WorldWideScience

Sample records for control center artcc

  1. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  2. Design and Operational Evaluation of the Traffic Management Advisor at the Ft. Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Harry N.; Vincent, Danny; Tobias, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NASA and the FAA have designed and developed and an automation tool known as the Traffic Management Advisor (TMA). The system was operationally evaluated at the Ft. Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC). The TMA is a time-based strategic planning tool that provides Traffic Management Coordinators and En Route Air Traffic Controllers the ability to efficiently optimize the capacity of a demand impacted airport. The TMA consists of trajectory prediction, constraint-based runway scheduling, traffic flow visualization and controllers advisories. The TMA was used and operationally evaluated for forty-one rush traffic periods during a one month period in the Summer of 1996. The evaluations included all shifts of air traffic operations as well as periods of inclement weather. Performance data was collected for engineering and human factor analysis and compared with similar operations without the TMA. The engineering data indicates that the operations with the TMA show a one to two minute per aircraft delay reduction during rush periods. The human factor data indicate a perceived reduction in en route controller workload as well as an increase in job satisfaction. Upon completion of the evaluation, the TMA has become part of the normal operations at the Ft. Worth ARTCC.

  3. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  4. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  5. FFTF Work Control Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity

  6. 'Motor control center obsolescence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A significant and growing problem within the global nuclear industry is the aging of motor control center (MCC) components. MCC's have a very important role in the safety and critical to generation requirements of a nuclear power plant. Although many OEM's MCC's such as ITE/Telemechanique, GE, Westinghouse, Cutler Hammer, Klockner Moeller, etc. have been used throughout the global nuclear industry, they all have one common aspect obsolescence. Obsolescence of various components within the MCC's such as molded case circuit breakers, starters, relays, heaters, contactors, etc. are impacting the reliability of the MCC to serve its intended function. The paper will discuss the options which the nuclear industry is faced with to increase the reliability of the MCC's while maintaining design control, qualification and meeting budget constraints. The options as listed below shall be discussed in detail with examples to enhance the readers understanding of the situation: 1) Component by component replacement: The hurdles associated with trying to find equivalent components to replace the obsolete components while still worki (mechanically and electrically) in the original cubicle will be presented. 2) Complete MCC cubicle with new internal components replacement: The process of supplying a replacement cubicle, with all new internal components and new door to replace the original cubicle will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of the advantages and dis-advantages of the two methods to bring the MCC to an as new condition with the overall goal of increasing reliability. (author)

  7. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  8. Poison control center - emergency number

    Science.gov (United States)

    For a POISON EMERGENCY call: 1-800-222-1222 ANYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this ...

  9. Hydraulically centered control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlacher, W.R.; Sampson, W.T.; Schukei, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A control rod suspended to reciprocate in a guide tube of a nuclear fuel assembly has a hydraulic bearing formed at its lower tip. The bearing includes a plurality of discrete pockets on its outer surface into which a flow of liquid is continuously provided. In one embodiment the flow is induced by the pressure head in a downward facing chamber at the end of the bearing. In another embodiment the flow originates outside the guide tube. In both embodiments the flow into the pockets produces pressure differences across the bearing which counteract forces tending to drive the rod against the guide tube wall. Thus contact of the rod against the guide tube is avoided

  10. Learning System Center App Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Naeem, Nasir

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for IT professionals working with Hyper-V, Azure cloud, VMM, and private cloud technologies who are looking for a quick way to get up and running with System Center 2012 R2 App Controller. To get the most out of this book, you should be familiar with Microsoft Hyper-V technology. Knowledge of Virtual Machine Manager is helpful but not mandatory.

  11. Emergency control centers for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Guidance is provided for the development and implementation of emergency control centers for nuclear power plants, including nuclear plant control room, nuclear plant company headquarters, emergency control center, and nuclear plant alternate emergency control center. Requirements and recommendations are presented for the mission, communications, instrumentation and equipment associated with each type of control center. Decisional aids, manning requirements and resources are also given; the decision aids cover both the accident assessment and protective action areas. Both normal and alternate means of communications are considered. Off-site emergency control centers, although not covered in the strict sense by this standard, are considered in an appendix

  12. The Poison Control Center--Its Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoguerra, Anthony S.

    1976-01-01

    Poison Control Centers are being utilized by more schools of pharmacy each year as training sites for students. This paper discusses what such a center is, its services, changes anticipated in the poison center system in the next several years and how they may influence pharmacy education, specifically as it relates to clinical toxicology.…

  13. Intelligent tutors for control center operator training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vale, Z.A. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Fernandes, M.F.; Marques, A. [Electricity of Portugal, Sacavem (Portugal)

    1995-12-31

    Power systems are presently remotely operated and controlled from control centers that receive on-line information about the power system state. Control center operators have very high-demanding tasks what makes their training a key issue for the performance of the whole power system. Simulators are usually used by electrical utilities for this purpose but they are very expensive applications and their use requires the preparation of the training sessions by qualified training staff which is a very time consuming task. Due to this, these simulators are only used a few times a year. Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) provide some new possibilities for control center operator training making easier its use without much assistance of the teaching staff. On the other hand, an expert system in use in a control center can be adapted to an ITS to train operators without much effort. 18 refs

  14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Page maintained by: Office of Associate Director of Communication, Division of Public ...

  15. Distribution control centers in the Croatian power system with particular consideration on ZAgreb distribution control center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupin, N.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion about control of Croatian Power system in the view of forthcoming free electricity market did not included do far distribution level. With this article we would like to clarify the role of distribution control centers pointing out importance of Zagreb Distribution control center, with controls one third of Croatian (HEP) consumption. (author)

  16. The ORNL Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S.; Ownby, F.M.; Meyer, F.W.; Havener, C.C.; Bannister, M.E.; Liu, W.; Jeffery, D.J.; Stancil, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    The principal mission of the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center is the collection evaluation, and dissemination of atomic collision data relevant to fusion energy development. With the advent of the widespread use of the World Wide Web, the data center's resources are being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users (cf. http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/). As this development continues, initially disparate, individually compiled resources will be transformed into integrated tools for retrieving recommended data, or displaying and manipulating the information available. The data center's present capabilities, recent data production/evaluation efforts, and goals for future development are highlighted here

  17. Trainer module for security control center operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    An operator trainer module has been developed to be used with the security control center equipment to be installed as part of a safeguards physical protection system. The module is designed to provide improved training and testing capabilities for control center operators through the use of simulations for perimeter equipment operations. Operators, through the trainer module, can be challenged with a variety of realistic situations which require responsive action identical to that needed in an actual system. This permits a consistent evaluation and confirmation of operator capabilities prior to assignment as an operator and allows for periodic retesting to verify that adequate performance levels are maintained

  18. Poison control center - Emergency number (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    For a poison emergency call 1-800-222-1222 anywhere in the United States. This national hotline number will let you ... is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the U.S. use this national ...

  19. Xingo`s control center; Centro de controle de Xingo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parente, Benedito; Souza, Antonio; Ferraz, Adelson; Florentino, Luiz; Costa, Carlos [Companhia Hidroeletrica do Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    This work describes the development activities of the Xingo`s Control Center, since its production until its commissioning. It emphasizes the applicative programs developed by the CHESF`s, an electric power utility of Brazil (Northeast and Southeast of Brazil, team together with the furnisher`s team. The results of factory and field tests are commented 7 refs.

  20. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W.; Blair, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices

  1. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Schempf, H. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Blair, L.M. [Human Machine Interfaces, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices.

  2. A control center design revisited: learning from users’ appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza da Conceição, Carolina; Cordeiro, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to present the lessons learned during a control center design project by revisiting another control center from the same company designed two and a half years before by the same project team. In light of the experience with the first project and its analysis, the designers and res...

  3. Customizing graphical user interface technology for spacecraft control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Edward; Giancola, Peter; Gibson, Steven; Mahmot, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    The Transportable Payload Operations Control Center (TPOCC) project is applying the latest in graphical user interface technology to the spacecraft control center environment. This project of the Mission Operations Division's (MOD) Control Center Systems Branch (CCSB) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an architecture for control centers which makes use of a distributed processing approach and the latest in Unix workstation technology. The TPOCC project is committed to following industry standards and using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components wherever possible to reduce development costs and to improve operational support. TPOCC's most successful use of commercial software products and standards has been in the development of its graphical user interface. This paper describes TPOCC's successful use and customization of four separate layers of commercial software products to create a flexible and powerful user interface that is uniquely suited to spacecraft monitoring and control.

  4. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  5. ORNL's Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gregory, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Data Center maintains a detailed bibliography of atomic data measurements and calculations for processes of interest to the fusion community. One hundred nineteen journals are regularly searched for papers of interest, including back issues to 1950. Entries are categorized by author, process, reactants, energy range, and theory/experiment. Complete bibliographies have been published since 1978 and a computerized data retrieval system is available. In addition, an updated and extended multi-volume critical compilation of cross sections (the ORNL Redbooks) is under way

  6. B Complex Test Control Center (TCC) #4210

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TCC is a dual control room facility for the B-1 and B-2 Test Positions on the B-Stand. The TCC houses continually-updated, state-of-the-art Data Acquisition and...

  7. American Association of Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... add poison control as a contact in your smartphone. Take the pledge! National Poison Prevention Week is March 19-25! Be a part of the conversation by following #PreventPoison and #NPPW2017 on social media, and check out AAPCC's NPPW webpage and press ...

  8. Training Center for Industrial Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Yezhov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the application of embedded microcontrollers and industrial controllers with built-in operating systems.With the development of embedded operating systems and technology of open standard IEC 61131-3 product developer can write their own program management and support staff – to modernize management program.

  9. 75 FR 30409 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... applications received in response to ``Workplace Health Research Network (WHRN)--Coordinating Center, SIP 10-031 and WHRN--Collaborating Centers, SIP 10-032, initial review.'' Contact Person for More Information..., Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Workplace Health Research...

  10. The Air Force Center for Optimal Design and Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burns, John

    1997-01-01

    This report contains a summary and highlights of the research funded by the Air Force under AFOSR URI Grant F49620-93-1-0280, titled 'Center for Optimal Design and Control of Distributed Parameter Systems' (CODAC...

  11. The Effectiveness of Yoga on Spiritual Intelligence in Air Traffic Controllers of Tehran Flight Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safara, Maryam; Ghasemi, Pejman

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of yoga on spiritual intelligence in air traffic controllers in Tehran flight control center. This was a quasi-experimental research and the study population includes all air traffic controllers in Tehran flight control center. The sample consisted of 40 people of the study population that were…

  12. New Emergency control center of Slovenske Elektrarne Bohunice NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecko, E.

    2012-01-01

    Emergency preparedness of nuclear power plant and operation assurance in case of a possible emergency calls to have devices for emergency response with equipment for rapid detection and continuous evaluation of anticipated events. Chief executive body designated to manage a nuclear power plant during major events is the emergency committee (EC). Emergency Committee is a part of the Emergency Response Organization (ERO). The following centers are on alert to ensure the activities of the ERO - Emergency Response office: - control room (CR) and emergency control room (ECR); - emergency management center (EMC); - Monitoring Centre (MC); - emergency backup control center (EBCC); - congregations of civil protection (CP) and CP shelters; - communications with warning and notification system (VARVYR). From a historical and practical point of view in the vicinity of Jaslovske Bohunice has been set up a joint emergency control center. The center was located on the territory of the former already inoperative V1 NPP. V1 NPP is currently integrated into the organizational structure of JAVYS. Operating Bohunice V2 NPP plant is a designated part of the Slovenske Elektrarne, a. s., whose majority owner is an Italian operator ENEL. In terms of various relevant factors, it was decided to build a new emergency management center on the territory of operating V2 NPP, meet the current standards.

  13. MOD control center automated information systems security evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Rich

    1991-01-01

    The role of the technology infusion process in future Control Center Automated Information Systems (AIS) is highlighted. The following subject areas are presented in the form of the viewgraphs: goals, background, threat, MOD's AISS program, TQM, SDLC integration, payback, future challenges, and bottom line.

  14. Future applications of artificial intelligence to Mission Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Future applications of artificial intelligence to Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: basic objectives of the NASA-wide AI program; inhouse research program; constraint-based scheduling; learning and performance improvement for scheduling; GEMPLAN multi-agent planner; planning, scheduling, and control; Bayesian learning; efficient learning algorithms; ICARUS (an integrated architecture for learning); design knowledge acquisition and retention; computer-integrated documentation; and some speculation on future applications.

  15. A source-controlled data center network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liang, Mangui; Wang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    The construction of data center network by applying SDN technology has become a hot research topic. The SDN architecture has innovatively separated the control plane from the data plane which makes the network more software-oriented and agile. Moreover, it provides virtual multi-tenancy, effective scheduling resources and centralized control strategies to meet the demand for cloud computing data center. However, the explosion of network information is facing severe challenges for SDN controller. The flow storage and lookup mechanisms based on TCAM device have led to the restriction of scalability, high cost and energy consumption. In view of this, a source-controlled data center network (SCDCN) model is proposed herein. The SCDCN model applies a new type of source routing address named the vector address (VA) as the packet-switching label. The VA completely defines the communication path and the data forwarding process can be finished solely relying on VA. There are four advantages in the SCDCN architecture. 1) The model adopts hierarchical multi-controllers and abstracts large-scale data center network into some small network domains that has solved the restriction for the processing ability of single controller and reduced the computational complexity. 2) Vector switches (VS) developed in the core network no longer apply TCAM for table storage and lookup that has significantly cut down the cost and complexity for switches. Meanwhile, the problem of scalability can be solved effectively. 3) The SCDCN model simplifies the establishment process for new flows and there is no need to download flow tables to VS. The amount of control signaling consumed when establishing new flows can be significantly decreased. 4) We design the VS on the NetFPGA platform. The statistical results show that the hardware resource consumption in a VS is about 27% of that in an OFS.

  16. A source-controlled data center network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liang, Mangui; Wang, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    The construction of data center network by applying SDN technology has become a hot research topic. The SDN architecture has innovatively separated the control plane from the data plane which makes the network more software-oriented and agile. Moreover, it provides virtual multi-tenancy, effective scheduling resources and centralized control strategies to meet the demand for cloud computing data center. However, the explosion of network information is facing severe challenges for SDN controller. The flow storage and lookup mechanisms based on TCAM device have led to the restriction of scalability, high cost and energy consumption. In view of this, a source-controlled data center network (SCDCN) model is proposed herein. The SCDCN model applies a new type of source routing address named the vector address (VA) as the packet-switching label. The VA completely defines the communication path and the data forwarding process can be finished solely relying on VA. There are four advantages in the SCDCN architecture. 1) The model adopts hierarchical multi-controllers and abstracts large-scale data center network into some small network domains that has solved the restriction for the processing ability of single controller and reduced the computational complexity. 2) Vector switches (VS) developed in the core network no longer apply TCAM for table storage and lookup that has significantly cut down the cost and complexity for switches. Meanwhile, the problem of scalability can be solved effectively. 3) The SCDCN model simplifies the establishment process for new flows and there is no need to download flow tables to VS. The amount of control signaling consumed when establishing new flows can be significantly decreased. 4) We design the VS on the NetFPGA platform. The statistical results show that the hardware resource consumption in a VS is about 27% of that in an OFS. PMID:28328925

  17. A minimum attention control center for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Control Centers for Nuclear Power Plants have characteristically been designed for maximum attention by the operating staffs of these plants. Consequently, the monitoring, control and diagnostics oriented cognitive activities by these staffs, were mostly ''data-driven'' in nature. This paper addresses a control center concept, under development by Combustion Engineering, that promotes a more ''information-driven'' cognitive interaction process between the operator and the plant. The more ''intelligent'' and therefore less attentive nature of such interactive process utilizes computer implemented cognitive engineered algorithms. The underlying structure of these algorithms is based upon the Critical Function/Success Path monitoring principle. The paper highlights a typical implementation of the minimum attention concept for the handling of unfamiliar safety related events. (author)

  18. Maintenance cost control at the Pacific Missile Test Center.

    OpenAIRE

    Jenson, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Pacific Missile Test Center (PMTC) is the Navy's largest Major Range and Test Facility Base, with an investment of over one billion dollars. The majority of this investment is in range test equipment and facilities including radar, telemetry, communication and command/ control systems. Concern is growing over the "excessively obsolete condition of PMTC technical equipment." Improvement of factors concerned with...

  19. CAMMESA control center controllers qualification; Habilitacion de operadores del centro de control de CAMMESA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaller, Daniel J [CAMMESA, Compania Administradora del Mercado Mayorista Electrico S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The safety and quality of the Interconnection Argentine System (IAS) operation, basically depend on the personnel performance in the CAMMESA Operation Control Center (COC), which is the IAS maximum operative hierarchy, and whose mission is to coordinate the IAS and the dispatch of the AWEM (Argentine Wholesale Electric Market) in real time. With the goal of improving the COC controllers' qualification in order to prevent critical situations and to solve the emergences based on an efficient way, in 1999 the process of 'Habilitation of OCC Controllers' was accomplished according to the resolution number 208/98 from the Energy General Office. This technical contribution describes the executed stages and the acquired experiences when applying the mentioned procedure indicating the main found difficulties, reached results and obtained benefits.

  20. Aircraft Turbine Engine Control Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    This lecture will provide an overview of the aircraft turbine engine control research at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Glenn Research Center (GRC). A brief introduction to the engine control problem is first provided with a description of the current state-of-the-art control law structure. A historical aspect of engine control development since the 1940s is then provided with a special emphasis on the contributions of GRC. The traditional engine control problem has been to provide a means to safely transition the engine from one steady-state operating point to another based on the pilot throttle inputs. With the increased emphasis on aircraft safety, enhanced performance and affordability, and the need to reduce the environmental impact of aircraft, there are many new challenges being faced by the designers of aircraft propulsion systems. The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at GRC is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, other government agencies, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research Mission. The second part of the lecture provides an overview of the various CDB technology development activities in aircraft engine control and diagnostics, both current and some accomplished in the recent past. The motivation for each of the research efforts, the research approach, technical challenges and the key progress to date are summarized. The technologies to be discussed include system level engine control concepts, gas path diagnostics, active component control, and distributed engine control architecture. The lecture will end with a futuristic perspective of how the various current technology developments will lead to an Intelligent and Autonomous Propulsion System requiring none to very minimum pilot interface

  1. Spacecraft control center automation using the generic inferential executor (GENIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Jonathan; Luczak, Ed; Stump, Doug

    1996-01-01

    The increasing requirement to dramatically reduce the cost of mission operations led to increased emphasis on automation technology. The expert system technology used at the Goddard Space Flight Center (MD) is currently being applied to the automation of spacecraft control center activities. The generic inferential executor (GENIE) is a tool which allows pass automation applications to be constructed. The pass script templates constructed encode the tasks necessary to mimic flight operations team interactions with the spacecraft during a pass. These templates can be configured with data specific to a particular pass. Animated graphical displays illustrate the progress during the pass. The first GENIE application automates passes of the solar, anomalous and magnetospheric particle explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft.

  2. Evaluation of completeness of selected poison control center data fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jeanie E; Marchbanks, Brenda; Willis, Branch; Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-08-01

    Poison control center data are used in research and surveillance. Due to the large volume of information, these efforts are dependent on data being recorded in machine readable format. However, poison center records include non-machine readable text fields and machine readable coded fields, some of which are duplicative. Duplicating this data increases the chance of inaccurate/incomplete coding. For surveillance efforts to be effective, coding should be complete and accurate. Investigators identified a convenience sample of 964 records and reviewed the substance code determining if it matched its text field. They also reviewed the coded clinical effects and treatments determining if they matched the notes text field. The substance code matched its text field for 91.4% of the substances. The clinical effects and treatments codes matched their text field for 72.6% and 82.4% of occurrences respectively. This under-reporting of clinical effects and treatments has surveillance and public health implications.

  3. Intelligent Control of Micro Grid: A Big Data-Based Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Li; Wang, Zhiseng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a structure of micro grid system with big data-based control center is introduced. Energy data from distributed generation, storage and load are analized through the control center, and from the results new trends will be predicted and applied as a feedback to optimize the control. Therefore, each step proceeded in micro grid can be adjusted and orgnized in a form of comprehensive management. A framework of real-time data collection, data processing and data analysis will be proposed by employing big data technology. Consequently, a integrated distributed generation and a optimized energy storage and transmission process can be implemented in the micro grid system.

  4. Is function-based control room design human-centered?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norros, L.; Savioja, P.

    2006-01-01

    Function-based approaches to system interface design appears an appealing possibility in helping designers and operators to cope with the vast amount of information needed to control complex processes. In this paper we provide evidence of operator performance analyses showing that outcome-centered performance measures may not be sufficiently informative for design. We need analyses indicating habitual patterns of using information, operator practices. We argue that practices that portray functional orienting to the task support mastery of the process. They also create potential to make use of function-based information presentation. We see that functional design is not an absolute value. Instead, such design should support communication of the functional significance of the process information to the operators in variable situations. Hence, it should facilitate development of practices that focus to interpreting this message. Successful function-based design facilitates putting operations into their contexts and is human-centered in an extended sense: It aids making sense in the complex, dynamic and uncertain environment. (authors)

  5. [Cocaine base paste: experience from the Montevideo Poison Control Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Antonio; Negrin, Alba; Laborde, Amalia

    2010-01-01

    In Uruguay, cocaine base paste (CBP, pasta base) is a widely used form of cocaine. The aim of our study is to determine the main clinical characteristics of CBP abusers. Retrospective, single-center study of consultations at the Montevideo Poison Control Center between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005. One hundred and thirteen consultations were included, with an average age of 22 years (+ - 0.5 years) and a female-male sex ratio of 1:4.3. The consultations were related to drug overdose (77%), suicide attempt (16.8%), and wanting to give up CBP use (6.2%). In 48.1% the time elapsed since inhalation of CBP was less than 6 hours. Doses varied between 0.5 gr. and 25 gr. Use of other drugs at the same time, such as alcohol, marijuana or benzodiazepines, was common (51 cases). The symptoms most frequently observed were neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular, followed by respiratory symptoms. In 16.8% of patients, reason for the consultation was intentional acute ingestion of drugs, considered as a suicide attempt, occurring within a few hours of drug consumption. CBP users are mostly young males. Although clinical findings are compatible with those for cocaine abuse, euphoria is a major clinical feature in CBP abusers. The presence of respiratory symptoms reflects the complications associated with the ingestion route. Suicide attempts occurring within a few hours of CBP confirm the high prevalence of suicidal ideation reported by other authors. cocaine base paste, clinical features, suicide attempts.

  6. Safety concerns with the Centers for Disease Control opioid calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudin J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Fudin,1–4 Mena Raouf,2 Erica L Wegrzyn,2–4 Michael E Schatman5,61Scientific and Clinical Affairs, Remitigate, LLC, Delmar, NY, USA; 2Stratton VA Medical Center, Albany, NY, USA; 3Western New England University College of Pharmacy, Springfield, MA, USA; 4Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USA; 5Research and Network Development, Boston Pain Care, Waltham, MA, USA; 6Department of Public Health & Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USAMorphine milligram equivalence (MME and other comparable acronyms have been employed in federal pain guidelines and used by policy makers to limit opioid prescribing.1–5 On March 18, 2016, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC released its Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.1 The guidelines provided 12 recommendations for “primary care clinicians prescribing opioids for chronic pain outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care”. One of the CDC recommendations states that clinicians “should avoid increasing dosage to ≥90 MME/day or carefully justify a decision to titrate dosage to ≥90 MME/day”.1

  7. 77 FR 72868 - The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral... announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control...

  8. The role of poison control centers in CBRN incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borron, S. W.; Haynes, J.; Young, P.

    2009-01-01

    Poison Control Centers (PCCs) have historically played a limited, parallel role in management of CBRN incidents; they are frequently called for advice by the public or health care providers when such incidents occur, but in many cases are not considered an integral part of the CBRN disaster emergency response team, lacking a 'place' in the Incident Command Structure (ICS). This is unfortunate, as PCCs represent an important public health resource. The roughly 60 centers in the U.S. are available 24/7, 365 days/year. Telephones are manned by professionals, including pharmacists and nurses with additional specialized training in poisoning response. PCC medical directors are generally trained in Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics or Preventive Medicine, with subspecialty training in Medical Toxicology. Many toxicologists attend specialized training in the radiation emergency management at REAC/TS. PCCs have extensive databases for poisoning management coupled with GIS surveillance. This combination of expertise and information renders PCCs well prepared to advice on decontamination and treatment of CBRN-contaminated victims. Their toxicology expertise allows their participation in risk assessment. PCCs are highly trusted by the community, enhancing their role in risk communication. We recently initiated a program that provides guidance on activation of PCCs by the Region 6 Regional Response Team (RRT6), Co-Chaired by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Coast Guard, serving as the federal component of the National Response System for the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The program will be described, with emphasis on how PCCs may work within ICS.(author)

  9. Alarm management in TRANSPETRO National Oil Control Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, Helio; Costa, Luciano [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    For sure Alarm Management is not a new issue. EEMUA 191 has been around since 1999 and everyone has received visits from consultants in this area. Besides this regulators have requested that operators have a policy for it. However there are few papers showing actual pipeline operator experience in alarm management. In this paper we present the work developed in TRANSPETRO National Oil Control Center since 2006, where we operate 5509 km of crude oil and refined products pipelines. Since the beginning of the centralized operation in 2002, alarm management has been a concern but a systematic approach has been taken since 2006. Initially we will make a brief revision of the literature and show trends for regulations. Then we will show the tools and the approach we have taken. Finally, the further developments we see. The point that we want to discuss is that, it has been very difficult to implement the system in a linear way and we believe that companies that have huge legacy systems, the same probably will occur. Putting in simple words, our main conclusion is: Implementing an Alarm Management policy produces good results however probably sometimes is better not to follow strictly the traditional steps. (author)

  10. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center Dynamics and Controls Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    NASA Armstrong continues its legacy of exciting work in the area of Dynamics and Control of advanced vehicle concepts. This presentation describes Armstrongs research in control of flexible structures, peak seeking control and adaptive control in the Spring of 2015.

  11. Systems engineering and integration of control centers in support of multiple programs. [ground control for STS payloads and unmanned vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center's new Multiprogram Control Center (MPCC) addresses the control requirements of complex STS payloads as well as unmanned vehicles. An account is given of the relationship of the MPCC to the STS Mission Control Center, with a view to significant difficulties that may be encountered and solutions thus far devised for generic problems. Examples of MPCC workstation applications encompass telemetry decommutation, engineering unit conversion, data-base management, trajectory processing, and flight design.

  12. 77 FR 58847 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... the causes, diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of physical and mental diseases, and other... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with...

  13. 78 FR 29754 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... relating to the causes, diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of physical and mental diseases, and... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with...

  14. 77 FR 46096 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...), concerning strategies and goals for the programs and research within OPHPR, monitoring the overall strategic... Board Strategic National Stockpile ad hoc working group; CDC's response to laboratory biosafety issues... Learning Centers; update on CDC's biosurveillance and situational awareness activities; (2) BSC liaison...

  15. Usable Translational Hand Controllers for NASA's Habitability Design Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    This summer I was given the opportunity to work at the Habitability Design Center (HDC). NASA Johnson Space Center's HDC is currently developing Cislunar and Mars spacecraft mockups. I contributed to this effort by designing from scratch low cost, functional translational hand controllers (THCs) that will be used in spacecraft mission simulation in low to medium fidelity exploration spacecraft mockups. This project fell under the category of mechatronics, a combination of mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering. Being an aerospace engineering student, I was out of my comfort zone. And that was a wonderful thing. The autonomy that my mentor, Dr. Robert Howard, allowed me gave me the opportunity to learn by trying, failing, and trying again. This project was not only a professional success for me, but a significant learning experience. I appreciated the freedom that I had to take the time to learn new things for myself rather than blindly follow instructions. I was the sole person working on this project, and was required to work independently to solve the many hardware and software challenges that the project entailed. I researched THCs that have been used on the ISS, the Space Shuttle, and the Orion MPVC and based my design off of these. I worked through many redesigns before finding an optimal configuration of the necessary mechanisms and electrical components for the THC. Once I had a functional hardware design, I dove into the challenge of getting an Arduino Uno, an extremely low cost and easily programmable microcontroller, to behave as a human interface device. The THCs I built needed to be able to integrate to a mission simulation designed by NASA's Graphics and Visualization Lab. This proved to be the most challenging aspect of the project. To accomplish this I learned how to change the firmware of the USB serial converter microcontroller. The process was very complicated as it involved multiple software programs and manual flashing of pins on the

  16. Control system at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    A modern control system was designed for SRRC to control and monitor the facilities of storage ring, beam transport line and injection system. The SRRC control system is a distributed system which is divided into two logical levels. Several process computers and workstations at upper level provide the computing power for physics simulation, data storage and graphical user interfaces. VME-based Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC) are the backbone of the lower level system which handle the real time devices access and the closed loop control. Ethernet network provides the interconnection between these two layers using IEEE 802.3 and TCP/IP protocol. The software in upper level computers includes data base server, network server, simulation programs, various application codes and X windows based graphical user interfaces. Device drivers, application programs for devices control and communication programs are the major software components at the ILC level

  17. The role of clinical toxicologists and poison control centers in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mark E; Bronstein, Alvin C; Heard, Stuart E; Barthold, Claudia L; Lando, James; Lewis, Lauren S; Schier, Joshua G

    2010-06-01

    Poison control centers and clinical toxicologists serve many roles within public health; however, the degree to which these entities collaborate is unknown. The objective of this survey was to identify successful collaborations of public health agencies with clinical toxicologists and poison control centers. Four areas including outbreak identification, syndromic surveillance, terrorism preparedness, and daily public health responsibilities amenable to poison control center resources were assessed. An online survey was sent to the directors of poison control centers, state epidemiologists, and the most senior public health official in each state and selected major metropolitan areas. This survey focused on three areas: service, structure within the local or state public health system, and remuneration. Questions regarding remuneration and poison control center location within the public health structure were asked to assess if these were critical factors of successful collaborations. Senior state and local public health officials were excluded because of a low response rate. The survey was completed in October 2007. A total of 111 respondents, 61 poison control centers and 50 state epidemiologists, were eligible for the survey. Sixty-nine (62%) of the 111 respondents, completed and returned the survey. Thirty-three (54%) of the 61 poison control centers responded, and 36 of the 50 state epidemiologists (72%) responded. The most frequent collaborations were terrorism preparedness and epidemic illness reporting. Additional collaborations also exist. Important collaborations exist outside of remuneration or poison control centers being a formal part of the public health structure. Poison control centers have expanded their efforts to include outbreak identification, syndromic surveillance, terrorism preparedness, and daily public health responsibilities amenable to poison control center resources. Collaboration in these areas and others should be expanded. Published

  18. Toolchain for User-Centered Intelligent Floor Heating Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agesen, Mads Kronborg; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Mikučionis, Marius

    2016-01-01

    temperature is below the user defined target temperature, otherwise it closes for the heating in the room. The disadvantage is that the heat exchange among the rooms, outside weather conditions, weather forecast and other factors are not considered. We propose a novel model-driven approach for intelligent...... floor heating control based on a chain of tools that allow us to gather the sensor readings from the actual hardware and use the state-of-the-art controller synthesis tool UPPAAL Stratego in order to synthesise abstract control strategies that are then executed on the real hardware platform provided...... by the company Seluxit. We have built a scaled demonstrator of the system and the experimental results document a 38% to 52 % increase in user satisfaction, moreover with additional energy savings between 2% to 12%....

  19. Use of the Human Centered Design concept when designing ergonomic NPP control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrehot, Petr A.; Houser, Frantisek; Riha, Radek; Tuma, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Human-Centered Design is a concept aimed at reconciling human needs on the one hand and limitations posed by the design disposition of the room being designed on the other hand. This paper describes the main aspects of application of the Human-Centered Design concept to the design of nuclear power plant control rooms. (orig.)

  20. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  1. 76 FR 28438 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... below concerns RFA CE10-004, the National Academic Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention... Violence Prevention (U01). Contact Person for More Information: Gwendolyn Haile Cattledge, PhD, M.S.E.H., F... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of...

  2. 78 FR 64505 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC) In accordance with... reviews progress toward injury prevention goals and provides evidence in injury prevention- related... matters, including the: (1) Review of extramural research concepts for funding opportunity announcements...

  3. Design electronic of manual control for cobalt unit Alcyon II of the National Center of Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morraz V, E.; Campos, X.

    2002-01-01

    A manual control for the cobalt unit, of French production, it was designed by the team of electronic of the national center of radiotherapy with materials found in the national trade. The control has the same characteristics that the original one and it is also adapted a switch from which you can control the lights of the room of the cobalt

  4. Glycemic control, compliance, and satisfaction for diabetic gravidas in centering group care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Laura I; Jelin, Angie C; Iqbal, Sara N; Belna, Sarah L; Fries, Melissa H; Patel, Misbah; Desale, Sameer; Ramsey, Patrick S

    2017-05-01

    To determine if diabetic gravidas enrolled in Centering® group care have improved glycemic control compared to those attending standard prenatal care. To compare compliance and patient satisfaction between the groups. We conducted a prospective cohort study of diabetics enrolled in centering group care from October 2013 to December 2015. Glycemic control, compliance and patient satisfaction (five-point Likert scale) were evaluated. Student's t-test, Chi-Square and mixed effects model were used to compare outcomes. We compared 20 patients in centering to 28 standard prenatal care controls. Mean fasting blood sugar was lower with centering group care (91.0 versus 105.5 mg/dL, p =0.017). There was no difference in change in fasting blood sugar over time between the two groups (p = 0.458). The percentage of time patients brought their blood glucose logs did not differ between the centering group and standard prenatal care (70.7 versus 73.9%, p = 0.973). Women in centering group care had better patient satisfaction scores for "ability to be seen by a physician" (5 versus 4, p = 0.041) and "time in waiting room" (5 versus 4, p =0.001). Fasting blood sugar was lower for patients in centering group care. Change in blood sugar over time did not differ between groups. Diabetic gravidas enrolled in centering group care report improved patient satisfaction.

  5. Simulation of Controller Pilot Data Link Communications over VHF Digital Link Mode 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretmersky, Steven C.; Murawski, Robert; Nguyen, Thanh C.; Raghavan, Rajesh S.

    2004-01-01

    Center air traffic (ZOB ARTCC).

  6. Transportable Payload Operations Control Center reusable software: Building blocks for quality ground data systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmot, Ron; Koslosky, John T.; Beach, Edward; Schwarz, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    The Mission Operations Division (MOD) at Goddard Space Flight Center builds Mission Operations Centers which are used by Flight Operations Teams to monitor and control satellites. Reducing system life cycle costs through software reuse has always been a priority of the MOD. The MOD's Transportable Payload Operations Control Center development team established an extensive library of 14 subsystems with over 100,000 delivered source instructions of reusable, generic software components. Nine TPOCC-based control centers to date support 11 satellites and achieved an average software reuse level of more than 75 percent. This paper shares experiences of how the TPOCC building blocks were developed and how building block developer's, mission development teams, and users are all part of the process.

  7. 75 FR 78997 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA) Advisory Committee... and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and...

  8. 75 FR 7483 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention--Ethics Subcommittee (ES); Correction AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), HHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting; meeting...

  9. Online social networking and US poison control centers: Facebook as a means of information distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Kathy; Smollin, Craig

    2015-06-01

    Online social networking services such as Facebook provide a novel medium for the dissemination of public health information by poison control centers in the United States. We performed a cross-sectional study of poison control center Facebook pages to describe and assess the use of this medium. Facebook pages associated with poison control centers were identified during a continuous two-week period from December 24, 2012 to January 7, 2013. Data were extracted from each page, including affiliated poison control center; page duration, measured in years since registration; number of subscribers; number of postings by general toxicological category; and measures of user-generated activity including "likes", "shares", and comments per posting. Among the 56 US poison control centers, 39 Facebook pages were identified, of which 29 were currently active. The total number of active pages has increased by 140% from 2009 to 2013 (average of 25% per year). The total number of all subscribers to active pages was 11,211, ranging from 40 to 2,456 (mean 387, SD 523), equal to 0.006% of all Facebook users in the United States. The number of subscribers per page was associated with page duration, number of postings, and type of postings. The types of toxicological postings were public education (45%), self-promotion (28%), childhood safety (12%), drugs of abuse (8%), environmental poisonings (6%), and general overdoses (1%). Slightly over half of all poison control centers in the United States are supplementing their outreach and education efforts through Facebook. In general, the more active the poison control center on Facebook, the more page followers and follower engagement gained.

  10. Adaptation effects in static postural control by providing simultaneous visual feedback of center of pressure and center of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenta; Mani, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Naoya; Sato, Yuki; Tanaka, Shintaro; Maejima, Hiroshi; Asaka, Tadayoshi

    2017-07-19

    The benefit of visual feedback of the center of pressure (COP) on quiet standing is still debatable. This study aimed to investigate the adaptation effects of visual feedback training using both the COP and center of gravity (COG) during quiet standing. Thirty-four healthy young adults were divided into three groups randomly (COP + COG, COP, and control groups). A force plate was used to calculate the coordinates of the COP in the anteroposterior (COP AP ) and mediolateral (COP ML ) directions. A motion analysis system was used to calculate the coordinates of the center of mass (COM) in both directions (COM AP and COM ML ). The coordinates of the COG in the AP direction (COG AP ) were obtained from the force plate signals. Augmented visual feedback was presented on a screen in the form of fluctuation circles in the vertical direction that moved upward as the COP AP and/or COG AP moved forward and vice versa. The COP + COG group received the real-time COP AP and COG AP feedback simultaneously, whereas the COP group received the real-time COP AP feedback only. The control group received no visual feedback. In the training session, the COP + COG group was required to maintain an even distance between the COP AP and COG AP and reduce the COG AP fluctuation, whereas the COP group was required to reduce the COP AP fluctuation while standing on a foam pad. In test sessions, participants were instructed to keep their standing posture as quiet as possible on the foam pad before (pre-session) and after (post-session) the training sessions. In the post-session, the velocity and root mean square of COM AP in the COP + COG group were lower than those in the control group. In addition, the absolute value of the sum of the COP - COM distances in the COP + COG group was lower than that in the COP group. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between the COM AP velocity and COP - COM parameters. The results suggest that the novel visual feedback

  11. Detecting air traffic controller interventions in recorded air transportation system data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yul

    In this study, I propose a systematic method of detecting aircraft deviation due to air traffic controller (ATC) intervention. The aircraft deviations associated with ATC interventions are detected using a heuristic algorithm developed from analyzing the actual positions of an aircraft to its filed flight plan when the aircraft trajectories were identified as having an encounter in a loss-of-separation incident. An actual (closed-loop) flight trajectory of the Cleveland Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZOB ARTCC) was collected from the FlightAware database. This was compared with the corresponding planned (open-loop) trajectory dataset generated by the Microsoft(c) Flight Simulator X (FSX). I implemented a conflict-detection algorithm in Matlab to identify open-loop flight trajectories that encounters in loss-of-separation. I analyzed the differences between the closed-loop and open-loop flight trajectories of aircrafts that were identified to have encounters in loss of separation. The analysis identified operationally significant deviations in the closed-loop trajectory data with respect to the horizontal paths of the aircrafts. I then developed and validated a heuristic algorithm, the ATC intervention detection algorithm, based on the findings from the analysis. When used with a test dataset to validate the algorithm, it achieved an 85.7% detection rate in detecting horizontal deviations made by the ATC in resolving identified conflicts, and a false-alarm rate of 68%. In addition to the ATC intervention detection algorithm, I present in this paper an analysis of deviated flight trajectories in an effort to display how the presented methodology can be utilized to provide insight into air traffic controller resolution strategies.

  12. System of automatic control over data Acquisition and Transmission to IGR NNC RK Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, I.I.; Gordienko, D.D.; Kunakov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Automated system for seismic and acoustic data acquisition and transmission in real time was established in Data Center IGR NNC RK, which functions very successively. The system monitors quality and volume of acquired information and also controls the status of the system and communication channels. Statistical data on system operation are accumulated in created database. Information on system status is reflected on the Center Web page. (author)

  13. Sixth NASA Glenn Research Center Propulsion Control and Diagnostics (PCD) Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litt, Jonathan S. (Compiler)

    2018-01-01

    The Intelligent Control and Autonomy Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted the Sixth Propulsion Control and Diagnostics Workshop on August 22-24, 2017. The objectives of this workshop were to disseminate information about research being performed in support of NASA Aeronautics programs; get feedback from peers on the research; and identify opportunities for collaboration. There were presentations and posters by NASA researchers, Department of Defense representatives, and engine manufacturers on aspects of turbine engine modeling, control, and diagnostics.

  14. Complete Quantum Control of a Single Silicon-Vacancy Center in a Diamond Nanopillar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G.; Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Dory, Constantin; Radulaski, Marina; Kelaita, Yousif; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Chu, Steven; Vuckovic, Jelena

    Coherent quantum control of a quantum bit (qubit) is an important step towards its use in a quantum network. SiV- center in diamond offers excellent physical qualities such as low inhomogeneous broadening, fast photon emission, and a large Debye-Waller factor, while the fast spin manipulation and techniques to extend the spin coherence time are under active investigation. Here, we demonstrate full coherent control over the state of a single SiV- center in a diamond nanopillar using ultrafast optical pulses. The high quality of the chemical vapor deposition grown SiV- centers allows us to coherently manipulate and quasi-resonantly read out the state of the single SiV- center. Moreover, the SiV- centers being coherently controlled are integrated into diamond nanopillar arrays in a site-controlled, individually addressable manner with high yield, low strain, and high spectral stability, which paves the way for scalable on chip optically accessible quantum system in a quantum photonic network. Financial support is provided by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences through Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences (SIMES) under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  15. Energy Center Structure Optimization by using Smart Technologies in Process Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilkina, Svetlana V.

    2018-03-01

    The article deals with practical application of fuzzy logic methods in process control systems. A control object - agroindustrial greenhouse complex, which includes its own energy center - is considered. The paper analyzes object power supply options taking into account connection to external power grids and/or installation of own power generating equipment with various layouts. The main problem of a greenhouse facility basic process is extremely uneven power consumption, which forces to purchase redundant generating equipment idling most of the time, which quite negatively affects project profitability. Energy center structure optimization is largely based on solving the object process control system construction issue. To cut investor’s costs it was proposed to optimize power consumption by building an energy-saving production control system based on a fuzzy logic controller. The developed algorithm of automated process control system functioning ensured more even electric and thermal energy consumption, allowed to propose construction of the object energy center with a smaller number of units due to their more even utilization. As a result, it is shown how practical use of microclimate parameters fuzzy control system during object functioning leads to optimization of agroindustrial complex energy facility structure, which contributes to a significant reduction in object construction and operation costs.

  16. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  17. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  18. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  19. Personal networks and locus of control in large urban centers of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo De Grande

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the relationship between locus of control and interpersonal relations structures in Argentina. After a representative sample (n = 1500 of households in seven major urban centers (>200,000 inhabitants, it examines the relationship between the externality of locus of control and different aspects of personal networks of each respondent. The results show that people having more relations experiment lower levels of externality of locus of control. Likewise, lower levels of externality are informed when personal ties outside the neighborhood are available, as well as ties high educational level. In this regard, significant associations are verified between control and personal relations structures.

  20. Adaptation of center of mass control under microgravity in a whole-body lifting task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; Toussaint, H.M.; Commissaris, D.A.C.M.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Human balance in stance is usually defined as the preservation of the vertical projection of the center of mass (COM) on the support area formed by the feet. Under microgravity conditions, the control of equilibrium seems to be no longer required. However, several reports indicate preservation of

  1. 77 FR 31018 - Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of... Violence or Sexual Violence Perpetration (R01), FOA CE12-003. In accordance with Section 10(a)(2) of the..., discussion of competitive applications following initial review of applications received in response to FOA...

  2. 75 FR 12769 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Control/Comparison Groups for Trials of Non... Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1998 with the mission of exploring... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health. [FR Doc. 2010-5767...

  3. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  4. Environmental control and life support testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Humphries, William R.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) test program at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is addressed. The immediate goals and current activities of the test program are discussed. Also described are the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF) and the initial ECLSS test configuration. Future plans for the ECLSS test program and the CMIF are summarized.

  5. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations

  6. The psychology of computer displays in the modern mission control center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granaas, Michael M.; Rhea, Donald C.

    1988-01-01

    Work at NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) has demonstrated the need for increased consideration of psychological factors in the design of computer displays for the WATR mission control center. These factors include color perception, memory load, and cognitive processing abilities. A review of relevant work in the human factors psychology area is provided to demonstrate the need for this awareness. The information provided should be relevant in control room settings where computerized displays are being used.

  7. Effects of voluntary and automatic control of center of pressure sway during quiet standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Kozo; Okada, Yohei; Nakano, Hideki; Osumi, Michihiro; Morioka, Shu

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of voluntary and automatic control on the spatial variables (envelope area, maximal amplitude, and root mean square [RMS]) of center of pressure (COP) displacement during quiet standing and identified differences in their postural control strategies (mean velocity [MV], mean power frequency [MPF], and power density). COP data were recorded under relaxed (experimental control), still (voluntary control), and dual (automatic control) conditions. RMS was significantly lower in the still and dual conditions than in the relaxed condition. MV, MPF, and power density were significantly higher in the still condition than in the dual condition. These results indicate that both voluntary and automatic control decrease the spatial variables of COP displacement; however, their postural control strategies are different.

  8. The Current State of Poison Control Centers in Pakistan and the Need for Capacity Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Khan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemical exposure is a major health problem globally. Poison control centers (PCCs play a leading role both in developed and developing countries in the prevention and control of poisonous chemical exposures. In this study, we aimed to assess the current state of PCCs in Pakistan and highlight capacity building needs in these centers. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the two registered PCCs was done during August – December 2011. Necessary services of the PCCs were evaluated and the data were recorded on a predesigned checklist. Results: Both PCCs are affiliated to a tertiary care hospital. Clinical services to poisoned patients were available 24 hours a day / 7 days a week. Information on common local products was available to poison center staff. Both centers were involved in undergraduate and post graduate teaching. Telephone poison information service was not available in either of centers. There was a limited capacity for qualitative and analytical toxicology. Common antidotes were available. There were limited surveillance activities to capture toxic risks existing in the community and also a deficiency was observed in chemical disaster planning. Conclusion: PCCs in Pakistan need capacity building for specialized training in toxicology, toxicovigilance, chemical disaster planning, analytical laboratory tests and telephone service for consultation in poisoning cases.   How to cite this article: Khan NU, Mir MU, Khan UR, Khan AR, Ara J, Raja K, et al. The Current State of Poison Control Centers in Pakistan and the Need for Capacity Building. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2014;3:31-5.

  9. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: A facile method of fabrication and color-center counting

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Remi

    2013-01-01

    We present a facile method for the production of fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (DNCs) of different sizes and efficiently quantify the concentration of emitting defect color centers (DCCs) of each DNC size. We prepared the DNCs by ball-milling commercially available micrometer-sized synthetic (high pressure, high temperature (HPHT)) diamonds and then separated the as-produced DNCs by density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) into size-controlled fractions. A protocol to enhance the uniformity of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in the diamonds was devised by depositing the DNCs as a dense monolayer on amino-silanized silicon substrates and then subjecting the monolayer to He+ beam irradiation. Using a standard confocal setup, we analyzed the average number of NV centers per crystal, and obtained a quantitative relationship between the DNC particle size and the NV number per crystal. This relationship was in good agreement with results from previous studies that used more elaborate setups. Our findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color centers and new strategies to create them. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Analysis of intentional drug poisonings using Ohio Poison Control Center Data, 2002-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Kelsey; Caupp, Sarah; Shi, Junxin; Wheeler, Krista K; Spiller, Henry A; Casavant, Marcel J; Xiang, Henry

    2017-08-01

    Pharmaceutical drug poisonings, especially those that are intentional, are a serious problem for adolescents and young adults. Poison control center data is a viable tool to track intentional drug poisonings in near real-time. To determine intentional drug poisoning rates among adolescents and young adults in Ohio using poison control center data. We analyzed data from 2002 to 2014 obtained by Ohio's three poison control centers. Inclusion variables were calls made to the centers that had appropriate subject age (10-29 years old), subject sex, involved substance (all drug classes), and medical outcome (no effect, minor effect, moderate effect, major effect, and death). Intentional drug poisoning reports were also separated into subgroups to compare suspected suicide reports to misuse and abuse reports. Finally, resident population estimates were used to generate 2014 intentional drug poisoning rates for each county in Ohio. The most common age group for intentional drug poisonings was 18-24. Females reported more suspected suicide drug poisonings while males reported more misuse/abuse drug poisonings. The most reported drug class across all ages was analgesics. Of the 88 counties in Ohio, Hamilton, Williams, Washington, and Guernsey counties had the highest rates of intentional drug poisonings. The high report rate of suspected suicides and analgesic class drugs demonstrates the need for preventative measures for adolescents and young adults in Ohio. Any interventions, along with legislative changes, will need to take place in our local communities.

  11. Direct numerical control of machine tools in a nuclear research center by the CAMAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwoll, K.; Mueller, K.D.; Becks, B.; Erven, W.; Sauer, M.

    1977-01-01

    The production of mechanical parts in research centers can be improved by connecting several numerically controlled machine tools to a central process computer via a data link. The CAMAC Serial Highway with its expandable structure yields an economic and flexible system for this purpose. The CAMAC System also facilitates the development of modular components controlling the machine tools itself. A CAMAC installation controlling three different machine tools connected to a central computer (PDP11) via the CAMAC Serial Highway is described. Besides this application, part of the CAMAC hardware and software can also be used for a great variety of scientific experiments

  12. Comparison of quality control for trauma management between Western and Eastern European trauma center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambale Giorgio

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality control of trauma care is essential to define the effectiveness of trauma center and trauma system. To identify the troublesome issues of the system is the first step for validation of the focused customized solutions. This is a comparative study of two level I trauma centers in Italy and Romania and it has been designed to give an overview of the entire trauma care program adopted in these two countries. This study was aimed to use the results as the basis for recommending and planning changes in the two trauma systems for a better trauma care. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a total of 182 major trauma patients treated in the two hospitals included in the study, between January and June 2002. Every case was analyzed according to the recommended minimal audit filters for trauma quality assurance by The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT. Results Satisfactory yields have been reached in both centers for the management of head and abdominal trauma, airway management, Emergency Department length of stay and early diagnosis and treatment. The main significant differences between the two centers were in the patients' transfers, the leadership of trauma team and the patients' outcome. The main concerns have been in the surgical treatment of fractures, the outcome and the lacking of documentation. Conclusion The analyzed hospitals are classified as Level I trauma center and are within the group of the highest quality level centers in their own countries. Nevertheless, both of them experience major lacks and for few audit filters do not reach the mmum standard requirements of ACS Audit Filters. The differences between the western and the eastern European center were slight. The parameters not reaching the minimum requirements are probably occurring even more often in suburban settings.

  13. Engineering of Fermi level by nin diamond junction for control of charge states of NV centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, T.; Makino, T.; Kato, H.; Shimizu, M.; Murooka, T.; Herbschleb, E. D.; Doi, Y.; Morishita, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hatano, M.; Yamasaki, S.; Mizuochi, N.

    2018-03-01

    The charge-state control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is very important toward its applications because the NV centers undergo stochastic charge-state transitions between the negative charge state (NV-) and the neutral charge state (NV0) of the NV center upon illumination. In this letter, engineering of the Fermi level by a nin diamond junction was demonstrated for the control of the charge state of the NV centers in the intrinsic (i) layer region. By changing the size (d) of the i-layer region between the phosphorus-doped n-type layer regions (nin) from 2 μm to 10 μm, we realized the gradual change in the NV- charge-state population in the i-layer region from 60% to 80% under 532 nm excitation, which can be attributed to the band bending in the i-layer region. Also, we quantitatively simulated the changes in the Fermi level in the i-layer region depending on d with various concentrations of impurities in the i-layer region.

  14. Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) in a Control Center Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirani, Joseph; Calvelage, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The technology of transmitting voice over data networks has been available for over 10 years. Mass market VoIP services for consumers to make and receive standard telephone calls over broadband Internet networks have grown in the last 5 years. While operational costs are less with VoIP implementations as opposed to time division multiplexing (TDM) based voice switches, is it still advantageous to convert a mission control center s voice system to this newer technology? Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) has converted its mission voice services to a commercial product that utilizes VoIP technology. Results from this testing, design, and installation have shown unique considerations that must be addressed before user operations. There are many factors to consider for a control center voice design. Technology advantages and disadvantages were investigated as they refer to cost. There were integration concerns which could lead to complex failure scenarios but simpler integration for the mission infrastructure. MSFC HOSC will benefit from this voice conversion with less product replacement cost, less operations cost and a more integrated mission services environment.

  15. Free-Piston Stirling Convertor Controller Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The free-piston Stirling convertor end-to-end modeling effort at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has produced a software-based test bed in which free-piston Stirling convertors can be simulated and evaluated. The simulation model includes all the components of the convertor - the Stirling cycle engine, linear alternator, controller, and load. This paper is concerned with controllers. It discusses three controllers that have been studied using this model. Case motion has been added to the model recently so that effects of differences between convertor components can be simulated and ameliorative control engineering techniques can be developed. One concern when applying a system comprised of interconnected mass-spring-damper components is to prevent operation in any but the intended mode. The design mode is the only desired mode of operation, but all other modes are considered in controller design.

  16. ONAV - An Expert System for the Space Shuttle Mission Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Malise; Wang, Lui

    1992-01-01

    The ONAV (Onboard Navigation) Expert System is being developed as a real-time console assistant to the ONAV flight controller for use in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center. Currently, Oct. 1991, the entry and ascent systems have been certified for use on console as support tools, and were used for STS-48. The rendezvous system is in verification with the goal to have the system certified for STS-49, Intelsat retrieval. To arrive at this stage, from a prototype to real-world application, the ONAV project has had to deal with not only Al issues but operating environment issues. The Al issues included the maturity of Al languages and the debugging tools, verification, and availability, stability and size of the expert pool. The environmental issues included real time data acquisition, hardware suitability, and how to achieve acceptance by users and management.

  17. Controlled coupling of NV defect centers to plasmonic and photonic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Michael, E-mail: michael.barth@physik.hu-berlin.d [Institute of Physics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Schietinger, Stefan; Schroeder, Tim; Aichele, Thomas; Benson, Oliver [Institute of Physics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers in diamond have recently emerged as promising candidates for a number of applications in the fields of quantum optics and quantum information, such as single photon generation and spin qubit operations. The performance of these defect centers can strongly be enhanced through coupling to plasmonic and photonic nanostructures, such as metal particles and optical microcavities. Here, we demonstrate the controlled assembly of such hybrid structures via manipulation with scanning near-field probes. In particular, we investigate the plasmonic enhancement of the single photon emission through coupling to gold nanospheres as well as the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the optical modes of microsphere resonators and photonic crystal cavities. These systems represent prototypes of fundamental nanophotonic/plasmonic elements and provide control on the generation and coherent transfer of photons on the level of a single quantum emitter.

  18. [Using the subcutaneous approach for symptoms control in a health center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual López, L; Portaceli Armiñana, A; Ros Sáez, A

    2001-01-01

    To describe the use of the subcutaneous tract for symptoms control in patients those are in phase of palliative treatment of their illness. Observational study. Primary care. Patients seen in a health center, in phase of palliative treatment of their illness, that needed for symptoms control the subcutaneous administration of drugs. Most of the patients were in terminal phase (19), the fundamental cause (17 cases) that justified the use of the subcutaneous tract was the difficulty to take drugs by oral tract in the last days of life, attention on death throes. The infusion continuous through injector type travenol, at an infusion speed of 2 ml/h, it was the most common way of drug administration (19 patients). The drugs and initial average dose most used were: morphine 19 patients dose 100 mg/24 h, hyoscine butylbromide (Buscapina), 13 patients, 60 mg/24 h, haloperidol 12 patients, 4 mg/24 h. The patients death was the main cause that justified the retirement of the continuous infusion (17 people sick), happening in its own home. Symptoms control was good or very good in the most of patients (14). The experience on using the subcutaneous tract for symptoms control in our health center is positive, being the fundamental cause for its use symptoms control in the last days of the patients life. The continuous subcutaneous infusion should be used in primary attention, as an usual technique for the symptoms control in patients that are in phase of palliative treatment of their illness.

  19. The Centers for Disease Control program to prevent primary and secondary disabilities in the United States.

    OpenAIRE

    Houk, V N; Thacker, S B

    1989-01-01

    The Disabilities Prevention Program builds on traditional Centers for Disease Control (CDC) strengths in public health surveillance, epidemiology, and technology transfer to State and local governments in translating the findings of research into prevention programs. The objectives of the CDC program are to provide a national focus for the prevention of primary and secondary disabilities, build capacity at the State and community levels to maintain programs to prevent disabilities, and increa...

  20. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Radiation Hazard Scale Data Product Review Feedback Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askin, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buddemeier, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alai, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-20

    In support of the Department of Energy (DOE) National nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) assisted in the development of new data templates for disseminating and communicating FRMAC1 data products using the CDC Radiation Hazard Scale communication tool. To ensure these data products will be useful to stakeholders during a radiological emergency, LLNL facilitated opportunities for product socialization and review.

  1. Person-centered care planning and service engagement: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Tondora, Janis; Davidson, Larry; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-04-22

    Service disengagement is a pervasive challenge the mental health care system faces. Mental health services are of little value should persons with mental illnesses continue to opt out of receiving them. Consumers attribute disengagement from care to an absence of choice in their treatment. In response, the mental health system is adopting a person-centered model, based upon recovery principles, to engage consumers more actively in their care. Person-centered care planning is a promising practice involving collaboration to develop and implement an actionable plan to assist the person in achieving personal recovery goals. This study design combines a parallel-group randomized controlled trial of community mental health organizations with qualitative methods to assess the effectiveness of person-centered care planning. Participants at 14 sites in Delaware and Connecticut will be randomized to treatment as usual or the person-centered care planning intervention. Participants will be in leadership (n = 70) or supervisory or direct care (n = 210) roles. The person-centered care planning intervention involves intensive staff training and 12 months of ongoing technical assistance. Quantitative survey data will be collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months measuring person-centered care planning competency and organizational factors. Consumer outcomes (engagement, medication adherence, functioning and consumer satisfaction) will be assessed by Medicaid and state-level data. Qualitative data focused on process factors will include staff and consumer interviews and focus groups. In this intent-to-treat analysis, we will use mixed-effects multivariate regression models to evaluate the differential impact of the person-centered care planning intervention on each consumer and implementation outcome as well as the extent to which clinician assessments of organizational factors are associated with the implementation outcome. Mixed methods will triangulate and strengthen the

  2. Test Platform for Advanced Digital Control of Brushless DC Motors (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    A FY 2001 Center Director's Discretionary Fund task to develop a test platform for the development, implementation. and evaluation of adaptive and other advanced control techniques for brushless DC (BLDC) motor-driven mechanisms is described. Important applications for BLDC motor-driven mechanisms are the translation of specimens in microgravity experiments and electromechanical actuation of nozzle and fuel valves in propulsion systems. Motor-driven aerocontrol surfaces are also being utilized in developmental X vehicles. The experimental test platform employs a linear translation stage that is mounted vertically and driven by a BLDC motor. Control approaches are implemented on a digital signal processor-based controller for real-time, closed-loop control of the stage carriage position. The goal of the effort is to explore the application of advanced control approaches that can enhance the performance of a motor-driven actuator over the performance obtained using linear control approaches with fixed gains. Adaptive controllers utilizing an exact model knowledge controller and a self-tuning controller are implemented and the control system performance is illustrated through the presentation of experimental results.

  3. 75 FR 4830 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention--Ethics Subcommittee (ES..., CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues arising from programs...

  4. 76 FR 57744 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on September 8, 2011, Volume 76, Number 174...

  5. 77 FR 41188 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter..., that the Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women, HHS, CDC, 4770 Buford Highway, NE., Mailstop K52, Atlanta...

  6. Mathematical model for adaptive control system of ASEA robot at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Omar

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic properties and the mathematical model for the adaptive control of the robotic system presently under investigation at Robotic Application and Development Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center are discussed. NASA is currently investigating the use of robotic manipulators for mating and demating of fuel lines to the Space Shuttle Vehicle prior to launch. The Robotic system used as a testbed for this purpose is an ASEA IRB-90 industrial robot with adaptive control capabilities. The system was tested and it's performance with respect to stability was improved by using an analogue force controller. The objective of this research project is to determine the mathematical model of the system operating under force feedback control with varying dynamic internal perturbation in order to provide continuous stable operation under variable load conditions. A series of lumped parameter models are developed. The models include some effects of robot structural dynamics, sensor compliance, and workpiece dynamics.

  7. Hypertension Control and co-morbidities in primary health care centers in Riyadh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Tuwijri, Abdulmohsin A [Dept. of Family Medicine, Ministry of Health, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Rukban, Mohammed Othman [Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, Coll. of Medicine, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in Saudi Arabia has been assessed only in preliminary reports. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of control of blood pressure and the prevalence of common hypertension co-morbidities among hypertensive patients attending primary health care (PHC) centers in Riyadh. A cross sectional study was conducted by reviewing medical records of hypertensive patients during May and June 2001. Two hundred fifty-five medical records selected by a stratified randomization process according to the distribution of the 73 PHC centers in the city and the total number of hypertensive patients registered in the mini-clinic of each PHC-center. Trained mini-clinic nurses collected data using a data collection form developed for this purpose. Of 255 patients, 121 (47.5%) were males and 134 (52.5%) were females, the mean age was 57.2+-11.1 years and 8.3% were smokers. The majority 204 (85.7%) had greater than normal body weight. Only 101 (40.4%) had controlled systolic BP. The most common co-morbidity was diabetes mellitus found in 98 (38.4%), followed by dislipidemia in 50 (19.6%), bronchial asthma in 28 (11.0%) and renal diseases in 12 (4.7%). Except for osteoporosis, which was reported by females only (P=0.003), the occurrences of hypertensive co-morbidities did not vary from other demographic characteristics. This study demonstrated poor blood pressure control in the mini-clinics in the PHC-centers. To improve the quality of care for hypertensive patients, we recommend an improvement in PHC physician knowledge of and attitudes toward the importance of achieving targeted blood pressure levels. (author)

  8. Hypertension Control and co-morbidities in primary health care centers in Riyadh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tuwijri, Abdulmohsin A.; Al-Rukban, Mohammed Othman

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in Saudi Arabia has been assessed only in preliminary reports. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of control of blood pressure and the prevalence of common hypertension co-morbidities among hypertensive patients attending primary health care (PHC) centers in Riyadh. A cross sectional study was conducted by reviewing medical records of hypertensive patients during May and June 2001. Two hundred fifty-five medical records selected by a stratified randomization process according to the distribution of the 73 PHC centers in the city and the total number of hypertensive patients registered in the mini-clinic of each PHC-center. Trained mini-clinic nurses collected data using a data collection form developed for this purpose. Of 255 patients, 121 (47.5%) were males and 134 (52.5%) were females, the mean age was 57.2+-11.1 years and 8.3% were smokers. The majority 204 (85.7%) had greater than normal body weight. Only 101 (40.4%) had controlled systolic BP. The most common co-morbidity was diabetes mellitus found in 98 (38.4%), followed by dislipidemia in 50 (19.6%), bronchial asthma in 28 (11.0%) and renal diseases in 12 (4.7%). Except for osteoporosis, which was reported by females only (P=0.003), the occurrences of hypertensive co-morbidities did not vary from other demographic characteristics. This study demonstrated poor blood pressure control in the mini-clinics in the PHC-centers. To improve the quality of care for hypertensive patients, we recommend an improvement in PHC physician knowledge of and attitudes toward the importance of achieving targeted blood pressure levels. (author)

  9. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Technology Control Center, report to the Steering committee. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report describes test for air pollution control of flue gas and mercury as a result of coal combustion. The NYSEG Kintigh Station provided flue gas to the Center 100% of the time during this performance period. As the Kintigh Station operated with a variety of coals, fluctuations in the Center`s inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations were experienced. Safety training for the month was conducted by the O&M Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisor and Shift Supervisors. {open_quotes}Personal Protective Equipment{close_quotes} was the topic of the month. Inspections of the ECTC Facility and safety equipment (SCR air-packs, fire extinguishers, etc.) were completed and recorded this month. All systems were found to be in good condition. By continuing to emphasize safe work habits at the Center, we have raised the total number of days without a lost time injury to 1426 as of 4/30/96. The monthly safety meeting with the NYSEG Kintigh Station was held on April 30, 1996 with both NYSEG and ECTC representatives. The topics of discussion included an overview of NYSEG`s upcoming alternate fuel burn, an update on plant staffing changes, and a discussion of future safety training activities.

  10. Numerical analysis of thermal environment control in high density data center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Kyung; Kim, Hyeon Joong; Cha, Dong An [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Increasing heat generation in CPUs can hamper effective recirculation and by pass because of the large temperature difference between the exhaust and the intake air through a server room. This increases the overall temperature inside a data center and decreases the efficiency of the data center's cooling system. The purpose of the data center's cooling system is to separate the intake and exhaust air by controlling the computer room air conditioner(CRAC). In this study, ICEPAK is used to conduct a numerical analysis of a data center's cooling system. The temperature distribution and the entire room are analyzed for different volumetric flow rates. The optimized volumetric flow rate is found for each CPU power. The heat removal and temperature distribution for CPU powers of 100, 120, and 140W are found to be the best for a volumetric flow rate of 0.15m'3'/s. The numerical analysis is verified through RTI indicators, and the results appear to be the most reliable when the RTI value is 81.

  11. Re-Engineering the ISS Payload Operations Control Center During Increased Utilization and Critical Onboard Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Stephanie R. B.; Marsh, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in utilization and hours of payload operations being executed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), upgrading the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) ISS Payload Control Area (PCA) was essential to gaining efficiencies and assurance of current and future payload health and science return. PCA houses the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) responsible for the execution of all NASA payloads onboard the ISS. POIC Flight Controllers are responsible for the operation of voice, stowage, command, telemetry, video, power, thermal, and environmental control in support of ISS science experiments. The methodologies and execution of the PCA refurbishment were planned and performed within a four-month period in order to assure uninterrupted operation of ISS payloads and minimal impacts to payload operations teams. To vacate the PCA, three additional HOSC control rooms were reconfigured to handle ISS real-time operations, Backup Control Center (BCC) to Mission Control in Houston, simulations, and testing functions. This involved coordination and cooperation from teams of ISS operations controllers, multiple engineering and design disciplines, management, and construction companies performing an array of activities simultaneously and in sync delivering a final product with no issues that impacted the schedule. For each console operator discipline, studies of Information Technology (IT) tools and equipment layouts, ergonomics, and lines of sight were performed. Infusing some of the latest IT into the project was an essential goal in ensuring future growth and success of the ISS payload science returns. Engineering evaluations led to a state of the art Video Wall implementation and more efficient ethernet cabling distribution providing the latest products and the best solution for the POIC. These engineering innovations led to cost savings for the project. Constraints involved in the management of

  12. Ayahuasca Exposure: Descriptive Analysis of Calls to US Poison Control Centers from 2005 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, C William; Brooks, Daniel E

    2017-09-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogenic plant preparation which usually contains the vine Banisteriopsis caapi and the shrub Psychotria viridis. This tea originates from the Amazon Basin where it is used in religious ceremonies. Because interest in these religious groups spreading as well as awareness of use of ayahuasca for therapeutic and recreational purposes, its use is increasing. Banisteriopsis caapi is rich in β-carbolines, especially harmine, tetrahydroharmine and harmaline, which have monoamine oxidase inhibiting (MAOI) activity. Psychotria viridis contains the 5HT2A/2C/1A receptor agonist hallucinogen N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). Usual desired effects include hallucination, dissociation, mood alteration and perception change. Undesired findings previously reported are nausea, vomiting, hypertension, and tachycardia. All human exposure calls reported to the American Association of Poison Controls Centers' (AAPCC) National Poison Data System (NPDS) between September 1, 2005 and September 1, 2015 were reviewed. Cases were filtered for specific plant derived ayahuasca-related product codes. Abstracted data included the following: case age and gender, exposure reason, exposure route, clinical manifestations, treatments given, medical outcomes and fatality. Five hundred and thirty-eight exposures to ayahuasca botanical products were reported. The majority of the calls to poison control centers came from healthcare facilities (83%). The most common route of exposure was ingestion. Most cases were men (437, 81%, 95% CI 77.7% - 84.3%). The median age was 21 (IQR 18-29). Most exposures were acute. Three hundred thirty-seven (63%) were reported to have a major or moderate clinical effect. The most common clinical manifestations reported were hallucinations (35%), tachycardia (34%), agitation (34%), hypertension (16%), mydriasis (13%) and vomiting (6%). Benzodiazepines were commonly given (30%). There were 28 cases in the series who required endotracheal intubation (5

  13. Internet Protocol Display Sharing Solution for Mission Control Center Video System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of broadcast television as a constant source of information throughout the NASA manned space flight Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the current Video Transport System (VTS) characteristics provides the ability to visually enhance real-time applications as a broadcast channel that decision making flight controllers come to rely on, but can be difficult to maintain and costly. The Operations Technology Facility (OTF) of the Mission Operations Facility Division (MOFD) has been tasked to provide insight to new innovative technological solutions for the MCC environment focusing on alternative architectures for a VTS. New technology will be provided to enable sharing of all imagery from one specific computer display, better known as Display Sharing (DS), to other computer displays and display systems such as; large projector systems, flight control rooms, and back supporting rooms throughout the facilities and other offsite centers using IP networks. It has been stated that Internet Protocol (IP) applications are easily readied to substitute for the current visual architecture, but quality and speed may need to be forfeited for reducing cost and maintainability. Although the IP infrastructure can support many technologies, the simple task of sharing ones computer display can be rather clumsy and difficult to configure and manage to the many operators and products. The DS process shall invest in collectively automating the sharing of images while focusing on such characteristics as; managing bandwidth, encrypting security measures, synchronizing disconnections from loss of signal / loss of acquisitions, performance latency, and provide functions like, scalability, multi-sharing, ease of initial integration / sustained configuration, integration with video adjustments packages, collaborative tools, host / recipient controllability, and the utmost paramount priority, an enterprise solution that provides ownership to the whole

  14. Calls to Florida Poison Control Centers about mercury: Trends over 2003-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Matthew O; Deshpande, Aniruddha; Stephan, Wendy B; Hunter, Candis M; Weisman, Richard S

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this analysis was to contrast trends in exposure-report calls and informational queries (a measure of public interest) about mercury to the Florida Poison Control Centers over 2003-2013. Poison-control specialists coded calls to Florida Poison Control Centers by substance of concern, caller demographics, and whether the call pertained to an exposure event or was an informational query. For the present study, call records regarding mercury were de-identified and provided along with daily total number of calls for statistical analysis. We fit Poisson models using generalized estimating equations to summarize changes across years in counts of daily calls to Florida Poison Control Centers, adjusting for month. In a second stage of analysis, we further adjusted for the total number of calls each day. We also conducted analyses stratified by age of the exposed. There was an overall decrease over 2003-2013 in the number of total calls about mercury [Ratio per year: 0.89, 95% CI: (0.88, 0.90)], and calls about mercury exposure [Ratio per year: 0.84, 95% CI: (0.83, 0.85)], but the number of informational queries about mercury increased over this time [Ratio per year: 1.15 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.18)]. After adjusting for the number of calls of that type each day (e.g., call volume), the associations remained similar: a ratio of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.87, 0.89) per year for total calls, 0.85 (0.83, 0.86) for exposure-related calls, and 1.17 (1.14, 1.21) for informational queries. Although, the number of exposure-related calls decreased, informational queries increased over 2003-2013. This might suggest an increased public interest in mercury health risks despite a decrease in reported exposures over this time period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient-centered recruitment and retention for a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, Sumedha; Jefferson, Ashlie; Cook, Ratna; Meeker, Caitlin R; Kim, Ji Hyun; Hartz, Kayla Marie; Wong, Yu-Ning; Caruso, Adele; Newman, Diane K; Morales, Knashawn H; Jayadevappa, Ravishankar

    2018-03-27

    Recruitment and retention strategies for patient-centered outcomes research are evolving and research on the subject is limited. In this work, we present a conceptual model of patient-centered recruitment and retention, and describe the recruitment and retention activities and related challenges in a patient-centered comparative effectiveness trial. This is a multicenter, longitudinal randomized controlled trial in localized prostate cancer patients. We recruited 743 participants from three sites over 15 months period (January 2014 to March 2015), and followed them for 24 months. At site 1, of the 773 eligible participants, 551 (72%) were enrolled. At site 2, 34 participants were eligible and 23 (68%) enrolled. Of the 434 eligible participants at site 3, 169 (39%) enrolled. We observed that strategies related to the concepts of trust (e.g., physician involvement, ensuring protection of information), communication (e.g., brochures and pamphlets in physicians' offices, continued contact during regular clinic visits and calling/emailing assessment), attitude (e.g., emphasizing the altruistic value of research, positive attitude of providers and research staff), and expectations (e.g., full disclosure of study requirements and time commitment, update letters) facilitated successful patient recruitment and retention. A stakeholders' advisory board provided important input for the recruitment and retention activities. Active engagement, reminders at the offices, and personalized update letters helped retention during follow-up. Usefulness of telephone recruitment was site specific and, at one site, the time requirement for telephone recruitment was a challenge. We have presented multilevel strategies for successful recruitment and retention in a clinical trial using a patient-centered approach. Our strategies were flexible to accommodate site-level requirements. These strategies as well as the challenges can aid recruitment and retention efforts of future large

  16. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  17. Optical and microwave control of germanium-vacancy center spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyushev, Petr; Metsch, Mathias H.; Ijaz, Aroosa; Binder, Jan M.; Bhaskar, Mihir K.; Sukachev, Denis D.; Sipahigil, Alp; Evans, Ruffin E.; Nguyen, Christian T.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Hemmer, Philip R.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Rogers, Lachlan J.; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-08-01

    A solid-state system combining a stable spin degree of freedom with an efficient optical interface is highly desirable as an element for integrated quantum-optical and quantum-information systems. We demonstrate a bright color center in diamond with excellent optical properties and controllable electronic spin states. Specifically, we carry out detailed optical spectroscopy of a germanium-vacancy (GeV ) color center demonstrating optical spectral stability. Using an external magnetic field to lift the electronic spin degeneracy, we explore the spin degree of freedom as a controllable qubit. Spin polarization is achieved using optical pumping, and a spin relaxation time in excess of 20 μ s is demonstrated. We report resonant microwave control of spin transitions, and use this as a probe to measure the Autler-Townes effect in a microwave-optical double-resonance experiment. Superposition spin states were prepared using coherent population trapping, and a pure dephasing time of about 19 ns was observed at a temperature of 2.0 K.

  18. Core elements of hospital antibiotic stewardship programs from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Loria A; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2014-10-15

    The proven benefits of antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) for optimizing antibiotic use and minimizing adverse events, such as Clostridium difficile and antibiotic resistance, have prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to recommend that all hospitals have an ASP. This article summarizes Core Elements of Hospital Antibiotic Stewardship Programs, a recently released CDC document focused on defining the infrastructure and practices of coordinated multidisciplinary programs to improve antibiotic use and patient care in US hospitals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  20. Multi-Vehicle Cooperative Control Research at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, 2000-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Curt

    2014-01-01

    A brief introductory overview of multi-vehicle cooperative control research conducted at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center from 2000 - 2014. Both flight research projects and paper studies are included. Since 2000, AFRC has been almost continuously pursuing research in the areas of formation flight for drag reduction and automated cooperative trajectories. An overview of results is given, including flight experiments done on the FA-18 and with the C-17. Other multi-vehicle cooperative research is discussed, including small UAV swarming projects and automated aerial refueling.

  1. Quality Control Practices for Chemistry and Immunochemistry in a Cohort of 21 Large Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Matthew W; Flood, James G; Melanson, Stacy E F; Baumann, Nikola A; Marzinke, Mark A; Rai, Alex J; Hayden, Joshua; Wu, Alan H B; Ladror, Megan; Lifshitz, Mark S; Scott, Mitchell G; Peck-Palmer, Octavia M; Bowen, Raffick; Babic, Nikolina; Sobhani, Kimia; Giacherio, Donald; Bocsi, Gregary T; Herman, Daniel S; Wang, Ping; Toffaletti, John; Handel, Elizabeth; Kelly, Kathleen A; Albeiroti, Sami; Wang, Sihe; Zimmer, Melissa; Driver, Brandon; Yi, Xin; Wilburn, Clayton; Lewandrowski, Kent B

    2018-05-29

    In the United States, minimum standards for quality control (QC) are specified in federal law under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment and its revisions. Beyond meeting this required standard, laboratories have flexibility to determine their overall QC program. We surveyed chemistry and immunochemistry QC procedures at 21 clinical laboratories within leading academic medical centers to assess if standardized QC practices exist for chemistry and immunochemistry testing. We observed significant variation and unexpected similarities in practice across laboratories, including QC frequency, cutoffs, number of levels analyzed, and other features. This variation in practice indicates an opportunity exists to establish an evidence-based approach to QC that can be generalized across institutions.

  2. Human factors review of electric power dispatch control centers. Volume 4. Operator information needs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.J.; Najaf-Zadeh, K.; Darlington, H.T.; McNair, H.D.; Seidenstein, S.; Williams, A.R.

    1982-10-01

    Human factors is a systems-oriented interdisciplinary specialty concerned with the design of systems, equipment, facilities and the operational environment. An important aspect leading to the design requirements is the determination of the information requirements for electric power dispatch control centers. There are significant differences between the system operator's actions during normal and degraded states of power system operation, and power system restoration. This project evaluated the information the operator requires for normal power system and control system operations and investigates the changes of information required by the operator as the power system and/or the control system degrades from a normal operating state. The Phase II study, published in two volumes, defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related. This volume presents detailed data concerning operator information needs that identify the needs for and the uses of power system information by a system operator in conditions ranging from normal through degraded operation. The study defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related, and it identifies the requisite information as consistent with current industry practice so as to aid control system designers. Training requirements are also included for planning entry-level and follow-on training for operators.

  3. High-fat diets and seizure control in myoclonic-astatic epilepsy: a single center's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard-Tremblay, Elisabeth; Berry, Patricia; Owens, Aaron; Cook, William Byron; Sittner, Haley R; Mazzanti, Marta; Huber, Jennifer; Warner, Molly; Shurtleff, Hillary; Saneto, Russell P

    2015-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of the Modified Atkins Diet (MAD) and Ketogenic Diet (KD) in seizure control within a population of myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (MAE) patients. This was a retrospective, single center study evaluating the seizure control by high fat diets. Seizure diaries kept by the parents performed seizure counts. All patients met the clinical criteria for MAE. Nine patients met the clinical criteria. We found that both the MAD and KD were efficacious in complete seizure control and allowed other medications to be stopped in seven patients. Two patients had greater than 90% seizure control without medications, one on the KD and the other on the MAD. Seizure freedom has ranged from 13 to 36 months, and during this time four patients have been fully weaned off of diet management. One patient was found to have a mutation in SLC2A1. Our results suggest that strictly defined MAE patients respond to the MAD with prolonged seizure control. Some patients may require the KD for seizure freedom, suggesting a common pathway of increased requirement for fats. Once controlled, those fully responsive to the Diet(s) could be weaned off traditional seizure medications and in many, subsequently off the MAD or KD. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Web 2.0 (and Beyond?) in Space Flight Operations Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Word processing was one of the earliest uses for small workstations, but we quickly learned that desktop computers were far more than e-typewriters. Similarly, "Web 2.0" capabilities, particularly advanced search engines, chats, wikis, blogs, social networking, and the like, offer tools that could significantly improve our efficiency at managing the avalanche of information and decisions needed to operate space vehicles in realtime. However, could does not necessarily equal should. We must wield two-edged swords carefully to avoid stabbing ourselves. This paper examines some Web 2.0 tools, with an emphasis on social media, and suggests which ones might be useful or harmful in real-time space operations co rnotl environments, based on the author s experience as a Payload Crew Communicator (PAYCOM) at Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) for the International Space Station (ISS) and on discussions with other space flight operations control organizations and centers. There is also some discussion of an offering or two that may come from beyond the current cyber-horizon.

  5. IEEE Std 649-1991: IEEE standard for qualifying Class 1E motor control centers for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The basic principles, requirements, and methods for qualifying Class 1E motor control centers for both harsh and mild environment applications in nuclear power generating stations are described. In addition to defining specific qualification requirements for Class 1E motor control centers and their components in accordance with the more general qualification requirements of IEEE Std 323-1983, this standard is intended to provide guidance in establishing a qualification program for demonstrating the adequacy of Class 1E motor control centers in nuclear power generating station applications

  6. The ORNL Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center: Overview of Activities 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center (CFADC) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory continued operation aimed at collecting, evaluating, and disseminating atomic, molecular, and particle-surface interaction (AM and PSI) data needed by both the U.S. and international plasma science communities. This work has been carried out within an overarching atomic physics research group which produces much of the required data through an active experimental and theoretical science program. The production of an annotated bibliography of AM and PSI literature relevant to plasma science continues to be among the most important activities of the data center, forming the basis for the CFADC on-line bibliographic search engine and a significant part of the IAEA A+M Data Unit's 'International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion.' Also chief among the data center's activities are responses to specific data requests from the plasma science community, leading to either rapid feedback using existing data resources or long term data production projects, as well as participation in IAEA Coordinated Research Programs including recently 'Data for Surface Composition Dynamics Relevant to Erosion Processes' and 'Atomic and Molecular Data for Plasma Modeling.' Highlights of recent data production projects include the following: Experimental and theoretical data for inelastic electron-hydrocarbon reactions, large scale computational results for particle reflection from surfaces, measurements of chemical sputtering from carbon, inaugural experiments considering molecular ion collisions with neutral hydrogen, and expansion of the database of elastic and related transport cross sections calculated for intrinsic and extrinsic impurities in hydrogen plasmas. Progress is being hampered owing to news from the US Department of Energy that it plans to close out the program after a ramp down of funding in 2012, following a distinguished 52 year history of contributions to the US and

  7. US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Its Partners' Contributions to Global Health Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappero, Jordan W; Cassell, Cynthia H; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Angulo, Frederick J; Craig, Allen; Pesik, Nicki; Dahl, Benjamin A; Ijaz, Kashef; Jafari, Hamid; Martin, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    To achieve compliance with the revised World Health Organization International Health Regulations (IHR 2005), countries must be able to rapidly prevent, detect, and respond to public health threats. Most nations, however, remain unprepared to manage and control complex health emergencies, whether due to natural disasters, emerging infectious disease outbreaks, or the inadvertent or intentional release of highly pathogenic organisms. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) works with countries and partners to build and strengthen global health security preparedness so they can quickly respond to public health crises. This report highlights selected CDC global health protection platform accomplishments that help mitigate global health threats and build core, cross-cutting capacity to identify and contain disease outbreaks at their source. CDC contributions support country efforts to achieve IHR 2005 compliance, contribute to the international framework for countering infectious disease crises, and enhance health security for Americans and populations around the world.

  8. Germinal Center Optimization Applied to Neural Inverse Optimal Control for an All-Terrain Tracked Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Villaseñor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there are several meta-heuristics algorithms which offer solutions for multi-variate optimization problems. These algorithms use a population of candidate solutions which explore the search space, where the leadership plays a big role in the exploration-exploitation equilibrium. In this work, we propose to use a Germinal Center Optimization algorithm (GCO which implements temporal leadership through modeling a non-uniform competitive-based distribution for particle selection. GCO is used to find an optimal set of parameters for a neural inverse optimal control applied to all-terrain tracked robot. In the Neural Inverse Optimal Control (NIOC scheme, a neural identifier, based on Recurrent High Orden Neural Network (RHONN trained with an extended kalman filter algorithm, is used to obtain a model of the system, then, a control law is design using such model with the inverse optimal control approach. The RHONN identifier is developed without knowledge of the plant model or its parameters, on the other hand, the inverse optimal control is designed for tracking velocity references. Applicability of the proposed scheme is illustrated using simulations results as well as real-time experimental results with an all-terrain tracked robot.

  9. Trends in Teenagers' Nonopiod Substance Exposures Reported to Poison Control Centers, 2010-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Brad; Mestan, Samantha; Ahrens, Monica; Bottei, Edward

    2018-05-01

    To describe current trends in nonopioid substance exposures and associated outcomes among teenagers nationwide. In this cross-sectional study, we used 2010-2015 data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers' National Poison Data System and Poisson tests to document trends in the rate of calls to poison control centers involving adolescents stratified by sex, exposures by substance category, proportion of intentional exposures, and severity of exposures. The number of calls per 1000 persons increased from 5.7 to 6.8 for teenage girls and decreased from 4.7 to 4.3 for boys. Reported exposures to prescription and over-the-counter medications and illicit street drugs increased between 24% and 73%, and reported opioid exposures decreased by 16%. Among teenage girls, intentional exposures increased from 57% to 68%, with cases increasingly managed in health care facilities and more likely to result in worse health outcomes. The increase in intentional nonopioid substance exposures among teenage girls, with serious and potentially life-threatening consequences, is a matter of serious concern. Similar trends were not observed among teenage boys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. FAA Alleged Waste and Mismanagement of Air Route Traffic Control Centers Critical and Essential Power Systems Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-16

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) reviewed a complaint from Congressman Deal on behalf of a constituent. The constituent alleged waste and mismanagement occurred in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Air Route Traffic Control Centers Criti...

  11. Experimental and Computational Instrumentation for Rotorcraft Noise and Vibration Control Research at the Penn State Rotorcraft Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A team of faculty at the Penn State Rotorcraft Center of Excellence has integrated five new facilities into a broad range of research and educational programs focused on rotorcraft noise and vibration control...

  12. IEEE Std 649-1980: IEEE standard for qualifying Class 1E motor control centers for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This standard describes the basic principles, requirements, and methods for qualifying Class 1E motor control centers for outside containment applications in nuclear power generating stations. Qualification of motor control centers located inside containment in a nuclear power generating station is beyond the scope of this standard. The purpose of this standard is (1) to define specific qualification requirements for Class 1E motor control centers in accordance with the more general qualification requirements of IEEE Std 323-1974, IEE Standard for Qualifying Class 1E Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations; (2) to provide guidance in establishing a qualification program for demonstrating the design adequacy of Class 1E motor control centers in nuclear power generating station applications

  13. Laser polarization dependent and magnetically control of group velocity in a dielectric medium doped with nanodiamond nitrogen vacancy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein; Rahimpour Soleimani, H., E-mail: Rahimpour@guilan.ac.ir

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, group velocity control of Gaussian beam in a dielectric medium doped with nanodiamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers under optical excitation is discussed. The shape of transmitted and reflected pulses from dielectric can be tuned by changing the intensity of magnetic field and polarization of the control beam. The effect of intensity of control beam on group velocity is also investigated.

  14. Development and evaluation of a multidisciplinary controlled substances committee within a patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernant, Stephanie A; Bastien, Rachel; Lai, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To present the development of a multidisciplinary controlled substances committee and describe its effectiveness in relation to prescribers' acceptance of committee recommendations, the number of premature deaths associated with controlled substances, and prescribers' need for education on controlled substances. A patient-centered medical home and accountable care organization in Maine that serves more than 60,000 patients across a large rural area, 70% of whom are classified as lower income. A multidisciplinary group of prescribers and PharmD residents created a committee to influence organizational culture regarding controlled substances. The Controlled Substances Initiative Committee (CSIC) updated institutional policies, developed provider education, and made personalized patient recommendations to prescribers. The primary outcome was average change in daily morphine equivalent dose (MED) in patients for whom CSIC recommended a dose reduction to the patient's prescriber. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of patients who died of a known overdose or suspected drug-related death during 2012-2013 or 2013-2014. In addition, prescriber beliefs about controlled substances were measured via a needs assessment. The average daily MED for patients whom CSIC recommended dose reduction was lower after 3 months compared with at baseline (175.5 ± 344.3 mg vs. 292.7 ± 466.5 mg; P vs. 11.1%; P = 1.00). However, a greater number of patients had a suspected drug-related death during 2013-2014 compared with during 2012-2013 (0% vs. 27.3%; P = 0.05). A multidisciplinary controlled substances committee may improve patient safety and outcomes by offering prescriber support and helping alter prescribing culture.

  15. ASTEC and MODEL: Controls software development at Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, John P.; Bauer, Frank H.; Surber, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    The ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software is under development at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The design goal is to provide a wide selection of controls analysis tools at the personal computer level, as well as the capability to upload compute-intensive jobs to a mainframe or supercomputer. In the last three years the ASTEC (Analysis and Simulation Tools for Engineering Controls) software has been under development. ASTEC is meant to be an integrated collection of controls analysis tools for use at the desktop level. MODEL (Multi-Optimal Differential Equation Language) is a translator that converts programs written in the MODEL language to FORTRAN. An upgraded version of the MODEL program will be merged into ASTEC. MODEL has not been modified since 1981 and has not kept with changes in computers or user interface techniques. This paper describes the changes made to MODEL in order to make it useful in the 90's and how it relates to ASTEC.

  16. Poison control centers in developing countries and Asia's need for toxicology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makalinao, Irma R.; Awang, Rahmat

    2005-01-01

    Poison control centers (PCCs) in developing countries have been set up in response to the challenge of decreasing mortality and morbidity from poisoning. The services range from poison information to actual clinical treatment mostly of acute cases. Lately, PCCs have expanded from their traditional role to one that actively engages in community health studies, toxicovigilance along with treatment of chronic poisoning. Recognizing that types of poisoning and specific needs may vary from country to country, toxicology education that addresses these unique regional issues has become more necessary. Toxicology education, both formal and informal, exists in various stages of development in Asia. Clearly, there are gaps that need to be addressed especially in areas where there are no poison centers or where strengthening is necessary. Collaboration between PCCs in developing countries can help augment available resources including human, analytical and technical expertise. The critical mass of trained toxicologists will fill in the demand for clinical and regulatory specialists and educators as well. This paper highlights the experiences and resources available to the Philippine and Malaysian poison centers and the strengths generated by networking and collaboration. The role of Asia Pacific Association of Medical Toxicology (APAMT) as the Science NGO representative to the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS) forum standing committee in promoting chemical safety at the regional level will be discussed. The 'Clearinghouse on the Sound Management of Chemicals', a platform for engaging multi-stakeholder and interdisciplinary partnerships, will be described as a possible model for capacity building to advance chemical safety through education and training not only in developing countries in Asia but globally as well

  17. Electronic Cigarette Exposure: Calls to Wisconsin Poison Control Centers, 2010–2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Debora; Tomasallo, Carrie D; Meiman, Jon G; Creswell, Paul D; Melstrom, Paul C; Gummin, David D; Patel, Disa J; Michaud, Nancy T; Sebero, Heather A; Anderson, Henry A

    2016-12-01

    E-cigarettes are battery-powered devices that deliver nicotine and flavorings by aerosol and have been marketed in the United States since 2007. Because e-cigarettes have increased in popularity, toxicity potential from device misuse and malfunction also has increased. National data indicate that during 2010–2014, exposure calls to US poison control centers increased only 0.3% for conventional cigarette exposures, whereas calls increased 41.7% for e-cigarette exposures. We characterized cigarette and e-cigarette exposure calls to the Wisconsin Poison Center January 1, 2010 through October 10, 2015. We compared cigarette and e-cigarette exposure calls by exposure year, demographic characteristics, caller site, exposure site, exposure route, exposure reason, medical outcome, management site, and level of care at a health care facility. During January 2010 to October 2015, a total of 98 e-cigarette exposure calls were reported, and annual exposure calls increased approximately 17-fold, from 2 to 35. During the same period, 671 single-exposure cigarette calls with stable annual call volumes were reported. E-cigarette exposure calls were associated with children aged ≤5 years (57/98, 58.2%) and adults aged ≥20 years (30/98, 30.6%). Cigarette exposure calls predominated among children aged ≤5 years (643/671, 95.8%). The frequency of e-cigarette exposure calls to the Wisconsin Poison Center has increased and is highest among children aged ≤5 years and adults. Strategies are warranted to prevent future poisonings from these devices, including nicotine warning labels and public advisories to keep e-cigarettes away from children.

  18. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  19. Adaptation of Control Center Software to Commerical Real-Time Display Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is currently developing an enhanced Huntsville Operation Support Center (HOSC) system designed to support multiple spacecraft missions. The Enhanced HOSC is based upon a distributed computing architecture using graphic workstation hardware and industry standard software including POSIX, X Windows, Motif, TCP/IP, and ANSI C. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is currently developing a prototype of the Display Services application for this system. Display Services provides the capability to generate and operate real-time data-driven graphic displays. This prototype is a highly functional application designed to allow system end users to easily generate complex data-driven displays. The prototype is easy to use, flexible, highly functional, and portable. Although this prototype is being developed for NASA-MSFC, the general-purpose real-time display capability can be reused in similar mission and process control environments. This includes any environment depending heavily upon real-time data acquisition and display. Reuse of the prototype will be a straight-forward transition because the prototype is portable, is designed to add new display types easily, has a user interface which is separated from the application code, and is very independent of the specifics of NASA-MSFC's system. Reuse of this prototype in other environments is a excellent alternative to creation of a new custom application, or for environments with a large number of users, to purchasing a COTS package.

  20. Antivenom Therapy for Crotaline Snakebites: Has the Poison Control Center Provided Effective Guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chia Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Crotaline snakebites (Protobothrops mucrosquamatus and Trimeresurus stejnegeri are a common medical emergency in Taiwan that can be effectively treated by a bivalent F(ab'2 antivenom. We investigated the differences in the clinical outcomes of patients who received different therapeutic regimens of antivenom in a medical center where clinical toxicologists followed the poison control center (PCC guidelines (medical group and surgeons did not (surgical group. The medical records of inpatients with crotaline snakebites between 1991 and 2005 were reviewed and information on demographics, treatments, adverse effects of antivenom, and complications was abstracted and analyzed. A total of 179 patients (90 medical, 89 surgical were eligible for study. There was no significant intergroup difference in baseline characteristics except that the dose of antivenom and the probability of antibiotic use were both higher in the surgical group (5.9 ± 4.2 vials vs. 2.7 ± 1.6 vials; 93% vs. 60%. Multiple logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, calendar year of envenomation, severity of envenomation, and antibiotic use did not disclose evidence of any difference in various clinical outcomes between medical and surgical patients. The lower dose of antivenom recommended by the PCC may be as effective and safe as the higher dose used in the surgical group for the treatment of crotaline snakebites.

  1. Automated daily quality control analysis for mammography in a multi-unit imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, Veli-Matti; Mäkelä, Teemu; Meaney, Alexander; Kaasalainen, Touko; Savolainen, Sauli

    2018-01-01

    Background The high requirements for mammography image quality necessitate a systematic quality assurance process. Digital imaging allows automation of the image quality analysis, which can potentially improve repeatability and objectivity compared to a visual evaluation made by the users. Purpose To develop an automatic image quality analysis software for daily mammography quality control in a multi-unit imaging center. Material and Methods An automated image quality analysis software using the discrete wavelet transform and multiresolution analysis was developed for the American College of Radiology accreditation phantom. The software was validated by analyzing 60 randomly selected phantom images from six mammography systems and 20 phantom images with different dose levels from one mammography system. The results were compared to a visual analysis made by four reviewers. Additionally, long-term image quality trends of a full-field digital mammography system and a computed radiography mammography system were investigated. Results The automated software produced feature detection levels comparable to visual analysis. The agreement was good in the case of fibers, while the software detected somewhat more microcalcifications and characteristic masses. Long-term follow-up via a quality assurance web portal demonstrated the feasibility of using the software for monitoring the performance of mammography systems in a multi-unit imaging center. Conclusion Automated image quality analysis enables monitoring the performance of digital mammography systems in an efficient, centralized manner.

  2. plasmatis Center for Innovation Competence: Controlling reactive component output of atmospheric pressure plasmas in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    The novel approach of using plasmas in order to alter the local chemistry of cells and cell environment presents a significant development in biomedical applications. The plasmatis center for innovation competence at the INP Greifswald e.V. performs fundamental research in plasma medicine in two interdisciplinary research groups. The aim of our plasma physics research group ``Extracellular Effects'' is (a) quantitative space and time resolved diagnostics and modelling of plasmas and liquids to determine distribution and composition of reactive species (b) to control the plasma and apply differing plasma source concepts in order to produce a tailored output of reactive components and design the chemical composition of the liquids/cellular environment and (c) to identify and understand the interaction mechanisms of plasmas with liquids and biological systems. Methods to characterize the plasma generated reactive species from plasma-, gas- and liquid phase and their biological effects will be presented. The diagnostic spectrum ranges from absorption/emission/laser spectroscopy and molecular beam mass spectrometry to electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and cell biological diagnostic techniques. Concluding, a presentation will be given of the comprehensive approach to plasma medicine in Greifswald where the applied and clinical research of the Campus PlasmaMed association is combined with the fundamental research at plasmatis center.

  3. Independent sailing with high tetraplegia using sip and puff controls: integration into a community sailing center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojhani, Solomon; Stiens, Steven A; Recio, Albert C

    2017-07-01

    We are continually rediscovering how adapted recreational activity complements the rehabilitation process, enriches patients' lives and positively impacts outcome measures. Although sports for people with spinal cord injuries (SCI) has achieved spectacular visibility, participation by high cervical injuries is often restricted due to poor accessibility, safety concerns, lack of adaptability, and high costs of technology. We endeavor to demonstrate the mechanisms, adaptability, accessibility, and benefits the sport of sailing creates in the rehabilitative process. Our sailor is a 27-year-old man with a history of traumatic SCI resulting in C4 complete tetraplegia. The participant completed an adapted introductory sailing course, and instruction on the sip-and-puff sail and tiller control mechanism. With practice, he navigated an on-water course in moderate winds of 5 to 15 knots. Despite trends toward shorter rehabilitation stays, aggressive transdisciplinary collaboration with recreation therapy can provide community and natural environment experiences while inpatient and continuing post discharge. Such peak physical and psychological experiences provide a positive perspective for the future that can be shared on the inpatient unit, with families and support systems like sailing clubs in the community. Rehabilitation theory directs a team process to achieve patient self-awareness and initiate self-actualization in spite of disablement. Utilization of local community sailing centers that have provided accessible assisted options provides person-centered self-realization of goals as assisted by family and natural supports. Such successful patients become native guides for others seeking the same experience.

  4. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ''polling'' the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important

  5. Operator-centered control of a semi-autonomous industrial robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Jones, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents work done by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Remotec, Inc., to develop a new operator-centered control system for Remotec's Andros telerobot. Andros robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities, the armed forces, and numerous law enforcement agencies to perform tasks which are hazardous for human operators. This project has automated task components and enhanced the video graphics display of the robot's position in the environment to significantly reduce operator workload. The procedure of automating a telerobot requires the addition of computer power to the robot, along with a variety of sensors and encoders to provide information about the robots performance in and relationship to its environment The resulting vehicle serves as a platform for research on strategies to integrate automated tasks with those performed by a human operator. The addition of these capabilities will greatly enhance the safety and efficiency of performance in hazardous environments

  6. Examining the role of gender in career advancement at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Roy, Kakoli; Gotway Crawford, Carol A

    2010-03-01

    During the past decade, efforts to promote gender parity in the healing and public health professions have met with only partial success. We provide a critical update regarding the status of women in the public health profession by exploring gender-related differences in promotion rates at the nation's leading public health agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using personnel data drawn from CDC, we found that the gender gap in promotion has diminished across time and that this reduction can be attributed to changes in individual characteristics (e.g., higher educational levels and more federal work experience). However, a substantial gap in promotion that cannot be explained by such characteristics has persisted, indicating continuing barriers in women's career advancement.

  7. Water Pollution Control Legislation in Israel: Understanding Implementation Processes from an Actor-Centered Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Hophmayer-Tokich

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the State of Israel, advanced legislation for the management of scarce water resources, including legislation to prevent water pollution, were put in place in the early stages of the State’s formation. Despite that, on-going uncontrolled pollution has deteriorated the quality of water sources for decades, with the main source of pollution being untreated or partially treated domestic wastewater. This has been mainly the result of lack of enforcement of the existing laws. During the 1990s and onwards, a shift to forceful enforcement has been observed and wastewater treatment substantially improved. The paper analyzes the implementation processes of the pollution control legislations (the lack-of and the shift to forceful enforcement based on an actor-centered approach, using the contextual interaction theory.

  8. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) testing are currently taking place at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Unique to this testing is the variety of test areas and the fact that all are located in one building. The north high bay of building 4755, the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), contains the following test areas: the Subsystem Test Area, the Comparative Test Area, the Process Material Management System (PMMS), the Core Module Simulator (CMS), the End-use Equipment Facility (EEF), and the Pre-development Operational System Test (POST) Area. This paper addresses the facility that supports these test areas and briefly describes the testing in each area. Future plans for the building and Space Station module configurations will also be discussed.

  9. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Motor control centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; O'Hearn, E.

    1994-02-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) commercial nuclear power plant motor control centers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  10. Relating calls to US poison centers for potential exposures to medications to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting of influenza-like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Gillian A; McKeown, Nathanael J; Rodriguez, Sergio; Spyker, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) monitors influenza like illness (ILI) and the National Poison Data System (NPDS) warehouses call data uploaded by US poison centers regarding reported exposures to medication. We examined the relationship between calls to poison centers regarding reported exposures to medications commonly used to treat ILI and weekly reports of ILI. The CDC reports ILI, by age group, for each of 10 Health and Human Services (HHS) regions. We examined NPDS summary data from calls reported to poison centers regarding reported exposures to acetaminophen, cough/cold medications, and promethazine, for the same weeks, age groups, and HHS regions for influenza seasons 2000-2013. ILI and NPDS exposures were examined using graphical plots, descriptive statistics, stepwise regression analysis, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). About 5,101,841 influenza-like illness cases were reported to the CDC, and 2,122,940 calls regarding reported exposures to medications commonly used to treat ILI, were reported by poison centers to the NPDS over the 13 flu seasons. Analysis of stepwise models of the linear untransformed data involving 24 NPDS data groups and for 60 ILI measures, over the 13 influenza seasons, demonstrated that reported exposures to medications used to treat ILI correlated with reported cases of ILI with a median R(2 )=( )0.489 (min R(2 )=( )0.248, max R(2 )=( )0.717), with mean ± SD of R(2 )=( )0.494 ± 0.121. Median number of parameters used (degrees of freedom - 1) was 7. NPDS data regarding poison center calls for selected ILI medication exposures were highly correlated with CDC ILI data. Since NPDS data are available in real time, it provides complimentary ILI monitoring. This approach may provide public health value in predicting other illnesses which are not currently as thoroughly monitored.

  11. Contamination Control and Hardware Processing Solutions at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, DeWitt H.; Hampton, Tammy; Huey, LaQuieta; Mitchell, Mark; Norwood, Joey; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    The Contamination Control Team of Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory supports many Programs/ Projects that design, manufacture, and test a wide range of hardware types that are sensitive to contamination and foreign object damage (FOD). Examples where contamination/FOD concerns arise include sensitive structural bondline failure, critical orifice blockage, seal leakage, and reactive fluid compatibility (liquid oxygen, hydrazine) as well as performance degradation of sensitive instruments or spacecraft surfaces such as optical elements and thermal control systems. During the design phase, determination of the sensitivity of a hardware system to different types or levels of contamination/FOD is essential. A contamination control and FOD control plan must then be developed and implemented through all phases of ground processing, and, sometimes, on-orbit use, recovery, and refurbishment. Implementation of proper controls prevents cost and schedule impacts due to hardware damage or rework and helps assure mission success. Current capabilities are being used to support recent and on-going activities for multiple Mission Directorates / Programs such as International Space Station (ISS), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Space Launch System (SLS) elements (tanks, engines, booster), etc. The team also advances Green Technology initiatives and addresses materials obsolescence issues for NASA and external customers, most notably in the area of solvent replacement (e.g. aqueous cleaners containing hexavalent chrome, ozone depleting chemicals (CFC s and HCFC's), suspect carcinogens). The team evaluates new surface cleanliness inspection and cleaning technologies (e.g. plasma cleaning), and maintains databases for processing support materials as well as outgassing and optical compatibility test results for spaceflight environments.

  12. Set up and operation for medical radiation exposure quality control system of health promotion center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Su; Kim, Jung Min; Jung, Hae Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, standard model of medical radiation dosage quality control system will be suggested and the useful of this system in clinical field will be reviewed. Radiation dosage information of modalities are gathered from digital imaging and communications in medicine(DICOM) standard data(such as DICOM dose SR and DICOM header) and stored in database. One CT scan, two digital radiography modalities and two mammography modalities in one health promotion center in Seoul are used to derive clinical data for one month. After 1 months research with 703 CT scans, the study shows CT 357.9 mGy·cm in abdomen and pelvic CT, 572.4 mGy·cm in brain without CT, 55.9 mGy·cm in calcium score/heart CT, screening CT at 54 mGy·cm in chest screening CT(low dose screening CT scan), 284.99 mGy·cm in C-spine CT and 341.85 mGy·cm in L-spine CT as health promotion center reference level of each exam. And with 1955 digital radiography cases, it shows 274.0 mGy·cm"2 and for mammography 6.09 mGy is shown based on 536 cases. The use of medical radiation shall comply with the principles of justification and optimization. This quality management of medical radiation exposure must be performed in order to follow the principle. And the procedure to reduce the radiation exposure of patients and staff can be achieved through this. The results of this study can be applied as a useful tool to perform the quality control of medical radiation exposure

  13. Set up and operation for medical radiation exposure quality control system of health promotion center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su; Kim, Jung Min [Korea University,Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, standard model of medical radiation dosage quality control system will be suggested and the useful of this system in clinical field will be reviewed. Radiation dosage information of modalities are gathered from digital imaging and communications in medicine(DICOM) standard data(such as DICOM dose SR and DICOM header) and stored in database. One CT scan, two digital radiography modalities and two mammography modalities in one health promotion center in Seoul are used to derive clinical data for one month. After 1 months research with 703 CT scans, the study shows CT 357.9 mGy·cm in abdomen and pelvic CT, 572.4 mGy·cm in brain without CT, 55.9 mGy·cm in calcium score/heart CT, screening CT at 54 mGy·cm in chest screening CT(low dose screening CT scan), 284.99 mGy·cm in C-spine CT and 341.85 mGy·cm in L-spine CT as health promotion center reference level of each exam. And with 1955 digital radiography cases, it shows 274.0 mGy·cm{sup 2} and for mammography 6.09 mGy is shown based on 536 cases. The use of medical radiation shall comply with the principles of justification and optimization. This quality management of medical radiation exposure must be performed in order to follow the principle. And the procedure to reduce the radiation exposure of patients and staff can be achieved through this. The results of this study can be applied as a useful tool to perform the quality control of medical radiation exposure.

  14. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Preetinder S; Gill, Tejkaran S; Kamath, Ashwini; Whisnant, Billy

    2012-01-01

    Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms) are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving health care-related literature and, in turn, promoting health literacy. Based on the comprehensive literature review and assessment of the 40 documents associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury, recommendations have been made for improving the readability, suitability, and usability of health care-related documents. The recommendations are

  15. High call volume at poison control centers: identification and implications for communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravati, E M; Latimer, S; Reblin, M; Bennett, H K W; Cummins, M R; Crouch, B I; Ellington, L

    2012-09-01

    High volume surges in health care are uncommon and unpredictable events. Their impact on health system performance and capacity is difficult to study. To identify time periods that exhibited very busy conditions at a poison control center and to determine whether cases and communication during high volume call periods are different from cases during low volume periods. Call data from a US poison control center over twelve consecutive months was collected via a call logger and an electronic case database (Toxicall®).Variables evaluated for high call volume conditions were: (1) call duration; (2) number of cases; and (3) number of calls per staff member per 30 minute period. Statistical analyses identified peak periods as busier than 99% of all other 30 minute time periods and low volume periods as slower than 70% of all other 30 minute periods. Case and communication characteristics of high volume and low volume calls were compared using logistic regression. A total of 65,364 incoming calls occurred over 12 months. One hundred high call volume and 4885 low call volume 30 minute periods were identified. High volume periods were more common between 1500 and 2300 hours and during the winter months. Coded verbal communication data were evaluated for 42 high volume and 296 low volume calls. The mean (standard deviation) call length of these calls during high volume and low volume periods was 3 minutes 27 seconds (1 minute 46 seconds) and 3 minutes 57 seconds (2 minutes 11 seconds), respectively. Regression analyses revealed a trend for fewer overall verbal statements and fewer staff questions during peak periods, but no other significant differences for staff-caller communication behaviors were found. Peak activity for poison center call volume can be identified by statistical modeling. Calls during high volume periods were similar to low volume calls. Communication was more concise yet staff was able to maintain a good rapport with callers during busy call periods

  16. Control of body's center of mass motion relative to center of pressure during uphill walking in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shih-Wun; Leu, Tsai-Hsueh; Wang, Ting-Ming; Li, Jia-Da; Ho, Wei-Pin; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2015-10-01

    Uphill walking places more challenges on the locomotor system than level walking does when the two limbs work together to ensure the stability and continuous progression of the body over the base of support. With age-related degeneration older people may have more difficulty in maintaining balance during uphill walking, and may thus experience an increased risk of falling. The current study aimed to investigate using gait analysis techniques to determine the effects of age and slope angles on the control of the COM relative to the COP in terms of their inclination angles (IA) and the rate of change of IA (RCIA) during uphill walking. The elderly were found to show IAs similar to those of the young, but with reduced self-selected walking speed and RCIAs (PIA in the sagittal plane (PIA and RCIA during walking provide a sensitive measure to differentiate individuals with different balance control abilities. The current results and findings may serve as baseline data for future clinical and ergonomic applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the steering committee. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued with the Pilot High Velocity FGD (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurements and control studies involving the EPA Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger capture solutions, and the use of activated carbon injection across the Pulse-Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) unit. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System was utilized this month in the TER test configuration to inject and transfer activated carbon to the PJFF bags for downstream mercury capture. Work also began in December to prepare the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber system for receipt of the B and W Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX) unit to be used in the 1996 DOE/PRDA testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained in cold-standby this month.

  18. Predictors of Default from Treatment for Tuberculosis: a Single Center Case-Control Study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Kyu; Shin, Hong-Joon; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yoon, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Young-Su; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    Default from tuberculosis (TB) treatment could exacerbate the disease and result in the emergence of drug resistance. This study identified the risk factors for default from TB treatment in Korea. This single-center case-control study analyzed 46 default cases and 100 controls. Default was defined as interrupting treatment for 2 or more consecutive months. The reasons for default were mainly incorrect perception or information about TB (41.3%) and experience of adverse events due to TB drugs (41.3%). In univariate analysis, low income (defaulter (15.2% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.005), and combined extrapulmonary TB (54.3% vs. 34.0%, P = 0.020) were significant risk factors for default. In multivariate analysis, the absence of TB stigma (adjusted odd ratio [aOR]: 46.299, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.078-265.365, P defaulters (aOR: 33.226, 95% CI: 2.658-415.309, P = 0.007), and low income (aOR: 5.246, 95% CI: 1.249-22.029, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of default from TB treatment. In conclusion, patients with absence of disease stigma, treated by a non-pulmonologist, who were former defaulters, and with low income should be carefully monitored during TB treatment in Korea to avoid treatment default.

  19. Predictors of Default from Treatment for Tuberculosis: a Single Center Case–Control Study in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Default from tuberculosis (TB) treatment could exacerbate the disease and result in the emergence of drug resistance. This study identified the risk factors for default from TB treatment in Korea. This single-center case–control study analyzed 46 default cases and 100 controls. Default was defined as interrupting treatment for 2 or more consecutive months. The reasons for default were mainly incorrect perception or information about TB (41.3%) and experience of adverse events due to TB drugs (41.3%). In univariate analysis, low income (defaulter (15.2% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.005), and combined extrapulmonary TB (54.3% vs. 34.0%, P = 0.020) were significant risk factors for default. In multivariate analysis, the absence of TB stigma (adjusted odd ratio [aOR]: 46.299, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.078–265.365, P defaulters (aOR: 33.226, 95% CI: 2.658–415.309, P = 0.007), and low income (aOR: 5.246, 95% CI: 1.249–22.029, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of default from TB treatment. In conclusion, patients with absence of disease stigma, treated by a non-pulmonologist, who were former defaulters, and with low income should be carefully monitored during TB treatment in Korea to avoid treatment default. PMID:26839480

  20. [Qilin Pills for idiopathic oligoasthenospermia: A multi-centered randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jia-Ming; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Chuan-Hang; Ning, Ke-Qin; Liu, Ji-Hong; Yang, Shu-Wen; Li, Hai-Song; Zhou, Shao-Hu; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Ji-Xiu; Huang, Yong-Han

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Qilin Pills in the treatment of oligoasthenospermia in infertile men. This multi-centered randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial included 216 infertile males with oligoasthenospermia, 108 in the trial group and the other 108 in the control, the former treated with Qilin Pills at the dose of 6 g tid while the latter with Wuziyanzong Pills at 6 g bid, both for 12 weeks. We examined the total sperm count, sperm motility and the count of progressively motile sperm of the patients before and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after medication and evaluated the safety of the drug based on the adverse events and the laboratory results of blood and urine routine examinations and liver and kidney function tests. Compared with the baseline, the patients in the trial group showed a significant time-dependent improvement after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of medication in sperm motility (21.75% vs 27.54%, 29.04% and 32.95%, P Pills can evidently improve the semen quality of oligoasthenospermia patients with no obvious adverse events.

  1. Management of pelvic inflammatory disease by primary care physicians. A comparison with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessol, N A; Priddy, F H; Bolan, G; Baumrind, N; Vittinghoff, E; Reingold, A L; Padian, N S

    1996-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published recommendations for clinicians on the management of pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is unknown if providers are aware of the guidelines or follow them. To compare pelvic inflammatory disease screening, diagnosis, treatment, and reporting practices among primary care physicians with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease. A weighted random sample of California primary care physicians surveyed in November 1992 and January 1993. Of the 1,165 physicians surveyed, 553 (48%) returned completed questionnaires. Among respondents, 302 (55%) reported having treated a case of pelvic inflammatory disease during the last 12 months, and of these, 52% answered that they were unsure of or do not follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease. Pediatricians and those with more years since residency were less likely to deviate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease, and family practitioners were more likely to deviate from the guidelines. Pelvic inflammatory disease is commonly encountered by primary care physicians in California. Training and experience were important predictors of compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations; however, substantial divergence from the guidelines occurs.

  2. Music therapy in Huntington's disease: a protocol for a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen-Rufi, Monique; Vink, Annemieke; Achterberg, Wilco; Roos, Raymund

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with autosomal dominant inheritance, characterized by motor disturbances, cognitive decline and behavioral and psychological symptoms. Since there is no cure, all treatment is aimed at improving quality of life. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological intervention, aiming to improve the quality of life, but its use and efficacy in patients with Huntington's disease has hardly been studied. In this article, a protocol is described to study the effects of music therapy in comparison with a control intervention to improve quality of life through stimulating expressive and communicative skills. By targeting these skills we assume that the social-cognitive functioning will improve, leading to a reduction in behavioral problems, resulting in an overall improvement of the quality of life in patients with Huntington's disease. The study is designed as a multi-center single-blind randomised controlled intervention trial. Sixty patients will be randomised using centre-stratified block-permuted randomisation. Patients will be recruited from four long-term care facilities specialized in Huntington's disease-care in The Netherlands. The outcome measure to assess changes in expressive and communication skills is the Behaviour Observation Scale Huntington and changes in behavior will be assessed by the Problem Behaviour Assesment-short version and by the BOSH. Measurements take place at baseline, then 8, 16 (end of intervention) and 12 weeks after the last intervention (follow-up). This randomized controlled study will provide greater insight into the effectiveness of music therapy on activities of daily living, social-cognitive functioning and behavior problems by improving expressive and communication skills, thus leading to a better quality of life for patients with Huntington's disease. Netherlands Trial Register: NTR4904 , registration date Nov. 15, 2014.

  3. Advanced Outage and Control Center: Strategies for Nuclear Plant Outage Work Status Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Weatherby

    2012-05-01

    The research effort is a part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a research and development program sponsored by the Department of Energy, performed in close collaboration with industry to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program serves to help the US nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The Outage Control Center (OCC) Pilot Project was directed at carrying out the applied research for development and pilot of technology designed to enhance safe outage and maintenance operations, improve human performance and reliability, increase overall operational efficiency, and improve plant status control. Plant outage management is a high priority concern for the nuclear industry from cost and safety perspectives. Unfortunately, many of the underlying technologies supporting outage control are the same as those used in the 1980’s. They depend heavily upon large teams of staff, multiple work and coordination locations, and manual administrative actions that require large amounts of paper. Previous work in human reliability analysis suggests that many repetitive tasks, including paper work tasks, may have a failure rate of 1.0E-3 or higher (Gertman, 1996). With between 10,000 and 45,000 subtasks being performed during an outage (Gomes, 1996), the opportunity for human error of some consequence is a realistic concern. Although a number of factors exist that can make these errors recoverable, reducing and effectively coordinating the sheer number of tasks to be performed, particularly those that are error prone, has the potential to enhance outage efficiency and safety. Additionally, outage management requires precise coordination of work groups that do not always share similar objectives. Outage

  4. New human-centered linear and nonlinear motion cueing algorithms for control of simulator motion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telban, Robert J.

    While the performance of flight simulator motion system hardware has advanced substantially, the development of the motion cueing algorithm, the software that transforms simulated aircraft dynamics into realizable motion commands, has not kept pace. To address this, new human-centered motion cueing algorithms were developed. A revised "optimal algorithm" uses time-invariant filters developed by optimal control, incorporating human vestibular system models. The "nonlinear algorithm" is a novel approach that is also formulated by optimal control, but can also be updated in real time. It incorporates a new integrated visual-vestibular perception model that includes both visual and vestibular sensation and the interaction between the stimuli. A time-varying control law requires the matrix Riccati equation to be solved in real time by a neurocomputing approach. Preliminary pilot testing resulted in the optimal algorithm incorporating a new otolith model, producing improved motion cues. The nonlinear algorithm vertical mode produced a motion cue with a time-varying washout, sustaining small cues for longer durations and washing out large cues more quickly compared to the optimal algorithm. The inclusion of the integrated perception model improved the responses to longitudinal and lateral cues. False cues observed with the NASA adaptive algorithm were absent. As a result of unsatisfactory sensation, an augmented turbulence cue was added to the vertical mode for both the optimal and nonlinear algorithms. The relative effectiveness of the algorithms, in simulating aircraft maneuvers, was assessed with an eleven-subject piloted performance test conducted on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator (VMS). Two methods, the quasi-objective NASA Task Load Index (TLX), and power spectral density analysis of pilot control, were used to assess pilot workload. TLX analysis reveals, in most cases, less workload and variation among pilots with the nonlinear algorithm. Control input

  5. Readability assessment of concussion and traumatic brain injury publications by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill PS

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Preetinder S Gill,1 Tejkaran S Gill,2 Ashwini Kamath,3 Billy Whisnant41College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI; 2College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3School of Information, University of Texas, Austin, TX; 4College of Technology, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USAAbstract: Health literacy is associated with a person’s capacity to find, access, contextualize, and understand information needed for health care-related decisions. The level of health literacy thus has an influence on an individual’s health status. It can be argued that low health literacy is associated with poor health status. Health care literature (eg, pamphlets, brochures, postcards, posters, forms are published by public and private organizations worldwide to provide information to the general public. The ability to read, use, and understand is critical to the successful application of knowledge disseminated by this literature. This study assessed the readability, suitability, and usability of health care literature associated with concussion and traumatic brain injury published by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level, Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning Fog, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, and Suitability Assessment of Materials indices were used to assess 40 documents obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. The documents analyzed were targeted towards the general public. It was found that in order to be read properly, on average, these documents needed more than an eleventh grade/high school level education. This was consistent with the findings of other similar studies. However, the qualitative Suitability Assessment of Materials index showed that, on average, usability and suitability of these documents was superior. Hence, it was concluded that formatting, illustrations, layout, and graphics play a pivotal role in improving

  6. Kennedy Space Center Timing and Countdown Interface to Kennedy Ground Control Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS) engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are developing a time-tagging process to enable reconstruction of the events during a launch countdown. Such a process can be useful in the case of anomalies or other situations where it is necessary to know the exact time an event occurred. It is thus critical for the timing information to be accurate. KGCS will synchronize all items with Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) obtained from the Timing and Countdown (T&CD) organization. Network Time Protocol (NTP) is the protocol currently in place for synchronizing UTC. However, NTP has a peak error that is too high for today's standards. Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is a newer protocol with a much smaller peak error. The focus of this project has been to implement a PTP solution on the network to increase timing accuracy while introducing and configuring the implementation of a firewall between T&CD and the KGCS network.

  7. Investigation and Development of Control Laws for the NASA Langley Research Center Cockpit Motion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, Craig R.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Zaychik, Kirill B.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop highly advanced simulators is a critical need that has the ability to significantly impact the aerospace industry. The aerospace industry is advancing at an ever increasing pace and flight simulators must match this development with ever increasing urgency. In order to address both current problems and potential advancements with flight simulator techniques, several aspects of current control law technology of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) motion base simulator were examined. Preliminary investigation of linear models based upon hardware data were examined to ensure that the most accurate models are used. This research identified both system improvements in the bandwidth and more reliable linear models. Advancements in the compensator design were developed and verified through multiple techniques. The position error rate feedback, the acceleration feedback and the force feedback were all analyzed in the heave direction using the nonlinear model of the hardware. Improvements were made using the position error rate feedback technique. The acceleration feedback compensator also provided noteworthy improvement, while attempts at implementing a force feedback compensator proved unsuccessful.

  8. The Neural-fuzzy Thermal Error Compensation Controller on CNC Machining Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Pai-Chung; Chen, Shen-Len

    The geometric errors and structural thermal deformation are factors that influence the machining accuracy of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machining center. Therefore, researchers pay attention to thermal error compensation technologies on CNC machine tools. Some real-time error compensation techniques have been successfully demonstrated in both laboratories and industrial sites. The compensation results still need to be enhanced. In this research, the neural-fuzzy theory has been conducted to derive a thermal prediction model. An IC-type thermometer has been used to detect the heat sources temperature variation. The thermal drifts are online measured by a touch-triggered probe with a standard bar. A thermal prediction model is then derived by neural-fuzzy theory based on the temperature variation and the thermal drifts. A Graphic User Interface (GUI) system is also built to conduct the user friendly operation interface with Insprise C++ Builder. The experimental results show that the thermal prediction model developed by neural-fuzzy theory methodology can improve machining accuracy from 80µm to 3µm. Comparison with the multi-variable linear regression analysis the compensation accuracy is increased from ±10µm to ±3µm.

  9. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  10. Weight Loss and Glycemic Control after Sleeve Gastrectomy: Results from a Middle Eastern Center of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalifa, Khalid; Al Ansari, Ahmed; Showaiter, May

    2018-02-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are strongly linked to both morbidity and mortality. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has been established as an effective means of weight loss for obese patients as well as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study was designed to examine the short- and midterm outcomes of patients who underwent SG in a Middle Eastern Center of Excellence, a military training teaching hospital. The clinical outcomes of 59 patients with impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM who underwent SG between 2011 and 2014 with at least one and up to four years of follow-up were studied. Data were collected and compared, including the pre- and post-surgery measures of weight, body mass index, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and fasting blood glucose. Complete remission was defined as a fasting blood glucose level ≤100 mg/dL, an HbA1c ≤6 mg/dL, without use of antidiabetic medications. All patients showed significant reduction in body mass index following SG. Tight glycemic control was achieved among both diabetic and prediabetic patients. In this study, 88.14 per cent of all patients (diabetic and prediabetic) achieved complete resolution from their impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM and maintained normal blood glucose and HbA1C levels from one to four years postoperatively. SG is beneficial both in terms of short- and midterm weight loss and glucose control in both diabetic and prediabetic obese patients.

  11. Transfusion Complications in Thalassemia Patients: A Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichinsky, Elliott; Neumayr, Lynne; Trimble, Sean; Giardina, Patricia J.; Cohen, Alan R.; Coates, Thomas; Boudreaux, Jeanne; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Kenney, Kristy; Grant, Althea; Thompson, Alexis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives Transfusions are the primary therapy for thalassemia but have significant cumulative risks. In 2004, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established a national blood safety monitoring program for thalassemia. The purpose of this report is to summarize the patient population as well as previous non-immune and immune transfusion complications at the time of enrollment into the program. A focus on factors associated with allo- and auto-immunization in chronically transfused patients and a description of blood product preparation and transfusion practices at the participating institutions are included. Study Design and Methods The CDC Thalassemia Blood Safety Network is a consortium of thalassemia centers, longitudinally following patients to determine transfusion-related complications. Enrollment occurred from 2004 through 2012 and annual data collection is ongoing. Demographic data, transfusion history, and previous transfusion and non-transfusion complications were summarized for patients enrolled between 2004 and 2011. Logistic analyses of factors associated with allo- and auto-immunization were developed. Summary statistics of infections reported at the time of enrollment were also calculated. Results The race/ethnicity of the 407 thalassemia patients enrolled in the Network was predominantly Asian or Caucasian and 27% were immigrants. The average age was 22.3 years ± 13.2 and patients received an average total number of 149 ± 103.4 units of red blood cells. Iron-induced multi-organ dysfunction was common despite chelation. At study entry, 86 patients had previously been exposed to possible transfusion-associated pathogens, including Hepatitis-C (61), Hepatitis B (20), Hepatitis A (3), Parvovirus (9), HIV (4), malaria (1), staphylococcus aureus (1) and babesia (1). As 27% of the population was born outside of the United States (India, Pakistan, Thailand, China, Vietnam and Iran accounting for 57%), the source of

  12. Research on Using the Naturally Cold Air and the Snow for Data Center Air-conditioning, and Humidity Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kunikazu; Tano, Shunichi; Ichino, Junko

    To lower power consumption has becomes a worldwide concern. It is also becoming a bigger area in Computer Systems, such as reflected by the growing use of software-as-a-service and cloud computing whose market has increased since 2000, at the same time, the number of data centers that accumulates and manages the computer has increased rapidly. Power consumption at data centers is accounts for a big share of the entire IT power usage, and is still rapidly increasing. This research focuses on the air-conditioning that occupies accounts for the biggest portion of electric power consumption by data centers, and proposes to develop a technique to lower the power consumption by applying the natural cool air and the snow for control temperature and humidity. We verify those effectiveness of this approach by the experiment. Furthermore, we also examine the extent to which energy reduction is possible when a data center is located in Hokkaido.

  13. Radiological protection and routinary controls of an activimeter with a cesium and barium sources in an nuclear medicine center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales L, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work the results when carrying out the routine controls in a Deluxe Isotope (Calibrator II) equipment, with some sources of Cesium 137 and Barium 133, in a Nuclear Medicine Center that operates from the year 1983 in a modern one construction inside the Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) are shown. Taking in account the Radiological Protection measures to verify if the equipment responds to the personnel's demands in the measurements of activities of the diverse radionuclides that are used in different types of exams that are carried out in this Nuclear Medicine Center are the objectives of this work. This Center was equipped initially with donated equipment by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with those that it develops assistance, educational works and of research, giving services to patients of the INEN and other public and private medical centers. (Author)

  14. Quantum Control of a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center using Surface Acoustic Waves in the Resolved Sideband Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golter, David; Oo, Thein; Amezcua, Maira; Wang, Hailin

    Micro-electromechanical systems research is producing increasingly sophisticated tools for nanophononic applications. Such technology is well-suited for achieving chip-based, integrated acoustic control of solid-state quantum systems. We demonstrate such acoustic control in an important solid-state qubit, the diamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. Using an interdigitated transducer to generate a surface acoustic wave (SAW) field in a bulk diamond, we observe phonon-assisted sidebands in the optical excitation spectrum of a single NV center. This exploits the strong strain sensitivity of the NV excited states. The mechanical frequencies far exceed the relevant optical linewidths, reaching the resolved-sideband regime. This enables us to use the SAW field for driving Rabi oscillations on the phonon-assisted optical transition. These results stimulate the further integration of SAW-based technologies with the NV center system.

  15. Design and implementation of robust decentralized control laws for the ACES structure at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Phillips, Douglas; Hyland, David C.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to design controllers that would provide substantial reduction of line-of-sight control errors. The satisfaction of this objective required the controllers to attenuate the beam vibration significantly. Particular emphasis was placed on controller simplicity (i.e., reduced-order and decentralized controller architectures). Complexity reduction in control law implementation is of paramount interest due to stringent limitations on throughput of even state-of-the-art space qualified processors. The results of this experiment successfully demonstrate active vibrator control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the ACES structure at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The ACES structure is dynamically traceable to future space systems and especially allows the study of line-of-sight control issues.

  16. Heart transplant outcomes in recipients of Centers for Disease Control (CDC) high risk donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, Athanasios; Wilson, Lynn; Sekar, Rajesh B; Mangi, Abeel A; Yun, James J

    2016-12-01

    A lack of donor hearts remains a major limitation of heart transplantation. Hearts from Centers for Disease Control (CDC) high-risk donors can be utilized with specific recipient consent. However, outcomes of heart transplantation with CDC high-risk donors are not well known. We sought to define outcomes, including posttransplant hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, in recipients of CDC high-risk donor hearts at our institution. All heart transplant recipients from August 2010 to December 2014 (n = 74) were reviewed. Comparison of 1) CDC high-risk donor (HRD) versus 2) standard-risk donor (SRD) groups were performed using chi-squared tests for nominal data and Wilcoxon two-sample tests for continuous variables. Survival was estimated with Kaplan-Meier curves. Of 74 heart transplant recipients reviewed, 66 (89%) received a SRD heart and eight (11%) received a CDC HRD heart. We found no significant differences in recipient age, sex, waiting list 1A status, pretransplant left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support, cytomegalovirus (CMV) status, and graft ischemia times (p = NS) between the HRD and SRD groups. All of the eight HRD were seronegative at the time of transplant. Postoperatively, there was no significant difference in rejection rates at six and 12 months posttransplant. Importantly, no HRD recipients acquired hepatitis or HIV. Survival in HRD versus SRD recipients was not significantly different by Kaplan-Meier analysis (log rank p = 0.644) at five years posttransplant. Heart transplants that were seronegative at the time of transplant had similar posttransplant graft function, rejection rates, and five-year posttransplant survival versus recipients of SRD hearts. At our institution, no cases of hepatitis or HIV occurred in HRD recipients in early follow-up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [YANG's pricking-cupping therapy for knee osteoarthritis: a multi-center randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Xiru; Hu, Zhihai; Sun, Aijun; Ma, Yanwen; Chen Yingying; Zhang, Xuzhi; Liu, Meiling; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shuoshuo; Zhang, Yunjia; Li, Yijing; Shen, Weidong

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of YANG's pricking-cupping therapy for knee osteoar thritis (KOA). Methods This was a multi-center randomized parallel controlled trial. One hundred and seventy one patients with KOA were randomly allocated to a pricking-cupping group (89 cases) and a conventional acu puncture group (82 cases). Neixiyan (EX-LE 4), Dubi (ST 35) and ashi points were selected in the two groups. Patients in the pricking-cupping group were treated with YANG's pricking-cupping therapy; the seven-star needles were used to perform pricking at acupoints, then cupping was used until slight bleeding was observed. Patients in the conventional acupuncture group were treated with semi-standardized filiform needle therapy. The treatment was given for 4 weeks (from a minimum of 5 times to a maximum of 10 times). The follow-up visit was 4 weeks. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the visual analogue scale (VAS) were adopted for the efficacy assessments. The pain score, stiffness score, physical function score and total score of WOMAC were all reduced after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit in the two groups (all P0. 05), each score and total score of WOMAC in the pricking-cupping group were lower than those in the conventional acupuncture group after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit (Pcupping group were lower than those in the conventional acupuncture group after 4-week treatment and during follow-up visit (P cupping and conventional acupuncture therapy can both significantly improve knee joint pain and function in patients with KOA, which are relatively safe. The pricking cupping therapy is superior to conventional acupuncture with the identical selection of acupoints.

  18. Dose control in semi industrial irradiation plant at the Ezeiza Atomic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorda, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1975 a study was initiated at the Division of Dosimetry to develop a technique and a system of dosimetry to be applied to the radiosterilization processes in the semi industrial irradiation plant of Ezeiza Atomic Center. The result of this study was the potassium nitrate/nitrite dosimeter used as routine dosimeter for control processes in food conservation, with a dose range of 0.2 kGy-1 kGy and in radiosterilization processes of disposable medical products of 1 kGy-150kGy. The potassium nitrate crystals undergo a radiolytic reduction. A linear correlation between the dose applied to the solid and the production of potassium nitrite was observed. After the irradiation of solid, the produced nitrite solution is colorimetrically titrated by measuring the absorbency in a spectrophotometer at 504 nm. The color is due to the formation of a diazonium salt and its later copulation with N-1 naphtylethylendiamine hydrochloride in acid medium. In 1980 a postal survey was organized presenting this dosimeter to standardize the irradiation dose in industrial process for Latin America. This dosimeter was presented in 1984 at the International Symposium on High Doses of the IAEA that took place in Vienna. Since them, comparative studies were performed between this dosimeter and those internationally considered and accepted: cerium(IV)/cerium(III) sulphate, ionization chamber of parallel plates, alanine. The results of comparison with the alanine dosimeter, which was used by Dr. Regula of the GSF of Munich, were the following: February 1985: 0% deviation; February 1986: 0.43% deviation. (Author)

  19. Comparison of mental health, happiness, and emotion control with adolescents’ residential centers of state welfare organization and family reared adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Bawi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Many research indicated that adolescents’ residential centers have the high possibility to diagnose with psychological disorders. Therefore, the aim of this study was investigated the mental health, happiness and emotion control among adolescents’ residential centers of state welfare organization.Materials and Methods: This research is a causal –comparative research. The 80 adolescents’ residential centers were chosen through available sampling and 80 adolescents of schools of Alborz city were selected through cluster method. Statistical analysis was conducted by using the independent t-test. The research instruments were Emotion Control Questionnaire (ECQ, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ, Goldenberg, and Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI.Results: The significantly different was observed in mental health, happiness and emotion control between two adolescents groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: The results indicate that the institutional-reared decrease the level of mental health, happiness and emotion control in adolescents. Thus, counselors should be considered these factors in therapeutic intervention to enhancing the mental health of adolescents’ residential centers.

  20. 77 FR 2549 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES... will provide counsel to the ACD, CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and... territorial health departments in their efforts to address public health ethics challenges, approaches for...

  1. 75 FR 57044 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES... will provide counsel to the ACD, CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and...; efforts to support state, tribal, local and territorial health departments address ethical issues in the...

  2. 76 FR 29755 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES... of public health ethics questions and issues arising from programs, scientists and practitioners... April 28, 2011, ACD, CDC meeting; discussion of next steps on addressing potential public health ethical...

  3. 76 FR 55678 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES... provide counsel to the ACD, CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues... in their efforts to address public health ethics challenges. The agenda is subject to change as...

  4. 75 FR 30409 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention--Ethics Subcommittee (ES) In... to the ACD, CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues arising from... address public health ethics issues and coordination of these efforts with the CDC Office of State, Tribal...

  5. 76 FR 3909 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES..., regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues arising from programs, scientists and... submitted on the ethical considerations document for the allocation of ventilators during a severe pandemic...

  6. 77 FR 34046 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES... ACD, CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues arising from programs... ethics standards to the accreditation process for public health departments; ethical considerations...

  7. 75 FR 72831 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)--Ethics Subcommittee (ES... counsel to the ACD, CDC, regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues arising from... strategy for addressing its charge to provide a preliminary overview to the ACD on ethical issues related...

  8. 77 FR 58397 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Ethics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention--Ethics Subcommittee (ES) In..., regarding a broad range of public health ethics questions and issues arising from programs, scientists and practitioners. Matters To Be Discussed: Agenda items will include the following topics: Ethical considerations...

  9. Effortful Control and Parents' Emotion Socialization Patterns Predict Children's Positive Social Behavior: A Person-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rachel L.; Dunsmore, Julie C.; Smith, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: We examined relations of effortful control with parent emotion socialization practices and child social behavior using a person-centered approach in children ages 18 months to 5 years. A total of 76 parents (66 mothers, 10 fathers) completed questionnaires at screening and 6-month follow-up. There were no age differences in…

  10. Interobserver agreement of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for classifying infections in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M. C.; Ong, David S. Y.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; de Beer, Friso M.; van Hooijdonk, Roosmarijn T. M.; Huson, Mischa A.; Straat, Marleen; van Vught, Lonneke A.; Wieske, Luuk; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J.; van der Poll, Tom; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Cremer, Olaf L.

    2013-01-01

    Correct classification of the source of infection is important in observational and interventional studies of sepsis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria are most commonly used for this purpose, but the robustness of these definitions in critically ill patients is not known. We

  11. Assessment of operators' mental workload using physiological and subjective measures in cement, city traffic and power plant control centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Majid; Motamedzade, Majid; Heidarimoghadam, Rashid; Soltanian, Ali Reza; Miyake, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the operators' mental workload (MW) of cement, city traffic control and power plant control centers using subjective and objective measures during system vital parameters monitoring. This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2014 to February 2015 at the cement, city traffic control and power plant control centers. Electrocardiography and electroencephalography data were recorded from forty males during performing their daily working in resting, low mental workload (LMW), high mental workload (HMW) and recovery conditions (each block 5 minutes). The NASA-Task Load Index (TLX) was used to evaluate the subjective workload of the operators. The results showed that increasing MW had a significant effect on the operators subjective responses in two conditions ([1,53] = 216.303, P < 0.001, η2 = 0.803). Also,the Task-MW interaction effect on operators subjective responses was significant (F [3, 53] = 12.628,P < 0.001, η2 = 0.417). Analysis of repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that increasing mental demands had a significant effect on heart rate, low frequency/high frequency ratio, theta and alpha band activity. The results suggested that when operators' mental demands especially in traffic control and power plant tasks increased, their mental fatigue and stress level increased and their mental health deteriorated. Therefore, it may be necessary to implement an ergonomic program or administrative control to manage mental probably health in these control centers. Furthermore, by evaluating MW, the control center director can organize the human resources for each MW condition to sustain the appropriate performance as well as improve system functions.

  12. Assessment of operators’ mental workload using physiological and subjective measures in cement, city traffic and power plant control centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Majid; Motamedzade, Majid; Heidarimoghadam, Rashid; Soltanian, Ali Reza; Miyake, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to evaluate the operators’ mental workload (MW) of cement, city traffic control and power plant control centers using subjective and objective measures during system vital parameters monitoring. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2014 to February 2015 at the cement, city traffic control and power plant control centers. Electrocardiography and electroencephalography data were recorded from forty males during performing their daily working in resting, low mental workload (LMW), high mental workload (HMW) and recovery conditions (each block 5 minutes). The NASA-Task Load Index (TLX) was used to evaluate the subjective workload of the operators. Results: The results showed that increasing MW had a significant effect on the operators subjective responses in two conditions ([1,53] = 216.303, P < 0.001, η2 = 0.803). Also,the Task-MW interaction effect on operators subjective responses was significant (F [3, 53] = 12.628,P < 0.001, η2 = 0.417). Analysis of repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that increasing mental demands had a significant effect on heart rate, low frequency/high frequency ratio, theta and alpha band activity. Conclusion: The results suggested that when operators’ mental demands especially in traffic control and power plant tasks increased, their mental fatigue and stress level increased and their mental health deteriorated. Therefore, it may be necessary to implement an ergonomic program or administrative control to manage mental probably health in these control centers. Furthermore, by evaluating MW, the control center director can organize the human resources for each MW condition to sustain the appropriate performance as well as improve system functions. PMID:27386425

  13. Report on the Audit of the Acquisition of the Tactical Air Operations Center/Modular Control Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-06

    This is our final report on the Audit of the Acquisition of the Tactical Air Operations Center/Modular Control Equipment (TAOC/MCE) for your...matters of concern that could affect the acquisition of the TAOC/MCE. We performed the audit from March through December 1990. The audit objective was...controls related to the audit objectives. The audit was made in accordance with the Inspector General’s critical program management element approach

  14. Impact of an Infection Control Program on the Prevalence of Nosocomial Infections at a Tertiary Care Center in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Ebnöther, Corina; Tanner, Beate; Schmid, Flavia; Rocca, Vittoria La; Heinzer, Ivo; Bregenzer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To study the impact of a multimodal infection control program on the rate of nosocomial infections at a 550-bed tertiary care center. Methods. Before and after the implementation of an infection control program, the rate of nosocomial infection was recorded in time-interval prevalence studies. Hand hygiene compliance was studied before and after the intervention. As a surrogate marker of compliance, the amount of alcohol-based hand rub consumed before the intervention was compared ...

  15. Control of the motion of the body's center of mass in relation to the center of pressure during high-heeled gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Lien; Lu, Tung-Wu; Liu, Ming-Wei

    2013-07-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and falling, leading to injuries such as fracture and ankle sprain. Knowledge of the motion of the body's center of mass (COM) with respect to the center of pressure (COP) during high-heeled gait may offer insights into the balance control strategies and provide a basis for approaches that minimize the risk of falling and associated adverse effects. The study aimed to investigate the influence of the base and height of the heels on the COM motion in terms of COM-COP inclination angles (IA) and the rate of change of IA (RCIA). Fifteen females who regularly wear high heels walked barefoot and with narrow-heeled shoes with three heel heights (3.9cm, 6.3cm and 7.3cm) while kinematic and ground reaction force data were measured and used to calculate the COM and COP, as well as the temporal-distance parameters. The reduced base of the heels was found to be the primary factor for the reduced normalized walking speed and the reduced frontal IA throughout the gait cycle. This was achieved mainly through the control of the RCIA during double-leg stance (DLS). The heel heights affected mainly the peak RCIA during DLS, which were not big enough to affect the IA. These results suggest young adults adopt a conservative strategy for balance control during narrow-heeled gait. The results will serve as baseline data for future evaluation of patients and/or older adults during narrow-heeled gait with the aim of reducing the risk of falling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Willingness to pay and willingness to accept in a patient-centered blood pressure control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason-Comstock, Julie; Streater, Alicia; Goodman, Allen; Janisse, James; Brody, Aaron; Mango, LynnMarie; Dawood, Rachelle; Levy, Phillip

    2017-08-07

    Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke but patients often discount recommended behavioral changes and prescribed medications. While effective interventions to promote adherence have been developed, cost-effectiveness from the patient's perspective, has not been well studied. The valuation of patient time and out of pocket expenses should be included while performing cost effectiveness evaluation. The Achieve BP study uses the contingent valuation method to assess willingness to accept (WTA) and willingness to pay (WTP) among patients with a history of uncontrolled blood pressure discharged from an urban emergency department and enrolled in a larger randomized controlled trial. WTA and WTP were assessed by asking patients a series of questions about time and travel costs and time value related to their study participation. A survey was conducted during the final study visit with patients to investigate the effectiveness of a kiosk-based educational intervention on blood pressure control. All study patients, regardless of study arm, received the same clinical protocol of commonly prescribed antihypertensive medication and met with research clinicians four times as part of the study procedures. Thirty-eight patients were offered the opportunity to participate in the cost-effectiveness study and all completed the survey. Statistical comparisons revealed these 38 patients were similar in representation to the entire RCT study population. All 38 (100.0%) were African-American, with an average age of 49.1 years; 55.3% were male, 21.1% were married, 78.9% had a high school or higher education, and 44.7% were working. 55.9% did not have a primary care provider and 50.0% did not have health insurance. Time price linear regression analysis was performed to estimate predictors of WTA and WTP. WTP and WTA may generate different results, and the elasticities were proportional to the estimated coefficients, with WTP about twice as

  17. In-Plane Shielding for CT: Effect of Off-Centering, Automatic Exposure Control and Shield-to-Surface Distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Dang, Pragya; Singh, Sarabjeet; Saini, Sanjay; Shepard, Jo Anne O. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (United States)

    2009-04-15

    To assess effects of off-centering, automatic exposure control, and padding on attenuation values, noise, and radiation dose when using in-plane bismuth-based shields for CT scanning. A 30 cm anthropomorphic chest phantom was scanned on a 64-multidetector CT, with the center of the phantom aligned to the gantry isocenter. Scanning was repeated after placing a bismuth breast shield on the anterior surface with no gap and with 1, 2, and 6 cm of padding between the shield and the phantom surface. The 'shielded' phantom was also scanned with combined modulation and off-centering of the phantom at 2 cm, 4 cm and 6 cm below the gantry isocenter. CT numbers, noise, and surface radiation dose were measured. The data were analyzed using an analysis of variance. The in-plane shield was not associated with any significant increment for the surface dose or CT dose index volume, which was achieved by comparing the radiation dose measured by combined modulation technique to the fixed mAs (p > 0.05). Irrespective of the gap or the surface CT numbers, surface noise increased to a larger extent compared to Hounsfield unit (HU) (0-6 cm, 26-55%) and noise (0-6 cm, 30-40%) in the center. With off-centering, in-plane shielding devices are associated with less dose savings, although dose reduction was still higher than in the absence of shielding (0 cm off-center, 90% dose reduction; 2 cm, 61%) (p < 0.0001). Streak artifacts were noted at 0 cm and 1 cm gaps but not at 2 cm and 6 cm gaps of shielding to the surface distances. In-plane shields are associated with greater image noise, artificially increased attenuation values, and streak artifacts. However, shields reduce radiation dose regardless of the extent of off-centering. Automatic exposure control did not increase radiation dose when using a shield.

  18. Emergency Flight Control Using Only Engine Thrust and Lateral Center-of-Gravity Offset: A First Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Burken, John; Maine, Trindel A.; Bull, John

    1997-01-01

    Normally, the damage that results in a total loss of the primary flight controls of a jet transport airplane, including all engines on one side, would be catastrophic. In response, NASA Dryden has conceived an emergency flight control system that uses only the thrust of a wing-mounted engine along with a lateral center-of-gravity (CGY) offset from fuel transfer. Initial analysis and simulation studies indicate that such a system works, and recent high-fidelity simulation tests on the MD-11 and B-747 suggest that the system provides enough control for a survivable landing. This paper discusses principles of flight control using only a wing engine thrust and CGY offset, along with the amount of CGY offset capability of some transport airplanes. The paper also presents simulation results of the throttle-only control capability and closed-loop control of ground track using computer-controlled thrust.

  19. The World Optical Depth Research and Calibration Center (WORCC) quality assurance and quality control of GAW-PFR AOD measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Nyeki, Stephan; Gröbner, Julian; Wehrli, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    The World Optical Depth Research Calibration Center (WORCC) is a section within the World Radiation Center at Physikalisches-Meteorologisches Observatorium (PMOD/WRC), Davos, Switzerland, established after the recommendations of the World Meteorological Organization for calibration of aerosol optical depth (AOD)-related Sun photometers. WORCC is mandated to develop new methods for instrument calibration, to initiate homogenization activities among different AOD networks and to run a network (GAW-PFR) of Sun photometers. In this work we describe the calibration hierarchy and methods used under WORCC and the basic procedures, tests and processing techniques in order to ensure the quality assurance and quality control of the AOD-retrieved data.

  20. Sentinel-3 Mission Performance Center: paving the way of high-quality controlled data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruniquel, Jerome; Féménias, Pierre; Goryl, Philippe; Bonekamp, Hans

    2015-04-01

    As part of the Sentinel-3 mission and in order to ensure the highest quality of products, ESA and EUMETSAT set up the Sentinel-3 Mission Performance Centre (S-3 MPC). This facility is part of the Payload Data Ground Segment (PDGS) and aims at controlling the quality of all generated products, from L0 to L2. The S-3 MPC is composed of a Coordinating Centre (CC), where the core infrastructure is hosted, which is in charge of the main routine activities (especially the quality control of data) and the overall service management. Expert Support Laboratories (ESLs) are involved in calibration and validation activities and provide specific assessment of the products (e.g., analysis of trends, ad hoc analysis of anomalies, etc.). The S-3 MPC interacts with the Processing Archiving Centers (PACs) and the marine centre at EUMETSAT. The S-3 MPC service contract is currently carried out by 23-partners consortium led by ACRI-ST, France. The S-3 MPC contract was kick-offed in September 2014 with a first set-up phase of 12 months. After the launch of S3-A (planned before end of 2015), the S-3 MPC will start its second phase to support commissioning activities. Then a routine operation phase of up to 5 years will begin, including the commissioning activities related to S3-B. The main S-3 MPC activities are: - Calibration: to update on-board and on-ground configuration data in order to meet product quality requirements. - Validation: to assess, by independent means with respect to the methods and tools used for calibration, the quality of the generated data products. Validation functions provide feedback to calibration and data processors corrective and perfective maintenance activities. - Verification: to confirm that the specified requirements on a system have been satisfied. - Quality Control: to routinely monitor the status of the sensor and to check if the derived products (Level 0, Level 1 and Level 2) meet the quality requirements along mission lifetime. - Algorithm

  1. Sustaining a Focus on Health Equity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Through Organizational Structures and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Hazel D; Roberts, George W; Bouye, Karen E; Green, Yvonne; McDonald, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The public health infrastructure required for achieving health equity is multidimensional and complex. The infrastructure should be responsive to current and emerging priorities and capable of providing the foundation for developing, planning, implementing, and evaluating health initiatives. This article discusses these infrastructure requirements by examining how they are operationalized in the organizational infrastructure for promoting health equity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, utilizing the nation's premier public health agency as a lens. Examples from the history of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's work in health equity from its centers, institute, and offices are provided to identify those structures and functions that are critical to achieving health equity. Challenges and facilitators to sustaining a health equity organizational infrastructure, as gleaned from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's experience, are noted. Finally, we provide additional considerations for expanding and sustaining a health equity infrastructure, which the authors hope will serve as "food for thought" for practitioners in state, tribal, or local health departments, community-based organizations, or nongovernmental organizations striving to create or maintain an impactful infrastructure to achieve health equity.

  2. Integrated Pest Management Intervention in Child Care Centers Improves Knowledge, Pest Control, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkon, Abbey; Nouredini, Sahar; Swartz, Alicia; Sutherland, Andrew Mason; Stephens, Michelle; Davidson, Nita A; Rose, Roberta

    To reduce young children's exposure to pests and pesticides, an integrated pest management (IPM) intervention was provided for child care center staff. The 7-month IPM education and consultation intervention was conducted by trained nurse child care health consultants in 44 child care centers in California. IPM knowledge surveys were completed by child care staff, objective IPM assessments were completed by research assistants pre- and postintervention, and activity logs were completed by the nurses. There were significant increases in IPM knowledge for the child care staff who attended workshops. There were reductions in the prevalence of pests and increases in IPM practices at the postintervention compared with the preintervention time point. The nurses consulted an average of 5.4 hours per center. A nurse-led IPM intervention in child care centers can reduce exposure to harmful substances for young children attending child care centers. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Contraceptive Use and the Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy: A Multi-Center Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Zhao, Wei-Hong; Meng, Chun-Xia; Ping, Hua; Qin, Guo-Juan; Cao, Shu-Jun; Xi, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qian; Li, Xiao-Cui; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the association between the risk of ectopic pregnancy (EP) and the use of common contraceptives during the previous and current conception/menstrual cycle. A multi-center case-control study was conducted in Shanghai. Women diagnosed with EP were recruited as the case group (n = 2,411). Women with intrauterine pregnancy (IUP) (n = 2,416) and non-pregnant women (n = 2,419) were matched as controls at a ratio of 1∶1. Information regarding the previous and current use of contraceptives was collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidential intervals (CIs). Previous use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) was associated with a slight risk of ectopic pregnancy (AOR1 = 1.87 [95% CI: 1.48-2.37]; AOR2 = 1.84 [1.49-2.27]), and the risk increased with the duration of previous use (P1 for trend contraceptives reduced the risk of both unwanted IUP (condom: AOR = 0.04 [0.03-0.05]; withdrawal method: AOR = 0.10 [0.07-0.13]; calendar rhythm method: AOR = 0.54 [0.40-0.73]; oral contraceptive pills [OCPs]: AOR = 0.03 [0.02-0.08]; levonorgestrel emergency contraception [LNG-EC]: AOR = 0.22 [0.16-0.30]; IUDs: AOR = 0.01 [0.005-0.012]; tubal sterilization: AOR = 0.01 [0.001-0.022]) and unwanted EP (condom: AOR1 = 0.05 [0.04-0.06]; withdrawal method: AOR1 = 0.13 [0.09-0.19]; calendar rhythm method: AOR1 = 0.66 [0.48-0.91]; OCPs: AOR1 = 0.14 [0.07-0.26]; IUDs: AOR1 = 0.17 [0.13-0.22]; tubal sterilization: AOR1 = 0.04 [0.02-0.08]). However, when contraception failed and pregnancy occurred, current use of OCPs (AOR2 = 4.06 [1.64-10.07]), LNG-EC (AOR2 = 4.87 [3.88-6.10]), IUDs (AOR2 = 21.08 [13.44-33.07]), and tubal sterilization (AOR2 = 7.68 [1.69-34.80]) increased the risk of EP compared with the non-use of contraceptives. Current use of most contraceptives reduce the risk of both IUP and EP. However, if the

  4. Contraceptive Use and the Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy: A Multi-Center Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    Full Text Available To evaluate the association between the risk of ectopic pregnancy (EP and the use of common contraceptives during the previous and current conception/menstrual cycle.A multi-center case-control study was conducted in Shanghai. Women diagnosed with EP were recruited as the case group (n = 2,411. Women with intrauterine pregnancy (IUP (n = 2,416 and non-pregnant women (n = 2,419 were matched as controls at a ratio of 1∶1. Information regarding the previous and current use of contraceptives was collected. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and the corresponding 95% confidential intervals (CIs.Previous use of intrauterine devices (IUDs was associated with a slight risk of ectopic pregnancy (AOR1 = 1.87 [95% CI: 1.48-2.37]; AOR2 = 1.84 [1.49-2.27], and the risk increased with the duration of previous use (P1 for trend <10-4, P2 for trend <10-4. The current use of most contraceptives reduced the risk of both unwanted IUP (condom: AOR = 0.04 [0.03-0.05]; withdrawal method: AOR = 0.10 [0.07-0.13]; calendar rhythm method: AOR = 0.54 [0.40-0.73]; oral contraceptive pills [OCPs]: AOR = 0.03 [0.02-0.08]; levonorgestrel emergency contraception [LNG-EC]: AOR = 0.22 [0.16-0.30]; IUDs: AOR = 0.01 [0.005-0.012]; tubal sterilization: AOR = 0.01 [0.001-0.022] and unwanted EP (condom: AOR1 = 0.05 [0.04-0.06]; withdrawal method: AOR1 = 0.13 [0.09-0.19]; calendar rhythm method: AOR1 = 0.66 [0.48-0.91]; OCPs: AOR1 = 0.14 [0.07-0.26]; IUDs: AOR1 = 0.17 [0.13-0.22]; tubal sterilization: AOR1 = 0.04 [0.02-0.08]. However, when contraception failed and pregnancy occurred, current use of OCPs (AOR2 = 4.06 [1.64-10.07], LNG-EC (AOR2 = 4.87 [3.88-6.10], IUDs (AOR2 = 21.08 [13.44-33.07], and tubal sterilization (AOR2 = 7.68 [1.69-34.80] increased the risk of EP compared with the non-use of contraceptives.Current use of most

  5. Optimization of traffic distribution control in software-configurable infrastructure of virtual data center based on a simulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Bolodurina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the proportion of use of cloud computing technology in today's business processes of companies is growing steadily. Despite the fact that it allows you to reduce the cost of ownership and operation of IT infrastructure, there are a number of problems related to the control of data centers. One such problem is the efficiency of the use of available companies compute and network resources. One of the directions of optimization is the process of traffic control of cloud applications and services in data centers. Given the multi-tier architecture of modern data center, this problem does not quite trivial. The advantage of modern virtual infrastructure is the ability to use software-configurable networks and software-configurable data storages. However, existing solutions with algorithmic optimization does not take into account a number of features forming network traffic with multiple classes of applications. Within the framework of the exploration solved the problem of optimizing the distribution of traffic cloud applications and services for the software-controlled virtual data center infrastructure. A simulation model describing the traffic in data center and software-configurable network segments involved in the processing of user requests for applications and services located network environment that includes a heterogeneous cloud platform and software-configurable data storages. The developed model has allowed to implement cloud applications traffic management algorithm and optimize access to the storage system through the effective use of the channel for data transmission. In experimental studies found that the application of the developed algorithm can reduce the response time of cloud applications and services, and as a result improve the performance of processing user requests and to reduce the number of failures.

  6. Controlling the Instructional Development Process. Training Development and Research Center Project Number Fifteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleezer, Catherine M.; Swanson, Richard A.

    Process control is a way of training managers in business and industry to plan, monitor, and communicate the instructional development process of training projects. Two simple and useful tools that managers use in controlling the process of instructional development are the Process Control Planning Sheet and the Process Control Record. The Process…

  7. 75 FR 48699 - Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... a.m.-3:30 p.m., August 24, 2010. Place: Emory Conference Center Hotel, 1615 Clifton Road, N.E... government through the ACD regarding a broad range of human health surveillance issues arising from the...: [email protected] . For security reasons, members of the public interested in attending the meeting should...

  8. Dynamical nuclear polarization using multi-colour control of color centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pengcheng [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Physics, Wuhan (China); Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Center for Quantum Optical Science, Wuhan (China); Plenio, Martin B. [Universitaet Ulm, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Ulm (Germany); Universitaet Ulm, Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Ulm (Germany); Cai, Jianming [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Physics, Wuhan (China); Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Center for Quantum Optical Science, Wuhan (China); Universitaet Ulm, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Ulm (Germany); Universitaet Ulm, Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology, Ulm (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Dynamical nuclear polarization (DNP) transfers the polarization of electron spins at cryogenic temperatures to achieve strong nuclear polarization for applications in nuclear magnetic resonance. Recently introduced approaches employ optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to achieve DNP even at ambient temperatures. In such schemes microwave radiation is used to establish a Hartmann-Hahn condition between the NV electron spin and proximal nuclear spins to facilitate polarization transfer. For a single monochromatic microwave driving field, the Hartmann-Hahn condition cannot be satisfied for an ensemble of NV centers due to inhomogeneous broadening and reduces significantly the overall efficiency of dynamical nuclear polarization using an ensemble of NV centers. Here, we adopt generalized Hartmann-Hahn type dynamical nuclear polarization schemes by applying microwave driving fields with (multiple) time-modulated frequencies. We show that it is possible to enhance the effective coupling between an ensemble of NV center spins with inhomogeneous broadening and nuclear spins, thereby improving significantly the overall efficiency of dynamical nuclear polarization. This approach can also be used to achieve dynamical nuclear polarization of an ensemble of nuclei with a distribution of Larmor frequencies, which would be helpful in magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a single NV spin sensor. (orig.)

  9. Increasing the operational efficiency and safety in operation control centers: the TRANSPETRO experience; Aumentando a seguranca e eficiencia operacional em centros de controle: a experiencia da TRANSPETRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felicio, Marco Aurelio Fierro; Frisoli, Caetano [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    The increase in operational efficiency and safety in operation control centers has been traditionally obtained through direct actions in the operational activity itself and on the resources and systems used for that. Modern supervisory and control systems, sophisticated simulation software, cutting-edge last generation equipment and installations, clear and comprehensive procedures definitions and intensive and constant training of the operation teams are, usually, the chosen paths followed by control centers in their incessant quest for increased operational efficiency and safety. This paper presents the path followed by the TRANSPETRO's National Operational Control Center - Natural Gas (Centro Nacional de Controle Operacional - CNCO-Gas) - that has not only focused with the traditional aspects above, but has also made intensive investments in systems and data base integrations, aiming at eliminating data inconsistencies and redundancies and at including automation, standardization and systematization of non-operational and complementary operational activities. These investments allowed TRANSPETRO CNCO-Gas face the big challenge of growing that TRANSPETRO's gas transportation activity is facing now and will be facing in the near future: from 2,600 km to 7,000 km of gas pipelines, and a volume of transported natural gas from 35 MMm{sup 3}/day to 100 MMm{sup 3}/day. (author)

  10. The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter: Results on Crystal Measurements, Quality Control and Data Management in the Rome Regional Center

    CERN Document Server

    Costantini, S

    2004-01-01

    The barrel of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter is currently under construction and will contain 61200 PbWO4 crystals. Half of them are being fully characterized for dimensions, optical properties and light yield in the INFN-ENEA Regional Center near Rome. We describe the setup of an automatic quality control system for the crystal measurements and the present results on their qualification, as well as the REDACLE project, which has been developed to control and ease the production process. As it will not be possible to precalibrate the whole calorimeter,the crystal measurements and quality checks performed at the Regional Center will be crucial to provide a basis for fast in-situ calibration with particles. REDACLE is at the same time a fast database and a data management system, where the database and the workflow structures are decoupled, in order to obtain the best flexibility.

  11. Current status of quality evaluation of nursing care through director review and reflection from the Nursing Quality Control Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xia; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The quality evaluation of nursing care is a key link in medical quality management. It is important and worth studying for the nursing supervisors to know the disadvantages during the process of quality evaluation of nursing care and then to improve the whole nursing quality. This study was to provide director insight on the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care from Nursing Quality Control Centers (NQCCs). Material and Methods: This qualitative study used a sample ...

  12. Size-controlled fluorescent nanodiamonds: A facile method of fabrication and color-center counting

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Remi; Floyd, Daniel L.; Peng, Wei; Choy, Jennifer; Lončar, Marko; Bakr, Osman

    2013-01-01

    findings suggest that nanocrystal size separation by DGU may be used to control the number of defects per nanocrystal. The efficient approaches described herein to control and quantify DCCs are valuable to researchers as they explore applications for color

  13. Recovery Act: Federspiel Controls (now Vigilent) and State of California Department of General Services Data Center Energy Efficient Cooling Control Demonstration. Final technical project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federspiel, Clifford; Evers, Myah

    2011-09-30

    Eight State of California data centers were equipped with an intelligent energy management system to evaluate the effectiveness, energy savings, dollar savings and benefits that arise when powerful artificial intelligence-based technology measures, monitors and actively controls cooling operations. Control software, wireless sensors and mesh networks were used at all sites. Most sites used variable frequency drives as well. The system dynamically adjusts temperature and airflow on the fly by analyzing real-time demands, thermal behavior and historical data collected on site. Taking into account the chaotic interrelationships of hundreds to thousands of variables in a data center, the system optimizes the temperature distribution across a facility while also intelligently balancing loads, outputs, and airflow. The overall project will provide a reduction in energy consumption of more than 2.3 million kWh each year, which translates to $240,000 saved and a reduction of 1.58 million pounds of carbon emissions. Across all sites, the cooling energy consumption was reduced by 41%. The average reduction in energy savings across all the sites that use VFDs is higher at 58%. Before this case study, all eight data centers ran the cooling fans at 100% capacity all of the time. Because of the new technology, cooling fans run at the optimum fan speed maintaining stable air equilibrium while also expending the least amount of electricity. With lower fan speeds, the life of the capital investment made on cooling equipment improves, and the cooling capacity of the data center increases. This case study depicts a rare technological feat: The same process and technology worked cost effectively in eight very different environments. The results show that savings were achieved in centers with diverse specifications for the sizes, ages and types of cooling equipment. The percentage of cooling energy reduction ranged from 19% to 78% while keeping temperatures substantially within the

  14. Association of Employee Attributes and Exceptional Performance Rating at a National Center of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Henry; Myles, Ranell L; Truman, Benedict I; Dean, Hazel D

    2015-01-01

    Employee performance evaluation motivates and rewards exceptional individual performance that advances the achievement of organizational goals. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and its operating units evaluate employee performance annually and reward exceptional performance with a cash award or quality step increase in pay. A summary performance rating (SPR) of "exceptional" indicated personal achievements in 2011 that were beyond expectations described in the employee's performance plan. To determine whether personal attributes and job setting of civil service employees were associated with an exceptional SPR in National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP) in 2011. Data from the CDC 2011 performance management database collected in 2012 were analyzed in 2013 to identify SPR, personal attributes, and job settings of full-time civil service employees. Multivariate logistic regression controlled for confounding and stratified analysis detected effect modifiers of the association between receiving an exceptional SPR in 2011 and gender, race/ethnicity, education, job location, job series, grade level, years in grade, years of federal service, supervisory role, and NCHHSTP division. Among the 1037 employees, exceptional SPR was independently associated with: female gender (adjusted odds ratio: 1.7 [1.3, 2.3]), advanced degrees (doctorate: 1.7 [1.1, 2.5] master's: [1.1, 2.0]), headquarters location (2.8 [1.9, 4.1]), higher pay grade (3.3 [2.4, 4.5]) and years in grade (0-1 years: 1.7 [1.3, 2.4]; 2-4 years: 1.5 [1.1, 2.0]), division level (Division A: 5.0 [2.5, 9.9]; Division B: 5.5 [3.5, 8.8]), and supervisory status (at a lower-pay grade) (odds ratio: 3.7 [1.1, 11.3]). Exceptional SPR is independently associated with personal employee attributes and job settings that are not modifiable by interventions designed to improve employee performance based on accomplishments.

  15. Role of water quality assessments in hospital infection control: Experience from a new oncology center in eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Bhalchandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality assessment and timely intervention are essential for health. Microbiology, total dissolved solids (TDS and free residual chlorine were measured for water quality maintenance in an oncology center in India. Impact of these interventions over a period of 22 months has been demonstrated with four cardinal events. Pseudomonas in hospital water was controlled by adequate chlorination, whereas high TDS in the central sterile supply department water was corrected by the installation of electro-deionization plant. Contaminated bottled water was replaced using quality controlled hospital supply. Timely detection and correction of water-related issues, including reverse osmosis plant was possible through multi-faceted approach to water quality.

  16. A single residue controls electron transfer gating in photosynthetic reaction centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shlyk, O.; Samish, I.; Matěnová, M.; Dulebo, A.; Poláková, H.; Kaftan, David; Scherz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAR 16 (2017), s. 1-13, č. článku 44580. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00703S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1416 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BACTERIAL REACTION CENTERS * INDUCED STRUCTURAL-CHANGES * ATOMIC-FORCE MICROSCOPE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  17. Re-centering variable friction device for vibration control of structures subjected to near-field earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbulut, Osman E.; Hurlebaus, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    This paper proposes a re-centering variable friction device (RVFD) for control of civil structures subjected to near-field earthquakes. The proposed hybrid device has two sub-components. The first sub-component of this hybrid device consists of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires that exhibit a unique hysteretic behavior and full recovery following post-transformation deformations. The second sub-component of the hybrid device consists of variable friction damper (VFD) that can be intelligently controlled for adaptive semi-active behavior via modulation of its voltage level. In general, installed SMA devices have the ability to re-center structures at the end of the motion and VFDs can increase the energy dissipation capacity of structures. The full realization of these devices into a singular, hybrid form which complements the performance of each device is investigated in this study. A neuro-fuzzy model is used to capture rate- and temperature-dependent nonlinear behavior of the SMA components of the hybrid device. An optimal fuzzy logic controller (FLC) is developed to modulate voltage level of VFDs for favorable performance in a RVFD hybrid application. To obtain optimal controllers for concurrent mitigation of displacement and acceleration responses, tuning of governing fuzzy rules is conducted by a multi-objective heuristic optimization. Then, numerical simulation of a multi-story building is conducted to evaluate the performance of the hybrid device. Results show that a re-centering variable friction device modulated with a fuzzy logic control strategy can effectively reduce structural deformations without increasing acceleration response during near-field earthquakes.

  18. Control of Database Applications at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Indianapolis Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    The Defense Finance and Accounting Service Financial Systems Organization, under the control of the Deputy Director for Information Management, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, is responsible...

  19. High Performance, Robust Control of Flexible Space Structures: MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Many spacecraft systems have ambitious objectives that place stringent requirements on control systems. Achievable performance is often limited because of difficulty of obtaining accurate models for flexible space structures. To achieve sufficiently high performance to accomplish mission objectives may require the ability to refine the control design model based on closed-loop test data and tune the controller based on the refined model. A control system design procedure is developed based on mixed H2/H(infinity) optimization to synthesize a set of controllers explicitly trading between nominal performance and robust stability. A homotopy algorithm is presented which generates a trajectory of gains that may be implemented to determine maximum achievable performance for a given model error bound. Examples show that a better balance between robustness and performance is obtained using the mixed H2/H(infinity) design method than either H2 or mu-synthesis control design. A second contribution is a new procedure for closed-loop system identification which refines parameters of a control design model in a canonical realization. Examples demonstrate convergence of the parameter estimation and improved performance realized by using the refined model for controller redesign. These developments result in an effective mechanism for achieving high-performance control of flexible space structures.

  20. Quality control of pediatric chest X-rays in diagnostic centers with and without pediatric competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alt, C.D.; Engelmann, D.; Schenk, J.P.; Troeger, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation protection in pediatric radiology is very important because of the particular sensitivity of radiosensitive organs in younger patients. Optimized image quality supports radiation protection and should be targeted. In our study we examined the quality of pediatric chest X-rays at diagnostic centers (university hospitals and other large clinics). We then evaluated differences in image quality in departments without pediatric competence (R) and departments with pediatric competence (PR). Materials and Methods: Our study was based on 313 conventional chest X-rays from 207 patients (192 p.a./a.p. and 121 lateral, 43 from R, 258 from PR and 12 neither from R nor KR) and 38 digital chest X-rays from 26 patients (25 p.a./a.p. and 13 lateral, 1 from R and 37 from PR). All patients (age 0 - 18 years) are from Nephroblastoma-Study SIOP-93/01-GPOH. We examined all initial chest X-rays, which were sent to us for evaluation upon request between 4/3/2002 and 6/14/2002. The examined parameters were: exposure, centering of the X-rays/patient positioning, collimation and sharpness. The X-rays were evaluated on a scale from 1 (best result) to 5 (worst result), resulting in an overall score of A = optimum, B = minor problems, C = major problems, or D = unusable. The optical density, the center of the image and the relative field size were also measured. Statistical tests (Mann-Whitney-U and log regression) were carried out on the conventional images. The study was performed retrospectively. The exposure, sharpness and optical density of the digital X-rays were not analyzed. Results: In the case of all conventional X-rays, the quality of the centering of the X-rays/patient positioning and collimation was moderate (average scale value: 2.4 and 2.8), and the quality of the exposure and sharpness was good and very good (average scale value: 1.9 and 1.5). The quality of the chest X-rays in departments with additional pediatric radiological expertise was better mainly in

  1. The releases control and the environment survey of the Cea Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Cea sets the environment protection in the heart of its security policy, which is based on the mastership of risks resulting from the researches activities and installations development. This policy aims to reduce as small as possible compared with the technical and economical necessities, the impact of its activities on the human and the environment. This document, takes stock for the year 2002, of the liquid and gas radioactive effluents releases as also of the radioactivity level around the Cea Centers, by a systematic monitoring of the atmosphere, the waters, the vegetation and the milk. (A.L.B.)

  2. Inventory management and control at the central distribution center for Univar Products International B.V.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pholnukulkit, Pimara

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the outcome of the Logistics Design Project carried out for Univar Products International B.V. The goal of this project is to design an inventory control system and implement an inventory control tool that supports decisions in managing inventory of all products in the central

  3. Patient-centered disease management (PCDM) for heart failure: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelman, David B; Plomondon, Mary E; Sullivan, Mark D; Nelson, Karin; Hattler, Brack; McBryde, Connor; Lehmann, Kenneth G; Potfay, Jonathan; Heidenreich, Paul; Rumsfeld, John S

    2013-07-09

    Chronic heart failure (HF) disease management programs have reported inconsistent results and have not included comorbid depression management or specifically focused on improving patient-reported outcomes. The Patient Centered Disease Management (PCDM) trial was designed to test the effectiveness of collaborative care disease management in improving health status (symptoms, functioning, and quality of life) in patients with HF who reported poor HF-specific health status. Patients with a HF diagnosis at four VA Medical Centers were identified through population-based sampling. Patients with a Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ, a measure of HF-specific health status) score of patients were randomized to receive usual care or the PCDM intervention, which included: (1) collaborative care management by VA clinicians including a nurse, cardiologist, internist, and psychiatrist, who worked with patients and their primary care providers to provide guideline-concordant care management, (2) home telemonitoring and guided patient self-management support, and (3) screening and treatment for comorbid depression. The primary study outcome is change in overall KCCQ score. Secondary outcomes include depression, medication adherence, guideline-based care, hospitalizations, and mortality. The PCDM trial builds on previous studies of HF disease management by prioritizing patient health status, implementing a collaborative care model of health care delivery, and addressing depression, a key barrier to optimal disease management. The study has been designed as an 'effectiveness trial' to support broader implementation in the healthcare system if it is successful. Unique identifier: NCT00461513.

  4. Quality control in Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center Banja Luka, RS, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goran Vuleta

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. The aim of this work is to give a review of situations in the Department of Nuclear Medicine in Banja Luka related to quality control. We must perform daily, weekly and monthly control of equipment in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, and we must keep records. In our Department we have equipment from different producers and different year of production: 3 gamma cameras (1973, 1989, 2000); 2 auto gamma counters (2000, 2006); 2 dose calibrators (1973, 2000); 1 thyroid uptake system (2000). Normally procedures for quality control are also different. The situation, according to results of quality control is good. All equipment is working normally and with good performance (except one gamma camera - a problem with hard drive), but we don't have a routine daily control and periodical control for others tests. Keeping a records is another problem. Why? 1. In Bosnia and Herzegovina we don't have Regulatory authority. That means that we don't have legislation, rules, inspection or any other regulatory instruments. 2. There is only school for nurses, we have no special school for medical technician. So, we need an education in that field. 3. Very small number of physicist in hospital, no education for medical and nuclear medicine physicist. Conclusion. Situation in Department of Nuclear Medicine in Banja Luka related to quality control is on the medium level. We are trying to put that on the higher level, but to accomplish that we need additional education for nurses (technicians) and physicist.

  5. Coping strategies and locus of control in childhood leukemia: a multi-center research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Polizzi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a very distressing experience for children and requires a special effort of adjustment. Therefore, it seems to be crucial to explore coping resources for the experienced risk condition. In this sense, the study focuses on coping strategies and locus of control in children with ALL during the treatment phase, and on their possible relation. The correlation between children and maternal coping strategies is also investigated. The participants involved were an experimental group of 40 children with ALL and their mothers, and 30 healthy children as the control group. The tools used were: the Child Behavioral Style Scale and the Monitor-Blunter Style Scale to assess the coping strategies of children and mothers; the locus of Control Scale for Children to analyze the children’s perception of controlling the events. Both children with ALL and their mothers resorted to monitoring coping strategies with a statistically significant rate of occurrence (children: M=17.8, SD=3.8; mothers: M=10.48, SD=3.4. The data concerning the locus of control show this tendency towards internal causes (M=53.1, SD=4.7. There were statistically significant correlations between monitoring coping strategies and external locus of control (r=0.400, P<0.05. The results gained from the control group are almost equivalent. The outcomes show several interesting resources of the psychological functioning of children as well as of their mothers.

  6. Cooperative Mmonitoring Center Occasional Paper/5: Propspects of Conventional Arms Control in South Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Amit; Kamal, Nazir

    1998-11-01

    The intensely adversarial relationship between India and Pakistan is marked by military rivalry, mutual distrust, and suspicion. The most dividing disagreement has been over the Kashmir region. An inability to discuss the Kashmir issue has prevented discussion on other important issues. Since there is little prospect of detente, at least in the near-term, the question is whether this rivalry can be contained by other means, such as arms control approaches. Conventional arms control has been applied flexibly and successfully in some regions to reduce threat-perceptions and achieve reassuring military stability. Some lessons from other international models might be applied to the India/Pakistan context. This paper discusses the status of conventional arms control in South Asia, the dominant Indian and Pakistani perceptions about arms control, the benefits that could be derived from arms control, as well as the problems and prospects of arms control. It also discusses existing conventional arms control agreements at the regional and global levels as well as the potential role of cooperative monitoring technology.

  7. Study of On-Ramp PI Controller Based on Dural Group QPSO with Different Well Centers Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm, dual-group QPSO with different well centers (DWC-QPSO algorithm, is proposed by constructing the master-slave subswarms. The new algorithm was applied in the parameter optimization of on-ramp traffic PI controller combining with nonlinear feedback theory. With the critical information contained in the searching space and results of the basic QPSO algorithm, this algorithm avoids the rapid disappearance of swarm diversity and enhances the global searching ability through collaboration between subswarms. Experiment results on an on-ramp traffic control simulation show that DWC-QPSO can be well applied in the study of on-ramp traffic PI controller and the comparison results illustrate that DWC-QPSO outperforms other evolutionary algorithms with enhancement in both adaptability and stability.

  8. NCC simulation model. Phase 2: Simulating the operations of the Network Control Center and NCC message manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Norman M.; Gill, Tepper; Charles, Mary

    1994-01-01

    The network control center (NCC) provides scheduling, monitoring, and control of services to the NASA space network. The space network provides tracking and data acquisition services to many low-earth orbiting spacecraft. This report describes the second phase in the development of simulation models for the FCC. Phase one concentrated on the computer systems and interconnecting network.Phase two focuses on the implementation of the network message dialogs and the resources controlled by the NCC. Performance measures were developed along with selected indicators of the NCC's operational effectiveness.The NCC performance indicators were defined in terms of the following: (1) transfer rate, (2) network delay, (3) channel establishment time, (4) line turn around time, (5) availability, (6) reliability, (7) accuracy, (8) maintainability, and (9) security. An NCC internal and external message manual is appended to this report.

  9. How exciton-vibrational coherences control charge separation in the photosystem II reaction center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Romero, Elisabet; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-14

    In photosynthesis absorbed sun light produces collective excitations (excitons) that form a coherent superposition of electronic and vibrational states of the individual pigments. Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy allows a visualization of how these coherences are involved in the primary processes of energy and charge transfer. Based on quantitative modeling we identify the exciton-vibrational coherences observed in 2D photon echo of the photosystem II reaction center (PSII-RC). We find that the vibrations resonant with the exciton splittings can modify the delocalization of the exciton states and produce additional states, thus promoting directed energy transfer and allowing a switch between the two charge separation pathways. We conclude that the coincidence of the frequencies of the most intense vibrations with the splittings within the manifold of exciton and charge-transfer states in the PSII-RC is not occurring by chance, but reflects a fundamental principle of how energy conversion in photosynthesis was optimized.

  10. Reactor control system upgrade for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Sacramento, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a new reactor control system for the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Facility. This new control system not only provides the same functionality as the existing control system in terms of graphic displays of reactor process variables, data archival capability, and manual, automatic, pulse and square-wave modes of operation, but adds to the functionality of the previous control system by incorporating signal processing algorithms for the validation of sensors and automatic calibration and verification of control rod worth curves. With the inclusion of these automated features, the intent of this control system is not to replace the operator but to make the process of controlling the reactor easier and safer for the operator. For instance, an automatic control rod calibration method reduces the amount of time to calibrate control rods from days to minutes, increasing overall reactor utilization. The control rod calibration curve, determined using the automatic calibration system, can be validated anytime after the calibration, as long as the reactor power is between 50W and 500W. This is done by banking all of the rods simultaneously and comparing the tabulated rod worth curves with a reactivity computer estimate. As long as the deviation between the tabulated values and the reactivity estimate is within a prescribed error band, then the system is in calibration. In order to minimize the amount of information displayed, only the essential flux-related data are displayed in graphical format on the control screen. Information from the sensor validation methods is communicated to the operators via messages, which appear in a message window. The messages inform the operators that the actual process variables do not correlate within the allowed uncertainty in the reactor system. These warnings, however, cannot cause the reactor to shutdown automatically. The reactor operator has the ultimate responsibility of using this

  11. Design of SCADA water resource management control center by a bi-objective redundancy allocation problem and particle swarm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolatshahi-Zand, Ali; Khalili-Damghani, Kaveh

    2015-01-01

    SCADA is an essential system to control critical facilities in big cities. SCADA is utilized in several sectors such as water resource management, power plants, electricity distribution centers, traffic control centers, and gas deputy. The failure of SCADA results in crisis. Hence, the design of SCADA system in order to serve a high reliability considering limited budget and other constraints is essential. In this paper, a bi-objective redundancy allocation problem (RAP) is proposed to design Tehran's SCADA water resource management control center. Reliability maximization and cost minimization are concurrently considered. Since the proposed RAP is a non-linear multi-objective mathematical programming so the exact methods cannot efficiently handle it. A multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) algorithm is designed to solve it. Several features such as dynamic parameter tuning, efficient constraint handling and Pareto gridding are inserted in proposed MOPSO. The results of proposed MOPSO are compared with an efficient ε-constraint method. Several non-dominated designs of SCADA system are generated using both methods. Comparison metrics based on accuracy and diversity of Pareto front are calculated for both methods. The proposed MOPSO algorithm reports better performance. Finally, in order to choose the practical design, the TOPSIS algorithm is used to prune the Pareto front. - Highlights: • Multi-objective redundancy allocation problem (MORAP) is proposed to design SCADA system. • Multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) is proposed to solve MORAP. • Efficient epsilon-constraint method is adapted to solve MORAP. • Non-dominated solutions are generated on Pareto front of MORAP by both methods. • Several multi-objective metrics are calculated to compare the performance of methods

  12. Control Systems Security Center Comparison Study of Industrial Control System Standards against the Control Systems Protection Framework Cyber-Security Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    Cyber security standards, guidelines, and best practices for control systems are critical requirements that have been delineated and formally recognized by industry and government entities. Cyber security standards provide a common language within the industrial control system community, both national and international, to facilitate understanding of security awareness issues but, ultimately, they are intended to strengthen cyber security for control systems. This study and the preliminary findings outlined in this report are an initial attempt by the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) Standard Awareness Team to better understand how existing and emerging industry standards, guidelines, and best practices address cyber security for industrial control systems. The Standard Awareness Team comprised subject matter experts in control systems and cyber security technologies and standards from several Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories, including Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This study was conducted in two parts: a standard identification effort and a comparison analysis effort. During the standard identification effort, the Standard Awareness Team conducted a comprehensive open-source survey of existing control systems security standards, regulations, and guidelines in several of the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors, including the telecommunication, water, chemical, energy (electric power, petroleum and oil, natural gas), and transportation--rail sectors and sub-sectors. During the comparison analysis effort, the team compared the requirements contained in selected, identified, industry standards with the cyber security requirements in ''Cyber Security Protection Framework'', Version 0.9 (hereafter referred to as the ''Framework''). For each of the seven sector/sub-sectors listed above, one standard was

  13. Work plan for upgrading the 241-A-701 compressed air system and motor control center. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This work plan will outline the responsibilities associated with the 241-A-701 Compressed Air System (CAS) and Motor Control Center (MCC) upgrades. All activities required to design, install, test, and operate the modified systems are addressed in this document. Upgrades Technical Support (UTS) of TWRS Engineering is responsible for the completion of all tasks associated with this upgrade. UTS will coordinate the upgrade activities, and ensure all tasks are successfully completed on or before the scheduled dates. The primary objective of the 241-A-701 Compressor and MCC Upgrade is to provide a reliable source of process and instrument compressed air to the A, AX, AY, and AZ tank farms

  14. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices and Poison Control Centers: Collaborating to Prevent Medication Errors and Unintentional Poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), the only independent nonprofit organization in the USA devoted to the prevention of medication errors. ISMP developed the national Medication Errors Reporting Program (MERP) and investigates and analyzes errors in order to formulate recommendations to prevent further occurrences. ISMP works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug manufacturers, professional organizations, and others to promote changes in package design, practice standards, and healthcare practitioner and consumer education. By collaborating with ISMP to share and disseminate information, Poison Control centers, emergency departments, and toxicologists can help decrease unintentional and accidental poisonings.

  15. An optically sensed control rod drive system for use at the Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, John L.; Fisher, Thomas H.

    1988-01-01

    The optically sensed rod drive control system, installed and modified at the NSCR is described. It has operated very well and has exhibited improved reliability over the previous system. The system has proven to give stable control rod positions, and the daily reset of the position indication serves to reduce the error between indicated and true rod position. The removal of the microswitches used for carriage up and carriage down indication in the previous system, and especially the 120 VAC motor control portion, has reduced the difficulty, time and uncertainty involved in upkeep of the system and also has removed a potentially dangerous source of personnel injury. As more operational experience is gained with this design, it is felt that other minor adjustments and logic changes may come about, but the present design of the system appears to be a successful and sufficient one

  16. A single-center, cross-sectional prevalence study of impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: association with dopaminergic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Michele; Logi, Chiara; Lucetti, Claudio; Del Dotto, Paolo; Baldacci, Filippo; Vergallo, Andrea; Ulivi, Martina; Del Sarto, Simone; Rossi, Giuseppe; Ceravolo, Roberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo

    2013-10-01

    The current study aimed at establishing the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and their association with demographic, drug-related, and disease-related characteristics. We performed a single-center cross-sectional study of 805 PD patients. Impulse control disorders were investigated with the Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease; also comorbid neuropsychiatric complications (dementia, delusions, visual hallucinations) were investigated with clinical interviews and ad hoc instruments (Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire and Neuropsychiatry Inventory). Impulse control disorders were identified in 65 patients (prevalence, 8.1%), with pathological gambling and hypersexuality the most frequent. Impulse control disorders were present in 57 of 593 cognitively preserved patients (prevalence, 9.6%) and in 8 of 212 demented patients (prevalence, 3.8%). Impulse control disorders were significantly associated with dopamine agonists (odds ratio [OR], 5.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.60-12.46; P Impulse control disorders frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (16.6% vs 12.5%; OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.79-2.74; P = 0.227). Additional variables associated with ICDs were male sex and younger age. These findings suggested that dopaminergic treatments in PD are associated with increased odds of having an ICD, but also other demographic and clinical variables are associated with ICDs, suggesting the multifactorial nature of the ICD phenomenon in PD.

  17. Altered center of mass control during sit-to-walk in elderly adults with and without history of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzurei; Chou, Li-Shan

    2013-09-01

    Sit-to-walk (STW) is a commonly performed activity of daily living that requires a precise coordination between momentum generation and balance control. However, there is a lack of biomechanical data demonstrating how the center of mass (COM) momentum and balance control interact. This study examines COM kinetic energy distribution in three movement directions and COM-Ankle inclination angles during STW among 15 healthy young adults, 15 elderly non-fallers, and 15 elderly fallers. We found that elderly adults, especially elderly fallers, chose a COM control strategy that provided more stability than mobility to perform STW. A smaller forward COM velocity, a more upward COM momentum distribution, and a smaller anterior-posterior COM-Ankle angle characterize this strategy. Healthy elderly adults modified their STW movement around seat-off so that they achieved a more upright position before walking. Elderly fallers not only altered COM control around seat-off but also showed limitation in COM control during gait initiation. Furthermore, their COM control in the medial-lateral direction might be perturbed at swing-off due to an increased distribution of kinetic energy. Examining COM momentum distribution in different movement directions and the relationship between positions of the COM and supporting foot during STW could enhance our ability to identify elderly adults who are at risk of falling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Coolant and ambient temperature control for chillerless liquid cooled data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2016-02-02

    Cooling control methods include measuring a temperature of air provided to a plurality of nodes by an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, measuring a temperature of at least one component of the plurality of nodes and finding a maximum component temperature across all such nodes, comparing the maximum component temperature to a first and second component threshold and comparing the air temperature to a first and second air threshold, and controlling a proportion of coolant flow and a coolant flow rate to the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the plurality of nodes based on the comparisons.

  19. Quality-Controlled Underway Oceanographic and Meteorological Data from the Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Predictions Center (COAPS) - Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Florida State University has been operating a data assembly center (DAC) to collect, quality evaluate, and distribute Shipboard Automated Meteorological and...

  20. The prevalence and impact of prescription controlled substance use among injured patients at a Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Robert; Bozeman, Matthew; Miller, Keith Roy; Smith, Jason Wayne; Harbrecht, Brian; Franklin, Glen; Benns, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing attention focused on the epidemic of prescription drug use in the United States, but little is known about its effects in trauma. The purpose of this study was to define the prevalence of prescription controlled substance use among trauma patients and determine its effects on outcome. A retrospective review of all patients admitted to a Level 1 trauma center from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2011, was performed. Patients dying within 24 hours or without home medication reconciliations were excluded. Data review included preexisting benzodiazepine or narcotic use, sex, age, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Scores (ISSs), intensive care unit (ICU) and overall length of stay, ventilator days, and overall cost. SAS version 9.3 was used for the analysis, and p ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. A total of 1,700 patients met inclusion criteria. Of these, 340 (20.0%) were on prescription narcotics and/or benzodiazepines at the time of admission. Patients in the narcotic/benzodiazepine group were significantly older (48 years vs. 43 years) and more likely to be women (43.7% vs. 28.9%). There was no difference in mechanism, ISS, or the presence of head injury between groups. Both ICU length of stay (3.3 days vs. 2.1 days) and total length of stay (7.8 days vs. 6.1 days) were significantly longer in patients on outpatient narcotics and/or benzodiazepines. Excluding severely injured patients, the need for mechanical ventilation was also increased among outpatient controlled substance users (15.8% vs. 11.0%). There is a substantial prevalence of preexisting controlled substance use (20%) among patients at our Level 1 trauma center. Preexisting controlled substance use is associated with longer total hospital and ICU stays. Among mildly to moderately injured patients, preinjury controlled substance is also associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. Prognostic study, level III.

  1. Space and Missile Systems Center Standard: Parts, Materials, and Processes Control Program for Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    preparation , implementation, and operation of a Parts, Materials, and Processes (PMP) control program for use during the design, development...Processes List CDR Critical Design Review CDRL Contract Data Requirements List CMOS Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor CONOPS Concept of Operations...Failure Review Board GFE Government Furnished Equipment GIDEP Government Industry Data Exchange Program HBT Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor IPT

  2. A User-Centered Educational Modeling Language Improving the Controllability of Learning Design Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendi, Asma; Bouhadada, Tahar; Bousbia, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    Semiformal EMLs are developed to facilitate the adoption of educational modeling languages (EMLs) and to address practitioners' learning design concerns, such as reusability and readability. In this article, SDLD (Structure Dialogue Learning Design) is presented, which is a semiformal EML that aims to improve controllability of learning design…

  3. Building collaboration? Co-location and territoriality in a railway control center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, T.A.H.; van Marrewijk, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the design of co-located spaces and how organizational actors experience such spaces. The literature on co-location is ambiguous about how reduced physical distance increases collaboration. To address this problem, we draw on an ethnographic study of a co-located railway control

  4. Active Return-to-Center Control Based on Torque and Angle Sensors for Electric Power Steering Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Pan-Pan; Su, Hao; Tang, Gong-You

    2018-03-14

    This paper presents a complete control strategy of the active return-to-center (RTC) control for electric power steering (EPS) systems. We first establish the mathematical model of the EPS system and analyze the source and influence of the self-aligning torque (SAT). Second, based on the feedback signals of steering column torque and steering wheel angle, we give the trigger conditions of a state switch between the steering assist state and the RTC state. In order to avoid the sudden change of the output torque for the driving motor when the state switches frequently between the steering assist state and the RTC state, we design an undisturbed state switching logic algorithm. This state switching logic algorithm ensures that the output value of the RTC controller is set to an initial value and increases in given steps up to a maximum value after entering the RTC state, and the output value of the RTC controller will reduce in given steps down to zero when exiting the RTC state. This therefore ensures smooth switch control between the two states and improves the driver's steering feeling. Third, we design the RTC controller, which depends upon the feedback signals of the steering wheel angle and the angular velocity. In addition, the controller increases the auxiliary control function of the RTC torque based on vehicle speed. The experimental results show that the active RTC control method does not affect the basic assist characteristics, which effectively reduces the residual angle of the steering wheel at low vehicle speed and improves the RTC performance of the vehicle.

  5. Active Return-to-Center Control Based on Torque and Angle Sensors for Electric Power Steering Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Pan Du

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete control strategy of the active return-to-center (RTC control for electric power steering (EPS systems. We first establish the mathematical model of the EPS system and analyze the source and influence of the self-aligning torque (SAT. Second, based on the feedback signals of steering column torque and steering wheel angle, we give the trigger conditions of a state switch between the steering assist state and the RTC state. In order to avoid the sudden change of the output torque for the driving motor when the state switches frequently between the steering assist state and the RTC state, we design an undisturbed state switching logic algorithm. This state switching logic algorithm ensures that the output value of the RTC controller is set to an initial value and increases in given steps up to a maximum value after entering the RTC state, and the output value of the RTC controller will reduce in given steps down to zero when exiting the RTC state. This therefore ensures smooth switch control between the two states and improves the driver’s steering feeling. Third, we design the RTC controller, which depends upon the feedback signals of the steering wheel angle and the angular velocity. In addition, the controller increases the auxiliary control function of the RTC torque based on vehicle speed. The experimental results show that the active RTC control method does not affect the basic assist characteristics, which effectively reduces the residual angle of the steering wheel at low vehicle speed and improves the RTC performance of the vehicle.

  6. [Internal quality control on HER2 status determination in breast cancers: Experience of a cancer center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Carine; Laé, Marick; Ratour, Julia; Hamel, Frédérique; Taris, Corinne; Caly, Martial; Le Cunff, Annie; Reyal, Fabien; Kirova, Youlia; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    The implementation of an internal quality control is mandatory to guarantee the accuracy of HER2 status in invasive breast cancers. To evaluate the impact of our quality control assurance on HER2 status results in invasive breast carcinomas from 2008 to 2014. HER2 status was determined by immunohistochemistry as the first-line indication, completed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for scores 2+ by immunohistochemistry. Internal quality control of HER2 status relied on the standardization of pre-analytical phases, the use of external controls with a known number of HER2 gene copies determined by FISH and continued monitoring of concordance between immunohistochemistry and FISH. The proportion of HER2-positive cases corresponding to scores 3+ by immunohistochemistry and 2+ amplified by FISH varied from 10.6% to 13.8% (median of 11.3%). The proportion of scores 2+ amplified by FISH varied from 13.3% to 32.7% during period of study. The rate of concordance between FISH and immunohistochemistry for score 0/1+ and 3+ cases were≥97%. Eight among 12 discordant cases were false positive resulting from errors in interpretation of immunohistochemistry (score 2+ instead of 3+). Calibration of immunohistochemistry on FISH for HER2 status contributes to limit variability of immunohistochemistry results due to technical issues or interpretation. The implementation of an external control of score 3+ on each slide enables accurate interpretation of score 2+ and 3+ by immunohistochemistry. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical pharmacists on medical care of pediatric inpatients: a single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore the best interventions and working patterns of clinical pharmacists in pediatrics and to determine the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in pediatrics. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 160 pediatric patients with nerve system disease, respiratory system disease or digestive system disease, who were randomly allocated into two groups, with 80 in each group. Interventions by clinical pharmacists in the experimental group included answering questions of physicians and nurses, giving advice on treating patients, checking prescriptions and patient counseling at discharge. In the control group, patients were treated without clinical pharmacist interventions. RESULTS: Of the 109 interventions provided by clinical pharmacists during 4 months, 47 were consultations for physicians and nurses, 31 were suggestions of treatment, with 30 accepted by physicians (96.77% and 31 were medical errors found in 641 prescriptions. Five adverse drug reactions were submitted to the adverse drug reaction monitoring network, with three in the experimental group and two in the control group. The average length of stay (LOS for patients with respiratory system diseases in the experimental group was 6.45 days, in comparison with 10.83 days in the control group, which was statistically different (p value<0.05; Average drug compliance rate in the experimental group was 81.41%, in comparison with 70.17% of the control group, which was statistically different (p value<0.05. Cost of drugs and hospitalization and rate of readmission in two weeks after discharge in the two groups were not statistically different. CONCLUSION: Participation by clinical pharmacists in the pharmacotherapy of pediatric patients can reduce LOS of patients with respiratory system disease and improve compliance rate through discharge education, showing no significant effects on prevention of ADR, reduction of cost of drugs and hospitalization and readmission

  8. Redox-controlled dinitrosyl formation at the diiron-oxo center of NorA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Rainer; Strube, Katja

    2008-01-01

    In the denitrifying bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, the NorA protein is coproduced with the respiratory nitric oxide (NO) reductase. NorA contains a diiron-oxo center, which can form stable adducts with dioxygen and NO. In contrast to other diiron proteins, the formation of NorA-NO requires both fully reduced protein and additional electrons. A minor fraction of in vitro NorA-NO represents a paramagnetic dinitrosyl iron complex (DNIC), while the major fraction is attributed to a DNIC of the structure {Fe(NO)(2)}, which shows no electron paramagnetic resonance. The NorA-DNIC may be formed either upon direct reaction of the protein with NO or upon incubation with nitrite due to an intrinsic nitrite reduction activity of NorA that liberates NO. NorA can be purified rapidly as a six histidine-tagged derivative from overproducing cells of Escherichia coli. This chapter describes procedures for the preparation of different redox forms of NorA for the formation of NorA adducts with NO, dioxygen, and azide, as well as for the quantification of NorA-bound NO.

  9. A symphony of regulations centered on p63 to control development of ectoderm-derived structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Luisa; Costanzo, Antonio; Merlo, Giorgio R

    2011-01-01

    The p53-related transcription factor p63 is critically important for basic cellular functions during development of the ectoderm and derived structure and tissues, including skin, limb, palate, and hair. On the one side, p63 is required to sustain the proliferation of keratinocyte progenitors, while on the other side it is required for cell stratification, commitment to differentiate, cell adhesion, and epithelial-mesenchymal signaling. Molecules that are components or regulators of the p63 pathway(s) are rapidly being identified, and it comes with no surprise that alterations in the p63 pathway lead to congenital conditions in which the skin and other ectoderm-derived structures are affected. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular regulations centered on p63, derived from the comprehension of p63-linked human diseases and the corresponding animal models, as well as from cellular models and high-throughput molecular approaches. We point out common themes and features, that allow to speculate on the possible role of p63 downstream events and their potential exploitation in future attempts to correct the congenital defect in preclinical studies.

  10. Observations on the radiochemical control of radiopharmaceuticals at tajoura nuclear research center (TNRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuzwida, M.A.; Saad, M.A.; Elmagrahi, H.; Elghanodi, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Production of radioisotopes for the radiopharmaceutical purposes is the main task of Tajoura nuclear center. During the analysis of the 131 I- radioactive solution which was produced using the so-called dry method, the following has been observed : in order to reduce the cost and the time of analytical cycle or time used for the radiochemical purity (RCP), a spot test has been used to indicate the position of the radioactivity in the chromatogram rather than using autoradiographing or the x-ray films. This method was based on the reaction between I 2 and starch to give a blue color at different R f values I 2 is liberated by I - oxidation (H 2 O 2 ) or by IO - 3 reaction with SCN - in the presence of HCl. A simple and fast test for the estimation of the content in the radioactive sample has been elaborated.This method was based on the reduction of Te (IV) or (VI) to Te metal using SnCI 2 in a alkaline media. The detection limit of the elaborated method was found to be 131 I- buffer solution, and 16.0 m S for Na CI saline solution were obtained

  11. The IEO Data Center Management System: Tools for quality control, analysis and access marine data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Antonia; Garcia, Maria Jesus; Nikouline, Andrei

    2010-05-01

    Since 1994 the Data Centre of the Spanish Oceanographic Institute develops system for archiving and quality control of oceanographic data. The work started in the frame of the European Marine Science & Technology Programme (MAST) when a consortium of several Mediterranean Data Centres began to work on the MEDATLAS project. Along the years, old software modules for MS DOS were rewritten, improved and migrated to Windows environment. Oceanographic data quality control includes now not only vertical profiles (mainly CTD and bottles observations) but also time series of currents and sea level observations. New powerful routines for analysis and for graphic visualization were added. Data presented originally in ASCII format were organized recently in an open source MySQL database. Nowadays, the IEO, as part of SeaDataNet Infrastructure, has designed and developed a new information system, consistent with the ISO 19115 and SeaDataNet standards, in order to manage the large and diverse marine data and information originated in Spain by different sources, and to interoperate with SeaDataNet. The system works with data stored in ASCII files (MEDATLAS, ODV) as well as data stored within the relational database. The components of the system are: 1.MEDATLAS Format and Quality Control - QCDAMAR: Quality Control of Marine Data. Main set of tools for working with data presented as text files. Includes extended quality control (searching for duplicated cruises and profiles, checking date, position, ship velocity, constant profiles, spikes, density inversion, sounding, acceptable data, impossible regional values,...) and input/output filters. - QCMareas: A set of procedures for the quality control of tide gauge data according to standard international Sea Level Observing System. These procedures include checking for unexpected anomalies in the time series, interpolation, filtering, computation of basic statistics and residuals. 2. DAMAR: A relational data base (MySql) designed to

  12. An adaptive noise cancelling system used for beam control at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.; Allison, S.; Grossberg, P.; Hendrickson, L.; Sass, R.; Shoaee, H.

    1993-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider now has a total of twenty-four beam-steering feedback loops used to keep the electron and positron beams on their desired trajectories. Seven of these loops measure and control the same beam as it proceeds down the linac through the arcs to the final focus. Ideally by each loop should correct only for disturbances that occur between it and the immediate upstream loop. In fact, in the original system each loop corrected for all upstream disturbances. This resulted in undesirable over-correction and ringing. We added MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) adaptive noise cancellers to separate the signal we wish to correct from disturbances further upstream. This adaptive control improved performance in the 1992 run

  13. Controlling the Coupling of a Single Nitrogen Vacancy Center to a Silver Nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Kumar, Shailesh; Shakoor, Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Dipole emitters are expected to efficiently couple to the plasmonic mode propagating along a cylindrically shaped metallic nano-structure. Such a strongly coupled system could serve as a fundamental building block for a single photon source on demand and a device enabling strong non-linear intera...... control over the relative nanowire diamond nano-crystal position is achieved by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in contact mode operation....

  14. US/Belarusian government-to-government material protection, control, and accounting cooperation at the Sosny Science and Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, R.S. Jr.; Baumann, M.; Madsen, R.W.; Krevsum, E.; Haase, M.

    1996-01-01

    A formal program of cooperation between the US Department of Energy and the Belarusian regulatory agency Promatomnazdor (PAN) began in 1994. A visit to the Belarusian Sosny Science and Technology Center (SSTC) by representatives from the US, Sweden, Japan, and the International Atomic Energy Agency resulted in a multinational program of cooperation to enhance the existing material protection, control, and accounting systems in place at Sosny. Specific physical-protection-related recommendations included upgrades to the physical protection systems at Buildings 33 and 40 at Sosny and the security systems in the SSTC central alarm station. US experts in conjunction with the multinational team and Belarus representatives, have reviewed initial designs for physical protection upgrades at Sosny. Subsequently, the US assumed an essential role for funding and technical oversight for enhancements at the SSTC, aspects of its emergency communication systems, and the upgrade of the SSTC site access control system. This paper addresses the status of physical protection enhancements at the Sosny site

  15. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... diagnosed with SSI and a matched control group (N=46) without SSI according to the CDC criteria after laparotomy. Two blinded experienced surgeons evaluated the hospital records and determined whether patients had CRSSI, based on the following criteria: antibiotic treatment, surgical intervention, prolonged...... hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant...

  16. Control of in-plane texture of body centered cubic metal thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.M.; Rodbell, K.P.; Colgan, E.G.; Hammond, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    We show that dramatically different in-plane textures can be produced in body centered cubic (bcc) metal thin films deposited on amorphous substrates under different deposition conditions. The crystallographic orientation distribution of polycrystalline bcc metal thin films on amorphous substrates often has a strong left-angle 110 right-angle fiber texture, indicating that {110} planes are parallel to the substrate plane. When deposition takes place under bombardment by energetic ions or atoms at an off-normal angle of incidence, the left-angle 110 right-angle fiber texture develops an in-plane texture, indicating nonrandom azimuthal orientations of the crystallites. Three orientations in Nb films have been observed under different deposition geometries, in which the energetic particle flux coincides with channeling directions in the bcc crystal structure. In-plane orientations in Mo films have also been obtained in magnetron sputtering systems with various configurations. These are described, and an example is given in which the in-plane orientation of Mo films deposited in two different in-line magnetron sputtering systems differs by a 90 degree rotation. In these two cases, there is a strong left-angle 110 right-angle fiber texture, but the in-plane left-angle 100 right-angle direction is oriented parallel to the scan direction in one system, and perpendicular to the scan direction in the other system. The conditions which produce such different in-plane textures in two apparently similar sputtering systems are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Epidemic assistance by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: role of the Epidemic Intelligence Service, 1946-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Stephen B; Stroup, Donna F; Sencer, David J

    2011-12-01

    Since 1946, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has responded to urgent requests from US states, federal agencies, and international organizations through epidemic-assistance investigations (Epi-Aids). The authors describe the first 60 years of Epi-Aids, breadth of problems addressed, evolution of methodologies, scope of activities, and impact of investigations on population health. They reviewed Epi-Aid reports and EIS Bulletins, contacted current and former Epidemic Intelligence Service staff, and systematically searched the PubMed and Web of Science databases. They abstracted information on dates, location, staff involved, health problems, methods, and impacts of investigations according to a preplanned protocol. They assessed the methods presented as well as the quality of reports. During 1946-2005, a total of 4,484 investigations of health events were initiated by 2,815 Epidemic Intelligence Service officers. In the early years, the majority were in response to infectious agents, although environmental problems emerged. Investigations in subsequent years focused on occupational conditions, birth defects, reproductive health, tobacco use, cancer, violence, legal debate, and terrorism. These Epi-Aids heralded expansion of the agency's mission and presented new methods in statistics and epidemiology. Recommendations from Epi-Aids led to policy implementation, evaluation, or modification. Epi-Aids provide the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the agility to respond rapidly to public health crises.

  18. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant (C...... a suitable standard definition for monitoring and identifying SSI, even if some cases of less clinically significant superficial SSI are included.......Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant...

  19. An advanced automation system for operation of Sao Paulo pumping stations from TRANSPETRO Master Control Center - CNCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcioli, Mario Sergio; Barreto, Camila Maria Benevenuto [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Since 2000 the operations of the TRANSPETRO pumping stations in the state of Sao Paulo region began to be transferred from local control centers located at the transfer and storage terminals to the National Operational Control Center (CNCO) of TRANSPETRO, located at the headquarters of the company, in Rio de Janeiro. The proposed paper aims to presenting an overview of the automation system that was developed to enable such pumping stations to be operated from CNCO in a reliable and secure manner, focusing on tools that offer an embedded system alarms completely free of false alarms with automatic determining of the root cause, and also automatic and advanced diagnoses of problems caused by failures of hardware, human error and abnormal conditions of the process, providing the CNCO SCADA system of accurate and quality information that help operators to make decisions. The referred automation system was integrated for the first time to CNCO SCADA system in 2000, for pipeline pumps of Osvat (Sao Sebastiao - Vale do Paraiba pipeline) station at the Sao Sebastiao Terminal - northern coast of Sao Paulo region. (author)

  20. [Differences in attachment and personality in children from child guidance centers, child psychiatry units, and control families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Peter; Scheuerer-Englisch, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Insecure attachment and deficits in self-regulation as personality traits are risk factors for the development of psychopathological symptoms from infancy on. This study examines differences in attachment and personality in late childhood, comparing children from non-clinical families, from a child guidance center, and child psychiatry units with in-patient care. Children's attachment representations, their attachment behavior strategy, reported distressing parental behavior, their emotional openness, and attachment coherency were assessed with the Late Childhood Attachment Interview (LCAI). Ego-resiliency, ego-undercontrol, field-independence, aggressiveness, and anxiety were assessed by means of the California Child Q-Sort. The results show clear attachment differences, with the child guidance group showing more attachment insecurity in the LCAI compared to the control group, and the psychiatric in-patient group even more attachment insecurity, more distressing parenting from both mother and father, and more attachment disorganization than the other two groups. Whereas children from the child guidance center and the child psychiatry unit did not differ in personality, both groups were significantly different from the control group in all personality dimensions. The results suggest that personality differences may be a risk factor for behaviour problems, however problem severity and the choice of the treatment institution seem to be influenced by attachment security.

  1. Job Demand and Control Interventions: A Stakeholder-Centered Best-Evidence Synthesis of Systematic Reviews on Workplace Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Williams-Whitt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical and psychological job demands in combination with the degree of control a worker has over task completion, play an important role in reducing stress. Occupational stress is an important, modifiable factor affecting work disability. However, the effectiveness of reducing job demands or increasing job control remains unclear, particularly for outcomes of interest to employers, such as absenteeism or productivity. Objective: This systematic review reports on job demand and control interventions that impact absenteeism, productivity and financial outcomes. Methods: A stakeholder-centered best-evidence synthesis was conducted with researcher and stakeholder collaboration throughout. Databases and grey literature were searched for systematic reviews between 2000 and 2012: Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, TRIP, health-evidence.ca, Rehab+, National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC, and Institute for Work and Health. Articles were assessed independently by two researchers for inclusion criteria and methodological quality. Differences were resolved through consensus. Results: The search resulted in 3363 unique titles. After review of abstracts, 115 articles were retained for full-text review. 11 articles finally met the inclusion criteria and are summarized in this synthesis. The best level of evidence we found indicates that multimodal job demand reductions for either at-work or off-work workers will reduce disability-related absenteeism. Conclusion: In general, the impacts of interventions that aim to reduce job demands or increase job control can be positive for the organization in terms of reducing absenteeism, increasing productivity and cost-effectiveness. However, more high quality research is needed to further assess the relationships and quantify effect sizes for the interventions and outcomes reviewed in this study.

  2. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  3. Job demand and control interventions: a stakeholder-centered best-evidence synthesis of systematic reviews on workplace disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Whitt, K; White, M I; Wagner, S L; Schultz, I Z; Koehn, C; Dionne, C E; Koehoorn, M; Harder, H; Pasca, R; Warje, O; Hsu, V; McGuire, L; Schulz, W; Kube, D; Hook, A; Wright, M D

    2015-04-01

    Physical and psychological job demands in combination with the degree of control a worker has over task completion, play an important role in reducing stress. Occupational stress is an important, modifiable factor affecting work disability. However, the effectiveness of reducing job demands or increasing job control remains unclear, particularly for outcomes of interest to employers, such as absenteeism or productivity. This systematic review reports on job demand and control interventions that impact absenteeism, productivity and financial outcomes. A stakeholder-centered best-evidence synthesis was conducted with researcher and stakeholder collaboration throughout. Databases and grey literature were searched for systematic reviews between 2000 and 2012: Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, TRIP, health-evidence.ca, Rehab+, National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC), and Institute for Work and Health. Articles were assessed independently by two researchers for inclusion criteria and methodological quality. Differences were resolved through consensus. The search resulted in 3363 unique titles. After review of abstracts, 115 articles were retained for full-text review. 11 articles finally met the inclusion criteria and are summarized in this synthesis. The best level of evidence we found indicates that multimodal job demand reductions for either at-work or off-work workers will reduce disability-related absenteeism. In general, the impacts of interventions that aim to reduce job demands or increase job control can be positive for the organization in terms of reducing absenteeism, increasing productivity and cost-effectiveness. However, more high quality research is needed to further assess the relationships and quantify effect sizes for the interventions and outcomes reviewed in this study.

  4. Sensitometric Control of Automatic Processors in a Hospital Center : Retrospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobato Busto, R.; Pombar Camean, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper analyses the results obtained between February (1990) and July (1991) of the sensitometric control of the seven automatic processors which are in Hospital General de Galicia-Clinico Universitario (Santiago de Compostela). The deviations with regard to the reference values of each processor, permitting the precocious detection of disturbances before being revealed by the image, were analysed. In this analysis, it was achieved that the days in which the automatic processors were out of standing only varied between 2.3% and 5% from the checked days. (author)

  5. Glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes at a primary health care center in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Balushi, Khalid A; Al-Haddabi, Mahmod; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al Za'abi, Mohammed

    2014-10-01

    To determine the status of blood sugar control by using fasting blood sugar (FBS) of ≤6.1 mmol/l and glycosyted hemoglobin A1c (HbAc1) of Oman. The overall mean age of the cohort was 53±12 years (range: 24-91) with females representing 60% (n=106) of the study sample. The study found that only 9.6% (n=17) and 35% (n=62) of the patients attained optimal FBS and HbAc1 levels, respectively. Higher HbA1c was significantly associated with higher diastolic BP (84 versus 80 mm Hg; p=0.006), higher total cholesterol (5.2 versus 4.7 mmol/l; p=0.002) and higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (3.8 versus 3.0 mmol/l; p=0.034). The results demonstrated poor glycemic control in Oman type 2 diabetic patients comparable to local and global studies especially in those hypertensive and dyslipidemic patients. Implementation of early and aggressive management of diabetes mellitus at the primary care setting is warranted. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anticoagulation Control in Patients With Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Attended at Primary Care Centers in Spain: The PAULA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Prieto, Luis; Osorio, Genoveva; Polo, José; Lobos, José María; Vargas, Diego; García, Nicolás

    2015-09-01

    To determine the current status of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists in the primary care setting in Spain. The PAULA study was a multicenter cross-sectional/retrospective observational study conducted throughout Spain. The study included patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who had been receiving vitamin K antagonist therapy during the past year and were attended at primary care centers. International normalized ratio (INR) values over the past 12 months were recorded. The degree of anticoagulation control was defined as the time the patient had remained within the therapeutic range and was determined by both the direct method (poor control < 60%) and by the Rosendaal method (poor control < 65%). The study assessed 1524 patients (mean age, 77.4 ± 8.7 years; 48.6% women; 64.2% in permanent atrial fibrillation; CHADS2 mean, 2.3 ± 1.2; CHA2DS2-VASc, 3.9 ± 1.5, and HAS-BLED, 1.6 ± 0.9). The mean number of INR readings recorded per patient was 14.4 ± 3.8. A total of 56.9% of patients had adequate INR control according to the direct method and 60.6% according to the Rosendaal method. The multivariate analysis identified the following predictors for poor INR control: female sex, dietary habits potentially affecting anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists, multidrug therapy, and a history of labile INR. Approximately 40% of patients (43.1% by the direct method and 39.4% by the Rosendaal method) with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who were receiving anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonists in primary care in Spain had poor anticoagulation control during the previous 12 months. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Control of vortex state in cobalt nanorings with domain wall pinning centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar Lal

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic rings at the mesoscopic scale exhibit new spin configuration states and switching behavior, which can be controlled via geometrical structure, material composition and applied field. Vortex states in magnetic nanorings ensure flux closure, which is necessary for low stray fields in high packing density in memory devices. We performed magnetoresistance measurements on cobalt nanoring devices and show that by attaching nanowires to the ring, the vortex state can be stabilized. When a square pad is attached to the free end of the wire, the domain wall nucleation field in the nanowire is reduced. In addition, the vortex state persists over a larger range of magnetic fields, and exists at all in-plane orientations of the magnetic field. These experimental findings are well supported by our micromagnetic simulations.

  8. Family Access to a Dentist Study (FADS): A Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Suchitra; Riedy, Christine; Albert, Jeffrey M; Lee, Wonik; Slusar, Mary Beth; Curtan, Shelley; Ferretti, Gerald; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many low-income parent/caregivers do not understand the importance of cavity-free primary (baby) teeth and the chronic nature of dental caries (tooth decay). As a consequence, dental preventive and treatment utilization is low even when children are screened in schools and referred for care. This study aims to test a referral letter and Dental Information Guide (DIG) designed using the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM) framework to improve caregivers’ illness perception of dental caries and increase utilization of care by children with restorative dental needs. Methods A multi-site randomized controlled trial with caregivers of Kindergarten to 4th grade children in urban Ohio and rural Washington State will compare five arms: (1) CSM referral letter alone; (2) CSM referral letter + DIG; (3) reduced CSM referral letter alone; (4) reduced CSM referral letter + DIG; (5) standard (control) referral. At baseline, children will be screened at school to determine restorative dental needs. If in need of treatment, caregivers will be randomized to study arms and an intervention packet will be sent home. The primary outcome will be dental care based on a change in oral health status by clinical examination 7 months post-screening (ICDAS sealant codes 1 and 2; restoration codes 3–8; extraction). Enrollment commenced summer 2015 with results in summer 2016. Conclusion This study uses the CSM framework to develop and test behavioral interventions to increase dental utilization among low-income caregivers. If effective this simple intervention has broad applicability in clinical and community-based settings. PMID:26500170

  9. Infection prevention and control and the refugee population: Experiences from the University of Louisville Global Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Ruth M; Goss, Linda; Wiemken, Timothy L; Bosson, Rahel S; Peyrani, Paula; Mattingly, William A; Pauly, Allison; Ford, Rebecca A; Kotey, Stanley; Ramirez, Julio A

    2017-06-01

    During 2016, approximately 140,000 individuals entered the United States as part of the federal government refugee resettlement program and established themselves in communities in virtually every state. No national database regarding refugee health currently exists; therefore, little is known about existing infectious diseases, conditions, and cultural practices that impact successful acculturation. The objective of this report is to identify what is currently known about refugees and circumstances important to infection prevention and control with respect to their roles as new community members, employees, and consumers of health care. Using data from the University of Louisville Global Health Center's Newly Arriving Refugee Surveillance System, health issues affecting refugees from the perspective of a community member, an employee, and a patient were explored. Lack of immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases is the most widespread issue impacting almost every adult, adolescent, and child refugee resettled in Kentucky. Health issues of concern from an infection prevention and control perspective include latent tuberculosis infection, HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, syphilis, and parasites. Other health conditions that may also be important include anemia, obesity, oral health, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Refugee resettlement provides motivation for collaborative work among those responsible for infection prevention and control in all settings, their public health partners, and those responsible for and interested in community workforce concerns. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Center of Mass Acceleration Feedback Control of Standing Balance by Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation against External Postural Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the use of center of mass (COM) acceleration feedback for improving performance of a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) control system to restore standing function to a subject with complete, thoracic-level spinal cord injury (SCI). The approach for linearly relating changes in muscle stimulation to changes in COM acceleration was verified experimentally and subsequently produced data to create an input-output map driven by sensor feedback. The feedback gains were systematically tuned to reduce upper extremity (UE) loads applied to an instrumented support device while resisting external postural disturbances. Total body COM acceleration was accurately estimated (> 89% variance explained) using three-dimensional (3-D) outputs of two accelerometers mounted on the pelvis and torso. Compared to constant muscle stimulation employed clinically, feedback control of stimulation reduced UE loading by 33%. COM acceleration feedback is advantageous in constructing a standing neuroprosthesis since it provides the basis for a comprehensive control synergy about a global, dynamic variable and requires minimal instrumentation. Future work should include tuning and testing the feedback control system during functional reaching activity that is more indicative of activities of daily living. PMID:22987499

  11. Human factors review of electric power dispatch control centers. Volume 3. Operator information needs summary. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.J.; Najaf-Zadeh, K.; Darlington, H.T.; McNair, H.D.; Seidenstein, S.; Williams, A.R.

    1982-10-01

    Human factors is a systems-oriented interdisciplinary specialty concerned with the design of systems, equipment, facilities and the operational environment. An important aspect leading to the design requirements is the determination of the information requirements for electric power dispatch control centers. There are significant differences between the system operator's actions during normal and degraded states of power system operation, and power system restoration. This project evaluated the information the operator requires for normal power system and control system operations and investigates the changes of information required by the operator as the power system and/or the control system degrades from a normal operating state. The Phase II study, published in two volumes, defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related. This volume presents a summary of operator information needs, identifying the needs for and the uses of power system information by a system operator in conditions ranging from normal through degraded operation. Training requirements are also included for planning entry-level and follow-on training for operators.

  12. Production Support Flight Control Computers: Research Capability for F/A-18 Aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John F.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) is working with the United States Navy to complete ground testing and initiate flight testing of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers. The Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) can give any fleet F/A-18 airplane an in-flight, pilot-selectable research control law capability. NASA DFRC can efficiently flight test the PSFCC for the following four reasons: (1) Six F/A-18 chase aircraft are available which could be used with the PSFCC; (2) An F/A-18 processor-in-the-loop simulation exists for validation testing; (3) The expertise has been developed in programming the research processor in the PSFCC; and (4) A well-defined process has been established for clearing flight control research projects for flight. This report presents a functional description of the PSFCC. Descriptions of the NASA DFRC facilities, PSFCC verification and validation process, and planned PSFCC projects are also provided.

  13. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John; Blanchard, Joan C; Itani, Kamal M F; Ricks, Philip; Dellinger, E Patchen; Allen, George; Kelz, Rachel; Reinke, Caroline E; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common type of health-care-associated infection (HAI) and adds considerably to the individual, social, and economic costs of surgical treatment. This document serves to introduce the updated Guideline for the Prevention of SSI from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). The Core section of the guideline addresses issues relevant to multiple surgical specialties and procedures. The second procedure-specific section focuses on a high-volume, high-burden procedure: Prosthetic joint arthroplasty. While many elements of the 1999 guideline remain current, others warrant updating to incorporate new knowledge and changes in the patient population, operative techniques, emerging pathogens, and guideline development methodology.

  14. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection: Prosthetic Joint Arthroplasty Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreti, John; Parvizi, Javad; Berbari, Elie; Ricks, Philip; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Peri-prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of total joint arthroplasty that appears to be increasing as more of these procedures are performed. Numerous risk factors for incisional (superficial and deep) and organ/space (e.g., PJI) surgical site infections (SSIs) have been identified. A better understanding and reversal of modifiable risk factors may lead to a reduction in the incidence of incisional SSI and PJI. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) recently updated the national Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection. The updated guideline applies evidence-based methodology, presents recommendations for potential strategies to reduce the risk of SSI, and includes an arthroplasty-specific section. This article serves to introduce the guideline development process and to complement the Prosthetic Joint Arthroplasty section with background information on PJI-specific economic burden, epidemiology, pathogenesis and microbiology, and risk factor information.

  15. Failure of initial disease control in bullous pemphigoid: a retrospective study of hospitalized patients in a single tertiary center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Noa; Zeeli, Tal; Sprecher, Eli; Geller, Shamir

    2017-10-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most prevalent autoimmune blistering skin disease in Western countries and in Israel. Initial disease control is achieved in 60-90% of BP patients within 1-4 weeks of corticosteroid therapy. In the remainder of patients, recalcitrant disease is controlled with additional immunosuppressive treatment. We aimed to evaluate the rate of BP patients who needed adjuvant therapy to achieve initial disease control and to identify potential predictors for recalcitrant disease. We conducted a retrospective study of newly diagnosed BP patients who were hospitalized at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center between the years 2008-2014. We performed statistical analyses to assess the association between clinical factors and failure of initial disease control. Among 114 hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed BP, 1.8% presented with oral mucosa involvement. Seven patients (6.1%) required systemic agents in addition to corticosteroids to achieve disease control. Hypertension (P = 0.048), involvement of the head region (P = 0.042), and metformin treatment (P = 0.02) were significantly more prevalent among patients with recalcitrant disease. The low frequency of recalcitrant BP (6.1%) and the rarity of involvement of the oral mucosa (1.8%) in this study suggest that Israeli BP patients present a milder phenotype compared to similar patients from other geographic areas. Hypertension, head involvement, and metformin therapy were found to be significantly associated with the need for adjuvant therapy to achieve initial control, suggesting that these parameters may serve as predictors of treatment response in BP. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  16. The effects of a newsletter on bedding control on house dust mite allergen concentrations in childcare centers in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeonghoon Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Bedding in childcare centers (CCCs can hold house dust mite (HDM allergens. This study examined whether HDM allergen levels can be reduced through the distribution of an educational newsletter on bedding control to parents of CCC children in Korea. Methods All 38 CCCs were measured for Der 1 (sum of Der f 1 and Der p 1 concentrations on classroom floors and bedding before the intervention. Educational newsletters on children’s bedding control were sent to 21 CCCs by mail, and teachers were asked to distribute the newsletters to the parents of the children (intervention group. The remaining 17 CCCs were not sent newsletters (control group. The measurement of Der 1 concentrations in 38 CCCs was repeated after the intervention. Dust samples were collected with a vacuum cleaner and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results The Der 1 concentrations on the bedding were significantly higher than those on the floors in 38 CCCs at baseline (p<0.05. Although changes of the Der 1 concentrations for the control group (n=17 were not significant, Der 1 concentrations for the intervention group (n=21 decreased significantly from 2077.9 ng/g dust to 963.5 ng/g dust on the floors and from 3683.9 ng/g dust to 610.4 ng/g dust on bedding (p<0.05. Conclusions The distribution of educational newsletters on bedding control to parents may be an effective means of controlling HDMs in CCCs.

  17. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Triolo, Ronald J

    2012-05-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM) acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI). In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its superior robustness and small number of inputs required.

  18. Comparing joint kinematics and center of mass acceleration as feedback for control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataraj Raviraj

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of feedback control systems for maintaining standing balance based on joint kinematics or total body center of mass (COM acceleration, and assess their clinical practicality for standing neuroprostheses after spinal cord injury (SCI. Methods In simulation, controller performance was measured according to the upper extremity effort required to stabilize a three-dimensional model of bipedal standing against a variety of postural disturbances. Three cases were investigated: proportional-derivative control based on joint kinematics alone, COM acceleration feedback alone, and combined joint kinematics and COM acceleration feedback. Additionally, pilot data was collected during external perturbations of an individual with SCI standing with functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS, and the resulting joint kinematics and COM acceleration data was analyzed. Results Compared to the baseline case of maximal constant muscle excitations, the three control systems reduced the mean upper extremity loading by 51%, 43% and 56%, respectively against external force-pulse perturbations. Controller robustness was defined as the degradation in performance with increasing levels of input errors expected with clinical deployment of sensor-based feedback. At error levels typical for body-mounted inertial sensors, performance degradation due to sensor noise and placement were negligible. However, at typical tracking error levels, performance could degrade as much as 86% for joint kinematics feedback and 35% for COM acceleration feedback. Pilot data indicated that COM acceleration could be estimated with a few well-placed sensors and efficiently captures information related to movement synergies observed during perturbed bipedal standing following SCI. Conclusions Overall, COM acceleration feedback may be a more feasible solution for control of standing with FNS given its

  19. Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germain, Shawn St. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Farris, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are

  20. Survey of Equipment Quality Control in Radiotherapy Centers in Croatia: First Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.; Diklic, A.; Smilovic Radojcic, Dj.; Svabic, M.; Kasabasic, M.; Ivkovic, A.; Faj, D.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of advanced radiation therapy techniques into clinical practice has a huge influence on tumour control as well as normal tissue sparing. Introduction of Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) into clinical practice results in precise 'tailoring' of dose distributions and according to that in reduction of irradiated volumes. This is not possible without, for the application of advanced radiation therapy techniques constructed, linear accelerators. They must be very precise, well tuned and maintained. In this way the milestone of radiation therapy quality assurance programme is machine quality control (QC). First step in development of quality control programme is existence of written QC protocols. The survey of existence of written QC protocols showed the lack of written protocols for QC procedures in Croatian radiotherapy departments. In this way regular implementation of the procedures are usually left to the conscience of the medical physicists. In the IAEA granted projects CRO6008 and RER9093, we harmonized existing QC protocols between radiation therapy departments at University hospitals Rijeka and Osijek and developed the new ones. The protocols made according to international guidelines are publicly available at websites of the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety and Croatian medical physics society in order to help other radiotherapy departments in Croatia to develop their own ones. Next step was reviewing of QC practices in different centres and exchanging experiences. For that purpose we defined a set of tests, according to the existing QC protocols. Then, on-site measurements were done to check QC parameters of linear accelerators and simulators in six radiation therapy centres in Croatia. In this paper we present the tests preformed, devices and analysing tools used, along with the overall results. Tests were preformed in six radiotherapy centres in Croatia on nine linear

  1. An elementary components of variance analysis for multi-center quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, P.J.; Rodbard, D.

    1977-01-01

    The serious variability of RIA results from different laboratories indicates the need for multi-laboratory collaborative quality control (QC) studies. Statistical analysis methods for such studies using an 'analysis of variance with components of variance estimation' are discussed. This technique allocates the total variance into components corresponding to between-laboratory, between-assay, and residual or within-assay variability. Components of variance analysis also provides an intelligent way to combine the results of several QC samples run at different evels, from which we may decide if any component varies systematically with dose level; if not, pooling of estimates becomes possible. We consider several possible relationships of standard deviation to the laboratory mean. Each relationship corresponds to an underlying statistical model, and an appropriate analysis technique. Tests for homogeneity of variance may be used to determine if an appropriate model has been chosen, although the exact functional relationship of standard deviation to lab mean may be difficult to establish. Appropriate graphical display of the data aids in visual understanding of the data. A plot of the ranked standard deviation vs. ranked laboratory mean is a convenient way to summarize a QC study. This plot also allows determination of the rank correlation, which indicates a net relationship of variance to laboratory mean. (orig.) [de

  2. Shiitake dermatitis recorded by French Poison Control Centers - new case series with clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boels, D; Landreau, A; Bruneau, C; Garnier, R; Pulce, C; Labadie, M; de Haro, L; Harry, P

    2014-07-01

    Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) is an edible mushroom which was initially grown in Japan and China and is now sold on the European market. Flagellate erythema may arise following shiitake consumption and was first described in Japan in 1974. This paper reports a French shiitake dermatitis case series. The findings of retrospective study of shiitake dermatitis cases, reported to French Poison Control Centres (PCC) from January 2000 to December 2013, are reported. Among 32 exposed patients, 15 presented flagellate urticarial lesions after raw shiitake consumption. The first case of this series was reported in 2006 and the last nine cases were reported as of 2012. After shared meals, no symptoms were reported among guests, who preferred cooked shiitake to the raw mushroom. In this series, rashes appeared 12 h to 5 days (median: 24 h) after raw shiitake ingestion. Linear and itchy urticarial lesions formed on the trunk, arms, and legs within a few hours and persisted for 3-21 days. In four cases, rash and pruritus were either triggered or worsened by sun exposure. Eleven patients received corticosteroids, antihistamines, or both. All patients completely recovered. Due to the rapidly increasing consumption of exotic food in Western countries, it is no surprise that cases of shiitake dermatitis are now appearing in Europe. The mechanism of shiitake dermatitis is thought to be toxic and due to lentinan, a polysaccharide component of the mushroom. There is no specific validated treatment for shiitake dermatitis. Health professionals and the general population should be aware of both the risk associated with raw shiitake consumption and of the good prognosis of this very spectacular and uncomfortable toxic dermatitis.

  3. Statistical quality control charts for liver transplant process indicators: evaluation of a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varona, M A; Soriano, A; Aguirre-Jaime, A; Barrera, M A; Medina, M L; Bañon, N; Mendez, S; Lopez, E; Portero, J; Dominguez, D; Gonzalez, A

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation, the best option for many end-stage liver diseases, is indicated in more candidates than the donor availability. In this situation, this demanding treatment must achieve excellence, accessibility and patient satisfaction to be ethical, scientific, and efficient. The current consensus of quality measurements promoted by the Sociedad Española de Trasplante Hepático (SETH) seeks to depict criteria, indicators, and standards for liver transplantation in Spain. According to this recommendation, the Canary Islands liver program has studied its experience. We separated the 411 cadaveric transplants performed in the last 15 years into 2 groups: The first 100 and the other 311. The 8 criteria of SETH 2010 were correctly fulfilled. In most indicators, the outcomes were favorable, with an actuarial survivals at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years of 84%, 79%, 76%, and 65%, respectively; excellent results in retransplant rates (early 0.56% and long-term 5.9%), primary nonfunction rate (0.43%), waiting list mortality (13.34%), and patient satisfaction (91.5%). On the other hand, some indicators of mortality were worse as perioperative, postoperative, and early mortality with normal graft function and reoperation rate. After the analyses of the series with statistical quality control charts, we observed an improvement in all indicators, even in the apparently worst, early mortality with normal graft functions in a stable program. Such results helped us to discover specific areas to improve the program. The application of the quality measurement, as SETH consensus recommends, has shown in our study that despite being a consuming time process, it is a useful tool. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nojo, humilhação e controle na limpeza de shopping centers no Brasil e no Canadá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquiria Padilha

    Full Text Available Este artigo visa a apresentar resultados de uma pesquisa qualitativa cujo objetivo principal foi analisar criticamente o sofrimento ancorado no trabalho precarizado de limpeza. Foram realizadas observações e entrevistas semiestruturadas com 12 trabalhadores de limpeza terceirizados de shopping centers no Brasil e no Canadá. A análise das entrevistas buscou regularidade dos assuntos recorrentes, agrupou elementos para constituir os núcleos temáticos de análise e construiu indícios para realizar a coerência teórica a partir da interpretação das descobertas sistematizadas. A pesquisa mostrou que o nojo e a humilhação dos trabalhadores de limpeza, ao lidarem com o lixo e a sujeira deixados pelos clientes em praças de alimentação e banheiros, são causa de sofrimento e demandam a performance de Trabalho Emocional. Foi possível encontrar, nos dois países, três núcleos temáticos de análise que se inter-relacionam no cotidiano do trabalho terceirizado de limpeza de shopping centers: o nojo, a humilhação e o controle.

  5. Snakebites notified to the poison control center of Morocco between 2009 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafiq, Fouad; El Hattimy, Faiçal; Rhalem, Naima; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Soulaymani, Abdelmajid; Mokhtari, Abdelrhani; Soulaymani-Bencheikh, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Snakebites cause considerable death and injury throughout the globe, particularly in tropical regions, and pose an important yet neglected threat to public health. In 2008, the Centre Anti Poison et de Parmacovigilance du Maroc (CAPM) started to set up a specific strategy for the control of snakebites that was formalized in 2012. The aim of the present study is to describe and update the epidemiological characteristics of snakebites notified to CAPM between 2009 and 2013. This retrospective five-year study included all cases of snakebites notified to CAPM by mail or phone. During the study period, 873 snakebite cases were reported to CAPM, an average incidence of 2.65 cases per 100,000 inhabitants with 218 cases each year. The highest incidence was found in Tangier-Tetouan region with 357 cases (40.9 %) followed by Souss Massa Draa region with 128 cases (14.6 %). The average age of patients was 26.8 ± 17.2 years. The male to female sex ratio was 1.67:1 and 77 % of cases occurred in rural areas. The bites occurred mainly in spring (44 %) followed by summer (42 %). Snake species was identified in 54 cases (6.2 %): colubrids represented 31 % (n = 18) and vipers 67 % (n = 36), mainly Daboia mauritanica, Bitis arietans and Cerastes cerastes. In 311 cases (35.6 %), the patients showed viper syndrome. Thrombocytopenia was observed in 23.5 % of viper syndrome cases, whereas, compartment syndrome was observed in 7.6 % patients. FAV-Afrique® was administered in 41 patients (5 %). In patients treated with antivenom, 38 patients recovered and three died. Twenty-seven deaths were reported (3.9 %). Despite specific efforts to better understand the epidemiology of snakebites in Morocco (incidence, severity, snake species involved), it remains underestimated. Therefore, further work is still necessary to ensure accessibility of appropriate antivenom against venomous species and to improve the management of envenomation in Morocco.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, March 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with various impinger capture solutions. Also, the installation of the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit was completed in March. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD Unit and were utilized in the HAP test configuration this month. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold- standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  7. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St Germain, Shawn Walter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Farris, Ronald Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications

  8. Center for Disease Control's Diethylstilbestrol Update: a case for effective operationalization of messaging in social marketing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Marifran; Basu, Ambar

    2010-07-01

    The Center for Disease Control's (CDC) Diethylstilbestrol (DES) Update, a campaign to educate people who may have been exposed to the drug DES, is framed on the premises of the social marketing model, namely formative research, audience segmentation, product, price, placement, promotion, and campaign evaluation. More than that, the campaign takes a critical step in extending the social marketing paradigm by highlighting the need to situate the messaging process at the heart of any health communication campaign. This article uses CDC's DES Update as a case study to illustrate an application of a message development tool within social marketing. This tool promotes the operationalization of messaging within health campaigns. Ultimately, the goal of this project is to extend the social marketing model and provide useful theoretical guidance to health campaign practitioners on how to accomplish stellar communication within a social marketing campaign.

  9. A Review of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Guidelines for the Clinical Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Caterina M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review information regarding the current guidelines for the clinical laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease as set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to chiropractic physicians and to discuss the clinical utility of this testing. The CDC's website was reviewed to determine what their current recommendations are for the clinical laboratory testing of Lyme disease. The CDC's established guidelines recommend the use of a 2-tiered serologic testing algorithm for the evaluation of patients with suspected Lyme disease. This review provides doctors of chiropractic with information to remain current with the CDC's recommended guidelines for Lyme disease testing because patients may present to their office with the associated signs and symptoms of Lyme disease.

  10. Development of Improved Graphical Displays for an Advanced Outage Control Center, Employing Human Factors Principles for Outage Schedule Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Germain, Shawn Walter; Farris, Ronald Keith; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-01-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are somewhat challenging to coordinate; therefore, finding ways to improve refueling outage performance, while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center (AOCC) project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the LWRS Program. LWRS is an R&D program that works closely with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current fleet of NPPs. As such, the LWRS Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, INL is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. The overall focus is on developing an AOCC with the following capabilities that enables plant and OCC staff to; Collaborate in real-time to address emergent issues; Effectively communicate outage status to all workers involved in the outage; Effectively communicate discovered conditions in the field to the OCC; Provide real-time work status; Provide automatic pending support notifications

  11. cGAS-mediated control of blood-stage malaria promotes Plasmodium-specific germinal center responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, William O; Butler, Noah S; Lindner, Scott E; Akilesh, Holly M; Sather, D Noah; Kappe, Stefan Hi; Hamerman, Jessica A; Gale, Michael; Liles, W Conrad; Pepper, Marion

    2018-01-25

    Sensing of pathogens by host pattern recognition receptors is essential for activating the immune response during infection. We used a nonlethal murine model of malaria (Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL) to assess the contribution of the pattern recognition receptor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to the development of humoral immunity. Despite previous reports suggesting a critical, intrinsic role for cGAS in early B cell responses, cGAS-deficient (cGAS-/-) mice had no defect in the early expansion or differentiation of Plasmodium-specific B cells. As the infection proceeded, however, cGAS-/- mice exhibited higher parasite burdens and aberrant germinal center and memory B cell formation when compared with littermate controls. Antimalarial drugs were used to further demonstrate that the disrupted humoral response was not B cell intrinsic but instead was a secondary effect of a loss of parasite control. These findings therefore demonstrate that cGAS-mediated innate-sensing contributes to parasite control but is not intrinsically required for the development of humoral immunity. Our findings highlight the need to consider the indirect effects of pathogen burden in investigations examining how the innate immune system affects the adaptive immune response.

  12. Quality control in the low activity radioanalytical laboratory of the Environmental Division, DIEAM.CN of NUCLEBRAS Research Center - CDTN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.A.G. de

    1988-01-01

    The Environmental Engineering Division - DIEAM.CN of NUCLEBRAS research center - CTDN, is in charge of the routine work related to the analysis of environment samples collected at several NUCLEBRAS facilities. This paper presents the procedures used for quality control of the analyses performed at the Laboratory. The samples are initially verified and recorded as soon as they arrive at the Division. From then on, each aliquot and each analysis will be controlled using a follow-up sheet. Once a year, the operational conditions of the Lab couting systems are verified thoroughly. At that time, the systems are calibrated using certified radioactivity standards. Performance of the detectors is checked using control graphs, which can indicate the need for specific procedures to be followed such as maintenance, decontamination or recalibration. In order to reduce the risk of mistakes and to increase the capacity for global data evaluation, a microcomputer is used for processing the counting data and for editing a final report. (author) [pt

  13. EFFECT OF NEBULIZED COLISTIN ON THE VENTILATOR CIRCUIT: A PROSPECTIVE PILOT CASE-CONTROL STUDY FROM A SINGLE CANCER CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad M Ghonimat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nebulized colistin (NC is used for the treatment of pneumonia due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. In this one-year case-control study, our objective was to evaluate the effect of NC on the ventilator circuit (VC components. The case group consisted of 25 mechanically-ventilated patients who received NC, while the control group was 25 mechanically-ventilated patients who did not receive NC. Respiratory therapists inspected the VC every 4 hrs and whenever a ventilator alarm was reported. The VC component was changed if the alarm did not subside after necessary measures were performed. Patients from both groups were treated at the adult ICU in King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC. In the case group, 22(88% patients required changing at least one of the circuit components (flow sensor, exhalation membrane, or nebulizer kit. The median number of changes (range per patient of the flow sensor, exhalation membrane, and nebulizer kit were: 2(1-3, 2(1-6, and 1(1-2, respectively. Large amounts of white crystals, which resembled the colistin powder, were reported on the replaced VC components. The flow sensor was changed in 2 control patients, but white crystals were absent. Crystals obtained from one case subject were confirmed to be colistin by chromatographic mass spectroscopy. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of crystal formation on the efficacy of NC and clinical outcomes.

  14. Poor procedures and quality control among nonaffiliated blood centers in Burkina Faso: an argument for expanding the reach of the national blood transfusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nébié, Koumpingnin; Ouattara, Siaka; Sanou, Mahamoudou; Kientega, Youssouphe; Dahourou, Honorine; Ky, Lassina; Kienou, Kisito; Diallo, Samba; Bigirimana, Françoise; Fretz, Catherine; Murphy, Edward L; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques

    2011-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the creation of national blood transfusion services. Burkina Faso has a CNTS (Centre National de Transfusion Sanguine-National Blood Transfusion Center) but it currently covers only 53% of the national blood supply versus 47% produced by independent hospital blood banks. To evaluate blood collection, testing, preparation, and prescription practices in the regions of Burkina Faso that are not covered by the CNTS, a cross-sectional survey was conducted. Data were collected by trained professionals from May to June 2009 at 42 autonomous blood centers not covered by the CNTS. Blood collection was supervised in all sites by laboratory technicians without specific training. There was no marketing of community blood donation nor mobile collection. Donation was restricted to replacement (family) donors in 21.4% of sites. Predonation screening of donors was performed in 63.4% of sites, but some did not use written questionnaires. Testing for HIV, hepatitis B virus, and syphilis was universal, although some sites did not screen for hepatitis C virus. In 83.3% of the sites, blood typing was performed without reverse ABO typing. In 97.6% of the sites, nurses acted alone or in conjunction with a physician to order blood transfusions. Shortcomings in non-CNTS blood centers argue for the development of a truly national CNTS. Such a national center should coordinate and supervise all blood transfusion activities, and is the essential first step for improving and institutionalizing blood transfusion safety and efficacy in a developing country. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  15. Poor procedures and quality control among non-affiliated blood centers in Burkina Faso: an argument for expanding the reach of the national blood transfusion center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nébié, Koumpingnin; Ouattara, Siaka; Sanou, Mahamoudou; Kientega, Youssouphe; Dahourou, Honorine; Ky, Lassina; Kienou, Kisito; Diallo, Samba; Bigirimana, Françoise; Fretz, Catherine; Murphy, Edward L.; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the creation of national blood transfusion services. Burkina Faso has a CNTS (Centre national de transfusion sanguine - National Blood Transfusion Center) but it currently covers only 53% of the national blood supply versus 47% produced by independent hospital blood banks. Study design To evaluate blood collection, testing, preparation and prescription practices in the regions of Burkina Faso that are not covered by the CNTS, we conducted a cross-sectional survey. Methodology Data were collected by trained professionals from May to June 2009, at 42 autonomous blood centers not covered by the CNTS. Results Blood collection was supervised in all sites by laboratory technicians without specific training. There was no marketing of community blood donation nor mobile collection. Donation was restricted to replacement (family) donors in 21.4% of sites. Pre-donation screening of donors was performed in 63.4% of sites, but some did not use written questionnaires. Testing for HIV, hepatitis B virus and syphilis was universal, although some sites did not screen for hepatitis C virus. In 83.3% of the sites blood typing was performed without reverse ABO typing. In 97.6% of the sites, nurses acted alone or in conjunction with a physician to order blood transfusions. Conclusion Shortcomings in non-CNTS blood centers argue for the development of a truly national CNTS. Such a national center should coordinate and supervise all blood transfusion activities, and is the essential first step for improving and institutionalizing blood transfusion safety and efficacy in a developing country. PMID:21736582

  16. Minatom of Russia Situation and Crisis Center and the Automated Federal Information System for Nuclear Material Control and Accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchik, V.P.; Kasumova, L.A.; Babcock, R.A.; Heinberg, C.L.; Tynan, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Under the Situation and Crisis Center (SCC) management, the Information Analytical Center (IAC) of the Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) of Russia was created to oversee the operation of the Federal Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Information System (FIS). During 2000, the FIS achieved an important milestone in its development: the basic functions of the information system were implemented. This includes placing into operation the collecting and processing of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A) information from the enterprises reporting to the FIS. The FIS began working with 14 Russian enterprises to develop and implement full-function reporting (i.e., reporting inventory and inventory changes including closeout and reconciliation between the FIS and enterprises). In 2001, the system will expand to include enterprise-level inventory information for all enterprises using nuclear materials in Russia. For this reason, at the end of 2000 through the beginning of 2001, five separate training sessions were held for over 100 enterprise personnel responsible for preparation and transfer of the reports to the FIS. Through the assistance of the Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) program, information systems for the accounting of nuclear materials are being installed at Russia enterprises. In creating the program for modernization of the Russian Federation State System of Accounting and Control (SSAC) of nuclear material, the SCC conducted a survey of the enterprises to determine the readiness of their internal MC and A systems for reporting to the FIS. Based on the information from the survey and the results of the projects on creation of local information systems at Russian enterprises, the analysis of information and the technical aspects of MC and A systems identified deficiencies that were analyzed and recommendations for eliminating these deficiencies were proposed. The concentration of analytical and administrative

  17. Human reliability and the control of continuous processes: case study of TRANSPETRO gas control center room; A confiabilidade humana no controle de processos continuos: estudo de caso no centro de controle de gasodutos da TRANSPETRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Venetia; Zamberlan, Maria Cristina; Setti, Egle [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Faertes, Denise; Figueiras, Luciana Heil; Marques, Arnaldo; Franca, Andre Guedes da [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Diniz, Vaner; Melo, Paulo Fernando Ferreira Frutuoso e [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2005-07-01

    This review presents a study using data from the activities of control of operations into the Center of Control Operational of Gas pipelines from TRANSPETRO. These study used the methodology of Analysis Ergonomic of Work (AET). Twenty hours of systematic observation have been performed from the activities of the operators and the supervisors into the CCG in different shifts with different staffs. The data obtained reveals the dynamics from the activities of control facing the increase of automation as well the strategies and adjustments that are performed by the operators with the increase of complexity of the systems they shall control. With the treatment of data we verify that occurs an important increasing of the activities, that interferes on to another, and that generates the loss of cooperation between operators, errors on the exchanges of information and so on. The survey from real activity at work was fundamental for the apprehension of the existing risks and for the generation of proposals to the improvement of the control of the process in the CCG. (author)

  18. The user-centered design as novel perspective for evaluating the usability of BCI-controlled applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kübler

    Full Text Available Albeit research on brain-computer interfaces (BCI for controlling applications has expanded tremendously, we still face a translational gap when bringing BCI to end-users. To bridge this gap, we adapted the user-centered design (UCD to BCI research and development which implies a shift from focusing on single aspects, such as accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR, to a more holistic user experience. The UCD implements an iterative process between end-users and developers based on a valid evaluation procedure. Within the UCD framework usability of a device can be defined with regard to its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. We operationalized these aspects to evaluate BCI-controlled applications. Effectiveness was regarded equivalent to accuracy of selections and efficiency to the amount of information transferred per time unit and the effort invested (workload. Satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and visual-analogue scales. These metrics have been successfully applied to several BCI-controlled applications for communication and entertainment, which were evaluated by end-users with severe motor impairment. Results of four studies, involving a total of N = 19 end-users revealed: effectiveness was moderate to high; efficiency in terms of ITR was low to high and workload low to medium; depending on the match between user and technology, and type of application satisfaction was moderate to high. The here suggested evaluation metrics within the framework of the UCD proved to be an applicable and informative approach to evaluate BCI controlled applications, and end-users with severe impairment and in the locked-in state were able to participate in this process.

  19. The user-centered design as novel perspective for evaluating the usability of BCI-controlled applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Andrea; Holz, Elisa M; Riccio, Angela; Zickler, Claudia; Kaufmann, Tobias; Kleih, Sonja C; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Desideri, Lorenzo; Hoogerwerf, Evert-Jan; Mattia, Donatella

    2014-01-01

    Albeit research on brain-computer interfaces (BCI) for controlling applications has expanded tremendously, we still face a translational gap when bringing BCI to end-users. To bridge this gap, we adapted the user-centered design (UCD) to BCI research and development which implies a shift from focusing on single aspects, such as accuracy and information transfer rate (ITR), to a more holistic user experience. The UCD implements an iterative process between end-users and developers based on a valid evaluation procedure. Within the UCD framework usability of a device can be defined with regard to its effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. We operationalized these aspects to evaluate BCI-controlled applications. Effectiveness was regarded equivalent to accuracy of selections and efficiency to the amount of information transferred per time unit and the effort invested (workload). Satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and visual-analogue scales. These metrics have been successfully applied to several BCI-controlled applications for communication and entertainment, which were evaluated by end-users with severe motor impairment. Results of four studies, involving a total of N = 19 end-users revealed: effectiveness was moderate to high; efficiency in terms of ITR was low to high and workload low to medium; depending on the match between user and technology, and type of application satisfaction was moderate to high. The here suggested evaluation metrics within the framework of the UCD proved to be an applicable and informative approach to evaluate BCI controlled applications, and end-users with severe impairment and in the locked-in state were able to participate in this process.

  20. A hand hygiene intervention to decrease infections among children attending day care centers: design of a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomer, Tizza P; Erasmus, Vicki; Vlaar, Nico; van Beeck, Ed F; Tjon-A-Tsien, Aimée; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Voeten, Hélène A C M

    2013-06-03

    Day care center attendance has been recognized as a risk factor for acquiring gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, which can be prevented with adequate hand hygiene (HH). Based on previous studies on environmental and sociocognitive determinants of caregivers' compliance with HH guidelines in day care centers (DCCs), an intervention has been developed aiming to improve caregivers' and children's HH compliance and decrease infections among children attending DCCs. The aim of this paper is to describe the design of a cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention. The intervention will be evaluated in a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial among 71 DCCs in the Netherlands. In total, 36 DCCs will receive the intervention consisting of four components: 1) HH products (dispensers and refills for paper towels, soap, alcohol-based hand sanitizer, and hand cream); 2) training to educate about the Dutch national HH guidelines; 3) two team training sessions aimed at goal setting and formulating specific HH improvement activities; and 4) reminders and cues to action (posters/stickers). Intervention DCCs will be compared to 35 control DCCs continuing usual practice. The primary outcome measure will be observed HH compliance of caregivers and children, measured at baseline and one, three, and six months after start of the intervention. The secondary outcome measure will be the incidence of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in 600 children attending DCCs, monitored over six months by parents using a calendar to mark the days their child has diarrhea and/or a cold. Multilevel logistic regression will be performed to assess the effect of the intervention on HH compliance. Multilevel poisson regression will be performed to assess the incidence of gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in children attending DCCs. This is one of the first DCC intervention studies to assess HH compliance of both caregivers and

  1. Self-poisoning with baclofen in alcohol-dependent patients: national reports to French Poison Control Centers, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier, Fanny; de Haro, Luc; Cardona, Florence; Picot, Cyndie; Puskarczyk, Emmanuel; Sapori, Jean-Marc; Tournoud, Christine; Franchitto, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Alcohol use disorders are frequently associated with self-intoxication in attempted suicide. In France since 2008, the off-label use of baclofen for treatment of alcohol dependence has greatly increased, leading to temporary regulation of use of the drug. At the request of the national authorities, the French Poison Control Centers carried out a retrospective survey to give an overview of baclofen exposure in this population. A retrospective study was carried out from January 2008 to December 2013, focusing on baclofen exposures in alcohol-dependent patients managed by the nine national French Poison Control Centers. 294 observations of baclofen exposures in alcohol-dependent patients were identified in our database. Of these, 220 were suicide attempts by self-poisoning and 74 were unintentional. The mean age of patients was 41.7 years, with a sex-ratio of 1.6. Patients attempting suicide with baclofen were younger than those with unintentional exposures, and 43.6% of them were women (vs 22.9%, p < 0.01). The mean supposed ingested dose was higher (480.7 mg) in patients who attempted suicide (vs 192.5 mg, p < 0.0001). 21.8% of intentional exposures involved baclofen alone. Psychiatric comorbidity (50.4%) was more frequent in the group of self-poisoning (p < 0.001). 132 patients were coded as severely exposed (60.0%). Nine victims died, but the causal link between self-poisoning with baclofen and fatal outcome should be interpreted with particular caution. Baclofen self-poisoning by alcohol-dependent patients is a serious concern for the French health authorities. Our results are similar to those previously published, suggesting that most patients with baclofen overdose should be admitted to an intermediate or intensive care unit as the clinical course requires close monitoring. Because suicidal ideation and suicide attempts are more prevalent in people with substance use disorders than in the general population, and because of the lack of

  2. A new reportable disease is born: Taiwan Centers for Disease Control's response to emerging Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Angela Song-En; Shu, Pei-Yun; Yang, Chin-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus infection, usually a mild disease transmitted through the bite of Aedes mosquitos, has been reported to be possibly associated with microcephaly and neurologic complications. Taiwan's first imported case of Zika virus infection was found through fever screening at airport entry in January 2016. No virus was isolated from patient's blood taken during acute illness; however, PCR products showed that the virus was of Asian lineage closely related to virus from Cambodia. To prevent Zika virus from spreading in Taiwan, the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control has strengthened efforts in quarantine and surveillance, increased Zika virus infection diagnostic capacity, implemented healthcare system preparedness plans, and enhanced vector control program through community mobilization and education. Besides the first imported case, no additional cases of Zika virus infection have been identified. Furthermore, no significant increase in the number of microcephaly or Guillain- Barré Syndrome has been observed in Taiwan. To date, there have been no autochthonous transmissions of Zika virus infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Depression management within GP-centered health care - A case-control study based on claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, Antje; Krause, Markus; Lehmann, Thomas; Schulz, Sven; Wolf, Florian; Biermann, Janine; Wasem, Jürgen; Gensichen, Jochen

    For most patients with depression, GPs are the first and long-term medical providers. GP-centered health care (GPc-HC) programs target patients with chronic diseases. What are the effects of GPc-HC on primary care depression management? An observational retrospective case-control study was conducted using health insurance claims data of patients with depressive disorder from July 2011 to December 2012. From 40,298 patients insured with the largest health plan in Central Germany participating in the GPc-HC program (intervention group, IG), we observed 4645 patients with depression over 18months: 72.2% women; 66.6years (mean); multiple conditions (morbidity-weight 2.50 (mean), 86%>1.0). We compared them with 4013 patients who did not participate (control group). In participants we found lower number of incomplete/non-specified depression diagnoses (4.46vs.4.82;MD-0.36; pcare" (38.2%vs.30.2%;PP+8.0;pDepressive patients participating in a GPc-HC program may be more often diagnosed by a GP, receive symptom-monitoring and appropriate depression treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Controlled, cross-sectional, multi-center study of physical capacity and associated factors in women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Bjersing, Jan; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Kosek, Eva; Gerdle, Björn; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2018-04-19

    Health and physical capacity are commonly associated with disease, age, and socioeconomic factors. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the degree to which physical capacity, defined as muscle strength and walking ability, is decreased in women with fibromyalgia (FM), as compared to healthy women, who are matched for age and level of education. The secondary aim was to investigate whether muscle strength and walking ability are associated with age, symptom duration, activity limitations and, Body Mass Index (BMI) in women with FM and control subjects. This controlled, cross-sectional, multi-center study comprised 118 women with FM and 93 age- and education-level-matched healthy women. The outcome measures were isometric knee-extension force, isometric elbow-flexion force, isometric hand-grip force, and walking ability. Differences between the groups were calculated, and for the women with FM analyses of correlations between the measures of physical capacity and variables were performed. The women with FM showed 20% (p BMI. It seems important to address this problem and to target interventions to prevent decline in muscle strength. Assessments of muscle strength and walking ability are easy to administer and should be routinely carried out in the clinical setting for women with FM. ClinicalTrials.gov identification number: NCT01226784 , Oct 21, 2010.

  5. Reaction Control System Thruster Cracking Consultation: NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The shuttle orbiter s reaction control system (RCS) primary thruster serial number 120 was found to contain cracks in the counter bores and relief radius after a chamber repair and rejuvenation was performed in April 2004. Relief radius cracking had been observed in the 1970s and 1980s in seven thrusters prior to flight; however, counter bore cracking had never been seen previously in RCS thrusters. Members of the Materials Super Problem Resolution Team (SPRT) of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conducted a detailed review of the relevant literature and of the documentation from the previous RCS thruster failure analyses. It was concluded that the previous failure analyses lacked sufficient documentation to support the conclusions that stress corrosion cracking or hot-salt cracking was the root cause of the thruster cracking and lacked reliable inspection controls to prevent cracked thrusters from entering the fleet. The NESC team identified and performed new materials characterization and mechanical tests. It was determined that the thruster intergranular cracking was due to hydrogen embrittlement and that the cracking was produced during manufacturing as a result of processing the thrusters with fluoride-containing acids. Testing and characterization demonstrated that appreciable environmental crack propagation does not occur after manufacturing.

  6. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabretta, Nicola; Miao, Wang; Dorren, Harm

    2016-03-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and applications. Virtualization mechanisms and technologies can leverage statistical multiplexing and fast switch reconfiguration to further extend the DC efficiency and agility. We present a novel high performance flat DCN employing bufferless and distributed fast (sub-microsecond) optical switches with wavelength, space, and time switching operation. The fast optical switches can enhance the performance of the DCNs by providing large-capacity switching capability and efficiently sharing the data plane resources by exploiting statistical multiplexing. Benefiting from the Software-Defined Networking (SDN) control of the optical switches, virtual DCNs can be flexibly created and reconfigured by the DCN provider. Numerical and experimental investigations of the DCN based on the fast optical switches show the successful setup of virtual network slices for intra-data center interconnections. Experimental results to assess the DCN performance in terms of latency and packet loss show less than 10^-5 packet loss and 640ns end-to-end latency with 0.4 load and 16- packet size buffer. Numerical investigation on the performance of the systems when the port number of the optical switch is scaled to 32x32 system indicate that more than 1000 ToRs each with Terabit/s interface can be interconnected providing a Petabit/s capacity. The roadmap to photonic integration of large port optical switches will be also presented.

  7. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Creation of NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate database of meteorological data is essential for designing any aerospace vehicle and for preparing launch commit criteria. Meteorological instrumentation were recently placed on the three Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B), which provide a unique meteorological dataset existing at the launch complex over an extensive altitude range. Data records of temperature, dew point, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction are produced at 40, 78, 116, and 139 m at each tower. The Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) received an archive that consists of one-minute averaged measurements for the period of record of January 2011 - April 2015. However, before the received database could be used EV44 needed to remove any erroneous data from within the database through a comprehensive quality control (QC) process. The QC process applied to the LPS towers' meteorological data is similar to other QC processes developed by EV44, which were used in the creation of meteorological databases for other towers at KSC. The QC process utilized in this study has been modified specifically for use with the LPS tower database. The QC process first includes a check of each individual sensor. This check includes removing any unrealistic data and checking the temporal consistency of each variable. Next, data from all three sensors at each height are checked against each other, checked against climatology, and checked for sensors that erroneously report a constant value. Then, a vertical consistency check of each variable at each tower is completed. Last, the upwind sensor at each level is selected to minimize the influence of the towers and other structures at LC-39B on the measurements. The selection process for the upwind sensor implemented a study of tower-induced turbulence. This paper describes in detail the QC process, QC results, and the attributes of the LPS towers meteorological

  8. A Comparison of the Views of Internal Controllers/Auditors and Branch/Call Center Personnel of the Banks for Operational Risk: A Case for Turkish Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinemis Zengin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the views of internal controllers/auditors and branch/call center personnel of the banks with respect to the operational risk. Within this scope, we made two different surveys to the personnel in Turkish banks in order to achieve this objective. The first survey was conducted by 310 branch and call center personnel whereas 151 personnel in internal control and audit departments of the banks carried out the second survey. The major finding in this study is that there is a difference in the views of these two groups regarding the evaluation of operational risk. In general, internal controllers/auditors look at the operational risk more negatively than branch/call center personnel. The personnel who control and audit operations in the bank think that operational risk knowledge level of branch/call center personnel is less sufficient, operational risk levels are higher, the controls to avoid this risk are less efficient than branch/call center personnel consider.

  9. Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team (PREDICT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Milgrom, Peter; Shirtcliff, R Michael; Bailit, Howard L; Huebner, Colleen E; Conrad, Douglas; Ludwig, Sharity; Mitchell, Melissa; Dysert, Jeanne; Allen, Gary; Scott, JoAnna; Mancl, Lloyd

    2015-06-20

    To improve the oral health of low-income children, innovations in dental delivery systems are needed, including community-based care, the use of expanded duty auxiliary dental personnel, capitation payments, and global budgets. This paper describes the protocol for PREDICT (Population-centered Risk- and Evidence-based Dental Interprofessional Care Team), an evaluation project to test the effectiveness of new delivery and payment systems for improving dental care and oral health. This is a parallel-group cluster randomized controlled trial. Fourteen rural Oregon counties with a publicly insured (Medicaid) population of 82,000 children (0 to 21 years old) and pregnant women served by a managed dental care organization are randomized into test and control counties. In the test intervention (PREDICT), allied dental personnel provide screening and preventive services in community settings and case managers serve as patient navigators to arrange referrals of children who need dentist services. The delivery system intervention is paired with a compensation system for high performance (pay-for-performance) with efficient performance monitoring. PREDICT focuses on the following: 1) identifying eligible children and gaining caregiver consent for services in community settings (for example, schools); 2) providing risk-based preventive and caries stabilization services efficiently at these settings; 3) providing curative care in dental clinics; and 4) incentivizing local delivery teams to meet performance benchmarks. In the control intervention, care is delivered in dental offices without performance incentives. The primary outcome is the prevalence of untreated dental caries. Other outcomes are related to process, structure and cost. Data are collected through patient and staff surveys, clinical examinations, and the review of health and administrative records. If effective, PREDICT is expected to substantially reduce disparities in dental care and oral health. PREDICT can be

  10. Advanced Stirling Convertor Dual Convertor Controller Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Bell, Mark E.; Dolce, James L.; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center developed a nonnuclear representation of a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) consisting of a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), Dual Convertor Controller (DCC) EMs (engineering models) 2 and 3, and associated support equipment, which were tested in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The DCC was designed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to actively control a pair of ASCs. The first phase of testing included a Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), which was developed by JHU/APL and simulates the operation and electrical behavior of a pair of ASCs in real time via a combination of hardware and software. RSIL provides insight into the electrical interactions between a representative radioisotope power generator, its associated control schemes, and realistic electric system loads. The first phase of integration testing included the following spacecraft bus configurations: capacitive, battery, and super-capacitor. A load profile, created based on data from several missions, tested the RPS's and RSIL's ability to maintain operation during load demands above and below the power provided by the RPS. The integration testing also confirmed the DCC's ability to disconnect from the spacecraft when the bus voltage dipped below 22 volts or exceeded 36 volts. Once operation was verified with the DASCS, the tests were repeated with actual operating ASCs. The goal of this integration testing was to verify operation of the DCC when connected to a spacecraft and to verify the functionality of the newly designed RSIL. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  11. Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Kussmaul, Michael; Casciani, Michael; Brown, Gregory; Wiser, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Future NASA missions could include establishing Lunar or Martian base camps, exploring Jupiters moons and travelling beyond where generating power from sunlight may be limited. Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) provide a dependable power source for missions where inadequate sunlight or operational requirements make other power systems impractical. Over the past decade, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting the development of RPSs. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) utilized a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC). While flight development of the ASRG has been cancelled, much of the technology and hardware continued development and testing to guide future activities. Specifically, a controller for the convertor(s) is an integral part of a Stirling-based RPS. For the ASRG design, the controller maintains stable operation of the convertors, regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified direct current output voltage for the spacecraft, synchronizes the piston motion of the two convertors in order to minimize vibration as well as manage and maintain operation with a stable piston amplitude and hot end temperature. It not only provides power to the spacecraft but also must regulate convertor operation to avoid damage to internal components and maintain safe thermal conditions after fueling. Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies has designed, developed and tested an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit (ACU) to support this effort. GRC used the ACU EDU as part of its non-nuclear representation of a RPS which also consists of a pair of Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), and associated support equipment to perform a test in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The RSIL was designed and built to evaluate hardware utilizing RPS technology. The RSIL provides insight into the electrical

  12. Human-centered sensor-based Bayesian control: Increased energy efficiency and user satisfaction in commercial lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granderson, Jessica Ann

    2007-12-01

    The need for sustainable, efficient energy systems is the motivation that drove this research, which targeted the design of an intelligent commercial lighting system. Lighting in commercial buildings consumes approximately 13% of all the electricity generated in the US. Advanced lighting controls1 intended for use in commercial office spaces have proven to save up to 45% in electricity consumption. However, they currently comprise only a fraction of the market share, resulting in a missed opportunity to conserve energy. The research goals driving this dissertation relate directly to barriers hindering widespread adoption---increase user satisfaction, and provide increased energy savings through more sophisticated control. To satisfy these goals an influence diagram was developed to perform daylighting actuation. This algorithm was designed to balance the potentially conflicting lighting preferences of building occupants, with the efficiency desires of building facilities management. A supervisory control policy was designed to implement load shedding under a demand response tariff. Such tariffs offer incentives for customers to reduce their consumption during periods of peak demand, trough price reductions. In developing the value function occupant user testing was conducted to determine that computer and paper tasks require different illuminance levels, and that user preferences are sufficiently consistent to attain statistical significance. Approximately ten facilities managers were also interviewed and surveyed to isolate their lighting preferences with respect to measures of lighting quality and energy savings. Results from both simulation and physical implementation and user testing indicate that the intelligent controller can increase occupant satisfaction, efficiency, cost savings, and management satisfaction, with respect to existing commercial daylighting systems. Several important contributions were realized by satisfying the research goals. A general

  13. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, November 1995. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Pilot High Velocity (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurement studies involving the EPA Draft Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber system was utilized in the TER test configuration this month while the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber unit remained in a state of cold-standby. A monthly inspection was conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems in the SCR building. These inspections will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff each month.

  14. Current status of quality evaluation of nursing care through director review and reflection from the Nursing Quality Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xia; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The quality evaluation of nursing care is a key link in medical quality management. It is important and worth studying for the nursing supervisors to know the disadvantages during the process of quality evaluation of nursing care and then to improve the whole nursing quality. This study was to provide director insight on the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care from Nursing Quality Control Centers (NQCCs). Material and Methods: This qualitative study used a sample of 12 directors from NQCCs who were recruited from 12 provinces in China to evaluate the current status of quality evaluation of nursing care. Data were collected by in-depth interviews. Content analysis method was used to analyze the data. Results: Four themes emerged from the data: 1) lag of evaluation index; 2) limitations of evaluation content; 3) simplicity of evaluation method; 4) excessive emphasis on terminal quality. Conclusion: It is of great realistic significance to ameliorate nursing quality evaluation criteria, modify the evaluation content based on patient needs-oriented idea, adopt scientific evaluation method to evaluate nursing quality, and scientifically and reasonably draw horizontal comparisons of nursing quality between hospitals, as well as longitudinal comparisons of a hospital’s nursing quality. These methods mentioned above can all enhance a hospital’s core competitiveness and benefit more patients. PMID:25419427

  15. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components: Phase 2, Motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Kassir, M.K.; Pepper, S.E.

    1987-12-01

    In Phase I of the Component Fragility Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a procedure to establish the seismic fragility of nuclear power plant equipment by use of existing test data and demonstrated its application by considering two equipment pieces. In Phase II of the program, BNL has collected additional test data, and has further advanced and is applying the methodology to determine the fragility levels of selected essential equipment categories. The data evaluation of four equipment families, namely, motor control center, switchboard, panelboard and power supply has been completed. Fragility levels have been determined for various failure modes of each equipment class and the deterministic results are presented in terms of test response spectra. In addition, the test data have been analyzed for determination of the respective probabilistic fragility levels. To this end, a single g-value has been selected to approximately represent the test vibration level and a statistical analysis has been performed with the g-values corresponding to a particular failure mode. The zero period acceleration and the average spectral acceleration over a frequency range of interest are separately used as the single g-value. The resulting parameters are presented in terms of a median value, an uncertainty coefficient and a randomness coefficient. Ultimately, each fragility level is expressed in terms of a single descriptor called an HCLPF value corresponding to a high (95%) confidence of a low (5%) probability of failure. The important observations made in the process of data analysis are included in this report

  16. International travelers with infectious diseases determined by pathology results, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - United States, 1995-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Kristina M; Barbre, Kira; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Blau, Dianna M; Sotir, Mark J; Zaki, Sherif R

    2017-09-01

    The failure to consider travel-related diagnoses, the lack of diagnostic capacity for specialized laboratory testing, and the declining number of autopsies may affect the diagnosis and management of travel-related infections. Pre- and post-mortem pathology can help determine causes of illness and death in international travelers. We conducted a retrospective review of biopsy and autopsy specimens sent to the Infectious Diseases Pathology Branch laboratory (IDPBL) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for diagnostic testing from 1995 through 2015. Cases were included if the specimen submitted for diagnosis was from a traveler with prior international travel during the disease incubation period and the cause of illness or death was unknown at the time of specimen submission. Twenty-one travelers, six (29%) with biopsy specimens and 15 (71%) with autopsy specimens, met the inclusion criteria. Among the 15 travelers who underwent autopsies, the most common diagnoses were protozoal infections (7 travelers; 47%), including five malaria cases, followed by viral infections (6 travelers; 40%). Biopsy or autopsy specimens can assist in diagnosing infectious diseases in travelers, especially from pathogens not endemic in the U.S. CDC's IDPBL provides a useful resource for clinicians considering infectious diseases in returned travelers. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Treatment for premenstrual syndrome with Vitex agnus castus: A prospective, randomized, multi-center placebo controlled study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhong; Chen, Rong; Zhou, Yingfang; Geng, Li; Zhang, Zhenyu; Chen, Shuling; Yao, Yanjun; Lu, Junli; Lin, Shouqing

    2009-05-20

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of VAC BNO 1095 extract in Chinese women suffering from moderate to severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled, parallel-group, multi-center clinical trial design was employed. After screening and preparation phase lasting three cycles, Eligible patients were randomly assigned into treatment or placebo groups and had treatment with VAC extract or placebo for up to three cycles. Efficacy was assessed using the Chinese version PMS-diary (PMSD) and PMTS. Two hundred and seventeen women were eligible to enter the treatment phase (TP) and were randomly assigned into the treatment group (108) or the placebo group (109), 208 provided the efficacy data (treatment 104, placebo 104), and 202 completed the treatment phase (treatment 101, placebo 101). The mean total PMSD score decreased from 29.23 at baseline (0 cycle) to 6.41 at the termination (3rd cycle) for the treatment group and from 28.14 at baseline (0 cycle) to 12.64 at the termination (3rd cycle) for the placebo group. The total PMSD score of 3rd cycle was significantly lower than the baseline in both groups (pVitex agnus castus (VAC BNO 1095 corresponding to 40mg herbal drug) is a safe, well tolerated and effective drug of the treatment for Chinese women with the moderate to severe PMS.

  18. Efficacy of chlorophyll c2 for seasonal allergic rhinitis: single-center double-blind randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Nishida, Naoya; Nota, Jumpei; Kitani, Takashi; Aoishi, Kunihide; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sugahara, Takuya; Hato, Naohito

    2016-12-01

    Chlorophyll c2 extracted from Sargassum horneri improved allergic symptoms in an animal model of allergic rhinitis. In the present study, we explored the efficacy of chlorophyll c2 in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. This was a single-center, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Sixty-six patients aged 20-43 years, each with a 2-year history of seasonal allergic rhinitis, were randomly assigned to receive either a single daily dose (0.7 mg) of chlorophyll c2 or placebo for 12 weeks. The use of medications including H1-antihistamines and topical nasal steroids was recorded by rescue medication scores (RMSs) noted after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. Disease-specific quality of life was measured using the Japan Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JRQLQ) both before and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. The RMS at 8 weeks was significantly better in the chlorophyll c2 than the placebo group (mean RMS difference = -3.09; 95 % confidence interval = -5.96 to -0.22); the mean RMS at 4 weeks was only slightly better in the chlorophyll c2 group. The JRQLQ scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. Chlorophyll c2 would have a potential to be an alternative treatment for allergic rhinitis.

  19. Guidelines for Implementation of an Advanced Outage Control Center to Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution, and Outage Risk Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Germain, Shawn W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Farris, Ronald K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Whaley, April M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medema, Heather D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gertman, David I. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by Department of Energy (DOE) and performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs that provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. The LWRS program serves to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. The purpose of this research is to improve management of nuclear power plant (NPP) outages through the development of an advanced outage control center (AOCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This technical report for industry implementation outlines methods and considerations for the establishment of an AOCC. This report provides a process for implementation of a change management plan, evaluation of current outage processes, the selection of technology, and guidance for the implementation of the selected technology. Methods are presented for both adoption of technologies within an existing OCC and for a complete OCC replacement, including human factors considerations for OCC design and setup.

  20. Economic perspective on strategic human capital management and planning for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kakoli; Chen, Zhuo Adam; Crawford, Carol A Gotway

    2009-11-01

    An organization's workforce--or human capital--is its most valuable asset. The 2002 President's Management Agenda emphasizes the importance of strategic human capital management by requiring all federal agencies to improve performance by enhancing personnel and compensation systems. In response to these directives, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) drafted its strategic human capital management plan to ensure that it is aligned strategically to support the agency's mission and its health protection goals. In this article, we explore the personnel economics literature to draw lessons from research studies that can help CDC enhance its human capital management and planning. To do so, we focus on topics that are of practical importance and empirical relevance to CDC's internal workforce and personnel needs with an emphasis on identifying promising research issues or methodological approaches. The personnel economics literature is rich with theoretically sound and empirically rigorous approaches for shaping an evidence-based approach to human capital management that can enhance incentives to attract, retain, and motivate a talented federal public health workforce, thereby promoting the culture of high-performance government.

  1. Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Lavage Solution versus Colonic Hydrotherapy for Bowel Preparation before Colonoscopy: A Single Center, Randomized, and Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This single center, randomized, and controlled study aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of polyethylene glycol electrolyte lavage (PEG-EL solution and colonic hydrotherapy (CHT for bowel preparation before colonoscopy. A total of 196 eligible outpatients scheduled for diagnostic colonoscopy were randomly assigned to the PEG-EL (n=102 or CHT (n=94 groups. Primary outcome measures included colonic cleanliness and adverse effects. Secondary outcome measures were patient satisfaction and preference, colonoscopic findings, ileocecal arrival rate, examiner satisfaction, and cecal intubation time. The results show that PEG-EL group was associated with significantly better colonic cleanliness than CHT group, fewer adverse effects, and increased examiner satisfaction. However, the CHT group had higher patient satisfaction and higher diverticulosis detection rates. Moreover, the results showed the same ileocecal arrival rate and patient preference between the two groups (P>0.05. These findings indicate that PEG-EL is the preferred option in patients who followed the preparation instructions completely.

  2. Major Tom to Ground Control: How Lipoproteins Communicate Extracytoplasmic Stress to the Decision Center of the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloux, Géraldine; Collet, Jean-François

    2017-11-01

    The envelope of bacteria is a complex multilayered shield that ensures multiple essential functions, including protecting the cell from external assaults. Hence, bacterial cells have evolved intricate mechanisms called envelope stress response systems (ESRS) to monitor all kinds of perturbations affecting the integrity of their envelope and to mount an appropriate response to contain or repair the damage. In the model bacterium Escherichia coli , several ESRS are built around a two-component system, in which envelope stress triggers a phosphotransfer between a sensor protein in the inner membrane of the envelope and a response regulator in the cytoplasm. In this review, we focus on two major ESRS in E. coli , the Rcs and Cpx pathways, in which additional proteins not directly involved in the phosphotransfer modulate signal transduction. Both the Rcs and Cpx systems can be turned on by a lipoprotein anchored in the outer membrane, RcsF and NlpE, respectively, providing a molecular connection between the most exterior layer of the envelope and the ground control center in the cytoplasm. Here, we review how these two lipoproteins, which share a striking set of features while being distinct in several aspects, act as sentinels at the front line of the bacterium by sensing and transducing stress to the downstream components of the Rcs and Cpx systems. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. The value of a poison control center in preventing unnecessary ED visits and hospital charges: A multi-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Casey R; Malheiro, Marty C; Bennett, Heather K W; Crouch, Barbara I

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the economic value of the Utah Poison Control Center (UPCC) by examining its contribution to the reduction of unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and associated charges across multiple years. A multi-year (2009-2014) analysis of cross-sectional data was performed. Callers were asked what they would do for a poison emergency if the UPCC was not available. Healthcare charges for ED visits averted were calculated according to insurance status using charges obtained from a statewide database. Of the 10,656 survey attempts, 5018 were completed. Over 30,000 cases were managed on-site each year. Using the proportion of callers who noted they would call 911, visit an ED, or call a physician's office, between 20.0 and 24.2 thousand ED visits were potentially prevented each year of the survey. Between $16.6 and $24.4 million dollars in unnecessary healthcare charges were potentially averted annually. Compared to the cost of operation, the service UPCC provides demonstrates economic value by reducing ED visits and associated charges. As the majority of patients have private insurance, the largest benefit falls to private payers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. George Kuzmycz Training Center: 5 years of American-Ukrainian efforts in the field of material control and accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilyuk, V.I.; Gavrylyuk, A.V.; Kirischuk, V.I.; Romanova, O.P.; Robinson, P.; Dickerson, S.; Kuzminski, J.; Sheppard, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    The George Kuzmycz Training Center for Physical Protection, Control and Accounting of Nuclear Material (GKTC) was established in October 1998 at the Kiev Institute for Nuclear Research. During the past six years, about 700 professionals from all Ukrainian nuclear installations, executive and regulatory bodies were trained at the GKTC. Future Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) training courses are going to be held even more frequently because Ukraine has already signed the Additional Model Protocol and its ratification by Ukrainian Parliament is expected to happen very soon. Additionally, a number of new training courses will be developed. US DOE trough Argonne National Laboratory has made significant efforts to transfer Automated Inventory/Material Accounting System (AIMAS) software to Ukraine. As a result, AIMAS software can be used as a basic code for the development of the Computerized MC and A System for all Ukrainian nuclear facilities despite their differences. In 2003, a new laboratory for Nondestructive Assay (NDA) was established with assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result, GKTC training capabilities will increase substantially. Furthermore, in order to increase the efficiency of NDA laboratory, it is planned to use the NDA equipment for a program of interdiction of illicit traffic of nuclear materials in Ukraine. American-Ukrainian MC and A efforts for the last 6 years, the problems encountered and the solutions to these problems, as well as comments, suggestions and recommendations for future activity at GKTC to promote and improve the nuclear material management culture in Ukraine are discussed in detail.

  5. A controlled evaluation of case clinical effect coding by poison center specialists for detection of WMD scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuhler, Michael C; Wittler, Mary A; Ford, Marsha; Dulaney, Anna R

    2011-08-01

    Many public health entities employ computer-based syndromic surveillance to monitor for aberrations including possible exposures to weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Often, this is done by screening signs and symptoms reported for cases against syndromic definitions. Poison centers (PCs) may offer significant contributions to public health surveillance because of their detailed clinical effect data field coding and real-time data entry. Because improper clinical effect coding may impede syndromic surveillance, it is important to assess this accuracy for PCs. An AAPCC-certified regional PC assessed the accuracy of clinical effect coding by specialists in poison information (SPIs) listening to audio recordings of standard cases. Eighteen different standardized cases were used, consisting of six cyanide, six botulism, and six control cases. Cases were scripted to simulate clinically relevant telephone conversations and converted to audio recordings. Ten SPIs were randomly selected from the center's staff to listen to and code case information from the recorded cases. Kappa scores and the percentage of correctly coding a present clinical effect were calculated for individual clinical effects summed over all test cases along with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The rate of the case coding by the SPIs triggering the PC's automated botulism and cyanide alerts was also determined. The kappa scores and the percentage of correctly coding a present clinical effect varied depending on the specific clinical effect, with greater accuracy observed for the clinical effects of vomiting and agitation/irritability, and poor accuracy observed for the clinical effects of visual defect and anion gap increase. Lack of correct coding resulted in only 60 and 86% of the cases that met the botulism and cyanide surveillance definitions, respectively, triggering the corresponding alert. There was no difference observed in the percentage of coding a present clinical effect between

  6. Analysis of Phone Calls Regarding Fluoride Exposure made to New Jersey Poison Control Center from 2010 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sneha; Quek, Samuel; Ruck, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    The American Association of Poison Control Center's annual reports demonstrate that acute fluoride exposure is not an uncommon occurrence. Despite its prevalence, there has been little published research on the topic in the last 10 years. The purpose of this study was to calculate the incidence of acute fluoride toxicity and lethality as it occurs in New Jersey and provide a descriptive epidemiology of acute fluoride exposures. The study design was retrospective in nature. Records of phone calls made by individuals reporting excessive fluoride exposure (in an amount greater than directed/prescribed) to New Jersey's poison control center, known as Poison Information and Education System from the years 2010 through 2012, were extracted from Toxicall® (Computer Automatic Systems, Inc.) database. A total of 2,476 human-only exposure records met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Incidence rates were calculated, and population characteristics, circumstances and medical outcomes of acute fluoride exposure cases were assessed and categorized. A total of 2,476 phone call records met the inclusion criteria. The fluoride exposures reported were from toothpaste with fluoride (49%, n=1,214), mouth rinse with fluoride (21.6%, n=536), multivitamin with fluoride (21.4%, n=530) and pure fluoride (0.08%, n=199). Medically speaking, 94.75% of calls were asymptomatic cases (n=2,346), 4.24% were symptomatic (n=105) and 1.01% were informational inquiries (n=25). Adverse symptoms reported were mostly minor (83.9% of symptomatic cases, n=88) and moderate (16.1% of symptomatic cases, n=17). The age group 18 months to 3 years of age showed the highest incidence of acute fluoride exposure (53.2%, n=1,317). There was a slightly higher incidence of acute fluoride exposures among males (n=1,317) vs. females (n=1,159). Most incidences occurred in the home (93.1% of records, n=2,305) and occurred unintentionally (96.7%, n=2,394). Calls were mainly made by the subject's mother (67.5%, n=1

  7. In vivo and in vitro performance of a China-made hemodialysis machine: a multi-center prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chen, Xiang-Mei; Cai, Guang-Yan; Li, Wen-Ge; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Hao, Li-Rong; Shi, Ming; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Hong-Li; Luo, Hui-Min; Zhang, Dong; Sun, Xue-Feng

    2017-08-02

    To evaluate the in vivo and in vitro performance of a China-made dialysis machine (SWS-4000). This was a multi-center prospective controlled study consisting of both long-term in vitro evaluations and cross-over in vivo tests in 132 patients. The China-made SWS-4000 dialysis machine was compared with a German-made dialysis machine (Fresenius 4008) with regard to Kt/V values, URR values, and dialysis-related adverse reactions in patients on maintenance hemodialysis, as well as the ultrafiltration rate, the concentration of electrolytes in the proportioned dialysate, the rate of heparin injection, the flow rate of the blood pump, and the rate of malfunction. The Kt/V and URR values at the 1st and 4th weeks of dialysis as well as the incidence of adverse effects did not differ between the two groups in cross-over in vivo tests (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the error values of the ultrafiltration rate, the rate of heparin injection or the concentrations of electrolytes in the proportioned dialysate at different time points under different parameter settings. At weeks 2 and 24, with the flow rate of the blood pump set at 300 mL/min, the actual error of the SWS-4000 dialysis machine was significantly higher than that of the Fresenius 4008 dialysis machine (P  0.05). The malfunction rate was higher in the SWS-4000 group than in the Fresenius 4008 group (P Fresenius 4008 dialysis machine; however, the malfunction rate of the former is higher than that of the latter in in vitro tests. The stability and long-term accuracy of the SWS-4000 dialysis machine remain to be improved.

  8. Quality-Controlled Wind Data from the Kennedy Space Center 915 Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has installed a five-instrument 915-Megahertz (MHz) Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) system that records atmospheric wind profile properties. The purpose of these profilers is to fill data gaps between the top of the KSC wind tower network and the lowest measurement altitude of the KSC 50-MHz DRWP. The 915-MHz DRWP system has the capability to generate three-dimensional wind data outputs from approximately 150 meters (m) to 6,000 m at roughly 15-minute (min) intervals. NASA s long-term objective is to combine the 915-MHz and 50-MHz DRWP systems to create complete vertical wind profiles up to 18,300 m to be used in trajectory and loads analyses of space vehicles and by forecasters on day-of-launch (DOL). This analysis utilizes automated and manual quality control (QC) processes to remove erroneous and unrealistic wind data returned by the 915-MHz DRWP system. The percentage of data affected by each individual QC check in the period of record (POR) (i.e., January to April 2006) was computed, demonstrating the variability in the amount of data affected by the QC processes. The number of complete wind profiles available at given altitude thresholds for each profiler in the POR was calculated and outputted graphically, followed by an assessment of the number of complete wind profiles available for any profiler in the POR. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the QC process on a day of a known weather event.

  9. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in triple-negative breast carcinoma: A prospective randomized controlled multi-center trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Mei; Ling, Rui; Xia Yuesheng; Luo Shanquan; Fu Xuehai; Xiao Feng; Li Jianping; Long Xiaoli; Wang Jianguo; Hou Zengxia; Chen Yunxia; Zhou Bin; Xu, Man

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) presents a high risk breast cancer that lacks the benefit from hormone treatment, chemotherapy is the main strategy even though it exists in poor prognosis. Use of adjuvant radiation therapy, which significantly decreases breast cancer mortality, has not been well described among poor TNBC women. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy could significantly increase survival outcomes in TNBC women after mastectomy. Patients and methods: A prospective randomized controlled multi-center study was performed between February 2001 and February 2006 and comprised 681 women with triple-negative stage I-II breast cancer received mastectomy, of them, 315 cases received systemic chemotherapy alone, 366 patients received radiation after the course of chemotherapy. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Simultaneously local and systemic toxicity were observed. Results: After a median follow-up of 86.5 months, five-year RFS rates were 88.3% and 74.6% for adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy alone, respectively, with significant difference between the two groups (HR 0.77 [95% CI 0.72, 0.98]; P = 0.02). Five-year OS significantly improved in adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation group compared with chemotherapy alone (90.4% and 78.7%) (HR 0.79 [95% CI 0.74, 0.97]; P = 0.03). No severe toxicity was reported. Conclusions: Patients received standard adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiation therapy was more effective than chemotherapy alone in women with triple-negative early-stage breast cancer after mastectomy.

  10. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Funding for HIV Testing Associated With Higher State Percentage of Persons Tested.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Samah; Dietz, Patricia M; Van Handel, Michelle; Zhang, Jun; Shrestha, Ram K; Huang, Ya-Lin A; Wan, Choi; Mermin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between state per capita allocations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding for HIV testing and the percentage of persons tested for HIV. We examined data from 2 sources: 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and 2010-2011 State HIV Budget Allocations Reports. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data were used to estimate the percentage of persons aged 18 to 64 years who had reported testing for HIV in the last 2 years in the United States by state. State HIV Budget Allocations Reports were used to calculate the state mean annual per capita allocations for CDC-funded HIV testing reported by state and local health departments in the United States. The association between the state fixed-effect per capita allocations for CDC-funded HIV testing and self-reported HIV testing in the last 2 years among persons aged 18 to 64 years was assessed with a hierarchical logistic regression model adjusting for individual-level characteristics. The percentage of persons tested for HIV in the last 2 years. In 2011, 18.7% (95% confidence interval = 18.4-19.0) of persons reported being tested for HIV in last 2 years (state range, 9.7%-28.2%). During 2010-2011, the state mean annual per capita allocation for CDC-funded HIV testing was $0.34 (state range, $0.04-$1.04). A $0.30 increase in per capita allocation for CDC-funded HIV testing was associated with an increase of 2.4 percentage points (14.0% vs 16.4%) in the percentage of persons tested for HIV per state. Providing HIV testing resources to health departments was associated with an increased percentage of state residents tested for HIV.

  11. Implementation of the Ohio College Library Center's Proposed Serials Control Subsystem at the University of South Florida Library: Some Preliminary Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitchell, Anne; Sprehn, Mary

    An evaluation of the Ohio College Library Center's (OCLC) proposed Serials Control Subsystem was undertaken to determine what effect the system would have on the operation of the Serials Department at the University of South Florida (USF) Library. The system would consist of three components: 1) claiming--identifying missing issues and generating…

  12. Evaluation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Concussion Initiative for High School Coaches: "Heads up: Concussion in High School Sports"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Kelly; Mitchko, Jane; Klein, Cynthia; Wong, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Background: To reduce the number of sports-related concussions, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with the support of partners and experts in the field, has developed a tool kit for high school coaches with practical, easy-to-use concussion-related information. This study explores the success of the tool kit in changing…

  13. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Möbius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjälmås, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjörg; Hoebeke, Piet; Walle, Johan Vande; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    2014-01-01

    Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center controlled

  14. Mosquito and Fly Surveillance and Control Research at the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology: Solving Operational Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mosquito and Fly Research Unit of the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology located in Gainesville Florida is the largest Federal laboratory devoted to specifically solving operational mosquito and fly surveillance and control challenges in the U.S. and internationa...

  15. Gabapentin in traumatic nerve injury pain: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, multi-center study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordh, Torsten E; Stubhaug, Audun; Jensen, Troels S

    2008-01-01

    A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over multi-center study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gabapentin in the treatment of neuropathic pain caused by traumatic or postsurgical peripheral nerve injury, using doses up to 2400mg/day. The study comprised a run...

  16. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Rose, Charles E.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Taussig, Jennifer; Gern, Robert; Hoyte, Tamika; Salazar, Laura; White, Jianglan; Todd, Jeff; Bautista, Greg; Flynn, Colin; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Isenberg, Debbie; Driscoll, Maura; Hurwitz, Elizabeth; Doherty, Rose; Wittke, Chris; Prachand, Nikhil; Benbow, Nanette; Melville, Sharon; Pannala, Praveen; Yeager, Richard; Sayegh, Aaron; Dyer, Jim; Sheu, Shane; Novoa, Alicia; Thrun, Mark; Al-Tayyib, Alia; Wilmoth, Ralph; Higgins, Emily; Griffin, Vivian; Mokotoff, Eve; MacMaster, Karen; Wolverton, Marcia; Risser, Jan; Rehman, Hafeez; Padgett, Paige; Bingham, Trista; Sey, Ekow Kwa; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa; Forrest, David; Beck, Dano; Cardenas, Gabriel; Nemeth, Chris; Anderson, Bridget J.; Watson, Carol-Ann; Smith, Lou; Robinson, William T.; Gruber, DeAnn; Barak, Narquis; Murrill, Chris; Neaigus, Alan; Jenness, Samuel; Hagan, Holly; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Wendel, Travis; Cross, Helene; Bolden, Barbara; D'Errico, Sally; Wogayehu, Afework; Godette, Henry; Brady, Kathleen A.; Kirkland, Althea; Sifferman, Andrea; Miguelino-Keasling, Vanessa; Velasco, Al; Tovar, Veronica; Raymond, H. Fisher; De León, Sandra Miranda; Rolón-Colón, Yadira; Marzan, Melissa; Courogen, Maria; Jaenicke, Tom; Thiede, Hanne; Burt, Richard; Jia, Yujiang; Opoku, Jenevieve; Sansone, Marie; West, Tiffany; Magnus, Manya; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects. PMID:25352589

  17. Limit of detection and threshold for positivity of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention assay for factor VIII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C H; Boylan, B; Shapiro, A D; Lentz, S R; Wicklund, B M

    2017-10-01

    Essentials Immunologic methods detect factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in some inhibitor-negative specimens. Specimens were tested by modified Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA) and fluorescence immunoassay. The NBA with preanalytical heat inactivation detects FVIII inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. IgG 4 frequency validates the established threshold for positivity of ≥ 0.5 NBU for this NBA. Background The Bethesda assay for measurement of factor VIII inhibitors called for quantification of positive inhibitors by using dilutions producing 25-75% residual activity (RA), corresponding to 0.4-2.0 Bethesda units, with the use of 'more sensitive methods' for samples with RA closer to 100% being recommended. The Nijmegen modification (Nijmegen-Bethesda assay [NBA]) changed the reagents used but not these calculations. Some specimens negative by the NBA have been shown to have FVIII antibodies detectable with sensitive immunologic methods. Objective To examine the performance at very low inhibitor titers of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-modified NBA (CDC-NBA), which includes preanalytic heat inactivation to liberate bound anti-FVIII antibodies. Methods Specimens with known inhibitors were tested with the CDC-NBA. IgG 4 anti-FVIII antibodies were measured by fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results Diluted inhibitors showed linearity below 0.4 Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU). With four statistical methods, the limit of detection of the CDC-NBA was determined to be 0.2 NBU. IgG 4 anti-FVIII antibodies, which correlate most strongly with functional inhibitors, were present at rates above the background rate of healthy controls in specimens with titers ≥ 0.2 NBU and showed an increase in frequency from 14.3% at 0.4 NBU to 67% at the established threshold for positivity of 0.5 NBU. Conclusions The CDC-NBA can detect inhibitors down to 0.2 NBU. The FLI, which is more sensitive, demonstrates anti-FVIII IgG 4 in some patients with negative (NBA, supporting the need for

  18. A hand hygiene intervention to decrease infections among children attending day care centers: Design of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.P. Zomer (Tizza); V. Erasmus (Vicky); N. Vlaar (Nico); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); A. Tjon-A-Tsien (Aimée); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Day care center attendance has been recognized as a risk factor for acquiring gastrointestinal and respiratory infections, which can be prevented with adequate hand hygiene (HH). Based on previous studies on environmental and sociocognitive determinants of caregivers'

  19. 2016 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers' National Poison Data System (NPDS): 34th Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummin, David D; Mowry, James B; Spyker, Daniel A; Brooks, Daniel E; Fraser, Michael O; Banner, William

    2017-12-01

    This is the 34th Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers' (AAPCC) National Poison Data System (NPDS). As of 1 January 2016, 55 of the nation's poison centers (PCs) uploaded case data automatically to NPDS. The upload interval was 9.50 [7.33, 14.6] (median [25%, 75%]) min, facilitating a near real-time national exposure and information database and surveillance system. We analyzed the case data tabulating specific indices from NPDS. The methodology was similar to that of previous years. Where changes were introduced, the differences are identified. Cases with medical outcomes of death were evaluated by a team of medical and clinical toxicologist reviewers using an ordinal scale of 1-6 to assess the Relative Contribution to Fatality (RCF) of the exposure. In 2016, 2,710,042 closed encounters were logged by NPDS: 2,159,032 human exposures, 54,019 animal exposures, 490,215 information cases, 6687 human confirmed non-exposures, and 89 animal confirmed non-exposures. US PCs also made 2,718,022 follow-up calls in 2016. Total encounters showed a 2.94% decline from 2015, while health care facility (HCF) human exposure cases increased by 3.63% from 2015. All information calls decreased by 12.5% but HCF information calls increased 0.454%, and while medication identification requests (Drug ID) decreased 29.6%, human exposure cases were essentially flat, decreasing by 0.431%. Human exposures with less serious outcomes have decreased 2.59% per year since 2008 while those with more serious outcomes (moderate, major or death) have increased by 4.39% per year since 2000. The top five substance classes most frequently involved in all human exposures were analgesics (11.2%), household cleaning substances (7.54%), cosmetics/personal care products (7.20%), sedatives/hypnotics/antipsychotics (5.84%), and antidepressants (4.74%). As a class, sedative/hypnotics/antipsychotics exposures increased most rapidly, by 10.7% per year (2088 cases/year), over the last

  20. RELATIONSHIP OF ASSESS SELF-ESTEEM AND LOCUS OF CONTROL WITH QUALITY OF LIFE DURING TREATMENT STAGES IN PATIENTS REFERRING TO DRUG ADDICTION REHABILITATION CENTERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2016-07-24

    Thus, the present research was carried out aimed at determining the relationship between self-esteem and locus of control and quality of life during treatment stages in the patients referring to drug addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city, Iran. The current study was a sectional research of descriptive correlation type. The research sample was 150 individuals of patients referring to addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city. For data gathering, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, and SF36 Quality of Life Questionnaire were used. Following collection of questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS/16 software. According to the results, in the 12 th day of treatment, 96 patients exhibited moderate self-esteem, 102 patients had internal locus of control, and the score of their overall quality of life was 40.43±12.71. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation coefficient indicated that a significant and positive relationship was observed between locus of control and quality of life during different treatment stages. It seems that quality of life improves during addiction treatment stages due to improvement of personality traits including locus of control and self-esteem. Therefore, consultation methods as a very crucial priority in addiction rehabilitation centers shall be taken into account by the health sector authorities and managers and can play an essential role in enhancing quality of life.

  1. RELATIONSHIP OF ASSESS SELF-ESTEEM AND LOCUS OF CONTROL WITH QUALITY OF LIFE DURING TREATMENT STAGES IN PATIENTS REFERRING TO DRUG ADDICTION REHABILITATION CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Thus, the present research was carried out aimed at determining the relationship between self-esteem and locus of control and quality of life during treatment stages in the patients referring to drug addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city, Iran. Methods: The current study was a sectional research of descriptive correlation type. The research sample was 150 individuals of patients referring to addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city. For data gathering, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Rotter’s Locus of Control Scale, and SF36 Quality of Life Questionnaire were used. Following collection of questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS/16 software. Results: According to the results, in the 12th day of treatment, 96 patients exhibited moderate self-esteem, 102 patients had internal locus of control, and the score of their overall quality of life was 40.43±12.71. Furthermore, Pearson’s correlation coefficient indicated that a significant and positive relationship was observed between locus of control and quality of life during different treatment stages. Conclusion: It seems that quality of life improves during addiction treatment stages due to improvement of personality traits including locus of control and self-esteem. Therefore, consultation methods as a very crucial priority in addiction rehabilitation centers shall be taken into account by the health sector authorities and managers and can play an essential role in enhancing quality of life. PMID:27698598

  2. Mentored peer review of standardized manuscripts as a teaching tool for residents: a pilot randomized controlled multi-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Victoria S S; Strowd, Roy E; Aragón-García, Rebeca; Moon, Yeseon Park; Ford, Blair; Haut, Sheryl R; Kass, Joseph S; London, Zachary N; Mays, MaryAnn; Milligan, Tracey A; Price, Raymond S; Reynolds, Patrick S; Selwa, Linda M; Spencer, David C; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing need for peer reviewers as the scientific literature grows. Formal education in biostatistics and research methodology during residency training is lacking. In this pilot study, we addressed these issues by evaluating a novel method of teaching residents about biostatistics and research methodology using peer review of standardized manuscripts. We hypothesized that mentored peer review would improve resident knowledge and perception of these concepts more than non-mentored peer review, while improving review quality. A partially blinded, randomized, controlled multi-center study was performed. Seventy-eight neurology residents from nine US neurology programs were randomized to receive mentoring from a local faculty member or not. Within a year, residents reviewed a baseline manuscript and four subsequent manuscripts, all with introduced errors designed to teach fundamental review concepts. In the mentored group, mentors discussed completed reviews with residents. Primary outcome measure was change in knowledge score between pre- and post-tests, measuring epidemiology and biostatistics knowledge. Secondary outcome measures included level of confidence in the use and interpretation of statistical concepts before and after intervention, and RQI score for baseline and final manuscripts. Sixty-four residents (82%) completed initial review with gradual decline in completion on subsequent reviews. Change in primary outcome, the difference between pre- and post-test knowledge scores, did not differ between mentored (-8.5%) and non-mentored (-13.9%) residents ( p  = 0.48). Significant differences in secondary outcomes (using 5-point Likert scale, 5 = strongly agree) included mentored residents reporting enhanced understanding of research methodology (3.69 vs 2.61; p  = 0.001), understanding of manuscripts (3.73 vs 2.87; p  = 0.006), and application of study results to clinical practice (3.65 vs 2.78; p  = 0.005) compared to non

  3. Impact of a program of diagnostic imaging quality control in mammography centers of the Federal District, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Rosangela da Silveira; Ferreira, Rubemar de Souza [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN/CNEN-CO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)]. E-mail: rcorrea@cnen.gov.br; Peixoto, Joao Emilio [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silver, Lynn Dee [New York Health Department, New York, NY (United States); Dias, Cintia Melazo [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (Diplan/CNEN), Braslia, DF (Brazil). Distrito do Planalto Central; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Hwang, Suy Ferreira [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the quality and the impact of an intervention involving inspection and education in mammography centers of the Federal District, Brazil. Materials and methods: Forty one mammography centers in the Federal District were studied in the period between 2000 and 2002. The intervention involved an initial inspection followed by a training activity and notification of mammography centers by the Federal District Sanitary Vigilance authority. The imaging quality was compared before and after the intervention. Results: None of the 36 centers which completed the study reached more than 90% compliance with the standard imaging quality prior to the interventions, whereas ten were above 90% afterwards. Major improvements were observed in chassis maintenance, breast compression and visualization of microcalcifications. Conclusion: Despite the availability of a great number of mammography centers in the Federal District, most of them did not meet the required quality standards. The intervention has shown to be effective for improving the imaging quality, however a continued action is required to solve the remaining problems and increase the impact of the program. (author)

  4. A Retrospective Study of Clinical Effects of Powdered Caffeine Exposures Reported to Three US Poison Control Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Gillian A; Johnson, Amberly R; Crouch, Barbara I; Valento, Matthew; Horowitz, B Zane; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Anhydrous caffeine, often sold on the Internet as a powdered caffeine product, is sold as "pure caffeine" to be used as an additive to beverages and has also been used as an ingredient in energy supplement products. This is a retrospective multiple-poison center chart review of calls regarding powdered caffeine to poison centers covering Oregon, Alaska, Guam, Washington, and Utah between January 1, 2013 and June 30, 2015. There were 40 calls to three poison centers over 30 months for powdered caffeine exposure. The majority of patients were over age 19 (52.5 %; 21/40) and male (70 %; 28/40). Sixty percent (24/40) of the patients were symptomatic but only 10 % (4/40) required admission; 52.5 % (21/40) of the patient calls were for inadvertent overdose of powdered caffeine; one patient overdosed in a self-harm attempt. Powdered caffeine calls to three poison centers during a 30-month study period were rare, and severe caffeine toxicity due to exposure was found in few patients. The majority of symptoms were reported after an inadvertent powdered caffeine overdose. An analysis of calls to three poison centers for powdered caffeine found that exposures were uncommon, but did result in toxicity, and highlighted that the lack of clear dosing instructions on product packaging may place patients at risk of inadvertent overdose.

  5. Computer modeling with randomized-controlled trial data informs the development of person-centered aged care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenoweth, Lynn; Vickland, Victor; Stein-Parbury, Jane; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Kenny, Patricia; Brodaty, Henry

    2015-10-01

    To answer questions on the essential components (services, operations and resources) of a person-centered aged care home (iHome) using computer simulation. iHome was developed with AnyLogic software using extant study data obtained from 60 Australian aged care homes, 900+ clients and 700+ aged care staff. Bayesian analysis of simulated trial data will determine the influence of different iHome characteristics on care service quality and client outcomes. Interim results: A person-centered aged care home (socio-cultural context) and care/lifestyle services (interactional environment) can produce positive outcomes for aged care clients (subjective experiences) in the simulated environment. Further testing will define essential characteristics of a person-centered care home.

  6. RECOVERY ACT: DYNAMIC ENERGY CONSUMPTION MANAGEMENT OF ROUTING TELECOM AND DATA CENTERS THROUGH REAL-TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL (RTOC): Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Moon

    2011-06-30

    This final scientific report documents the Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Stage 2 Concept Development effort on Data Center Energy Reduction and Management Through Real-Time Optimal Control (RTOC). Society is becoming increasingly dependent on information technology systems, driving exponential growth in demand for data center processing and an insatiable appetite for energy. David Raths noted, 'A 50,000-square-foot data center uses approximately 4 megawatts of power, or the equivalent of 57 barrels of oil a day1.' The problem has become so severe that in some cases, users are giving up raw performance for a better balance between performance and energy efficiency. Historically, power systems for data centers were crudely sized to meet maximum demand. Since many servers operate at 60%-90% of maximum power while only utilizing an average of 5% to 15% of their capability, there are huge inefficiencies in the consumption and delivery of power in these data centers. The goal of the 'Recovery Act: Decreasing Data Center Energy Use through Network and Infrastructure Control' is to develop a state of the art approach for autonomously and intelligently reducing and managing data center power through real-time optimal control. Advances in microelectronics and software are enabling the opportunity to realize significant data center power savings through the implementation of autonomous power management control algorithms. The first step to realizing these savings was addressed in this study through the successful creation of a flexible and scalable mathematical model (equation) for data center behavior and the formulation of an acceptable low technical risk market introduction strategy leveraging commercial hardware and software familiar to the data center market. Follow-on Stage 3 Concept Development efforts include predictive modeling and simulation of algorithm performance, prototype demonstrations with representative data center equipment to

  7. Infection prevention and control practice for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever-A multi-center cross-sectional survey in Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Tom E; Gulzhan, Abuova; Ahmeti, Salih; Al-Abri, Seif S; Asik, Zahide; Atilla, Aynur; Beeching, Nick J; Bilek, Heval; Bozkurt, Ilkay; Christova, Iva; Duygu, Fazilet; Esen, Saban; Khanna, Arjun; Kader, Çiğdem; Mardani, Masoud; Mahmood, Faisal; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Pshenichnaya, Natalia; Sunbul, Mustafa; Yalcin, Tuğba Y; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a life threatening acute viral infection that presents significant risk of nosocomial transmission to healthcare workers. Evaluation of CCHF infection prevention and control (IP&C) practices in healthcare facilities that routinely manage CCHF cases in Eurasia. A cross-sectional CCHF IP&C survey was designed and distributed to CCHF centers in 10 endemic Eurasian countries in 2016. Twenty-three responses were received from centers in Turkey, Pakistan, Russia, Georgia, Kosovo, Bulgaria, Oman, Iran, India and Kazakhstan. All units had dedicated isolation rooms for CCHF, with cohorting of confirmed cases in 15/23 centers and cohorting of suspect and confirmed cases in 9/23 centers. There was adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) in 22/23 facilities, with 21/23 facilities reporting routine use of PPE for CCHF patients. Adequate staffing levels to provide care reported in 14/23 locations. All centers reported having a high risk CCHFV nosocomial exposure in last five years, with 5 centers reporting more than 5 exposures. Education was provided annually in most centers (13/23), with additional training requested in PPE use (11/23), PPE donning/doffing (12/23), environmental disinfection (12/23) and waste management (14/23). Staff and patient safety must be improved and healthcare associated CCHF exposure and transmission eliminated. Improvements are recommended in isolation capacity in healthcare facilities, use of PPE and maintenance of adequate staffing levels. We recommend further audit of IP&C practice at individual units in endemic areas, as part of national quality assurance programs.

  8. The efficacy of incentives to motivate continued fitness-center attendance in college first-year students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Lizzy; Harvey, Jean

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether fitness-center attendance established with the provision of weekly monetary incentives persisted after the discontinuation, or decreased frequency, of incentives. One hundred seventeen first-year college students participated during the 2011-2012 academic year. A randomized controlled trial with control, discontinued-incentive, and continued-incentive conditions was conducted. During fall semester, students in incentive conditions received weekly monetary payments for meeting fitness-center attendance goals. During spring semester, discontinued-incentive condition participants no longer received incentives, whereas continued-incentive condition participants received payments on a variable-interval schedule. ID-card attendance records tracked fitness-center attendance. Goal completion decreased from 63% in the incentive groups during the fall semester to 3% in the discontinued-incentive condition, and 39% in the continued-incentive condition during the spring semester. There was not a significant interaction between condition and body mass index change, F(6, 332) = 0.67, p = .68. Incentive discontinuation resulted in students no longer meeting fitness-center attendance goals. A variable-interval reward schedule better maintained attendance.

  9. Radiological protection and routinary controls of an activimeter with a cesium and barium sources in an nuclear medicine center; Proteccion radiologica y controles rutinarios de un activimetro con fuentes de cesio y bario en un centro de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales L, M.E. [IPEN INEN, Centro de Medicina Nuclear, Av. Aviacion 3799, Lima 34 (Peru)]. e-mail: toyoco3000@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    In the present work the results when carrying out the routine controls in a Deluxe Isotope (Calibrator II) equipment, with some sources of Cesium 137 and Barium 133, in a Nuclear Medicine Center that operates from the year 1983 in a modern one construction inside the Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) are shown. Taking in account the Radiological Protection measures to verify if the equipment responds to the personnel's demands in the measurements of activities of the diverse radionuclides that are used in different types of exams that are carried out in this Nuclear Medicine Center are the objectives of this work. This Center was equipped initially with donated equipment by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with those that it develops assistance, educational works and of research, giving services to patients of the INEN and other public and private medical centers. (Author)

  10. High-performance flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabretta, N.; Miao, W.; Dorren, H.J.S.; Schroder, H.; Chen, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Traffic in data centers networks (DCNs) is steadily growing to support various applications and virtualization technologies. Multi-tenancy enabling efficient resource utilization is considered as a key requirement for the next generation DCs resulting from the growing demands for services and

  11. Department of Energy Support for Operations of the WMO/GAW Quality Control/Science Activity Center for the Americas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, B. B.

    2003-11-13

    As a formal activity of the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch, to provide, through agency collaboration, a center of excellence in the United States that would impose quality assurance techniques on data collected by national air and precipitation quality networks operating in the Americas (north, south, and central).

  12. Relationship of Interpersonal Behaviors and Health-Related Control Appraisals to Patient Satisfaction and Compliance in a University Health Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Thomas A.; Auerbach, Stephen M.; Kiesler, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors' aim was to evaluate patient-provider relationships in a college health center. Participants: Eighty student patients and their health-care providers. Methods: Patients completed a measure of perceived health competence before a consultation and measures of provider participatory behavior and interpersonal behavior before…

  13. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis: Waste Pit Area storm water runoff control, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    This report evaluates remedial action alternatives at the Feed Materials production Center in response to the need to contain contaminated storm water runoff. The storm water is being contaminated as it falls over a radioactive/chemical waste pit which contains uranium contaminated wastes. Alternatives considered include no action, surface capping, surface capping with lateral drainage, runoff collection and treatment, and source removal

  14. The Development of a Virtual Company to Support the Reengineering of the NASA/Goddard Hubble Space Telescope Control Center System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Ken

    1999-01-01

    This is a report to the Third Annual International Virtual Company Conference, on The Development of a Virtual Company to Support the Reengineering of the NASA/Goddard Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Control Center System. It begins with a HST Science "Commercial": Brief Tour of Our Universe showing various pictures taken from the Hubble Space Telescope. The presentation then reviews the project background and goals. Evolution of the Control Center System ("CCS Inc.") is then reviewed. Topics of Interest to "virtual companies" are reviewed: (1) "How To Choose A Team" (2) "Organizational Model" (3) "The Human Component" (4) "'Virtual Trust' Among Teaming Companies" (5) "Unique Challenges to Working Horizontally" (6) "The Cultural Impact" (7) "Lessons Learned".

  15. "Carbon in Underland": A multidisciplinary approach to producing an informative animated video for the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geological CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Cappuccio, J. A.; Berry, I.; Miller, J.; Bourg, I. C.; Kelly, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the 'Science for Our Nation's Energy Future, Summit and Forum', each of the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) created in 2009 by the US Department of Energy was invited to design a short, engaging film with the central goal to educate, inspire, and entertain an intelligent but not expert audience about the extraordinary science, innovation and people in their center. The Center for Nanoscale Control of Geological CO2 (NCGC) is an EFRC that is building a next generation understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes critical to controlling the flow,transport, and ultimate mineralization in porous rock media, in particular as applied to geologic sequestration of CO2. In response to the invitation, the NCGC assembled a team that included several young scientists, the Center project manager, and members from the Public Affairs and Creative Services Office of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the objective of preparing a submission. A videographer from the Creative Services Office was responsible for overall management including production, art direction, and editing, while scientists from the Center were responsible for scientific content and original storyline concept. The Center project manager facilitated the communication between team members. A group of scientists together with the project manager developed the original idea, which was refined and given shape as a script in dialogue form by a science writer from Public Affairs. The objective was to communicate scientific content in an entertaining manner with a simple storyline. In a second phase, the script was revised further by scientists for content. Clips from experiments and modeling simulations were requested from the Center's scientists to illustrate the scientific content. Video production and animation were done by the videographer and an animator in an iterative process that involve feedback from the Center team. The final cut was edited to meet the maximum length

  16. Real time stagger of electric network advanced analysis functions of a modern control center; Escalonamento em tempo real das funcoes avancadas de analise de rede eletrica de um moderno centro de controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagari, Eduardo Nicola Ferraz

    1996-02-01

    This work presents two models for implementation of staggers for network analysis functions in real time for a control center. The methodology is described. Tests were performed in a electric power system of Campinas region, Sao Paulo sate - Southeast Brazil. Results are presented.

  17. Detecting themes of public concern: a text mining analysis of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Ebola live Twitter chat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Allison J; Scheinfeld, Emily; Bernhardt, Jay M; Wilcox, Gary B; Suran, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    A diagnosis of Ebola on US soil triggered widespread panic. In response, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a live Twitter chat to address public concerns. This study applied a textual analytics method to reveal insights from these tweets that can inform communication strategies. User-generated tweets were collected, sorted, and analyzed to reveal major themes. The public was concerned with symptoms and lifespan of the virus, disease transfer and contraction, safe travel, and protection of one's body. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW): a family-centered, community-based obesity prevention randomized controlled trial for preschool child-parent pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po'e, Eli K; Heerman, William J; Mistry, Rishi S; Barkin, Shari L

    2013-11-01

    Growing Right Onto Wellness (GROW) is a randomized controlled trial that tests the efficacy of a family-centered, community-based, behavioral intervention to prevent childhood obesity among preschool-aged children. Focusing on parent-child pairs, GROW utilizes a multi-level framework, which accounts for macro (i.e., built-environment) and micro (i.e., genetics) level systems that contribute to the childhood obesity epidemic. Six hundred parent-child pairs will be randomized to a 3-year healthy lifestyle intervention or a 3-year school readiness program. Eligible children are enrolled between ages 3 and 5, are from minority communities, and are not obese. The principal site for the GROW intervention is local community recreation centers and libraries. The primary outcome is childhood body mass index (BMI) trajectory at the end of the three-year study period. In addition to other anthropometric measurements, mediators and moderators of growth are considered, including genetics, accelerometry, and diet recall. GROW is a staged intensity intervention, consisting of intensive, maintenance, and sustainability phases. Throughout the study, parents build skills in nutrition, physical activity, and parenting, concurrently forming new social networks. Participants are taught goal-setting, self-monitoring, and problem solving techniques to facilitate sustainable behavior change. The GROW curriculum uses low health literacy communication and social media to communicate key health messages. The control arm is administered to both control and intervention participants. By conducting this trial in public community centers, and by implementing a family-centered approach to sustainable healthy childhood growth, we aim to develop an exportable community-based intervention to address the expanding public health crisis of pediatric obesity. © 2013.

  19. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of mucosal barrier injury-associated bloodstream infection improves accurate detection of preventable bacteremia rates at a pediatric cancer center in a low- to middle-income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Dara; González, Miriam L; Loera, Adriana; Aguilera, Marco; Relyea, George; Aristizabal, Paula; Caniza, Miguela A

    2016-04-01

    The US National Healthcare Safety Network has provided a definition of mucosal barrier injury-associated, laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI) to improve infection surveillance. To date there is little information about its influence in pediatric oncology centers in low- to middle-income countries. To determine the influence of the definition on the rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and compare the clinical characteristics of MBI versus non-MBI LCBI cases. We retrospectively applied the National Healthcare Safety Network definition to all CLABSIs recorded at a pediatric oncology center in Tijuana, Mexico, from January 2011 through December 2014. CLABSI events were reclassified according to the MBI-LCBI definition. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of MBI and non-MBI CLABSIs were compared. Of 55 CLABSI events, 44% (24 out of 55) qualified as MBI-LCBIs; all were MBI-LCBI subcategory 1 (intestinal flora pathogens). After the number of MBI-LCBI cases was removed from the numerator, the CLABSI rate during the study period decreased from 5.72-3.22 infections per 1,000 central line days. Patients with MBI-LCBI were significantly younger than non-MBI-LCBI patients (P = .029) and had a significantly greater frequency of neutropenia (100% vs 39%; P = .001) and chemotherapy exposure (87% vs 58%; P = .020) and significantly longer median hospitalization (34 vs 23 days; P = .008). A substantial proportion of CLABSI events at our pediatric cancer center met the MBI-LCBI criteria. Our results support separate monitoring and reporting of MBI and non-MBI-LCBIs in low- to middle-income countries to allow accurate detection and tracking of preventable (non-MBI) bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of long-term wearing of high-heeled shoes on the control of the body's center of mass motion in relation to the center of pressure during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Lien; Lu, Tung-Wu; Liu, Ming-Wei

    2014-04-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and falling, leading to injuries such as fracture and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of habitual wearing of high-heeled shoes on the body's center of mass (COM) motion relative to the center of pressure (COP) during gait. Fifteen female experienced wearers and 15 matched controls walked with high-heeled shoes (7.3cm) while kinematic and ground reaction force data were measured and used to calculate temporal-distance parameters, joint moments, COM-COP inclination angles (IA) and the rate of IA changes (RCIA). Compared with inexperienced wearers, experienced subjects showed significantly reduced frontal IA with increased ankle pronator moments during single-limb support (pheel-strike, and reduced DLS time (pheel-strike (pknee extensor moments at toe-off (pheeled shoes, providing a basis for future design of strategies to minimize the risk of falling during high-heeled gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. The results of the present study demonstrated the importance of referral centers in support of basic health services within the decentralization strategy. But, the success of the program depends on the advent of new developmental tools to augment diagnostic accuracy for leprosy. However, it should be emphasized that for new diagnostic methods to be developed, a greater commitment on the part of the health care system regarding research is urgently needed.

  2. Depressive symptoms and gestational length among pregnant adolescents: Cluster randomized control trial of CenteringPregnancy® plus group prenatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Jennifer N; Epel, Elissa; Lewis, Jessica B; Cunningham, Shayna D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Thomas, Melanie; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2017-06-01

    Depressive symptoms are associated with preterm birth among adults. Pregnant adolescents have high rates of depressive symptoms and low rates of treatment; however, few interventions have targeted this vulnerable group. Objectives are to: (a) examine impact of CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care on perinatal depressive symptoms compared to individual prenatal care; and (b) determine effects of depressive symptoms on gestational age and preterm birth among pregnant adolescents. This cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in 14 community health centers and hospitals in New York City. Clinical sites were randomized to receive standard individual prenatal care (n = 7) or CenteringPregnancy® Plus group prenatal care (n = 7). Pregnant adolescents (ages 14-21, N = 1,135) completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale during pregnancy (second and third trimesters) and postpartum (6 and 12 months). Gestational age was obtained from medical records, based on ultrasound dating. Intention to treat analyses were used to examine objectives. Adolescents at clinical sites randomized to CenteringPregnancy® Plus experienced greater reductions in perinatal depressive symptoms compared to those at clinical sites randomized to individual care (p = .003). Increased depressive symptoms from second to third pregnancy trimester were associated with shorter gestational age at delivery and preterm birth (<37 weeks gestation). Third trimester depressive symptoms were also associated with shorter gestational age and preterm birth. All p < .05. Pregnant adolescents should be screened for depressive symptoms prior to third trimester. Group prenatal care may be an effective nonpharmacological option for reducing depressive symptoms among perinatal adolescents. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Technical study for the automation and control of processes of the chemical processing plant for liquid radioactive waste at Racso Nuclear Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevedo D, M.; Ayala S, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce the development of an automation and control system in a chemical processing plant for liquid radioactive waste of low and medium activity. The control system established for the chemical processing plant at RACSO Nuclear Center is described. It is an on-off sequential type system with feedback. This type of control has been chosen according to the volumes to be treated at the plant as processing is carried out by batches. The system will be governed by a programmable controller (PLC), modular, with a minimum of 24 digital inputs, 01 analog input, 16 digital outputs and 01 analog input. Digital inputs and outputs are specifically found at the level sensors of the tanks and at the solenoid-type electro valve control. Analog inputs and outputs have been considered at the pH control. The comprehensive system has been divided into three control bonds, The bonds considered for the operation of the plant are described, the plant has storing, fitting, processing and clarifying tanks. National Instruments' Lookout software has been used for simulation, constituting an important tool not only for a design phase but also for a practical one since this software will be used as SCADA system. Finally, the advantages and benefits of this automation system are analyzed, radiation doses received by occupationally exposed workers are reduced and reliability on the operation on the system is increased. (authors)

  4. High performance SDN enabled flat data center network architecture based on scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calabretta, N.; Miao, W.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a reconfigurable virtual datacenter network by utilizing statistical multiplexing offered by scalable and flow-controlled optical switching system. Results show QoS guarantees by the priority assignment and load balancing for applications in virtual networks.

  5. A Hybrid Approach to Cognitive Engineering: Supporting Development of a Revolutionary Warfighter-Centered Command and Control System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ockerman, Jennifer; McKneely, Jennifer A; Koterba, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    ...) for the requirements analysis and design of revolutionary command and control systems and domains. This hybrid approach uses knowledge elicitation and representation techniques from several current cognitive engineering methodologies...

  6. Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Lawrence E. [Alstom Grid Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This report provides findings from the field regarding the best ways in which to guide operational strategies, business processes and control room tools to support the integration of renewable energy into electrical grids.

  7. Strategies and Decision Support Systems for Integrating Variable Energy Resources in Control Centers for Reliable Grid Operations. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Lawrence E. [Alstom Grid, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    This is the executive summary for a report that provides findings from the field regarding the best ways in which to guide operational strategies, business processes and control room tools to support the integration of renewable energy into electrical grids.

  8. Rehabilitation for the management of knee osteoarthritis using comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine in community health centers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It is becoming increasingly necessary for community health centers to make rehabilitation services available to patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. However, for a number of reasons, including a lack of expertise, the small size of community health centers and the availability of only simple medical equipment, conventional rehabilitation therapy has not been widely used in China. Consequently, most patients with knee osteoarthritis seek treatment in high-grade hospitals. However, many patients cannot manage the techniques that they were taught in the hospital. Methods such as acupuncture, tuina, Chinese medical herb fumigation-washing and t’ai chi are easy to do and have been reported to have curative effects in those with knee osteoarthritis. To date, there have been no randomized controlled trials validating comprehensive traditional Chinese medicine for the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Furthermore, there is no standard rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for knee osteoarthritis. The aim of the current study is to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation protocol using traditional Chinese medicine for the management of knee osteoarthritis in a community health center. Method/design This will be a randomized controlled clinical trial with blinded assessment. There will be a 4-week intervention utilizing rehabilitation protocols from traditional Chinese medicine and conventional therapy. Follow-up will be conducted for a period of 12 weeks. A total of 722 participants with knee osteoarthritis will be recruited. Participants will be randomly divided into two groups: experimental and control. Primary outcomes will include range of motion, girth measurement, the visual analogue scale, and results from the manual muscle, six-minute walking and stair-climbing tests. Secondary outcomes will include average daily consumption of pain medication, ability to perform daily tasks and health

  9. Operator-centered technical documentation of the power plant control system. Betreibergerechte, betriebstechnische Dokumentation der Kraftwerks-Leittechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welfonder, E

    1986-01-01

    The report - starting with an overview of the general structure of documentation - includes in chapter 3 an assortment of the main expectations to be had by the technical staff towards control system documentation. These are divided into: general basic requirements; testable compulsory requirements; practical recommendations and information for the manufacturer. In chapter 4 these documentation requirements are reflected to the present state of technical documentation. The main emphasis of the report however is laid on the sample documentation for one control system area presented in chapter 5. This sample documentation is based on a hierarchically structured and function related documentary method developed by the University of Stuttgart on the basis of the derived requirements and the present usual control system documentation. This function-related documentary method proves to be useful, not only for the technical staff in his rapid search for control system disturbances, but also offers - due to its clear and homogeneous meshed structure - considerable advantages for control system planning, projecting and initial start ups. As the presented documentation method is furthermore independent of the control system manufacturers, it is important that all participants try to use it uniformly.

  10. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  11. Undisturbed stance control in healthy adults is achieved differently along anteroposterior and mediolateral axes: evidence from visual feedback of various signals from center of pressure trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, Patrice R

    2009-05-01

    Provided through the screen of a monitor, the participant's resultant center of pressure (CPRes) movements from a force platform device, modified the postural performance of a healthy individual. However, these effects could largely vary with the axis that researchers consider (mediolateral [ML] or anteroposterior [AP]), because they know these controls are involved in 2 distinct ankle and hip mechanisms. To demonstrate this organization, the author tested a group of healthy adults in several conditions that gave the whole or some part of the information in the CPRes displacements. Compared with the CPRes feedback, left and right plantar CP or body weight distribution feedback deteriorated the control of the vertically projected center of gravity (CGv) along the ML and AP axes, whose amplitudes increased, respectively. These data highlight the primary role of loading or unloading and pressure variations in the achievement of postural control along each ML or AP axis, respectively. It is interesting that merging these 2 pieces of information (CPRes displacements) helped participants optimize their postural performance.

  12. History of Injury and Violence as public health problems and emergence of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at CDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleet, David A; Baldwin, Grant; Marr, Angela; Spivak, Howard; Patterson, Sara; Morrison, Christine; Holmes, Wendy; Peeples, Amy B; Degutis, Linda C

    2012-09-01

    Injuries and violence are among the oldest health problems facing humans. Only within the past 50 years, however, has the problem been addressed with scientific rigor using public health methods. The field of injury control began as early as 1913, but wasn't approached systematically or epidemiologically until the 1940s and 1950s. It accelerated rapidly between 1960 and 1985. Coupled with active federal and state interest in reducing injuries and violence, this period was marked by important medical, scientific, and public health advances. The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) was an outgrowth of this progress and in 2012 celebrated its 20th anniversary. NCIPC was created in 1992 after a series of government reports identified injury as one of the most important public health problems facing the nation. Congressional action provided the impetus for the creation of NCIPC as the lead federal agency for non-occupational injury and violence prevention. In subsequent years, NCIPC and its partners fostered many advances and built strong capacity. Because of the tragically high burden and cost of injuries and violence in the United States and around the globe, researchers, practitioners, and decision makers will need to redouble prevention efforts in the next 20 years. This article traces the history of injury and violence prevention as a public health priority-- including the evolution and current structure of the CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effect of Workplace Counseling Interventions Launched by Workplace Health Promotion and Tobacco Control Centers in Taiwan: An Evaluation Based on the Ottawa Charter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tzu-Hua; Huang, Joh-Jong; Chang, Fong-Ching; Chang, Yu-Tsz; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Workplace health promotion (WHP) is important to prevent work-related diseases, reduce workplace hazards, and improve personal health of the workers. Health promotion projects were launched through the centers of WHP funded by the Taiwan Bureau of Health Promotion since 2003. Hence, the aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of WHP programs intervention from 2003 to 2007. The intervention group consisted of 838 business entities which had ever undergone counseling of the three centers in northern, central, and southern Taiwan from 2003 to 2007. The control group was composed of 1000 business entities randomly selected from the business directories of the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taiwan. The questionnaire survey included general company profiles and the assessment of workplace health according to the five action areas of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. We have received 447 (53.3%) questionnaires from the intervention group and 97 questionnaires from the control group. The intervention group was more effective in using the external resources and medical consultation, and they had better follow-up rates of the abnormal results of annual health examinations. Compared to the control group, the intervention group had a significantly decreased smoking rate in 246 companies (61.2%) and a reduced second-hand smoke exposure in 323 companies (78.6%) (penvironment.

  14. Comparison of air-driven vs electric torque control motors on canal centering ability by ProTaper NiTi rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Erfanian, Mahdi; Lomee, Mahdi; Afkhami, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Cleaning and shaping is one of the most important phases in root canal therapy. Various rotary NiTi systems minimize accidents and facilitate the shaping process. Todays NiTi files are used with air-driven and electric handpieces. This study compared the canal centering after instrumentation using the ProTaper system using Endo IT, electric torque-control motor, and NSK air-driven handpiece. This ex vivo randomized controlled trial study involved 26 mesial mandibular root canals with 10 to 35° curvature. The roots were randomly divided into 2 groups of 13 canals each. The roots were mounted in an endodontic cube with acrylic resin, sectioned horizontally at 2, 6 and 10 mm from the apex and then reassembled. The canals were instrumented according to the manufacturer's instructions using ProTaper rotary files and electric torque-control motors (group 1) or air-driven handpieces (group 2). Photographs of the cross-sections included shots before and after instrumentation, and image analysis was performed using Photoshop software. The centering ability and canal transportation was also evaluated. Repeated measurement and independent t-test provided statistical analysis of canal transportation. The comparison of the rate of transportation toward internal or external walls between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.62). Comparison of the rate of transportation of sections within one group was not significant (p = 0.28). Use of rotary NiTi file with either electric torquecontrol motor or air-driven handpiece had no effect on canal centering. NiTi rotary instruments can be used with air-driven motors without any considerable changes in root canal anatomy, however it needs the clinician to be expert.

  15. Solar Torque Management for the Near Earth Asteroid Scout CubeSat Using Center of Mass Position Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphee, Juan; Heaton, Andrew; Diedrich, Ben; Stiltner, Brandon C.

    2018-01-01

    A novel mechanism, the Active Mass Translator (AMT), has been developed for the NASA Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout mission to autonomously manage the spacecraft momentum. The NEA Scout CubeSat will launch as a secondary payload onboard Exploration Mission 1 of the Space Launch System. To accomplish its mission, the CubeSat will be propelled by an 86 square-meter solar sail during its two-year journey to reach asteroid 1991VG. NEA Scout's primary attitude control system uses reaction wheels for holding attitude and performing slew maneuvers, while a cold gas reaction control system performs the initial detumble and early trajectory correction maneuvers. The AMT control system requirements, feedback architecture, and control performance will be presented. The AMT reduces the amount of reaction control propellant needed for momentum management and allows for smaller capacity reaction wheels suitable for the limited 6U spacecraft volume. The reduced spacecraft mass allows higher in-space solar sail acceleration, thus reducing time-of-flight. The reduced time-of-flight opens the range of possible missions, which is limited by the lifetime of typical non-radiation tolerant CubeSat avionics exposed to the deep-space environment.

  16. Public health capacity building in southeastern Europe: a partnership between the Open Society Institute and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Noah; Brborovic, Ognjen; Fimka, Tozija; Robie, Brian D; Bull, David L; Spasovski, Mome; Baker, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    The political disintegration of former Yugoslavia inaugurated in 1991 resulted in the decentralization of health systems in the federation's successor nation-states. Efforts by the Open Society Institute improved public health planning and management needs consequent to health sector changes. Beginning in Croatia in 2001, the Institute developed ongoing collaborations between Andrija Stampar School of Public Health and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2003 and 2004, it expanded its project to include the republics of Macedonia and of Serbia and Montenegro.

  17. Magnetic field modeling and optimal operational control of a single-side axial-flux permanent magnet motor with center poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.-T.; Lee, S.-C.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed approach for analyzing magnetic field distributions of a single-sided axial-flux permanent magnet motor with center poles will be provided. Based on the devised flux model, the related position-dependent torque and axial force of the motor can be systematically developed. By incorporating adequate control designs, the optimal operational performance of the motor system can be conveniently achieved. Results showed that not only the motor structure is suitable for related military and transportation applications, but also the magnetic field model can provide appropriate mathematical basis for relative operational realizations

  18. Knowledge of HIV Testing Guidelines Among US Internal Medicine Residents: A Decade After the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Routine HIV Testing Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandachi, Dima; Dang, Bich N; Wilson Dib, Rita; Friedman, Harvey; Giordano, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Ten years after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended universal HIV screening, rates remain low. Internal medicine residents are the front-line medical providers for large groups of patients. We evaluated the knowledge of internal medicine residents about HIV testing guidelines and examined adherence to universal HIV testing in an outpatient setting. A cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residents at four residency programs in Chicago was conducted from January to March 2016. Aggregate data on HIV screening were collected from 35 federally qualified community health centers in the Chicago area after inclusion of an HIV testing best practice alert in patients' electronic medical records. Of the 192 residents surveyed, 130 (68%) completed the survey. Only 58% were aware of universal HIV screening and 49% were aware that Illinois law allows for an opt-out HIV testing strategy. Most of the residents (64%) ordered no more than 10 HIV tests in 6 months. The most frequently reported barriers to HIV testing were deferral because of urgent care issues, lack of time, and the perception that patients were uncomfortable discussing HIV testing. From July 2015 to February 2016, the average HIV testing adherence rate in the 35 health centers was 18.2%. More effort is needed to change HIV testing practices among internal medicine residents so that they will adopt this approach in their future clinical practice. Improving knowledge about HIV testing and addressing other HIV testing barriers are essential for such a successful change.

  19. WHO 2006 child growth standards: implications for the prevalence of stunting and underweight-for-age in a birth cohort of Gabonese children in comparison to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2000 growth charts and the National Center for Health Statistics 1978 growth references

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, Norbert G.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Decker, Marie-Luise; Goesch, Julia; Poetschke, Marc; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Kombila, Davy; Fortin, Julien; Lell, Bertrand; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G.; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the proportion of children being stunted and underweight-for-age at 3, 9 and 15 months in Lambaréné, Gabon, using the WHO child growth standards released in 2006 as compared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2000 and the National Center for Health

  20. Volume totalizers analysis of pipelines operated by TRANSPETRO National Operational Control Center; Analise de totalizadores de volume em oleodutos operados pelo Centro Nacional de Controle e Operacao da TRANSPETRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramaki, Thiago Lessa; Montalvao, Antonio Filipe Falcao [Petrobras Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marques, Thais Carrijo [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper aims to present the results and methodology in the analysis of differences in volume totals used in systems such as batch tracking and leak detection of pipelines operated by the National Center for Operational Control (CNCO) at TRANSPETRO. In order to optimize this type of analysis, software was developed to acquisition and processing of historical data using the methodology developed. The methodology developed takes into account the particularities encountered in systems operated by TRANSPETRO, more specifically, by CNCO. (author)

  1. 77 FR 11136 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; a Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval... conclusively established and the identification of the key, functional alleles in gene regions associated with... underlying genetic structure. A multidisciplinary case- control study of lymphoma in Asia, where lymphoma...

  2. A novel scalable and low latency hybrid data center network architecture based on flow controlled fast optical switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Fulong; Guelbenzu, Gonzalo; Calabretta, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    We present a novel hybrid DCN based on flow-controlled fast optical switches. Results show packet loss < 1.4E-5 and latency < 2.4μs for 100,000 servers (0.3 load). Costs and power consumptions are also compared with current technologies.

  3. Populating a Control Point Database: A cooperative effort between the USGS, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center and the Grand Canyon Youth Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. M.; Fritzinger, C.; Wharton, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center measures the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on the resources along the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead in support of the Grand Canyon Adaptive Management Program. Control points are integral for geo-referencing the myriad of data collected in the Grand Canyon including aerial photography, topographic and bathymetric data used for classification and change-detection analysis of physical, biologic and cultural resources. The survey department has compiled a list of 870 control points installed by various organizations needing to establish a consistent reference for data collected at field sites along the 240 mile stretch of Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. This list is the foundation for the Control Point Database established primarily for researchers, to locate control points and independently geo-reference collected field data. The database has the potential to be a valuable mapping tool for assisting researchers to easily locate a control point and reduce the occurrance of unknowingly installing new control points within close proximity of an existing control point. The database is missing photographs and accurate site description information. Current site descriptions do not accurately define the location of the point but refer to the project that used the point, or some other interesting fact associated with the point. The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) resolved this problem by turning the data collection effort into an educational exercise for the participants of the Grand Canyon Youth organization. Grand Canyon Youth is a non-profit organization providing experiential education for middle and high school aged youth. GCMRC and the Grand Canyon Youth formed a partnership where GCMRC provided the logistical support, equipment, and training to conduct the field work, and the Grand Canyon Youth provided the time and personnel to complete the field work. Two data

  4. A family affair: A Ral-exocyst-centered network links Ras, Rac, Rho signaling to control cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Giulia; Biondini, Marco; Camonis, Jacques; Parrini, Maria Carla

    2017-05-12

    Cell migration is central to many developmental, physiologic and pathological processes, including cancer progression. The Ral GTPases (RalA and RalB) which act down-stream the Ras oncogenes, are key players in the coordination between membrane trafficking and actin polymerization. A major direct effector of Ral, the exocyst complex, works in polarized exocytosis and is at the center of multiple protein-protein interactions that support cell migration by promoting protrusion formation, front-rear polarization, and extra-cellular matrix degradation. In this review we describe the recent advancements in deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying this role of Ral via exocyst on cell migration. Among others, we will discuss the recently identified cross-talk between Ral and Rac1 pathways: exocyst binds to a negative regulator (the RacGAP SH3BP1) and to the major effector (the Wave Regulatory Complex, WRC) of Rac1, the master regulator of protrusions. Next challenge will be to better characterize the dynamics in space and in time of these molecular interplays, to better understand the pleiotropic functions of Ral in both normal and cancer cells.

  5. Export Controls: Export-Controlled Technology at Contractor, University, and Federally Funded Research and Development Center Facilities (D-2004-061)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... The report discusses the steps DoD needs to take to identify unclassified export-controlled technology and to ensure that DoD contractors, universities, and Federally Funded Research and Development...

  6. Update to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (2017): A summary, review, and strategies for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lyndsay M; Thom, Kerri A; Preas, Michael Anne

    2018-03-07

    Surgical site infections remain a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased length of stay and cost amongst hospitalized patients in the United States. This article summarizes the evidence used to inform the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (2017), and highlights key updates and new recommendations. We also present specific suggestions for how infection preventionists can play a central role in guideline implementation by translating these recommendations into evidence-based policies and practices in their facility. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Identifying the public's concerns and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's reactions during a health crisis: An analysis of a Zika live Twitter chat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Lazard, Allison J; Wilcox, Gary B; Mackert, Michael; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2016-12-01

    The arrival of the Zika virus in the United States caused much concern among the public because of its ease of transmission and serious consequences for pregnant women and their newborns. We conducted a text analysis to examine original tweets from the public and responses from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during a live Twitter chat hosted by the CDC. Both the public and the CDC expressed concern about the spread of Zika virus, but the public showed more concern about the consequences it had for women and babies, whereas the CDC focused more on symptoms and education. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/16: The Potential of Technology for the Control of Small Weapons: Applications in Developing Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALTMANN, JURGEN

    2000-07-01

    For improving the control of small arms, technology provides many possibilities. Present and future technical means are described in several areas. With the help of sensors deployed on the ground or on board aircraft, larger areas can be monitored. Using tags, seals, and locks, important objects and installations can be safeguarded better. With modern data processing and communication systems, more information can be available, and it can be more speedily processed. Together with navigation and transport equipment, action can be taken faster and at greater range. Particular considerations are presented for cargo control at roads, seaports, and airports, for monitoring designated lines, and for the control of legal arms. By starting at a modest level, costs can be kept low, which would aid developing countries. From the menu of technologies available, systems need to be designed for the intended application and with an understanding of the local conditions. It is recommended that states start with short-term steps, such as acquiring more and better radio transceivers, vehicles, small aircraft, and personal computers. For the medium term, states should begin with experiments and field testing of technologies such as tags, sensors, and digital communication equipment.

  9. Effect of Kuanxiong Aerosol () on Patients with Angina Pectoris: A Non-inferiority Multi-center Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao-Ning; Bai, Rui-Na; Dong, Guo-Ju; Ge, Chang-Jiang; Zhou, Jing-Min; Huang, Li; He, Yan; Wang, Jun; Ren, Ai-Hua; Huang, Zhan-Quan; Zhu, Guang-Li; Lu, Shu; Xiong, Shang-Quan; Xian, Shao-Xiang; Zhu, Zhi-Jun; Shi, Da-Zhuo; Lu, Shu-Zheng; Li, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the effect and safety of Kuanxiong Aerosol (, KA) on patients with angina pectoris. Block randomization was performed to randomly allocate 750 patients into KA (376 cases) and control groups (374 cases). During an angina attack, the KA group received 3 consecutive sublingual sprays of KA (0.6 mL per spray). The control group received 1 sublingual nitroglycerin tablet (NT, 0.5 mg/tablet). Log-rank tests and Kaplan-Meier estimations were used to estimate the angina remission rates at 6 time-points after treatment (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and >5 min). Logistic regression analysis was performed to observe the factors inflfluencing the rate of effective angina remission, and the remission rates and incidences of adverse reactions were compared for different Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) classes of angina. The 5-min remission rates in the KA and control groups were not signifificantly different (94.41% vs. 90.64%, P>0.05). The angina CCS class signifificantly inflfluenced the rate of remission (95% confidence interval = 0.483-0.740, P0.05), while they were signifificantly better for KA in the CCSI and II subgroups (Pangina. Furthermore, in CCSII and III patients, KA is superior to NT, with a lower incidence of adverse reactions. (Registration No. ChiCTRIPR-15007204).

  10. Thiazides and Osteoporotic Spinal Fractures: A Suspected Linkage Investigated by Means of a Two-Center, Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Di Biase, Giuseppina; Noutsias, Michel

    2017-11-01

    An alleged association of chronic use of thiazide diuretics with an increased risk of bone fragility fractures has been highlighted by a relatively recent prospective cohort study. However, the concept that thiazides exert a beneficial effect on osteoporosis is still a predominant view. This effect would be mediated by the decrease in renal clearance of calcium ions, a pharmacological feature recognized for a long time now to this class of drugs, as opposed to the increase in calcium urinary excretion attributed instead to loop diuretics, i.e. furosemide and similar drugs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to attempt to clarify whether regular use of thiazide diuretics as antihypertensive therapeutics is associated with a significantly increased risk of osteoporotic fractures in female patients aged 65 or over. In this two-center retrospective study, we followed up a cohort of female patients with (n = 80) and without (n = 158) thiazide-induced hyponatremia. A total of 48 osteoporotic fractures were recorded during a median follow-up period of 57.5 months. By means of univariate regression analysis, an association was found between thiazide-induced hyponatremia and increased risk of vertebral fractures (odds ratio (OR): 7.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.755 - 15.39; P fractures. No association of a history of thiazide-induced hyponatremia and risk of fracture was noticeable in the final model. Because thiazide-induced hyponatremia was associated with spinal fractures in univariate but not multivariate analysis, a possible explanation is that hyponatremia may be a confounder of the relation between body mass and spinal fractures. Indeed, reduced body mass especially among elderly women with small body build may confer heightened risk of thiazide-induced hyponatremia because of decreased bone sodium available for exchange with the serum sodium. Thus, occurrence of hyponatremia could only serve as an indirect surrogate marker for osteoporosis risk.

  11. Successful Control of Winter Pyrexias Caused by Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 in Japanese Training Centers by Achieving High Vaccination Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae, Naomi; Ode, Hirotaka; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a major cause of winter pyrexia in racehorses in two training centers (Ritto and Miho) in Japan. Until the epizootic period of 2008-2009, a vaccination program using a killed EHV-1 vaccine targeted only susceptible 3-year-old horses with low antibody levels to EHV-1 antigens. However, because the protective effect was not satisfactory, in 2009-2010 the vaccination program was altered to target all 3-year-old horses. To evaluate the vaccine's efficacy, we investigated the number of horses with pyrexia due to EHV-1 or equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) infection or both and examined the vaccination coverage in the 3-year-old population and in the whole population before and after changes in the program. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) estimated numbers of horses infected with EHV-1 or EHV-4 or both, among pyretic horses from 1999-2000 to 2008-2009 were 105 ± 47 at Ritto and 66 ± 44 at Miho. Although the estimated number of infected horses did not change greatly in the first period of the current program, it decreased from the second period, with means (±SD) of 21 ± 12 at Ritto and 14 ± 15 at Miho from 2010-2011 to 2012-2013. Vaccination coverage in the 3-year-old population was 99.4% at Ritto and 99.8% at Miho in the first period, and similar values were maintained thereafter. Coverage in the whole population increased more gradually than that in the 3-year-old population. The results suggest that EHV-1 epizootics can be suppressed by maintaining high vaccination coverage, not only in the 3-year-old population but also in the whole population. PMID:24872513

  12. Centers for Disease Control review panel's recommendations on health effects and epidemiological studies of operations at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. Public comment and meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    Based on the request of the US Department of Energy, the Centers for Disease Control of the US Department of Health and Human Services organized a panel to review the feasibility and usefulness of conducting further epidemiologic studies of delayed health effects around the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The review and recommendations of the panel were documented in a report entitled Epidemiologic Projects Considered Possible to Undertake in Populations Around the Savannah River Plant. On November 30, 1984, the Department of Energy announced in the Federal Register (49 FR 47095) the conduct of a public meeting and a 30-day public comment period between December 1 and December 30, 1984, on the recommendations of the review panel. Based on the requests of individuals and representatives of organizations attending the December 18, 1984, public meetings, the Department of Energy subsequently announced in the Federal Register on December 31, 1984 (49 FR 50767) an extension of the public comment period to January 31, 1985. This report documents the public meeting and comment process, and provides responses to the public comments that were submitted during this process. In addition, this report contains the Department of Energy's position based on the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control review panel and the public comments. 23 refs., 16 tabs

  13. Control of simultaneous outbreaks of carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae and extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection in an intensive care unit using interventions promoted in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012 carbapenemase-resistant Enterobacteriaceae Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enfield, Kyle B; Huq, Nujhat N; Gosseling, Megan F; Low, Darla J; Hazen, Kevin C; Toney, Denise M; Slitt, Gavin; Zapata, Heidi J; Cox, Heather L; Lewis, Jessica D; Kundzins, John R; Mathers, Amy J; Sifri, Costi D

    2014-07-01

    We describe the efficacy of enhanced infection control measures, including those recommended in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) toolkit, to control concurrent outbreaks of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) and extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDR-AB). Before-after intervention study. Fifteen-bed surgical trauma intensive care unit (ICU). We investigated the impact of enhanced infection control measures in response to clusters of CPE and XDR-AB infections in an ICU from April 2009 to March 2010. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the presence of blaKPC and resistance plasmids in CRE. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to assess XDR-AB clonality. Enhanced infection-control measures were implemented in response to ongoing transmission of CPE and a new outbreak of XDR-AB. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing the incidence rate (IR) of CPE and XDR-AB before and after the implementation of these measures. The IR of CPE for the 12 months before the implementation of enhanced measures was 7.77 cases per 1,000 patient-days, whereas the IR of XDR-AB for the 3 months before implementation was 6.79 cases per 1,000 patient-days. All examined CPE shared endemic blaKPC resistance plasmids, and 6 of the 7 XDR-AB isolates were clonal. Following institution of enhanced infection control measures, the CPE IR decreased to 1.22 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P = .001), and no more cases of XDR-AB were identified. Use of infection control measures described in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 CRE toolkit was associated with a reduction in the IR of CPE and an interruption in XDR-AB transmission.

  14. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  15. Application of statistical process control and process capability analysis procedures in orbiter processing activities at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Robert R.; Jackson, Andrew E.; Swart, William W.; Barth, Timothy S.

    1994-01-01

    Successful ground processing at KSC requires that flight hardware and ground support equipment conform to specifications at tens of thousands of checkpoints. Knowledge of conformance is an essential requirement for launch. That knowledge of conformance at every requisite point does not, however, enable identification of past problems with equipment, or potential problem areas. This paper describes how the introduction of Statistical Process Control and Process Capability Analysis identification procedures into existing shuttle processing procedures can enable identification of potential problem areas and candidates for improvements to increase processing performance measures. Results of a case study describing application of the analysis procedures to Thermal Protection System processing are used to illustrate the benefits of the approaches described in the paper.

  16. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/4: Missile Control in South Asia and the Role of Cooperative Monitoring Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, N.; Sawhney, P.

    1998-10-01

    The succession of nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in May 1998 has changed the nature of their missile rivalry, which is only one of numerous manifestations of their relationship as hardened adversaries, deeply sensitive to each other's existing and evolving defense capabilities. The political context surrounding this costly rivalry remains unmediated by arms control measures or by any nascent prospect of detente. As a parallel development, sensible voices in both countries will continue to talk of building mutual confidence through openness to avert accidents, misjudgments, and misinterpretations. To facilitate a future peace process, this paper offers possible suggestions for stabilization that could be applied to India's and Pakistan's missile situation. Appendices include descriptions of existing missile agreements that have contributed to better relations for other countries as well as a list of the cooperative monitoring technologies available to provide information useful in implementing subcontinent missile regimes.

  17. Similar decreases in local tumor control are calculated for treatment protraction and for interruptions in the radiotherapy of carcinoma of the larynx in four centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Chris; Robertson, A. Gerald; Hendry, Jolyon H.; Roberts, Stephen A.; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Duncan, William B.; MacDougall, R. Hugh; Kerr, Gillian R.; O'Sullivan, B.; Keane, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Data on patients with cancer of the larynx are analyzed using statistical models to estimate the effect of gaps in the treatment time on the local control of the tumor. Methods and Materials: Patients from four centers, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Manchester, and Toronto, with carcinoma of the larynx and treated by radiotherapy were followed up and the disease-free period recorded. In all centers the end point was control of the primary tumor after irradiation alone. The local control rates at ≥2 years, P c , were analyzed by log linear models, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to model the disease-free period. Results: T stage, nodal involvement, and site of the tumor were important determinants of the disease-free interval, as was the radiation schedule used. Elongation of the treatment time by 1 day, or a gap of 1 day, was associated with a decrease in P c of 0.68% per day for P c = 0.80, with a 95% confidence interval of (0.28, 1.08)%. An increase of 5 days was associated with a 3.5% reduction in P c from 0.80 to 0.77. At P c = 0.60 an increase of 5 days was associated with an 7.9% decrease in P c . The time factor in the Linear Quadratic model, γ/α, was estimated as 0.89 Gy/day, 95% confidence interval (0.35, 1.43) Gy/day. Conclusions: Any gaps (public holidays are the majority) in the treatment schedule have the same deleterious effect on the disease free period as an increase in the prescribed treatment time. For a schedule, where dose and fraction number are specified, any gap in treatment is potentially damaging

  18. Distribution electric system simulator to support decision-making for CFE (Federal Electric Commission) Distribution Control Centers; Simulador del Sistema Electrico de Distribucion para apoyo en la toma de decisiones en Centros de Control de Distribucion de la CFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa Reza, Alfredo; Quintero Reyes, Agustin; Garcia Mendoza, Raul; Calleros Torres, Tito Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Borjas Diaz, Jesus Fidel; Sierra Rodriguez, Benjamin; Torres Abrego, Rafael [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    This article presents the physical, logical and functional architecture designed to integrate the Electric Distribution System (EDS) simulator developed for the CFE and the electric energy Distribution Control Centers in Mexico. The objective of the EDS simulator is to integrate engineering distribution functions (power flow, short circuit, optimal reconfiguration and reliability, among others) and an expert system (Case-based Reasoning) to aid the process of information analysis, decision-making and the capacity-building of the CFE's Regional and Zonal Distribution Control Centers. The EDS simulator has been installed, updated and is operational in the Tampico Zone and the Gulf Division Distribution Center, as an established product that continually evolves along with the actual operating dynamics. [Spanish] Se presenta la arquitectura fisica, logica y funcional disenada para integrar el simulador del Sistema Electrico de Distribucion (SED) desarrollado para la Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE) y los Centros de Control de Distribucion de energia electrica en Mexico. El objetivo del simulador del SED es integrar funciones de ingenieria de distribucion (flujo de potencia, corto circuito, reconfiguracion optima, confiabilidad, entre otras) y un sistema experto (Razonamiento Basado en Casos) para apoyar el proceso de analisis de informacion, la toma de decisiones y la capacitacion en los Centros de Control de Distribucion Zonales y Regionales de CFE. El Simulador del SED se encuentra instalado, actualizado y en operacion en la Zona Tampico y en la Division de Distribucion Golfo Centro como un producto consolidado y en constante evolucion a la par de la dinamica operativa real.

  19. Detection of domestic violence by community mental health teams: a multi-center, cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijne, Roos E; Howard, Louise M; Trevillion, Kylee; Jongejan, Femke E; Garofalo, Carlo; Bogaerts, Stefan; Mulder, Cornelis L; Kamperman, Astrid M

    2017-08-07

    Domestic Violence and Abuse (DVA) is associated with a range of psychosocial and mental health problems. Having a psychiatric illness increases likelihood of being a victim of DVA. Despite the evidence of a high risk for DVA and the serious effects of violent victimization in psychiatric patients, detection rates are low and responses are inadequate. The aim of the BRAVE (Better Reduction trough Assessment of Violence and Evaluation) study is to improve detection of and response to DVA in psychiatric patients. In this article, we present the protocol of the BRAVE study which follows the SPIRIT guidelines. The BRAVE study is a cluster randomized controlled trial. We will include 24 community mental health teams from Rotterdam and The Hague. Twelve teams will provide care as usual and 12 teams will receive the intervention. The intervention consists of 1) a knowledge and skills training for mental health professionals about DVA, 2) a knowledge and skills training of DVA professionals about mental illness, 3) provision and implementation of a referral pathway between community mental health and DVA services. The follow up period is 12 months. Our primary outcome is the rate of detected cases of recent or any history of DVA in patients per team in 12 months. Detection rates are obtained through a systematic search in electronic patient files. Our secondary aims are to obtain information about the gain and sustainability of knowledge on DVA in mental health professionals, and to obtain insight into the feasibility, sustainability and acceptability of the intervention. Data on our secondary aims will be obtained through structured in depth interviews and a questionnaire on knowledge and attitudes on DVA. This study is the first cluster randomized controlled trial to target both male and female psychiatric patients that experience DVA, using an intervention that involves training of professionals. We expect the rate of detected cases of DVA to increase in the

  20. Dupuytren’s Disease: Predicting Factors and Associated Conditions. A Single Center Questionnaire-Based CaseControl Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Morelli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conflicting studies link several conditions and risk factors to Dupuytren’s disease (DD. A questionnaire-based case-control study was set to investigate associated conditions and clinical features of DD in a sample of Italian patients. The main purpose was the identification of predicting factors for: DD development; involvement of multiple rays; involvement of both hands; development of radial DD; development of recurrences and extensions. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to investigate medical and drug histories, working and life habits, DD clinical features, familial history, recurrences and extensions. Binary logistic regression, Mann Whitney U-test and Fisher’s exact test were used for the statistical analysis. Results: A role in DD development was found for male sex, cigarette smoking, diabetes and heavy manual work. The development of aggressive DD has been linked to age, male sex, high alcohol intake, dyslipidemias and positive familial history. Conclusion: Further studies might explain the dual relationship between ischemic heart disease and DD. According to our results, the questionnaire used for this study revealed to be an easy-handling instrument to analyze the conditions associated to DD. Nevertheless, its use in further and larger studies is needed to confirm our results as well as the role of the questionnaire itself as investigation tool for clinical studies.

  1. Developing a Continuous Quality Improvement Assessment Using a Patient-Centered Approach in Optimizing Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updyke, Katelyn Mariko; Urso, Brittany; Beg, Shazia; Solomon, James

    2017-10-09

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-organ, autoimmune disease in which patients lose self-tolerance and develop immune complexes which deposit systemically causing multi-organ damage and inflammation. Patients often experience unpredictable flares of symptoms with poorly identified triggers. Literature suggests exogenous exposures may contribute to flares in symptoms. An online pilot survey was marketed globally through social media to self-reported SLE patients with the goal to identify specific subpopulations who are susceptible to disease state changes based on analyzed exogenous factors. The pilot survey was promoted for two weeks, 80 respondents fully completed the survey and were included in statistical analysis. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed on de-identified patient surveys and compared to previous literature studies reporting known or theorized triggers in the SLE disease state. The pilot survey identified similar exogenous triggers compared to previous literature, including antibiotics, increasing beef intake, and metal implants. The goal of the pilot survey is to utilize similar questions to develop a detailed internet-based patient interactive form that can be edited and time stamped as a method to promote continuous quality improvement assessments. The ultimate objective of the platform is to interact with SLE patients from across the globe longitudinally to optimize disease control and improve quality of care by allowing them to avoid harmful triggers.

  2. Patient-centered feedback on the results of personality testing increases early engagement in residential substance use disorder treatment: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonigen, Daniel M; Timko, Christine; Jacob, Theodore; Moos, Rudolf H

    2015-03-14

    Patient-centered models of assessment have shown considerable promise for increasing patients' readiness for mental health treatment in general, but have not been used to facilitate patients' engagement in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. We developed a brief patient-centered intervention using assessment and feedback of personality data and examined its acceptability and efficacy to increase early engagement in residential SUD treatment. Thirty patients entering a 90-day residential SUD treatment program were randomly assigned to a feedback (n = 17) or control (n = 13; assessment-only) condition. Normal-range personality was assessed with the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R). Patients were re-interviewed one month after treatment entry to obtain information on their satisfaction with the intervention, as well as their adjustment to the residential milieu. Electronic medical records were reviewed to obtain information on patients' length of stay in the program and discharge status. Univariate ANOVAs and chi-square tests were conducted to examine group differences on outcomes. Patients' ratings indicated strong satisfaction with the feedback intervention and expectations that it would have a positive impact on their treatment experiences. Among patients who had not previously been treated in the residential program, the feedback intervention was associated with more positive relationships with other residents in treatment and a stronger alliance with the treatment program one month after treatment entry. The feedback intervention was also associated with a longer length of stay in treatment, although this effect did not reach statistical significance. The findings highlight the clinical utility of providing SUD patients with patient-centered feedback based on the results of personality testing, and provide preliminary support for the acceptability and efficacy of this intervention to facilitate early engagement in residential SUD treatment.

  3. Factors which contributed for low quality sputum smears for the detection of acid fast bacilli (AFB) at selected health centers in Ethiopia: A quality control perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Ayehu; Ayele, Yeshi; Berhan, Yifru; Woldeyohannes, Desalegn; Erku, Woldaregay; Sisay, Solomon

    2018-01-01

    Quality of tuberculosis (TB) microscopy diagnosis is not a guarantee despite implementation of External Quality Assurance (EQA) service in all laboratories of health facilities. Hence, we aimed at evaluating the technical quality and the findings of sputum smear microscopy for acid fast bacilli (AFB) at health centers in Hararge Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was carried out between July 8, 2014 and July 7, 2015.A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) method was put into practice for collecting all necessary sample slides. Data were analyzed by using SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences) version 20 software. P-value quality, smear size, smear thickness, staining and evenness were indicated in 40 (72.7%), 39 (70.9%), 37 (67.3%), 27(49.1%) and 37 (67.3%) of the collected samples, respectively. False negative AFB findings were significantly associated with lack of Internal Quality Control (IQC) measures (AOR (Adjusted Odds Ratio): 2.90 (95% CI (Confidence Interval): 1.25,6.75) and poor staining procedures (AOR: 2.16(95% CI: 1.01, 5.11). The qualities of AFB smear microscopy reading and smearing were low in most of the laboratories of the health centers. Therefore, it is essential to strength EQA program through building the capacity of laboratory professionals.

  4. Oncologic control obtained after radical prostatectomy in men with a pathological Gleason score ≥ 8: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audenet, François; Comperat, Eva; Seringe, Elise; Drouin, Sarah J; Richard, François; Cussenot, Olivier; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2011-01-01

    To assess the oncologic control afforded by radical prostatectomy (RP) in high-risk prostate cancers with a Gleason score ≥ 8. We performed a retrospective review of prostate cancer patients who underwent RP between 1995 and 2005 for prostate cancer and who had a pathologic Gleason score ≥ 8. Biochemical recurrence was defined as a single rise in PSA levels over 0.2 ng/ml after surgery. Overall, 64 patients were included and followed for a median time of 84.3 months. The mean age was 63 ± 5.2 years. The mean preoperative PSA was 11.9 ± 7.3 ng/ml (1.9-31), and 29 patients (46%) had a PSA > 10 ng/ml. The biopsy Gleason score was ≤ 7 for 49 patients (76.6%). After pathologic analysis, there were 25 (39%) stage pT2, 37 (58%) stage pT3, and 2 (3%) stage pT4 patients. Nine patients had lymph node involvement (14%). The surgical margins were positive in 25 patients (39%). In 51 patients, (80%) the Gleason score was underestimated by biopsies: 40 patients with a definitive score of Gleason 8 had a Gleason score of 6 or 7 on biopsies, while 11 patients with a Gleason score of 9 initially, had a Gleason score of 7 or 8. Twenty-seven patients underwent adjuvant treatment: external radiation therapy (n = 19), HRT (n = 3), or both (n = 5). During follow-up, 41 patients (64%) presented with a biochemical recurrence, and 11 (17%) died. The PSA-free survival rate at five year was 44%. RP remains a possible therapeutic option in certain cases of the high-risk cohort of patients with a Gleason score ≥ 8. However, patients should be warned that surgery might only be the first step of a multi-modal treatment approach. The modalities of adjuvant treatments and the right schedule to deliver it following RP still need to be defined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient-centered professional practice models for managing low back pain in older adults: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Long, Cynthia R; Vining, Robert D; Andresen, Andrew A; Hondras, Maria A; Lyons, Kevin J; Killinger, Lisa Z; Wolinsky, Fredric D; Wallace, Robert B

    2017-10-13

    Low back pain is a debilitating condition for older adults, who may seek healthcare from multiple providers. Few studies have evaluated impacts of different healthcare delivery models on back pain outcomes in this population. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes of older adults receiving back pain treatment under 3 professional practice models that included primary medical care with or without chiropractic care. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with 131 community-dwelling, ambulatory older adults with subacute or chronic low back pain. Participants were randomly allocated to 12 weeks of individualized primary medical care (Medical Care), concurrent medical and chiropractic care (Dual Care), or medical and chiropractic care with enhanced interprofessional collaboration (Shared Care). Primary outcomes were low back pain intensity rated on the numerical rating scale and back-related disability measured with the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included clinical measures, adverse events, and patient satisfaction. Statistical analyses included mixed-effects regression models and general estimating equations. At 12 weeks, participants in all three treatment groups reported improvements in mean average low back pain intensity [Shared Care: 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0 to 2.6; Dual Care: 3.0; 95% CI 2.3 to 3.8; Medical Care: 2.3; 95% CI 1.5 to 3.2)] and back-related disability (Shared Care: 2.8; 95% CI 1.6 to 4.0; Dual Care: 2.5; 95% CI 1.3 to 3.7; Medical Care: 1.5; 95% CI 0.2 to 2.8). No statistically significant differences were noted between the three groups on the primary measures. Participants in both models that included chiropractic reported significantly better perceived low back pain improvement, overall health and quality of life, and greater satisfaction with healthcare services than patients who received medical care alone. Professional practice models that included primary care and

  6. Metformin in women with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy (MiTy): a multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Denice S; Murphy, Kellie; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Tomlinson, George; Sanchez, Johanna; Zinman, Bernard; Ohlsson, Arne; Ryan, Edmond A; Fantus, I George; Armson, Anthony B; Lipscombe, Lorraine L; Barrett, Jon F R

    2016-07-19

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes in pregnancy is rising and rates of serious adverse maternal and fetal outcomes remain high. Metformin is a biguanide that is used as first-line treatment for non-pregnant patients with type 2 diabetes. We hypothesize that metformin use in pregnancy, as an adjunct to insulin, will decrease adverse outcomes by reducing maternal hyperglycemia, maternal insulin doses, maternal weight gain and gestational hypertension/pre-eclampsia. In addition, since metformin crosses the placenta, metformin treatment of the fetus may have a direct beneficial effect on neonatal outcomes. Our aim is to compare the effectiveness of the addition of metformin to insulin, to standard care (insulin plus placebo) in women with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy. The MiTy trial is a multi-centre randomized trial currently enrolling pregnant women with type 2 diabetes, who are on insulin, between the ages of 18-45, with a gestational age of 6 weeks 0 days to 22 weeks 6 days. In this randomized, double-masked, parallel placebo-controlled trial, after giving informed consent, women are randomized to receive either metformin 1,000 mg twice daily or placebo twice daily. A web-based block randomization system is used to assign women to metformin or placebo in a 1:1 ratio, stratified for site and body mass index. The primary outcome is a composite neonatal outcome of pregnancy loss, preterm birth, birth injury, moderate/severe respiratory distress, neonatal hypoglycemia, or neonatal intensive care unit admission longer than 24 h. Secondary outcomes are large for gestational age, cord blood gas pH pregnancy, and duration of hospital stays. The trial aims to enroll 500 participants. The results of this trial will inform endocrinologists, obstetricians, family doctors, and other healthcare professionals caring for women with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy, as to the benefits of adding metformin to insulin in this high risk population. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: no

  7. Genomics in Public Health: Perspective from the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridgely Fisk Green

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The national effort to use genomic knowledge to save lives is gaining momentum, as illustrated by the inclusion of genomics in key public health initiatives, including Healthy People 2020, and the recent launch of the precision medicine initiative. The Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC partners with state public health departments and others to advance the translation of genome-based discoveries into disease prevention and population health. To do this, OPHG has adopted an “identify, inform, and integrate” model: identify evidence-based genomic applications ready for implementation, inform stakeholders about these applications, and integrate these applications into public health at the local, state, and national level. This paper addresses current and future work at OPHG for integrating genomics into public health programs.

  8. Genomics in Public Health: Perspective from the Office of Public Health Genomics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ridgely Fisk; Dotson, W David; Bowen, Scott; Kolor, Katherine; Khoury, Muin J

    2015-01-01

    The national effort to use genomic knowledge to save lives is gaining momentum, as illustrated by the inclusion of genomics in key public health initiatives, including Healthy People 2020, and the recent launch of the precision medicine initiative. The Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) partners with state public health departments and others to advance the translation of genome-based discoveries into disease prevention and population health. To do this, OPHG has adopted an "identify, inform, and integrate" model: identify evidence-based genomic applications ready for implementation, inform stakeholders about these applications, and integrate these applications into public health at the local, state, and national level. This paper addresses current and future work at OPHG for integrating genomics into public health programs.

  9. Integrated real-time information to use in commercial, logistics and operational activities provide by the national control center operation of Transpetro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniceto, Hello A. R. [National Control Center Operation Transpetro, Rio de Janeiro, (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    TRANSPETRO needed real time computational tools to manage its commercial, logistics and operational activities more efficiently. TRANSPETRO's National Control Center Operation developed an information site that provides information in real time on the process plans involved in each operation, using a Plant Information Management System (PIMS). SCADA systems were introduced during 2009 and 2010. This paper reports on the global introduction of the site and its basic architecture. Every screen displays the overall data in real time on movement in volume in pipeline operated by TRANSPETRO. The products transported are tracked for each infrastructure and are shown on dynamic geographic maps. Applications have been developed to improve the quality of information available to customers. It was found that the development of this site using PIMS technology brought gains in support to decision-making at the strategic and tactical levels for TRANSPETRO.

  10. Communicating public health preparedness information to pregnant and postpartum women: an assessment of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web pages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Brianna; Felter, Elizabeth; Downes, Amia; Trauth, Jeanette

    2015-04-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women have special needs during public health emergencies but often have inadequate levels of disaster preparedness. Thus, improving maternal emergency preparedness is a public health priority. More research is needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to how preparedness information is communicated to these women. A sample of web pages from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention intended to address the preparedness needs of pregnant and postpartum populations was examined for suitability for this audience. Five of the 7 web pages examined were considered adequate. One web page was considered not suitable and one the raters split between not suitable and adequate. None of the resources examined were considered superior. If these resources are considered some of the best available to pregnant and postpartum women, more work is needed to improve the suitability of educational resources, especially for audiences with low literacy and low incomes.

  11. Contributions of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Implementing the Global Health Security Agenda in 17 Partner Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzmaurice, Arthur G; Mahar, Michael; Moriarty, Leah F; Bartee, Maureen; Hirai, Mitsuaki; Li, Wenshu; Gerber, A Russell; Tappero, Jordan W; Bunnell, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), a partnership of nations, international organizations, and civil society, was launched in 2014 with a mission to build countries' capacities to respond to infectious disease threats and to foster global compliance with the International Health Regulations (IHR 2005). The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) assists partner nations to improve IHR 2005 capacities and achieve GHSA targets. To assess progress through these CDC-supported efforts, we analyzed country activity reports dating from April 2015 through March 2017. Our analysis shows that CDC helped 17 Phase I countries achieve 675 major GHSA accomplishments, particularly in the cross-cutting areas of public health surveillance, laboratory systems, workforce development, and emergency response management. CDC's engagement has been critical to these accomplishments, but sustained support is needed until countries attain IHR 2005 capacities, thereby fostering national and regional health protection and ensuring a world safer and more secure from global health threats.

  12. Risk factors for the acquisition of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli at a tertiary care center in South Korea: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Young; Song, Je Eun; Kim, Min Hyung; Choi, Heun; Kim, Jae Kyung; Ann, Hea Won; Kim, Jung Ho; Jeon, Yongduk; Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Sun Bean; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Song, Young Goo; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-06-01

    Carbapenem resistance among gram-negative bacilli is an emerging threat worldwide. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the acquisition of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CRE). We conducted a matched case-control study comprising 57 cases of acquisition of CRE and 114 controls (1:2 matched) selected from patients with a culture of carbapenem-susceptible E coli between January 2006 and December 2010 at a 2000-bed tertiary care center in South Korea. On univariate analysis, previous use of carbapenem (P carbapenem (odds ratio [OR], 4.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-14.46; P = .01) and previous use of fluoroquinolone (OR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.14-6.99; P = .03) were independent risk factors. At this institute, the antibiotic selective pressure of carbapenems and fluoroquinolones was shown to be an important risk factor for the acquisition of CRE. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selection of a Data Acquisition and Controls System Communications and Software Architecture for Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory Thermal and Vacuum Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Upgrade of data acquisition and controls systems software at Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) involved the definition, evaluation and selection of a system communication architecture and software components. A brief discussion of the background of the SESL and its data acquisition and controls systems provides a context for discussion of the requirements for each selection. Further framework is provided as upgrades to these systems accomplished in the 1990s and in 2003 are compared to demonstrate the role that technological advances have had in their improvement. Both of the selections were similar in their three phases; 1) definition of requirements, 2) identification of candidate products and their evaluation and testing and 3) selection by comparison of requirement fulfillment. The candidates for the communication architecture selection embraced several different methodologies which are explained and contrasted. Requirements for this selection are presented and the selection process is described. Several candidates for the software component of the data acquisition and controls system are identified, requirements for evaluation and selection are presented, and the evaluation process is described.

  14. Quality control in environmental radioactivity measurements: experience of the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation, acting as International Reference Center Of the World Health Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, M L; Gahinet, M E; Moroni, J P; De Zertucha, J; Pellerin, P [Service Central de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - Le Vesinet (France)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to make known the experiences in the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (SCPRI) in two fields: (i)in relation to the survey of, and research on, environmental radiation in France for 15 years, and (ii) as the International Reference Center (IRC), a responsibility which has been assigned to it by the World Health Organisation (WHO) for more than 7 years. The SCPRI has no permanent activity in pure metrology but the control which it exerts on a national scale (more than 30,000 environmental samples analyzed each year) and the periodic intercomparisons which it organizes with a large number of foreign Public Health Laboratories have led to the development of a strict quality control program for the techniques of preparation and verification of standard sources and reference samples which are essential in the use of counters, the application and development of spectrometric and radiochemical analytical methods and in the distribution of samples for intercomparison purposes. A description is given of practical experience of quality control in the preparation of standards and in international inter-comparisons organized under the sponsorship of the World Health Organization.

  15. Effects of lifestyle intervention using patient-centered cognitive behavioral therapy among patients with cardio-metabolic syndrome: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Mei, Songli; Yang, Rui; Chen, Ling; Gao, Hang; Li, Li

    2016-11-18

    Cardio-metabolic syndrome (CMS) is a highly prevalent condition. There is an urgent need to identify effective and integrated multi-disciplinary approaches that can reduce risk factors for CMS. Sixty-two patients with a history of CMS were randomized 1:1 into two groups: a standard information -only group (control), or a self-regulated lifestyle waist circumference (patient-centered cognitive behavioral therapy) intervention group. A pretest and posttest, controlled, experimental design was used. Outcomes were measured at the baseline (week 0) and at the end of intervention (week 12). Comparisons were drawn between groups and over time. The mean (standard deviation) age of the subjects was 48.6 (5.8) years ranging from 32 to 63, and 56.9% of the participants were female. Both groups showed no significant differences in Demographic variables and the metabolic syndrome indicators at baseline. While the control group only showed modest improvement after 12 weeks, compared to baseline, the intervention group demonstrated significant improvement from baseline. This study controlled for patients' demographics and baseline characteristics when assessing the effects of intervention. After adjusting for age, education and baseline level, the experimental group and the control group were statistically significant different in the following post-treatment outcomes: WC (F = 35.96, P cognitive behavioral therapy can improve the physical and mental health conditions among individuals reporting a history of cardio-metabolic syndrome, and possibly provided preliminary benefits for the treatment of CMS. Chinese Clinical Trial Register #, ChiCTR15006148 .

  16. User-centered design of a web-based self-management site for individuals with type 2 diabetes - providing a sense of control and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Catherine H; Parsons, Janet A; Hall, Susan; Newton, David; Jovicic, Aleksandra; Lottridge, Danielle; Shah, Baiju R; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-07-23

    To design and test a web-based self-management tool for patients with type 2 diabetes for its usability and feasibility. An evidence-based, theory-driven website was created for patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-three patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were recruited from 2 diabetes care centers in Toronto, Canada. We employed focus group methodology to assess acceptability, sustainability, strengths and weaknesses of the self-management website. Based on these results, revisions were made to the website. Three cycles of individual usability testing sessions using cognitive task analysis were conducted with patients with type 2 diabetes. Revisions to the website were made based on results from this testing. We identified five themes concerning participants' experiences of health care and related unmet needs: 1) Desire for information and for greater access to timely and personalized care to gain a sense of control of their disease; 2) Desire for community (sharing experiences with others) to fulfill practical and emotional needs; 3) Potential roles of an online self-management website in self-empowerment, behavior change, self-management and health care delivery; 4) Importance of a patient-centered perspective in presenting content (e.g. common assumptions, medical nomenclature, language, messaging, sociocultural context); 5) Barriers and facilitators to use of a self-management website (including perceived relevance of content, incorporation into usual routine, availability for goal-directed use, usability issues). Participants outlined a series of unmet health care needs, and stated that they wanted timely access to tailored knowledge about their condition, mechanisms to control and track their disease, and opportunities to share experiences with other patients. These findings have implications for patients with type 2 diabetes of diverse ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and disease severity, as well as to the design of other computer

  17. Correlates of quality of life among individuals with epilepsy enrolled in self-management research: From the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Managing Epilepsy Well Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Welter, Elisabeth; Friedman, Daniel; Spruill, Tanya M; Stoll, Shelley; Sahoo, Satya S; Bukach, Ashley; Bamps, Yvan A; Valdez, Joshua; Jobst, Barbara C

    2017-04-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that causes substantial burden on patients and families. Quality of life may be reduced due to the stress of coping with epilepsy. For nearly a decade, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Prevention Research Center's Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network has been conducting research on epilepsy self-management to address research and practice gaps. Studies have been conducted by independent centers across the U.S. Recently, the MEW Network sites, collaboratively, began compiling an integrated database to facilitate aggregate secondary analysis of completed and ongoing studies. In this preliminary analysis, correlates of quality of life in people with epilepsy (PWE) were analyzed from pooled baseline data from the MEW Network. For this analysis, data originated from 6 epilepsy studies conducted across 4 research sites and comprised 459 PWE. Descriptive comparisons assessed common data elements that included gender, age, ethnicity, race, education, employment, income, seizure frequency, quality of life, and depression. Standardized rating scales were used for quality of life (QOLIE-10) and for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9). While not all datasets included all common data elements, baseline descriptive analysis found a mean age of 42 (SD 13.22), 289 women (63.0%), 59 African Americans (13.7%), and 58 Hispanics (18.5%). Most, 422 (92.8%), completed at least high school, while 169 (61.7%) were unmarried, divorced/separated, or widowed. Median 30-day seizure frequency was 0.71 (range 0-308). Depression at baseline was common, with a mean PHQ-9 score of 8.32 (SD 6.04); 69 (29.0%) had depression in the mild range (PHQ-9 score 5-9) and 92 (38.7%) had depression in the moderate to severe range (PHQ-9 score >9). Lower baseline quality of life was associated with greater depressive severity (pepilepsy research studies. While findings must be tempered by potential sample bias, i.e. a relative under

  18. Turkish assessment of SURF (SUrvey of Risk Factor Management) study: Control rates of cardiovascular risk factors derived from databases of 15 different levels of health centers in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oğuz, Aytekin; Balcı, Mustafa Kemal; Temizhan, Ahmet; Güldal Altunoğlu, Esma; Bektaş, Osman; Aslan, Güler; Iyigün, Özgün; Kara, Ahmet; Tanrıverdi Pınar, Handan; Yavuz, Saffet; Tekin, Murat; Ercan, Saffet; Çelik, Selda; Sezgin Meriçliler, Özlem; Bozkurt Çakır, İrem

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence to recommendations for secondary prevention and the achievement of treatment targets for the control of risk factors in patients with established coronary heart disease (CHD) who were followed-up at various healthcare facilities in Turkey. According to the protocol of the international Survey of Risk Factor Management study, questionnaire forms were completed and demographic, anthropometric, and laboratory data of CHD patients who were followed-up at a total of 15 selected primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare centers were recorded. Among a total of 724 CHD patients (69.8% male; mean age: 63.3±10.7 years) included in the study, 18.4% were current smokers, only 19.1% had normal body mass index, and 22.1% had waist circumference below the limit of abdominal obesity. Physical activity was insufficient in 53% of the patients, 47.3% had low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol value, 46% had triglyceride level above 150 mg/dL, and 67% had glycated hemoglobin value of 6.5% or above. Of all the patients, 88.1% were using antiplatelet drugs, 71.4% were using beta-blockers, 55.7% were using statins, and 41.9% were using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers. Blood pressure was under control in 56.7% of the hypertensive patients using antihypertensive drugs, and the proportion of diabetic patients who reached glycemic control targets using antidiabetic drugs was 35.9%. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was below 70 mg/dL in 12.2% of the patients using statins. According to the data obtained, among Turkish CHD patients, the control rate of cardiovascular risk factors is low, and implementation of the recommendations regarding lifestyle modification and medication use for secondary prevention in the current guidelines are insufficient.

  19. Evaluate Data Center Network Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilimon, Artur

    through a data center network, which is usually built with layer 2 switches and layer 3 routers. The topology of the data center network is crucial for latency in the data communication to and from the data center and between servers in the data center. Tests can be conducted to measure latency and other...... Engineering, scientists evaluate data center network topologies with an SDN-based (Software-Defined Networking) control framework measuring network performance – primarily latency. This can be used to plan data center scaling by testing how a new topology will function before changes are made. Data center...... performance parameters for different data center network topologies. It is however important that tests can be repeated and reproduced to have comparable information from the tests. There are, of course, many topologies that can be used for data center networks. At DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics...

  20. Risk factors associated with mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus. A case-control study in a tertiary care center in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cruz, B; Tapia, N; Villa-Romero, A R; Reyes, E; Cardiel, M H

    2001-01-01

    To identify the mortality risk factors in a group of Mexican patients with SLE. A case-control autopsy study in a tertiary care center in Mexico, City. Patients with SLE who died during 1958 to 1994 with an autopsy study were selected as cases, and alive patients matched by age (+/- 3 years), decade of SLE onset, and disease duration (+/- 5 years) were defined as controls. Clinical charts were reviewed looking at clinical variables. SLE disease activity was evaluated with the MexSledai index, and SLE disease severity with the Severity Index. Variables were classified as present at any moment during the follow-up and 3 months before death in cases or cut-off date in controls. matched univariate and multivariate analysis by multiple logistic regression were performed, and the results were presented as odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals (OR, 95%CI). 76 matched pairs of patients were studied. Age, gender, and years offormal education were similar in the cases and controls. Variables associated with mortality three months before death were: lung involvement OR= 15.6, 95%CI (4.8-50.3), p<0.001; severe thrombocytopenia 9.6 (2.9-31.7), p<0.001; heart involvement 5.8 (2.6-13.0), p<0.001; and the severity index (cases 8.8 mu, 2.4 sigma vs controls 3.5, 2.0, respectively) 2.2 (1.5-3.4), p<0.001. Variables associated with mortality detected at any moment before death were kidney involvement 2.16 (1.09-4.29), p<0.02; the steroid therapeutic index 2.3 (1.2-4.5), p<0.001; number of previous admissions 2.4 (1.4-4.3), p<0.001; the MEX-SLEDAI index (cases 21.6 mu 6.3 sigma vs controls 12.6, 5.8), 1.2 (1.1-1.3), p<0.001; and the number of severe infections 14.4 (4.4-46.2), p<0.001. Protective variables were skin involvement 0.1 (0.3-0.6), p<0.001; daily dose of chloroquine (cases 3.9 mu, 24.1 sigma vs controls 39.4, 60.0 mg), p <0.0001 and the time from thefirst SLE symptom to the patient's demise or the cut-off date 0.7(0.6-0.9), p<0.001. Multiple logistic regression showed

  1. Percentage height of center of mass is associated with the risk of falls among elderly women: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Cláudio W L; Castro, Charlles H M; Pedreira, Paulo G; Heymann, Roberto E; Szejnfeld, Vera L

    2011-06-01

    Falls are a serious health problem for aged people, causing social and economic burden. Despite being an important determinant of balance, the positioning of the center of mass (COM) has not been evaluated as a risk factor for falls. This study examined the association between the percentage height of COM (%COM) and the risk of falls in the elderly. Healthy women aged 60 years and older were consecutively selected in a case-control study. Forty-eight individuals classified as "fallers" (having suffered two or more falls in the previous year) were the cases while 48 age and weight-matched women with one fall or no falls in the previous year were the controls ("non-fallers"). Body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) by DXA, 30-second chair stand test, abdominal circumference, Berg's balance scale and %COM using the reaction board method were evaluated in all participants. Body composition parameters were not significantly different between groups. Spine and hip BMD tended to be lower in the fallers, but the difference was significant only at the femoral neck (0.80±0.10g/cm(2) versus 0.87±0.76g/cm(2); pfalls. Further work is needed in order to determine the value of board reaction measurements in a clinical setting to identify patients at high risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors associated with late ANC initiation among pregnant women in select public health centers of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: unmatched case–control study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrekidan, Kahasse; Worku, Alemayehu

    2017-01-01

    Background Although Ethiopia has shown remarkable achievements in reducing maternal mortality in the last 10 years, the prevalence of late antenatal care (ANC) initiation is still high in the country. Objective The primary purpose of this study was to identify the factors related to late ANC initiation among pregnant women in selected public health centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Subjects and methods A total of 402 pregnant women (cases=134, controls=268) were recruited using multistage sampling. The design selected for the study was unmatched case–control. EpiData version 3.02 and SPSS version 20.0 were used for data entry and statistical analysis, respectively. Binary logistic regression model was used to model the odds of late ANC initiation. Results The odds of attending ANC late were significantly higher for mothers with a monthly household income of $8.50 to start the ANC service (AOR=3.04; 95% CI: 1.98, 4.67). Conclusion Low educational level, low income of the household, unplanned pregnancy, stay for ANC service were the main predictors of late ANC initiation. Therefore, any intervention which would need to improve early ANC initiation should focus on economic empowerment of women, and tailored health education for migrant women should be strengthened. PMID:29138615

  3. Factors associated with late ANC initiation among pregnant women in select public health centers of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: unmatched case-control study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrekidan, Kahasse; Worku, Alemayehu

    2017-01-01

    Although Ethiopia has shown remarkable achievements in reducing maternal mortality in the last 10 years, the prevalence of late antenatal care (ANC) initiation is still high in the country. The primary purpose of this study was to identify the factors related to late ANC initiation among pregnant women in selected public health centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A total of 402 pregnant women (cases=134, controls=268) were recruited using multistage sampling. The design selected for the study was unmatched case-control. EpiData version 3.02 and SPSS version 20.0 were used for data entry and statistical analysis, respectively. Binary logistic regression model was used to model the odds of late ANC initiation. The odds of attending ANC late were significantly higher for mothers with a monthly household income of $8.50 to start the ANC service (AOR=3.04; 95% CI: 1.98, 4.67). Low educational level, low income of the household, unplanned pregnancy, stay for ANC service were the main predictors of late ANC initiation. Therefore, any intervention which would need to improve early ANC initiation should focus on economic empowerment of women, and tailored health education for migrant women should be strengthened.

  4. Similar muscles contribute to horizontal and vertical acceleration of center of mass in forward and backward walking: implications for neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Karen; De Groote, Friedl; Massaad, Firas; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse

    2012-01-01

    Leg kinematics during backward walking (BW) are very similar to the time-reversed kinematics during forward walking (FW). This suggests that the underlying muscle activation pattern could originate from a simple time reversal, as well. Experimental electromyography studies have confirmed that this is the case for some muscles. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that muscles showing a time reversal should also exhibit a reversal in function [from accelerating the body center of mass (COM) to decelerating]. However, this has not yet been verified in simulation studies. In the present study, forward simulations were used to study the effects of muscles on the acceleration of COM in FW and BW. We found that a reversal in function was indeed present in the muscle control of the horizontal movement of COM (e.g., tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius). In contrast, muscles' antigravity contributions maintained their function for both directions of movement. An important outcome of the present study is therefore that similar muscles can be used to achieve opposite functional demands at the level of control of the COM when walking direction is reversed. However, some muscles showed direction-specific contributions (i.e., dorsiflexors). We concluded that the changes in muscle contributions imply that a simple time reversal would be insufficient to produce BW from FW. We therefore propose that BW utilizes extra elements, presumably supraspinal, in addition to a common spinal drive. These additions are needed for propulsion and require a partial reconfiguration of lower level common networks. PMID:22423005

  5. Approaches in controllable generation of artificial pinning center in REBa2Cu3O y -coated conductor for high-flux pinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y.; Miura, S.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Ichino, Y.; Awaji, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Ichinose, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews the progress of studies to determine optimum shapes of the artificial pinning center (APC) of REBa2Cu3O y thin films and coated conductors towards superconducting magnets operating at temperatures of 77 K or less. Superconducting properties vary depending on the kind and quantity of BaMO3 materials. Therefore, we study changes in the shapes of nanorods that are due to the difference in the quality of additives and growth temperature. In addition, we aim to control the APC using an optimum shape that matches the operating temperature. In particular, we describe the shape control of nanorods in SmBCO thin films and coated conductors by employing lower temperature growth (LTG) technology using seed layers. From the cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observations, we confirmed that using the LTG method, the BaHfO3 (BHO) nanorods, which were comparatively thin and short in length, formed a firework structure in the case of SmBCO films with coated conductors. The superconducting properties in the magnetic field of the SmBCO-coated conductor with the optimum amount of BHO showed that {F}{{p}}\\max = 1.6 TN m-3 on a single crystalline substrate and 1.5 TN m-3 on metallic substrate with a biaxially textured MgO layer fabricated by ion-beam assisted deposition method tape 4.2 K.

  6. Development of quality control and instrumentation performance metrics for diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in the multi-center clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Samuel T.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Warren, Robert V.; Hill, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Leproux, AnaÑ--s.; Durkin, Amanda F.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Haghany, Hosain; Mantulin, William W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Instrument equivalence and quality control are critical elements of multi-center clinical trials. We currently have five identical Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Imaging (DOSI) instruments enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN, #6691) trial located at five academic clinical research sites in the US. The goal of the study is to predict the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 60 patients. In order to reliably compare DOSI measurements across different instruments, operators and sites, we must be confident that the data quality is comparable. We require objective and reliable methods for identifying, correcting, and rejecting low quality data. To achieve this goal, we developed and tested an automated quality control algorithm that rejects data points below the instrument noise floor, improves tissue optical property recovery, and outputs a detailed data quality report. Using a new protocol for obtaining dark-noise data, we applied the algorithm to ACRIN patient data and successfully improved the quality of recovered physiological data in some cases.

  7. Prophylactic use of Saccharomyces boulardii probiotics in preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea: a single center hospital-based case-control study in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Panic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD develops through the loss of normal bacterial intestinal flora. We have conducted a case-control study in order to assess whether prophylactic administration of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii prevents occurrence of AAD among adult hospitalized patients. Methods. Single-center hospital based case-control study was conducted in University Clinic “Dr Dragisa Misovic-Dedinje”, Belgrade, Serbia. Hospital records were screened in order to identify all the patients developing AAD in period January 1. 2010 – August 31. 2015. For every case, one age and gender matched control was randomly selected among patients hospitalized at the same time at the same department who were administered with antibiotics and did not develop AAD. For both cases and controls data were extracted on demographics, medical history, indication for use of antibiotics, antibiotics used, and prophylactic use of S.boulardii probiotics. The relationship between occurrence of AAD and putative risk factors were measured using the odds ratios (ORs and their 95% confidence interval (CI derived from logistic regression analysis. Results. Number of 59 cases and 59 controls were included in the study. Most of AAD cases were associated with old age (mean age of 78.05, and almost half (49.15% were hospitalized on geriatrics department. Most prescribed class of antibiotics among cases was III generation cephalosporins (50.85%, followed by fluoroquinolones (28.81% and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (20.34%. Significantly more cases than controls were treated with carbapenems (16.95% vs. 5.08% respectively, p=0.04. Significantly less cases were administered with prophylactic S. boulardii probiotics (18.64% vs. 42.37% p=0.005. We identified prophylactic use of S. boulardii to act protectively against development of AAD from both univariate (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.14-0.72 and multivariate analysis (OR:0.36, 95% CI: 0.14-0.80. Use of

  8. Tuberculosis infection control practices and associated factors among health care workers in health centers of West Gojjam zone, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Kassahun; Wasie, Belaynew; Azage, Muluken

    2016-08-08

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem. The emerging epidemic of multi- and extensively drug-resistant (M/XDR) TB further imperils health workers, patients and public health. Health facilities with inadequate infection control are risky environments for the emergence and transmission of TB. There was no study that presented data on infection control practices of health care workers. This study aimed to assess tuberculosis infection control practices and associated factors among health care workers in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia. Institution based quantitative cross-sectional study triangulated with qualitative observation and key informant interview was conducted. Six hundred sixty two health care workers were selected by multistage random sampling method. Self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data. Observation checklists and key informant interview guides were used to collect qualitative data. Quantitative data were entered in to Epi Info version 3.5.3 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Odds ratio with 95 % confidence interval was used to identify factors associated with TB infection control practice of health care workers. Qualitative data were translated, transcribed, analyzed and triangulated with the quantitative findings. The proportion of proper TB infection control (TBIC) practices was 38 %. Qualitative data showed that administrative, environmental and personal respiratory protection control measures were not practiced well. Knowledge on the presence of TBIC plan [AOR = 4.25, 95 % CI: 2.46 - 7.35], knowledge on the presence of national guideline [AOR = 8.95, 95 % CI: 4.35 - 18.40] and working department of the health care workers were independent predictors of TBIC practices. The proportion of proper TBIC practices of health care workers was low. TBIC practices were determined by knowing the presence of TBIC plan and national guideline and working department. Hence, supportive

  9. Temporal analyses of coral snakebite severity published in the American Association of Poison Control Centers' Annual Reports from 1983 through 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Frank G; Stolz, Uwe; Shirazi, Farshad; McNally, Jude

    2010-01-01

    The only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved coral snake antivenom was officially discontinued in 2007, causing ever-diminishing supplies. This study describes the severity of U.S. coral snakebites during the last 25 years to determine trends in annual rates of these bites' medical outcomes. This study retrospectively analyzed all human coral snakebites voluntarily reported by the public and/or health care professionals to poison centers that were subsequently published in the Annual Reports of the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) from 1983 through 2007. Annual rates of medical outcomes from coral snakebites were calculated by dividing the annual number of people bitten by coral snakes who developed fatal, major, moderate, minor, or no effect outcomes by the total annual number of people bitten by coral snakes. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in annual rates. From 1983 through 2007, the incidence rate of coral snakebites producing no effects significantly decreased by 4.7% per year [incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.953; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.920-0.987]. From 1985 through 2007, the incidence rates of minor and major outcomes did not significantly change; however, moderate outcomes significantly increased by 3.4% per year (IRR = 1.034; 95% CI = 1.004-1.064). No fatalities were reported from 1983 through 2007. Annual rates of coral snakebites producing no effects significantly decreased and those producing moderate outcomes significantly increased in our analyses of data from the last 25 years of published AAPCC Annual Reports. This study has important limitations that must be considered when interpreting these conclusions.

  10. A multi-center study on the regenerative effects of erythropoietin in burn and scalding injuries: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Christina Irene; Bader, Augustinus; Dornseifer, Ulf; Egert, Silvia; Dunda, Sebastian; Grieb, Gerrit; Wolter, Thomas; Pallua, Norbert; von Wild, Tobias; Siemers, Frank; Mailänder, Peter; Thamm, Oliver; Ernert, Carsten; Steen, Michael; Sievers, Reiner; Reichert, Bert; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans; Hartmann, Bernd; Otte, Max; Kehl, Victoria; Ohmann, Christian; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Machens, Hans-Günther

    2013-05-03

    Although it was initially assumed that erythropoietin (EPO) was a hormone that only affected erythropoiesis, it has now been proposed that EPO plays an additional key role in the regulation of acute and chronic tissue damage. This is a large, prospective, randomized, double-blind, multi-center study, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and fully approved by the designated ethics committee. The trial, which is to investigate the effects of EPO in severely burned patients, is in its recruitment phase and is being carried out in 13 German burn care centers. A total of 150 patients are to be enrolled to receive study medication every other day for 21 days (EPO 150 IU/kg body weight or placebo). A follow-up of one year is planned. The primary endpoint of this study is the time until complete re-epithelialization of a defined skin graft donor site is reached. Furthermore, clinical parameters such as wound healing, scar formation (using the Vancouver scar scale), laboratory values, quality of life (SF-36), angiogenic effects, and gene- and protein-expression patterns are to be determined. The results will be carefully evaluated for gender differences. We are seeking new insights into the mechanisms of wound healing in thermally injured patients and more detailed information about the role EPO plays, specifically in these complex interactions. We additionally expect that the biomimetic effects of EPO will be useful in the treatment of acute thermal dermal injuries. EudraCT Number: 2006-002886-38, Protocol Number: 0506, ISRCT Number: http://controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN95777824/ISRCTN95777824.

  11. Building a Quality Controlled Database of Meteorological Data from NASA Kennedy Space Center and the United States Air Force's Eastern Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James C.; Barbre. Robert E., Jr.; Decker, Ryan K.; Orcutt, John M.

    2018-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (EV44) has provided atmospheric databases and analysis in support of space vehicle design and day-of-launch operations for NASA and commercial launch vehicle programs launching from the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC), co-located on the United States Air Force's Eastern Range (ER) at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The ER complex is one of the most heavily instrumented sites in the United States with over 31 towers measuring various atmospheric parameters on a continuous basis. An inherent challenge with large sets of data consists of ensuring erroneous data is removed from databases, and thus excluded from launch vehicle design analyses. EV44 has put forth great effort in developing quality control (QC) procedures for individual meteorological instruments, however no standard QC procedures for all databases currently exists resulting in QC databases that have inconsistencies in variables, methodologies, and periods of record. The goal of this activity is to use the previous efforts by EV44 to develop a standardized set of QC procedures from which to build meteorological databases from KSC and the ER, while maintaining open communication with end users from the launch community to develop ways to improve, adapt and grow the QC database. Details of the QC procedures will be described. As the rate of launches increases with additional launch vehicle programs, it is becoming more important that weather databases are continually updated and checked for data quality before use in launch vehicle design and certification analyses.

  12. A multi-center randomized controlled trial to compare a self-ligating bracket with a conventional bracket in a UK population: Part 1: Treatment efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dywer, Lian; Littlewood, Simon J; Rahman, Shahla; Spencer, R James; Barber, Sophy K; Russell, Joanne S

    2016-01-01

    To use a two-arm parallel trial to compare treatment efficiency between a self-ligating and a conventional preadjusted edgewise appliance system. A prospective multi-center randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in three hospital orthodontic departments. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive treatment with either a self-ligating (3M SmartClip) or conventional (3M Victory) preadjusted edgewise appliance bracket system using a computer-generated random sequence concealed in opaque envelopes, with stratification for operator and center. Two operators followed a standardized protocol regarding bracket bonding procedure and archwire sequence. Efficiency of each ligation system was assessed by comparing the duration of treatment (months), total number of appointments (scheduled and emergency visits), and number of bracket bond failures. One hundred thirty-eight subjects (mean age 14 years 11 months) were enrolled in the study, of which 135 subjects (97.8%) completed treatment. The mean treatment time and number of visits were 25.12 months and 19.97 visits in the SmartClip group and 25.80 months and 20.37 visits in the Victory group. The overall bond failure rate was 6.6% for the SmartClip and 7.2% for Victory, with a similar debond distribution between the two appliances. No significant differences were found between the bracket systems in any of the outcome measures. No serious harm was observed from either bracket system. There was no clinically significant difference in treatment efficiency between treatment with a self-ligating bracket system and a conventional ligation system.

  13. Are Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for Preexposure Prophylaxis Specific Enough? Formulation of a Personalized HIV Risk Score for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beymer, Matthew R; Weiss, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Bourque, Linda B; Gee, Gilbert C; Morisky, Donald E; Shu, Suzanne B; Javanbakht, Marjan; Bolan, Robert K

    2017-01-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has emerged as a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention tool for populations at highest risk for HIV infection. Current US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for identifying PrEP candidates may not be specific enough to identify gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) at the highest risk for HIV infection. We created an HIV risk score for HIV-negative MSM based on Syndemics Theory to develop a more targeted criterion for assessing PrEP candidacy. Behavioral risk assessment and HIV testing data were analyzed for HIV-negative MSM attending the Los Angeles LGBT Center between January 2009 and June 2014 (n = 9481). Syndemics Theory informed the selection of variables for a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. Estimated coefficients were summed to create an HIV risk score, and model fit was compared between our model and CDC guidelines using the Akaike Information Criterion and Bayesian Information Criterion. Approximately 51% of MSM were above a cutpoint that we chose as an illustrative risk score to qualify for PrEP, identifying 75% of all seroconverting MSM. Our model demonstrated a better overall fit when compared with the CDC guidelines (Akaike Information Criterion Difference = 68) in addition to identifying a greater proportion of HIV infections. Current CDC PrEP guidelines should be expanded to incorporate substance use, partner-level, and other Syndemic variables that have been shown to contribute to HIV acquisition. Deployment of such personalized algorithms may better hone PrEP criteria and allow providers and their patients to make a more informed decision prior to PrEP use.

  14. Comparison of Salivary pH in Diabetic Patients Referring to Diabetes Center of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences with Non-Diabetic Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Owlia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has extensive oral consequences which could be referred to changes of saliva properties. The purpose of this study was to compare the pH of un-stimulated whole saliva between diabetic patients that referred to diabetes center of Yazd Shahid Sadoughi university and non- diabetic persons. Methods: In this Case- control study, the population consisted of 60 persons in 2 groups: Thirty diabetic patients(type 2 and 30 non-diabetic persons. Two patients of case group were excluded from study due to inconsistency of their salivary pH and pH paper. Sampling from saliva was performed after 2 hours of abstinence from eating and smoking. Then pH of samples was measured by the pH paper that was scored from 5.5 to 8. After that blood sample was taken for measuring FBS. Data from 2 groups was analyzed using t-test, Mann-Whitney test and Spearman correlation by SPSS software(ver. 12. Results: Mean pH in case and control groups was 6.11 ±0.57 and 6.66±0.64, respectively. The results showed that pH of un-stimulated whole saliva in diabetic patients was significantly lower than control group(P=0.001. Conclusion: pH of un-stimulated whole saliva in diabetic patients was lower than non-diabetic persons and pH of un-stimulated whole saliva had a reverse relationship with FBS(P=0.031.

  15. Design and usability evaluation of user-centered and visual-based aids for dietary food measurement on mobile devices in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Hung; Lee, Chien-Wei; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Hsin-Yun; Yeh, Jou-Yin; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia

    2016-12-01

    We designed and developed two interactive apps interfaces for dietary food measurements on mobile devices. The user-centered designs of both the IPI (interactive photo interface) and the SBI (sketching-based interface) were evaluated. Four types of outcomes were assessed to evaluate the usability of mobile devices for dietary measurements, including accuracy, absolute weight differences, and the response time to determine the efficacy of food measurements. The IPI presented users with images of pre-determined portion sizes of a specific food and allowed users to scan and then select the most representative image matching the food that they were measuring. The SBI required users to relate the food shape to a readily available comparator (e.g., credit card) and scribble to shade in the appropriate area. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate their usability. A total of 108 participants were randomly assigned into the following three groups: the IPI (n=36) and SBI (n=38) experimental groups and the traditional life-size photo (TLP) group as the control. A total of 18 types of food items with 3-4 different weights were randomly selected for assessment by each type. The independent Chi-square test and t-test were performed for the dichotomous and continuous variable analyses, respectively. The total accuracy rates were 66.98%, 44.15%, and 72.06% for the IPI, SBI, and TLP, respectively. No significant difference was observed between the IPI and TLP, regardless of the accuracy proportion or weight differences. The SBI accuracy rates were significantly lower than the IPI and TLP accuracy rates, especially for several spooned, square cube, and sliced pie food items. The time needed to complete the operation assessment by the user was significantly lower for the IPI than for the SBI. Our study corroborates that the user-centered visual-based design of the IPI on a mobile device is comparable the TLP in terms of the usability for dietary food measurements

  16. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  17. Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program Study: a randomized, controlled prospective comparative value evaluation of 2 pressure ulcer prevention strategies in nursing and rehabilitation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Ronald J; Brown, Lynne; Chakravarthy, Debashish

    2012-10-01

    This article assesses the comparative prevention-effectiveness and economic implications of a Pressure Ulcer Prevention Program (PUPP) against standard practice of prevention using Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ]) guidelines and a mixture of commercial products. The study is a randomized, controlled, prospective cohort study with an accompanying economic evaluation. The economic evaluation is performed from the perspective of the nursing and rehabilitation centers. Two nursing and rehabilitation centers under the same quality and safety support organization. Both institutions are experiencing high nursing staff turnover and incidence of pressure ulcers (PrUs). 133 residents at risk of developing PrUs (EQUIP-for-Quality Risk Score Moderate to Very High [MVH]). All are Medicare-eligible residents with Minimum Data Set (MDS) 2.0 evaluations. The PUPP includes a strategic product bundle and decision algorithms driven by MDS 2.0 Resident Assessment Scores to assist in reducing or preventing PrUs and incontinence-associated skin conditions. The control group utilizes a different brand and assortment of commercial skin care products, briefs, pads, and mattresses, but without use of the decision algorithms driven by MDS 2.0 Resident Assessment Scores. Pressure ulcer prevention education was done for all nurses by a nurse certified in the PUPP program at the beginning and ad libitum by trained senior nursing staff at the end of the study. Comparative reduction in the incidence of nosocomial PrUs and average 6-month net cost savings per MVH-risk resident. Residents were assessed for PrU risk using EQUIP-for-Quality risk assessment algorithm based on data from their Minimum Data Set (MDS 2.0), then assigned to either the PUPP program or control group (standard practice following AHRQ guidelines). Residents were followed until discharge, death, development of PrU, or a maximum time period of 6 months. Direct

  18. Evaluation of left ventricular mass and function, lipid profile, and insulin resistance in Egyptian children with growth hormone deficiency: A single-center prospective case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growth hormone deficiency (GHD in adults is associated with a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that may contribute to an increased mortality for cardiovascular disease. In children, relatively few studies have investigated the effect of GHD and replacement therapy on cardiac performance and metabolic abnormalities that may place them at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD at an early age. Aim: This study was aimed to assess the left ventricular function, lipid profile, and degree of insulin resistance in Egyptian children with GHD before and after 1 year of GH replacement therapy. Settings and Design: Prospective case-control study, single-center study. Materials and Methods: Thirty children with short stature due to GHD were studied in comparison to 20 healthy age- and sex-matched children. All subjects were subjected to history, clinical examination, auxological assessment, and echocardiography to assess the left ventricular function. Blood samples were collected for measuring IGF-1, lipid profile (Total, LDL, HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and atherogenic index (AI, fasting blood sugar, and fasting insulin levels. In addition, basal and stimulated GH levels were measured in children with suspected GHD. Statistical Analysis Used: Student′s t-test was used for parametric data, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used for non-parametric data. Results: Total, LDL cholesterol, triglyceride, AI, and insulin were significantly higher in children with GHD than in healthy controls at baseline. After 12 months of GH replacement therapy, total, LDL cholesterol, triglyceride, AI and insulin were significantly decreased, while homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR was significantly increased compared to both pre-treatment and control values. At baseline, the left ventricular mass (LVM and left ventricular mass index (LVMi were significantly lower in GHD children than in controls. After 12 months of GH

  19. Perspectives on Strengthening Cancer Research and Control in Latin America Through Partnerships and Diplomacy: Experience of the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Frech

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the Pan American Health Organization, noncommunicable diseases, including cancer, are the leading causes of preventable and premature death in the Americas. Governments and health care systems in Latin America face numerous challenges as a result of increasing morbidity and mortality from cancer. Multiple international organizations have recognized the need for collaborative action on and technical support for cancer research and control in Latin America. The Center for Global Health at the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-CGH is one entity among many that are working in the region and has sought to develop a strategy for working in Latin America that draws on and expands the collaborative potential of engaged, skilled, and diverse partners. NCI-CGH has worked toward developing and implementing initiatives in collaboration with global partners that share the common objectives of building a global cancer research community and translating research results into evidence-informed policy and practice. Both objectives are complementary and synergistic and are additionally supported by an overarching strategic framework that is focused on partnerships and science diplomacy. This work highlights the overall strategy for NCI-CGH engagement in Latin America through partnerships and diplomacy, and highlights selected collaborative efforts that are aimed at improving cancer outcomes in the region.

  20. Inorganic nitrate as a treatment for acute heart failure: a protocol for a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot and feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Roman; Seman, Michael; Braat, Sabine; Sortino, Joshua; Allen, Jason D; Neil, Christopher J

    2017-08-08

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a frequent reason for hospitalization worldwide and effective treatment options are limited. It is known that AHF is a condition characterized by impaired vasorelaxation, together with reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, an endogenous vasodilatory compound. Supplementation of inorganic sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) is an indirect dietary source of NO, through bioconversion. It is proposed that oral sodium nitrate will favorably affect levels of circulating NO precursors (nitrate and nitrite) in AHF patients, resulting in reduced systemic vascular resistance, without significant hypotension. We propose a single center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial, evaluating the feasibility of sodium nitrate as a treatment for AHF. The primary hypothesis that sodium nitrate treatment will result in increased systemic levels of nitric oxide pre-cursors (nitrate and nitrite) in plasma, in parallel with improved vasorelaxation, as assessed by non-invasively derived systemic vascular resistance index. Additional surrogate measures relevant to the known pathophysiology of AHF will be obtained in order to assess clinical effect on dyspnea and renal function. The results of this study will provide evidence of the feasibility of this novel approach and will be of interest to the heart failure community. This trial may inform a larger study.

  1. Physical examination instead of laboratory tests for most infants born to mothers colonized with group B Streptococcus: support for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoni, Luigi; Ronfani, Luca; Da Riol, Rosalia; Demarini, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    To compare 2 approaches in the management of neonates at risk for group B Streptococcus early-onset sepsis: laboratory tests plus standardized physical examination and standardized physical examination alone. Prospective, sequential study over 2 consecutive 12-month periods, carried out in the maternity hospitals of the region Friuli-Venezia Giulia (north-eastern Italy). All term infants were included (7628 in the first period, 7611 in the second). In the first period, complete blood count and blood culture were required for all infants at risk, followed by a 48-hour period of observation with a standardized physical examination. In the second period, only standardized physical examination was performed. Study outcomes were: (1) number of neonates treated with antibiotics; and (2) time between onset of signs of possible sepsis and beginning of treatment. There was no difference between the 2 periods in the rate of maternal colonization (19.7% vs 19.8%, P = .8), or in other risk factors. The interval between onset of signs of sepsis and starting of antibiotics was not different in the 2 periods. Significantly fewer infants were treated with antibiotics in the second period (0.5% vs 1.2%, P examination seem to offer no advantage over standardized physical examination alone; the latter was associated with fewer antibiotic treatments. Our results are in agreement with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of continuous versus intermittent subglottic secretion drainage in preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia in patients requiring mechanical ventilation: A single-center randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroko; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Hayami, Hajime; Shimosaka, Mika; Tsuboi, Sayaka; Sato, Mitsunori; Takebayashi, Shigeo; Morita, Satoshi; Saito, Mari; Goto, Takahisa; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu

    2018-03-23

    Aspiration of subglottic secretion is a widely used intervention to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study aimed to compare the efficacy of continuous and intermittent subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) in preventing VAP. A single-center randomized controlled trial was conducted on adult postoperative patients who were expected to undergo mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. Primary outcome measure was incidence of VAP and secondary outcome measures were length of mechanical ventilation and intensive-care unit (ICU) stay. Fifty-nine patients received continuous SSD, while 60 patients received intermittent SSD. Of these 119 patients, 88 (74%) were excluded and 15 and 16 patients were allocated to receive continuous and intermittent SSD, respectively. VAP was detected in 4 (26.7%) and 7 (43.8%) patients in the continuous and intermittent groups, respectively, (p=0.320). The length of mechanical ventilation was significantly shorter (p=0.034) in the continuous group (99.5±47.1 h) than in the intermittent group (159.9±94.5 h). The length of ICU stay was also shorter (p=0.0097) in the continuous group (6.3±2.1 days) than the intermittent group (9.8±4.8 days). Although continuous SSD did not reduce the incidence of VAP, it reduced the length of mechanical ventilation and ICU stay when compared to intermittent SSD.

  3. Efficacy of an HIV/STI sexual risk-reduction intervention for African American adolescent girls in juvenile detention centers: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiClemente, Ralph J; Davis, Teaniese L; Swartzendruber, Andrea; Fasula, Amy M; Boyce, Lorin; Gelaude, Deborah; Gray, Simone C; Hardin, James; Rose, Eve; Carry, Monique; Sales, Jessica M; Brown, Jennifer L; Staples-Horne, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Few HIV/STI interventions exist for African American adolescent girls in juvenile detention. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of an intervention to reduce incident STIs, improve HIV-preventive behaviors, and enhance psychosocial outcomes. We conducted a randomized controlled trial among African American adolescent girls (13-17 years, N = 188) in juvenile detention from March 2011 to May 2012. Assessments occurred at baseline and 3- and 6-months post-randomization and included: audio computer-assisted self-interview, condom skills assessment, and self-collected vaginal swab to detect Chlamydia and gonorrhea. The Imara intervention included three individual-level sessions and four phone sessions; expedited partner therapy was offered to STI-positive adolescents. The comparison group received the usual care provided by the detention center: STI testing, treatment, and counseling. At the 6-month assessment (3-months post-intervention), Imara participants reported higher condom use self-efficacy (p incident Chlamydia or gonorrhea infections, condom use, or number of vaginal sex partners. Imara for detained African American adolescent girls can improve condom use skills and psychosocial outcomes; however, a critical need for interventions to reduce sexual risk remains.

  4. The IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR at human chromosome 14q32.2: hierarchical interaction and distinct functional properties as imprinting control centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Kagami

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Human chromosome 14q32.2 harbors the germline-derived primary DLK1-MEG3 intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR and the postfertilization-derived secondary MEG3-DMR, together with multiple imprinted genes. Although previous studies in cases with microdeletions and epimutations affecting both DMRs and paternal/maternal uniparental disomy 14-like phenotypes argue for a critical regulatory function of the two DMRs for the 14q32.2 imprinted region, the precise role of the individual DMR remains to be clarified. We studied an infant with upd(14pat body and placental phenotypes and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the IG-DMR alone (patient 1 and a neonate with upd(14pat body, but no placental phenotype and a heterozygous microdeletion involving the MEG3-DMR alone (patient 2. The results generated from the analysis of these two patients imply that the IG-DMR and the MEG3-DMR function as imprinting control centers in the placenta and the body, respectively, with a hierarchical interaction for the methylation pattern in the body governed by the IG-DMR. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating an essential long-range imprinting regulatory function for the secondary DMR.

  5. Roles and contributions of pharmacists in regulatory affairs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for public health emergency preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Tina R; Kim, Hye-Joo; Yu, Yon

    To provide a general description of the roles and contributions of three pharmacists from the Regulatory Affairs program (RA) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) who are involved in emergency preparedness and response activities, including the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) public health emergency. Atlanta, GA. RA consists of a staff of nine members, three of whom are pharmacists. The mission of RA is to support CDC's preparedness and emergency response activities and to ensure regulatory compliance for critical medical countermeasures against potential threats from natural, chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear events. RA was well involved in the response to the H1N1 outbreak through numerous activities, such as submitting multiple Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) requests to the Food and Drug Administration, including those for medical countermeasures to be deployed from the Strategic National Stockpile, and developing the CDC EUA website (www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/eua). RA will continue to support current and future preparedness and emergency response activities by ensuring that the appropriate regulatory mechanisms are in place for the deployment of critical medical countermeasures from the Strategic National Stockpile against threats to public health.

  6. Do soft skills predict surgical performance?: a single-center randomized controlled trial evaluating predictors of skill acquisition in virtual reality laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschuw, K; Schlosser, K; Kupietz, E; Slater, E P; Weyers, P; Hassan, I

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality (VR) training in minimal invasive surgery (MIS) is feasible in surgical residency and beneficial for the performance of MIS by surgical trainees. Research on stress-coping of surgical trainees indicates the additional impact of soft skills on VR performance in the surgical curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of structured VR training and soft skills on VR performance of trainees. The study was designed as a single-center randomized controlled trial. Fifty first-year surgical residents with limited experience in MIS ("camera navigation" in laparoscopic cholecystectomy only) were randomized for either 3 months of VR training or no training. Basic VR performance and defined soft skills (self-efficacy, stress-coping, and motivation) were assessed prior to randomization using basic modules of the VR simulator LapSim(®) and standardized psychological questionnaires. Three months after randomization VR performance was reassessed. Outcome measurement was based on the results derived from the most complex of the basic VR modules ("diathermy cutting") as the primary end point. A correlation analysis of the VR end-point performance and the psychological scores was done in both groups. Structured VR training enhanced VR performance of surgical trainees. An additional correlation to high motivational states (P 0.05). Low self-efficacy and negative stress-coping strategies seem to predict poor VR performance. However, structured training along with high motivational states is likely to balance out this impairment.

  7. The Quality Control Algorithms Used in the Process of Creating the NASA Kennedy Space Center Lightning Protection System Towers Meteorological Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John M.; Brenton, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The methodology and the results of the quality control (QC) process of the meteorological data from the Lightning Protection System (LPS) towers located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch complex 39B (LC-39B) are documented in this paper. Meteorological data are used to design a launch vehicle, determine operational constraints, and to apply defined constraints on day-of-launch (DOL). In order to properly accomplish these tasks, a representative climatological database of meteorological records is needed because the database needs to represent the climate the vehicle will encounter. Numerous meteorological measurement towers exist at KSC; however, the engineering tasks need measurements at specific heights, some of which can only be provided by a few towers. Other than the LPS towers, Tower 313 is the only tower that provides observations up to 150 m. This tower is located approximately 3.5 km from LC-39B. In addition, data need to be QC'ed to remove erroneous reports that could pollute the results of an engineering analysis, mislead the development of operational constraints, or provide a false image of the atmosphere at the tower's location.

  8. Prospective change control analysis of transfer of platelet concentrate production from a specialized stem cell transplantation unit to a blood transfusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigle, Joerg-Peter; Medinger, Michael; Stern, Martin; Infanti, Laura; Heim, Dominik; Halter, Joerg; Gratwohl, Alois; Buser, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Specialized centers claim a need for blood component production independent from the general blood transfusion services. We performed a prospective change control analysis of the transfer of platelet (PLT) production for hematological patients at the University Hospital Basel from the Department of Hematology to the Blood Transfusion Centre, Swiss Red Cross, Basel in February 2006. We wanted to demonstrate that neither quality nor transfusion outcome was affected. Production quantity and efficiency, product quality and transfusion outcome were systematically recorded. A 2-year pretransfer period was compared to a 2 year post-transfer period. After transfer production quantity at the Blood Transfusion Centre increased from 4,483 to 6,190 PLT concentrates. Production efficiency increased with a significant decrease in the rate of expired products (18% vs. 8%; P 5 × 10(11); P 5 vs. 10.7; P = 0.3) and the rate of patients with inadequate post-transfusion increment (31.5% vs. 32.1%; P = 0.6) did not differ. Supply and quality of PLT products was maintained after the transfer of PLT production to the Blood Transfusion Centre. An optimization of the supply chain process with markedly decreased expiration rates was achieved. These results argue against the need of specialized PLT production sites for selected patient groups. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Recent Experiences of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Guidance Navigation and Control (GN and C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is an independently funded NASA Program whose dedicated team of technical experts provides objective engineering and safety assessments of critical, high risk projects. NESC's strength is rooted in the diverse perspectives and broad knowledge base that add value to its products, affording customers a responsive, alternate path for assessing and preventing technical problems while protecting vital human and national resources. The Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is one of fifteen such discipline-focused teams within the NESC organization. The TDT membership is composed of GN&C specialists from across NASA and its partner organizations in other government agencies, industry, national laboratories, and universities. This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA.

  10. A Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial of Adding Brief Skill-Based Psychoeducation to Primary Needle and Syringe Programs to prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Study Protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Naserbakht

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to design an RCT in order to assess the effects of adding a brief skill-based psychoeducation (PE to routine Needle and Syringe Programs to reduce injection and high risk sexual behaviors associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection among referrals of Drop-in Centers (DICs.This was a randomized control trial with the primary hypothesis that adding skill-based PE to the routine needle syringe program (NSP provided in the DICs would be more effective in reducing injection and high risk sexual behaviors associated with HIV infection compared to the routine programs. We intended to randomly allocate 60 patients per group after obtaining informed written consent,. The intervention group receive a combination of brief psychoeducation consisting two individual sessions of skill-based education concerning blood borne viral infection, specifically HIV. The control group received the routine primary NSP services provided in DIC. Study assessments were undertaken by a psychologist at baseline, 1 and 3 months after recruitment. The primary outcome measure was the comparison of the trend of alterations in high risk sexual and injection behaviors associated with HIV infection during 3 months after the initiation of the intervention between the two groups. Secondary outcome measures included the comparison of HIV/AIDS related knowledge and client satisfaction in the participants.This paper presents a protocol for an RCT of brief skill-based PE by a trained psychologist to reduce the sexual and injection related high risk behaviors among drug users who received primary NSP services in DIC. This trial tried to investigate the efficacy of the intervention on increasing HIV/AIDS related knowledge and client satisfaction. The results of different indicators of high risk behaviors will be discussed.

  11. Interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards controllable in situ self-assembly of artificial pinning centers in RE-123 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy; Shi, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Raising critical current density J c in high temperature superconductors (HTSs) is an important strategy towards performance-cost balanced HTS technology for commercialization. The development of strong nanoscale artificial pinning centers (APCs) in HTS, such as YBa2Cu3O7 or RE-123 in general, represents one of the most exciting progressions in HTS material research in the last decade. Significantly raised J c has been demonstrated in APC/RE-123 nanocomposites by enhanced pinning on magnetic vortices in magnetic fields towards that demanded in practical applications. Among other processes, strain-mediated self-organization has been explored extensively for in situ formation of the APCs based on fundamental physics design rules. The desire in controlling the morphology, dimension, orientation, and concentration of APCs has led to a fundamental question on how strains interact in determining APCs at a macroscopic scale. Answering this question demands an interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards a thorough understanding of fundamental physics governing the strain-mediated self-organization of the APCs in the APC/RE-123 nanocomposites. Such an understanding is the key for a leap forward from the traditionally empirical method to materials-by-design to enable an optimal APC landscape to be achieved in epitaxial films of APC/YBCO nanocomposites under a precise guidance of fundamental physics. The paper intends to provide a review of recent progress made in the controllable generation of APCs using the interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach. The emphasis will be given to the understanding so far achieved using such an approach on the collective effect of the strain field on the morphology, dimension, and orientation of APCs in epitaxial APC/RE-123 nanocomposite films.

  12. Reliability and Repetition Effect of the Center of Pressure and Kinematics Parameters That Characterize Trunk Postural Control During Unstable Sitting Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbado, David; Moreside, Janice; Vera-Garcia, Francisco J

    2017-03-01

    Although unstable seat methodology has been used to assess trunk postural control, the reliability of the variables that characterize it remains unclear. To analyze reliability and learning effect of center of pressure (COP) and kinematic parameters that characterize trunk postural control performance in unstable seating. The relationships between kinematic and COP parameters also were explored. Test-retest reliability design. Biomechanics laboratory setting. Twenty-three healthy male subjects. Participants volunteered to perform 3 sessions at 1-week intervals, each consisting of five 70-second balancing trials. A force platform and a motion capture system were used to measure COP and pelvis, thorax, and spine displacements. Reliability was assessed through standard error of measurement (SEM) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 2,1 ) using 3 methods: (1) comparing the last trial score of each day; (2) comparing the best trial score of each day; and (3) calculating the average of the three last trial scores of each day. Standard deviation and mean velocity were calculated to assess balance performance. Although analyses of variance showed some differences in balance performance between days, these differences were not significant between days 2 and 3. Best result and average methods showed the greatest reliability. Mean velocity of the COP showed high reliability (0.71 reliability (0.37 reliability using the average method (0.62 reliability than kinematics ones. Specifically, mean velocity of COP showed the highest test-retest reliability, especially for the average and best methods. Although correlations between COP and mean joint angular velocity were high, the few relationships between COP and kinematic standard deviation suggest different postural behavior can lead to a similar balance performance during an unstable sitting protocol. III. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Knowledge and implementation of the National Malaria Control Programme among health-care workers in primary health-care centers in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitope Wunmi Ladi-Akinyemi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of capacity to implement programs effectively and low public education about malaria is some of the factors that Nigeria governments must address to effectively combat malaria. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed the knowledge and implementation of the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP among health-care workers in the primary health-care centers in Ogun state. Three hundred and twenty-five respondents were recruited into the study using cluster sampling method. A pretested self-administered questionnaire was used to collect necessary information. Analysis and statistical calculation was done using SPSS version 20.0. Relationships between categorical variables were tested using Chi-square test with P value at 0.05. Results: One hundred and twenty-five (38.5% of the respondents were from Ado-odo/Ota local government areas (LGAs, 120 (36.9% of the respondents were from Ijebu-ode LGA and 80 (24.6% were from Ewekoro LGA. About 37.8% of the respondents were within age range of 45–54 years, with mean of 41.7 ± 8.5. Over 90% of the respondents knew the mode of transmission of malaria, <50% of them could identified case definition of simple and complicated malaria. Large percentage of the respondents knew the signs and symptoms of simple malaria. The respondents who were older (P = 0.004 with more than 15-year work experience (P = 0.006 had good knowledge score of the NMCP. Conclusion: Knowledge and implementation of NMCP by health-care workers in some of the LGAs in this study was inadequate. Regular visit to the health facilities, especially those in the remote areas by the staff of malaria control unit were recommended.

  14. The Effect of Adding Comorbidities to Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Central-Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Risk-Adjustment Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah S; Leekha, Surbhi; Magder, Laurence S; Pineles, Lisa; Anderson, Deverick J; Trick, William E; Woeltje, Keith F; Kaye, Keith S; Stafford, Kristen; Thom, Kerri; Lowe, Timothy J; Harris, Anthony D

    2017-09-01

    BACKGROUND Risk adjustment is needed to fairly compare central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates between hospitals. Until 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) methodology adjusted CLABSI rates only by type of intensive care unit (ICU). The 2017 CDC models also adjust for hospital size and medical school affiliation. We hypothesized that risk adjustment would be improved by including patient demographics and comorbidities from electronically available hospital discharge codes. METHODS Using a cohort design across 22 hospitals, we analyzed data from ICU patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2013. Demographics and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) discharge codes were obtained for each patient, and CLABSIs were identified by trained infection preventionists. Models adjusting only for ICU type and for ICU type plus patient case mix were built and compared using discrimination and standardized infection ratio (SIR). Hospitals were ranked by SIR for each model to examine and compare the changes in rank. RESULTS Overall, 85,849 ICU patients were analyzed and 162 (0.2%) developed CLABSI. The significant variables added to the ICU model were coagulopathy, paralysis, renal failure, malnutrition, and age. The C statistics were 0.55 (95% CI, 0.51-0.59) for the ICU-type model and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.60-0.69) for the ICU-type plus patient case-mix model. When the hospitals were ranked by adjusted SIRs, 10 hospitals (45%) changed rank when comorbidity was added to the ICU-type model. CONCLUSIONS Our risk-adjustment model for CLABSI using electronically available comorbidities demonstrated better discrimination than did the CDC model. The CDC should strongly consider comorbidity-based risk adjustment to more accurately compare CLABSI rates across hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1019-1024.

  15. Saccharomyces boulardii for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adult hospitalized patients: a single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoni, Pietro; Riva, Alessia; Bellatorre, Alessandro Giacco; Amigoni, Maria; Redaelli, Elena; Ronchetti, Anna; Stefani, Mariangela; Tironi, Rosangela; Molteni, Edoardo Ennio; Conte, Dario; Casazza, Giovanni; Colli, Agostino

    2012-06-01

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) are common complications of antibiotic use. Probiotics were effective in preventing AAD and CDAD in several randomized controlled trials. This study was aimed at testing the effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on the occurrence of AAD and CDAD in hospitalized patients. A single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial was performed. Patients being prescribed antibiotics or on antibiotic therapy for boulardii or an indistinguishable placebo twice daily within 48 h of beginning antibiotic therapy, continued treatment for 7 days after antibiotic withdrawal, and were followed for 12 weeks after ending antibiotic treatment. Of 562 consecutive eligible patients, 275 patients aged 79.2 ± 9.8 years (134 on placebo) were randomized and 204 aged 78.4 ± 10.0 years (98 on placebo) completed the follow-up. AAD developed in 13.3% (13/98) of the patients receiving placebo and in 15.1% (16/106) of those receiving S. boulardii (odds ratio for S. boulardii vs. placebo, 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.53-2.56). Five cases of CDAD occurred, 2 in the placebo group (2.0%) and 3 in the probiotic group (2.8%; odds ratio for S. boulardii vs. placebo, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.23-8.55). There was no difference in mortality rates (12.7% vs. 15.6%, P=0.60). In elderly hospitalized patients, S. boulardii was not effective in preventing the development of AAD.

  16. Recruitment and enrollment for the simultaneous conduct of 2 randomized controlled trials for patients with subacute and chronic low back pain at a CAM research center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondras, Maria A; Long, Cynthia R; Haan, Andrea G; Spencer, Lori Byrd; Meeker, William C

    2008-10-01

    To describe recruitment and enrollment experiences of 2 low back pain (LBP) randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Descriptive report. Chiropractic research center in the midwest United States that is not a fee-for-service clinic. Both trials enrolled participants with subacute or chronic LBP without neurologic signs who had not received spinal manipulative care during the previous month. For study 1 we screened 1940 potential participants to enroll 192 participants (89 women and 103 men), mean age 40.0 +/- 9.4 years (range, 21-54 years). For study 2 we screened 1849 potential participants to enroll 240 participants (105 women and 135 men) at least 55 years old (mean, 63.1 +/- 6.7 years). Study 1 randomly assigned participants to 2 weeks of 2 different chiropractic techniques or a wait list control group. Study 2 randomly assigned participants to 6 weeks of 2 different chiropractic techniques or medical care consisting of 3 provider visits for medications. Recruitment source costs and yield, and baseline characteristics of enrolled versus nonparticipants were recorded. We conducted 3789 telephone screens for both trials to enroll 432 (11%) participants, at a cost in excess of $156,000 for recruitment efforts. The cost per call for all callers averaged $41, ranging from $4 to $300 based on recruitment method; for enrolled participants, the cost per call was $361, ranging from $33 to $750. Direct mail efforts accounted for 62% of all callers, 57% for enrolled participants, and had the second lowest cost per call for recruitment efforts. It is important that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research can be successfully conducted at CAM institutions. However, the costs associated with recruitment efforts for studies conducted at CAM institutions may be higher than expected and many self-identified participants are users of the CAM therapy. Therefore, strategies for efficient recruitment methods and targeting nonusers of CAM therapies should be developed early

  17. Evaluation of the New Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ventilator-Associated Event Module and Criteria in Critically Ill Children in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosifidis, Elias; Chochliourou, Elpis; Violaki, Asimenia; Chorafa, Elisavet; Psachna, Stavroula; Roumpou, Afroditi; Sdougka, Maria; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the new adult Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) ventilator-associated event (VAE) module in critically ill children and compare with the traditionally used CDC definition for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). DESIGN Retrospective observational study of mechanically ventilated children in a pediatric intensive care unit in Greece January 1-December 31, 2011. METHODS Assessment of new adult CDC VAE module including 3 definition tiers: ventilator-associated condition (VAC), infection-related VAC, and possible/probable ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAE-VAP); comparison with traditional CDC criteria for clinically defined pneumonia in mechanically ventilated children (PNEU-VAP). We recorded Pediatric Risk of Mortality score at admission (PRISM III), number of ventilator-days, and outcome. RESULTS Among 119 patients with mechanical ventilation (median [range] number of ventilator-days, 7 [1-183]), 19 patients experienced VAC. Criteria for VAE-VAP were fulfilled in 12 of 19 patients with VAC (63%). Children with either VAC or VAE-VAP were on ventilation more days than patients without these conditions (16.5 vs 5 d, P=.0006 and 18 vs 5 d, PVAC (31.6%), than the patients without new VAE-VAP (14%, P=.007) or VAC (15%, P=.1), respectively. No significant association was found between PNEU-VAP and death. Incidences of PNEU-VAP and VAE-VAP were similar, but the agreement was poor. CONCLUSIONS VAE-VAP and PNEU-VAP found similar prevalence in critically ill children but with poor agreement. However, excess of death was significantly associated only with VAE-VAP. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016:1-5.

  18. Blood glucose control in diabetes patients seen in primary health care centers Controle glicêmico em pacientes diabéticos atendidos em centros de atenção primária à saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília F Assunção

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated to poor glycemic control among diabetic patients seen at primary health care centers. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 372 diabetic patients attending 32 primary health care centers in southern Brazil. Data on three hierarchical levels of health unit infrastructure, medical care and patient characteristics were collected. RESULTS: The frequency of poor glycemic control was 50.5%. Multivariate analysis (multilevel method showed that patients with body mass indexes below 27 kg/m², patients on oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin, and patients diagnosed as diabetic over five years prior to the interview were more likely to present poor glycemic control when compared to their counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Given the hierarchical data structuring, all associations found suggest that factors associated to hyperglycemia are related to patient-level characteristics.OBJETIVO: Identificar fatores associados à falta de controle glicêmico em pacientes diabéticos atendidos em centros de atenção primária à saúde. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal em amostra de 372 pacientes diabéticos atendidos nos 32 centros de atenção primária de uma cidade do sul do Brasil. Foram coletados dados ordenados em três níveis hierárquicos: estrutura das unidades de saúde, características do processo do cuidado médico e pacientes diabéticos. RESULTADOS: A freqüência de falta de controle glicêmico foi de 50,5%. A análise multivariada (método multinível mostrou que pacientes com Índice de Massa Corporal abaixo de 27 kg/m², em tratamento medicamentoso e com mais de cinco anos de diagnóstico de diabetes, tiveram maior probabilidade de apresentar hiperglicemia quando comparados a seus pares. CONCLUSÕES: Considerando a estrutura hierárquica dos dados, todas as associações encontradas sugerem que os fatores associados à hiperglicemia são relacionados a características dos pacientes.

  19. The reflection on the practice of workspace design: from conception to execution of control center; A reflexao sobre a pratica de projetos de espacos de trabalho: da concepcao a execucao de um centro de controle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, Carolina S.; Duarte, Francisco J.C.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia de Producao; Maia, Nora C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lannes Junior, Ayr [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to present and distinguish the contribution of ergonomics in control rooms design. The methodology that was utilized in the project analysis of a recently built control center, reflection on practice, allows to evidence the characteristics of the ergonomics approach and of the project management that have strongly affect the final result. On the basis of this reflection, the lessons learned during the various stages of the project, from the preliminary studies to the work execution, are presented, with special emphasis on: build up of requirements and layout characteristics; management of different logics, integrating the various actors - users and designers - involved and leveling information among them throughout the whole process; organization of users participation and simulation of working conditions; specification of furniture, linings and equipment, with implementation of new technologies; attendance to the work execution site, due to the existing recreations in that stage as well as the impact of the changes on the control room future activity; and timing consideration for analyzing reference situations at the beginning of the project, and for social construction with the actors during project development. (author)

  20. Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing Every Other Day on Prevention of Hospital-Acquired Infections in the Surgical ICU: A Single-Center, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Joshua T; Ashton, Carol M; Bui, Lan N; Pham, Vy P; Shirkey, Beverly A; Blackshear, Jolene E; Bersamin, Jimmy B; Pomer, Rubie May L; Johnson, Michael L; Magtoto, Audrey D; Butler, Michelle O; Tran, Shirley K; Sanchez, Leah R; Patel, Jessica G; Ochoa, Robert A; Hai, Shaikh A; Denison, Karen I; Graviss, Edward A; Wray, Nelda P

    2016-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that compared with daily soap and water bathing, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate bathing every other day for up to 28 days decreases the risk of hospital-acquired catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection in surgical ICU patients. This was a single-center, pragmatic, randomized trial. Patients and clinicians were aware of treatment-group assignment; investigators who determined outcomes were blinded. Twenty-four-bed surgical ICU at a quaternary academic medical center. Adults admitted to the surgical ICU from July 2012 to May 2013 with an anticipated surgical ICU stay for 48 hours or more were included. Patients were randomized to bathing with 2% chlorhexidine every other day alternating with soap and water every other day (treatment arm) or to bathing with soap and water daily (control arm). The primary endpoint was a composite outcome of catheter-associated urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated pneumonia, incisional surgical site infection, and primary bloodstream infection. Of 350 patients randomized, 24 were excluded due to prior enrollment in this trial and one withdrew consent. Therefore, 325 were analyzed (164 soap and water versus 161 chlorhexidine). Patients acquired 53 infections. Compared with soap and water bathing, chlorhexidine bathing every other day decreased the risk of acquiring infections (hazard ratio = 0.555; 95% CI, 0.309-0.997; p = 0.049). For patients bathed with soap and water versus chlorhexidine, counts of incident hospital-acquired infections were 14 versus 7 for catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 13 versus 8 for ventilator-associated pneumonia, 6 versus 3 for incisional surgical site infections, and 2 versus 0 for primary bloodstream infection; the effect was consistent across all infections. The absolute risk reduction for acquiring a hospital-acquired infection was 9.0% (95% CI, 1.5-16.4%; p

  1. Cumulative occupational lumbar load and lumbar disc disease – results of a German multi-center case-control study (EPILIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaelis Martina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The to date evidence for a dose-response relationship between physical workload and the development of lumbar disc diseases is limited. We therefore investigated the possible etiologic relevance of cumulative occupational lumbar load to lumbar disc diseases in a multi-center case-control study. Methods In four study regions in Germany (Frankfurt/Main, Freiburg, Halle/Saale, Regensburg, patients seeking medical care for pain associated with clinically and radiologically verified lumbar disc herniation (286 males, 278 females or symptomatic lumbar disc narrowing (145 males, 206 females were prospectively recruited. Population control subjects (453 males and 448 females were drawn from the regional population registers. Cases and control subjects were between 25 and 70 years of age. In a structured personal interview, a complete occupational history was elicited to identify subjects with certain minimum workloads. On the basis of job task-specific supplementary surveys performed by technical experts, the situational lumbar load represented by the compressive force at the lumbosacral disc was determined via biomechanical model calculations for any working situation with object handling and load-intensive postures during the total working life. For this analysis, all manual handling of objects of about 5 kilograms or more and postures with trunk inclination of 20 degrees or more are included in the calculation of cumulative lumbar load. Confounder selection was based on biologic plausibility and on the change-in-estimate criterion. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated separately for men and women using unconditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age, region, and unemployment as major life event (in males or psychosocial strain at work (in females, respectively. To further elucidate the contribution of past physical workload to the development of lumbar disc diseases, we performed lag

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of pollution control measures via the occurrence of DDTs and HCHs in wet deposition of an urban center, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling-Chuan; Bao, Lian-Jun; Li, Shao-Meng; Tao, Shu; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2017-04-01

    Wet deposition is not only a mechanism for removing atmospheric pollutants, but also a process which reflects loadings of atmospheric pollutants. Our previous study on wet deposition examined the effectiveness of short-term control measures on atmospheric particulate pollution, which were partly effective for organic pollutants of current input sources. In the present study, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), representative of legacy contaminants, were measured in the same samples collected throughout the entire year of 2010 in Guangzhou, a large urban center in South China. Concentrations of ∑DDT (sum of o,p' and p,p'-DDT, o,p' and p,p'-DDE, o,p' and p,p'-DDD, and p,p'-DDMU) and ∑HCH (sum of α-, β-, γ-, and δ-HCH) in wet deposition were in the ranges of nd-69 (average: 1.8 ng L -1 ) and nd-150 ng L -1 (average: 5.1 ng L -1 ), respectively. In addition, the results of source diagnostics and backward air mass trajectories appeared to suggest the transport of antifouling paint derived DDTs from the coastal region off South China to Guangzhou. The combined wet and dry deposition flux of ∑HCH in the first quarter (January to March) was greater than that in the fourth quarter (October to December), while those of ∑DDT were comparable in the first and fourth quarters. Similar trends were also observed for the concentrations of ∑HCH and ∑DDT in aerosol samples. These results suggested the short-term pollution control measures implemented during the 16th Asian Games and 10th Asian Para Games (held in November and December 2010, respectively) did not work well for DDTs. The reduced input of HCHs during the fourth quarter was probably associated with the strict ban on lindane for food safety, which also exposed the weakness of control measures focusing mainly on the removal of atmospheric particulate matter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rehabilitation Engineering Center with Research in Controls and Interfaces for Severely Disabled People. Progress Report for Third Year Grant, September 30, 1980-September 29, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Maurice A.

    The Rehabilitation Engineering Center (Palo Alto, California) has developed a wide range of patient services which provide assistance to the disabled community in northern California and various research activities which have had impact on the disabled population nationally. The Center has three philosophical goals: to assist each child toward as…

  4. Final Technical Report. Factors Controlling In Situ Uranium and Technetium Bio-Reduction and Reoxidation at the NABIR Field Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Jonathan D. Istok , Oregon State University; Dr. Lee Krumholz, University of Oklahoma; Dr. James McKinley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Dr. Baohua Gu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2006-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to better understand factors and processes controlling microbially-mediated reduction and reoxidation of U and Tc in the unconsolidated residuum overlying the Nolichucky shale at the Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Project activities were designed to test the following hypotheses: (1) The small rates of denitrification and U bio-reduction observed in laboratory incubations of sediments from FRC Area 1 at low pH (< 5) are due to the presence of high concentrations of toxic metals (especially Al and Ni). Rates of Tc reduction will also be small at low pH in the presence of high concentrations of toxic metals. (2) In situ rates of U and perhaps Tc bio-reduction can be increased by increasing system pH and thus precipitating toxic metals from solution. (3) In situ rates of U and Tc bio-reduction can be increased by the addition of humic substances, which complex toxic metals such as Al and Ni, buffer pH, and serve as electron shuttles to facilitate U and Tc reduction. (4) Microbially-reduced U and Tc are rapidly oxidized in the presence of high concentrations of NO3- and the denitrification intermediates NO2-, N2O, and NO. (5) An electron-donor-addition strategy (type and form of donor, with or without pH adjustment and with or without the co-addition of humic substances) can be devised to reduce U and Tc concentrations for an extended period of time in low pH groundwater in the presence of high concentrations of NO3-, Al, and Ni. This strategy operates by removing or complexing these components of FRC groundwater to allow the subsequent reduction of U(VI) and Tc(VII)

  5. A study of the patients suffering from tuberculosis and tuberculosis-diabetes comorbidity in Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program Centers of Northern Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM is recognized as an important risk factor to tuberculosis (TB. India has high TB burden, along with rising DM prevalence. Aim: This study was conducted to document the coexistence of DM and TB in persons with established TB under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program. Type of Study: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive observational study conducted at selected Directly Observed Therapy center in Gwalior North Central India. Materials and Methods: A total of 550 patients with confirmed diagnosis of TB and on treatment were recruited. The study participants were screened for DM and diagnoses were made on the basis of the World Health Organization criteria. Clinical parameters were compared between persons with DM and those without DM. Results: DM/TB co-morbidity was noted in 85 individuals and these made up 15.4% of the study population. The mean age was higher in DM patients with TB (43.4 ± 15.4 vs. 33.1 ± 16.2 years, P = 0.000; the mean duration of symptoms of TB with DM was more (124 ± 16.4 vs. 107.49 ± 10.3 days. Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that increasing age, positive family history of diabetes, sedentary occupation, and presence of pulmonary TB were significantly associated with diabetes among TB patients. Conclusions: Diabetes is an important co-morbid feature to be sought in patients with TB. This study re-echo the need to raise awareness on screening for DM in persons with TB.

  6. Cost of Operating Central Cancer Registries and Factors That Affect Cost: Findings From an Economic Evaluation of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Program of Cancer Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangka, Florence K L; Subramanian, Sujha; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Weir, Hannah K; Trebino, Diana; Babcock, Frances; Ewing, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) evaluated the economics of the National Program of Cancer Registries to provide the CDC, the registries, and policy makers with the economics evidence-base to make optimal decisions about resource allocation. Cancer registry budgets are under increasing threat, and, therefore, systematic assessment of the cost will identify approaches to improve the efficiencies of this vital data collection operation and also justify the funding required to sustain registry operations. To estimate the cost of cancer registry operations and to assess the factors affecting the cost per case reported by National Program of Cancer Registries-funded central cancer registries. We developed a Web-based cost assessment tool to collect 3 years of data (2009-2011) from each National Program of Cancer Registries-funded registry for all actual expenditures for registry activities (including those funded by other sources) and factors affecting registry operations. We used a random-effects regression model to estimate the impact of various factors on cost per cancer case reported. The cost of reporting a cancer case varied across the registries. Central cancer registries that receive high-quality data from reporting sources (as measured by the percentage of records passing automatic edits) and electronic data submissions, and those that collect and report on a large volume of cases had significantly lower cost per case. The volume of cases reported had a large effect, with low-volume registries experiencing much higher cost per case than medium- or high-volume registries. Our results suggest that registries operate with substantial fixed or semivariable costs. Therefore, sharing fixed costs among low-volume contiguous state registries, whenever possible, and centralization of certain processes can result in economies of scale. Approaches to improve quality of data submitted and increasing electronic reporting can also reduce cost.

  7. Item response theory analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health-Related Quality of Life (CDC HRQOL) items in adults with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielenz, Thelma J; Callahan, Leigh F; Edwards, Michael C

    2016-03-12

    Examine the feasibility of performing an item response theory (IRT) analysis on two of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention health-related quality of life (CDC HRQOL) modules - the 4-item Healthy Days Core Module (HDCM) and the 5-item Healthy days Symptoms Module (HDSM). Previous principal components analyses confirm that the two scales both assess a mix of mental (CDC-MH) and physical health (CDC-PH). The purpose is to conduct item response theory (IRT) analysis on the CDC-MH and CDC-PH scales separately. 2182 patients with self-reported or physician-diagnosed arthritis completed a cross-sectional survey including HDCM and HDSM items. Besides global health, the other 8 items ask the number of days that some statement was true; we chose to recode the data into 8 categories based on observed clustering. The IRT assumptions were assessed using confirmatory factor analysis and the data could be modeled using an unidimensional IRT model. The graded response model was used for IRT analyses and CDC-MH and CDC-PH scales were analyzed separately in flexMIRT. The IRT parameter estimates for the five-item CDC-PH all appeared reasonable. The three-item CDC-MH did not have reasonable parameter estimates. The CDC-PH scale is amenable to IRT analysis but the existing The CDC-MH scale is not. We suggest either using the 4-item Healthy Days Core Module (HDCM) and the 5-item Healthy days Symptoms Module (HDSM) as they currently stand or the CDC-PH scale alone if the primary goal is to measure physical health related HRQOL.

  8. Development of Methodologies for Technology Deployment for Advanced Outage Control Centers that Improve Outage Coordination, Problem Resolution and Outage Risk Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shawn St. Germain; Ronald Farris; Heather Medeman

    2013-09-01

    schedule depends upon the performance of the outage management organization. During an outage, the outage control center (OCC) is the temporary command center for outage managers and provides several critical functions for the successful execution of the outage schedule. Essentially, the OCC functions to facilitate information inflow, assist outage management in processing information and to facilitate the dissemination of information to stakeholders. Currently, outage management activities primarily rely on telephone communication, face to face reports of status and periodic briefings in the OCC. Much of the information displayed in OCCs is static and out of date requiring an evaluation to determine if it is still valid. Several advanced communication and collaboration technologies have shown promise for facilitating the information flow into, across and out of the OCC. Additionally, advances in the areas of mobile worker technologies, computer based procedures and electronic work packages can be leveraged to improve the availability of real time status to outage managers.

  9. Cognitive and organizational ergonomics in the transition of the new integrated center of control of an oil refinery: human reliability and administration of changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, Lucy M S; Puquirre, Magda S E S; Buso, Sandro A; Ogasawara, Érika L; Marcon Passero, Carolina R; Bianchi, Marcos C

    2012-01-01

    The conception of a product is closely tied to its adaptation level to the users. In this view, designers are increasingly oriented to survey the needs and features of the users. This paper aims at developing a diagnosis of employees working in high-complexity activities in a petrochemical company, in light of the physical and operating changes in the Integrated Center of Control; assessing the reception sensibility to changes; assessing the cognitive pattern of the group; and making suggestions that might eliminate or minimize the difficulties in the transition process of the change, in order to reduce the adaptation period. The field of study comprised 111 production, transfer and storage operators, forming 5 groups of desktop activities. The stages of the study followed the following flow: survey of the prescribed tasks and organizational structure; Concentrated Attention test; application of the Work and Disease Risks Inventory (ITRA, Portuguese acronym); and structured psychological interview. The ITRA results pointed to a serious cognitive cost (3.83) for all five groups, this being the largest intervention focus. The items: division of task contents (3.52), social professional relationships (2.93), quality of the physical environment (2.91), physical cost (3.24), emotional cost (2.71), freedom of expression (3.77), professional fulfillment (3.41); experience and suffering (2.75), lack of recognition (2.18) and physical injuries (2.07) were considered critical. Meanwhile, social damages (1.64) and psychological injuries (1.35) are bearable. As to the Concentrated Attention test, most workers registered average level. In the individual interviews, workers showed that larger involvement in the process of physical, organizational and operational change in the desktops and on field works was required, as well as the follow up of implementations, so as to reduce the adaptation process and prevent rework (furniture, equipment, noise, form of communication with the

  10. Psychometric properties of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health-Related Quality of Life (CDC HRQOL items in adults with arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeVellis Robert

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring health-related quality of life (HRQOL is important in arthritis and the SF-36v2 is the current state-of-the-art. It is only emerging how well the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC HRQOL measures HRQOL for people with arthritis. This study's purpose is to assess the psychometric properties of the 9-item CDC HRQOL (4-item Healthy Days Core Module and 5-item Healthy Days Symptoms Module in an arthritis sample using the SF-36v2 as a comparison. Methods In Fall 2002, a cross-sectional study acquired survey data including the CDC HRQOL and SF-36v2 from 2 North Carolina populations of adult patients reporting osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia; 2182 (52% responded. The first item of both the CDC HRQOL and the SF-36v2 was general health (GEN. All 8 other CDC HRQOL items ask for the number of days in the past 30 days that respondents experienced various aspects of HRQOL. Exploratory principal components analyses (PCA were conducted on each sample and the combined samples of the CDC HRQOL. The multitrait-multimethod matrix (MTMM was used to compute correlations between each trait (physical health and mental health and between each method of measurement (CDC HRQOL and SF36v2. The relative contribution of the CDC HRQOL in predicting the physical component summary (PCS and the mental component summary (MCS was determined by regressing the CDC HRQOL items on the PCS and MCS scales. Results All 9 CDC HRQOL items loaded primarily onto 1 factor (explaining 57% of the item variance representing a reasonable solution for capturing overall HRQOL. After rotation a 2 factor interpretation for the 9 items was clear, with 4 items capturing physical health (physical, activity, pain, and energy days and 3 items capturing mental health (mental, depression, and anxiety days. All of the loadings for these two factors were greater than 0.70. The CDC HRQOL physical health factor correlated with PCS (r = -.78, p 2

  11. Yukmijihwang-tang for the treatment of xerostomia in the elderly: study protocol for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-center trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gajin; Park, Jae-Woo; Ko, Seok-Jae; Son, Jihee; Seon, Jongki; Kim, Juyeon; Kim, Seulki; Yeo, Inkwon; Ryu, Bongha; Kim, Jinsung

    2013-09-03

    Xerostomia, a subjective sense of dry mouth, is not generally regarded a disease despite its high prevalence among the elderly, and therefore continues to impair affected patients' quality of life. In traditional Korean medicine, 'Yin-Deficiency' has been implicated in the pathogenesis of xerostomia among the elderly. Yukmijihwang-tang is a famous herbal prescription used to relieve 'Yin-Deficiency', and reportedly has antioxidant effects; therefore, it is postulated that Yukmijihwang-tang can be used to treat xerostomia in the elderly. However, to our knowledge, no clinical trial has been conducted on the effects of Yukmijihwang-tang on xerostomia. Thus, we designed a randomized clinical trial to investigate the effects and safety of Yukmijihwang-tang on xerostomia in the elderly. In addition, we will clarify the aforementioned assumption that 'Yin-Deficiency' is the major cause of xerostomia in the elderly by identifying a correlation between xerostomia and 'Yin-Deficiency'. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial will be carried out at two centers: Kyung Hee University Korean Medicine Hospital and Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong. We will recruit 96 subjects aged 60-80 years who have experienced xerostomia for 3 months prior to participation. Subjects who present with score >40 on the visual analogue scale for xerostomia and unstimulated salivary flow rate under 0.3mL/min will be included and the randomization will be carried out by an independent statistician by using a random number creation program. The subjects and all researchers except the statistician will be blinded to the group assignment. Yukmijihwang-tang or placebo will be administered to each group for 8 weeks. The primary outcome is change in the scores for the visual analogue scale for xerostomia and the dry mouth symptom questionnaire from 0 to 8 weeks. It will be assessed whether Yukmijihwang-tang can be used as a new herbal treatment for xerostomia in the elderly by

  12. Trauma patients meeting both Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's definitions for ventilator-associated pneumonia had worse outcomes than those meeting only one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Duraid; Griffin, Russell; Swain, Thomas; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Camins, Bernard

    2017-08-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) replaced its old definition for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) with the ventilator-associated events algorithm in 2013. We sought to compare the outcome of trauma patients meeting the definitions for VAP in the two modules. Trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injuries and with at least 2 d of ventilator support were identified from the trauma registry from 2013 to 2014. VAP was determined using two methods: (1) VAP as defined by the "old," clinically based NHSN definition and (2) possible VAP as defined by the updated "new" NHSN definition. Cohen's kappa statistic was determined to compare the two definitions for VAP. To compare demographic and clinical outcomes, the chi-square and Student's t-tests were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. From 2013 to 2014, there were 1165 trauma patients admitted who had at least 2 d of ventilator support. Seventy-eight patients (6.6%) met the "new" NHSN definition for possible VAP, 361 patients (30.9%) met the "old" definition of VAP, and 68 patients (5.8%) met both definitions. The kappa statistic between VAP as defined by the "new" and "old" definitions was 0.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.27). There were no differences in age, gender, race, or injury severity score when comparing patients who met the different definitions. Those satisfying both definitions had longer ventilator support days (P = 0.0009), intensive care unit length of stay (LOS; P = 0.0003), and hospital LOS (P = 0.0344) when compared with those meeting only one definition. There was no difference in mortality for those meeting both and those meeting the old definition for VAP; patients meeting both definitions had higher respiratory rate at arrival (P = 0.0178). There was no difference in mortality between patients meeting the "old" and "new" NHSN definitions for VAP; those who met "both" definitions had longer

  13. Chinese herbal Pulian ointment in treating psoriasis vulgaris of blood-heat syndrome: a multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nuo; Zhao, Wenbin; Xing, Jianmin; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Guangzhong; Zhang, Yunbi; Li, Yuanwen; Liu, Wali; Shi, Fei; Bai, Yanping

    2017-05-15

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a long history in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris. We aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal Pulian ointment in treating psoriasis vulgaris of blood-heat syndrome. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Participants with psoriasis vulgaris of blood-heat syndrome were blinded and randomized to receive Pulian ointment or placebo ointment twice daily for 4 weeks, with follow-up 8 weeks after treatment. Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) scores, severity of each symptom and area of skin lesion and quality of life were assessed at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks. Adverse events were recorded during the study. SAS 9.4 software and SPSS 17.0 software was applied for data analysis. A total of 300 participants with psoriasis vulgaris of blood-heat syndrome were assessed for eligibility, and 294 were randomly assigned to the Pulian ointment and placebo group from six study centers. Full analysis set (FAS): after 4 weeks of treatment, there were significant differences between groups in PASI score and the separate score of skin lesion area, favoring Pulian ointment group (P  0.05). Per protocol set (PPS): There was no statistically significant difference in PASI score and separate score of each symptom and area of skin lesion between two groups (P > 0.05). Quality of life measured by Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) improved after treatment in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). After being followed up for 8 weeks, the total relapse rates of the Pulian Ointment group and placebo group were 5.88 and 8.45%, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant between the two groups (P > 0.05). No adverse event was observed in both groups throughout the study. Pulian Ointment seems effective and well tolerated in improving the

  14. Management of Adult Syphilis: Key Questions to Inform the 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Khalil G

    2015-12-15

    A panel of experts generated 8 "key questions" in the management of adult syphilis. A systematic literature review was conducted and tables of evidence were constructed to answer these important questions. Penicillin is the drug of choice to treat syphilis. Doxycycline to treat early and late latent syphilis is an acceptable alternate option if penicillin cannot be used. There is no added benefit to enhanced antimicrobial therapy when treating human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons with syphilis. If a patient misses a dose of penicillin in a course of weekly therapy for late syphilis, clinical experience suggests that an interval of 10-14 days between doses might be acceptable before restarting the sequence of injections. Pharmacologic considerations suggest that an interval of 7-9 days between doses, if feasible, may be more optimal. Missed doses are not acceptable for pregnant women. A cerebrospinal fluid examination to diagnose neurosyphilis is recommended in persons diagnosed with tertiary syphilis (eg, cardiovascular syphilis or late benign syphilis), persons with neurological signs or symptoms consistent with neurosyphilis, and asymptomatic persons whose serological titers do not decline appropriately following recommended therapy and in whom reinfection is ruled out. Infection and reinfection rates, particularly among men who have sex with men, are high. Frequent serological screening of this population appears to be the most cost-efficient intervention. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues to recommend the use of the traditional rapid plasma reagin-based screening algorithm. The positive predictive value for syphilis associated with an isolated unconfirmed reactive treponemal chemiluminescence assay or enzyme immunoassay is low if the epidemiological risk and clinical probability for syphilis are low. Among pregnant women with serodiscordant serologies (positive treponemal tests and a negative nontreponemal test), the risk of

  15. Resistance patterns and outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired pneumonia. Validation of European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classification of multidrug resistant organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Torres, Antonio; Rinaudo, Mariano; Terraneo, Silvia; de Rosa, Francesca; Ramirez, Paula; Diaz, Emili; Fernández-Barat, Laia; Li Bassi, Gian Luigi; Ferrer, Miquel

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial resistance has become a major public health problem. To validate the definition of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) based on the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classification. Prospective, observational study in six medical and surgical Intensive-Care-Units (ICU) of a University hospital. Three-hundred-and-forty-three patients with ICU-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP) were prospectively enrolled, 140 patients had no microbiological confirmation (41%), 82 patients (24%) developed ICUAP for non-MDRO, whereas 121 (35%) were MDROs. Non-MDRO, MDRO and no microbiological confirmation patients did not present either a significant different previous antibiotic use (p 0.18) or previous hospital admission (p 0.17). Appropriate antibiotic therapy was associated with better ICU survival (105 [92.9%] vs. 74 [82.2%]; p = 0.03). An adjusted multivariate regression logistic analysis identified that only MDRO had a higher ICU-mortality than non-MDRO and no microbiological confirmation patients (OR 2.89; p < 0.05; 95% CI for Exp [β]. 1.02-8.21); Patients with MDRO ICUAP remained in ICU for a longer period than MDRO and no microbiological confirmation respectively (p < 0.01) however no microbiological confirmation patients had more often antibiotic consumption than culture positive ones. Patients who developed ICUAP due to MDRO showed a higher ICU-mortality than non-MDRO ones and use of ICU resources. No microbiological confirmation patients had more often antibiotic consumption than culture positive patients. Risk factors for MDRO may be important for the selection of initial antimicrobial therapy, in addition to local epidemiology. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency control center of the nuclear Regulatory Authority: a national, regional and international tool to coordinate the response to radiological and nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Osvaldo; Hernandez, Daniel; Telleria, Diego; Bruno, Hector; Boutet, Luis; Kunst, Juan; Sadaniowski, Ivana; Rey, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the year 1998, with the regulation of the Nuclear Law, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is constituted as the national coordinator of the response in case of nuclear or radiological emergencies. The ARN builds his first operative center installed in his Head quarter in Buenos Aires. Likewise, from the obligations that come with the Convention of Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the ARN is the National Warning Point and the National Competent Authority. Therefore, the operative capacity of the center needs to be expanded to cover not only the national territory but also its link with the region and the IAEA, as an access point to the International community, as the conventions demand. For the purpose of giving ARN capacities which reflect the state of art at the international level on Nuclear Emergency Centers and warrant that its equipment and technology will be compatible with those abroad (mainly with IAEA), the ARN made an arrangements with Department of Energy of United States, in the framework of an existing bilateral Argentine Foreign Office/US Government agreement (Joint Standing Committee on Nuclear Cooperation). This agreement allows a deep experience exchange, high level specialists support and last generation equipment access. As a result, the center of ARN can be considerate as the most advanced civil nuclear emergency center in the region. This work describes the implementation process of the emergency center and the technical features, like the physical distribution, hardware and software resources, communication equipment, Geographic Information Systems, etc. (author)

  17. Comparação entre as curvas de crescimento do Centers for Disease Control and Prevention e da Organização Mundial da Saúde para lactentes com idade de seis a 12 meses Comparison between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization growth curves for six to 12 months old infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Sant'Anna Pires

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o estado nutricional de lactentes de ambos os sexos de acordo com a curva proposta pelo Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC-2000 e com a nova curva de crescimento proposta pela Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS-2006. MÉTODOS: Estudo longitudinal no qual foram acompanhadas crianças de ambos os sexos, nascidas a termo, com idade entre seis meses e um ano, em aleitamento materno predominante ou exclusivo. Os dados foram coletados por um único pesquisador por meio de ficha de atendimento nutricional composta por dados demográficos, antropométricos e sobre a alimentação da criança. Foram realizados testes de Wilcoxon e Friedman para comparar cada medida das curvas e analisar a variância, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Da amostra final de 55 crianças, 51% (n=28 eram do sexo masculino. Os percentuais de eutrofia dos índices de peso por idade e de estatura adequada para idade de ambos os sexos apresentaram-se acima de 80%. Não houve diferença significante na classificação do estado nutricional, segundo as curvas utilizadas. A porcentagem de concordância das duas curvas em relação ao peso e à estatura foi de 98,2 e 96,4%, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES: As curvas de crescimento da OMS-2006 e do CDC-2000 foram similares para classificar o estado nutricional de lactentes entre 6-12 meses em aleitamento materno.OBJECTIVE: Compare the nutritional status of male and female infants classified according to the growth curve proposed by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC-2000 and the new growth curve proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO-2006. METHODS: This longitudinal study enrolled children of 6-12 months old of both genders. They were born at term and exclusively or predominantly breastfed. A single researcher collected demographic, anthropometric and nutritional data. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare curves and the Friedman test was used to analyze the variance. RESULTS: Among the

  18. [On the way to shortening tuberculosis treatments: clinical trials of the Unitat d' Investagació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio; Sánchez, Francesca; Nelson, Jeanne; Miró, José M; Caylà, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    New treatment guidelines are required to improve the tuberculosis control strategies that have been used for 30 years. Seven centers of the Barcelona Tuberculosis Research Unit (BTRU) (Unitat d'Investigació en Tuberculosi de Barcelona) are collaborating with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in a series of clinical trials on latent tuberculosis infection and tuberculosis disease. BTRU participation began in 2004 with Study 26, an evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of rifapentine plus isoniazid administered once weekly for 3 months compared with the standard treatment for latent tuberculosis infection. The BTRU centers together enrolled 246 patients (3% of the total). General enrollment was completed in February, 2008. HIV-infected patient and child enrollment continues. Treatment with 12 doses instead of 270 doses is expected to be a clear success. However, the analysis will be completed in 2010. Study 28 (started in 2006), designed for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, compared standard treatment with an experimental regimen substituting moxifloxacin for isoniazid. BTRU centers together enrolled 15 patients (3.5% of the total). The provisional results (presented at the 47th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Chicago, 2007) showed no difference between the sputum conversion rate of each regimen at week 8 of treatment. Study 29 is currently underway, in which rifapentine was introduced in the experimental regimen for active tuberculosis treatment. Copyright (c) 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Situation 2002: release monitoring and surveillance of environment of Cea centers; Bilan 2002: controle des rejets et surveillance de l'environnement des centres CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This publication renders an account of the situation of the releases of liquid and gaseous radioactive effluents, for the year 2002, as well as the radioactivity levels measured in the vicinity of Cea centers through the systematic surveillance of atmosphere, waters, vegetation and milk. An analysis on five years allows to follow their evolution. (N.C.)

  20. Comparing case-control study for treatment of proximal tibia fractures with a complete metaphyseal component in two centers with different distinct strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berven, Haakon; Brix, Michael; Izadpanah, Kaywan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to compare two methods of stabilization for proximal tibia fractures (AO 41) with a complete metaphyseal component, external fixation with the Ilizarov wire frame, and internal fixation with locking plates. METHODS: Patients from two level 1 trauma centers...

  1. Multi-center randomized controlled trial of cognitive treatment, placebo, oxybutynin, bladder training, and pelvic floor training in children with functional urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gool, Jan D.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Tamminen-Moebius, Tytti; Lax, Hildegard; Hirche, Herbert; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Hjalmas, Kelm; Jodal, Ulf; Bachmann, Hannsjoerg; Hoebeke, Piet; Vande Walle, Johan; Misselwitz, Joachim; John, Ulrike; Bael, An

    Objective Functional urinary incontinence causes considerable morbidity in 8.4% of school-age children, mainly girls. To compare oxybutynin, placebo, and bladder training in overactive bladder (OAB), and cognitive treatment and pelvic floor training in dysfunctional voiding (DV), a multi-center

  2. Discovery and Distribution of Black Smokers on the Western Galapagos Spreading Center: Implications for Spatial and Temporal Controls on High Temperature Venting at Ridge/Hotspot Intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymon, R. M.; Anderson, P. G.; Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; White, S. M.; MacDonald, K. C.

    2006-12-01

    Though nearly one-fifth of the mid-ocean ridge (MOR) lies on or near hotspots, it has been debated whether hotspots increase or decrease MOR hydrothermal flux, or affect vent biota. Despite hotspot enhancement of melt supply, high-temperature vent plumes are enigmatically sparse along two previously-surveyed ridge- hotspot intersections [Reykjanes Ridge (RR), Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR)]. This has been attributed to crustal thickening by excess volcanism. During the 2005-06 GalAPAGoS expedition, we conducted nested sonar, plume, and camera surveys along a 540 km-long portion of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC) where the ridge intersects the Galapagos hotspot at lon. 94.5 -89.5 deg. W. Although MOR hydrothermal springs were first found along the eastern GSC crest in 1977 near lon. 86 deg. W, the GalAPAGoS smokers are the first active high-temperature vents to be found anywhere along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary. Active and/or recently-inactive smokers were located beneath plumes at 5 sites on the seafloor between lon. 91 deg. W and 94.5 deg. W (see Anderson et al., this session) during near-bottom, real-time fiber-optic Medea camera surveys. Smokers occur along eruptive seafloor fissures atop axial volcanic ridges near the middles of ridge segments, mainly in areas underlain by relatively shallow, continuous axial magma chamber (AMC) seismic reflectors. These findings (1) support magmatic, rather than tectonic, control of GSC smoker distribution; (2) demonstrate that thick crust at MOR-hotspot intersections does not prevent high-temperature hydrothermal vents from forming; and, (3) appear to be inconsistent with models suggesting that enhanced hydrothermal cooling causes abrupt deepening of the AMC and transition from non-rifted to rifted GSC morphology near lon. 92.7 deg. W. The widely-spaced smoker sites located on different GSC segments exhibit remarkably similar characteristics and seafloor settings. Most sites are mature or extinct, and are on lava

  3. Experiences of a secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration from the radiation protection and hygiene center CPHR in its first year of work and the procedures for quality assessment used in the calibration and quality control service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, J.A.; Campa, R.; Jova Sed, L.

    1996-01-01

    Experiences of a secondary laboratory of dosimetric calibration from the Radiation Protection and Hygiene Center (CPHR) in first year of work and the procedures for quality assessment used in the calibration and quality control service of radiotherapeutic equipment. For the yield calibration of the calibrated sources an ionometric method was used using ionizing chambers coupled to electrometers. Those determination were based on dosimetric American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM)

  4. Diseño de un Sistema de Control Interno para la Clínica Oftalmológica Laser Center Visión 20/20 CLV S.A

    OpenAIRE

    Meneses Angulo, Lourdes Lorena; Subía Pincay, Gladys Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis focuses in develops a system of internal control in the Laser Clinic Center Vision 20/20 CLV S.A with the purpose of strengthening the activities, procedures and processes for the improvement of the entity. Every area of a company that has neither functions nor internal suitable controls can happen a risk of having diversions in their operations and in the capture of decisions of the management, the same one that can lead to a crisis, this offer is to be able to safeguar...

  5. Comparison of radiation doses obtained for radiation monitoring of controlled areas with radiation doses obtained for personnel dosimetry in radiodiagnosis centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lescano, Roberto; Caspani, Carlos; Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we propose to search an indicator that shows, at an objective way, the quality of the radioprotection actions. The method is about to determine doses, measured in the work area, connecting them with the workload, and finally get the dose for the center. Them we make a comparison with the personal film dosimetry data. We discuss the final results, evaluating the radioprotection conditions in daily work. (author)

  6. COST ANALYSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL ACTIVITIES CENTERED AT THE PATIENT AND PERFORMED ON THE OUT-PATIENT BASIS IN THE URBAN SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Gelmanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Costs of out-patient patient-centered activities introduced into the existing standard model of the tuberculosis treatment have been evaluated in Tomsk TB Service. Additional measures enhancing compliance in the patients included the following: timely detection and management of side effects of chemotherapy, social support to the patients, treatment at home, psychological support and treatment by the Sputnik team of most socially vulnerable patients.The average additional costs for the patient-centered activities per 1 patient treated as per regimens I, II, III made 1367 RUR a month; per 1 PR TB patient – 2978 RUR; and per regimen IV – 4865 RUR. Patient-centered activities performed during the out-patient stage of treatment made 7% out of the total treatment costs for regimens I, II, III; 14% when treating polyresistant TB; and 16% for regimen IV.