situation of the site and the layout of the final storage mine, in particular, are included as basic data. The final storage conditions are only determined with the awarding of the planning decision. Compliance with them can be proved by random sample tests on waste containers or via a qualification and inspection of the conditioning process. (DG) [de

  7. Automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, I.; Vasko, M.; Daniska, V.; Schultz, O.

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation the automatized material and radioactivity flow control tool in decommissioning process is discussed. It is concluded that: computer simulation of the decommissioning process is one of the important attributes of computer code Omega; one of the basic tools of computer optimisation of decommissioning waste processing are the tools of integral material and radioactivity flow; all the calculated parameters of materials are stored in each point of calculation process and they can be viewed; computer code Omega represents opened modular system, which can be improved; improvement of the module of optimisation of decommissioning waste processing will be performed in the frame of improvement of material procedures and scenarios.

  8. Physical, chemical and radioactive characterization of co-products from titanium dioxide industry for valorization in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazquez, M.J.; Mantero, J.; Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Vaca, F.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to characterize the raw materials (ilmenite and slag), waste (red gypsum) and several co-products (sulphate monohydrate and sulphate heptahydrated) form the titanium dioxide industry in relation to their elemental composition (major, minor and trace elements), granulometry, mineralogy, microscopic morphology, physical composition and radioactive content in order to apply this knowledge in the valorization of the co-products in the fields such a as construction, civil engineering, etc. In particular, the main properties of cements produced with different proportions of red gypsum were studied, and the obtained improvements, in relation to Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC) were evaluated. It was also demonstrated that the levels of pollutants and the radioactive content in the produced RG cements, remain within the regulated safety limits. (Author). 38 refs.

  9. Characterization of naturally occurring radioactive materials and Cobald-60 contaminated ferrous scraps from steel industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, H.E.; Chiu, H.S.; Hunga, J.Y.; His, H.W.; Chen, Y.B.

    2002-01-01

    Since the occurrence of radioactively contaminated rebar incident in 1992, steel industries in Taiwan were encouraged by Atomic Energy Council (AEC) to install portal monitor to detect the abnormal radiation in shipments of metal scrap feed. From 1994 through 1999, there were 53 discoveries of radioactivity in ferrous scraps by steel companies. These include 15 orphan radioactive sources, 16 cobalt-60 contaminated rebars, 20 Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) contaminated scraps, and two unknowns. Most NORM-contaminated scraps were from abroad. The NORM and cobalt-60 contaminated scraps were taken from the steel mills and analyzed in laboratory. The analytical results of scales and sludge sampled from NORM-contaminated scraps combining with the circumstantial evidences indicate that five possible industrial processes may be involved. They are oil production and treatment, heavy mineral sand benefication and rare earth processing, copper mining and processing, recovery of ammonium chloride by lime adsorption in Ammonium-soda process, and tailing of uranium enrichment process. The cobalt-60 activity and trace elements concentrations of contaminated rebars confirm that all of them were produced domestically in the period from Oct. 1982 to Jan. 1983, when the cobalt-60 sources were lost and entered the electric arc furnace to produce the contaminated rebars. (author)

  10. Related regulation of quality control of industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This book introduce related regulation of quality control of industrial products, which includes regulations of industrial products quality control, enforcement ordinance of industrial products quality control, enforcement regulation of quality control of industrial products, designated items with industrial production quality indication, industrial production quality test, and industrial production quality test organization and management tips of factory quality by grade.

  11. Basic regulatory requirements for carrying out investigations, reasoning and the approving of the disposal of radioactive and other industrial waste in geological formations in the U.S.S.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimenov, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Legislation and other regulatory standards in force or in preparation in the USSR relating to the disposal and storage of radioactive and other industrial wastes in underground formations are discussed in the report. A tentative outline of the basic operations involved in the disposal of radioactive and other industrial wastes into geological formations is given. Supervision, control and penalties provided by law are also discussed. Conclusions are made that the comparison of national legislative instruments and regulatory documents and procedures relating to underground disposal of radioactive and industrial wastes into geological formations is timely and urgent. (author)

  12. The equipment for low radioactivity measurements in industrial and field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, R.; Owczarczyk, A.; Szpilowski, S.; Zenczykiewicz, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The equipment for low radioactivity measurements in industrial and field conditions has been worked out. Three scintillation detectors applied work in coincidence system. Their scintillation crystals are divided one to another by lead shieldings. All measuring system is situated in a lead container with lead cover. The measuring vessel fills practically all free volume of the lead container. Their shape ensures the best possible measurement geometry. (author). 3 figs

  13. Quality control concept for radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Martens, B.R.; Odoj, R.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a contract with the BfS for the performance of quality control measures is necessary. It is principally possible to apply two alternative methods: random checks on waste packages or qualification of conditioning processes with subsequent inspections. Priority is given to the control by the process qualification. Both methods have successfully been developed in the Federal Republic of Germany and can be applied. In the course of the qualification of conditioning processes it must be demonstrated by inactive and/or active runs that waste packages are produced which fulfil the waste acceptance requirements. The qualification results in the fixation of a handbook for the operation of the respective conditioning process including the process instrumentation and the operational margins. The qualified process will be inspected to assure the compliance of the actual operation with the conditions fixed in the handbook. (orig./DG)

  14. Effective regulatory control of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meserve, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the situation in the USA regarding government control over use of radiation sources, the challenges it faces and the potential paths to their resolution. In the light of the large number of radiation sources in use worldwide, the safety record on balance is remarkably good. But there is still considerable room for improvement. The IAEA has an important role to play, and it is playing it effectively

  15. Regulatory control of radioactivity and nuclear fuel cycle in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.; Jennekens, J.H.

    1977-05-01

    Legislation and regulations giving birth to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) are outlined, as well as current licencing procedures. The AECB bases its health and safety criteria on ICRP recommendations. R and D is funded to aid regulatory activity. Licencing activities cover uranium resource management, uranium mining and milling, nuclear generating stations, heavy water plants, and radioactive waste management. Safeguards, physical security, and international controls are also concerns of the AECB. (E.C.B.)

  16. Handbook for industrial noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The basic principles of sound, measuring techniques, and instrumentation associated with general purpose noise control are discussed. Means for identifying and characterizing a noise problem so that subsequent work may provide the most efficient and cost effective solution are outlined. A methodology for choosing appropriate noise control materials and the proper implementation of control procedures is detailed. The most significant NASA sponsored contributions to the state of the art development of optimum noise control technologies are described including cases in which aeroacoustics and related research have shed some light on ways of reducing noise generation at its source.

  17. Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelet, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The beginning of this book explains the why and how of the radioactivity, with a presentation of the different modes of disintegration. Are tackled the reports between radioactivity and time before explaining how the mass-energy equivalence appears during disintegrations. Two chapters treat natural radioisotopes and artificial ones. This book makes an important part to the use of radioisotopes in medicine (scintigraphy, radiotherapy), in archaeology and earth sciences (dating) before giving an inventory of radioactive products that form in the nuclear power plants. (N.C.)

  18. Industrial strategy for nondestructive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Michaut, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    For Electricite de France, the nondestructive control strategy passes by a responsibility of services, a competition between companies, a clarification of the market access and a dialogue with the companies

  19. Materials contamination control in the microelectronic industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardif, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with many aspects of the contamination of materials in the microelectronic industry. The contamination's control of chemicals, process gases, silicon and the survey of the ions free water's purity are treated. (TEC). 29 figs., 7 tabs

  20. Problems with radioactivity scrap in the iron and steel industry of the Czech and Slovak Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, J.; Toman, V.

    1999-01-01

    During the recent restructuring process, the Czech steel industry has undergone a drastic reduction in the steel production by around 40%. Under such situation, previously exported volumes have been diverted into domestic markets. For the export, the Czech steel industry had to make its efforts in enhancing the quality of products and in improving the technologies in accordance with ISO standards (ISO 9000 and also ISO 14000). Among the various new quality demands in the export market, the radioactive contamination of steel products has received a very high attention. The Czech Iron and Steel Federation has organized a working team specialized in solving the problems arising from radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap and steel products. The working team is made up of specialists from steel producers and scrap handling firms of the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic, of experts from the State Office for Nuclear Safety, the Ministry of Industry and Trade and the Metrological Institute. Members of the Inspectorate for Ionizing Radiation and the General Directory for Customs are also included. This working team takes part in the elaboration of the legislative norms in that area. This paper deals with all the detailed functions of the working team. At present, all the major Czech steel producers have installed stationary radiation monitoring systems for detecting the possible radioactivity in all materials entering into factories. Under an agreement arranged between the producers of the Czech Iron and Steel Federation, the tolerable range of radionuclide contents in steel scrap and steel products has been set at the maximum of 100 Bq/kg in ( scrap and steel products. In this respect, the large firms collecting and treating scrap have also installed stationary radiation monitoring systems. In such monitoring systems, the detector will measure and check the values of radioactivity above 10 - 15% higher than the natural background level. In the case that

  1. Natural radioactivity in Egyptian and industrially used australian bauxites and its tailing red mud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahirm, N.; Abd el Maksoud, T.; El Ezaby, B.; Nada, A.; Abu Zeid, H.

    1999-01-01

    Red mud is produced in considerable masses as a waste product in the production of aluminum from bauxite. It may be used for industrial or agricultural purposes. According to it's genesis by weathering and sedimentation bauxites contain high concentrations of uranium and thorium. Three Egyptian bauxites, Australian industry used bauxite and its red mud tailing were analyzed by a high resolution gamma spectrometer, with a hyper pure germanium detector. The three Egyptian bauxites show high concentrations in uranium series, and around 120 Bq kg -1 for uranium -235. K-40 concentrations for these samples ranged from 289 to 575 Bq kg -1 . Thorium series concentrations show lower values. The industrially used bauxite shows very low concentrations for all radioactive nuclides. Its tailing red mud as a low level radioactive waste LLRW, shows low concentrations for uranium - series, thorium - series and also 40 K, so it is recommended to be used in industrial and agricultural purposes, which is not permissible for the normal red mud. (author)

  2. Laboratory use of industrial control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijllart, A.; Avot, L.; Brahy, D.; Jegou, D.; Saban, R.

    1994-01-01

    Industrial control system manufacturers supply the building blocks for the control of industrial equipment or specific process control applications. Although the laboratory environment is different in many aspects (prototyping, evolution and frequent reconfiguration), the use of these building blocks remain attractive because of their general purpose nature, their cost and the large spectrum of available types. In this paper we present three projects which have been implemented using both industrial control system building blocks (PLCs, controllers, digital and analogue plug-in I/O cards) and commercial software packages (LabView and VisualBasic) for the man-machine interface, the data acquisition and archiving, and the process control. This approach has proved to be economical, easy and fast to implement. ((orig.))

  3. Surveillance and control of containment by means of radioactive measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.; Rousseau, L.; Delalande, J.

    1983-12-01

    In this paper, the radioactive measurements participating in the surveillance and control of the reactor containment as well as the possible procedures or operating rules related to, especially the ultimate procedures which could be implemented in case of a beyond of design accident, are presented. However, an overall view of the plant radiation monitoring system installed on the French plants is first given. If necessary, difference between 900 MW and 1300 MW units are emphasized

  4. HABIT, Toxic and Radioactive Release Hazards in Reactor Control Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stage, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. 2 - Methods: Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel

  5. A guide for controlling consumer products containing radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Consumer products are considered regardless of the purpose for which the radionuclide is added. For example, the purpose may be to make use of the ionising radiation emitted by the substance in the product itself (e.g. radioluminescent devices antistatic devices and ionisation chamber smoke detectors), or to make use of some other property of the material where the presence of radiation in the final product is merely adventitious (e.g. thorium gas mantles, ceramics with uranium glazes, and products containing radioactive tracers added to facilitate manufacturing and inspection processes). The Guide does not cover some products containing natural radioactive substances which have not been intentionally added, such as building materials. The Guide does not cover medicinal products and pharmaceuticals, nuclear powered cardiac pacemakers, or electronic equipment, such as television receivers, that emit X-rays. Unlike the 1970 Guide, this Guide does not consider those products, such as EXIT signs, containing gaseous tritium light sources, that would not be supplied directly to members of the public. The Guide is concerned mainly with the exposure arising from consumer products of those persons who are not subject to any regulatory controls for purposes of radiation protection in normal circumstances. Members of the public come under this heading, but not workers involved in the manufacture of consumer products. These workers will normally be subject to separate control. Radiological protection concepts and policy for the control of radioactive consumer products and licensing and post-licensing surveillance are developed

  6. Design controls for the medical device industry

    CERN Document Server

    Teixeira, Marie B

    2013-01-01

    The second edition of a bestseller, Design Controls for the Medical Device Industry provides a comprehensive review of the latest design control requirements, as well as proven tools and techniques to ensure your company's design control program evolves in accordance with current industry practice. The text assists in the development of an effective design control program that not only satisfies the US FDA Quality System Regulation (QSR) and ISO 9001 and 13485 standards, but also meets today's third-party auditor/investigator expectations and saves you valuable time and money.The author's cont

  7. Industrial influences on an accelerator control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westervelt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Industrial applications of a control system package have extended from industrial research to process control. While the requirements of these applications have much in common with accelerator controls, there are always extensions, different emphases, and additional requirements. These often add to the applicability of the software in all fields and certainly keep the development team challenged. This paper discusses some of the influences that industrial applications such as power distribution monitoring, casting and rolling mills, and aircraft engine testing have on software originally designed for scientific research. We also discuss some of the differences in the software development process between development for in-house use and development for sales and industrial use. (Author) ref., fig

  8. A survey of citizen's attitude to disposal sites of industrial waste and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Kaoru; Tanaka, Masaru; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate a risk perception about landfill sits for industrial waste or radioactive waste through the questionnaire survey. As a result, it was shown that most of people worried about health and environmental impact of radioactive waste; and moreover, high ratios of the peoples felt dangerous and scary sensuously. Public trust to the central government was very low. Over 60 percent of people do not trust that countermeasures will be taken at the times of accident' and nearly 70 percent of people do not trust that 'the information about the accident is disclosed'. Answers to questions concerning about public trust regarding countermeasures at the accident, information disclosure at the accident, environmental standard, and environmental technology show significant correlation with risk perception of landfill sites. (author)

  9. Management of ''short-lifetime'' radioactive wastes, an industrial reality to safeguard the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussat, A.

    1992-01-01

    On the occasion of the inauguration of the Aube waste storage center by A.Billardon, Vice Minister for Energy, the author reviews the management situation in France for short life radioactive wastes. The wastes are first defined and their characteristics explained, and then are discussed the general principles underlying the management of these wastes, which involves finding ways to avoid the dispersal of radioactive products into the environment. The author explains why the French have chosen surface storage, and then goes into the integrated management system developed to optimize the long-term management of short-term wastes on the technical and economic levels. The two storage centers existing in France (the Manche and Aube centers) are then described. The article winds up with a presentation of the system as it has been adapted abroad, and another possible adaptation for use in storing toxic industrial wastes. 2 figs., 3 photos

  10. Radioactive wastes from Angra-1 plant and radioisotope production to medical and industrial uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldonian, Nelson L.; Mattos, Luis A.T. de

    1997-01-01

    Based on false premises, critics point of view have frequently lead part of Brazilian public opinion to impeach the validity of nuclear energy applications.The critics allege that social implications discredit those applications. In this context, treated as if not known theirs diverse characteristics, great noise has been created about radioactive wastes related to diverse nuclear industry processes. Due to the great misunderstanding on the subject, this paper presents the characteristics and destinations of radioactive wastes related to nucleoelectric generation and to radioisotopes production in Brazil. Even so someone could point out that those characteristics are diverse, we discuss in a comparative way the benefits of those two kinds of nuclear applications. (author). 5 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Introduction to Papers 3-5. The UK industry's strategy for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passant, F.H.

    1989-01-01

    The waste management policies and strategies of the main radioactive waste producers in the UK, namely the CEGB, BNFL and the UKAEA are summarised. Three papers will be published in the Proceedings of this Conference, giving details, for the CEGB, BNFL and the UKAEA of individual policies and strategies outlining how they have developed and are being implemented. An overview of the strategy for each type of waste with some examples of the approach being followed, is given. The key elements of radioactive waste management policy and strategy are set down by the Government, in various White Papers, and the detailed Industry strategy is consistent with these, indeed it is determined largely by them. (author)

  12. Non-Destructive Testing for Control of Radioactive Waste Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumeri, S.; Carrel, F.

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and control of radioactive waste packages are important issues in the management of a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, Andra performs quality control inspection on radwaste package before disposal to ensure the compliance of the radwast characteristics with Andra waste disposal specifications and to check the consistency between Andra measurements results and producer declared properties. Objectives of this quality control are: assessment and improvement of producer radwaste packages quality mastery, guarantee of the radwaste disposal safety, maintain of the public confidence. To control radiological characteristics of radwaste package, non-destructive passive methods (gamma spectrometry and neutrons counting) are commonly used. These passive methods may not be sufficient, for instance to control the mass of fissile material contained inside radwaste package. This is particularly true for large concrete hull of heterogeneous radwaste containing several actinides mixed with fission products like 137Cs. Non-destructive active methods, like measurement of photofission delayed neutrons, allow to quantify the global mass of actinides and is a promising method to quantify mass of fissile material. Andra has performed different non-destructive measurements on concrete intermediate-level short lived nuclear waste (ILW-SL) package to control its nuclear material content. These tests have allowed Andra to have a first evaluation of the performance of photofission delayed neutron measurement and to identify development needed to have a reliable method, especially for fissile material mass control in intermediate-level long lived waste package.

  13. Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive substances can become associated with scrap metal in various ways and if not discovered they can be incorporated into steel and non-ferrous metals through the melting process. This can cause health hazards as well as environmental concerns and there can be serious commercial implications. Numerous incidents have occurred in recent years involving the discovery of radioactive substances in scrap metal and, in some cases, in metal from the melting process. These incidents have proved to be very costly in relation to the recovery and cleanup operations required but also in terms of the potential loss of confidence of the industry in scrap metal as a resource. This has led the scrap metal industry to seek ways of managing the problem. In most countries, shipments of scrap metal are monitored but at different points in the distribution chain and to different extents and efficiencies. As yet, only limited efforts towards unifying and harmonizing monitoring strategies and methods in the context of scrap metal have been made at the international level. The Conference was organized into five sessions: the global perspective, national policies and strategies, compliance with radiological criteria, management of incidents with contaminated scrap metal, and improving confidence and protecting the interests of stakeholders. The aim of the first session was to present the views and perspectives of the different organizations concerned with radioactive material in scrap metal, scrap metal recycling, steel making, radiation source security and safety and international trade and economics. The second session covered some of the national policies and strategies being used to address the control of radioactive material that has been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal were presented. In addition to the oral presentations, contributions describing the situation in many countries of the world in the form of posters were displayed. The many posters reporting national

  14. Control and Management of Radioactive Material Inadvertently Incorporated into Scrap Metal. Proceedings of an International Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    Radioactive substances can become associated with scrap metal in various ways and if not discovered they can be incorporated into steel and non-ferrous metals through the melting process. This can cause health hazards as well as environmental concerns and there can be serious commercial implications. Numerous incidents have occurred in recent years involving the discovery of radioactive substances in scrap metal and, in some cases, in metal from the melting process. These incidents have proved to be very costly in relation to the recovery and cleanup operations required but also in terms of the potential loss of confidence of the industry in scrap metal as a resource. This has led the scrap metal industry to seek ways of managing the problem. In most countries, shipments of scrap metal are monitored but at different points in the distribution chain and to different extents and efficiencies. As yet, only limited efforts towards unifying and harmonizing monitoring strategies and methods in the context of scrap metal have been made at the international level. The Conference was organized into five sessions: the global perspective, national policies and strategies, compliance with radiological criteria, management of incidents with contaminated scrap metal, and improving confidence and protecting the interests of stakeholders. The aim of the first session was to present the views and perspectives of the different organizations concerned with radioactive material in scrap metal, scrap metal recycling, steel making, radiation source security and safety and international trade and economics. The second session covered some of the national policies and strategies being used to address the control of radioactive material that has been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal were presented. In addition to the oral presentations, contributions describing the situation in many countries of the world in the form of posters were displayed. The many posters reporting national

  15. Fractional Order Models of Industrial Pneumatic Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Razminia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a new approach for modeling of versatile controllers in industrial automation and process control systems such as pneumatic controllers. Some fractional order dynamical models are developed for pressure and pneumatic systems with bellows-nozzle-flapper configuration. In the light of fractional calculus, a fractional order derivative-derivative (FrDD controller and integral-derivative (FrID are remodeled. Numerical simulations illustrate the application of the obtained theoretical results in simple examples.

  16. Competent authority regulatory control of the transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this guide is to assist competent authorities in regulating the transport of radioactive materials and to assist users of transport regulations in their interactions with competent authorities. The guide should assist specifically those countries which are establishing their regulatory framework and further assist countries with established procedures to harmonize their application and implementation of the IAEA Regulations. This guide specifically covers various aspects of the competent authority implementation of the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. In addition, physical protection and safeguards control of the transport of nuclear materials as well as third party liability aspects are briefly discussed. This is because they have to be taken into account in overall transport regulatory activities, especially when establishing the regulatory framework

  17. Immobilization of low and intermediate level radioactive liquid wastes using some industrial by-product materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, N.M.; EI-Dessouky, M.I.; Abou EI-Nour, F.H.; Abdel-Khalik, M.

    2006-01-01

    Immobilization of low and intermediate level.radioactive liquid wastes in different matrices: ordinary Portland cement and cement mixed with some industrial byproduct: by-pass kiln cement dust, blast furnace slag and ceramic sludge was studied. The effect of these industrial by-product materials on the compressive strength, water immersion, radiation effect and teachability were investigated. The obtained results showed that, these industrial by-product improve the cement pastes where they increase the compressive strength, decrease the leaching rate for radioactive cesium-137 and cobalt-60 ions through the solidified waste forms and increase resistance for y-radiation. It is found that, solidified waste forms of intermediate level liquid waste (ILLW) had high compressive strength values more than those obtained from low level liquid waste (LLLW). The compressive strength increased after immersion in different leachant for one and three months for samples with LLLW higher than those obtained for ILLW. The cumulative fractions released of cesium-137 and cobalt-60 of solidified waste forms of LLLW was lower than those obtained for ILLW

  18. [The main directions of improving the system of state accounting and control of radioactive substances and radioactive waste products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a modification of the basic directions of state accounting and control of radioactive substances and radioactive waste products, whose implementation will significantly improve the efficiency of its operation at the regional level. Selected areas are designed to improve accounting and control system for the submission of the enterprises established by the reporting forms, the quality of the information contained in them, as well as structures of information and process for collecting, analyzing and data processing concerning radioactive substances and waste products.

  19. Investigation of environmental radioactivity of wine cellars, watercourse and industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyorfi, Tamas, E-mail: gyorfi.tamas@ejf.hu [Eoetvoes Jozsef College (Hungary); Raics, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-09-15

    The aim of the investigations was to determine activity concentration of radioactive isotopes in soil samples collected from different provinces of Hungary. Earlier studies have proved that the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration is higher than permitted in some wine cellars. To investigate the reason for this phenomenon, the activity concentration of soil samples was measured. Analyzing {sup 137}Cs isotope activity in samples collected from the area of a watercourse it was possible to determine the silting-up rate. Activity concentrations were measured for red mud originating from an industrial disaster.

  20. Radioactive investigation in an industrial plant of Ascoli Piceno which makes use of graphite scraps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Ciaccio, P.; Grisanti, F.; Sabatini, F.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997 a radiological alarm originated in an Italian industrial plant in Ascoli Piceno. This fact required to investigate a peculiar case of a possible radioactive contamination in a working environment up to its solution. A working group made of experts of various Institutes and Organisations, after an analysis of the situation, carried out an experimental study and drew some scientific and radiation protection conclusions. This report contains a review of the work performed by the working group and a summary of the radiation protection intervention at the plant [it

  1. Investigation of environmental radioactivity of wine cellars, watercourse and industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyorfi, Tamas; Raics, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the investigations was to determine activity concentration of radioactive isotopes in soil samples collected from different provinces of Hungary. Earlier studies have proved that the 222 Rn activity concentration is higher than permitted in some wine cellars. To investigate the reason for this phenomenon, the activity concentration of soil samples was measured. Analyzing 137 Cs isotope activity in samples collected from the area of a watercourse it was possible to determine the silting-up rate. Activity concentrations were measured for red mud originating from an industrial disaster.

  2. Spoken commands control robot that handles radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelan, P.F.; Keddy, C.; Beugelsdojk, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Several robotic systems have been developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory to handle radioactive material. Because of safety considerations, the robotic system must be under direct human supervision and interactive control continuously. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a voice-recognition system that permits this control, yet allows the robot to perform complex preprogrammed manipulations without the operator's intervention. To provide better interactive control, we connected to the robot's control computer, a speech synthesis unit, which provides audible feedback to the operator. Thus upon completion of a task or if an emergency arises, an appropriate spoken message can be reported by the control computer. The training programming and operation of this commercially available system are discussed, as are the practical problems encountered during operations

  3. The regulatory control over radiation sources: the Brazilian experience and some lessons learned from industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.L.C.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D.; Instituto Militar de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority. These activities are described, especially those related to management of orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal considering the actions already put into place by CNEN during the licensing and controlling of radioactive sources in the industry and other facilities. In Brazil, there is not yet an effective system for controlling the scrap metal and recycling industry, thus a coordinated approach to achieve a harmonized and effective response with the involvement of third parties is needed, especially the metal industries and ores facilities. These practices call for stringent regulatory control, in order to reduce the occurrence of orphan sources, and consequently, radioactive material appearing in scrap metal. Some challenges of managing the national radiation sources register systems will be discussed, in order to cover effectively all the radiation source history (in a 'from the cradle to the grave' basis), and the dynamic maintenance and update of these data. The main industrial applications considered in this work are those dealing with constant movement of sources all over the country, with geographical issues to be considered in the managing and controlling actions, such as gammagraphy and well-logging. This study aims to identify and promote good practices to prevent inadvertent diversion of radioactive material, taking into account existing international recommendations and some lessons learned in national level. (author)

  4. The regulatory control over radiation sources: the Brazilian experience and some lessons learned from industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.L.C.; Gomes, J.D.R.L.; Gomes, R.S.; Costa, M.L.L.; Thomé, Z.D., E-mail: evaldo@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jlopes@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rogeriog@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mara@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: zielithome@gmail.com [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioproteção e Segurança Nuclear; Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Seção de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    This study gives an overview of the activities of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), as the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority. These activities are described, especially those related to management of orphan sources and radioactive material in scrap metal considering the actions already put into place by CNEN during the licensing and controlling of radioactive sources in the industry and other facilities. In Brazil, there is not yet an effective system for controlling the scrap metal and recycling industry, thus a coordinated approach to achieve a harmonized and effective response with the involvement of third parties is needed, especially the metal industries and ores facilities. These practices call for stringent regulatory control, in order to reduce the occurrence of orphan sources, and consequently, radioactive material appearing in scrap metal. Some challenges of managing the national radiation sources register systems will be discussed, in order to cover effectively all the radiation source history (in a 'from the cradle to the grave' basis), and the dynamic maintenance and update of these data. The main industrial applications considered in this work are those dealing with constant movement of sources all over the country, with geographical issues to be considered in the managing and controlling actions, such as gammagraphy and well-logging. This study aims to identify and promote good practices to prevent inadvertent diversion of radioactive material, taking into account existing international recommendations and some lessons learned in national level. (author)

  5. Management and control of radioactive wastes in Ghana | Gbadago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is responsible for monitoring and tracking all radioactive materials imported, stored or exported. The profile of radioactive sources in active use are also presented, in addition to spent radioactive sources currently in the custody of the NRWMC as part of the inventory for creating databases on radioactive wastes in Ghana.

  6. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.T.; Fenton, D.; O'Flaherty, T.

    2001-01-01

    The primary legislation governing safety in uses of ionizing radiation in Ireland is the Radiological Protection Act, 1991. This Act provided for the establishment in 1992 of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, and gives the Institute the functions and powers which enable it to be the regulatory body for all matters relating to ionizing radiation. A Ministerial Order made under the Act in 2000 consolidates previous regulations and, in particular, provides for the implementation in Irish law of the 1996 European Union Directive which lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation. Under the legislation, the custody, use and a number of other activities involving radioactive substances and irradiating apparatus require a licence issued by the Institute. Currently some 1260 licences are in force. Of these, some 850 are in respect of irradiating apparatus only and are issued principally to dentists and veterinary surgeons. The remaining licences involve sealed radiation sources and/or unsealed radioactive substances used in medicine, industry or education. A schedule attached to each licence fully lists the sealed sources to which the licence applies, and also the quantities of radioactive substances which may be acquired or held under the licence. It is an offence to dispose of, or otherwise relinquish possession of, any licensable material other than in accordance with terms and conditions of the licence. Disused sources are returned to the original supplier or, where this is not possible, stored under licence by the licensee who used them. Enforcement of the licensing provisions relies primarily on the programme of inspection of licensees, carried out by the Institute's inspectors. The Institute's Regulatory Service has a complement of four inspectors, one of whom is the Manager of the Service. The Manager reports to one of the Institute's Principal

  7. National infrastructure for detecting, controlling and monitoring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS) has the direct responsibility to assure proper safety for handling, accounting for and controlling of nuclear materials and radioactive sources which based on a solid regulatory infrastructure , its elements contains the following items: preventing, responding, training, exchanging of information. Based on the National Law for AECS's Establishment no. 12/1976, a Ministerial Decree for Radiation Safety no. 6514 dated 8.12.1997, issued by the Prime Minister. This Decree authorizes the Syrian Atomic Energy Commission to regulate all kinds of radiation sources. It fulfills the basic requirements of radiation protection and enforce the rules and regulations. The Radiation and Nuclear Regulatory Office (RNRO) is responsible for preparing all the draft regulations. In 1999 the General Regulations for Radiation Protection was issued by the Director General of the AECS, under Decision no. 112/99 dated 3.2.1999. It is based on an IAEA publication, Safety Series no. 115 (1996), and adopted to meet the national requirements. Syria has nine Boarding Centers seeking to prevent unauthorized movement of nuclear material and radioactive sources in and out side the country. They are related to the Atomic Energy Commission (AECS), and are located at the main entrances of the country. Each is provided with the practical tools and equipment in order to assist Radiation Protection Officers (RPO) in fulfilling their commitments, by promoting greater transparency in legal transfers of radioactive materials and devices. They apply complete procedures for the safe import, export and transit of radioactive sources. The RPOs provide authorizations by issuing an entry approval document, after making sure that each concerned shipments has an authorized license from the Syrian Regulatory Body (RNRO) before permitting shipments to leave, arrive or transit across their territory, enabling law enforcement to track the legal movement of

  8. Dose control in road transport of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerulis, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The radiation doses to workers in the transport of radioactive material should be as low as reasonably achievable. The average doses of drivers and loaders, sampled in this thesis should be decreased. The demonstration of doses control in a road vehicle with radioactive material required by the current Brazilian regulation, CNEN NE 5.01 should be written in its own printed form with exposure values obtained in normally occupied positions from workers and members of the public, even when the consignment does not need 'exclusive use' (⅀IT ≤50). Through bibliographic research, modeling and field research, this research work shows that this demonstration of the control should be done by writing the registration accumulation of load, limited (⅀IT ≤50), also in the own printed form. It is for a better control method, in order to avoid the use of measuring equipment, to build standardization with foreign regulations, to the current occupational doses of radioprotection technicians, the costs and time, (important for consignment with radiopharmaceuticals short half-life) would be all smaller. Exposure values of the parameters used with this method are smaller than regulatory limits. The segregation distances between loads and the cabins of vehicles shall be showed by Brazilian regulation updated to contribute to these aims. (author)

  9. Robot Control Overview: An Industrial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Brogårdh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One key competence for robot manufacturers is robot control, defined as all the technologies needed to control the electromechanical system of an industrial robot. By means of modeling, identification, optimization, and model-based control it is possible to reduce robot cost, increase robot performance, and solve requirements from new automation concepts and new application processes. Model-based control, including kinematics error compensation, optimal servo reference- and feed-forward generation, and servo design, tuning, and scheduling, has meant a breakthrough for the use of robots in industry. Relying on this breakthrough, new automation concepts such as high performance multi robot collaboration and human robot collaboration can be introduced. Robot manufacturers can build robots with more compliant components and mechanical structures without loosing performance and robots can be used also in applications with very high performance requirements, e.g., in assembly, machining, and laser cutting. In the future it is expected that the importance of sensor control will increase, both with respect to sensors in the robot structure to increase the control performance of the robot itself and sensors outside the robot related to the applications and the automation systems. In this connection sensor fusion and learning functionalities will be needed together with the robot control for easy and intuitive installation, programming, and maintenance of industrial robots.

  10. Issues and Experiences on Radioactive Waste Quality Control / Quality Assurance with Regard to Future Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmerhagen, I.; Brennecke, P.; Steyer, S.; Bandt, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany all types of radioactive waste (short-lived, long-lived) are to be disposed of in deep geological formations. Thus, the safe management of radioactive waste presupposes an appropriate conditioning of primary waste-to-waste packages suitable for emplacement in a repository as well as the documentation of pre-treatment, processing and packaging steps and the waste package characteristics being relevant for disposal. Due to the operation, decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear facilities as well as the application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine and research and development radioactive waste continuously arises in Germany. In order to manage this waste different measures and procedures regarding its conditioning and quality control/quality assurance were introduced and since many years successfully applied. Waste conditioning is especially characterized by a flexible application of the Konrad waste acceptance requirements. The rationale for this approach is due to the present non-availability of a repository in Germany. Several examples of a 'tailor-made' application of the waste acceptance requirements in treatment, conditioning and documentation processes as well as the quality assurance/quality control processes illustrate the current German approach. (authors)

  11. Kinematics Control and Analysis of Industrial Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongbo; Cai, Fan; Li, Yongmei; Liu, Wei

    2018-03-01

    The robot’s development present situation, basic principle and control system are introduced briefly. Research is mainly focused on the study of the robot’s kinematics and motion control. The structural analysis of a planar articulated robot (SCARA) robot is presented,the coordinate system is established to obtain the position and orientation matrix of the end effector,a method of robot kinematics analysis based on homogeneous transformation method is proposed, and the kinematics solution of the robot is obtained.Establishment of industrial robot’s kinematics equation and formula for positive kinematics by example. Finally,the kinematic analysis of this robot was verified by examples.It provides a basis for structural design and motion control.It has active significance to promote the motion control of industrial robot.

  12. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  13. IT Security Aspects of Industrial Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Holecko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a set of general network system architectures for industrial process control systems as well as vulnerabilities related to these systems and the IT threats these systems are exposed to from the point of view of Common Criteria methodology and ITU-T recommendation X.805.

  14. Training Center for Industrial Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Yezhov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the application of embedded microcontrollers and industrial controllers with built-in operating systems.With the development of embedded operating systems and technology of open standard IEC 61131-3 product developer can write their own program management and support staff – to modernize management program.

  15. Cyber Security of Industrial Control Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; Paske, B.J. te

    2015-01-01

    Our society and its citizens depend on the undisturbed functioning of (critical) infrastructures and their services. Crucial processes in most critical infrastructures, and in many other organisations, rely on the correct and undisturbed functioning of Industrial Control Systems (ICS). A failure of

  16. Panel discussion on 'Government and industry social responsibility towards potential communities hosting radioactive waste management sites'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cragg, W.; Storey, K.; Cooper, H.; McIntyre, J.; Brown, P.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' In healthy democracies, support from local communities for industrial/development projects is highly desirable. What are the respective roles of the various stakeholder sectors, i.e. governments, industry, and communities around industrial projects, including waste management facilities, and how can they interact with sustainable development in mind? Should the private sector be involved in public policy? Should the public sector have an active role in providing funding complementing the notion of the Polluter pays principle? Should communities have a greater role in overseeing the activities of industry and be enabled to do so? Should communities be empowered to increase their role in decision-making processes? Are there trends emerging in this area? Are there improvements to be made? The Not-in-My-Backyard (NIMBY) reflex is not e thical . Thoughtful review is required when considering the right or the desirability to develop. Each of the invited panel members will briefly approach this issue from the perspective of their respective sector. A discussion period will ensue which hopefully will provide insight into how diverse sectors can work together to ensure the establishment of radioactive waste management facilities in communities which support such projects based on local and national values. (author)

  17. Industries processing naturally occurring radioactive materials: twenty years of emission data in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzi, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the dose assessment of discharges to air of two industries processing NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) in the Netherlands. An industrial plant producing elemental phosphorus (thermal process, unique within Europe) reports since 1987 its emission data to the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (VROM: Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment). This plant accounts for the highest release of Po-210 to air in the Netherlands, with a yearly average of approximately 500 GBq. Other significant NORM discharges to air arise from an industrial plant with blast-furnaces for steel production. Yearly discharges fall under permit, and are reported, since 1993. RIVM, the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, is tasked by the Ministry to assess the dose to the general public arising from these discharges to air. Air transport modelling is used to determine both air concentration (for inhalation exposure) and deposition rate of the radionuclides. A (conservative) committed ingestion dose is determined by modelling the uptake of radionuclides from contaminated farmland, and assuming a food basket to be fairly representative for the population of the Netherlands. Discharges to water in the Netherlands have decreased in the past twenty years, due both to the closure of two phosphoric acid plants a decade ago and the improved treatment of waste fluids by other NORM industries. The collective dose assessed from discharges to air since 1987 is presented here. (author)

  18. Evaluation of HPGe spectrometric devices in monitoring the level of radioactive contamination in metallurgical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrucci, A., E-mail: andrea.petrucci@enea.it [ENEA – Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazione Ionizzanti, Rome (Italy); Arnold, D.; Burda, O. [PTB – Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); De Felice, P. [ENEA – Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazione Ionizzanti, Rome (Italy); Garcia-Toraño, E.; Mejuto, M.; Peyres, V. [CIEMAT – Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Šolc, J. [CMI – Czech Metrology Institute, Radiova 1a, 102 00 Praha 10 (Czech Republic); Vodenik, B. [IJS – Laboratory for Radioactivity Measurements, Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana Slovenia (Slovenia)

    2015-10-11

    This paper presents the results of the tests of High Purity Germanium (HPGe) based gamma spectrometers employed for radioactivity control carried out on a daily basis in steel factories. This new application of this type of detector is part of the Joint Research Project (JRP) MetroMETAL supported by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The final purpose of the project was the improvement and standardisation of the measurement methods and systems for the control of radioactivity of recycled metal scraps at the beginning of the working process and for the certification of the absence of any radioactive contamination above the clearance levels (IAEA-TECDOC-8S5) in final steel products, Clearance levels for radionuclides in solid materials: application of exemption principles). Two prototypes based on HPGe detectors were designed and assembled to suit the needs of steel mills which had been examined previously. The evaluation of the two prototypes, carried out at three steel factories with standard sources of {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 241}Am in three different matrices (slag, fume dust and cast steel) and with samples provided on-site by the factories, was successful. The measurements proved the superiority of the prototypes over the scintillation detectors now commonly used regarding energy resolution and multi-nuclide identification capability. The detection limits were assessed and are presented as well.

  19. Project of an information integrated system to provide support to the regulatory control of the radioactive waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christovao, Marilia Tavares

    2005-05-01

    Sources and radioactive waste deriving from industry activities, medical practice and other areas are collected, received, and stored as waste on Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Institutes, that also generate, treat and store their own radioactive waste. The object of this project is to present an Integrated Information System named SICORR, having as guidelines, the referred processes to the radioactive waste regulatory control, under the responsibility of the Radioactive Waste Division (DIREJ), the General Coordination of Licensing and Control (CGLC), the Directorate of Safety and Radiation Protection (DRS) and the CNEN. The main objective of the work was reached, once the project SICORR modeling considers the radioactive waste control inventory, enclosing the treatment and integration of the radioactive waste and the radionuclides data and processes; the installations that produce, use, transport or store radiation sources data; and, CNEN Institutes responsible for the radioactive waste management data. The SICORR functions or essential modules involve the data treatment, integration, standardization and consistency between the processes. The SICORR specification and the analysis results are registered in documents, Software Specification Proposal (PESw) and Software Requirements Specification (ERSw), and are presented in text, in diagrams and user interfaces. Use cases have been used in the SICORR context diagram. The user interfaces for each use case have been detailed, defining the graphical layout, the relationships description with other interfaces, the interface details properties and the commands and the product entrances and exits. For objects radioactive waste and radionuclides, states diagrams have been drawn. The activities diagram represents the business model process. The class diagram represents the static objects and relationships that exist between them, under the specification point of view. The class diagram have been determined

  20. Manual control models of industrial management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossman, E. R. F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The industrial engineer is often required to design and implement control systems and organization for manufacturing and service facilities, to optimize quality, delivery, and yield, and minimize cost. Despite progress in computer science most such systems still employ human operators and managers as real-time control elements. Manual control theory should therefore be applicable to at least some aspects of industrial system design and operations. Formulation of adequate model structures is an essential prerequisite to progress in this area; since real-world production systems invariably include multilevel and multiloop control, and are implemented by timeshared human effort. A modular structure incorporating certain new types of functional element, has been developed. This forms the basis for analysis of an industrial process operation. In this case it appears that managerial controllers operate in a discrete predictive mode based on fast time modelling, with sampling interval related to plant dynamics. Successive aggregation causes reduced response bandwidth and hence increased sampling interval as a function of level.

  1. Ergonomic Redesign of an Industrial Control Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Raeisi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Operator's role in industrial control centers takes place in time, which is one of the most important determinants of whether an expected action is going to be successful or not. In certain situations, due to the complex nature of the work, the existing interfaces and already prepared procedures do not meet the dynamic requirements of operator's cognitive demands, making the control tasks unnecessarily difficult. This study was conducted to identify ergonomic issues with a specific industrial control panel, and redesign its layout and elements to enhance its usability. Task and link analysis methodologies were implemented. All essential functions and supporting operations were identified at the required trivial levels. Next, the weight of any possible link between the elements of the panel was computed as a composite index of frequency and importance. Finally, all components were rearranged within a new layout, and a computerized mockup was generated. A total of 8 primary tasks was identified, including 4 system failure handling tasks, switching between manual and automated modes, and 3 types of routine vigilance and control tasks. These tasks were broken down into 28 functions and 145 supporting operations, accordingly. Higher link values were observed between hand rest position and 2 elements. Also, 6 other components showed robust linkages. In conclusion, computer modeling can reduce the likelihood of accidents and near misses in industrial control rooms by considering the operators' misperception or mental burden and correcting poor design of the panels and inappropriate task allocation.

  2. Organization of customs control of fissionable and other radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukhlinov, L.; Bojko, V.

    2001-01-01

    Among the routine inspection tasks of the Sheremetyevo customs office are tasks stemming from international commitments of Russia to prevent proliferation of nuclear weapons and material that can be used for making these weapons. These tasks are: radiation monitoring of all vehicles, passengers, their luggage and goods crossing the state border; inspection of fissionable and radioactive materials (FRM) legally transported by participants in the foreign trade activities with a view to checking that the declared data fully correspond to the actual radioactive cargo. Organizational measures and technical measures at the Sheremetyevo customs office are described in detail. The efficiency of the scheme is illustrated by the following figures. In 1997, when appropriate technical means and trained personnel were lacking, there were only 2 events of detecting items with a rather high radioactivity level in the luggage. In 1999, after the entire radiation monitoring system was fully deployed (i.e. the flight checkpoint was equipped with technical means of radiation monitoring, personnel was trained, special technologies and algorithms were developed), there were 61 events of radiation detection, and in 2000 there have been 90 events, including breaches of legal FRM traffic regulations through disagreement of declared and actual parameters. We believe that the above-considered organization of radiation monitoring allows effective and quite reliable control of and adequate response to possible illicit transport of FRM through the airport Sheremetyevo to other countries, including CIS. In the near future we plan to increase the efficiency of the radiation monitoring by integrating the currently operational customs-used stationary FRM detection systems into a single information network capable of providing simultaneous video-aided continuous nuclear monitoring at three terminals (Sheremetyevo-1, Sheremetyevo-2, Sheremetyevo-Cargo) with display of information at the workstation

  3. The control of the radioactive pollution of milk (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michon, G.

    1962-01-01

    Milk, an essential foodstuff, is the object of a supervision and vigilant controls governed by numerous laws which protect its commercial and sanitary qualities. The development of the use of nuclear energy poses and will pose new problems of hygiene and the milk should benefit from controls concerning its possible contamination. Grass-eating animals are particularly subjected to radioactive contaminations and the milk which they produce does not escape contamination because of of its saline composition and of the particular metabolism of the mammary gland. As a result, milk is a contamination integrator and its analysis makes it possible to detect radioelements which can only be detected with great difficulty in an average size plant sample. (author) [fr

  4. Criteria of exemption of regulatory control for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco A. Medrano Lopez

    1991-01-01

    Being based on the information contained in the 10 CFR Part 20, of the section 20.301 until the 20.306 where the mechanisms by means of which can prepare the waste of low level are indicated. While the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) it amended in the year of 1985 the Act of Politics on Low level Wastes, in particular the section 10 of the amendment of the Act, relative to the concept BRC treats those groups of radioactive waste in that their activity contents are so low that they could be exempt of the regulatory control, either liberating them toward the environment or to exempt people or organizations of the regulatory control

  5. Statutory Instruments - 1984 No. 863 and 1985 No. 708. Public Health, England and Wales - Public Health Scotland. The Control of Pollution (Radioactive Waste) Regulations 1984, The Control of Pollution (Radioactive Waste) Regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Regulations provide that radioactive waste is to be treated as any other waste for pollution control purposes as opposed to special radioactive control purposes. In the former respect, radioactive waste is subject to Part II of the Control of Pollution Act 1974, but in the latter, it remains subject to the Radioactive Substances Act 1960. (NEA) [fr

  6. Improving control of the coal industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valkovyy, V I; Ignatyev, B N

    1982-01-01

    Questions of organizing control of the coal industry based on the use of ACS are examined. Improvement of control of the sector is done in the following main trends: pinpointing the distribution of rights; duties and responsibilities within the associations; more complete calculation of the positions; standard structures of the mines, open pits and other production units of the specific operating conditions; improvement in the forms and methods of controlling specialized production units; formation of style and methods of leadership corresponding to the modern conditions of production.

  7. Improving industrial process control systems security

    CERN Document Server

    Epting, U; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2004-01-01

    System providers are today creating process control systems based on remote connectivity using internet technology, effectively exposing these systems to the same threats as corporate computers. It is becoming increasingly difficult and costly to patch/maintain the technical infrastructure monitoring and control systems to remove these vulnerabilities. A strategy including risk assessment, security policy issues, service level agreements between the IT department and the controls engineering groups must be defined. In addition an increased awareness of IT security in the controls system engineering domain is needed. As consequence of these new factors the control system architectures have to take into account security requirements, that often have an impact on both operational aspects as well as on the project and maintenance cost. Manufacturers of industrial control system equipment do however also propose progressively security related solutions that can be used for our active projects. The paper discusses ...

  8. The application of sanctions for violations of the regulatory standards in the industrial uses of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian

    2013-01-01

    This work describe the mechanisms used for to apply the penalties in industrial uses of radioactive materials, the experience gained in recent years in various administrative steps, as well as relevant aspects of some cases and / or exceptional situations that were detected by the ARN during regulatory inspections by complaints or other means, and that led to the imposition of administrative penalties in such industrial applications. This scheme covers various types of sanctions that depending on the severity of the fault may be: warnings, fines, suspension or cancellation of permits or permissions, and if necessary arrest and / or decommissioning of radioactive material

  9. Using radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The leaflet discusses the following: radioactivity; radioisotopes; uses of ionising radiations; radioactivity from (a) naturally occurring radioactive elements, and (b) artificially produced radioisotopes; uses of radioactivity in medicine, (a) clinical diagnostic, (b) therapeutic (c) sterilization of medical equipment and materials; environmental uses as tracers; industrial applications, e.g. tracers and radiography; ensuring safety. (U.K.)

  10. Natural radioactivity content and radionuclides leachability of bricks containing industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalina Laili; Mohd Zaidi Ibrahim; Nur Azna Mahmud; Muhamat Omar

    2012-01-01

    A study have been carried out using gamma-ray spectrometric system to determine the natural radioactivity level in bricks made from industrial waste and their associated radiation hazard. Brick-1 and brick-2 contained waste from coal power plant and granite industry, respectively. The leachability of radionuclides from these bricks was also investigated. The activity concentration values of 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 232 Th, and 40 K are 64.25, 63.15, 67.9 and 254.19 Bq kg -1 , respectively in brick-1, and 193, 164.48, 164.63 and 1348.75 Bq kg -1 , respectively in brick-2. The radiation hazard indexes such as radium equivalent activities (Ra eq ), representative level index (I γr ), external hazard index (H ex ) and internal hazard index (H in ) were calculated and compared with the internationally approved values. Results indicate that brick-1 showed less radiological hazard than brick-2. This suggested that brick-1 could be used in building construction without exceeding the proposed criterion level. The leachability of 226 Ra for bricks showed the activity concentration slightly exceeded the limit generally used for industrial wastewater for example 1 BqL -1 . (author)

  11. Recovery from Iridium-192 flakes of a radioactive source for industrial use after a radiation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, W.H.; Zapata, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    The Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) is the most used and ideal for industrial radiography applications, especially in petrochemical plants and pipelines and provides better contrast sensitivity for thick (25.4 mm). This source has constructive sealed double encapsulation, the internal capsule containing stainless steel to radioactive material in the form of flakes and welded with TIG process. The radiological incident happened at a gas station fuel sales in circumstances in which there was a homogeneity test welds a tank, the flakes or Ir-192 fell off his ponytail and left scattered over an area of 2 m 2 , some fell flat areas and other land so collected in lead shielding and metal container and ground source. Full recovery of the leaflets was performed at the Division of radioactive waste management (GRRA) gaining a total of 22 flakes with no radiation risk to staff performance and installation and the conclusion was reached that the misapplicaion of TIG welding was the main cause the incident. (author)

  12. Natural radioactivity in some rocks employed as dimension and decorative stones in the Nigerian building industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubosun, I A; Tchokossa, P; Balogun, F A; Fasasi, M K; Ocan, O; Adesanmi, C A

    2013-12-01

    The natural radioactivity in some selected granites and allied rocks from the Basement Complex of Nigeria for use as dimension/decorative stones was measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. The average activity concentrations observed for the selected rock samples range from 9 to 124 Bq kg⁻¹; 13 to 60 Bq kg⁻¹ and 1360 to 2326 Bq kg⁻¹ for ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th and ⁴⁰K, respectively. The mean radiological hazard indices were 121.62 nGy h⁻¹; 239.73 Bq kg⁻¹; 0.65 Bq kg⁻¹ and 0.77 Bq kg⁻¹ for the absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent, external hazard and internal hazard, respectively. The results obtained were examined on the basis of existing International recommended limits and compared with data on similar rocks from other parts of the world. The values obtained for the rocks, except one, were found to be lower than the values recommended for building materials, and the rocks are considered safe for use as decorative stones as defined by OECD criteria (NEA-OCED Nuclear Energy Agency Dose Constraints in Optimisation of Occupational Radiological Protection Report by NEA Group Experts, OCED, France (2011)). Results highlight the fact that, despite meeting certain suitability criteria such as colour, texture, etc., the radioactivity content of the rocks is another factor of importance for their continued application in the human environment/building industry.

  13. Thermal treatments available for destruction of industrial wastes. Application to the incineration of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, Gerard.

    1981-08-01

    Both the collecting and processing circuits and the physicochemical laws of combustion and thermal degradation of industrial wastes are recalled. The various incineration processes are reviewed considering especially conversion of refuse to energy and recovery of raw materials either before or after treatment. Wastes are devided into three classes according to their physical state: solid, liquid or sludge, gas. Some processes based on pyrolysis in the absence of air or at sub-stoichiometric levels are presented. A similar study is carried out on radioactive wastes, taking into account the particular aspects raised by incineration. Operational devices are described and some lines of research about the application of new techniques are summarized. The results derived from laboratory or pilot plant experiments are presented [fr

  14. Formal verification of industrial control systems

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Verification of critical software is a high priority but a challenging task for industrial control systems. For many kinds of problems, testing is not an efficient method. Formal methods, such as model checking appears to be an appropriate complementary method. However, it is not common to use model checking in industry yet, as this method needs typically formal methods expertise and huge computing power. In the EN-ICE-PLC section, we are working on a [methodology][1] and a tool ([PLCverif][2]) to overcome these challenges and to integrate formal verification in the development process of our PLC-based control systems. [1]: http://cern.ch/project-plc-formalmethods [2]: http://cern.ch/plcverif

  15. Radioactive tracer technique in process optimization: applications in the chemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Process optimization is concerned with the selection of the most appropriate technological design of the process and with controlling its operation to obtain maximum benefit. The role of radioactive tracers in process optimization is discussed and the various circumstances under which such techniques may be beneficially applied are identified. Case studies are presented which illustrate how radioisotopes may be used to monitor plant performance under dynamic conditions to improve production efficiency and to investigate the cause of production limitations. In addition, the use of sealed sources to provide information complementary to the tracer study is described. (author)

  16. Environmental radioactivity: the importance of controlling exposure of the public: some experiences in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gomez, Isis Maria

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear power is offering considerable advantages, it is considering the option to produce energy and the economy has moved in favour of the nuclear power. Therefore, the security is important within of the industry because ensures the control of public exposure and the environment and it plays a crucial role. Public exposure refers to exposure that is not of the direct work with ionizing radiation or the application of nuclear techniques in medical treatment and diagnosis. There are potential sources of discharges into the environment as the spent fuel and the waste disposal. Some of the routes of exposure are atmospheric discharge, liquid discharge, irrigation, environment, decomposition of the rain, food chains, etc. International regulations on subject of radiological safety are set by the IAEA and have a hierarchical order: fundamentals, requirements and guidelines. The International Commission of Radiological Protection and the Committee of the General Assembly of the United Nations are described in the research. The action is exposed in Cuba with regard to nuclear programs that have been realized or that are executed in relation to the control of the exposure of the public in existing applications. It mentions the centralized management of radioactive rights generated, the control of other sources of exposure, and the Red Nacional de Vigilancia Radiologica Ambiental. It also includes numerical data of studies realized on the extent of the sources of public exposure, the external doses received by the Cuban population product of environmental sources of radiation, the estimating of the doses received by the Cuban population by the incorporation of radionuclides present in the water and food. Likewise, the radioactive environmental funds; the phosphate mining; the protection and extraction of oil and the presence of radon inside the house are shown. The exposure to gamma radiation in thermal spas; the exposure to environmental sources of radiation

  17. Environmental impact assessment of radioactive material transport in the nuclear industry in China over the past 30 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.M.; Wang, X.X.

    1999-01-01

    An outline is given of the transport of radioactive material in the nuclear industry in China over the past 30 years (1955-1985) (excluding Taiwan). During 1955-1985, the freight volume of packages of radioactive material was some 4.50x10 6 items. The total activity was about 4.64x10 5 TBq. The total transport distance was 2.10x10 8 km. The available results show that annual individual doses to transport workers are rather low. Much attention has been paid to the safe transport of the radioactive material. Hence, no accident with serious radiological effects on transport workers and the public has ever happened during the past 30 years. The paper also discusses how to strengthen the surveillance and administration, and the radiation protection of radioactive material transport, etc. (author)

  18. Modeling of geo-material durability and contaminant fate in recycling or disposal of industrial and radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Windt, L.

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the HYTEC model, coupling chemical and hydrodynamic processes, and its application to the recycling of inorganic wastes and the disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes. A common feature is the assessment of geo-material durability while submitted to chemical disturbances by their industrial or natural environment and, reciprocally, the quantification of contaminant fate in soils and aquifers. Research papers in a first section numerically oriented, HYTEC is validated by means of an intercomparison exercise based on oxidative UO 2 dissolution and the subsequent migration of U species in subsurface environments. A numerical approach of leaching tests is also discussed. Several researches based on HYTEC follows. The evolution of the cement/clay interface is simulated in the framework of the multi-barrier system of radioactive waste disposal and the Tournemire engineering analog; discriminating between the physical and chemical key processes. The physico-chemical processes of cement biodegradation by fungi are investigated with a focus on acidic hydrolysis and complexation by biogenic carboxylic acids. Modeling of source-terms and ageing with respect to contaminant migration is discussed in the case of the chemical alteration of spent fuel pellets under disposal conditions by considering radiolytic dissolution, inhibiting effect and radioactive decay, and by analyzing the effect of fractures on the containment properties of subsurface disposal facilities of stabilized/solidified waste. Leaching lab experiments applied to steel slag and the chemical evolution of leachate from MSWI sub-bases of two pilot roads over 10 years are eventually modelled to better estimate the environmental impact of such recycling scenarios. On-going research In the straight lines of the modeling of radioactive waste disposal, a first perspective is to investigate the transient states driven by thermal gradient and water re-saturation of the near-field barriers and

  19. Control of trafficking of radioactive sources/substances on European Community eastern border

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovjagina, Irina; Graveris, Visvaldis

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Taking into account Latvia geographical location, historical core stones (the dissolution of Soviet Union, join to European Community) and increasing of the international terrorism treats, control fissile and non-fissile radioactive material become one of high priorities. During past 2 years active work and practical exercise with representative from Ministry of Defense, Police, and Custom etc. on control of trafficking of such materials were performed and Operational Manual for Control on Radioactive Materials for Customs and Policy officers is issued. All land borders check points with Russian Federation and Byelorussian, all harbors and airports were equipped with a gamma/ neutrons or gamma control portals. To control unwanted material traffic within the country, as well as to ensure the recycled scrap metal is source-free use of monitoring portals and additional portable detectors in the past years strictly increased. Cases with alarm levels, when gamma dose rate exceeds more than 1.5 times the background level, are subject to reporting and analyzing by Radiation Safety Centre (RDC) experts (24 hours on duty). Consultative phone service for inhabitants is maintained; guidelines and working procedures within Authority and other Institutions involving were developed and implemented. As a result, in 2007 RDC has got 612 reports from the border. In 83% cases this was relevant to the trains, in 17%- to the trucks. Mostly enhanced activity was due to potassium compounds in fertilizers (85%), due to ceramics (4%), abrasives (2.5%), and refractory materials (3%). Controlling scrap metal there were revealed two sources in 2007 - one Sr-90 calibration source and other Cs-137 orphan source (origin unknown). The presence of radioactive sources in scrap in the past 3 years has been represented by Co-60, Cs-137 and Sr-90 sources, parts of statically electricity neutralizers, Ra-226. Several times NORM industries polluted materials were from scrap excluded

  20. Regulatory control and safety of radiation and radioactive sources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollah, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    The application of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources in different fields such as, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and teaching is constantly increasing in Bangladesh. Any system enacted to control exposure to ionizing radiation has as primary objective the protection of health of people against the deleterious effects of radiation. Establishing the appropriate level of radiological protection and safety of radiation sources used in practice or intervention attains this objective. The regulatory program governing the safe use of radioactive and radiation sources in Bangladesh is based on the legislation enacted as Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NSRC) Act-93 and NSRC Rules-97 and its implementation by the competent authority. The radiation control infrastructures and procedure are described as well as their functioning for the implementation of relevant activities such as licensing, regular inspection, personal dose monitoring, emergency preparedness, etc. The issue of security of radiation source is dealt in close relation with the preparation and use of the inventory of all radiation sources in the country

  1. Managing Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials In the Petroleum Industry in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahsat, H.; Korany, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) have been known to be present in varying concentrations in hydrocarbon reservoirs. These NORM under certain reservoir conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels.the recognition of NORM as a potential source of contamination to oil and gas facilities has become widely spread and gained increased momentum from the industry. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that maintenance and other personnel may be sufficiently severe that maintenance and other personnel may be exposed to hazardous concentrations. Health and environmental concerns regarding NORM have become an important safety issue in upstream petroleum industry in Egypt since the early 1990's when NORM have been detected in different gas and oil production facilities. In these facilities, radiation protection measures were taken to realize safe handling and disposal of NORM according to the applicable international standards. This paper describes the extent of the NORM contamination problem in Egypt and presents guidelines for dealing with NORM based on the latest scientific techniques and international experiences

  2. Review of Cyclotrons for the Production of Radioactive Isotopes for Medical and Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmor, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Radioactive isotopes are used in a wide range of medical, biological, environmental and industrial applications. Cyclotrons are the primary tool for producing the shorter-lived, proton-rich radioisotopes currently used in a variety of medical applications. Although the primary use of the cyclotron-produced short-lived radioisotopes is in PET/CT (positron emission tomography/computed tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) diagnostic medical procedures, cyclotrons are also producing longer-lived isotopes for therapeutic procedures as well as for other industrial and applied science applications. Commercial suppliers of cyclotrons are responding by providing a range of cyclotrons in the energy range of 3-70MeV for the differing needs of the various applications. These cyclotrons generally have multiple beams servicing multiple targets. This review article presents some of the applications of the radioisotopes and provides a comparison of some of the capabilities of the various current cyclotrons. The use of nuclear medicine and the number of cyclotrons supplying the needed isotopes are increasing. It is expected that there will soon be a new generation of small "tabletop" cyclotrons providing patient doses on demand.

  3. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Slurry Fed Melters (SFM) are being developed in the United States, Europe and Japan for the conversion of high-level radioactive waste to borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The high transition metal, noble metal, nitrate, organic, and sulfate contents of these wastes lead to unique melter redox control requirements. Pilot waste-glass melter operations have indicated the possibility of nickel sulfide or noble-metal fission-product accumulation on melter floors, which can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, and decrease melter life. Sulfide formation is prevented by control of the redox chemistry of the melter feed. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Computerized thermodynamic computations are being developed to predict the sequence and products of redox reactions and is assessing process variations. Continuous melter test results have been compared to improved computer staged-thermodynamic-models of redox behavior. Feed chemistry control to prevent sulfide and moderate noble metal accumulations are discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs

  4. Radioactive Control of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant Environment in the Year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulic, S.; Miklavzic, U.; Franic, Z.; Kanduc, M.

    1998-01-01

    Regular Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPPK) radioactivity control comprises the supervisions of the inventory of liquid and gaseous emissions at the source, and the independent supervisions of the input of radionuclides into larger environment (imisson). The controlled environment area consists primarily of a 12 kilometers large circle around the object, where the largest values of imission could be expected, and where possible changes in the Sava river and the underground waters could first be noticed. The circle has been enlarged upon the territory of the Republic of Croatia (RC) from Jesenice on Dolenjsko until Podsused (30 km of air - line distance). As reference points relevant for the readiness in the case of accident, especially for detection of iodine and aerosol air transport, the program comprises also measuring points in the RC at larger distances (from 14 to 27 km) in the direction of Zagreb its larger western surroundings (passive Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in the each 42 km long). Continuous control of emission is performed by the radiological service of KNPP by routine procedures, supplemented by adequate measurements from other authorized institutions (intercomparisons, parallel measurements of representative and other samples). Summarised results of radioactive measurements for man-made and natural radionuclides are presented for different transfer media and exposure pathways in the form of assessed effective doses. Conservatively estimated dose burdens received by a member of the reference (critical) population group as the result of NPP emissions amount to a value of the committed effective dose equivalent smaller than 20 μSv/year. This value represents less than 1 % of the annual dose received on average from natural and artificial sources by a member of the general public in the normal environment. The yearly doses from natural radioactivity, global contamination (Chernobyl, atmospheric nuclear explosions), non-nuclear industries and

  5. Radioactive control of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant in the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulic, S.; Miklavzic, U.; Franic, Z.; Kanduc, M.

    1996-01-01

    Regular Krsko Nuclear Power Plant (NPPK) radioactivity control comprises the supervisions of the inventory of liquid and gaseous emissions at the source, and the independent supervisions of the input of radionuclides into larger environment. The controlled environment area consist primarily of a 12 kilometers large circle around the object, where the largest values of immission could be expected, and where possible changes in the Sava river and the underground waters could first be noticed. The circle has been enlarged upon the territory of the Republic of Croatia (RC) from Jesenice on Dolenjsko until Podsused (30 km of air-line distance). As reference points relevant for the readiness in the case of accident, especially for detection of iodine and aerosol air transport, the program comprises also measuring points in the RC at larger distances (from 14 to 27 km) in the direction of Zagreb its larger western surroundings (passive Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters in each 42 km long). Continuous of control of emission is performed by the radiological service of (KNPP) by routine procedures, supplemented by adequate measurements from other authorized institutions. Summarized results of radioactive measurements for man-made and natural radionuclides are presented for different transfer media and exposure pathways in the form of assessed effective doses. Conservatively estimated dose burdens received by a member of the reference (critical) population group as the result of NPP emissions amount to a value of the committed effective dose equivalent smaller than 20 μSv/year. This value represents less than 1% of the annual dose received on average from natural and artificial sources by a member of the general public in the normal environment. The yearly doses from natural radioactivity, global contamination , non-nuclear industries and hospitals are also estimated from the measured data in some media. (author)

  6. Comparative levels of radioactive air pollutants from industry and fallout. A progress report of radioecological investigations of airborne radioactivity in the Utah environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendleton, R.C.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported of measurements carried on during the year 1971 and the first two months of 1972 on the radioactivity from natural as compared to artificial radiation sources in the environment in Utah. During this time, a major portion of our work was devoted to analyses of the data and preparation of a report related to the Baneberry venting event and the accumulation of data on fallout from the January 7, 1972 Chinese nuclear explosion. Calibration procedures were developed for air samplers for the establishment of the numbers of pCi/m 3 in air. The responses of the air monitors in relationship to the ventilation index, seasonal effect, and the industrial complexity of the area were analyzed. Continuous measurements were made of the levels of radioactive materials in soils and vegetation and the results of these studies are presented mainly in tabular form. Comparisons have been made of the levels of radioactive materials in soils on the basis of square mile levels and the distribution of the radioactive materials in the soil profiles. Measurements of farm crops, including the major sources from which dairy products would be produced, have been made, and some comparisons by year and location have been made. Studies of secondary aerosols have been made using the dust accumulated on farm implements as the indicator of the kinds of secondary aerosols to which farmers and outdoorsmen might be exposed. These results would also be indicative of the kinds of dusts produced when high winds resuspend soil deposited radionuclides

  7. Improving production control within the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, R L

    1982-01-01

    The problems of controlling and minimising design and manufacturing information within the automotive industry are both costly and do not make maximum use of previous experience. With the advent of CAD/CAM, many new techniques have evolved for the speedy construction of design and manufacturing data bases. A means of binding together these data bases and controlling the design and process planning information is now presented in the form of Computervision's Migraphics and Miplan software. This gives a data retrieval capability from all area's of the production cycle including design and detail, numerical control and robotics, process planning, manufacture and procurement. Together with its numerous analytical capabilities this sorftware provides an excellent tool for the optimisation of manufacturing techniques, thus providing a complete CAD/CAM system from a single data base.

  8. Investigation on proper materials of a liner system for trench type disposal facilities of radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hisakazu; Amazawa, Hiroya; Sakai, Akihiro; Arikawa, Masanobu; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Project Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency will settle on near surface disposal facilities with and without engineered barriers for radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities. Both of them are so called 'concrete pit type' and 'trench type', respectively. The technical standard of constructing and operating a disposal facility based on 'Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors' have been regulated partly by referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. This means that the concrete pit type and the trench type disposal facility resemble an isolated type for specified industrial wastes and a non leachate controlled type final disposal site for stable industrial wastes, respectively. On the other, We plan to design a disposal facility with a liner system corresponding to a leachate controlled type final disposal site on a crucial assumption that radioactive wastes other than stable industrial wastes to be disposed into the trench type disposal facility is generated. By current nuclear related regulations in Japan, There are no technical standard of constructing the disposal facility with the liner system referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. We investigate the function of the liner system in order to design a proper liner system for the trench type disposal facility. In this report, We investigated liner materials currently in use by actual leachate controlled type final disposal sites in Japan. Thereby important items such as tensile strength, durability from a view point of selecting proper liner materials were studied. The items were classified into three categories according to importance. We ranked proper liner materials for the trench type disposal facility by evaluating the important items per material. As a result, high density polyethylene(HDPE) of high elasticity type polymetric sheet was selected

  9. Some discussions on micrometeorology and atmospheric diffusion of classic and radioactive industrial pollutions. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veverka, O.; Valenta, V.; Vlachovsky, K.

    1976-01-01

    Plume depletion and deposition is discussed for the cases of stack disposal of conventional and radioactive wastes. Dry and wet deposition processes and general radioactive decay chains including isomeric transitions are taken into account. (author)

  10. Loopholes of laws and regulations related to redevelopment of former sites of radioactive material control area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsuka, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    We found loopholes of laws and regulations for supervising radioactive materials. It is not obliged to measure the soil radioactivity of the sites that were formerly used as scientific or engineering institutes, or hospitals with a radioactive material control area. If the former institutes or hospitals made studies with radioactive materials before the enforcement of the law concerning prevention from radiation hazards due to isotopes and its detailed regulations, it is concluded that there was the period when the radioactive materials were not under management. If it is found that the radioactive materials were applied at the former site before the enforcement of the related laws and regulations, the radioactivity in the soil of the redeveloped area should be examined, which should be obliged by some laws or regulations. (author)

  11. Control verification radioactive effluent discharges to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, D.E.; Czerniczyniec, M.A.; Amado, V.A.; Curti, A.R.; Lee Gonzáles, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The National Law of Nuclear Activity No. 24,804 establishes that the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) will be responsible for the function of regulation and control of nuclear activity, grant, suspend and revoke licenses, permits or authorizations and to issue regulatory standards on radiation and nuclear safety. According to the latter the ARN has issued a set of rules that make up the regulatory framework for nuclear activity. This includes the standards that determine the radiological criteria for controlling the release of radioactive effluents which were established to protect members of the public. In the process of licensing a facility, the ARN determines the authorized discharge of gaseous and liquid effluents which must comply with the installation values. These annual values are understood as an operating restriction (OR) and arise from the activity of each relevant radionuclide present in the discharge. For this is taken as a reference the level of optimized discharge considering an appropriate margin of flexibility to ensure public protection without interfering with the operation of the installation. This paper presents the results of the review of the above criteria and methodology for calculating the RO adopted by the RNA present. [es

  12. Operation of controlled-air incinerators and design considerations for controlled-air incinerators treating hazardous and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRee, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the basic theory and design philosophies of the so-called controlled-air incinerator and examines the features of this equipment that make it ideally suited to the application of low-level radioactive waste disposal. Special equipment design considerations for controlled air incinerators treating hazardous and radioactive wastes are presented. 9 figures

  13. Characteristics of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the oil and gas industries: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Puad Abu; Mohd Noor Mohd Yunus; Sopian, K.; Amran Abd Majid

    1999-01-01

    Activities and work practices in which radiation exposure of workers and members of the public is increased due to the presence of NORM are receiving increased attention from regulatory agencies and, to lesser extent, from the general public. In Malaysia the main sources of NORM are from the technological activities of tin mining, ore and heavy mineral processing, combustion of coal to generate power, and oil and gas extraction. The crude oil sludge that contains NORM arising from the oil and gas extraction activities lately has received special attention by the Malaysian regulatory authorities. These crude oil sludge are considered as Scheduled Waste (contains heavy metals) by Department of Environmental (DOE) and very low level radioactive waste which contains NORM by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB), and its cannot be disposed without permission and proper control. This paper reviewed the radiological behaviour and characteristic o NORM in the crude oil sludge from the oil and gas production activities in Malaysia. (Author)

  14. Radioactive contamination of Bunodosoma caissarum under controlled conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Gouvea, R. de C. dos; Santos, P.L. dos

    The kinetics of uptake and release of radionuclides 137 Cs, 131 I, 133 Ba, 51 Cr (III and VI), 60 Co and 65 Zn in the 'cnidaria' Bunodosoma caissarum have been studied. This is an exclusively Brazilian species and easily collected on the Rio de Janeiro coastal waters. The kinetic experiments have been made in aquariums of 1000 cm 3 , in laboratory under controlled conditions and accompanied by single channel radiometry. The velocities of concentration were evident to radionuclides 131 I and 133 Ba. The larger concentration factors were registred to 51 Cr (III), 65 Zn and 51 Cr (VI), with middle values of 20,0 , 14,5 and 8,6 respectively. The same radionuclides stood out in the loss experiments, presenting the following biological half-lives : 292,2 h ( 51 Cr-III), 784,0 h ( 51 Cr-VI) and 823,0 h ( 65 Zn). This expressive value for the 65 Zn suggests a probable biological integration of this radionuclide by the species studied. The results allow us to indicate the 'anthozoa' Bunodosoma caissarum as a bioindicator of the radioactive contamination of the marine environment. (Author) [pt

  15. Radioactive waste tank ventilation system incorporating tritium control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a ventilation system for radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The unique design of the system is aimed at cost-effective control of tritiated water vapor. The system includes recirculation ventilation and cooling for each tank in the facility and a central exhaust air clean-up train that includes a low-temperature vapor condenser and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME). A one-seventh scale pilot plant was built and tested to verify predicted performance of the low-temperature tritium removal system. Tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the removal of condensable vapor and soluble and insoluble aerosols and to estimate the operating life of the mist eliminator. Definitive design of the ventilation system relied heavily on the test data. The unique design features of the ventilation system will result in far less release of tritium to the atmosphere than from conventional high-volume dilution systems and will greatly reduce operating costs. NESHAPs and TAPs NOC applications have been approved, and field construction is nearly complete. Start-up is scheduled for late 1996. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Radiological safety and environmental implications in beach mineral industry due to naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, P.M.B.; Haridasan, P.P.; Maniyan, C.G.; Khan, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of monazite (primary ore of Thorium) along with ilmenite and other minerals in the beach sand deposits of coastal regions of South India has made some of these coastal areas prominent among Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) in the world. The beach mineral industries are situated in populated areas in these NHBRAs. The radiation background prevailing in these areas due to the presence of the Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) Thorium with traces of Uranium and their decay products had been found to result in estimated percaput annual external exposures ranging from 3 to 25 mSv to the population at NHBRA depending on the monazite content of the soil in the area. The internal exposures estimated are of the order of 1 to 2 mSv per year. The mining of minerals and refilling of the mined out areas with mineral free sand and rehabilitation of the area is found to reduce the external radiation fields by a factor of 3. The notional environmental external radiation exposures to the population occupying this modified NHBRA also reduce correspondingly. (author)

  17. Nuclear Security Systems and Measures for the Detection of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear terrorism and the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive material threaten the security of all States. There are large quantities of diverse radioactive material in existence, which are used in areas such as health, the environment, agriculture and industry. The possibility that nuclear and other radioactive material may be used for terrorist acts cannot be ruled out in the current global situation. States have responded to this risk by engaging in a collective commitment to strengthen the protection and control of such material, and to establish capabilities for detection and response to nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. Through its nuclear security programme, the IAEA supports States to establish, maintain and sustain an effective nuclear security regime. The IAEA has adopted a comprehensive approach to nuclear security. This approach recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of and response to trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive material; national response plans; and contingency measures. Within its nuclear security programme, the IAEA aims to assist States in implementing and sustaining such a regime in a coherent and integrated manner. Each State carries the full responsibility for nuclear security, specifically: to provide for the security of nuclear and other radioactive material and associated facilities and activities; to ensure the security of such material in use, storage or in transport; to combat illicit trafficking; and to detect and respond to nuclear security events. This is an Implementing Guide on nuclear security systems and measures for the detection of nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. The objective of the publication is to provide guidance to Member States for the

  18. The Control of Pollution (Radioactive Waste) Regulations 1976 of 10 June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The discharge into a public sewer of trade effluent is governed by the Control of Pollution Act 1974, under which water authorities in England and Wales have certain powers to regulate such discharges. These provisions have not however applied hitherto to radioactive waste, the disposal of which required mainly authorisation by the Minister of State for the Environment. Under the present Regulations, the 1974 Act will apply to radioactive waste so as to give water authorities control over liquid discharges into their sewers, notwithstanding that they contain radioactive waste while the powers of the Minister of State are maintained regarding control and disposal of the radioactive parts of such waste under the 1960 act on Radioactive substances. (N.E.A.) [fr

  19. An approach to the exemption from regulatory control of radioactive waste not linked to the nuclear fuel cycle in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    When radioactive material is handled, treated, administered or stored, and spills or residues and contamination are foreseeable, there must be ways and means of distinguishing between a radioactive waste which needs no further registration and one needing appropriate control and regulation. This report examines the actual situation of exemption from regulatory control for unrestricted or conditional release for disposal of some radioactive waste produced outside the nuclear fuel cycle, particularly in hospitals, research and industry. Recently introduced dose-based and risk-based approaches to exemption are then summarized and their application to radioactive waste produced outside the nuclear fuel cycle is reviewed. It has been shown that current practices are generally safe, but that there is a clear need for harmonization among European Community Member States of exemption levels based on sound radiological protection criteria. 24 refs

  20. Express control of migration processes of radioactive substances during drilling works in 'Ukryttya' object local zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pravdivyj, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Technical proposals are prepared to create a procedure for operative control of drilling works. Such a procedure will permit detecting the displacement of radioactively contaminated ground along borehole bore and correcting the drilling work procedure, which would prevent radioactive substance spreading, in boreholes of 'Ukryttya' object local zone and those of Exclusion Zone

  1. Controls exercised by the Army over radioactive consumer-type items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taras, D.N.

    1978-01-01

    There are considerations that must be taken into account in the selection of radioactive products for military use that are of less consequence in consumer use. Because of these considerations, the Army and the other military services exercise control over radioactive commodities for military use. This paper describes the requirements of the Army safety policy

  2. The control of the radioactive pollution of milk (1962); Comment concevoir une surveillance des pollutions radioactives du lait (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michon, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    Milk, an essential foodstuff, is the object of a supervision and vigilant controls governed by numerous laws which protect its commercial and sanitary qualities. The development of the use of nuclear energy poses and will pose new problems of hygiene and the milk should benefit from controls concerning its possible contamination. Grass-eating animals are particularly subjected to radioactive contaminations and the milk which they produce does not escape contamination because of of its saline composition and of the particular metabolism of the mammary gland. As a result, milk is a contamination integrator and its analysis makes it possible to detect radioelements which can only be detected with great difficulty in an average size plant sample. (author) [French] Le lait, aliment essentiel, fait l'objet d'une surveillance et de controles vigilants regis par de nombreux textes legislatifs qui protegent ses qualites marchandes et sanitaires. Le developpement de l'utilisation de l'energie nucleaire pose et posera de nouveaux problemes d'hygiene et le lait doit beneficier de controles portant sur sa pollution radioactive eventuelle. Les, animaux herbivores sont particulierement exposes aux contaminations radioactives et les laits qu'ils produisent, du fait de leurs compositions salines et du metabolisme particulier de la glande mammaire, n'echappent point aux pollutions. De ce fait, le lait est un integrateur de contamination et son analyse permet de retrouver des radioelements que l'on ne decele qu'avec beaucoup de difficultes sur un echantillon vegetal de taille moyenne. (auteur)

  3. USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTCOTT, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary

  4. USING STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL TO MONITOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT A RADIOACTIVE FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WESTCOTT, J.L.; JOCHEN; PREVETTE

    2007-01-01

    Two facilities for storing spent nuclear fuel underwater at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State are being removed from service, decommissioned, and prepared for eventual demolition. The fuel-storage facilities consist of two separate basins called K East (KE) and K West (KW) that are large subsurface concrete pools filled with water, with a containment structure over each. The basins presently contain sludge, debris, and equipment that have accumulated over the years. The spent fuel has been removed from the basins. The process for removing the remaining sludge, equipment, and structure has been initiated for the basins. Ongoing removal operations generate solid waste that is being treated as required, and then disposed. The waste, equipment and building structures must be characterized to properly manage, ship, treat (if necessary), and dispose as radioactive waste. As the work progresses, it is expected that radiological conditions in each basin may change as radioactive materials are being moved within and between the basins. It is imperative that these changing conditions be monitored so that radioactive characterization of waste is adjusted as necessary

  5. Interfacing industrial process control systems to LEP/LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabany, M.

    1992-01-01

    Modern industrial process control systems have developed to meet the needs of industry to increase the production while decreasing the costs. Although particle accelerators designers have pioneered in control systems during the seventies, it has now become possible to them to profit of industrial solutions in substitution of, or in complement with the more traditional home made ones. Adapting and integrating such industrial systems to the accelerator control area will certainly benefit to the field in terms of finance, human resources and technical facilities offered off-the-shelf by the widely experienced industrial controls community; however this cannot be done without slightly affecting the overall accelerator control architecture. The paper briefly describes the industrial controls arena and takes example on an industrial process control system recently installed at CERN to discuss in detail the related choices and issues. (author)

  6. Separation systems for the nuclear industry: from system elaboration to its validation in radioactive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draye, Micheline

    2004-01-01

    My research deals with the end of the electronuclear cycle and aims to design, create, assess and/or improve various separation Systems for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The range of roads explored is large from liquid-liquid extraction, tp membrane processes, through solid-liquid extraction. Beyond the development of various concepts for targeted radionuclides separation, the Systems efficiency and stability were studied. Evaluation of irradiation dose on separations was examined based on the needs of the nuclear industry. As an example, after highlighting the great potential of DCH18C6 for the development of a new nuclear fuel reprocessing process, we determined the structure of its degradation products using a suite of analytical techniques (FTIR, NMR, CG-MS and X-ray diffraction). Considering the increasing precautions taken by the nuclear industry, we deem it necessary to expand our investigations into organic stereochemistry of extracting ligands. We determined the stereochemistry of the DCH18C6 radiolysis products. Despite the capacity of the structural analytical techniques used and previously quoted, we synthesized each possible structure to assess ail the proposed fragments. These syntheses allowed us to evaluate the degradation products interference during potential DCH18C6 industrial use and to conclude that its great extraction capabilities and its remarkable chemical and radiochemical stability make the DCH18C6 a reliable candidate for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. To vary the available analytical techniques and to develop more relevant scientific approaches, some of the described work was conducted as a part of national and/or international collaborations. In this context, the study of the poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) resin stability in radioactive medium allowed us to establish a scientific collaboration with the 'Nuclear Physic Institute of Lyon' for the use of a surface analysis fine technique, the Time of Flight

  7. Clearance of slightly radioactive material from radiological control in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, S.

    1995-01-01

    Clearance from radiological control of slightly radioactive material arising from operation or decommissioning of nuclear installations has been practiced in Germany for nearly two decades. Meanwhile, for the clearance of metal generally approved and applicable recommendations for clearance levels have been issued. For other materials like building waste, case-by-case decisions are made by the state licensing authorities. Efforts to implement consistent sets of clearance levels for all kinds of material are under way. As several decommissioning projects will soon generate large amounts of materials from dismantling, a solution needs to be reached soon. The legal framework in Germany governing the use of atomic energy consists of the Atomic Energy Act and several ordinances. Rules and guidelines including the recommendations of the German Commission for Radiation Protection (SSK) exist on a lower level and are not legally binding. Several generic studies for the derivation of clearance levels for metals and building debris with alpha, beta, and gamma contamination have been performed on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, which oriented themselves on an individual dose of 10 microSv/a in agreement with IAEA recommendations. Stochastic models have been used for establishing the connection between specific activity of the material to be released and the resulting individual doses, with significant advantages over deterministic scenarios. In the future, for new SSK recommendations or an ordinance on clearance, the increase of masses from demolition of installations, higher recycling rates in the conventional sector and harmonization with international regulations and standards have to be taken into account

  8. Industrial radioprotection in the radioactive gauges: necessity for preservation of the objectives without discouraging their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnet, Antonio Carlos

    1996-01-01

    This work presents some suggestions for regulations revision and adaptation in order that the implicit real risks existent in the different fabrication stages of radiation sources and radioactive gauges operation, from the radioactive material acquisition to the final disposal, including the supervisors training

  9. Abstract of the law relating to the nuclear industry and radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This summary of the law relating to Atomic Energy and Radioactive substances as at March 1980 is divided into sections headed: (1) The common law. (2) Legislation. (3) Regulations under the Factories Act 1961. (4) Regulations, rules etc. affecting the transport of radioactive materials. (5) The Euratom treaty. (U.K.)

  10. Study of radioactivity diffusion for bitumen-coated blocks produced by an industrial coating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.

    1969-01-01

    The solidification by bitumen of chemical coprecipitation sludges from the Marcoule waste treatment station has been studied in the laboratory and has led to the construction of an industrial coating plant. The quality of the coated material obtained has been controlled by the lixiviation test carried out with ordinary water and with sea-water on 45 ml laboratory samples and on industrial coated blocks of 150 litres. Tests on blocks of such a size have necessitated the installation of three special tanks. Two, each of 2000 litres capacity, contain ordinary and sea-water which was continuously recycled at a rate of 2.5 cm/hr and renewed periodically. In the third tank having a capacity of 11000 litres, the coated block was buried in earth and sprinkled with ordinary water with a view to studying the migration of radioelements in soil. The results of these tests confirm those obtained during the laboratory experiments. (authors) [fr

  11. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-15

    benefit from the information in this publication, particularly with respect to design optimization for decay tanks or guidance provided on quality assurance arrangements. The most appropriate management option for the country and for individual facilities may be selected on the basis of local organizational preferences and experience, consistent with the national regulatory requirements. Due to the costs involved, the potential complexity of technical and environmental considerations, and the need to ensure adequate performance of any required decay storage arrangements, the process of selecting the optimized liquid effluent management option may be complex. This is especially true in countries with limited liquid radioactive effluent generation, limited practical experience and inadequate resources. This publication is intended for decision makers in countries generating radioactive effluents in the areas of medicine, education, research and industry with non-nuclear power applications. It provides guidance and information on how to implement and optimize their radioactive effluent management practices and describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technology for the discharge of liquid radioactive effluents into the sewer system. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for the implementation of the most appropriate process design for effluent discharges at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of decay storage arrangements for different scales of radioactive effluent generation.

  12. Management of Discharge of Low Level Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated in Medical, Educational, Research and Industrial Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    benefit from the information in this publication, particularly with respect to design optimization for decay tanks or guidance provided on quality assurance arrangements. The most appropriate management option for the country and for individual facilities may be selected on the basis of local organizational preferences and experience, consistent with the national regulatory requirements. Due to the costs involved, the potential complexity of technical and environmental considerations, and the need to ensure adequate performance of any required decay storage arrangements, the process of selecting the optimized liquid effluent management option may be complex. This is especially true in countries with limited liquid radioactive effluent generation, limited practical experience and inadequate resources. This publication is intended for decision makers in countries generating radioactive effluents in the areas of medicine, education, research and industry with non-nuclear power applications. It provides guidance and information on how to implement and optimize their radioactive effluent management practices and describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technology for the discharge of liquid radioactive effluents into the sewer system. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for the implementation of the most appropriate process design for effluent discharges at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of decay storage arrangements for different scales of radioactive effluent generation

  13. Customs control over the transportation of radiation sources and radioactive materials through the frontier of the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derevyashko, A.

    1998-01-01

    1. As it is shown in the name the main purpose of this Paper is to describe system of customs control over transportation of radiation sources and radioactive materials through the frontier of the Republic of Belarus, clarifying herewith influence of global situation on the creation of this system and noting technical needs of Customs Administration of Belarus in its activities aimed at strengthening the control system. 2. The Republic of Belarus has not the enterprises of atomic-industrial complex and does not produce radioactive and nuclear materials, so, control over them is largely connected with their transit through frontiers of Belarus and its territory. It is necessary to note, that the frontier of Belarus with the Ukraine, Poland and Baltic States is an external frontier of a Custom Union between Belarus, Russia, Kazakhstan and Kirghizia. On the territory of the last three states are concentrated extraction and production of radioactive and nuclear materials, part of which can be transported by the shortest way to the European countries through the territory and frontiers of the Republic of Belarus. 3. The significant part of the republic territory suffered from Chernobyl catastrophe. In a number of the polluted regions of Belarus there were created the zones of >, the residing on them is prohibited by legislation. On those territories there were created numerous burial grounds for the conditionally radioactive and low radioactive wastes. In this connection, there is also a danger of illegal importation of various radioactive wastes from contiguous countries to these zones and burial them there. On the other hand, there are known the numerous cases of exportation of various materials, subjects, food from the polluted zones even out of Belarus. 4. Taking into account the aforesaid the Customs Administration of the Republic of Belarus as well as other public authorities, clearly recognizes the necessity of organization of an effective radiation control on

  14. Study on the improved evaluation of radioactivity of activated control rods in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waki, Toshikazu; Yamada, Motoyuki; Horikawa, Yoshihiko; Miyake, Yusuke; Sakashita, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation method of radioactivity of activated materials has been developed as ORIGEN code. However, it is difficult to precisely evaluate the radioactivity of neutron absorption materials such as control rods. A control rod in PWR is made of Ag-In-Cd alloy that absorbs neutron greatly and the thermal neutron flux decreases rapidly in and around it. This phenomenon is called depression effect. The consideration of depression effect is necessary to evaluate radioactivity of the control rod. In this study we improved the reliability of the cross-section value of Ag-107(n,γ) Ag-108m by the irradiation examination in JRR3. In addition, we calculated (1) the neutron spectrum and neutron flux with depression effect by MCNP of Monte Carlo method and (2) the radioactivity of the activated control rod. The pieces of control rod were irradiated at JMTR of JAERI. As a result of the accuracy of the measurement data calculation results, we developed the method of evaluation for the radioactivity of activated control rod. The radioactivity of activated control rod in PWR was evaluated and compared with the measurement data, resulting in positive accuracy. Of special significance was confirmation of the value of Ag-108m, as an essential nuclide for long term dose estimation of disposal facility. The cross-section value of Ag-107(n,γ) Ag-108m was about one forty of existent library. This method was accurately confirmed and developed for evaluating activated control rods reasonably. (author)

  15. International regulatory control of the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindell, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    The development of the IAEA regulations on the transport of radioactive materials and the background for the adoption of these regulations by the various international organizations responsible for regulating the different modes of international transport of hazardous materials is briefly discussed

  16. Control of radioactive contamination of food in the country Somogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, E.; Viragh, I.

    1980-01-01

    The radioactive contamination of spinach, sorrel, lettuce, animal bones, milk and fish was determined in the period 1961-1978. Peak values were measured in 1963 and 1976. The contamination of plants reached higher levels, however, it did not exceed 25 pCi per g dry weight. (L.E.)

  17. Handbook of radioactivity measurements procedures. Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    This report is concerned with the measurement of radioactivity in general, but specifically it deals with radioactive materials that have become available in the last three decades, from nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, for applications in medicine, scientific research, and industry. It is also concerned with low-level radioactivity measurements for the monitoring of radioactivity in environmental media, such as air and water, in connection with the control of radioactive effluents associated with the production of nuclear power or the use of radionuclides. Included in appendices are nuclear decay data for selected radionuclides and statistics of radioactive decay. An extensive bibliography is also included

  18. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1996-09-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment of equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in production waste streams. The assessment estimated maximum individual dose equivalents for workers and the general public. Sensitivity analyses of certain input parameters also were conducted. On the basis of this assessment, it is concluded that (1) regulations requiring workers to wear respiratory protection during equipment cleaning operations are likely to result in lower worker doses, (2) underground injection and downhole encapsulation of NORM wastes present a negligible risk to the general public, and (3) potential doses to workers and the general public related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment can be controlled by limiting the contamination level of the initial feed. It is recommended that (1) NORM wastes be further characterized to improve studies of potential radiological doses; (2) states be encouraged to permit subsurface disposal of NORM more readily, provided further assessments support this study; results; (3) further assessment of landspreading NORM wastes be conducted; and (4) the political, economic, sociological, and nonradiological issues related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment be studied to fully examine the feasibility of this disposal option

  19. Study of waste acceptance criteria for low-level radioactive waste from medical, industrial, and research facilities (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koibuchi, Hiroto; Dohi, Terumi; Ishiguro, Hideharu; Hayashi, Masaru; Senda, Masaki

    2008-12-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is supposed to draw up the plan for the disposal program of the very low-level radioactive waste and low-level radioactive waste generated from medical, industrial and research facilities. For instance, there are these facilities in JAEA, universities, private companies, and so on. JAEA has to get to know about the waste and its acceptance of other institutions described above because it is important for us to hold the licenses for the disposal program regarding safety assessment. This report presents the basic data concerning radioactive waste of research institutes etc. except RI waste, domestic and foreign information related to acceptance criteria for disposal of the low-level radioactive waste, the current status of foreign medical waste management, waste acceptance, and such. In this report, Japan's acceptance criteria were summarized on the basis of present regulation. And, the criteria of foreign countries, United States, France, United Kingdom and Spain, were investigated by survey of each reference. In addition, it was reported that the amount of waste from laboratories etc. for near-surface disposal and their characterization in our country. The Subjects of future work: the treatment of hazardous waste, the problem of the double-regulation (the Nuclear Reactor Regulation Law and the Law Concerning Prevention from Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotopes and Others) and the possession of waste were discussed here. (author)

  20. Controlling the Outcome of Melting Radioactive Sources in Scrap Metal: from Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance towards a 'Codex Metallarius'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.J., E-mail: agonzale@sede.arn.gov.ar [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-07-15

    Orphan radiation sources have been inadvertently incorporated into scrap metal and traces of radioactive residues have appeared in finished metal products causing public anxiety, despair in industry and governmental concern. The international principles of exclusion, exemption and clearance can be used to tackle this problem. They are described in detail, as they are becoming universally established for defining the scope of radiation protection regulations. However, notwithstanding the relevance of these principles, the paper suggests a straightforward professional consensus for discontinuing radiological control of commodities with minute traces of radioactive residues. The consensus should unambiguously specify a generic activity concentration in inedible commodities, including metals, below which radiological control may be effectively relinquished. A subsequent legally binding intergovernmental undertaking could resolve the current regulatory ambiguity, facilitate commercial exchange and ensure adequate public protection. For metals, it might take the form of a 'Codex Metallarius' (similar to the existing Codex Alimentarius for edible commodities) establishing a generic level of radiological acceptability for finished metal products. Furthermore, it is proposed that there should be an international convention to prevent radioactive sources becoming orphaned from regulatory control and then inadvertently appearing in trash and scrap. (author)

  1. The control of the radioactive pollution of milk (1962); Comment concevoir une surveillance des pollutions radioactives du lait (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michon, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    Milk, an essential foodstuff, is the object of a supervision and vigilant controls governed by numerous laws which protect its commercial and sanitary qualities. The development of the use of nuclear energy poses and will pose new problems of hygiene and the milk should benefit from controls concerning its possible contamination. Grass-eating animals are particularly subjected to radioactive contaminations and the milk which they produce does not escape contamination because of of its saline composition and of the particular metabolism of the mammary gland. As a result, milk is a contamination integrator and its analysis makes it possible to detect radioelements which can only be detected with great difficulty in an average size plant sample. (author) [French] Le lait, aliment essentiel, fait l'objet d'une surveillance et de controles vigilants regis par de nombreux textes legislatifs qui protegent ses qualites marchandes et sanitaires. Le developpement de l'utilisation de l'energie nucleaire pose et posera de nouveaux problemes d'hygiene et le lait doit beneficier de controles portant sur sa pollution radioactive eventuelle. Les, animaux herbivores sont particulierement exposes aux contaminations radioactives et les laits qu'ils produisent, du fait de leurs compositions salines et du metabolisme particulier de la glande mammaire, n'echappent point aux pollutions. De ce fait, le lait est un integrateur de contamination et son analyse permet de retrouver des radioelements que l'on ne decele qu'avec beaucoup de difficultes sur un echantillon vegetal de taille moyenne. (auteur)

  2. National Public Information Symposium on Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy, NUC Info' 2000. Radioactive Waste Management and Site Restoration in Uranium Industry. Proceedings. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Ion; Comsa, Olivia

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings published in two volumes contain materials presented at the National Public Information Symposium on Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy, NUC Info' 2000. Radioactive Waste Management and Site Restoration in Uranium Industry - held on 5th September to 8th September 2000 at Baita - Bihor, Romania. The proceedings are structured in 4 sections: 1. Management of radioactive wastes arising from uranium mining, milling and decommissioning; 2. Uranium mine closing down; 3. Environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites; 4. Management of radioactive wastes arising from nuclear applications. The contributions in this volume debate the issues of environment restoration at uranium ore mining and management of radioactive wastes resulted from nuclear applications

  3. Border Control of Nuclear and Other Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medakovic, S.; Cizmek, A.; Prah, M.

    2007-01-01

    In the second half of year 2006, stationary detection systems for nuclear and other radioactive materials were installed on Border Crossing Bregana, Croatia. Yantar 2U, which is the commercial name of the system, is integrated automatic system capable of detection of nuclear and other radioactive materials prepared for fixed-site customs applications (Russian origin). Installed system contains portal monitors, camera, communication lines and communication boxes and server. Two fully functional separate systems has been installed on BC Bregana, one on truck entrance and another one on car entrance. In this article the operational experience of installed system is presented. This includes statistical analysis of recorded alarms, evaluation of procedures for operational stuff and maintenance and typical malfunction experience, as well as some of the recommendation for future use of detection systems.(author)

  4. Pennsylvania's technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material experiences and studies of the oil and gas industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, David J

    2015-02-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's experiences and ongoing studies related to technologically enhanced, naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in the oil and gas industry. It has been known for many years that Pennsylvania's geology is unique, with several areas having relatively high levels of natural uranium and thorium. In the 1950s, a few areas of the state were evaluated for commercial uranium production. In the late 1970s, scoping studies of radon in homes prompted the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Bureau of Radiation Protection (BRP) to begin planning for a larger state-wide radon study. The BRP and Oil and Gas Bureau also performed a TENORM study of produced water in the early 1990s for a number of conventional oil and gas wells. More recently, BRP and the Bureau of Solid Waste developed radiation monitoring regulations for all Pennsylvania solid waste disposal facilities. These were implemented in 2001, prompting another evaluation of oil and gas operations and sludge generated from the treatment of conventionally produced water and brine but mainly focused on the disposal of TENORM solid waste in the state's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle D landfills. However, since 2008, the increase in volumes of gas well wastewater and levels of Ra observed in the unconventional shale gas well flow-back fracking water has compelled DEP to fully re-examine these oil and gas operations. Specifically, with BRP in the lead, a new TENORM study of oil and gas operations and related wastewater treatment operations has been initiated (), supported by an American National Standards Institute standard on TENORM () and a U.S. Government Accountability Office report on shale resource development and risks (). This study began in early 2013 and will examine the potential public and worker radiation exposure and environmental impact as well as re-evaluate TENORM waste disposal. This

  5. Technological and organizational aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document comprises collected lecture on radioactive waste management which were given by specialists of the Radioactive Waste Management Section of the IAEA, scientific-industrial enterprise 'Radon' (Moscow, RF) and A.A. Bochvar's GNTs RF VNIINM (Moscow, RF) on various courses, seminars and conferences. These lectures include the following topics: basic principles and national systems of radioactive waste management; radioactive waste sources and their classification; collection, sorting and initial characterization of radioactive wastes; choice of technologies of radioactive waste processing and minimization of wastes; processing and immobilization of organic radioactive wastes; thermal technologies of radioactive waste processing; immobilization of radioactive wastes in cements, asphalts, glass and polymers; management of worked out closed radioactive sources; storage of radioactive wastes; deactivation methods; quality control and assurance in radioactive waste management

  6. Radioactive waste: the poisoned legacy of the nuclear industry; Dechets radioactifs: l'heritage empoisonne du nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselet, Y. [Campagne Climat/Energie - Greenpeace (France)

    2011-02-15

    The nuclear industry produces a huge amount of radioactive waste from one end to the other of the nuclear cycle: i.e. from mining uranium to uranium enrichment through reactor operating, waste reprocessing and dismantling nuclear power plants. Nuclear power is now being 'sold' to political leaders and citizens as an effective way to deal with climate change and ensure security of energy supplies. Nonetheless, nuclear energy is not a viable solution and is thus a major obstacle to the development of clean energy for the future. In addition to safety and security issues, the nuclear industry is, above all, faced with the huge problem of how to deal with the waste it produces and for which it has no solution. This ought to put a brake on the nuclear industry, but instead, against all expectations, its development continues to gather pace. (author)

  7. On the feasibility of device fingerprinting in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.; Hadziosmanovic, D.; Zambon, Emmanuele; Kargl, Frank; Luiijf, Eric; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2013-01-01

    As Industrial Control Systems (ICS) and standard IT networks are becoming one heterogeneous entity, there has been an increasing effort in adjusting common security tools and methodologies to fit the industrial environment. Fingerprinting of industrial devices is still an unexplored research field.

  8. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Albloushi, Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    The use of seawater in cooling towers for industrial applications has much merit in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries due to the scarcity and availability of fresh water. Seawater make-up in cooling towers is deemed the most feasible because of its unlimited supply in coastal areas. Such latent-heat removal with seawater in cooling towers is several folds more efficient than sensible heat extraction via heat exchangers. Operational challenges such as scaling, corrosion, and biofouling are a major challenge in conventional cooling towers, where the latter is also a major issue in seawater cooling towers. Biofouling can significantly hamper the efficiency of cooling towers. The most popular methods used in cooling treatment to control biofouling are disinfection by chlorination. However, the disadvantages of chlorination are formation of harmful disinfection byproducts in the presence of high organic loading and safety concerns in the storage of chlorine gas. In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities

  9. Radioactivity and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, R N [Fertilizer Association of India, New Delhi

    1977-12-01

    Power generation from radioisotopes is one of the major applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and is in practice in over twenty countries including India. Other well-known applications of radioactive substances are in medicine, industry, scientific and industrial research programs, and nuclear weapons. The only serious disadvantage with the radioisotopes and their waste products is the constant release of radiation energy which contaminates the environment and endangers the life. An attempt has been made to identify the major sources of radioactivity in the environment and assess its potential impact on the environment. Recent developments in safety measures for prevention of contamination and control of radioactivity and in radioactive wastes management are also discussed.

  10. COLOR POLLUTION CONTROL IN TEXTILE DYEING INDUSTRY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    tannery sludge derived activated carbon is lower compared with commercial ... industrial solid waste for the treatment of wastewater is a win-win strategy ..... The authors are thankful to the management of VIT University, Vellore, India for ...

  11. Emissions control techniques applied to industrial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, B.

    2004-12-15

    As emission standards for industrial vehicles become increasingly stringent, many research projects are seeking to develop after-treatment systems. These systems will have to combine efficiency, durability and low operating cost.

  12. EPA's Radioactive Source Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsick, D.

    2004-01-01

    The US EPA is the lead Federal agency for emergency responses to unknown radiological materials, not licensed, owned or operated by a Federal agency or an Agreement state (Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, 1996). The purpose of EPA's clean materials programme is to keep unwanted and unregulated radioactive material out of the public domain. This is achieved by finding and securing lost sources, maintaining control of existing sources and preventing future losses. The focus is on both, domestic and international fronts. The domestic program concentrates on securing lost sources, preventing future losses, alternative technologies like tagging of radioactive sources in commerce, pilot radioactive source roundup, training programs, scrap metal and metal processing facilities, the demolition industry, product stewardship and alternatives to radioactive devices (fewer radioactive source devices means fewer orphan sources). The international program consists of securing lost sources, preventing future losses, radiation monitoring of scrap metal at ports and the international scrap metal monitoring protocol

  13. Control of radioactive contamination and radiation exposure in the environment - tasks, techniques, implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, A.

    1997-01-01

    A brief historical abstract of the steps in the discovery of natural radioactivity and development of man-made radioactivity is presented, as well as the historical development of the control of radioactivity in the environment. The goals of control measures and the tasks, classified by the possible sources of release, are demonstrated and the required methods described (measuring methods, evaluation methods, and information techniques). The control measures, based on different legal principles, are introduced and their technological implementation, including their current status, described. Finally, an account is given of the progressive harmonisation of the national control systems, as well as of the integration of these control systems into international control and information networks. (orig.) [de

  14. Strengthening control over radioactive sources in authorized use and regaining control over orphan sources. National strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this report is to provide practical guidance to States on the development of a national strategy for improving control over radioactive sources, particularly dangerous sources (Categories 1-3). Part of this process involves the determination of the magnitude of the potential problem with orphan and vulnerable sources and indeed, whether or not a national strategy is needed. The ultimate objective is that States will use this report to develop and then implement a plan of action that will result in all significant sources being managed in a safe and secure manner. This report attempts to provide both the background knowledge and the methodology necessary for an individual or small team of responsible persons to develop a national strategy for improving control over all radioactive sources, but especially orphan and vulnerable sources. The background knowledge given in Chapter 3 is an update of the information on practices that was given in IAEA-TECDOC-804, which focused on spent radioactive sources. After some introductory material, this report provides both the factual information and the general steps needed to develop and implement a national strategy. Part I contains background information for those who are not already familiar with the subject including the need for national strategies, the generic causes of loss of control of sources, with specific examples and the common applications of radioactive sources. Part II details the actual process for the development and implementation of a national strategy, which includes assessing the problem by first gathering specific and national information, determining the nature and magnitude of the problem, developing the national strategy by evaluating, and prioritizing possible solutions, implementing the strategy subsequent to a high level decision; and evaluating the effectiveness of the plan and making changes as a result until the desired objective is achieved. Searches for sources will be part of

  15. Radiation safety and culture of prevention in the use of radioactive materials in industry : criteria and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, Walter Adrian

    2008-01-01

    As time goes by and experience is gained, modernization and technological development show the need to implement more complex programs and procedures to ensure a high level of compliance with radiation safety, particularly in those activities in which radioactive material is used in industry. A relevant aspect of present technology is the concern to introduce mechanisms to prevent radiological accidents or incidents, to ensure early detection of failures. This includes systems that either individually or as a whole, increase the level of responsibility of the different disciplines involved, so as to avoid a situation that could lead to loss of control of the facility or part of it. The prevention of an abnormal situation, overexposure of workers or unwanted risks, should be considered in the level of vulnerability of the facility, a concept drawn from international protection systems and which is applied directly in radiation safety. Preventive management, risk communication and proposals for change or improvement along with the detection of risks and training, constitute all the factors contained within prevention policies. Dose limitation, optimization and justification, old tools used for decades, could not be replaced by other modern concepts and criteria. ALARA culture (including performance indicators) should be considered. The atmosphere at work, working under pressure as well as other factors such as quality issues, ethics of prevention, etc. align with this idea of prevention and safety, besides changes in attitude, towards risk prevention (methods, reports, intervention guides, working instructions, and any other helpful tool), are followed by preventive, as well as predictive and corrective maintenance, applied to minimize the dose absorbed by workers. A clear policy of prevention is needed as well as an appropriate level of radiation safety which should be taken into account since the very beginning of the development of a given practice. All these

  16. Radiation Safety and Culture of Prevention in the Use of Radioactive Materials in Industry. Criteria and Trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truppa, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    As time goes by and experience is gained, modernization and technological development show the need to implement more complex programs and procedures to ensure a high level of compliance with radiation safety, particularly in those activities in which radioactive material is used in industry. A relevant aspect of present technology is the concern to introduce mechanisms to prevent radiological accidents or incidents, to ensure early detection of failures. This includes systems that either individually or as a whole, increase the level of responsibility of the different disciplines involved, so as to avoid a situation that could lead to loss of control of the facility or part of it. The prevention of an abnormal situation, overexposure of workers or unwanted risks, should be considered in the level of vulnerability of the facility, a concept drawn from international protection systems and which is applied directly in radiation safety. Preventive management, risk communication and proposals for change or improvement along with the detection of risks and training, constitute all the factors contained within prevention policies. Dose limitation, optimization and justification, old tools used for decades, could not be replaced by other modern concepts and criteria. ALARA culture (including performance indicators) should be considered. The atmosphere at work, working under pressure as well as other factors such as quality issues, ethics of prevention, etc. align with this idea of prevention and safety, besides changes in attitude, towards risk prevention (methods, reports, intervention guides, working instructions, and any other helpful tool), are followed by preventive, as well as predictive and corrective maintenance, applied to minimize the dose absorbed by workers. A clear policy of prevention is needed as well as an appropriate level of radiation safety which should be taken into account since the very beginning of the development of a given practice. All these

  17. An industry perspective on commercial radioactive waste disposal conditions and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Stephen A

    2006-11-01

    The United States is presently served by Class-A, -B and -C low-level radioactive waste and naturally-occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material disposal sites in Washington and South Carolina; a Class-A and mixed waste disposal site in Utah that also accepts naturally-occurring radioactive material; and hazardous and solid waste facilities and uranium mill tailings sites that accept certain radioactive materials on a site-specific basis. The Washington site only accepts low-level radioactive waste from 11 western states due to interstate Compact restrictions on waste importation. The South Carolina site will be subject to geographic service area restrictions beginning 1 July 2008, after which only three states will have continued access. The Utah site dominates the commercial Class-A and mixed waste disposal market due to generally lower state fees than apply in South Carolina. To expand existing commercial services, an existing hazardous waste site in western Texas is seeking a Class-A, -B and -C and mixed waste disposal license. With that exception, no new Compact facilities are proposed. This fluid, uncertain situation has inspired national level rulemaking initiatives and policy studies, as well as alternative disposal practices for certain low-activity materials.

  18. An Industrial Model Based Disturbance Feedback Control Scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawai, Fukiko; Nakazawa, Chikashi; Vinther, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model based disturbance feedback control scheme. Industrial process systems have been traditionally controlled by using relay and PID controller. However these controllers are affected by disturbances and model errors and these effects degrade control performance. The authors...... propose a new control method that can decrease the negative impact of disturbance and model errors. The control method is motivated by industrial practice by Fuji Electric. Simulation tests are examined with a conventional PID controller and the disturbance feedback control. The simulation results...

  19. Radiation risk from natural radioactivity in oil and gas production industry. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eid, M A [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    This paper throws light on the natural radioactive materials as well as the radiation background level in Egypt and other global areas. It also describes the deposition of naturally occurring radioactivity as well as the gamma-ray exposure rate primarily due to {sub 226} Ra and daughters which concentrate as scale or sludge in oil field piping and equipment. The potential hazards arising during normal operation, maintenance, and cleaning are considered. Occupational annual personnel doses are estimated and examined relative to work function. The measures to reduce occupational radiation exposure and radioactive contamination were investigated. The data indicated that relatively higher exposure rates are associated with areas around water discharge system, separator and descaling operations where the dose rates varying between 0.02-6 m R/h. The annual collective effective dose equivalent was estimated about 4.58 man-Rem, and the mean annual dose equivalent of about 120 mrem were measured. 3 tabs.

  20. Quality control of concretes for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.

    2015-01-01

    The spent sealed radioactive sources are considered as a specific type of radioactive wastes and should be properly stored to ensure their integrity and prevent or limit the release of radionuclides in the geosphere. For this, these sources can be put up in concrete matrices. This research presents the evaluation and characterization of five concretes prepared with 4 brands of commercial cements: CPC Extra RS, CPC 30R Impercem of Cemex, Cruz Azul CPC 30R and CPC 30R of Apasco; three sizes of coarse aggregate (<30 mm, 29-11 mm and <10 mm) and fine aggregate (0.0797 mm) used as matrices for conditioning of spent sealed radioactive sources, in order to verify if these specific concretes accredit the standard NOM-019-Nucl-1995. After hardening for 28 days the concrete specimens were subjected to the tests: compressive strength; thermal cycles, irradiation, leaching and permeability, later to be characterized by: 1) X-ray diffraction in order to meet their crystalline phases; 2) scanning electron microscopy, to determine changes in morphology; 3) infrared spectroscopy, to determine the structural changes of concrete from its functional groups; 4) Raman spectroscopy to determine their structural changes and 5) Moessbauer spectroscopy, which determines changes in the oxidation state of iron in the concrete. According to the results and the changes presented by each concrete after applying the tests set by NOM-019-Nucl-1995, is concluded that the concrete made with cement Cemex brand (CPC 30-RS Extra), gravel of particle size 11-29 mm and sieved sand (0.0797 mm) can be used as matrices of spent sealed sources conditioning. Is remarkable a morphological and structural change of the concrete due to gamma irradiation and heat treatment. (Author)

  1. A computer program for controlling a university radioactive material inventory: From confusion to computer to control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, D.B.; Riches, C.G.; O'Brian, M.J.; Riordan, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The University of Washington is a large user of radioactive material. Over 250 authorized programs are working in over 600 labs with nearly 3500 orders of radioactive material per year. The state license sets limits on the total amount of material on campus. There are also limits on sewer disposal. To meet these needs it is necessary to know the amount of material on campus at any time. A computer program was developed which covered many aspects of the radiation safety record needs including inventory control. Inventory is now managed by tracking each order from purchase to disposal. A screen menu as part of the interactive program allows immediate and detailed information about the inventory at time of purchase approval and delivery. Because of this system our knowledge and control of radionuclide work on campus has increased dramatically. A description of how this system is used during ordering, delivery and disposal will be given. Details on the methods to check limits are included along with a summary of the reports made possible by the current data files

  2. An industrial sewing machine variable speed controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Youngner, Frank

    The apparel industry is attempting to move in a new direction in the coming decade. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from a sit down operation to a stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with the sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. This report details a new design for a treadle to operate an industrial sewing machine that has a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator, as well as the ergonomics involved. Procedures for testing the design are included along with possible uses for the treadle in other applications besides an industrial sewing machine.

  3. Control of radioactive waste disposal into the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The body of this publication is intended to provide adequate information on the broad aspects of radioactive waste disposal into the sea. The introduction of radionuclides into the sea from uncontrollable sources, such as weapons test explosions, is outside the scope of this publication, as are releases of radionuclides from nuclear-powered vessels. It should be stressed that agreements on practices for the marine disposal of wastes are being developed and the understanding of oceanographic processes is rapidly progressing; therefore, the conclusions presented here should always be considered in the context of changes in both knowledge and practice that occur subsequent to the completion of this text

  4. The use of PHP in the radioactive effluent treatment in rare earth industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitang, Q.; Ruensheng, W.

    1985-01-01

    Monazite is one of the most important rare earth resources, processing monazite, however, is accompanied by radioactive effluent that needs treatment. A satisfactory treatment should be able not only to insolubilize the radioactive isotopes but also to clarify the suspension quickly and completely. In this study, out of 15 different coagulants, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHP) of molecular weight 1000 has been chosen as the most efficient one for the clarification of the treated effluent in question. Satisfactory performance has been attained in a continuous clarifier

  5. The process matters: cyber security in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadziosmanovic, D.

    2014-01-01

    An industrial control system (ICS) is a computer system that controls industrial processes such as power plants, water and gas distribution, food production, etc. Since cyber-attacks on an ICS may have devastating consequences on human lives and safety in general, the security of ICS is important.

  6. Non-destructive controls in the mechanical industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarlan, L

    1978-12-01

    The sequence of operations implicating the mechanical industries from the suppliers to their customers is briefly recalled; a description of the field of application of non-destructive control methods in these industries is given. Follows a description of some recent typical applications of the principal methods: radiography, ultrasonic waves, magnetism, acoustic emission, sonic control, tracer techniques.

  7. Application of just-in-time manufacturing techniques in radioactive source in well logging industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atma Yudha Prawira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear logging is one of major areas of logging development. This paper presents an empirical investigation to bring the drilling and completion of wells from an ill-defined art to a refined sci-ence by using radioactive source to “look and measure” such as formation type, formation dip, porosity, fluid type and numerous other important factors. The initial nuclear logging tools rec-ords the radiation emitted by formation as they were crossed by boreholes. Gamma radiation is used in well logging as it is powerful enough to penetrate the formation and steel casing. The ra-dioactive source is reusable so that after engineer finished the job the radioactive source is sent back to bunker. In this case inventory level of radioactive source is relatively high compared with monthly movement and the company must spend large amount of cost just for inventory. After calculating and averaging the monthly movement in 2014 and 2015, we detected a big pos-sibility to cut the inventory level to reduce the inventory cost.

  8. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment related to equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in production waste streams. The assessment evaluated the relative dose of these activities and included a sensitivity analysis of certain input parameters. Future studies and potential policy actions are recommended

  9. Control of the surface radioactive contamination in the field of biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, S.; Encina, A. de la; Gaspar, J.; Macias, M. T.; Sanchez, A.; Usera, F.

    2012-01-01

    The manipulation of unsealed sources in biomedical research involves significant risk of radioactive contamination. the aim of this study has been to analyze the radioactive contamination occurring in the field of biomedical research, assessing its magnitude, identifying the equipment that can be contaminated with higher probability and monitoring the evolution of the contaminations production taking into account the radioisotopes and the activities uses, and the radiation protection control applied. The data used for this study correspond to a very lengthy period of time and it have been collected in the radioactive facility, of the Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia (CSIC), a very large biological research centre that can be used perfectly as a reference for this area. The results obtained show a gradual and significant decrease in the incidence of the radioactive contamination. This is due to the optimization of radiation protection standards applied and the implementation or a systematic operational radiation protection program. (Author) 13 refs.

  10. Controlling radioactive sources. Stronger 'cradle-to-grave' security needed, IAEA says

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This article highlights the IAEA activities in the field of radiation safety and security of radiation sources and other radioactive materials in its Member States. The IAEA has been active in lending its expertise to search out and secure orphaned sources in several countries. Additionally more than 70 States have joined with the IAEA to collect and share information on trafficking incidents and other unauthorized movements of radioactive sources and other radioactive materials. In March 2002 the IAEA Board of Governors approved a multi-faceted Action plan to Combat Nuclear Terrorism that includes upgrading radiation safety and security. One programme is designed to ensure that significant, uncontrolled radioactive sources are brought under regulatory control and properly secured by providing assistance to Member States in their efforts to identify, locate and secure or dispose of orphan sources

  11. Treatment and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in the oil and gas industry. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Ruediger B.; Schmuelling, Marcus; Hosemann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Concerning naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) from the oil/ and gas industry most of the industrial countries were lacking clear regulatory frameworks in waste legislation for many years. In the meanwhile on several places in Europe, but also in some of the GCC states in the Middle East such as in the United Arab Emirates and in Oman specialized treatment facilities are either in the stage of construction or already in operation. In particular, pilot plants for the decontamination of NORM-contaminated equipment have been tested recently. The paper reflects on the generation and the technical characterization of NORM but also the legislation compared on international level. Particularly an overview was provided by comparing the common practice on disposal in the North American Countries in comparison to Germany, the UK but also Australia. In addition the successful treatment of produced water from crude oil separation in a ''Constructed Wetland'' in the Sultanate Oman is briefly highlighted.

  12. Days on safety of industrial radiographic controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This program is divided in three parts: the context and the regulations, the preparation and the implementation, the tools of prevention and the initiatives and the perspectives.In the first part devoted to the context and regulation are: the context by the Authority of nuclear safety (A.S.N.), the regulation referential, the transport of gamma-graphs; in the second part are the distribution of liabilities, materials and associated requirements, the feedback of incidents and exploitation of it, training and base requirements, works of S.F.R.P./C.O.F.R.E.N.D. and the A.S.N. position; the third part includes help to evaluation of risks at working places of industry radiologists, dosimetry study of a working place, guide to evaluate oneself; the fourth part devoted to the initiatives and the perspectives are: regional experiences charters of good practices in industry radiography, integration of works and deployment by the members of the C.O.F.R.E.N.D., perspectives in matter of prevention of occupational risks in the area of industry radiography. (N.C.)

  13. Regulatory control and management of radioactive materials in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, A.M.; Parami, V.K.; Domondon, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) by virtue of Republic Act 2067, as amended, Republic Act 5207 and Executive Order 128 (1987), was mandated to promote, advance and regulate the safe and peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology in the Philippines. The PNRI was formerly the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission, established in 1958. This report aims to share the information and experience of PNRI as a regulatory authority on the administrative, technical and managerial aspects to ensure the safety and security of radioactive material in the country. It describes the country's regulatory framework, operational experiences, international co-operation including reporting system and database, and radiological safety assessment and compliance monitoring. It also briefly discusses the current development of the country's radiological emergency response plan and the radiation protection services offered by the PNRI. In the discussion and recommendations, some of the results of the regulatory information conferences conducted with the end-users are enumerated. (author)

  14. Determination of naturally occurring radioactive materials and heavy metals in soil sample at industrial site area Gebeng, Pahang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Dzulkhairi Zulkifly

    2012-01-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the natural occurring radioactivity and heavy metal at an industrial site area Gebeng, Pahang. Sampling has been done in four different stations. This study has been carried out to determine the natural radioactivity ( 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 226 Ra) and heavy metal in soil sample. Natural radioactivities were determined using Gamma Spectrometry System, the heavy metal determination was done using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The result for analysis radioactivity concentration showed that Uranium-238 were in the range of 28.18 ± 4.78 Bq/ kg - 39.63 ± 4.79 Bq/ kg, while the concentration for Thorium-232 were in the range of 45.66 ± 5.49 Bq/ kg - 72.43 ± 9.47 Bq/ kg and for the Radium-226, the concentration were in the range of 8.93 ± 1.15 Bq/ kg - 14.29 ± 2.61 Bq/ kg. The concentration of Potassium-40 were in the range of 51.06 ± 12.18 Bq/ kg - 426.28 ± 137.70 Bq/ kg. 8 heavy metals have been found from the four different stations which are Al, Fe, V, Mn, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb. Fe show the highest concentration among the other heavy metal while Pb show the lowest concentration. From this study, the specific activities of natural radionuclide in almost all stations were below the world limit average for soil, which is 35 Bq/ kg for Uranium-238 and Radium-226, while Thorium-232 and Potassium-40 were above the world limit average which are 30 Bq/ kg and 400 Bq/ kg. (author)

  15. Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, I.; Wiesenberger, H.

    2001-01-01

    This chapter of the environmental control report deals with the environmental impact of the industry in Austria. It gives a review of the structure and types of the industry, the legal framework and environmental policy of industrial relevance. The environmental situation of the industry in Austria is analyzed in detail, concerning air pollution (SO 2 , NO x , CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , N 2 O, NH 3 , Pb, Cd, Hg, dioxin, furans), waste water, waste management and deposit, energy and water consumption. The state of the art in respect of the IPPC-directives (European Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Bureau) concerning the best available techniques of the different industry sectors is outlined. The application of European laws and regulations in the Austrian industry is described. (a.n.)

  16. Impacts of cement industries on environment and control measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, H.N.; Malik, H.N.; Naushad, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Utilization of cement as building material is gaining more importance. Cement industries around the world are contributing in global and as well as local pollution. In Pakistan most of the cement industries are constructed in remote areas without any proper environmental impact assessment. Unawareness of peoples toward sustainable environment and due to lack of job opportunities, dwellers are demanding employment rather than clean environment from title-holder of the industry. Air pollution caused by cement industries is harmful to the human's health, spoils and erodes building surface, corrodes metals, weakens textiles, deteriorates atmospheric visibility, affects plant life and leads to ecological imbalances. To investigate environmental impact of cement industries in Pakistan, environmental conditions around and inside the five cement industries in the vicinity of Taxila city are studied. To inspect the whole scenario, air pollution control devices in these industries were also examined in detail. These industries are using Electrostatic Precipitators and Baghouses to control air pollution (dust particulates). Proper caring of these equipment is necessary for better results. Detailed study shows that emissions from their stacks and dust particulates are causing problems. Health consultants in study area are much worry about the health of workers and environmental degradation in the vicinity of these industries. The comparison of air pollution control devices shows that Baghouses are environmental friendly. Considering the field conditions it is also concluded that involvement of government and environmental pollution control agencies is much more necessary. (author)

  17. Emergency planning and preparedness for accidents involving radioactive materials used in medicine, industry, research and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Safety Series book should be considered as a technical guide aimed at the users of radioactive materials and the appropriate local and national authorities. It does not represent a single solution to the problems involved but rather draws the outlines of the plans and procedures that have to be developed in order to mitigate the consequences of an accident, should one occur. The preparation of local and national plans should follow the technical recommendations provided in this publication, with due consideration given to local factors which might vary from country to country (e.g. governmental systems, local legislation, quantities of radioactive materials involved). Several types of accidents are described, together with their possible radiological consequences. The basic principles of the protective measures that should be applied are discussed, and the principles of emergency planning and the measures needed to maintain preparedness for an operational response to an accident are outlined

  18. The management of radioactive waste arising from the medical, industrial and research use of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The management of radioactive wastes in Australia is reviewed. Technical criteria for regulated user-disposal, shallow ground disposal and long term storage are examined. Options for ensuring adequate regional and national access to waste repositories are discussed. The Committee recommends that the code of practice for user-disposal be finalised, a national program be initiated to identify sites suitable for shallow ground burial and the Commonwealth proceed to investigate the development of facilities for interim and long term storage

  19. The role of the airline industry in the safe and efficient carriage of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouchaar, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    For the transport of dangerous goods, including radioactive material, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) - representing its member airlines - works towards greater standardization, streamlining of traffic-handling procedures, more automation, reduced government-clearance procedures and documentary requirements, improved handling at airports, and adequate terminal facilities. The paper provides an overview of how IATA works with other international agencies to accomplish these goals and how it reflects the IAEA Transport Regulations in the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations. (author)

  20. Radiation hazard control in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    In view of the wide circulation of the first edition, the revised edition has been designed to assist in the training of industrial radiographic personnel for certification according to Canadian General Specifications Board Standard 48-GP-4M. It is not designed for use by management and, consequently dose not include management function which are required by regulations pertaining to the use of radiation. Instead, it is intended for the man in the field and is written with his welfare and the safety of the general public as its primary goals

  1. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1985, Part -2, Annex 2b, Environmental Radioactivity control, Control of air contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patic, D.; Smiljanic, R.; Zaric, M.; Savic, Z.; Ristic, D.

    1985-01-01

    During the period from November 1984 - November 1985, within the radioactivity control on the Vinca Institute site air contamination radioactive aerosol contents was measured. Control was done on 4 measuring stations, two in the Institute and two locations in the direction of wind i.e. Belgrade, 2 km and 7 km away from the Institute respectively. This position of the measuring locations enables control of radiation safety of the Institute, as well as environment of Belgrade taking into account the existence of the reactor and other possible contaminants in the Institute [sr

  2. Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT): The Powerful Industrial Radiotracer Techniques for Hydrodynamics and Flow Visualization Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Amirul Syafiq Mohd Yunos

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive particle tracking (RPT) techniques have been widely applied in the field of chemical engineering, especially in hydrodynamics in multiphase reactors. This technique is widely used to monitor the motion of the flow inside a reactor by using a single radioactive particle tracer that is neutrally buoyant with respect to the phase is used as a tracker. The particle moves inside the volume of interest and its positions are determined by an array of scintillation detectors counting in coming photons. Particle position reconstruction algorithms have been traditionally used to map measured counts rate into the coordinates by solving a minimization problem between measured events and calibration data. RPT have been used to validate respective-scale CFD models to partial success. This presentation described an introduction to radioactive particle tracking and summarizing a history of such developments and the current state of this method in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, with a perspective towards the future and how these investigations may help scale-up developments. (author)

  3. Cybersecurity Framework for Ship Industrial Control System

    OpenAIRE

    Maule, R. William; Hake, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Ship mechanical and electrical control systems, and the communications grid through which these devices operate, are a high priority concern for Navy leadership. Ship systems use microprocessor-based controls to interface with physical objects, and Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) to automate ship electromechanical processes. Ship operations are completely dependent on these devices. The commercial security products upon which ships depend do not work on ICS, leaving ships vulnerable. Th...

  4. Legislative and Regulatory Control for the Safety of Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metals Generated from Mining and Mineral Processing Facilities in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajane, E. P.; Shale, K., E-mail: PEMohajane@nnr.co.za [National Nuclear Regulator, Centurion, Gauteng (South Africa)

    2011-07-15

    In South Africa, enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are associated with many mining and industrial processes. Significant amounts of waste materials are involved which can result in radiation exposure of the workers and the public particularly through the diversion of materials into the public domain. The following operations have been regulated in South Africa for the past twenty years: operating metallurgical plants utilizing NORM, underground mining operations, scrap recyclers and smelters, and rehabilitation and remediation activities involving the above sites. The radioactively contaminated scrap metal generated from the above mentioned facilities is available for recycling in amounts of thousands of tons. The South African government has, to a certain extent, responded to the above-mentioned challenges by introducing regulatory controls to the affected industries. The existing regulatory controls have, however, not provided absolute answers to all issues associated with the management of scrap. (author)

  5. National Public Information Symposium on Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy, NUC Info'2000. Radioactive Waste Management and Site Restoration in Uranium Industry. Proceedings. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Ion; Comsa, Olivia

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings published in two volumes contain materials presented at the National Public Information Symposium on Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy, NUC Info'2000, Radioactive Waste Management and Site Restoration in Uranium Industry, held on 5. September to 8. September 2000 at Baita Bihor, Romania. As the name of Symposium indicates, this manifestation is addressed not only to specialists but rather to the public at large. The proceedings are structured in 4 sections: 1. Management of radioactive waste arising from uranium mining, milling and decommissioning; 2. Uranium mine close-down; 3. Environmental restoration of uranium mining and milling sites; 4. Management of radioactive waste arising from nuclear applications. The first volume also contains an inaugural session dedicated to nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and development of uranium industry in Romania. The contributions in the first volume deal with the management of radioactive waste arising from uranium mining, milling and decommissioning and uranium mine close-out

  6. Wastewater quality control at Sarnia (Ontario, Canada) petrochemical industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Arlinda C. [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Souza, Eliane S.; Himmelman, William [Lambton College, Sarnia, ON (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Ontario industries are required by law to meet strict regulations under the provinces under MISA initiative (Municipal-Industrial Strategy for Abatement). The petroleum-petrochemical area was selected as a leader in the development of new environmental objectives, and monitoring and training programs. Sarnia has become a world leader in industrial environmental control systems and the approach toward zero emissions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Wastewater quality control at Sarnia (Ontario, Canada) petrochemical industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianna, Arlinda C [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Salvador, BA (Brazil); Souza, Eliane S; Himmelman, William [Lambton College, Sarnia, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    Ontario industries are required by law to meet strict regulations under the provinces under MISA initiative (Municipal-Industrial Strategy for Abatement). The petroleum-petrochemical area was selected as a leader in the development of new environmental objectives, and monitoring and training programs. Sarnia has become a world leader in industrial environmental control systems and the approach toward zero emissions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Engineering models and methods for industrial cell control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1997-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the engineering, i.e. the designing and making, of industrial cell control systems. The focus is on automated robot welding cells in the shipbuilding industry. The industrial research project defines models and methods for design and implemen-tation of computer based...... SHIPYARD.It is concluded that cell control technology provides for increased performance in production systems, and that the Cell Control Engineering concept reduces the effort for providing and operating high quality and high functionality cell control solutions for the industry....... control and monitor-ing systems for production cells. The project participants are The Danish Academy of Technical Sciences, the Institute of Manufacturing Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark and ODENSE STEEL SHIPYARD Ltd.The manufacturing environment and the current practice...

  9. An assessment of the disposal of radioactive petroleum industry waste in nonhazardous landfills using risk-based modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.P.; Arnish, J.J.; Williams, G.P.; Blunt, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Certain petroleum production activities cause naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to accumulate in concentrations above natural background levels, making safe and cost-effective management of such technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) a key issue for the petroleum industry. As a result, both industry and regulators are interested in identifying cost-effective disposal alternatives that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. One such alternative, currently allowed in Michigan with restrictions, is the disposal of TENORM wastes in nonhazardous waste landfills. The disposal of petroleum industry wastes containing radium-226 (Ra-226) in nonhazardous landfills was modeled to evaluate the potential radiological doses and health risks to workers and the public. Multiple scenarios were considered in evaluating the potential risks associated with landfill operations and the future use of the property. The scenarios were defined, in part, to evaluate the Michigan policy; sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the impact of key parameters on potential risks. The results indicate that the disposal of petroleum industry TENORM wastes in nonhazardous landfills in accordance with the Michigan policy and existing landfill regulations presents a negligible risk to most of the potential receptors considered in this study.

  10. Use of semiconductor detectors for radioactive waste account and control

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, L N; Zakharchenko, A A

    2002-01-01

    The possibilities and development status of the contemporary semiconductor detectors and detecting devices intended for radiation monitoring at nuclear industry enterprises, including Chernobyl Shelter and depositories of nuclear wastes are shown. Such devices,created in the last years, can be successfully used for measurements of the gamma-radiation dose rate as well as for the isotope composition evaluation of nuclear materials and wastes, both during the work cycles and in emergency situations.

  11. The safe control of the transport of radioactive material in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumette, L.

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of the transport of radioactive and fissile material for civil use concerns the protection of human beings and the environment against the radiological risk which can occur by these conveyed material. That's why this regulation particularly calls upon the law of the protection of the environment, upon the law of the transport of dangerous goods and upon the nuclear law. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency [I.A.E.A.], the implementation of this regulation gives the transport a high level of safety. It comes from I.A.E.A's recommendations which have taken into account lessons from the scientific research and from technical experiences. These recommendations are implemented in international binding modal regulations so that they can be adapted to the ways of transport. Their acceptance in the inner law goes with some national specific laws, mainly connected with the operator's missions and responsibilities. So this technical and administrative regulation is rather complex, and its codification would make it clearer. Nevertheless the whole regulation meets the double aim of the law in transport of dangerous goods which is to insure the safety of this transport of dangerous goods without prejudicing exchanges. In order to apply the regulation, the operators use supervision procedure to check their activities are in conformity with the law. In addition to these procedures, the Authorities supervise this conformity from time to time, by making boring. Operators and the Authorities involve their responsibility which is dependent either on the system of civil responsibility in case of damage, or on the system of administrative responsibility in case of error or risk, or on the system of penal responsibility in case of infraction of the law. So the operators have to apply the regulation and the Administration has to enforce this regulation they have built up. However, the self-control of the safety of the transport of radioactive

  12. Environmental Control Plan for the Industrial Hygiene Field Services Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    This environmental control plan is for the Hanford Site's Industrial Hygiene Field Services Facility, located in the 100-N Area. This facility is used for the maintenance and storage of respirators, respiratory equipment and testing, calibration and testing of industrial hygiene equipment, and asbestos fiber counting

  13. PIPELINE CORROSION CONTROL IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion in pipelines is one of the major challenges faced by oil and gas industries all over the world. This has made corrosion control or management a major factor to consider before setting up any industry that will transport products via pipelines. In this study the types of corrosion found on system 2A pipeline were; ...

  14. HITACHI security concept for industrial control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, H.; Yamada, T.; Okubo, S.; Nakano, T.

    2012-01-01

    Security is a necessary factor for the safe and efficient operation of today's control systems. To ensure safe operation of control systems throughout their lifetime, security measures must be carefully planned in the development phase and then maintained continuously during the operation phase and other following phases. To ensure operation within the system's safe states, Hitachi proposes security concept processes (1) to derive security measures rationally and (2) to maintain the security model over the system life cycle. Hitachi also proposes security development programs which support the integration of standards-compliant systems and development of robust control equipment. (author)

  15. Utilization of small-amount of radioactive isotope. Report of Technical Committee for Using Minor Radioactive Sources, Section of Physical Science and Industry, JRIAS. (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The report of this series is a summary of considerations made by the committee which was founded in January, 1991, for stimulating the utilization of small-amount radioactive isotopes. The present report (1) is composed of three chapters concerning the purpose above mentioned and achievement of the committee, and reasonable regulation for the sealed isotopes. For the purpose, analysis was made for the present states of small-amount radioisotope utilization and of legal regulation and proposals were done by the committee. In the past, the first (1/1, 1991-5/31, 1992) and second (6/1, 1992 5/31, 1994) terms of the committee investigated the present states of utilization and safety handling in Japan and foreign countries, methods for stimulation, education and re-evaluation of the past trials for technology of those sub-legal isotopes together with translation of IAEA SAFETY SERIES No. 104 into Japanese, which was published in the journal Radioisotopes vol.44 (1995), for reference of the present states in Japan and foreign countries. In the chapter of proposal for the reasonable regulation for the sealed isotopes, the present committee investigated the present states of utilization of the industrial instruments and daily necessities which are equipped with small-amount radioisotopes, their legal and safety problems involved and the basis of calculation of exemption level, and made proposals for reasonable regulation. (K.H.)

  16. Development of internal dose assessment procedure for workers in industries using raw materials containing naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheol Kyu; KIm, Yong Geon; Ji, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Koo, Bon Cheol; Chang, Byung Uck

    2016-01-01

    It is necessary to assess radiation dose to workers due to inhalation of airborne particulates containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to ensure radiological safety required by the Natural Radiation Safety Management Act. The objective of this study is to develop an internal dose assessment procedure for workers at industries using raw materials containing natural radionuclides. The dose assessment procedure was developed based on harmonization, accuracy, and proportionality. The procedure includes determination of dose assessment necessity, preliminary dose estimation, airborne particulate sampling and characterization, and detailed assessment of radiation dose. The developed dose assessment procedure is as follows. Radioactivity concentration criteria to determine dose assessment necessity are 10 Bq·g-1 for 40K and 1 Bq·g-1 for the other natural radionuclides. The preliminary dose estimation is performed using annual limit on intake (ALI). The estimated doses are classified into 3 groups (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, and >0.3 mSv). Air sampling methods are determined based on the dose estimates. Detailed dose assessment is performed using air sampling and particulate characterization. The final dose results are classified into 4 different levels (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, 0.3-1 mSv, and >1 mSv). Proper radiation protection measures are suggested according to the dose level. The developed dose assessment procedure was applied for NORM industries in Korea, including coal combustion, phosphate processing, and monazite handing facilities. The developed procedure provides consistent dose assessment results and contributes to the establishment of optimization of radiological protection in NORM industries

  17. Development of internal dose assessment procedure for workers in industries using raw materials containing naturally occurring radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Cheol Kyu; KIm, Yong Geon; Ji, Seung Woo; Kim, Kwang Pyo [College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Bon Cheol; Chang, Byung Uck [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    It is necessary to assess radiation dose to workers due to inhalation of airborne particulates containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) to ensure radiological safety required by the Natural Radiation Safety Management Act. The objective of this study is to develop an internal dose assessment procedure for workers at industries using raw materials containing natural radionuclides. The dose assessment procedure was developed based on harmonization, accuracy, and proportionality. The procedure includes determination of dose assessment necessity, preliminary dose estimation, airborne particulate sampling and characterization, and detailed assessment of radiation dose. The developed dose assessment procedure is as follows. Radioactivity concentration criteria to determine dose assessment necessity are 10 Bq·g-1 for 40K and 1 Bq·g-1 for the other natural radionuclides. The preliminary dose estimation is performed using annual limit on intake (ALI). The estimated doses are classified into 3 groups (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, and >0.3 mSv). Air sampling methods are determined based on the dose estimates. Detailed dose assessment is performed using air sampling and particulate characterization. The final dose results are classified into 4 different levels (<0.1 mSv, 0.1-0.3 mSv, 0.3-1 mSv, and >1 mSv). Proper radiation protection measures are suggested according to the dose level. The developed dose assessment procedure was applied for NORM industries in Korea, including coal combustion, phosphate processing, and monazite handing facilities. The developed procedure provides consistent dose assessment results and contributes to the establishment of optimization of radiological protection in NORM industries.

  18. Storage of low-level radioactive waste and regulatory control of sealed sources in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Markkanen, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on the non nuclear low-level radioactive waste. The cornerstone for maintaining radioactive sources under control in Finland is that all practices involving sources are subject to authorization and all licensing information, including information on each individual source, are entered into a register which is continuously updated based on applications and notifications received from the licenses. Experiences during the past twenty years have shown that source-specific records of sources combined with regular inspections at the places of use have prevented efficiency losing control over sealed radioactive sources. The current capacity in the interim storage for State owned waste is not adequate for all used sealed sources and other small user waste which are currently kept in the possession of the licensees. Thus, expansion of the storage capacity and other options for taking care of the small user waste is under consideration. (N.C.)

  19. Computer-based supervisory control and data acquisition system for the radioactive waste evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, N.G.; Schreiber, S.B.; Yarbro, S.L.; Gomez, B.G.; Nekimken, H.L.; Sanchez, D.E.; Bibeau, R.A.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The evaporator process at TA-55 reduces the amount of transuranic liquid radioactive waste by separating radioactive salts from relatively low-level radioactive nitric acid solution. A computer-based supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system has been installed on the process that allows the operators to easily interface with process equipment. Individual single-loop controllers in the SCADA system allow more precise process operation with less human intervention. With this system, process data can be archieved in computer files for later analysis. Data are distributed throughout the TA-55 site through a local area network so that real-time process conditions can be monitored at multiple locations. The entire system has been built using commercially available hardware and software components

  20. The use of ligneous plants for controlling the radioactive contamination of a soil; Utilisation des vegetaux ligneux au controle de la pollution radioactive d'un sol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnaire, J; Heuze, C; Aubert, M T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A method for checking on the possible radioactive pollution of CEN-G. soil, by taking samples of tissue of ligneous plants cultivated on the land in question, is proposed and investigated during the vegetation period. A preliminary study on the retention capacity of the CEN-G. soil for solutions containing {sup 32}P and chemical composition is given. (author) [French] Une methode de controle de la pollution radioactive eventuelle du sol du CEN-G., a l'aide de prelevements de tissus de vegetaux ligneux, cultives sur ce terrain est proposee et etudiee pendant la periode vegetative. Une etude preliminaire du pouvoir de retention du sol du CEN-G, vis-a-vis de solutions contenant du {sup 32}P et de composition chimique, est exposee. (auteur)

  1. Radiation control of food and forest industry production in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, I.P.; Barabashkin, A.V.; Kondrat'ev, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    Service of the Ministry of Health ( 151 radiology laboratories ) and The Ministry of Agriculture ( 1330 radiology laboratories ) carry out the permanent control of the content of radionuclides in food. Last years there was no case registered of drinking water with the content of radioactive substances exceeding the permissible level. Radiation control of food and agricultural raw products is carried out in several stages: at the place of production, during reprocessing and a control of ready made product. The fact that there was no case of delivery of the products with the content of radionuclides higher than permissible level for sale says about the reliability of the system of the control. The permissible levels of the content of radionuclides are presented for food, drinking water, products of forest industry and agricultural production. 1 tab

  2. Optimization and control methods in industrial engineering and construction

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    This book presents recent advances in optimization and control methods with applications to industrial engineering and construction management. It consists of 15 chapters authored by recognized experts in a variety of fields including control and operation research, industrial engineering, and project management. Topics include numerical methods in unconstrained optimization, robust optimal control problems, set splitting problems, optimum confidence interval analysis, a monitoring networks optimization survey, distributed fault detection, nonferrous industrial optimization approaches, neural networks in traffic flows, economic scheduling of CCHP systems, a project scheduling optimization survey, lean and agile construction project management, practical construction projects in Hong Kong, dynamic project management, production control in PC4P, and target contracts optimization.   The book offers a valuable reference work for scientists, engineers, researchers and practitioners in industrial engineering and c...

  3. PIPELINE CORROSION CONTROL IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    protection technique as a method of controlling corrosion in oil and gas pipelines is effective and efficient when compared to ... In the field of crude oil production and associated engineering .... Industrial/Mechanical Systems, Joen Printing and.

  4. Insights on the Security and Dependability of Industrial Control Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kargl, Frank; van der Heijden, R.; van der Heijden, Rens W.; König, Hartmut; Valdes, Alfonso; Dacier, Marc C.

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss the findings of a recent research seminar on the security and dependability of industrial control systems and provide an overview of major challenges in the field and areas where current research should focus.

  5. Design and implementation of an industrial vector-controlled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jose Titus

    1 Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai ... Vector-controlled induction motor drives are quite popular in the industry in applications that ... monitored machine parameters and fault information.

  6. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book highlights the main issues of public concern related to radioactive waste management and puts them into perspective. It provides an overview of radioactive waste management covering, among other themes, policies, implementation and public communication based on national experiences. Its purpose is to assists in increasing the understanding of radioactive waste management issues by public and national authorities, organizations involved in radioactive waste management and the nuclear industry; it may also serve as a source book for those who communicate with the public. Even in the unlikely event that nuclear power does not further develop around the world, the necessity for dealing with nuclear waste from past usages, from uranium mining and milling, decontamination and decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities and from the uses of radioactive materials in medicine, industry and research would still exist. In many countries, radioactive waste management planning involves making effective institutional arrangements in which responsibilities and liabilities are well established for the technical operation and long term surveillance of disposal systems. Financing mechanisms are part of the arrangements. Continuous quality assurance and quality control, at all levels of radioactive waste management, are essential to ensure the required integrity of the system. As with any other human activity, improvements in technology and economics may be possible and secondary problems avoided. Improvements and confirmation of the efficiency of processes and reduction of uncertainties can only be achieved by continued active research, development and demonstration, which are the goals of many national programmes. International co-operation, also in the form of reviews, can contribute to increasing confidence in the ongoing work. The problem of radioactive wastes is not a unique one; it may be compared with other problems of toxic wastes resulting from many other

  7. Studies for improvement of regulatory control on the radioactive effluent released from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Jae Hak; Park, H. M.; Song, M. C.; Lee, K. H.; Jang, J. K.; Chun, J. K.; Jeong, K. H.

    2005-05-01

    This report contains the second-year results of the research project titled 'Studies for Improvement of Regulatory Control on the Radioactive Effluent Released from Nuclear Facilities' and mainly provides technical and strategic approaches to improve performance of regulatory control on the gaseous effluent released from domestic nuclear facilities. The main result contained here includes overview and technical bases of radioactive gaseous effluent control (Chapter 1), reconsideration of the sensitivity requirements for measurement of radioactivity in gaseous effluent sample (Chapter 2), uncertainty analysis of the calculated radioactivity in gaseous effluent (Chapter 3), and improvement of quantification method of noble gas releases (Chapter 4). In addition, analysis of the impact due to combined sampling of particulate from multiple release points (Chapter 5), comparison of domestic nuclear reactors gaseous effluent data to foreign PWRs (Chapter 6), standardized sampling technique for collection of gaseous tritium (Chapter 7), and application of Xe-133 equivalent concept to gaseous effluent control (Chapter 8) are also provided. As a whole, this report provides a generic approach to improve the performance of regulatory control on the gaseous effluent. Therefore, actual enforcement of the recommendations should be preceded by establishment of a series of action plans reflecting on the site- and facility-specific design and operational features

  8. Corrosion Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it..

  9. Local hierarchical control for industrial microgrids with improved frequency regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rey, Juan M.; Vergara, Pedro P.; Castilla, Miguel

    2018-01-01

    Local control strategies that operate without relying on communication systems enhance flexibility and reliability of AC industrial microgrids. Based on a previous work in which a secondary switched control was proposed, this paper presents a complementary strategy to improve the frequency......-use of communications. Experimental results obtained on a laboratory microgrid are presented to validate the performance of the proposed complementary control strategy....

  10. Public perceptions of industrial risks: the context of public attitudes toward radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, T.C.

    1981-06-01

    A survey was made to determine the public risk perception of several industrial hazards. A free response approach was used in order for respondents to generate their own alternatives. The general class of hazard investigated here included all hazardous industrial facilities. The free response survey was used to study public perception of: (a) the closeness of the nearest hazardous industrial facility (as estimated by the respondent); (b) the sort of facility it is; (c) the sorts of risk associated with it; and (d) the persons placed at risk by it. Respondents also identified the risks of, and the persons placed at risk by, both a toxic chemical disposal facility and a nuclear waste disposal facility. Results of this study thus can inform us of the unprompted concerns of the public regarding a wide variety of industrial facilities

  11. General Pest Control - Industrial. Manual 95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the general pest control category. The text discusses general, parasitic and miscellaneous pests such as ants, ticks, and spiders; fabric, wood-destroying, and grain pests such as beetles, termites, and…

  12. EPICS: Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epics Development Team

    2013-02-01

    EPICS is a set of software tools and applications developed collaboratively and used to create distributed soft real-time control systems for scientific instruments such as particle accelerators and telescopes. Such distributed control systems typically comprise tens or even hundreds of computers, networked together to allow communication between them and to provide control and feedback of the various parts of the device from a central control room, or even remotely over the internet. EPICS uses Client/Server and Publish/Subscribe techniques to communicate between the various computers. A Channel Access Gateway allows engineers and physicists elsewhere in the building to examine the current state of the IOCs, but prevents them from making unauthorized adjustments to the running system. In many cases the engineers can make a secure internet connection from home to diagnose and fix faults without having to travel to the site. EPICS is used by many facilities worldwide, including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, Fermilab, Keck Observatory, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Australian Synchrotron, and Stanford Linear Accellerator Center.

  13. Control systems in optical fibre industry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostka, František

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 4 (1998), s. 195-200 ISSN 1405-5546 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) KSK1067601 Projekt 10/96/K:4107 Keywords : control systems * real time systems * microcomputers * optical fibres Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. Power and control in interactions between journalists and health-related industries: the view from industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Bronwen; Lipworth, Wendy L; Forsyth, Rowena; Jordens, Christopher F C; Kerridge, Ian

    2014-06-01

    The mass media is a major source of health information for the public, and as such the quality and independence of health news reporting is an important concern. Concerns have been expressed that journalists reporting on health are increasingly dependent on their sources--including representatives of industries responsible for manufacturing health-related products--for story ideas and content. Many critics perceive an imbalance of power between journalists and industry sources, with industry being in a position of relative power, however the empirical evidence to support this view is limited. The analysis presented here--which is part of a larger study of industry-journalist relationships--draws on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with representatives of health-related industries in Australia to inductively examine their perceptions of power relations between industry and journalists. Participants painted a picture in which journalists, rather than themselves, were in a position to control the nature, extent, and outcome of their interactions with industry sources. Our results resonate with the concept of "mediatisation" as it has been applied in the domain of political reporting. It appears that, from the perspective of industry representatives, the imposition of media logic on health-related industries may inappropriately influence the information that the public receives about health-related products.

  15. RISKS OF LOSING CONTROLLABILITY WHILE LIBERALIZING THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Petrusha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses controllability qua a reliability characteristic of the electric-power grid controlling system. The following notions are used: the object (environment susceptibility towards the control stimuli, the controlling system adequacy, environment of the secure functioning. The author points to the necessity of accounting for the limitations of technological and organizational character. While liberalizing the electric-power industry, the backbone control-principle “the industry functioning reliability” is being replaced with the principle of “profit-making” that requires complete restatement of the control philosophy.The conflict between commercial benefit gaining and the reliability assurance expenses leads to losing controllability in all the managerial links and to probable catastrophic consequences. The recapitulation of the Russian Federation power industry privatization substantiates concerns of the liberal ideas poor survivability in the ex-Soviet territories. The results of degradation of the secure-functioning environment demonstrate affinity of the mechanisms that triggered the Chernobyl NPP, Fukusima NPP, and Sayan-Shushenskya HPP disasters. Securing reliability of the strategic objects leaves the competence boundaries of the electricpower industry.The topical issue of Belorussian electric-power industry functioning and developing is the combination of technical re-equipment (developing the operational dispatch management and the control-system organizational modernizing in general with gradual and controllable transition to the market mechanisms of functioning. Herewith, preserving the state monopoly on regime provision for the operation of the electric-power system should not leave out the industry appeal for outside investment and is regulated by the optimal degree and intensity of the state participation in governing the electric-power supply industry. The distinction of privatization models and the stages

  16. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile radionuclides generated during used nuclear fuel reprocessing in the US is almost certain to be necessary for the licensing of a reprocessing facility in the US. Various control technologies have been developed, tested, or used over the past 50 years for control of volatile radionuclide emissions from used fuel reprocessing plants. The US DOE has sponsored, since 2009, an Off-gas Sigma Team to perform research and development focused on the most pressing volatile radionuclide control and immobilization problems. In this paper, we focus on the control requirements and methodologies for 85Kr and 129I. Numerous candidate technologies have been studied and developed at laboratory and pilot-plant scales in an effort to meet the need for high iodine control efficiency and to advance alternatives to cryogenic separations for krypton control. Several of these show promising results. Iodine decontamination factors as high as 105, iodine loading capacities, and other adsorption parameters including adsorption rates have been demonstrated under some conditions for both silver zeolite (AgZ and Ag-functionalized aerogel. Sorbents, including an engineered form of AgZ and selected metal organic framework materials (MOFs, have been successfully demonstrated to capture Kr and Xe without the need for separations at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter

  18. The exemption of regulatory control for the management of low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.T.; Carboneras, P.

    1993-01-01

    A high number of wastes produced in different fields of science and technology, as well as nuclear power plants, contain a significant volume of byproducts contaminated with radioisotopes, having a very low radioactive level. This kind of wastes might be managed as ordinary wastes by conventional methods or even reused. In order to carry out this procedure, a new regulation exempting these products from the regulatory control normatives would be necessary. This paper analyzes the big advantages of introducing these exemptions (costs recycling, radioactive wastes minimization) and how they follow the recommendations of ICRP, IAEA, EC and NRC

  19. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  20. Project of an information integrated system to provide support to the regulatory control of the radioactive waste inventory; Projeto de um sistema integrado de informacao para suporte ao controle regulatorio do inventario de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christovao, Marilia Tavares

    2005-05-15

    Sources and radioactive waste deriving from industry activities, medical practice and other areas are collected, received, and stored as waste on Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Institutes, that also generate, treat and store their own radioactive waste. The object of this project is to present an Integrated Information System named SICORR, having as guidelines, the referred processes to the radioactive waste regulatory control, under the responsibility of the Radioactive Waste Division (DIREJ), the General Coordination of Licensing and Control (CGLC), the Directorate of Safety and Radiation Protection (DRS) and the CNEN. The main objective of the work was reached, once the project SICORR modeling considers the radioactive waste control inventory, enclosing the treatment and integration of the radioactive waste and the radionuclides data and processes; the installations that produce, use, transport or store radiation sources data; and, CNEN Institutes responsible for the radioactive waste management data. The SICORR functions or essential modules involve the data treatment, integration, standardization and consistency between the processes. The SICORR specification and the analysis results are registered in documents, Software Specification Proposal (PESw) and Software Requirements Specification (ERSw), and are presented in text, in diagrams and user interfaces. Use cases have been used in the SICORR context diagram. The user interfaces for each use case have been detailed, defining the graphical layout, the relationships description with other interfaces, the interface details properties and the commands and the product entrances and exits. For objects radioactive waste and radionuclides, states diagrams have been drawn. The activities diagram represents the business model process. The class diagram represents the static objects and relationships that exist between them, under the specification point of view. The class diagram have been determined

  1. Development of data acquisition and analysis system to application of the radioactive tracers in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Luis E.B.; Sa, Lidia V. de; Sousa, Alvaro S.F. de

    1997-01-01

    It has been developed at the IEN - Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear a system to evaluate the operation conditions of industry units by studying the RTD (Residence Time Distribution) curves when a pulse of radiation is injected in the system. It consists of NaI (Ti) 3 x 3 scintillation detectors, mono channel analyses and a interface to a computer. All data collected are analysed by a program called TRACER which possibilities a preliminary mathematical data treatment; display on the scream the RTD curve, and calculated the average residence time and the response function, not only for instantaneous impulses, but also for continuous ones. After accomplishing all the information, it is possible to pinpoint problems such as canalizations, deal volumes, leaks, and decrease in the efficiency of the industry units analysed.The system is made up a set of compact modules and can easily be used in industries installations. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. French industrial plant AVM for continuous vitrification of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, Roger; Sombret, Claude; Barbe, Alain

    1975-01-01

    The A.V.M. plant is a continuous process plant now under construction at Marcoule and intended for vitrifying the whole of fission product solutions from the C.E.A. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) - Marcoule reprocessing plant. The outset of the construction took place in the second 1974 half year; the first radioactive run is scheduled in July 1977. The two steps of the process are shown: first a continuous calcination then a continuous glass making from the calcined product and suitable additives. The plant consists in two parts: vitrification and storage facilities. Some wastes will be continuously produced day after day due to gas clean up and worn out materials. Characteristics of the solutions processed, calcined products, glass composition, and expected liquid wastes are given in tables [fr

  3. Radioactivity in the oil industry - how much is it and is it of any concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thingvoll, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    Oil producing countries around the North Sea generate annually around 200 tons of naturally occurring radioactive waste materials. This paper deals with the health risk from radiation doses received by workers and the public from handling and processing LSA (Low Specific Activity) scale. The values of specific activity (Bq/g) and the total becquerel (Bq) activity of the scale exceeds the exemption levels suggested in the EU (European Union) directive on ionizing radiation (1994 revision). If the proposed EU directive comes into force the consequences will be large and mostly negative in terms of public image and cost. The improvements in radiological protection for the workers and public in general are anticipated to be minor. A few recommendations to address these problems have been suggested. 19 refs., 8 tabs

  4. Environmental Radioactivity from Natural, Industrial and Military Sources. 4th Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Steve

    1998-09-01

    Merril Eisenbud's series of books on environmental radioactivity have long had a place on the bookshelves of those involved with the environmental aspects of radiation protection. They provide authoritative coverage of the subject including sources, transport mechanisms and effects. The first edition, published in 1963, was naturally mostly concerned with the effects of nuclear weapons testing in the atmosphere. The second edition, published in 1977, reflected the then expansive phase of nuclear power development worldwide and included an extensive treatment of the nuclear fuel cycle and its contributions to environmental radioactivity. In 1987 the third edition included coverage of the Three Mile Island accident and the Chernobyl accident against the background of cessation of new orders for nuclear plant in the United States. The fourth edition is a major revision with a lot of new material, and the welcome adoption of SI units throughout. The principal additions to the new edition are chapters on environmental surveillance, radiological assessment and dose reconstruction, and the remediation of contaminated sites; nothing has been lost from the extensive coverage of other topics in the third edition, whilst the text and bibliography have been revised and brought up to date. Earlier editions of the book have provided good summaries of accidents which have resulted in environmental contamination, and the updating here results in more extensive and up-to-date coverage of the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents, including the more recent evidence of health effects from the latter, together with new sections on the Palomares nuclear weapons accident in Spain, the Mayak/Chelyabinsk complex in Russia, and the accidents involving lost gamma radiation sources in Juarez, Mexico and Goiania, Brazil. Both here and in the extensive coverage of contamination at the USDoE production sites the new edition reflects and benefits from the increased public availability

  5. Radioactivity in the oil industry - how much is it and is it of any concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thingvoll, J.T. [Norske Stats Oljeselskap A.S., Stavanger (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Oil producing countries around the North Sea generate annually around 200 tons of naturally occurring radioactive waste materials. This paper deals with the health risk from radiation doses received by workers and the public from handling and processing LSA (Low Specific Activity) scale. The values of specific activity (Bq/g) and the total becquerel (Bq) activity of the scale exceeds the exemption levels suggested in the EU (European Union) directive on ionizing radiation (1994 revision). If the proposed EU directive comes into force the consequences will be large and mostly negative in terms of public image and cost. The improvements in radiological protection for the workers and public in general are anticipated to be minor. A few recommendations to address these problems have been suggested. 19 refs., 8 tabs.

  6. Application of radioactive methods for the measurement of physical parameters used in industrial nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignan, G.

    1989-01-01

    The thesis presents the development of non-destructive and non-intrusive assay using source of rays (neutrons or gammas) which is external to the system to characterize (activation methods). They are intended to measure physical values used in industrial nuclear plants (Fissile matter concentration, neutronic multiplicity, presence of heavy nuclei...). The presentation is as follows: - Theoretical study of the suggested methods and development of signal processing to ensure the representativeness of the measurement. - Experimental qualification. - Implantation of these techniques in an industrial context [fr

  7. Some discussions on micrometeorology and atmospheric diffusion of classic and radioactive industrial pollutions. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veverka, O.; Valenta, V.; Vlachovsky, K.

    1976-01-01

    The formulae are given expressing the atmospheric dispersion of industrial emissions released from the stacks of industrial plants and power plants. Gaussian distribution of the emissions is assumed. The behaviour of the plume is discussed and the concepts of lofting and fumigation are explained. Generalized relations are derived for the calculation of the atmospheric dispersion of gaseous wastes applicable to both high and short stack disposal and to the leakage from buildings, assuming that the source of emissions is of a point type and emissions are released continuously. (L.O.)

  8. Guidelines for selecting preferred highway routes for highway-route-controlled quantity shipments of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The document presents guidelines for use by State officials in selecting preferred routes for highway route controlled quantity shipments of radioactive materials. A methodology for analyzing and comparing safety factors of alternative routes is described. Technical information on the impacts of radioactive material transportation needed to apply the methodology is also presented. Application of the methodology will identify the route (or set of routes) that minimizes the radiological impacts from shipments of these radioactive materials within a given State. Emphasis in the document is on practical application of the methodology. Some details of the derivation of the methods and data are presented in the appendices. All references in the body of the report can be found listed in the Bibliography (Appendix F)

  9. Software Support for Industrial Controls Contract

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Corral, E

    2001-01-01

    The contract covers the development and the operation and maintenance (O&M) of the monitoring and control systems used for supervising CERN's technical infrastructure. The contract involves those responsible for equipment in any current or future technical installation. We are outsourcing a complex activity which will require efforts on both preparing the specifications for new projects and setting clear definitions of tasks and procedures for O&M. It is a result-oriented contract in which performance will be continually evaluated by different methods and tools: project management plan and project follow-up, and CAMMS (Computerised Assets and Maintenance Management system). To be used effectively, this approach requires complete traceability of activities and documentation of the systems. Based on the analysis of the results measured and the shared (CERN and contractor) experience, the O&M activities will be reviewed and reorganised and operational procedures will be changed according to needs. A ...

  10. Regulatory control of radioactive sources: an international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1998-01-01

    Within its Regular Programme and its Technical Co-operation Programme, the IAEA undertakes a number of activities in support of national efforts aimed at strengthening national infrastructures for the control of radiation sources. The framework of these activities is described. (author)

  11. Corrosion control of carbon steel radioactive-liquid storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Young.

    1997-05-01

    As the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) continues vitrification operation and begins decontamination activities, it is vital to continue to maintain the integrity of the high-level waste tanks and prevent further corrosion that may disrupt the operation. This report describes the current operational status and some corrosion concerns with corresponding control measure recommendations. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Biofouling control of industrial seawater cooling towers

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Bloushi, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the research focuses on biofouling control in seawater cooling towers by investigating two different approaches. The first strategy addresses the use of alternative oxidants (i.e. ozone micro-bubbles and chlorine dioxide) in treatment of cooling towers. The second strategy investigates removing nutrients in seawater using granular activated carbon filter column and ultrafiltration to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Laboratory bench-scale tests in terms of temperature, cycle of concentration, dosage, etc. indicated that, at lower oxidant dosages (total residual oxidant (TRO) equivalent = 0.1 mg/l Cl2), chlorine dioxide had a better disinfection effect than chlorine and ozone. The performance of oxidizing biocides at pilot scale, operating at assorted conditions, showed that for the disinfectants tested, ozone could remove 95 % bioactivity of total number of bacteria and algae followed by chlorine dioxide at 85%, while conventional chlorine dosing only gave 60% reduction in bioactivities. Test results of GAC bio-filter showed that around 70 % removal of total organic carbon in the seawater feed was achieved and was effective in keeping the microbial growth to a minimum. The measured results from this study enable designers of seawater cooling towers to manage the biofouling problems when such cooling towers are extrapolated to a pilot scale.

  13. Research on design method of main control room intake air radioactive monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei; Sun Yu; Wang Jiaoya; Liu Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    According to the design of the main control room intake gamma radiation dose rate monitoring channels in CPR1000 project and the study of relevant regulations and standards, a design method of main control room air inlet radioactive monitoring was presented. The measured object, equipment layout and chain operation were described. The threshold setting was explored using a calculation model established by MCNP software. The advantages, disadvantages and improvement ideas of this design were presented on the basis of calculation results. (authors)

  14. Model Oriented Application Generation for Industrial Control Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Copy, B; Blanco Vinuela, E; Fernandez Adiego, B; Nogueira Ferandes, R; Prieto Barreiro, I

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Unified Industrial Control Systems framework (UNICOS) is a software generation methodology and a collection of development tools that standardizes the design of industrial control applications [1]. A Software Factory, named the UNICOS Application Builder (UAB) [2], was introduced to ease extensibility and maintenance of the framework, introducing a stable metamodel, a set of platformindependent models and platformspecific configurations against which code generation plugins and configuration generation plugins can be written. Such plugins currently target PLC programming environments (Schneider and SIEMENS PLCs) as well as SIEMENS WinCC Open Architecture SCADA (previously known as ETM PVSS) but are being expanded to cover more and more aspects of process control systems. We present what constitutes the UNICOS metamodel and the models in use, how these models can be used to capture knowledge about industrial control systems and how this knowledge can be leveraged to generate both code and configuratio...

  15. Proceedings of the AECB sponsored workshop on control of the ordering and receiving of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The workshop was held in Mississauga, Ontario, on February 4, 1997 for the purpose of bringing together radiation safety professionals to exchange information and propose options for action for the improved control of the ordering and receiving of radioactive materials. The focus was on unsealed radioisotopes and Type 'A' shipments. The workshop participants represented five major processors or distributors and five users who manage large radiation safety programs. These participants were invited because of their knowledge, experience and proximity. Workshop objectives were developed from a review of AECB files, from an AECB report which analysed, in a systematic manner, controls on the ordering and receiving of radioactive material, and from the participants' responses to a pre-workshop request for additional information. The objectives were to propose options for action: to prevent unauthorized persons from placing an order with a supplier; to prevent unauthorized persons from receiving radioactive material by establishing tighter control on the transfer of radioactive material and improving the control of radioactive material during and after delivery. This report provides a record of the presentations and discussions as well as the options for action developed during the workshop. The proposed options for action suggest additional regulatory requirements and guidance documents. Also identified was a need for better assessment, stricter enforcement and future discussions. Included in this report are new licence conditions which were developed as a result of this workshop, several 'parking lot' issues which were raised but considered outside the scope of the discussion and a list of participants. This workshop met the needs and expectation of the Materials Regulation Division (MRD) staff and addressed the needs of the participants. It also provided an opportunity to share information and ideas. It is MRDs intention to keep this collaborative workshop approach for

  16. Use of Industrial Components in SL/BT Equipment Controls

    CERN Document Server

    Carlier, E

    1999-01-01

    The control system of all SPS target stations, beam absorbers and other aperture limiting devices is presently being refurbished, using solely standard industrial hardware and software components. SIEMENS Simatic S7-300 programmable logic controllers serve as equipment controllers. They are connected through Profibus to a WinNT front-end running the SIEMENS WinCC SCADA package which acts as local controller and gateway for remote access. A variant configuration, where the PLCs are directly linked to Ethernet, has been used for controlling the SPS Q measurement kickers. These and some other SL/BT projects will be reviewed where fully off-the-shelf components have been successfully integrated into the SL accelerator controls infrastructure. The arguments leading to the various technical choices will be laid down including a report of the experience gained. Finally, the presentation will address the perspective and current ideas for using industrial components in controlling SL/BT equipment during the LHC era.

  17. "Protected biological control"- Biological pest management in the greenhouse industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilkington, L.J.; Messelink, G.J.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Mottee, Le K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the foundations and characteristics of biological control in protected cropping and what drivers are behind adoption of this management system within this industry. Examining a brief history of biological control in greenhouses and what makes it a successful management

  18. Design and control considerations for industrial and space manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, D. E.; Book, W. J.; Lynch, P. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is a progress report summarizing theoretical and practical results concerning integration of design and control aspects of manipulator arms for industrial or space applications. The relationships between task specifications, gross motions, fine motions, actuator type and location, size and strength of structural members, control servos and strategies, and overall design evaluation are briefly discussed, with some technical examples.

  19. A model for automation of radioactive dose control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Henrique Calazans; Zambon, Jose Waldir; Bitelli, Ricardo; Honaiser, Eduardo Henrique Rangel

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a proposal for automation of the personnel dose control system to be used in nuclear medicine environments. The model has considered the Standards and rules of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and of the Health Ministry. The advantages of the model is a robust management of the integrated dose and technicians qualification status. The software platform selected to be used was the Lotus Notes and an analysis of the advantages, disadvantages of the use of this platform is also presented. (author)

  20. A model for automation of radioactive dose control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Carlos Henrique Calazans; Zambon, Jose Waldir; Bitelli, Ricardo; Honaiser, Eduardo Henrique Rangel [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: calazans@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: zambon@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: bitelli@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, e-mail: honaiser@ctmsp.mar.mil.br

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents a proposal for automation of the personnel dose control system to be used in nuclear medicine environments. The model has considered the Standards and rules of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) and of the Health Ministry. The advantages of the model is a robust management of the integrated dose and technicians qualification status. The software platform selected to be used was the Lotus Notes and an analysis of the advantages, disadvantages of the use of this platform is also presented. (author)

  1. Some discussions on micrometeorology and atmospheric diffusion of classic and radioactive industrial pollutions. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veverka, O.; Vlachovsky, K.; Valenta, V.

    1977-01-01

    The mean horizontal wind velocity is defined and it is calculated that it varies little with height so that it may be considered as constant up to the reference level which corresponds to the height of the source of industrial pollution. The formula is given for the calculation of the mean dispersion values of the diffusion coefficient and of the dispersion factor. (J.P.)

  2. The Role of Automatic Radiation Monitoring in Control of Illicit Trafficking of Radioactive Materials in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Automatic radiation monitoring in Slovenia comprises monitoring of external gamma radiation, aerosol radioactivity, radon progeny concentration, and radioactive deposition measurements. The officer on duty has an important part in assuring proper and undisturbed functioning of our automatic radiation monitoring. He is the one who gets the first alert message on radiation levels when exceeded pre-set values in the territory of Slovenia. Together with continuous control over the functioning of automatic radiation monitoring, the officer on duty has been also assigned for receiving messages from users, who carry the 'Radiation pager' (it is a trade mark for Sensor Technology Engineering, inc. from USA). All valuable experiences of the officer on duty who has been accepting reports from customs officers, police officers, from Slovenian radiation and nuclear safety inspectors, are described in this article. The officer on duty with his new role contributes to prevention of the illicit trafficking and inadvertent movement of radioactive materials over the territory of Slovenia. In the last year there where many different causes of emergency calls: from many cases of patient after radioisotopes medical treatment to serious rejected shipment with exceeded radiation. This is only a beginning of responsible task how to introduce and assure the control of the inadvertent movement of radioactive materials in Slovenia. (author)

  3. Radioactive waste management in the Federal Republic of Germany: Industrial practices and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabener, K.H.

    1987-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), the production and use of nuclear-generated electricity expanded steadily despite the fact that opposition from the environmentalists led to the impression of an upcoming moratorium for nuclear energy. With this increase in capacity--by the year 1990, nearly 25 000 MW will be on the line--there will be an increase in the volume of low-level (non-heat-generating) radwaste originating from nuclear power plants. Radwaste management has been influenced to a considerable extent by the requirements of the final repository. Following a period of trial storage in the Asse repository, preparations are now being made for storage in the Konrad ore mine. It is intended to begin storage in 1991. Requirements for the packages specify containers with a volume from 3.9 to 10.9 m/sup 3/ or cast iron safety drums. These drums are suitable for radioactive materials in powder form (resins, dried concentrates) without the need for embedding materials. Storage in standard 55-gal drums is no longer permitted. The costs for final storage will be very high so that volume reduction is of prime importance. Kraftwerk Union (KWU) as a supplier of nuclear power plants (NPPs) examined the radwaste market and decided to combine delivery of radwaste treatment systems to NPPs with service jobs including radwaste handling and conditioning in its own service and maintenance plant at Karlstein

  4. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  5. Evaluation of urban and industrial wastewater treatment plants using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Luis Eduardo Barreira

    2001-07-01

    A methodology for studies and evaluation of sewage treatment plants with radioactive tracers is presented.. Radioisotopes as 82 Br ( for the liquid phase), 110m Ag and 140 La, (for the solid phase) was used to evaluate sewage flow rates, mixing pattern in equalization tank and test effluent treatment units. The tracer was injected in the unit (instantaneously or in a constant rate with a pump) and NaI-scintillation detectors measured the output signal. The Fortran program TRACADORES was developed to analyze the response function of the units in form of residence times distribution curves (RTD), which represents the probability of an element of the material to interact with the unit, and calculate the mean residence time γ, the central moment of this distribution function. This fundamental parameter characterizes the tank and serves as a quantitative evaluation for its performance. With the radiotracer techniques was possible to identify dead zone, channeling, internal circulation of the solid phase inside the tanks. The technique represents a guideline for redesign a imperfect unit and eliminate the problem. (author)

  6. Carboy Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These training vary from web-based cyber security training for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors

  7. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  8. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  9. Nondestructive techniques for the control of conditioned radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delprato, U.

    1987-01-01

    The final product of the radwaste conditioning process must satisfy certain requirments and physico-chemical properties in order to assure its safe long-term behaviour. Of course, the foreseen quality assurance and quality control should be conducted by means of non-destructive techniques. This work presents an over-view of various applicable non-destructive methods of analysis, showing their fields of investigation in testing waste packages, together with some arising practical problems. The most promising methods, such as eddy current testing, ultrasonic testing, γ-scanning, γ-spectroscopy, neutron counting and computerized tomography, are treated more deeply and some applications are presented. Particular attention is devoted to the development of a device based on computerized tomography; its essential components are reported and some design problems are also discussed

  10. ARCON96, Radioactive Plume Concentration in Reactor Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Simonen, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ARCON96 was developed to calculate relative concentrations in plumes from nuclear power plants at control room air intakes in the vicinity of the release point. 2 - Methods: ARCON96 implements a straight-line Gaussian dispersion model with dispersion coefficients that are modified to account for low wind meander and building wake effects. Hourly, normalized concentrations (X/Q) are calculated from hourly meteorological data. The hourly values are averaged to form X/Qs for periods ranging from 2 to 720 hours in duration. The calculated values for each period are used to form cumulative frequency distributions. 3 - Restriction on the complexity of the problem: ARCON96 is a single user program. If expanded output is selected by the user, the file includes the hourly input and X/Qs and the intermediate computational results. The output file may exceed a megabyte size

  11. Natural radioactivity and human exposure by raw materials and end product from cement industry used as building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovska, Z.; Nedelkovski, D.; Ristova, M.

    2010-01-01

    During the manufacturing process in the cement industry, raw materials of different levels of natural radioactivity are utilized. In this study we present the radiological impact of cements as a building material and the different raw materials used in their manufacture. A total of 218 samples of raw materials and their end product cements were collected from the cement industry of Macedonia (The Former Yugoslav Republic) during the period 2005-2007. The specific activities, evaluated by gamma spectrometry analysis, showed the highest mean specific activity in fly ash ( 226 Ra, 107 ± 45 Bq kg -1 ; 232 Th, 109 ± 30 Bq kg -1 ; 40 K, 685 ± 171 Bq kg -1 ), which is used as a raw material. However, the final cement product usually has relatively lower activity compared with the activity of the raw material and the mean specific activity of the final cement products were lower ( 226 Ra, 42 ± 10 Bq kg -1 ; 232 Th, 28 ± 6 Bq kg -1 ; 40 K, 264 ± 50 Bq kg -1 ). The radium equivalent activity and the hazard index were calculated for each sample to assess the radiation hazard. The mean annual effective dose originating from the cements was found to be 111 ± 22 μSv y -1 , which is below the recommended EC limit of 300 μSv y -1 .

  12. Nuclear security recommendations on nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control: Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide guidance to States in strengthening their nuclear security regimes, and thereby contributing to an effective global nuclear security framework, by providing: - Recommendations to States and their competent authorities on the establishment or improvement of the capabilities of their nuclear security regimes, for carrying out effective strategies to deter, detect and respond to a criminal act, or an unauthorized act, with nuclear security implications, involving nuclear or other radioactive material that is out of regulatory control; - Recommendations to States in support of international cooperation aimed at ensuring that any nuclear or other radioactive material that is out of regulatory control, whether originating from within the State or from outside that State, is placed under regulatory control and the alleged offenders are, as appropriate, prosecuted or extradited

  13. Amersham's high radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulkin, S

    1984-11-01

    An account is given of the history, organisation and work of Amersham International, to produce radioactive and other products for use in medical diagnosis and therapy, in research in the life sciences, and in industrial processes and control systems. The account covers the developments from the war-time work of Thorium Ltd., on naturally occurring radioactive materials, through the post-war expansion into the field of artificial radioisotopes, as the Radiochemical Centre (part of the UK Atomic Energy Authority), to the recent reorganisation and privatization. The width of the range of activities and products available is emphasised, with examples.

  14. Amersham's high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caulkin, S.

    1984-01-01

    An account is given of the history, organisation and work of Amersham International, to produce radioactive and other products for use in medical diagnosis and therapy, in research in the life sciences, and in industrial processes and control systems. The account covers the developments from the war-time work of Thorium Ltd., on naturally occurring radioactive materials, through the post-war expansion into the field of artificial radioisotopes, as the Radiochemical Centre (part of the UK Atomic Energy Authority), to the recent reorganisation and privatization. The width of the range of activities and products available is emphasised, with examples. (U.K.)

  15. The influence of industrial applications on a control system toolbox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clout, P.

    1992-01-01

    Vsystem is as an open, advanced software application toolbox for rapidly creating fast, efficient and cost-effective control and data-acquisition systems. Vsystem's modular architecture is designed for single computers, networked computers and workstations running under VAX/VMS or VAX/ELN. At the heart of Vsystem lies Vaccess, a user extendible real-time database and library of access routines. The application database provides the link to the hardware of the application and can be organized as one database or separate database installed in different computers on the network. Vsystem has found application in charged-particle accelerator control, tokamak control, and industrial research, as well as its more recent industrial applications. This paper describes the broad feature of Vsystem and the influence that recent industrial applications have had on the software. (author)

  16. Information security of industrial control systems: possible attack vectors and protection methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatiy A. Grachkov

    2018-03-01

    obtaining unauthorized access to industrial control systems using the Shodan search engine is described and recommendations how to ensure information security of the industrial control system are given.

  17. Assessment of natural radioactivity levels and radiation hazards due to cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Taher, A.; Abdel Halim, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The cement industry is considered as one of the basic industries that plays an important role in the national economy of developing countries. Activity concentrations of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K in Assiut cement and other local cement types from different Egyptian factories has been measured by using γ-ray spectrometry. From the measured γ-ray spectra, specific activities were determined. The measured activity concentrations for these natural radionuclides were compared with the reported data for other countries. The average values obtained for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K activity concentration in different types of cement are lower than the corresponding global values reported in UNSCEAR publications. The obtained results show that the averages of radiation hazard parameters for Assiut cement factory are lower than the acceptable level of 370 Bq kg -1 for radium equivalent Ra eq , 1 for level index Iγr, the external hazard index Hex ≤1 and 59 (nGy h -1 ) for absorbed dose rate. The manufacturing operation reduces the radiation hazard parameters. Cement does not pose a significant radiological hazard when used for construction of buildings.

  18. Radioactive waste management in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.

    1984-01-01

    The first part of this paper briefly describes the nuclear industry in Belgium and the problem of radioactive wastes with regard to their quality and quantity. The second part emphasizes the recent guidelines regarding the management of the nuclear industry in general and the radioactive wastes in particular. In this respect, important tasks are the reinforcement of administrative structures with regard to the supervision and the control of nuclear activities, the establishment of a mixed company entrusted with the covering of the needs of nuclear plants in the field of nuclear fuels and particularly the setting up of a public autonomous and specialized organization, the 'Public Organization for the Management of Radioactive Waste and Fissile Materials', in short 'O.N.D.R.A.F.'. This organization is in charge of the management of the transport, the conditioning, the storage and the disposal of radioactive wastes. (Auth.)

  19. The application of mean control chart in managing industrial processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papić-Blagojević Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the advent of mass production comes the problem of monitoring and maintaining the quality of the product, which stressed the need for the application of selected statistical and mathematical methods in the control process. The main objective of applying the methods of statistical control is continuous quality improvement through permanent monitoring of the process in order to discover the causes of errors. Shewart charts are the most popular method of statistical process control, which performs separation of controlled and uncontrolled variations along with detection of increased variations. This paper presents the example of Shewart mean control chart with application in managing industrial process.

  20. Model Predictive Control for an Industrial SAG Mill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohan, Valeriu; Steinke, Florian; Metzger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    identication. When applied to MIMO systems we call this controller a MIMO-ARX based MPC. We use an industrial Semi-Autogenous Grinding (SAG) mill to illustrate the performance of this controller. SAG mills are the primary units in a grinding chain and also the most power consuming units. Therefore, improved...... control of SAG mills has the potential to signicantly improve eciency and reduce the specic energy consumption for mineral processes. Grinding circuits involving SAG mills are multivariate processes. Commissioning of a control system based on a classical single-loop controllers with logic is time...

  1. Statistical process control in wine industry using control cards

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrieva, Evica; Atanasova-Pacemska, Tatjana; Pacemska, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    This paper is based on the research of the technological process of automatic filling of bottles of wine in winery in Stip, Republic of Macedonia. The statistical process control using statistical control card is created. The results and recommendations for improving the process are discussed.

  2. Possibility of using radioactivity control measurements for determining contamination paths in nutritional vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, A.

    1966-01-01

    The object of the report is to study the possibility of using results of radioactivity controls for determining the paths followed by contamination in nutritional vectors; these are necessary for calculating protection norms. Radioactive contamination of a nutritional vector is expressed in terms of parameters which suggest that a certain number of criteria may be used for choosing the results which are to be exploited. An actual example of a 'vertical' study based on results of measurements made purely for control purposes shows the difficulties which may be encountered. A list of the results obtained by the control networks set up in the Community Countries, either for the atmosphere, for milk, or for other foodstuffs, shows that these networks are not at the present organised in such a way as to make such a study possible. It appears desirable that a large part of the work carried out by the control Services be oriented in such a way as to yield the complementary information required for experimental studies of radioactive contamination transfers. (author) [fr

  3. Industrial radioactive wastes: what are we talking about?; Les dechets radioactifs industriels: de quoi s'agit-il?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bars, Y. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs ANDRA, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2001-07-01

    The subject of radioactive wastes is developed through their origin, their classification, their scale of size. The different storage centers are given and the new channels of radioactive wastes management are tackled. The particular case of high level and long term radioactive wastes is detailed. (N.C.)

  4. Assessment of radiological hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials in cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Gul, R.; Ara, T.; Hussain, M.

    2012-01-01

    A study on the radiological hazard in Portland cement due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials is being carried out. The Portland cement manufactured in the Islamabad/Rawalpindi region of Pakistan, intermediate products (clinker) and the various raw materials which compose the product have been analysed for 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K using a gamma spectrometry system with a N-type high-purity germanium detector of 80 % relative efficiency. From the measured gamma ray spectra, specific activities were determined. The mean values of the total specific activity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K are 34.2±11.9, 29.1±3.6 and 295.1±66.9 Bq kg -1 , respectively in Portland cement, 28.4±8.7, 11.3±1.7 and 63.1±17.3 Bq kg -1 , respectively in lime stone, 8.2±1.9, 16.2±3.9 and 187.7±53.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively in gypsum, 34.7±13.1, 41.2±6.7 and 187.6±17.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively in clay, 41.1±11.8, 39.3±6.9 and 195.1±29.2 Bq kg -1 , respectively in laterite and 51.1±18.2, 23.2±1.2 and 258.4±15.3 Bq kg -1 , respectively in clinker. The radium equivalent activities (Ra eq ), external hazard index (H ex ), internal hazard index (H in ), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose rate (E eff ) were also determined. The measured activity concentrations for these radio nuclides and radiological indices were compared with the reported national and international data. All these measured values are comparable with the worldwide data reported in UNSCEAR publications. (authors)

  5. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Nuclear and other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control: Recommendations (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents recommendations for the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that is out of regulatory control. It is based on national experiences and practices and guidance publications in the field of security as well as the nuclear security related international instruments. The recommendations include guidance for States with regard to the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that has been reported as being out of regulatory control as well as for material that is lost, missing or stolen but has not been reported as such, or has been otherwise discovered. In addition, these recommendations adhere to the detection and assessment of alarms and alerts and to a graded response to criminal or unauthorized acts with nuclear security implications.

  6. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control: Recommendations (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents recommendations for the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that is out of regulatory control. It is based on national experiences and practices and guidance publications in the ? field of security as well as the nuclear security related international instruments. The recommendations include guidance for States with regard to the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that has been reported as being out of regulatory control as well as for material that is lost, missing or stolen but has not been reported as such, or has been otherwise discovered. In addition, these recommendations adhere to the detection and assessment of alarms and alerts and to a graded response to criminal or unauthorized acts with nuclear security implications.

  7. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control: Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents recommendations for the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that is out of regulatory control. It is based on national experiences and practices and guidance publications in the field of security as well as the nuclear security related international instruments. The recommendations include guidance for States with regard to the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that has been reported as being out of regulatory control as well as for material that is lost, missing or stolen but has not been reported as such, or has been otherwise discovered. In addition, these recommendations adhere to the detection and assessment of alarms and alerts and to a graded response to criminal or unauthorized acts with nuclear security implications

  8. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for hazardous chemical and mixed radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Koenig, R.A.; Warner, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is currently the only radioactive waste incineration facility in the US permitted to treat polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The CAI was developed in the mid-1970's as a demonstration system for volume reduction of transuranic (TRU) contaminated combustible solid wastes. It has since undergone additions and modifications to accommodate hazardous chemical wastes in response to a need within the Department of Energy (DOE) to treat mixed radioactive/chemical wastes. An overview of these additions which include a liquid feed system, a high intensity liquid injection burner, and an activated carbon adsorption unit is presented here. Also included is a discussion of the procedures required for Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitting of the CAI

  9. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Nuclear and Other Radioactive Material out of Regulatory Control: Recommendations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents recommendations for the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that is out of regulatory control. It is based on national experiences and practices and guidance publications in the field of security as well as the nuclear security related international instruments. The recommendations include guidance for States with regard to the nuclear security of nuclear and other radioactive material that has been reported as being out of regulatory control as well as for material that is lost, missing or stolen but has not been reported as such, or has been otherwise discovered. In addition, these recommendations adhere to the detection and assessment of alarms and alerts and to a graded response to criminal or unauthorized acts with nuclear security implications.

  10. Observations on the use of cost-benefit analysis in the control of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, J.G.; Hetherington, J.A.

    1975-10-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste to the environment can lead to the irradiation of large numbers of people, and although the individual doses may be very small compared with the ICRP dose limits the total population dose may not be insignificant. In these circumstances the control procedure is likely to be determined by the requirement that doses be kept 'as low as is readily achievable'(see ICRP-9, para. 52). This recommendation has been interpreted in ICRP-22, where the use of cost-benefit analysis is suggested as a means of application in practice. This paper discusses some of the implications of these recommendations in relation to the control of radioactive waste disposal, under the following headings: the use of collective dose; the costing of collective dose; the assessment and use of detrimental costs; and the payment of detrimental costs. (author)

  11. Behaviour of the radioactive noxious substances of nuclear industry in the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, A.

    1977-01-01

    In the present publication, the behaviour of important radionuclides, occuring in nuclear industry, is described. An understanding of their behaviour, whose phenomena generally are well known, is a prerequisite for understanding the principles of radiation protection measures as well as a base for a discussion of the biological effects of radionuclides, which, however, are not described in this paper. The biological behaviour is characterized by the ways of resorption of the nuclides, their distribution and retention in the organs and their excretion pattern. An essential question is concerned with differences between animal species and with the extrapolation of animal data to man. The behaviour of some of the radionuclides in man is already well known; in the other cases, typical data from animal experiments will be given in order to characterize the biological behaviour. (orig.) [de

  12. The role of the health physicist in the control of airborne radioactive hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, J.K.

    1978-01-01

    Health physics is based on the ease and sensitivity with which ionising radiations can be measured, as well as on the extensive medical knowledge of its long-term effects. Such studies have led to fundamental contributions to scientific health protection as well as practical occupational hygiene. The first aspect is illustrated with aerosol biophysics as example, while the practical control of airborne radioactive hazards in South Africa is described inside uranium plants as well as in the environment of nuclear installations [af

  13. Sources of ionizing radiation in industry: licensing and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, V.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper are presented several methods, which the Inspection on the Safe Use of Atomic Energy applies for the control on the use of sources of ionizing radiation in industry. It reviews some problems, which we have to solve during our inspections. An analysis and assessment of them is done. The prescribed safety ensuring measures are discussed. (author)

  14. Software systems for energy control in the English industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouma, J.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Monitoring and targeting software systems have proved to be valuable tools for energy control, permitting to save five to ten percent of energy. The article reviews the systems that are presently available in England and illustrates how these systems are successfully used in practice in small (British Telecom) and middle large (Charles Wells Brewery) industrial applications. (A.S.)

  15. Non-destructive controls in the steel tube industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondot, J.

    1978-01-01

    The main non-destructive control methods in the tube industry are reviewed: eddy currents, particularly well adapted to small tubes; magnetoscopic testing for weldless tubes; ultrasonic waves widely used for thick weldless tubes and weldings; radiography, to examine tube ends and the known questionable zones; measure of diameters by laser [fr

  16. Sequence-aware intrusion detection in industrial control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.; Zambon, Emmanuele; Kargl, Frank; Zhou, Jianying; Jones, D.

    Nowadays, several threats endanger cyber-physical systems. Among these systems, industrial control systems (ICS) operating on critical infrastructures have been proven to be an attractive target for attackers. The case of Stuxnet has not only showed that ICSs are vulnerable to cyber-attacks, but

  17. Universal CNC platform motion control technology for industrial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Senlin; Wang Yang

    2011-01-01

    According to the more scanning methods and the higher speed of industrial CT, the higher precision of the motion location and the data collection sync-control is required at present, a new motion control technology was proposed, which was established based on the universal CNC system with high precision of multi-axis control. Aiming at the second and the third generation of CT scanning motion, a control method was researched, and achieved the demands of the changeable parameters and network control, Through the simulation of the second and the third generation of CT scanning motion process, the control precision of the rotation axis reached 0.001° and the linear axis reached 0.002 mm, Practical tests showed this system can meet the requirements of the multi-axis motion integration and the sync signal control, it also have advantages in the control precision and the performance. (authors)

  18. Instrumentation, controls and automation in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The year 1991 will be remembered as the year EPRI joined with the ISA Power Division to present an outstanding group to technical papers at the First Annual ISA/EPRI Joint Controls and Automation Conference. All papers met the theme for the conference namely Innovative Instrumentation, Controls, and Automation Techniques for the Power Generation Industry and cover a myriad of application ranging from nuclear to conventional fossil to co-generation plants involving nuclear, conventional BTG, and combined cycle equipment applications

  19. Radiation monitoring in the NPP environment, control of radioactivity in NPP-environment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Problems of radiation monitoring and control of the NPP-environment system (NPPES) are considered. Radiation control system at the NPP and in the environment provides for the control of the NPP, considered as the source of radioactive releases in the environment and for the environmental radiation climate control. It is shown, that the radiation control of the NPP-environment system must be based on the ecological normalization principles of the NPP environmental impacts. Ecological normalization should be individual for the NPP region of each ecosystem. The necessity to organize and conduct radiation ecological monitoring in the NPP regions is pointed out. Radiation ecological monitoring will provide for both environmental current radiation control and information for mathematical models, used in the NPPES radiation control

  20. The evolution of industrial power monitoring and control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, K. E.

    1998-04-01

    The evolution of power monitoring and control systems in industrial situations are described. Computer-based PMC (power monitoring and control) systems are discussed in two sections. Section 1 covers the PC/DOS based systems in use up to the 1990s. These systems had multitasking capability, sufficient for scanning a serial line running a multi-drop protocol to field instruments, which in turn were running either proprietary or PLC subsets, maintaining a level of operator display, data logging and query support. Since the mid-1990s the second generation of industrial power monitoring and control systems based on the PC/NT system came into use, driven to market by three factors: (1) availability of low cost PCs, (2) widespread availability of computer networking technologies, and (3) the appearance of the robust, industrially viable NT operating system. Second generation systems are characterized by division into two tiers; a monitoring system focused on remote metering, and a second tier of a modular system capable of fully implementing both power monitoring and supervisory control. Looking toward the future, the requirements for systems is expected to become more unique, driven by the need for information for energy procurement decision making, automatic control for integrating power acquisition from multiple suppliers, power capacity and integrated power and production control planning needs, and power quality and reliability issues. A review of the functionality of PMC systems, and system architectures was also provided. Results of a survey of PMC systems applications were also discussed. 2 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  1. Anti-tobacco control industry strategies in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklik, Seda; Gultekin-Karakas, Derya

    2018-02-26

    Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) penetrated the Turkish cigarette market due to trade and investment liberalization in the post-1980 period and eventually secured full control. Despite tobacco control policies put in place in reaction to accelerating consumption, TTCs reinforced their market power through a variety of strategies. This paper explores industry strategies that counteract tobacco control policies in Turkey. The study employs both qualitative and quantitative analyses to explore industry strategies in Turkey. Besides the content analyses of industry and market reports, descriptive analyses were conducted for the sub-periods of 1999-2015. The analyses focus on the market strategies of product innovation, advertisement-promotion, cost management and pricing. Rising sales of low tar, ultra-low tar, slim, super-slim and flavoured cigarettes indicate that product innovation served to sustain consumption. Besides, the tobacco industry, using its strong distribution channels, the Internet, and CSR projects, were found to have promoted smoking indirectly. The industry also rationalized manufacturing facilities and reduced the cost of tobacco, making Turkey a cigarette-manufacturing base. Tobacco manufacturers, moreover, offered cigarettes in different price segments and adjusted net prices both up and down according to price categories and market conditions. In response to the successful effect of shifts in price margins, the market share of mid-priced cigarettes expanded while those within the economy category maintained the highest market share. As a result of pricing strategies, net sales revenues increased. Aside from official cigarette sales, the upward trends in the registered and unregistered sales of cigarette substitutes indicate that the demand-side tobacco control efforts remain inadequate. The Turkish case reveals that the resilience of the tobacco industry vis-à-vis mainstream tobacco control efforts necessitates a new policy perspective

  2. Carboy Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, Daniel [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These training vary from web-based cyber security training for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  3. Metrology-based control and profitability in the semiconductor industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Charles

    2001-06-01

    This paper summarizes three studies of the semiconductor industry conducted at SEMATECH and MIT's Sloan School of Management. In conjunction they lead to the conclusion that rapid problem solving is an essential component of profitability in the semiconductor industry, and that metrology-based control is instrumental to rapid problem solving. The studies also identify the need for defect attribution. Once a source of a defect has been identified, the appropriate resources--human and technological--need to be brought into the physically optimal location for corrective action. The Internet is likely to enable effective defect attribution by inducing collaboration between different companies.

  4. Industrial application of thermal image processing and thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingxue

    2001-09-01

    Industrial application of infrared thermography is virtually boundless as it can be used in any situations where there are temperature differences. This technology has particularly been widely used in automotive industry for process evaluation and system design. In this work, thermal image processing technique will be introduced to quantitatively calculate the heat stored in a warm/hot object and consequently, a thermal control system will be proposed to accurately and actively manage the thermal distribution within the object in accordance with the heat calculated from the thermal images.

  5. Demolition and removal of radioactively contaminated concrete soil: Aerosol control and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Grace, A.C. III

    1995-12-01

    From 1963 to 1985, two concrete-lined ponds were used to reduce the volume of radioactive liquids from the Institute`s research programs. Following withdrawal of the {open_quotes}hot ponds{close_quotes} from active use, the residual sludges and plastic liners of the ponds were removed and shipped to a radioactive waste disposal site. From 1987 to 1994, the concrete structures remained undisturbed pending environmental restoration on the site. Restoration began in 1994 and was completed in 1995. Restoration involved mechanical breakup and removal of the concrete structures and removal of areas of contaminated soils from the site. This report describes the design and results of the aerosol control and monitoring program that was conducted to ensure protection of workers and the environment during the restoration process. The aerosol control and monitoring strategy developed for remediation of the ITRI hot ponds was successful both in preventing dispersion of radioactive dusts and in demonstrating that exposures of workers and offsite releases were within statutory limits.

  6. Startup of the experimental physics industrial control system at NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sichta, P.; Dong, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Experimental Physics Industrial Control System (EPICS) is a set of software which is being used as the basis of the National Spherical Torus Experiment's (NSTX) Process Control System, a major element of the NSTX's Central Instrumentation and Control System. EPICS is a result of a co-development effort started by several US Department of Energy National Laboratories. EPICS is actively supported through an international collaboration made up of government and industrial users. EPICS' good points include portability, scalability, and extensibility. A drawback for small experiments is that a wide range of software skills are necessary to get the software tools running for the process engineers. The authors' experience in designing, developing, operating, and maintaining NSTX's EPICS (system) will be reviewed

  7. A concept of environmental controlling for industrial enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poelzl, U.

    1992-01-01

    The protection of nature is seen as a global challenge to mankind. Industrial enterprises are confronted with the question of how to contribute to the solution of environmental problems. In this study possibilities and concepts are printed out that would enable industrial enterprises to recognize and as a consequence reduce environmental pollution and risks caused by their products and production processes by means of organization. After a description of recent developments in the entrepreneur's surroundings brought about by environmental problems, and a characterization of environmental management, which can be seen as a reaction to the above mentioned developments, a concept of environmental controlling for industrial enterprises is developed deductively. Environmental controlling is here regarded as a sub-system of environmental management that supports the determination of environmental aims, the analysis, the planning and the control of environmental pollution, as well as the use of material and energy by installing and coordinating a specific environment information system. The main functions of environmental controlling are planning, controlling, informing, advising and some special functions. The specific functional instruments for carrying out these tasks are described in a special chapter. (author)

  8. The control of radioactivity in the working environment in the factories for production of phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajdacic, B.N.; Gnjatovic, S.S.; Vujovic, P.V.

    1980-01-01

    The results of dosimetric control in factories for the production of phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizers in Serbia, and of the measurement of the total beta radioactivity of samples collected in these factories, are presented. An increase in the radiation dose, even up to 1000 times background, has been found at certain places in the plant. These results serve as a basis for conclusions on the existence, variation and collection of the radioactive component in particular phases of the technological process for the production of phosphate fertilizers. An attempt is made on the basis of the results obtained in three plants to evaluate the degree of danger in the working environment and in the area surrounding the factories and to propose protective measures. (Author)

  9. Workshop meeting on State accounting and control system for radioactive substances and waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.F.

    2012-01-01

    On 2-6 July 2012, the fifth All-Russian workshop meeting of State Accounting and Control System for Radiation Substances (RS) and Radioactive Wastes (RAW) was conducted. The objective of the workshop was to discuss development of the State Accounting and Control System for RS and RAW in the Russian Federation, current changes to legal acts and regulations that pertain to management of RS and RAW, as well as other issues related to organisation of RS and RAW management activities and promotion of international cooperation [ru

  10. Regulatory control of radiation sources and radioactive materials in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Prouza, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes legal and regulatory provisions for radiation protection and safe use of sources of ionizing radiation in the Czech Republic with special emphasis on aspects of bringing activities under regulatory control and releasing them from it. It covers the development of a new legal framework, the work of the regulatory body, an overview of sources in use and provisions to achieve effective regulatory control of facilities and releases of radioactive material into the environment. Also, it describes reported unusual events with a proposed scheme for their classification and evaluation. (author)

  11. Radioactive materials in recycled metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

    1995-04-01

    In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap--radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations.

  12. Direct adaptive control of a PUMA 560 industrial robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Lee, Thomas; Delpech, Michel

    1989-01-01

    The implementation and experimental validation of a new direct adaptive control scheme on a PUMA 560 industrial robot is described. The testbed facility consists of a Unimation PUMA 560 six-jointed robot and controller, and a DEC MicroVAX II computer which hosts the Robot Control C Library software. The control algorithm is implemented on the MicroVAX which acts as a digital controller for the PUMA robot, and the Unimation controller is effectively bypassed and used merely as an I/O device to interface the MicroVAX to the joint motors. The control algorithm for each robot joint consists of an auxiliary signal generated by a constant-gain Proportional plus Integral plus Derivative (PID) controller, and an adaptive position-velocity (PD) feedback controller with adjustable gains. The adaptive independent joint controllers compensate for the inter-joint couplings and achieve accurate trajectory tracking without the need for the complex dynamic model and parameter values of the robot. Extensive experimental results on PUMA joint control are presented to confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme, in spite of strong interactions between joint motions. Experimental results validate the capabilities of the proposed control scheme. The control scheme is extremely simple and computationally very fast for concurrent processing with high sampling rates.

  13. Management of waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education safety guide

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on the > fulfilment of the safety requirements established in Safety Standards > Series No. WS-R-2, Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, > Including Decommissioning. It covers the roles and responsibilities of > different bodies involved in the predisposal management of radioactive > waste and in the handling and processing of radioactive material. It > is intended for organizations generating and handling radioactive > waste or handling such waste on a centralized basis for and the > regulatory body responsible for regulating such activities.  > Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the > environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. General safety > considerations; 5. Predisposal management of radioactive waste; 6. > Acceptance of radioactive waste in disposal facilities; 7. Record > keeping and reporting; 8. Management systems; Appendix I: Fault > schedule for safety assessment and environmental impact assessment; > Ap...

  14. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castor, S.B.; Lock, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km 2 that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain

  15. Model oriented application generation for industrial control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copy, B.; Barillere, R.; Blanco, E.; Fernandez Adiego, B.; Nogueira Fernandes, R.; Prieto Barreiro, I.

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Unified Industrial Control Systems framework (UNICOS) is a software generation methodology and a collection of development tools that standardizes the design of industrial control applications. A Software Factory, named the UNICOS Application Builder (UAB), was introduced to ease extensibility and maintenance of the framework, introducing a stable meta-model, a set of platform-independent models and platform-specific configurations against which code generation plug-ins and configuration generation plug-ins can be written. Such plug-ins currently target PLC programming environments (Schneider and SIEMENS PLCs) as well as SIEMENS WinCC Open Architecture SCADA (previously known as ETM PVSS) but are being expanded to cover more and more aspects of process control systems. We present what constitutes the UNICOS meta-model and the models in use, how these models can be used to capture knowledge about industrial control systems and how this knowledge can be used to generate both code and configuration for a variety of target usages. (authors)

  16. [Comparison Analysis of Economic and Engineering Control of Industrial VOCs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-fei; Liu, Chang-xin; Cheng, Jie; Hao, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollutant has become China's major air pollutant in key urban areas like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. It is mainly produced from industry sectors, and engineering control is one of the most important reduction measures. During the 12th Five-Year Plan, China decides to invest 40 billion RMB to build pollution control projects in key industry sectors with annual emission reduction of 605 000 t x a(-1). It shows that China attaches a great importance to emission reduction by engineering projects and highlights the awareness of engineering reduction technologies. In this paper, a macroeconomic model, namely computable general equilibrium model, (CGE model) was employed to simulate engineering control and economic control (imposing environmental tax). We aim to compare the pros and cons of the two reduction policies. Considering the economic loss of the whole country, the environmental tax has more impacts on the economy system than engineering reduction measures. We suggest that the central government provides 7 500 RMB x t(-1) as subsidy for enterprises in industry sectors to encourage engineering reduction.

  17. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  18. Measures to detect and control radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap at border checkpoints in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smagala, G.

    1999-01-01

    The issue of radioactive contaminated metallurgical scrap has never received a high priority in Poland and in the international community. Since the dissolution of the former Soviet Union a higher attention has been given to the problem. Poland which is located between the West and East Europe has the obligation to develop and implement an effective prevention and detection system. The reasons to increase national control and detection system at the border checkpoints in Poland are to avoid the following risks: post Chernobyl contamination transports of commodities; transport of contaminated metal scrap; transfer of radioactive waste for their disposal or utilization; high risk of becoming a transit country of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and radioactive sources. In order to avoid the above-mentioned risks, Poland initiated in 1990, a deployment of the portable radiation devices at the border checkpoints and, as of 1998, the number of installed instruments exceeded a hundred. This paper presents Poland's activities to detect contaminated scrap at its border checkpoints. (author)

  19. Management and control of radioactive wastes from uranium-milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.H.; Deal, L.J.; Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Of the 39 privately owned mills that produced and sold uranium to the U.S. Government during 1948 to 1971, 22 have closed down either due to exhaustion of reserves or lack of market. On the inactive mill sites there remains 24 million metric tons of tailings containing 14,000 curies of radium. Success in stabilization has been variable. In the past, theoretical models have had to be used in estimation of the environmental effects of uranium milling for lack of a sufficient factual base. ERDA in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and the states involved is undertaking a comprehensive radiological assessment at each site. The results of this assessment should provide valuable basic information on the environmental impact of uranium ore processing. The current studies reveal that the inactive sites are a cause of small public exposure to radiation, primarily from radon-222 from the tailings piles. This paper reviews radioactivity management in uranium ore processing to control spread of radioactive materials, including methods used for stabilization to prevent wind and water erosion. Recent measurements of radioactivity levels in soils, ground and surface waters, and in air near tailings piles are summarized, and public health implications are evaluated. Guidelines have been developed for land decontamination, and procedures evaluated for long-term management of contaminated material to minimize future human exposure. Alternative methods for long-term tailings stabilization, their costs and benefits in terms of serious health effects avoided are presented

  20. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  1. The Challenges of the "Software Support for Industrial Controls" Contract

    CERN Document Server

    Ninin, P

    2000-01-01

    ST division is currently specifying a 'Software Support for Industrial Controls' contract. The application of this contract and its success will require several changes in our habits for specifying, designing, and maintaining control systems. This paper summarizes some key concepts which should be respected in order to obtain maximum benefits from the future contract and to optimize the software activities in the division. The contract concerns the maintenance and development of the monitoring and control systems used for supervising CERN's technical infrastructure (electrical distribution, cooling water, air conditioning, safety, and access control). The systems concerned consist of computer and communication hardware and software, tailored to provide specific functionalities for the remote operation, command, and monitoring of equipment. All these systems use commercially available software and hardware such as SCADA, PLCs and associated drivers, controllers, fieldbuses, and networks. It is intended to cont...

  2. Management and employee control in current industrial work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle; Hvid, Helge

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how employee control is affected by the ongoing erosion of boundaries in work organization and established boundaries in the relationship between employees and management. One assumption is that the erosion of boundaries offers potential for increased employee control, meaning...... increased autonomy or self-determination at work (employee control how and when to do what). This assumption is supported by theories on the psychosocial working environment. Another assumption is that the erosion of boundaries threatens the frontiers from where employees can defend their interests......, and consequently reduces employees’ control of their work (what and how much to do). This assumption is supported by “labor process theory.” This article studies control and the erosion of boundaries in two case factories in the food industry. Two perspectives are applied: the psychosocial working environment...

  3. Management and employee control in current industrial work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle; Hvid, Helge

    2014-01-01

    , and consequently reduces employees’ control of their work (what and how much to do). This assumption is supported by “labor process theory.” This article studies control and the erosion of boundaries in two case factories in the food industry. Two perspectives are applied: the psychosocial working environment......This article examines how employee control is affected by the ongoing erosion of boundaries in work organization and established boundaries in the relationship between employees and management. One assumption is that the erosion of boundaries offers potential for increased employee control, meaning...... increased autonomy or self-determination at work (employee control how and when to do what). This assumption is supported by theories on the psychosocial working environment. Another assumption is that the erosion of boundaries threatens the frontiers from where employees can defend their interests...

  4. Pollution control -- Recovery of uranium from phosphatic fertilizer industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, R.N.; Pachaiyappan, V.

    1979-01-01

    Various uranium recovery processes, viz. Brazilian process (HCL leaching), selective extraction of U, Japanese process, ORNL process and the Indian methods, recently developed, pertaining to the fertilizer industry are reviewed and their relative merits are discussed. Special attention has been paid to the recovery of uranium from the Indian and imported phosphatic rocks, showing the advantages, both from the pollution control and nuclear energy aspects. (K.B.)

  5. Robust control charts in industrial production of olive oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Luís M.; Mateus, Dina M. R.; Alves, Ana C.; Grilo, Helena L.

    2014-10-01

    Acidity is one of the most important variables in the quality analysis and characterization of olive oil. During the industrial production we use individuals and moving range charts to monitor this variable, which is not always normal distributed. After a brief exploratory data analysis, where we use the bootstrap method, we construct control charts, before and after a Box-Cox transformation, and compare their robustness and performance.

  6. Application of Object-Based Industrial Controls for Cryogenics

    CERN Document Server

    Casas-Cubillos, J; Gomes, P; Pezzetti, M; Sicard, Claude Henri; Varas, F J

    2002-01-01

    The first application of the CERN Unified Industrial Control system (UNICOS) has been developed for the 1.8 K refrigerator at point 1.8 in mid-2001. This paper presents the engineering methods used for application development, in order to reach the objectives of maintainability and reusability, in the context of a development done by an external consortium of engineering firms. It will also review the lessons learned during this first development and the improvements planned for the next applications.

  7. Security of the data transmission in the industrial control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Bednarek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The theme of this paper is to present the data transmission security system between the stations of the industrial control system. The possible options for secure communications between process stations, as well as between process and operator station are described. Transmission security mechanism is based on algorithms for symmetric and asymmetric encryption. The authentication process uses a software token algorithm and a one-way hash function. The algorithm for establishing a secured connection between the stations, including the authentication process and encryption of data transmission is given. The process of securing the transmission consists of 4 sub-processes: (I authentication; (II asymmetric, public keys transmission; (III symmetric key transmission; (IV data transmission. The presented process of securing the transmission was realized in the industrial controller and emulator. For this purpose, programming languages in accordance with EN 61131 were used. The functions were implemented as user function blocks. This allows us to include a mixed code in the structure of the block (both: ST and FBD. Available function categories: support of the asymmetric encryption; asymmetric encryption utility functions; support of the symmetric encryption; symmetric encryption utility functions; support of the hash value calculations; utility functions of conversion.[b]Keywords[/b]: transmission security, encryption, authentication, industrial control system

  8. The experience of Russian Federation in organization of customs control of fissionable and other radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podchishaev, A.

    2001-01-01

    Among the routine inspection tasks of customs offices are tasks stemming from international commitments of Russia to prevent proliferation of nuclear weapons and material that can be used for making these weapons. These tasks are: radiation monitoring of all vehicles, passengers, their luggage and goods crossing the state border; inspection of fissionable and radioactive materials (FRM) legally transported by participants in the foreign trade activities with a view to checking that the declared data fully correspond to the actual radioactive cargo. Organizational measures involve the Sheremetyevo customs office has a department whose personnel is specially trained in radiation monitoring and can operate radiometric and spectrometric instruments. These specialists are included in shifts on duty responsible for customs clearing and inspection and carry out continuous radiation monitoring of passengers and their luggage, vehicles and goods crossing the border. They work on the 24-hour basis, which allows quickly and skillfully localizing the detected radiation source and avoiding direct contact of customs, officers, airport personnel, and passengers with the radioactive item. Technical measures include provision and everyday use of radiation monitoring instrumentation, classified as: stationary equipment of primary radiation monitoring (SEPRM); hand-held instruments for additional radiation monitoring (RM); spectrometric equipment for control of legal FRM transport. The customs procedure for monitoring of fissionable and radioactive materials is divided into three stages. Stage I, primary RM is carried out by stationary FRM detection systems Yantar for customs applications installed on the customs inspection line next to the X-ray inspection equipment (XIE). Stage II, additional RM is carried out by officer who uses hand-held instruments to check the passenger's luggage for surface contamination; to perform primary identification of the detected radioactive source

  9. Study of the radioactive particle tracking technique using gamma-ray attenuation and MCNP-X code to evaluate industrial agitators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam, Roos Sophia de F.; Salgado, César M., E-mail: rsophia.dam@gmail.com, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Agitators or mixers are highly used in the chemical, food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. During the fabrication process, the equipment may fail and compromise the appropriate stirring or mixing procedure. Besides that, it is also important to determine the right point of homogeneity of the mixture. Thus, it is very important to have a diagnosis tool for these industrial units to assure the quality of the product and to keep the market competitiveness. The radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique is widely used in the nuclear field. In this paper, a method based on the principles of the RPT technique is presented. Counts obtained by an array of detectors properly positioned around the unit will be correlated to predict the instantaneous positions occupied by the radioactive particle by means of an appropriate mathematical search location algorithm. Detection geometry developed employs eight NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors and a Cs-137 (662 keV) source with isotropic emission of gamma-rays. The modeling of the detection system is performed using the Monte Carlo Method, by means of the MCNP-X code. In this work a methodology is presented to predict the position of a radioactive particle to evaluate the performance of agitators in industrial units by means of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). (author)

  10. Follow-up by the ANDRA to the Cigeo project after the public debate - Industrial centre of geological storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    In a first part, this report comments and discusses the evolutions of the Cigeo (industrial centre of geological storage of radioactive wastes) project after the public debate in terms of: integration of a pilot industrial phase to the installation start up, implementation of a regularly reviewed master plan for the storage exploitation, a planning arrangement, and commitment of civil society in the project. The next part briefly presents the different steps defined by the ANDRA to answer the demand for reversibility. The third part states ANDRA's commitments: to guarantee safety above all, to preserve and to develop the hosting territory, and to manage the costs

  11. Stock Control in Automotive Industry with Simulation Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Vegnerová

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available At this time in economic environment there is the big trend of coming logistical chain, supply chain and supply chain management (SCM. SCM deals with material and information flows control, inventory management, demand forecast, production plan optimalization, distribution management etc. Nowadays for effective purchase, production and distribution plan and control in companies are utilized the simulation and simulation programmes. This paper deals with the simulation programme Witness and its utilization for finding of results real problems – simulation utilization for stocks solution in automotive industry. The model can be used for the determination of new delivery system of materials and for stocks reduction.

  12. Recent developments in nucleonic control systems and on-stream analysers for the mineral and coal industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent developments in industrial nuclear gauging in Australia are briefly reviewed. Quality control, process control and automation in the mineral and coal industries are based on measurements of the composition and flows of critical process stream. Australia's vast mineral wealth and its importance to the national economy has resulted in CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) successfully developing and commercializing a variety of nucleonic gauges to meet the needs of the mineral and coal industries. These include gauges for on-line determination of the ash content of coal on conveyor belts, the ash content of solids of weight fraction of coal in slurries, on-stream determination of iron, alumina and manganese in iron ore, bulk analysis of raw feed limestone in the cement industry, and gauges for the measurement of level, moisture, and interfaces. A variety of gauges based on natural radioactivity have also been developed. Instruments based on natural gamma radiation are relatively inexpensive, and free of artificial radiation sources. An on-stream analyser based on natural gamma ray activity has been developed for monitoring the soil content of sugar cane. Significant benefits accrued to industry in using nucleonic gauges are briefly discussed. (author). 18 refs., 8 figs

  13. Effects of wireless packet loss in industrial process control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongkang; Candell, Richard; Moayeri, Nader

    2017-05-01

    Timely and reliable sensing and actuation control are essential in networked control. This depends on not only the precision/quality of the sensors and actuators used but also on how well the communications links between the field instruments and the controller have been designed. Wireless networking offers simple deployment, reconfigurability, scalability, and reduced operational expenditure, and is easier to upgrade than wired solutions. However, the adoption of wireless networking has been slow in industrial process control due to the stochastic and less than 100% reliable nature of wireless communications and lack of a model to evaluate the effects of such communications imperfections on the overall control performance. In this paper, we study how control performance is affected by wireless link quality, which in turn is adversely affected by severe propagation loss in harsh industrial environments, co-channel interference, and unintended interference from other devices. We select the Tennessee Eastman Challenge Model (TE) for our study. A decentralized process control system, first proposed by N. Ricker, is adopted that employs 41 sensors and 12 actuators to manage the production process in the TE plant. We consider the scenario where wireless links are used to periodically transmit essential sensor measurement data, such as pressure, temperature and chemical composition to the controller as well as control commands to manipulate the actuators according to predetermined setpoints. We consider two models for packet loss in the wireless links, namely, an independent and identically distributed (IID) packet loss model and the two-state Gilbert-Elliot (GE) channel model. While the former is a random loss model, the latter can model bursty losses. With each channel model, the performance of the simulated decentralized controller using wireless links is compared with the one using wired links providing instant and 100% reliable communications. The sensitivity of the

  14. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for software support for industrial controls

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for software support for industrial controls. Following a market survey carried out among 68 firms in twelve Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2711/ST) was sent on 12 April 2000 to nine firms and five consortia in eight Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received seven tenders from two firms and five consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm GTD (ES), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 October 2000, for a total amount not exceeding 4 500 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include an option for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: ES?100%.

  15. Procurement and use of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Sumathi, E.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used throughout the world for a wide variety of peaceful purposes in industry, medicine, agriculture, research and education. It has been recognized that unsecured radioactive sources can cause serious radiological accidents involving radiation injuries and fatalities. Radioactive source after its useful life, although considered waste, can still pose a security threat if not managed properly. Today, there is a growing concern that terrorist or criminal groups could gain access to disused high activity radioactive sources and use it with harmful intent. Consequently, there has been a global trend towards increased control, accounting, and security measures to prevent such incidents. Particular concern is expressed regarding radioactive sources that have become orphaned (not under regulatory control) or vulnerable (under weak regulatory control and about to be orphaned). The International Basic Safety Standards published by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provide an internationally harmonized basis for ensuring the safe and secure use of sources of ionizing radiation

  16. An Efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Industrial Monitoring and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-Luis, Juan; Gómez-Galán, Juan Antonio; Gómez-Bravo, Fernando; Sánchez-Raya, Manuel; Alcina-Espigado, Javier; Teixido-Rovira, Pedro Miguel

    2018-01-10

    This paper presents the design of a wireless sensor network particularly designed for remote monitoring and control of industrial parameters. The article describes the network components, protocol and sensor deployment, aimed to accomplish industrial constraint and to assure reliability and low power consumption. A particular case of study is presented. The system consists of a base station, gas sensing nodes, a tree-based routing scheme for the wireless sensor nodes and a real-time monitoring application that operates from a remote computer and a mobile phone. The system assures that the industrial safety quality and the measurement and monitoring system achieves an efficient industrial monitoring operations. The robustness of the developed system and the security in the communications have been guaranteed both in hardware and software level. The system is flexible and can be adapted to different environments. The testing of the system confirms the feasibility of the proposed implementation and validates the functional requirements of the developed devices, the networking solution and the power consumption management.

  17. An Efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Industrial Monitoring and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-Luis, Juan; Gómez-Bravo, Fernando; Sánchez-Raya, Manuel; Alcina-Espigado, Javier; Teixido-Rovira, Pedro Miguel

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless sensor network particularly designed for remote monitoring and control of industrial parameters. The article describes the network components, protocol and sensor deployment, aimed to accomplish industrial constraint and to assure reliability and low power consumption. A particular case of study is presented. The system consists of a base station, gas sensing nodes, a tree-based routing scheme for the wireless sensor nodes and a real-time monitoring application that operates from a remote computer and a mobile phone. The system assures that the industrial safety quality and the measurement and monitoring system achieves an efficient industrial monitoring operations. The robustness of the developed system and the security in the communications have been guaranteed both in hardware and software level. The system is flexible and can be adapted to different environments. The testing of the system confirms the feasibility of the proposed implementation and validates the functional requirements of the developed devices, the networking solution and the power consumption management. PMID:29320466

  18. An Efficient Wireless Sensor Network for Industrial Monitoring and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Aponte-Luis

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a wireless sensor network particularly designed for remote monitoring and control of industrial parameters. The article describes the network components, protocol and sensor deployment, aimed to accomplish industrial constraint and to assure reliability and low power consumption. A particular case of study is presented. The system consists of a base station, gas sensing nodes, a tree-based routing scheme for the wireless sensor nodes and a real-time monitoring application that operates from a remote computer and a mobile phone. The system assures that the industrial safety quality and the measurement and monitoring system achieves an efficient industrial monitoring operations. The robustness of the developed system and the security in the communications have been guaranteed both in hardware and software level. The system is flexible and can be adapted to different environments. The testing of the system confirms the feasibility of the proposed implementation and validates the functional requirements of the developed devices, the networking solution and the power consumption management.

  19. Development of measuring and control systems for underwater cutting of radioactive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drews, P.; Fuchs, K.

    1990-01-01

    Shutdown and dismantling of nuclear power plants requires special techniques to decommission the radioactive components involved. For reasons of safety, decommissioning of components under water can be advantageous because of the radioactive shielding effect of water. In this project, research activities and developmental works focused on the realization of different sensor systems and their adaptation to cutting tasks. A new image-processing system has been developed in addition to the use of a modified underwater TV camera for optical cutting process control (plasma and abrasive wheel cutting). For control of process parameters, different inductive, ultrasonic and optical sensors have been modified and tested. The investigations performed are aimed at assuring high-quality underwater cutting with the help of sensor systems specially adapted to cutting tasks, with special signal procession and evaluation through microcomputer control. It is important that special attention be paid to the reduction of interferences in image pick-up and procession. The measuring system has been designed and realized according to the consideration of the demands for underwater cutting processes. The reliability of the system was tested in conjunction with a four-axes handling system

  20. Integrated pollution prevention and control scares industrial companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackova, K.; Sobinkovic, B.

    2003-01-01

    It will not be easy to obtain a permit to open a new industrial plant. And not only the new ones but all important operating industrial productions will require a so called integrated permit. Both authorities and company managers consider the validation process to be more demanding compared to the current procedure for obtaining a building or user permit. As of August 1, 2003 - the day a new Act on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) is expected to enter into force - only integrated permits will be given. The related bill has been passed to the parliament for the second reading. As of end of April next year the future of 31 industrial plants will depend on whether they will be granted a integrated permit or not. IPPC is a terror for companies due to its seriousness, complexity and the relatively short time given, should they not manage to obtain a permit the plant may be closed down. The European Commission (EC) Directive 96/61/EC Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control raises the same concerns among companies in European Union (EU) member states. It is one of the most strict environmental standards and one of the sensitive conditions of EU entry. That is one of the reasons transition periods for this Directive were negotiated for ten Slovak companies. (Authors)

  1. Industrial accidents in radiological controlled areas: the importance of radiation protection in the organisation of the emergency aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenolland, J.L.; Laporte, E.

    2003-01-01

    After some disappointments when the first French nuclear units were started, it became clear that all the aspects linked to radio-protection needed to be taken into account in the context of emergency aid in the case of an industrial accident in radiological controlled area. In the case of an accident involving people, on-site first aid is provided by permanent services of the power plant. These teams are trained in first aid and fire-fighting. They are well trained in radioprotection. The specificity of an industrial event in controlled zone is that the victims' conventional injuries, whether it be a wound, a burn or a fracture, can be complicated by radioactive contamination. If it is justified, the exterior emergency services (firemen and medical teams) sire immediately called in. These teams are not necessarily trained in radioprotection. (authors)

  2. Control Performance Management in Industrial Automation Assessment, Diagnosis and Improvement of Control Loop Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Jelali, Mohieddine

    2013-01-01

    Control Performance Management in Industrial Automation provides a coherent and self-contained treatment of a group of methods and applications of burgeoning importance to the detection and solution of problems with control loops that are vital in maintaining product quality, operational safety, and efficiency of material and energy consumption in the process industries. The monograph deals with all aspects of control performance management (CPM), from controller assessment (minimum-variance-control-based and advanced methods), to detection and diagnosis of control loop problems (process non-linearities, oscillations, actuator faults), to the improvement of control performance (maintenance, re-design of loop components, automatic controller re-tuning). It provides a contribution towards the development and application of completely self-contained and automatic methodologies in the field. Moreover, within this work, many CPM tools have been developed that goes far beyond available CPM packages. Control Perform...

  3. Conditioning of radioactive waste from the waste collection centers of the German states as illustrated by radioactive waste from industrial production processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellmacher, J.; Sickert, T.

    2011-01-01

    The amount of negligible heat generating waste in Germany is increasing due to deconstruction of decommissioned nuclear facilities. Until 2040 277.000 m 3 are expected. By conditioning processes the wastes are transferred into a chemical stabile and water insoluble state and packaged in appropriate containers for final repository disposal. The radioactive waste in the collection containers are coated with wax for immobilization of the surface contamination, in the next step the containers are filled with pressurized geopolymer, a thixotropic fluid (under pressure the viscosity is decreased, so that cavities are filled). The conditioned material, the so called interim product is stored in trays for the final packaging in appropriate containers.

  4. Management of Industrial Processes with Programmable Logic Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Tufoi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In a modern economy, automation (the control is primarily to raise the competitiveness of a product, either directly through price or quality, or indirectly through the improvement of working conditions of staff productive. The control of industrial processes involves the management of dynamic systems that have continuous states. These systems are described by differential equations and, in general, analog inputs and outputs. Management of these systems is achieved, in general, with classical automation, by automation or with analog computers which contains modules with input / output analog performance. If states, inputs and outputs of a system can be modeled using binary variables, then these systems can be driven with Programmable Logic Controller.

  5. The Periodic Measurement of the Airborne Radioactivity In Controlled Area of KOMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Park, Sung-Kyun; Min, Yi-Sub; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) to start the performance operation in the second half of 2013, is currently operated in each beamline 20-MeV and 100-MeV. The accelerator operation period is simply divided by three operation cycles which are the maintenance checks period for accelerator device, the performance test period before driving accelerator and the operation period. During this operation period, beam is irradiated to target. At this time, the proton beams collide with the target material and a high dose of radiations such as gamma ray and neutron occurred. Radiation controlled area at the accelerator facility is divided into accelerator tunnel and beam utilization zone. As a result of measuring the airborne radioactivity in the controlled area in accordance with the operating cycle of the proton accelerator KOMAC, It was confirmed that the value of the airborne radioactivity does not significantly differ according to each accelerator operating cycles. And alpha and beta values measured inside the area that workers primarily work is very low indoor radon level than the value of the recommendations in multiple facilities.

  6. The management of radioactive wastes from small producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Medicine, research and industry generate various type of radioactive wastes which have to be managed by the ANDRA, the French agency for the management of radioactive wastes. This educative booklet explains the missions of the ANDRA with respect to these small producers: collection, selection, conditioning, control and storage of wastes. (J.S.)

  7. Marie Curie and her laboratory: science, industry, instruments and metrology of radioactivity in France, 1896-1914

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudia, S.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis treats of the historical aspect of the scientific research on radioactivity in France at the end of the 19. century and the beginning of the 20. century through the works of Marie Curie. (J.S.)

  8. Remote detection and ecological monitoring of the industrial and natural nuclei activity of radioactive elements based on passive microwave radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakova, Liliya K.; Chistyakov, Vyacheslav Y.; Losev, Dmitry V.; Penin, Sergei T.; Tarabrin, Yurij K.; Yakubov, Vladimir P.; Yurjev, Igor A.

    1998-12-01

    The passive remote method of microwave radiometry and its instrumental realization for express diagnostics of radioactive elements in the atmosphere have been discussed. Analysis of the microwave radiation due to ionization and dissociation of atmospheric components interacting with radioactive elements is carried out. The photochemical processes resulting in background microwave radiation power have been discussed. As an example, the results of natural experiment of detecting the atomic hydrogen radiation in the plume of emissions of nuclear cycle processing plants have been presented.

  9. Definition and preparation of glassy matrices by innovating processes to confine radioactive wastes and industrial toxic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The confinement by vitrification of high-level radioactive wastes is studied in the CEA for fifteen years. These studies have lead to the preparation of glassy matrices by innovating processes. These processes can be applied to non-radioactive toxic materials treatment too. In this work are more particularly described the glassy matrix long-dated behaviour and the different vitrification processes used (by direct induction in cold crucible, by transferred arc plasma). (O.L.). 1 tab

  10. Application of quality assurance to radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear power generation and the use of radioactive materials in medicine, research and industry produce radioactive wastes. In order to assure that wastes are managed safely, the implementation of appropriate management control is necessary. This IAEA publication deals with quality assurance principles for safe disposal. This report may assist managers responsible for safe disposal of radioactive waste in achieving quality in their work; and to regulatory bodies to provide guidance for their licensee waste disposal programmes. 17 refs.

  11. Application of quality assurance to radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Nuclear power generation and the use of radioactive materials in medicine, research and industry produce radioactive wastes. In order to assure that wastes are managed safely, the implementation of appropriate management control is necessary. This IAEA publication deals with quality assurance principles for safe disposal. This report may assist managers responsible for safe disposal of radioactive waste in achieving quality in their work; and to regulatory bodies to provide guidance for their licensee waste disposal programmes. 17 refs

  12. Radioisotope techniques for process optimisation and control in the offshore oil and gas industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    For over fifty years, radioisotope technology has been used by the oil industry to solve problems and to help optimise process operations. The widespread development of offshore oil and gas fields has brought, and continues to bring, new challenges and, in response, new or modified applications of radioisotope technology have been introduced. This paper presents case studies, which illustrate the use of radioisotopes, both in the sub-sea environment and on the offshore production platforms. On the platform, radioisotope techniques applied singly or in combination, have been applied to the performance assessment of oil/gas separation and gas dehydration units. Novel nucleonic instrumentation has been developed for the control of three-phase separators. Sub-sea, radioactive tracers and/or sealed sources have been used to investigate the integrity of submerged structures and to troubleshoot pipeline problems. The continuing expansion in the use of this technology stems from industry increasing awareness of its versatility and from the fact that the benefits it confers can be obtained at a relatively modest cost. Examples of economic benefit described in the paper are associated with production enhancements derived from the ability of radioisotope technology to measure performance and diagnose problems on line, without disrupting process operations in any way. (Author)

  13. Measurement of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K radioactivity contents in by-product phosphogypsum from phosphate fertilizer industry using gamma ray spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirel, H.; Parmaksiz, A.; Vural, M.; Cakir, I.T.; Demircioglu, B.; Yucel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Phosphatic fertilizers are produced from the industrial processing of rock phosphate ores which are known to contain naturally occurring radionuclides such as 238 U and its daughter products. A high volume by-product known as phosphogypsum (PG) from the production of phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizer causes serious storage and environmental problems in phosphoric acid industries. During the phosphoric acid production process, 226 Ra (t 1/2 =1600 y) ends up in PG which has chemical analogous to calcium element. Since the stockpiles of PG near the phosphatic fertilizer plants are huge amounts, the radioactivity contained in PG has measured in view of environmental radioactivity problem. In this work, the natural radioactivity in eighty PG samples taken from a stock near Samsun phosphoric fertilizer plant was measured by a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. The mean activity of 226 Ra in PG samples has been found to be 546 Bq.kg -1 . However, the activities of 232 Th and 40 K measured in PG samples are negligibly small. In the presented paper, the gamma spectrometric method employed for this work is discussed and the radiological risk impact of radon gas emanation from 226 Ra mainly contained in PG, has been assessed

  14. Review to give the public clear information on near surface disposal project of low-level radioactive wastes generated from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobu, Nobuhiro; Amazawa, Hiroya; Koibuchi, Hiroto; Nakata, Hisakazu; Kato, Masatoshi; Takao, Tomoe; Terashima, Daisuke; Tanaka, Yoshie; Shirasu, Hisanori

    2013-12-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereafter abbreviated as “JAEA”) has promoted near surface disposal project for low-level radioactive wastes generated from research, industrial and medical facilities after receiving project approval from the government in November 2009. JAEA has carried out public information about low-level radioactive wastes disposal project on the web site. When some town meetings are held toward mutual understanding with the public, more detailed and clear explanations for safety management of near surface disposal are needed especially. Therefore, the information provision method to make the public understand should be reviewed. Moreover, a web-based survey should be carried out in order to get a sense of what the public knows, what it values and where it stands on nuclear energy and radiation issues, because the social environment surrounding nuclear energy and radiation issues has drastically changed as a result of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on March 11, 2011. This review clarified the points to keep in mind about public information on near surface disposal project for low-level radioactive wastes generated from research, industrial and medical facilities, and that public awareness and understanding toward nuclear energy and radiation was changed before and after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. (author)

  15. Technical and economic evaluation of controlled disposal options for very low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.J.; Vance, J.N.

    1990-08-01

    Over the past several years, there has been considerable interest by the nuclear industry in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) explicitly defined an activity level in plant waste materials at which the radiological impacts would be so low as to be considered Below Regulatory Concern (BRC). In January 1989, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) completed an extensive industry research effort to develop the technical bases for establishing criteria for the disposal of very low activity wastes in ordinary disposal facilities. The Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), with assistance from the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), drafted a petition titled: ''Petition for Rulemaking Regarding Disposal of Below Regulatory Concern Radioactive Wastes from Commercial Nuclear Power Plants.'' Subsequent to the industry making a final decision for submittal of the drafted BRC petition, EPRI was requested to evaluate the technical and economic impact of six BRC options. These options are: take no action in pursuing a BRC waste exemption, petition the NRC for authorization to disposal of any BRC waste in any ordinary disposal facility, limit disposal of BRC waste to the nuclear power plant site, limit disposal of BRC waste to the nuclear power plant site and other utility owned property, petition for a mixed waste exemption, and petition for single waste stream exemptions in sequence (i.e. soil, followed by sewage sludge, etc.). The petition and technical bases were written to support the disposal of any BRC waste type in any ordinary disposal facility. These documents do not provide all of the technical and economic information needed to completely assessment the BRC options. This report provides the technical and economic basis for a range of options concerning disposal of very low activity wastes. 3 figs., 20 tabs

  16. Handling of radioactive sources in Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, Manuel

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the following aspects: sealed and unsealed radioactive sources, radiation detectors, personnel and area monitoring, surface pollution, radioactive wastes control and radioactive sources transferring. (The author)

  17. Evolution of the VLT instrument control system toward industry standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekebusch, Mario J.; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Knudstrup, Jens; Popovic, Dan; Zins, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The VLT control system is a large distributed system consisting of Linux Workstations providing the high level coordination and interfaces to the users, and VME-based Local Control Units (LCU's) running the VxWorks real-time operating system with commercial and proprietary boards acting as the interface to the instrument functions. After more than 10 years of VLT operations, some of the applied technologies used by the astronomical instruments are being discontinued making it difficult to find adequate hardware for future projects. In order to deal with this obsolescence, the VLT Instrumentation Framework is being extended to adopt well established Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) components connected through industry standard fieldbuses. This ensures a flexible state of the art hardware configuration for the next generation VLT instruments allowing the access to instrument devices via more compact and simpler control units like PC-based Programmable Logical Controllers (PLC's). It also makes it possible to control devices directly from the Instrument Workstation through a normal Ethernet connection. This paper outlines the requirements that motivated this work, as well as the architecture and the design of the framework extension. In addition, it describes the preliminary results on a use case which is a VLTI visitor instrument used as a pilot project to validate the concepts and the suitability of some COTS products like a PC-based PLCs, EtherCAT8 and OPC UA6 as solutions for instrument control.

  18. Initial demonstration of DWPF process and product control strategy using actual radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will vitrify high-level nuclear waste into borosilicate glass. The waste will be mixed with properly formulated glass-making frit and fed to a melter at 1150 degrees C. Process control and product quality are ensured by proper control of the melter feed composition. Algorithms have been developed to predict the processability of the melt and the durability of the final glass based on this feed composition. To test these algorithms, an actual radioactive waste contained in a shielded facility at SRS was analyzed and a frit composition formulated using a simple computer spreadsheet which contained the algorithms. This frit was then mixed with the waste and the resulting slurry fed to a research scale joule-heated melter operated remotely. Approximately 24 kg of glass were successfully prepared. This paper will describe the frit formulation, the vitrification process, and the glass durability

  19. Focus on radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1989-01-01

    Written for children, this book looks at the nature of radioactive materials, how they were discovered, what they are used for and how they affect the environment around us. The emphasis is on the benefits of radioactive materials, particularly in nuclear power stations, in medical diagnostics and radiotherapy, in industry and in agriculture. Nuclear fission and fusion are explained, how radioactive materials are handled and naturally occurring radioactivity are included. (UK).

  20. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.

    1994-01-01

    This booklet is a publication by International Atomic Energy Agency for general awareness of citizens and policy-makers to clarify their concept of nuclear wastes. In a very simple way it tells what is radioactivity, radiations and radioactive wastes. It further hints on various medial and industrial uses of radiations. It discusses about different types of radioactive wastes and radioactive waste management. Status of nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern European countries are also discussed

  1. Radioactive consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Otomaru

    1981-01-01

    Present situation of utilizing the radioactive consumer products and exposure dose were reviewed with published data. Practically, consumer products are divided into three categories, (1) radioactive nuclides intentionally incorporated into radioluminous dye, ionization chambers for smoke detector, eliminator of static electricity, and glow lamp (2) natural radioactive nuclides contained in false teeth, porcelain, glass, and gas mantle (3) natural radioactive nuclides accumulated as industrial waste at the consumption of coal, petroleum, and natural gas or in fertilizer and materials for construction. (Nakanishi, T.)

  2. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  3. Controlling the level of radioactivity of cigarettes sold in Kinshasa: Case Tumbaco light and Embassy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woto, M.L.; Lukanda, M.V.; Mulumba, L.C.P.; Musibondo-Eyul'Anki, D.; Kabangu, Y.; Disila, L.A.; Dizono, Z.R.B.

    2009-01-01

    At the anti-smoking, which continues to grow now in the world with positive results on the chemical vectors: tar and nicotine, as we know the harm in North America and Europe, nowadays, radioactivity is added. This second vector radiation-induced lung cancer, radon is hazardous and radioactive daughters 210P b and 210P o that Big Tobacco had hid the truth for 40 years. The surgeon C. Everett Ko op, a pioneer of Modern Pediatrics (Philadelphia, USA) showed that the radioactivity found in many tobacco 210P o, and that rather than derivatives of tar and nicotine, account for 90% of all lung cancers of smokers recounted. These assertions have prompted the current authors to control the level of alpha and beta radioactivity in cigarettes Tumbaco Embassy and light manufactured by Tabac Congo. These products are commonly consumed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, particularly in the city of Kinshasa. Following this study, we present quantitative data related to lead the health authorities of the Democratic Republic of Congo to take necessary measures or to enact laws prohibiting smoking in public places and for monitoring production these cigarettes. Thus, the mean mass activities for gross alpha and beta measured for the cigarette lighter Tumbaco and Embassy appear respectively as follows: 11.32Bq/kg and 7.08Bq/kg for alpha cons 38.34Bq/kg and 29.5Bq/kg (Table 10). In addition, the estimated average effective dose for an annual consumption of cigarettes one pack per year worth 0.0726 mSv/ year (0.05 mSv/ hour) and light Tumbaco 0.04574 mSv/ year (0.02μSv/hour) for Embassy. These values are lower than the hourly limit or permissible annual dose for members of the public (or 1mSv/an 0.5μSv/hour) following radiation protection standards of the international Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 60, 1990). This means that these dose rates are below the threshold for non-stochastic effects, and these limits do not apply to stochastic or random effects (Tables

  4. Legionella in industrial cooling towers: monitoring and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, A; Verani, M; Battistini, R

    2010-01-01

    Legionella contamination of industrial cooling towers has been identified as the cause of sporadic cases and outbreaks of legionellosis among people living nearby. To evaluate and control Legionella contamination in industrial cooling tower water, microbiological monitoring was carried out to determine the effectiveness of the following different disinfection treatments: (i) continuous chlorine concentration of 0.01 ppm and monthly chlorine shock dosing (5 ppm) on a single cooling tower; (ii) continuous chlorine concentration of 0.4 ppm and monthly shock of biocide P3 FERROCID 8580 (BKG Water Solution) on seven towers. Legionella spp. and total bacterial count (TBC) were determined 3 days before and after each shock dose. Both strategies demonstrated that when chlorine was maintained at low levels, the Legionella count grew to levels above 10(4) CFU l(-1) while TBC still remained above 10(8 )CFU l(-1). Chlorine shock dosing was able to eliminate bacterial contamination, but only for 10-15 days. Biocide shock dosing was also insufficient to control the problem when the disinfectant concentration was administered at only one point in the plant and at the concentration of 30 ppm. On the other hand, when at a biocide concentration of 30 or 50 ppm was distributed throughout a number of points, depending on the plant hydrodynamics, Legionella counts decreased significantly and often remained below the warning limit. Moreover, the contamination of water entering the plant and the presence of sediment were also important factors for Legionella growth. For effective decontamination of outdoor industrial cooling towers, disinfectants should be distributed in a targeted way, taking into account the possible sources of contamination. The data of the research permitted to modify the procedure of disinfection for better reduce the water and aerosol contamination and consequently the exposure risk.

  5. Learning more about radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  6. The Atomic Energy Control Board and the uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, R.M.

    The Atomic Energy Control Board controls prescribed substances and nuclear facilities through a licensing system. It is only recently that this system has been applied to the uranium industry. There are four stages in the licensing procedure before a Mine-Mill Facility Operating Licence is issued: exploration requires an underground exploration permit; site approval is needed before the start of the development stage; development approval is required before the construction of the mill and waste management facilities and depends on the information in a preliminary safety report; the granting of a final operating licence occurs after the Board is satisfied with the final safety report, operating policies and principles, tailings management, and decommissioning plans. The Board has resource management policies designed to ensure that uranium reserves are available to meet Canada's needs. The administration of safeguards is also the Board's responsibility. (LL)

  7. Remote control of the industry processes. POWERLINK protocol application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wóbel, A.; Paruzel, D.; Paszkiewicz, B.

    2017-08-01

    The present technological development enables the use of solutions characterized by a lower failure rate, and work with greater precision. This allows you to obtain the most efficient production, high speed production and reliability of individual components. The main scope of this article was POWERLINK protocol application for communication with the controller B & R through communication Ethernet for recording process parameters. This enables control of run production cycle using an internal network connected to the PC industry. Knowledge of the most important parameters of the production in real time allows detecting of a failure immediately after occurrence. For this purpose, the position of diagnostic use driver X20CP1301 B&R to record measurement data such as pressure, temperature valve between the parties and the torque required to change the valve setting was made. The use of POWERLINK protocol allows for the transmission of information on the status of every 200 μs.

  8. Controlled study of the evolution of radon and its decay products in radioactive mine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calizaya A, F.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis discusses three aspects related to radon emissions and control of radon decay products in mine environments: (1) measurement of the effects of environmental parameters on radiation levels, (2) analysis of the data using ordinary linear regression and transfer function models and (3) prediction of the concentration of radioactive contaminants in the mine air. In-mine and laboratory experiments were conducted to develop the research data. In mine tests were conducted in a bulkhead isolated mine drift containing low grade uranium ore at the Colorado School of Mines, Experimental Mine with the US Bureau of Mines - Spokane Research Center (USBM, SRC) micro-computer based radiation monitoring system. Parameters such as amount of ore, amount of condensation nuclei in the mine air, temperature, air velocity, and barometric pressure were studied. The laboratory tests were conducted in an air-tight radon chamber equipped with a container of the radioactive material, various monitors, and the USBM, SRC Data Acquisition System. The effect of parameters such as ore grade, particle size, rock moisture, air temperature and relative humidity on radon concentrations were measured in the laboratory. Radiation levels, together with parameters affecting these levels, were measured over a period of one year (June 1984-July 1985) both in the laboratory model and in the field

  9. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu.

    1996-01-01

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  10. Radioactivity measuring and control method and the system for facility of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Megumu

    1996-12-03

    In measurement and control for radioactivity in an inspection operation in radiation circumstance for nuclear power plant facilities, radioactive materials in air are sometimes suspended together with ordinary dusts. Then, when a radiation level is low, light is applied to the suspended dusts to measure the quantity and the number of the dusts thereby estimating the radiation level based on the amount of the dusts. Then, the level of the equipments is informed to an operator based on the estimated value, and an operation time is determined. Since the optical dust monitor is inexpensive, a number of dust monitors can be brought into an operation chamber. In addition, they are reduced in the size and the weight, an operator can carry and bring them into the operation chamber. A distribution of dusts can be determined by measuring the concentration of dusts using a plurality of dust monitors thereby enabling to improve safety and economical property of periodical inspection for nuclear power plant facilities. (T.M.)

  11. Environmental radiation control and quality management system in design and operation of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    New environmental regulations and radiation safety standards are being implemented almost daily to ensure radiation safety, in particular for practices causing exposures to undue radiation doses. A particular emphasis of real challenge for organizations and users of radiation sources has to be for proper radiological safety assessment and is becoming cost effectively to be prepared for auditing. Special concern for the environment is of global . nature, and hence environmental auditing has been and will continue to be an essential practice for improving the environment and for meeting the relevant regulations and standards. In general, most facilities that deal with radioactive sources undertake strict safety measures in terms of personnel radiation protection, handling procedures and security. Hence, those measures should comply with the requirements of the environmental protection standards. Accordingly, a successful quality management system must balance realities of organization and personnel in achieving quality objectives. Organizational principles are found in the technical aspects of' quality management, such as, charting, requirements, measurements, procedures, ... , etc. Human principles are found in the communication side of quality management (e.g. meetings, ,decision making, ,teams, ... , etc). The quality management must understand and balance skills needed to blend them together. Large gamma irradiators present a high potential radiation hazard to the surrounding environment, since the amount of radioactivity is of the order of (P Bq) and a very high dose rates are produced during irradiation. Application of environmental radiation control deemed by regulatory authority and a proper quality management system by the utility would serve public health and safety

  12. Industrial Raman gas sensing for real-time system control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buric, M.; Mullen, J.; Chorpening, B.; Woodruff, S.

    2014-06-01

    Opportunities exist to improve on-line process control in energy applications with a fast, non-destructive measurement of gas composition. Here, we demonstrate a Raman sensing system which is capable of reporting the concentrations of numerous species simultaneously with sub-percent accuracy and sampling times below one-second for process control applications in energy or chemical production. The sensor is based upon a hollow-core capillary waveguide with a 300 micron bore with reflective thin-film metal and dielectric linings. The effect of using such a waveguide in a Raman process is to integrate Raman photons along the length of the sample-filled waveguide, thus permitting the acquisition of very large Raman signals for low-density gases in a short time. The resultant integrated Raman signals can then be used for quick and accurate analysis of a gaseous mixture. The sensor is currently being tested for energy applications such as coal gasification, turbine control, well-head monitoring for exploration or production, and non-conventional gas utilization. In conjunction with an ongoing commercialization effort, the researchers have recently completed two prototype instruments suitable for hazardous area operation and testing. Here, we report pre-commercialization testing of those field prototypes for control applications in gasification or similar processes. Results will be discussed with respect to accuracy, calibration requirements, gas sampling techniques, and possible control strategies of industrial significance.

  13. Criteria of exemption of regulatory control for radioactive material; Criterios de exencion del control regulatorio para material radiactivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medrano Lopez, Marco A [Gerencia de Seguridad Radiologica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    Being based on the information contained in the 10 CFR Part 20, of the section 20.301 until the 20.306 where the mechanisms by means of which can prepare the waste of low level are indicated. While the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) it amended in the year of 1985 the Act of Politics on Low level Wastes, in particular the section 10 of the amendment of the Act, relative to the concept BRC treats those groups of radioactive waste in that their activity contents are so low that they could be exempt of the regulatory control, either liberating them toward the environment or to exempt people or organizations of the regulatory control.

  14. Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nick Soelberg

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost

  15. Current significant challenges in the decommissioning and environmental remediation of radioactive facilities: A perspective from outside the nuclear industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cerezo, V; Domínguez-Vilches, E; González-Barrios, A J

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the results of implementing an extrajudicial environmental mediation procedure in the socioenvironmental conflict associated with routine operation of the El Cabril Disposal Facility for low- and medium- activity radioactive waste (Spain). We analyse the socio-ethical perspective of this facility's operation with regard to its nearby residents, detailing the structure and development of the environmental mediation procedure through the participation of society and interested parties who are or may become involved in such a conflict. The research, action, and participation method was used to apply the environmental mediation procedure. This experience provides lessons that could help improve decision-making processes in nuclear or radioactive facility decommissioning projects or in environmental remediation projects dealing with ageing facilities or with those in which nuclear or radioactive accidents/incidents may have occurred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radioactive waste packages stored at the Aube facility for low-intermediate activity wastes. A selective and controlled storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The waste package is the first barrier designed to protect the man and the environment from the radioactivity contained in wastes. Its design is thus particularly stringent and controlled. This brochure describes the different types of packages for low to intermediate activity wastes like those received and stored at the Aube facility, and also the system implemented by the ANDRA (the French national agency of radioactive wastes) and by waste producers to safely control each step of the design and fabrication of these packages. (J.S.)

  17. Measurement of Gamma Radioactivity in a Group of Control Subjects from the Stockholm Area During 1959-1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, I Oe; Nilsson, I; Eckerstig, K

    1963-08-15

    Repeated measurements of the gamma radioactivity in a group of control subjects have been made since June 1959, using a whole body counter scintillation spectrometer. The body contents of cesium-137 and potassium-40 and their trends with time have been determined. The cesium-137 values have been compared with the results from measurements of the fallout rate of cesium-137 and the concentration of cesium-137 in milk. The control group study was carried out to obtain information about the gamma radioactivity situation in the general population. Such an investigation is necessary if one wants to measure occupational contamination at low levels.

  18. Spatial gradient of human health risk from exposure to trace elements and radioactive pollutants in soils at the Puchuncaví-Ventanas industrial complex, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmani-Ghabeshi, S; Palomo-Marín, M R; Bernalte, E; Rueda-Holgado, F; Miró-Rodríguez, C; Cereceda-Balic, F; Fadic, X; Vidal, V; Funes, M; Pinilla-Gil, E

    2016-11-01

    The Punchuncaví Valley in central Chile, heavily affected by a range of anthropogenic emissions from a localized industrial complex, has been studied as a model environment for evaluating the spatial gradient of human health risk, which are mainly caused by trace elemental pollutants in soil. Soil elemental profiles in 121 samples from five selected locations representing different degrees of impact from the industrial source were used for human risk estimation. Distance to source dependent cumulative non-carcinogenic hazard indexes above 1 for children (max 4.4 - min 1.5) were found in the study area, ingestion being the most relevant risk pathway. The significance of health risk differences within the study area was confirmed by statistical analysis (ANOVA and HCA) of individual hazard index values at the five sampling locations. As was the dominant factor causing unacceptable carcinogenic risk levels for children (sampling locations which are closer to the industrial complex, whereas the risk was just in the tolerable range (10 -6 - 10 -4 ) for children and adults in the rest of the sampling locations at the study area. Furthermore, we assessed gamma ray radiation external hazard indexes and annual effective dose rate from the natural radioactivity elements ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) levels in the surface soils of the study area. The highest average values for the specific activity of 232 Th (31 Bq kg -1 ), 40 K (615 Bq kg - 1 ), and 226 Ra (25 Bq kg -1 ) are lower than limit recommended by OECD, so no significant radioactive risk was detected within the study area. In addition, no significant variability of radioactive risk was observed among sampling locations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Production techniques and quality control of sealed radioactive sources of palladium-103, iodine-125, iridium-192 and ytterbium-169. Final report of a coordinated research project 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Radioisotopes have been used extensively for many years for several medical and industrial applications either in the form of an open source or encapsulated in an appropriate metallic container (sealed source). The design and technology for the preparation of radioactive sealed sources is an area of continuous development to satisfy an ever increasing demand for a larger variety of shapes, sizes, type of radioisotope and levels of radioactivity required for newer and specialized applications. In medicine, sealed sources using the radioisotopes of 125 I, 192 Ir and 103 Pd are commonly used for brachytherapy for the treatment of malignant diseases, and for bone density measurements. In industry, they are widely used for non-destructive testing (NDT), radiation processing, 'on-line' process control systems and on-line elemental analysis of mineral resources. Some well-known examples of such sources are 60 Co for industrial nucleonic gauges, 192 Ir sources for industrial radiography, 241 Am sources for smoke detectors and chemical analysers and, more recently, 169 Yb for NDT measurements of thin metallic tubes and plates. The current challenges in development include the production of miniature size sources with a high level of activity, a high degree of uniformity in the distribution of the radioactivity and the highest degree of safety, requiring stringent quality control methods. The IAEA has been promoting and supporting activities designed to increase the utilization of radiation and radioisotopes in several areas. In particular, in view of the proven benefits of, and an increasing demand for radioactive sealed sources for medical and industrial applications, upon the recommendation of several experts, a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radioactive Sources for Emerging Therapeutic and Industrial Applications was begun in 2002. The aim of the CRP was the optimization and testing of procedures and methods for the fabrication and quality control

  20. Status of radioactive material transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueny, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    As about 900.000 parcels containing radioactive materials are transported every year in France, the author recalls the main risks and safety principles associated with such transport. He indicates the different types of parcels defined by the regulation: excepted parcels, industrial non fissile parcels (type A), type B and fissile parcels, and highly radioactive type C parcels. He briefly presents the Q-system which is used to classify the parcels. He describes the role of the ASN in the control of transport safety, and indicates the different contracts existing between France or Areva and different countries (Germany, Japan, Netherlands, etc.) for the processing of used fuels in La Hague