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Sample records for contrasting molecular pathology

  1. Molecular pathology and thyroid FNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poller, D N; Glaysher, S

    2017-12-01

    This review summarises molecular pathological techniques applicable to thyroid FNA. The molecular pathology of thyroid tumours is now fairly well understood. Molecular methods may be used as a rule-in test for diagnosis of malignancy in thyroid nodules, eg BRAF V600E point mutation, use of a seven-gene mutational panel (BRAF V600E, RAS genes, RET/PTC or PAX8/PPARG rearrangement), or as a comprehensive multigene next-generation sequencing panel, eg ThyroSeq v2. Molecular methods can also be applied as rule-out tests for malignancy in thyroid nodules, eg Afirma or ThyroSeq v2 or as markers of prognosis, eg TERT promoter mutation or other gene mutations including BRAF V600E, TP53 and AKT1, and as tests for newly defined tumour entities such as non-invasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary like nuclei, or as a molecular marker(s) for targeted therapies. This review describes practical examples of molecular techniques as applied to thyroid FNA in routine clinical practice and the value of molecular diagnostics in thyroid FNA. It describes the range of molecular abnormalities identified in thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers with some practical applications of molecular methods to diagnosis and prognosis of thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mandelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program′s core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  3. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E; Platt, Mia Y; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K F; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J; Beckwith, Bruce A; Baron, Jason M; McClintock, David S; Kuo, Frank C; Lebo, Matthew S; Gilbertson, John R

    2014-01-01

    Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists.

  4. Molecular pathology of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, L H; Drake, R R; Esquela-Kirscher, A; Lance, R S; Semmes, O J; Troyer, D A

    2010-01-01

    This chapter includes discussion of the molecular pathology of tissue, blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions. Because we are unable to reliably image the disease in vivo, a 12 core method that oversamples the peripheral zone is widely used. This generates large numbers of cores that need to be carefully processed and sampled. In spite of the large number of tissue cores, the amount of tumor available for study is often quite limited. This is a particular challenge for research, as new biomarker assays will need to preserve tissue architecture intact for histopathology. Methods of processing and reporting pathology are discussed. With the exception of ductal variants, recognized subtypes of prostate cancer are largely confined to research applications, and most prostate cancers are acinar. Biomarker discovery in urine and expressed prostatic secretions would be useful since these are readily obtained and are proximate fluids. The well-known challenges of biomarker discovery in blood and urine are referenced and discussed. Mediators of carcinogenesis can serve as biomarkers as exemplified by mutations in PTEN and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The use of proteomics in biomarker discovery with an emphasis on imaging mass spectroscopy of tissues is discussed. Small RNAs are of great interest, however, their usefulness as biomarkers in clinical decision making remains the subject of ongoing research. The chapter concludes with an overview of blood biomarkers such as circulating nucleic acids and tumor cells and bound/free isoforms of prostate specific antigen (PSA).

  5. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

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    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Molecular pathology of bone tumours: diagnostic implications.

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    Puls, Florian; Niblett, Angela J; Mangham, D Chas

    2014-03-01

    Alongside histomorphology and immunohistochemistry, molecular pathology is now established as one of the cornerstones in the tissue diagnosis of bone tumours. We describe the principal molecular pathological techniques employed, and each of the bone tumour entities where their identified characteristic molecular pathological changes can be detected to support and confirm the suspected histological diagnosis. Tumours discussed include fibrous dysplasia, classical and subtype osteosarcomas, central and surface cartilaginous tumours, Ewing's sarcoma, vascular tumours, aneurysmal bone cyst, chordoma, myoepithelioma, and angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. This is a rapidly evolving field with discoveries occurring every few months, and some of the newer entities (the Ewing's-like sarcomas), which are principally identified by their molecular pathology characteristics, are discussed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in the assessment of urogenital pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libero Barozzi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an innovative technique that employs microbubble contrast agents to demonstrate parenchymal perfusion. Although initial clinical application was focused on the liver pathology, a wide variety of clinical conditions can be assessed now with CEUS. CEUS is a well-tolerated technique and is acquiring an increasing role in the assessment of renal pathology because contrast agents are not excreted by the kidney and do not affect the renal function. CEUS demonstrated an accuracy similar to contrast enhanced multi-detector computed tomography (CEMDCT in detecting focal lesions, with the advantage of the real-time assessment of microvascular perfusion by using time-intensity curves. The aim of this paper is to review the main indications of CEUS in the assessment of renal and urogenital pathology. Imaging examples are presented and described. Advantages and limitations of CEUS with reference to conventional US and CE-MDCT are discussed.

  8. Molecular pathology and age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Christoph; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2010-12-15

    Over the course of our lifetime a stochastic process leads to gradual alterations of biomolecules on the molecular level, a process that is called ageing. Important changes are observed on the DNA-level as well as on the protein level and are the cause and/or consequence of our 'molecular clock', influenced by genetic as well as environmental parameters. These alterations on the molecular level may aid in forensic medicine to estimate the age of a living person, a dead body or even skeletal remains for identification purposes. Four such important alterations have become the focus of molecular age estimation in the forensic community over the last two decades. The age-dependent accumulation of the 4977bp deletion of mitochondrial DNA and the attrition of telomeres along with ageing are two important processes at the DNA-level. Among a variety of protein alterations, the racemisation of aspartic acid and advanced glycation endproducs have already been tested for forensic applications. At the moment the racemisation of aspartic acid represents the pinnacle of molecular age estimation for three reasons: an excellent standardization of sampling and methods, an evaluation of different variables in many published studies and highest accuracy of results. The three other mentioned alterations often lack standardized procedures, published data are sparse and often have the character of pilot studies. Nevertheless it is important to evaluate molecular methods for their suitability in forensic age estimation, because supplementary methods will help to extend and refine accuracy and reliability of such estimates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The long Tramp from Cellular Pathology to Molecular Pathology

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    Hans Guski

    2017-05-01

    Derivatives: The observation of principal identity of biological meaningful elements can be agglutinated to a ‘general theory of live’ and its manifestation. All of the investigated elements posses the same regularities, which are altered, destroyed or newly built by external influences such as disease, physical and psychological forces. Not all magnification levels that display with these elements are of the same significance. Already Virchow suggested that ‘smaller elements (molecules might be responsible for changes that are visible ‘in larger elements’ (at cellular level.  The reflection on these ideas can be associated with the implementation of molecular techniques which has been developed in the 20th century and are still ongoing today. Perspectives: Thus, cellular and molecular pathology can be integrated under one umbrella. This umbrella will lead to newly man-formed structures, such as artificial DNA and gene components or functional chip implantations.

  10. Molecular digital pathology: progress and potential of exchanging molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Pfeifer, John D; LaFramboise, William A; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-09-01

    Many of the demands to perform next generation sequencing (NGS) in the clinical laboratory can be resolved using the principles of telepathology. Molecular telepathology can allow facilities to outsource all or a portion of their NGS operation such as cloud computing, bioinformatics pipelines, variant data management, and knowledge curation. Clinical pathology laboratories can electronically share diverse types of molecular data with reference laboratories, technology service providers, and/or regulatory agencies. Exchange of electronic molecular data allows laboratories to perform validation of rare diseases using foreign data, check the accuracy of their test results against benchmarks, and leverage in silico proficiency testing. This review covers the emerging subject of molecular telepathology, describes clinical use cases for the appropriate exchange of molecular data, and highlights key issues such as data integrity, interoperable formats for massive genomic datasets, security, malpractice and emerging regulations involved with this novel practice.

  11. Molecular Pathology of Human Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative conditions in humans and animals. In this review, we summarize the molecular background of phenotypic variability, relation of prion protein (PrP to other proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, and pathogenesis of neuronal vulnerability. PrP exists in different forms that may be present in both diseased and non-diseased brain, however, abundant disease-associated PrP together with tissue pathology characterizes prion diseases and associates with transmissibility. Prion diseases have different etiological background with distinct pathogenesis and phenotype. Mutations of the prion protein gene are associated with genetic forms. The codon 129 polymorphism in combination with the Western blot pattern of PrP after proteinase K digestion serves as a basis for molecular subtyping of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Tissue damage may result from several parallel, interacting or subsequent pathways that involve cellular systems associated with synapses, protein processing, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  12. [Diagnostic molecular pathology of lymphatic and myeloid neoplasms].

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    Klapper, W; Kreipe, H

    2015-03-01

    Molecular pathology has been an integral part of the diagnostics of tumors of the hematopoietic system substantially longer than for solid neoplasms. In contrast to solid tumors, the primary objective of molecular pathology in hematopoietic neoplasms is not the prediction of drug efficacy but the diagnosis itself by excluding reactive proliferation and by using molecular features for tumor classification. In the case of malignant lymphomas, the most commonly applied molecular tests are those for gene rearrangements for immunoglobulin heavy chains and T-cell receptors. However, this article puts the focus on new and diagnostically relevant assays in hematopathology. Among these are mutations of MYD88 codon 265 in lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas, B-raf V600E in hairy cell leukemia and Stat3 exon 21 in indolent T-cell lymphomas. In myeloproliferative neoplasms, MPL W515, calreticulin exon 9 and the BCR-ABL and JAK2 V617F junctions are the most frequently analyzed differentiation series. In myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms, SRSF2, SETBP1 and CSF3R mutations provide important differential diagnostic information. Genes mutated in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are particularly diverse but their analysis significantly improves the differential diagnostics between reactive conditions and MDS. The most frequent changes in MDS include mutations of TET2 and various genes encoding splicing factors.

  13. Contrasting Pathology of the Stress Granule Proteins TIA-1 and G3BP in Tauopathies

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    Vanderweyde, Tara; Yu, Haung; Varnum, Megan; Liu-Yesucevitz, Liqun; Citro, Allison; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Duff, Karen; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Stress induces aggregation of RNA-binding proteins to form inclusions, termed stress granules (SGs). Recent evidence suggests that SG proteins also colocalize with neuropathological structures, but whether this occurs in Alzheimer’s disease is unknown. We examined the relationship between SG proteins and neuropathology in brain tissue from P301L Tau transgenic mice, as well as in cases of Alzheimer’s disease and FTDP-17. The pattern of SG pathology differs dramatically based on the RNA-binding protein examined. SGs positive for T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) or tristetraprolin (TTP) initially do not colocalize with tau pathology, but then merge with tau inclusions as disease severity increases. In contrast, G3BP (ras GAP-binding protein) identifies a novel type of molecular pathology that shows increasing accumulation in neurons with increasing disease severity, but often is not associated with classic markers of tau pathology. TIA-1 and TTP both bind phospho-tau, and TIA-1 overexpression induces formation of inclusions containing phospho-tau. These data suggest that SG formation might stimulate tau pathophysiology. Thus, study of RNA-binding proteins and SG biology highlights novel pathways interacting with the pathophysiology of AD, providing potentially new avenues for identifying diseased neurons and potentially novel mechanisms regulating tau biology. PMID:22699908

  14. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

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    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, and the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  15. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  16. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

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    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  17. The Molecular Pathology of Cushing Disease: Are We Nearly There?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Ashley B

    2017-02-01

    The molecular pathology of corticotroph tumors is surveyed in the light of recent work showing the induction of aggressive corticotroph tumors by the transgenic expression of epidermal growth factor receptors.

  18. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  19. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-12-15

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  20. The ins and outs of molecular pathology reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Véronique; Dufraing, Kelly; Deans, Zandra C; van Krieken, Han J; Dequeker, Elisabeth M C

    2017-08-01

    The raid evolution in molecular pathology resulting in an increasing complexity requires careful reporting. The need for standardisation is clearer than ever. While synoptic reporting was first used for reporting hereditary genetic diseases, it is becoming more frequent in pathology, especially molecular pathology reports too. The narrative approach is no longer feasible with the growing amount of essential data present on the report, although narrative components are still necessary for interpretation in molecular pathology. On the way towards standardisation of reports, guidelines can be a helpful tool. There are several guidelines that focus on reporting in the field of hereditary diseases, but it is not always feasible to extrapolate these to the reporting of somatic variants in molecular pathology. The rise of multi-gene testing causes challenges for the laboratories. In order to provide a continuous optimisation of the laboratory testing process, including reporting, external quality assessment is essential and has already proven to improve the quality of reports. In general, a clear and concise report for molecular pathology can be created by including elements deemed important by different guidelines, adapting the report to the process flows of the laboratory and integrating the report with the laboratory information management system and the patient record.

  1. Emerging Themes in Image Informatics and Molecular Analysis for Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-07-11

    Pathology is essential for research in disease and development, as well as for clinical decision making. For more than 100 years, pathology practice has involved analyzing images of stained, thin tissue sections by a trained human using an optical microscope. Technological advances are now driving major changes in this paradigm toward digital pathology (DP). The digital transformation of pathology goes beyond recording, archiving, and retrieving images, providing new computational tools to inform better decision making for precision medicine. First, we discuss some emerging innovations in both computational image analytics and imaging instrumentation in DP. Second, we discuss molecular contrast in pathology. Molecular DP has traditionally been an extension of pathology with molecularly specific dyes. Label-free, spectroscopic images are rapidly emerging as another important information source, and we describe the benefits and potential of this evolution. Third, we describe multimodal DP, which is enabled by computational algorithms and combines the best characteristics of structural and molecular pathology. Finally, we provide examples of application areas in telepathology, education, and precision medicine. We conclude by discussing challenges and emerging opportunities in this area.

  2. Application of molecular genetic tools for forest pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee-Sook Kim; John Hanna; Amy Ross-Davis; Ned Klopfenstein

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular genetics have provided powerful tools to address critical issues in forest pathology to help promote resilient forests. Although molecular genetic tools are initially applied to understand individual components of forest pathosystems, forest pathosystems involve dynamic interactions among biotic and abiotic components of the...

  3. Colorectal Cancers: An Update on Their Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Kentaro

    2018-01-20

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) are the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Rather than being a single, uniform disease type, accumulating evidence suggests that CRCs comprise a group of molecularly heterogeneous diseases that are characterized by a range of genomic and epigenomic alterations. This heterogeneity slows the development of molecular-targeted therapy as a form of precision medicine. Recent data regarding comprehensive molecular characterizations and molecular pathological examinations of CRCs have increased our understanding of the genomic and epigenomic landscapes of CRCs, which has enabled CRCs to be reclassified into biologically and clinically meaningful subtypes. The increased knowledge of the molecular pathological epidemiology of CRCs has permitted their evolution from a vaguely understood, heterogeneous group of diseases with variable clinical courses to characteristic molecular subtypes, a development that will allow the implementation of personalized therapies and better management of patients with CRC. This review provides a perspective regarding recent developments in our knowledge of the molecular and epidemiological landscapes of CRCs, including results of comprehensive molecular characterizations obtained from high-throughput analyses and the latest developments regarding their molecular pathologies, immunological biomarkers, and associated gut microbiome. Advances in our understanding of potential personalized therapies for molecularly specific subtypes are also reviewed.

  4. Oligodendroglioma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, P.; Bent, M. van den; Perry, A.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly a century, the diagnosis and grading of oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas has been based on histopathology alone. Roughly 20 years ago, the first glioma-associated molecular signature was found with complete chromosome 1p and 19q codeletion being particularly common in

  5. Molecular pathology of breast apocrine carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J.E.; Gromova, I.; Gromov, P.

    2006-01-01

    .5% of all invasive breast cancers according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry, and despite the fact that they are morphologically distinct from other breast lesions, there are at present no standard molecular criteria available for their diagnosis. In addition, the relationship between...

  6. Bioenergetics molecular biology, biochemistry, and pathology

    CERN Document Server

    Ozawa, Takayuki

    1990-01-01

    The emergence of the Biochemical Sciences is underlined by the FAOB symposium in Seoul and highlighted by this Satellite meeting on the "New Bioenergetics. " Classical mitochondrial electron transfer and energy coupling is now complemented by the emerging molecular biology of the respiratory chain which is studied hand in hand with the recognition of mitochondrial disease as a major and emerging study in the basic and clinical medical sciences. Thus, this symposium has achieved an important balance of the fundamental and applied aspects of bioenergetics in the modern setting of molecular biology and mitochondrial disease. At the same time, the symposium takes note not only of the emerging excellence of Biochemical Studies in the Orient and indeed in Korea itself, but also retrospectively enjoys the history of electron transport and energy conservation as represented by the triumvirate ofYagi, King and Slater. Many thanks are due Drs. Kim and Ozawa for their elegant organization of this meeting and its juxtapo...

  7. Evaluation of pathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: Comparison with pathology on resected specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Sadanobu; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Ichikawa, Hideo; Kawachi, Toshiaki; Otobe, Katsuhiko; Hibi, Toshio; Takeshima, Kenji; Kiriyama, Seiki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Tanikawa, Makoto; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Isogai, Masatoshi; Kaneoka, Yuji; Washizu, Junji

    2006-01-01

    Features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) observed by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) were compared to pathological features of corresponding resected HCC specimens, to evaluate the ability of CEUS to depict the pathological features of HCC. We investigated 50 HCC nodules that were treated by surgical resection. All nodules had been examined by CEUS with intravenous contrast agent (Levovist) before surgery. CEUS findings were divided into three phases for evaluation and classification of enhancement patterns: two vascular phases (arterial phase and portal venous phase) and the delayed phase. Pathological examination focused on differentiation and on the presence or absence of a tumor capsule, intratumoral septum, and intratumoral necrosis. All 21 nodules that showed a linear or annular vessel around the tumor margin in the arterial phase had capsular formation. Of the 27 nodules that showed heterogeneous perfusion in the portal venous phase, 21 (77.8%) had an intratumoral septum and 23 (85.2%) showed intratumoral necrosis. All nodules that were depicted as a defect with an unclear margin in the delayed phase were well-differentiated HCCs, whereas all nodules that were depicted as a defect with a clear margin were moderately or poorly differentiated HCCs. From our observations, the arterial, portal venous, and delayed phases of CEUS could reflect different pathological aspects of HCC. Some pathological characteristics of HCC might be evaluated preoperatively and non-invasively, by means of combined analysis of three phases of CEUS findings

  8. Considerations for standardizing predictive molecular pathology for cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests that were once ancillary to the core business of cyto-histopathology are becoming the most relevant workload in pathology departments after histopathology/cytopathology and before autopsies. This has resulted from innovations in molecular biology techniques, which have developed at an incredibly fast pace. Areas covered: Most of the current widely used techniques in molecular pathology such as FISH, direct sequencing, pyrosequencing, and allele-specific PCR will be replaced by massive parallel sequencing that will not be considered next generation, but rather, will be considered to be current generation sequencing. The pre-analytical steps of molecular techniques such as DNA extraction or sample preparation will be largely automated. Moreover, all the molecular pathology instruments will be part of an integrated workflow that traces the sample from extraction to the analytical steps until the results are reported; these steps will be guided by expert laboratory information systems. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry for quantification will be largely digitalized as much as histology will be mostly digitalized rather than viewed using microscopy. Expert commentary: This review summarizes the technical and regulatory issues concerning the standardization of molecular tests in pathology. A vision of the future perspectives of technological changes is also provided.

  9. The Top 10 fungal pathogens in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dean, R.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Pretorius, Z.A.; Hammond-Kosack, K.E.; Pietro, Di A.; Spanu, P.D.; Rudd, J.J.; Dickman, M.; Kahmann, R.; Ellis, J.; Foster, G.D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to survey all fungal pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate which fungal pathogens they would place in a ‘Top 10’ based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 495 votes from the international

  10. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Ian A; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjö, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Solé, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J Han

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this paper is to provide minimum requirements for the management of molecular pathology laboratories. This general guidance should be augmented by the specific guidance available for different tumour types and tests. Preanalytical considerations are important, and careful consideration of the way in which specimens are obtained and reach the laboratory is necessary. Sample receipt and handling follow standard operating procedures, but some alterations may be necessary if molecular testing is to be performed, for instance to control tissue fixation. DNA and RNA extraction can be standardised and should be checked for quality and quantity of output on a regular basis. The choice of analytical method(s) depends on clinical requirements, desired turnaround time, and expertise available. Internal quality control, regular internal audit of the whole testing process, laboratory accreditation, and continual participation in external quality assessment schemes are prerequisites for delivery of a reliable service. A molecular pathology report should accurately convey the information the clinician needs to treat the patient with sufficient information to allow for correct interpretation of the result. Molecular pathology is developing rapidly, and further detailed evidence-based recommendations are required for many of the topics covered here. PMID:25012948

  11. Noel T. Keen--pioneer leader in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collmer, Alan; Gold, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Noel T. Keen (1940-2002) made pioneering contributions to molecular plant pathology during a period when the study of disease mechanisms was transformed by the new tools of molecular genetics. His primary contributions involved race-specific elicitors of plant defenses and bacterial pectic enzymes. In collaboration with Brian J. Staskawicz and Frances Jurnak, respectively, Noel cloned the first avirulence gene and determined that pectate lyase C possessed a novel structural motif, known as the parallel beta-helix. Noel received his B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State University in Ames and his Ph.D. from the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin in Madison in 1968. He joined the faculty of the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of California at Riverside the same year and remained there his entire career. He served as Chair of the department from 1983 to 1989 and in 1997 assumed the William and Sue Johnson Endowed Chair in Molecular Plant Pathology. He became a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society in 1991, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1996, a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology in 1997, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1997. He was serving as President of the American Phytopathological Society (2001-2002) at the time of his death.

  12. Spectral triangulation molecular contrast optical coherence tomography with indocyanine green as the contrast agent

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Changhuei; McGuckin, Laura E. L.; Simon, John D.; Choma, Michael A.; Applegate, Brian E.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    We report a new molecular contrast optical coherence tomography (MCOCT) implementation that profiles the contrast agent distribution in a sample by measuring the agent's spectral differential absorption. The method, spectra triangulation MCOCT, can effectively suppress contributions from spectrally dependent scatterings from the sample without a priori knowledge of the scattering properties. We demonstrate molecular imaging with this new MCOCT modality by mapping the distribution of indocyani...

  13. Automated Multi-Contrast Brain Pathological Area Extraction from 2D MR Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Bartušek, Karel; Kropatsch, W.G.; Smékal, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2015), s. 58-69 ISSN 1665-6423 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brain Pathology * Brain Tumor * MRI * Multi-contrast MRI * Symmetry Analysis Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.447, year: 2013

  14. Molecular pathology of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma: review and opportunities for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, John Richard; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2016-12-01

    Since the first identification of CTNNB1 mutations in adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP), much has been learned about the molecular pathways and processes that are disrupted in ACP pathogenesis. To date this understanding has not translated into tangible patient benefit. The recent development of novel techniques and a range of preclinical models now provides an opportunity to begin to support treatment decisions and develop new therapeutics based on molecular pathology. In this review the authors summarize many of the key findings and pathways implicated in ACP pathogenesis and discuss the challenges that need to be tackled to translate these basic science findings for the benefit of patients.

  15. Top 10 plant viruses in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G; Adkins, Scott; Czosnek, Henryk; Palukaitis, Peter; Jacquot, Emmanuel; Hohn, Thomas; Hohn, Barbara; Saunders, Keith; Candresse, Thierry; Ahlquist, Paul; Hemenway, Cynthia; Foster, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    Many scientists, if not all, feel that their particular plant virus should appear in any list of the most important plant viruses. However, to our knowledge, no such list exists. The aim of this review was to survey all plant virologists with an association with Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate which plant viruses they would place in a 'Top 10' based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated more than 250 votes from the international community, and allowed the generation of a Top 10 plant virus list for Molecular Plant Pathology. The Top 10 list includes, in rank order, (1) Tobacco mosaic virus, (2) Tomato spotted wilt virus, (3) Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, (4) Cucumber mosaic virus, (5) Potato virus Y, (6) Cauliflower mosaic virus, (7) African cassava mosaic virus, (8) Plum pox virus, (9) Brome mosaic virus and (10) Potato virus X, with honourable mentions for viruses just missing out on the Top 10, including Citrus tristeza virus, Barley yellow dwarf virus, Potato leafroll virus and Tomato bushy stunt virus. This review article presents a short review on each virus of the Top 10 list and its importance, with the intent of initiating discussion and debate amongst the plant virology community, as well as laying down a benchmark, as it will be interesting to see in future years how perceptions change and which viruses enter and leave the Top 10. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. The Top 10 fungal pathogens in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Ralph; Van Kan, Jan A L; Pretorius, Zacharias A; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E; Di Pietro, Antonio; Spanu, Pietro D; Rudd, Jason J; Dickman, Marty; Kahmann, Regine; Ellis, Jeff; Foster, Gary D

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this review was to survey all fungal pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate which fungal pathogens they would place in a 'Top 10' based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 495 votes from the international community, and resulted in the generation of a Top 10 fungal plant pathogen list for Molecular Plant Pathology. The Top 10 list includes, in rank order, (1) Magnaporthe oryzae; (2) Botrytis cinerea; (3) Puccinia spp.; (4) Fusarium graminearum; (5) Fusarium oxysporum; (6) Blumeria graminis; (7) Mycosphaerella graminicola; (8) Colletotrichum spp.; (9) Ustilago maydis; (10) Melampsora lini, with honourable mentions for fungi just missing out on the Top 10, including Phakopsora pachyrhizi and Rhizoctonia solani. This article presents a short resumé of each fungus in the Top 10 list and its importance, with the intent of initiating discussion and debate amongst the plant mycology community, as well as laying down a bench-mark. It will be interesting to see in future years how perceptions change and what fungi will comprise any future Top 10. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  17. Molecular pathological epidemiology of epigenetics: emerging integrative science to analyze environment, host, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shuji; Lochhead, Paul; Chan, Andrew T; Nishihara, Reiko; Cho, Eunyoung; Wolpin, Brian M; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Meissner, Alexander; Schernhammer, Eva S; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Epigenetics acts as an interface between environmental/exogenous factors, cellular responses, and pathological processes. Aberrant epigenetic signatures are a hallmark of complex multifactorial diseases (including neoplasms and malignancies such as leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and breast, lung, prostate, liver, and colorectal cancers). Epigenetic signatures (DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression, etc) may serve as biomarkers for risk stratification, early detection, and disease classification, as well as targets for therapy and chemoprevention. In particular, DNA methylation assays are widely applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue specimens as clinical pathology tests. To better understand the interplay between etiological factors, cellular molecular characteristics, and disease evolution, the field of 'molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE)' has emerged as an interdisciplinary integration of 'molecular pathology' and 'epidemiology'. In contrast to traditional epidemiological research including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), MPE is founded on the unique disease principle, that is, each disease process results from unique profiles of exposomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, microbiomes, and interactomes in relation to the macroenvironment and tissue microenvironment. MPE may represent a logical evolution of GWAS, termed 'GWAS-MPE approach'. Although epigenome-wide association study attracts increasing attention, currently, it has a fundamental problem in that each cell within one individual has a unique, time-varying epigenome. Having a similar conceptual framework to systems biology, the holistic MPE approach enables us to link potential etiological factors to specific molecular pathology, and gain novel pathogenic insights on causality. The widespread application of epigenome (eg, methylome) analyses will enhance our understanding of disease heterogeneity, epigenotypes (CpG island methylator

  18. Molecular pathology and prostate cancer therapeutics: from biology to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Butler, Lisa M; Estelles, David Lorente; de Bono, Johann S

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and has an extremely heterogeneous clinical behaviour. The vast majority of PCas are hormonally driven diseases in which androgen signalling plays a central role. The realization that castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to rely on androgen signalling prompted the development of new, effective androgen blocking agents. As the understanding of the molecular biology of PCas evolves, it is hoped that stratification of prostate tumours into distinct molecular entities, each with its own set of vulnerabilities, will be a feasible goal. Around half of PCas harbour rearrangements involving a member of the ETS transcription factor family. Tumours without this rearrangement include SPOP mutant as well as SPINK1-over-expressing subtypes. As the number of targeted therapy agents increases, it is crucial to determine which patients will benefit from these interventions and molecular pathology will be key in this respect. In addition to directly targeting cells, therapies that modify the tumour microenvironment have also been successful in prolonging the lives of PCa patients. Understanding the molecular aspects of PCa therapeutics will allow pathologists to provide core recommendations for patient management. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Different Achilles Tendon Pathologies Show Distinct Histological and Molecular Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Klatte-Schulz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasons for the development of chronic tendon pathologies are still under debate and more basic knowledge is needed about the different diseases. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize different acute and chronic Achilles tendon disorders. Achilles tendon samples from patients with chronic tendinopathy (n = 7, chronic ruptures (n = 6, acute ruptures (n = 13, and intact tendons (n = 4 were analyzed. The histological score investigating pathological changes was significantly increased in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to acute ruptures. Inflammatory infiltration was detected by immunohistochemistry in all tendon pathology groups, but was significantly lower in tendinopathy compared to chronic ruptures. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis revealed significantly altered expression of genes related to collagens and matrix modeling/remodeling (matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to intact tendons and/or acute ruptures. In all three tendon pathology groups markers of inflammation (interleukin (IL 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, IL6, IL10, IL33, soluble ST2, transforming growth factor β1, cyclooxygenase 2, inflammatory cells (cluster of differentaition (CD 3, CD68, CD80, CD206, fat metabolism (fatty acid binding protein 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, adiponectin, and innervation (protein gene product 9.5, growth associated protein 43, macrophage migration inhibitory factor were detectable, but only in acute ruptures significantly regulated compared to intact tendons. The study gives an insight into structural and molecular changes of pathological processes in tendons and might be used to identify targets for future therapy of tendon pathologies.

  20. Molecular Pathology: A Requirement for Precision Medicine in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The increasing importance of targeting drugs and check-point inhibitors in the treatment of several tumor entities (breast, colon, lung, malignant melanoma, lymphoma, etc.) and the necessity of a companion diagnostic (HER2, (pan)RAS, EGFR, ALK, BRAF, ROS1, MET, PD-L1, etc.) is leading to new challenges for surgical pathology. Since almost all the biomarkers to be specifically detected are tissue based, a precise and reliable diagnostic is absolutely crucial. To meet this challenge surgical pathology has adapted a number of molecular methods (semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR and its multiple variants, (pyro/Sanger) sequencing, next generation sequencing (amplicon, whole exome, whole genome), DNA arrays, methylation analyses, etc.) to be applicable for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Reading a patient's tissue as 'deeply' as possible and obtaining information on the morphological, genetic, proteomic and epigenetic background are the tasks of pathologists and molecular biologists and provide the clinicians with information relevant for precision medicine. Intensified cooperation between clinicians and pathologists will provide the basis of improved clinical drug selection and guide development of new cancer gene therapies and molecularly targeted drugs by research units and the pharmaceutical industry. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  1. Ex vivo characterization of pathologic fluids with quantitative phase-contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Vivien, E-mail: vivien.richter@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Weg 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Willner, Marian S., E-mail: marian.willner@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Henningsen, John, E-mail: john.henningsen@tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Birnbacher, Lorenz, E-mail: lorenz.birnbacher@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Marschner, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.marschner@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herzen, Julia, E-mail: julia.herzen@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kimm, Melanie A., E-mail: melanie.kimm@tum.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) provides additional information beyond absorption characteristics by detecting the phase shift of the X-ray beam passing through material. The grating-based system works with standard polychromatic X-ray sources, promising a possible clinical implementation. PCI has been shown to provide additional information in soft-tissue samples. The aim of this study was to determine if ex vivo quantitative phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) may differentiate between pathologic fluid collections. Materials and methods: PCCT was performed with the grating interferometry method. A protein serial dilution, human blood samples and 17 clinical samples of pathologic fluid retentions were imaged and correlated with clinical chemistry measurements. Conventional and phase-contrast tomography images were reconstructed. Phase-contrast Hounsfield Units (HUp) were used for quantitative analysis analogously to conventional HU. The imaging was analyzed using overall means, ROI values as well as whole-volume-histograms and vertical gradients. Contrast to noise ratios were calculated between different probes and between imaging methods. Results: HUp showed a very good linear correlation with protein concentration in vitro. In clinical samples, HUp correlated rather well with cell count and triglyceride content. PCI was better than absorption imaging at differentiating protein concentrations in the protein samples as well as at differentiating blood plasma from cellular components. PCI also allowed for differentiation of watery samples (such as lymphoceles) from pus. Conclusion: Phase-contrast computed tomography is a promising tool for the differentiation of pathologic fluids that appear homogenous with conventional attenuation imaging.

  2. Regions of low density in the contrast-enhanced pituitary gland: normal and pathologic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, E.F.; Turski, P.A.; LaMasters, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of low-density regions in the contrast-enhanced pituitary gland and the possible causes of these regions were investigated by a retrospective review of computed tomographic (CT) scans of the head in 50 patients and autopsy specimens of the pituitary in 100 other patients. It was found that focal areas of low density within the contrast enhanced pituitary gland can be caused by various normal and pathologic conditions such as pituitary microadenomas, pars intermedia cysts, foci of metastasis, infarcts, epidermoid cysts, and abscesses. Although most focal low-density regions probably represent pituitary microadenomas, careful clinical correlation is needed to establish a diagnosis

  3. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, John; Genin, Stephane; Magori, Shimpei; Citovsky, Vitaly; Sriariyanum, Malinee; Ronald, Pamela; Dow, Max; Verdier, Valérie; Beer, Steven V; Machado, Marcos A; Toth, Ian; Salmond, George; Foster, Gary D

    2012-08-01

    Many plant bacteriologists, if not all, feel that their particular microbe should appear in any list of the most important bacterial plant pathogens. However, to our knowledge, no such list exists. The aim of this review was to survey all bacterial pathologists with an association with the journal Molecular Plant Pathology and ask them to nominate the bacterial pathogens they would place in a 'Top 10' based on scientific/economic importance. The survey generated 458 votes from the international community, and allowed the construction of a Top 10 bacterial plant pathogen list. The list includes, in rank order: (1) Pseudomonas syringae pathovars; (2) Ralstonia solanacearum; (3) Agrobacterium tumefaciens; (4) Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae; (5) Xanthomonas campestris pathovars; (6) Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovars; (7) Erwinia amylovora; (8) Xylella fastidiosa; (9) Dickeya (dadantii and solani); (10) Pectobacterium carotovorum (and Pectobacterium atrosepticum). Bacteria garnering honourable mentions for just missing out on the Top 10 include Clavibacter michiganensis (michiganensis and sepedonicus), Pseudomonas savastanoi and Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This review article presents a short section on each bacterium in the Top 10 list and its importance, with the intention of initiating discussion and debate amongst the plant bacteriology community, as well as laying down a benchmark. It will be interesting to see, in future years, how perceptions change and which bacterial pathogens enter and leave the Top 10. © 2012 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2012 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The value of cell-free DNA for molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Caitlin M; Kothari, Prachi D; Mouliere, Florent; Mair, Richard; Somnay, Saira; Benayed, Ryma; Zehir, Ahmet; Weigelt, Britta; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Arcila, Maria E; Berger, Michael F; Tsui, Dana Wy

    2018-04-01

    Over the past decade, advances in molecular biology and genomics techniques have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The technological advances in tissue profiling have also been applied to the study of cell-free nucleic acids, an area of increasing interest for molecular pathology. Cell-free nucleic acids are released from tumour cells into the surrounding body fluids and can be assayed non-invasively. The repertoire of genomic alterations in circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is reflective of both primary tumours and distant metastatic sites, and ctDNA can be sampled multiple times, thereby overcoming the limitations of the analysis of single biopsies. Furthermore, ctDNA can be sampled regularly to monitor response to treatment, to define the evolution of the tumour genome, and to assess the acquisition of resistance and minimal residual disease. Recently, clinical ctDNA assays have been approved for guidance of therapy, which is an exciting first step in translating cell-free nucleic acid research tests into clinical use for oncology. In this review, we discuss the advantages of cell-free nucleic acids as analytes in different body fluids, including blood plasma, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, and their clinical applications in solid tumours and haematological malignancies. We will also discuss practical considerations for clinical deployment, such as preanalytical factors and regulatory requirements. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Guideline on the requirements of external quality assessment programs in molecular pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krieken, J Han; Normanno, Nicola; Blackhall, Fiona; Boone, Elke; Botti, Gerardo; Carneiro, Fatima; Celik, Ilhan; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Cree, Ian A; Deans, Zandra C; Edsjö, Anders; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Kamarainen, Outi; Kreipe, Hans H; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Marchetti, Antonio; Murray, Samuel; Opdam, Frank J M; Patterson, Scott D; Patton, Simon; Pinto, Carmine; Rouleau, Etienne; Schuuring, Ed; Sterck, Silke; Taron, Miquel; Tejpar, Sabine; Timens, Wim; Thunnissen, Erik; van de Ven, Peter M; Siebers, Albert G; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    Molecular pathology is an integral part of daily diagnostic pathology and used for classification of tumors, for prediction of prognosis and response to therapy, and to support treatment decisions. For these reasons, analyses in molecular pathology must be highly reliable and hence external quality

  6. Contrast-enhanced power Doppler endosonography and pathological assessment of vascularization in advanced gastric carcinomas--a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, Sevastiţa; Filip, Maria-Monalisa; Georgescu, Claudia-Valentina; Angelescu, Cristina; Ciurea, Tudorel; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    Besides representing angiogenesis markers, microvascular density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are two important tools for the assessment of prognosis in patients with gastric cancer. The aim of our study was to assess the Doppler parameters (resistivity and pulsatility indexes) and vascularity index (VI) calculated by contrast-enhanced power Doppler endoscopic ultrasound (CEPD-EUS) in correlation with the expression of intra-tumoral MVD and VEGF in patients with gastric cancer. The study included 20 consecutive patients with advanced gastric carcinoma, but without distant metastasis at initial assessment. All the patients were assessed by contrast-enhanced power Doppler endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) combined with pulsed Doppler examinations in the late venous phase. The vascularity index (VI) was calculated before and after injection of second generation microbubble contrast specific agent (SonoVue 2.4 mL), used as a Doppler signal enhancer. Moreover, pulsed Doppler parameters (resistivity and pulsatility indexes) were further calculated. The correlation between power Doppler parameters and pathological/molecular parameters (MVD assessed through immunohistochemistry with CD31 and CD34, as well as VEGF assessed through real-time PCR) was assessed. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used for the assessment of prognosis. Significantly statistical correlations were found between post-contrast VI and CD34 (p=0.0226), VEGF (p=0.0231), VEGF-A (p=0.0464) and VEGF-B (p=0.0022) while pre-contrast VI was correlated only with CD34 expression. Pulsatility index and resistivity index were not correlated with MVD or VEGF expression. Survival analysis demonstrated that VEGF-A is an accurate parameter for survival rate (p=0.045), as compared to VEGF (p=0.085) and VEGF-B (p=0.230). We did not find any correlation between the survival rate and ultrasound parameters (RI, PI, pre-contrast VI or post-contrast VI). Assessment of tumor vascularity using contrast

  7. Normal anatomy and pathological changes of the infrapatellar pad of fat in double contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehnke, E.

    1980-01-01

    The diagnostic validity of double-contrast angiography in patients with Hoffa's disease was studied by re-evaluation of 1566 arthrographs without knowing the surgical findings. In order to obtain more information on the anatomy and pathology of the intrapatellar pad of fat, so knee joints of corpses were dissected who had died at different stages of life. As the studies showed, the decisive diagnostic factors in Hoffa's disease are the clinical complaints and an enlarged pad of fat in the arthrographic picture. (orig.) [de

  8. Correlativity study on MRI morphologic features, pathology, and molecular biology of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rong; Gong Shuigen; Zhang Weiguo; Chen Jinhua; He Shuangwu; Liu Baohua; Li Zengpeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation among MRI morphologic features, pathology, and molecular biology of breast cancer. Methods: MR scanning was performed in 78 patients with breast cancer before operation and MRI morphologic features of breast cancer were analyzed. The mastectomy specimens of the breast neoplasm were stained with immunohistochemistry, and the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), C-erbB-2, p53, and the distribution of microvessel density (MVD) was measured. The pathologic results were compared with MRI features. Results: Among the 80 breast cancers, ER positive expression was positively correlated with the spiculate margin of breast cancer (P 0.05). Among the 41 breast cancers with dynamic MR scans, there was positive correlation between the spatial distribution of contrast agent and MVD (P<0.01). Conclusion: There exists some correlation among MRI morphologic features, pathology, and molecular biology factors in breast cancer to certain extent. The biologic behavior and prognosis of the breast cancer can be assessed according to MRI features

  9. The pathology of familial breast cancer: Immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osin, Pinchas P; Lakhani, Sunil R

    1999-01-01

    Extensive studies of BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast tumours have been carried out in the few years since the identification of these familial breast cancer predisposing genes. The morphological studies suggest that BRCA1 tumours differ from BRCA2 tumours and from sporadic breast cancers. Recent progress in immunohistochemistry and molecular biology techniques has enabled in-depth investigation of molecular pathology of these tumours. Studies to date have investigated issues such as steroid hormone receptor expression, mutation status of tumour suppressor genes TP53 and c-erbB2, and expression profiles of cell cycle proteins p21, p27 and cyclin D 1 . Despite relative paucity of data, strong evidence of unique biological characteristics of BRCA1-associated breast cancer is accumulating. BRCA1-associated tumours appear to show an increased frequency of TP53 mutations, frequent p53 protein stabilization and absence of imunoreactivity for steroid hormone receptors. Further studies of larger number of samples of both BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated tumours are necessary to clarify and confirm these observations

  10. Molecular Pathological Classification of Neurodegenerative Diseases: Turning towards Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G

    2016-02-02

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) are characterized by selective dysfunction and loss of neurons associated with pathologically altered proteins that deposit in the human brain but also in peripheral organs. These proteins and their biochemical modifications can be potentially targeted for therapy or used as biomarkers. Despite a plethora of modifications demonstrated for different neurodegeneration-related proteins, such as amyloid-β, prion protein, tau, α-synuclein, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), or fused in sarcoma protein (FUS), molecular classification of NDDs relies on detailed morphological evaluation of protein deposits, their distribution in the brain, and their correlation to clinical symptoms together with specific genetic alterations. A further facet of the neuropathology-based classification is the fact that many protein deposits show a hierarchical involvement of brain regions. This has been shown for Alzheimer and Parkinson disease and some forms of tauopathies and TDP-43 proteinopathies. The present paper aims to summarize current molecular classification of NDDs, focusing on the most relevant biochemical and morphological aspects. Since the combination of proteinopathies is frequent, definition of novel clusters of patients with NDDs needs to be considered in the era of precision medicine. Optimally, neuropathological categorizing of NDDs should be translated into in vivo detectable biomarkers to support better prediction of prognosis and stratification of patients for therapy trials.

  11. A wide variety of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR appearances of breast cancer: Pathologic correlation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Masayuki; Furukawa, Akira; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristic magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of breast cancers, as well as, its variations and to investigate the pathology providing different patterns of dynamic-MR appearances. Materials and methods: Fifty-two women with cancer underwent mastectomy (52 tumors resected) and had MR imaging at our institution between April 2001 and March 2004. MR images of T1WI, T2WI, dynamic-MRI and contrast-enhanced T1WI were obtained and evaluated. Dynamic-MR images were correlated with pathological findings. Results: Common MR appearance of breast cancer was a focal mass either with irregular or spiculated margins with similar signal intensity on T1WI as and similar to higher signal intensity on T2WI compared to the normal mammary gland. On static contrast-enhanced T1WI, apparent enhancement was typically observed. On dynamic MRI, tumor-rim-enhancement on an early phase image and washout enhancement pattern on dynamic images, both characteristic for breast cancer, were observed, however, the prevalence of them was relatively low, which could be explained by the variation of histopathology among breast cancer nodules. Conclusion: In diagnosing breast masses on MRI, as well as the common and characteristic findings of breast cancer, the variations of MR findings and their underlying histopathology should also be considered

  12. Robust skull stripping using multiple MR image contrasts insensitive to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Snehashis; Butman, John A; Pham, Dzung L

    2017-02-01

    over the competing methods on both healthy and pathological brains. We also show that our multi-contrast framework is robust and maintains accurate performance across different types of acquisitions and scanners, even when using normal brains as atlases to strip pathological brains, demonstrating that our algorithm is applicable even when reference segmentations of pathological brains are not available to be used as atlases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Pathology of Murine Ureteritis Causing Obstructive Uropathy with Hydronephrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, Osamu; Otsuka, Saori; Namiki, Yuka; Hashimoto, Yoshiharu; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Primary causes of urinary tract obstruction that induces urine retention and results in hydronephrosis include uroliths, inflammation, and tumors. In this study, we analyzed the molecular pathology of ureteritis causing hydronephrosis in laboratory rodents. F2 progenies of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice were studied histopathologically and by comprehensive gene expression analysis of their ureters. Incidence of hydronephrosis was approximately 5% in F2 progenies. Histopathologically, this hydronephrosis was caused by stenosis of the proximal ureter, which showed fibrosis and papillary malformations of the proliferative epithelium with infiltrations of B-cell-dominated lymphocytes. Additionally, CD16-positive large granular leukocytes and eosinophils infiltrated from the ureteral mucosa to the muscular layer. Eosinophilic crystals were characteristically observed in the lumen of the ureter and the cytoplasm of large granular leukocytes, eosinophils, and transitional epithelial cells. Comprehensive gene profiling revealed remarkably elevated expression of genes associated with hyperimmune responses through activation of B cells in diseased ureters. Furthermore, diseased ureters showed dramatically higher gene expression of chitinase 3-like 3, known as Ym1, which is associated with formation both of adenomas in the transitional epithelium and of eosinophilic crystals in inflammatory conditions. The Ym1 protein was mainly localized to the cytoplasm of the transitional epithelium, infiltrated cells, and eosinophilic crystals in diseased ureters. We determined that the primary cause of hydronephrosis in F2 mice was ureteritis mediated by the local hyperimmune response with malformation of the transitional epithelium. Our data provide a novel molecular pathogenesis for elucidating causes of aseptic inflammation in human upper urinary tracts. PMID:22114694

  14. 3D Modeling of Vascular Pathologies from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor Rivera, Diego; Orkisz, Maciej; Arias, Julian; Uriza, Luis Felipe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for generating 3D vascular models from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) using a fast marching algorithm. The main contributions of this work are: the use of the original image for defining a speed function (which determines the movement of the interface) and the calculation of the time in which the interface identifies the artery. The proposed method was validated on pathologic carotid artery images of patients and vascular phantoms. A visual appraisal of vascular models obtained with the method shows a satisfactory extraction of the vascular wall. A quantitative assessment proved that the generated models depend on the values of algorithm parameters. The maximum induced error was equal to 1.34 voxels in the diameter of the measured stenoses.

  15. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Shaojie; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Lu, Zaijun

    2009-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid-polyethylene glycol/gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA) nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. The PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA-PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd-DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was -12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed ( r = 0.987). The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd-DTPA. PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA-PEG/Gd-DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular targeted imaging contrast agent.

  16. Biocompatible Nanocomplexes for Molecular Targeted MRI Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Dexin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accurate diagnosis in early stage is vital for the treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of poly lactic acid–polyethylene glycol/gadolinium–diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes using as biocompatible molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. The PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes were obtained using self-assembly nanotechnology by incubation of PLA–PEG nanoparticles and the commercial contrast agent, Gd–DTPA. The physicochemical properties of nanocomplexes were measured by atomic force microscopy and photon correlation spectroscopy. The T1-weighted MR images of the nanocomplexes were obtained in a 3.0 T clinical MR imager. The stability study was carried out in human plasma and the distribution in vivo was investigated in rats. The mean size of the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes was 187.9 ± 2.30 nm, and the polydispersity index was 0.108, and the zeta potential was −12.36 ± 3.58 mV. The results of MRI test confirmed that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes possessed the ability of MRI, and the direct correlation between the MRI imaging intensities and the nano-complex concentrations was observed (r = 0.987. The signal intensity was still stable within 2 h after incubation of the nanocomplexes in human plasma. The nanocomplexes gave much better image contrast effects and longer stagnation time than that of commercial contrast agent in rat liver. A dose of 0.04 mmol of gadolinium per kilogram of body weight was sufficient to increase the MRI imaging intensities in rat livers by five-fold compared with the commercial Gd–DTPA. PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes could be prepared easily with small particle sizes. The nanocomplexes had high plasma stability, better image contrast effect, and liver targeting property. These results indicated that the PLA–PEG/Gd–DTPA nanocomplexes might be potential as molecular

  17. Pathologic contrast enhancement of cerebral lesions: A comparative study using stereotactic CT, stereotactic MR imaging, and stereotactic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earnest, F. IV; Kelly, P.J.; Scheithauer, B.; Kall, B.; Cascino, T.L.; Ehman, R.L.; Forbes, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author compared the pattern and degree of Gd-DTPA dimeglumine contrast enhancement demonstrated on stereotactic MR images with that seen on stereotactic CT images obtained after conventional iodinated contrast agent enhancement and with histopathologic findings on sequential stereotactic brain biopsies. Stereotactic biopsies of the areas that enhanced on CT or MR imaging revealed tumor tissue with neovascularity. Tumor tissue with no or mild neovascularity did not enhance with contrast agent administration. Isolated tumor cells were frequently found beyond the margins of some primary brain neoplasms defined by contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging and CT. The histopathologic findings associated with pathologic contrast agent enhancement are presented

  18. Nanomedicine for the molecular diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juenet, Maya; Varna, Mariana; Aid-Launais, Rachida [Inserm, U1148, Cardiovascular Bio-Engineering, X. Bichat Hospital, 75018, Paris (France); Université Paris 13, Institut Galilée, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75018, Paris (France); Chauvierre, Cédric, E-mail: cedric.chauvierre@inserm.fr [Inserm, U1148, Cardiovascular Bio-Engineering, X. Bichat Hospital, 75018, Paris (France); Université Paris 13, Institut Galilée, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75018, Paris (France); Letourneur, Didier [Inserm, U1148, Cardiovascular Bio-Engineering, X. Bichat Hospital, 75018, Paris (France); Université Paris 13, Institut Galilée, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75018, Paris (France)

    2015-12-18

    Predicting acute clinical events caused by atherosclerotic plaque rupture remains a clinical challenge. Anatomic mapping of the vascular tree provided by standard imaging technologies is not always sufficient for a robust diagnosis. Yet biological mechanisms leading to unstable plaques have been identified and corresponding biomarkers have been described. Nanosystems charged with contrast agents and targeted towards these specific biomarkers have been developed for several types of imaging modalities. The first systems that have reached the clinic are ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Their potential relies on their passive accumulation by predominant physiological mechanisms in rupture-prone plaques. Active targeting strategies are under development to improve their specificity and set up other types of nanoplatforms. Preclinical results show a huge potential of nanomedicine for cardiovascular diagnosis, as long as the safety of these nanosystems in the body is studied in depth. - Highlights: • Ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction are the main causes of death in the world. • Their prevalence is related to late detection of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. • Biomarkers of atherosclerosis evolution and potential ligands have been identified. • Nanosystems based on these ligands appear promising for early molecular diagnosis. • Preclinical and clinical nanosystems for common imaging modalities are described.

  19. Nanomedicine for the molecular diagnosis of cardiovascular pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juenet, Maya; Varna, Mariana; Aid-Launais, Rachida; Chauvierre, Cédric; Letourneur, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Predicting acute clinical events caused by atherosclerotic plaque rupture remains a clinical challenge. Anatomic mapping of the vascular tree provided by standard imaging technologies is not always sufficient for a robust diagnosis. Yet biological mechanisms leading to unstable plaques have been identified and corresponding biomarkers have been described. Nanosystems charged with contrast agents and targeted towards these specific biomarkers have been developed for several types of imaging modalities. The first systems that have reached the clinic are ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Their potential relies on their passive accumulation by predominant physiological mechanisms in rupture-prone plaques. Active targeting strategies are under development to improve their specificity and set up other types of nanoplatforms. Preclinical results show a huge potential of nanomedicine for cardiovascular diagnosis, as long as the safety of these nanosystems in the body is studied in depth. - Highlights: • Ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction are the main causes of death in the world. • Their prevalence is related to late detection of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. • Biomarkers of atherosclerosis evolution and potential ligands have been identified. • Nanosystems based on these ligands appear promising for early molecular diagnosis. • Preclinical and clinical nanosystems for common imaging modalities are described.

  20. Viewing individual cells and ambient microvasculature using two molecular contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Wei, Xunbin; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-03-01

    To view the individual cells and ambient microvasculature simultaneously will be helpful to study tumor angiogenesis and microenvironments. To achieve this, two molecular contrast mechanisms were exploited simultaneously by integrating two imaging modalities, confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). These share the same scanning optical path and laser source. The induced photoacoustic (PA) signal was detected by a highly sensitive needle hydrophone; while the back-traveling fluorescent photons emitted from the same sample were collected by an avalanche photodetector. Experiments on ex vivo rat bladders were conducted. The CFM image depicted the shape and size of the individual cells successfully. Besides large polygonal umbrella cells, some intracellular components can also be discerned. With the CFM image presenting morphologic cellular information in the bladder wall, the PAM image provides the complementary information, based on the endogenous optical absorption contrast, of the microvascular distribution inside the bladder wall, from large vessels to capillaries. Such multimodal imaging provides the opportunity to realize both histological assay and characterization of microvasculature using one imaging setup. This approach offers the possibility of comprehensive diagnosis of cancer in vivo.

  1. Molecular and pathological identification of feline coronavirus type I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-06-05

    Jun 5, 2012 ... In this study, we described the isolation and molecular characterization of .... fecv2b) designed in the regions of S-protein gene were used to differentiate ..... The molecular dynamics of feline coronaviruses. Vet. Microbiol.

  2. Molecular Pathology: Predictive, Prognostic, and Diagnostic Markers in Uterine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterhouse, Lauren L; Howitt, Brooke E

    2016-09-01

    This article focuses on the diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive molecular biomarkers in uterine malignancies, in the context of morphologic diagnoses. The histologic classification of endometrial carcinomas is reviewed first, followed by the description and molecular classification of endometrial epithelial malignancies in the context of histologic classification. Taken together, the molecular and histologic classifications help clinicians to approach troublesome areas encountered in clinical practice and evaluate the utility of molecular alterations in the diagnosis and subclassification of endometrial carcinomas. Putative prognostic markers are reviewed. The use of molecular alterations and surrogate immunohistochemistry as prognostic and predictive markers is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction of pathology and molecular characterization of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, E.D.; Cherstvoy, E.; Egloff, B.; Hoefler, H.; Vecchio, G.; Bogdanova, T.; Bragarnik, M.; Tronko, N.D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of joint studies of thyroid cancer in children under 15 years of age between departments in Cambridge, Brussels, Naples and Munich in the European Union, and departments in Minsk, Kiev and Obninsk in the newly independent states of Eastern Europe. The pathology of 264 cases of childhood thyroid cancer out of 430 that have occurred since 1990 in the 3 countries in which high levels of fallout from the Chernobyl accident occurred has been restudied by NIS and EU pathologists. The overall level of agreement reached was about 97%. The diagnosis was supported by immunocytochemistry and ISH for the differentiation markers, thyroglobulin and calcitonin, and the tumors were classified according to the WHO, with papillary carcinomas being further subclassified. 99% of the 134 Belarussian cases were papillary carcinomas, as were 94% of the 114 Ukrainian tumors. All 9 of the Russian cases available for study were papillary in type. 76 of 154 cases of childhood thyroid cancer reviewed over a 30 year period in England and Wales and were also studied, 68% of these were papillary carcinoma. Histological study showed that a subtype of papillary carcinoma, rarely found in adults, with a solid/follicular architecture occurred in children. It was found in 72% of the Belarussian papillary carcinomas, 76% of the Ukrainian cases, but only 40% of the England and Wales cases. Molecular biological studies showed that the proportion of cases of papillary carcinoma expressing the ret gene was not significantly different in the exposed and the unexposed tumors, studies of the type of translocation leading to ret gene expression are not yet conclusive. Ras gene mutations were found as expected in follicular carcinoma, but were absent from any papillary carcinoma, whether from exposed or unexposed cases. TSH receptor mutations, normally found in follicular tumors were not found in any papillary carcinomas, nor were any p53 mutations identified. All these results

  4. Overlapping molecular pathological themes link Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies and hereditary spastic paraplegias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Vincent; Clowes, Virginia E; Reid, Evan

    2013-08-01

    In this review we focus on Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathies and hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Although these diseases differ in whether they primarily affect the peripheral or central nervous system, both are genetically determined, progressive, long axonopathies that affect motor and sensory pathways. This commonality suggests that there might be similarities in the molecular pathology underlying these conditions, and here we compare the molecular genetics and cellular pathology of the two groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Genetic Buffering Relationships Identified in Fission Yeast To Elucidate the Molecular Pathology of Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    tsc1 and tsc2 loss of function mutations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Northeast Regional Yeast Meeting, June 16-17, University at Buffalo, The State...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0169 TITLE: Using Genetic Buffering Relationships Identified in Fission Yeast To Elucidate the Molecular Pathology of...SUBTITLE Using Genetic Buffering Relationships Identified in Fission 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0169 Yeast to Elucidate the Molecular Pathology

  6. European Consensus Conference for external quality assessment in molecular pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krieken, J. H.; Siebers, A. G.; Normanno, N.; Timens, Wim

    Molecular testing of tumor samples to guide treatment decisions is of increasing importance. Several drugs have been approved for treatment of molecularly defined subgroups of patients, and the number of agents requiring companion diagnostics for their prescription is expected to rapidly increase.

  7. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  8. Genetics and molecular pathology of Stargardt-like macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Wong, Paul; Ayyagari, Radha

    2010-05-01

    Stargardt-like macular degeneration (STGD3) is an early onset, autosomal dominant macular degeneration. STGD3 is characterized by a progressive pathology, the loss of central vision, atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium, and accumulation of lipofuscin, clinical features that are also characteristic of age-related macular degeneration. The onset of clinical symptoms in STGD3, however, is typically observed within the second or third decade of life (i.e., starting in the teenage years). The clinical profile at any given age among STGD3 patients can be variable suggesting that, although STGD3 is a single gene defect, other genetic or environmental factors may play a role in moderating the final disease phenotype. Genetic studies localized the STGD3 disease locus to a small region on the short arm of human chromosome 6, and application of a positional candidate gene approach identified protein truncating mutations in the elongation of very long chain fatty acids-4 gene (ELOVL4) in patients with this disease. The ELOVL4 gene encodes a protein homologous to the ELO group of proteins that participate in fatty acid elongation in yeast. Pathogenic mutations found in the ELOVL4 gene result in altered trafficking of the protein and behave with a dominant negative effect. Mice carrying an Elovl4 mutation developed photoreceptor degeneration and depletion of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). ELOVL4 protein participates in the synthesis of fatty acids with chain length longer than 26 carbons. Studies on ELOVL4 indicate that VLCFA may be necessary for normal function of the retina, and the defective protein trafficking and/or altered VLCFA elongation underlies the pathology associated with STGD3. Determining the role of VLCFA in the retina and discerning the implications of abnormal trafficking of mutant ELOVL4 and depleted VLCFA content in the pathology of STGD3 will provide valuable insight in understanding the retinal structure, function, and pathology underlying STGD3

  9. Techniques for Maximizing the Performance of Molecular Pathology Testing: Responsibilities of All Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren UZUN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular pathological analysis has an expanding role in patient diagnosis and management. The performance of these techniques relies on excellent laboratory procedures. However, the crucial step is obtaining the best samples for molecular analysis. Archiving and selection of these are the responsibilities of all pathologists even if they are not working at a center with molecular pathological facilities. This review focuses on the features of different types of materials for molecular pathological analysis. Many steps that might affect the results, including communication between the pathologist and the oncology team, features of different types of materials (cytological, tissue blocks, biopsy, circulating tumor cells (CTCs and cell-free circulating nucleic acids, effects of tissue processing, methods for selecting the best material, and tissue saving and tumor enrichment methods are discussed. The procedures for referral to a center for molecular pathological analysis are also mentioned. Awareness of the importance of the cytopathological and histopathological material of the patients for future molecular pathological analysis by pathologists is of the utmost importance.

  10. Molecular pathology in adult gliomas: diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jansen, Michael

    2010-07-01

    Over the past 10 years, there has been an increasing use of molecular markers in the assessment and management of adult malignant gliomas. Some molecular signatures are used diagnostically to help pathologists classify tumours, whereas others are used to estimate prognosis for patients. Most crucial, however, are those markers that are used to predict response to certain therapies, thereby directing clinicians to a particular treatment while avoiding other potentially deleterious therapies. Recently, large-scale genome-wide surveys have been used to identify new biomarkers that have been rapidly developed as diagnostic and prognostic tools. Given these developments, the pace of discovery of new molecular assays will quicken to facilitate personalised medicine in the setting of malignant glioma.

  11. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cree, Ian A.; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjo, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Sole, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J. Han

    2014-01-01

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this

  12. Guidance for laboratories performing molecular pathology for cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cree, Ian A.; Deans, Zandra; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Normanno, Nicola; Edsjo, Anders; Rouleau, Etienne; Sole, Francesc; Thunnissen, Erik; Timens, Wim; Schuuring, Ed; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Murray, Samuel; Dietel, Manfred; Groenen, Patricia; Van Krieken, J. Han

    Molecular testing is becoming an important part of the diagnosis of any patient with cancer. The challenge to laboratories is to meet this need, using reliable methods and processes to ensure that patients receive a timely and accurate report on which their treatment will be based. The aim of this

  13. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-08-07

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management.

  14. Evaluation of the pathological response and prognosis following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in molecular subtypes of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhao,1 Xiaoqiu Dong,2 Rongguo Li,1 Xiao Ma,1 Jian Song,1 Yingjie Li,3 Dongwei Zhang1 1Department of General Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 2Department of Ultrasonography, Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 3Department of Pathology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China Background: The pathological complete response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer correlates with the prognosis for survival. Tumors may have different prognoses according to their molecular subtypes. This study was performed to evaluate the relevance of the pathological response and prognosis following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer.Methods: A consecutive series of 88 patients with operable breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy was analyzed. Patients were classified into four molecular subtypes based on the immunohistochemistry profile of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2, and Ki-67. The histological response was assessed according to Miller-Payne grading (MPG and Residual Disease in Breast and Nodes (RDBN.Results: Ten patients (11.4% achieved a pathological complete response, assessed according to RDBN. The pathological complete response rate was 13.6% according to MPG. Patients with the triple-negative subtype were more likely to achieve a pathological complete response than those with luminal A breast cancer (P=0.03. MPG and RDBN are independent predictors of distant disease-free survival and local recurrence-free survival, but do not predict overall survival. Ki-67, size of invasive carcinoma, lymph nodes, molecular subtypes, MPG, and RDBN are important predictors of distant disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, and overall survival.Conclusion: MPG and RDBN were similarly related to the patient’s prognosis. MPG was more suitable for evaluation of distant disease

  15. MRI and pathological features of different molecular subtypes of breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yang; Huo Tianlong; Lai Yunyao; Hong Nan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the MRI and pathological features of different molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Methods: The data of 202 patients who underwent primary breast cancer resection were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients had MRI preoperatively. The molecular subtypes of breast cancer defined by immunohistochemistry were classified as basal-like, luminal and HER-2 overexpression. Morphology (including mass or non-mass like enhancement, shape and margin of masses, unifocal or multifocal masses) and enhancement characteristics on MRI, histologic types and grades of tumors were analyzed with Chi-square test, exact test, Fisher exact test, Kruskal-Wallis H test, and Wilcoxon test. Results: Among the 202 patients, 34 were basal-like, 144 were luminal and 24 were HER-2 overexpression. The number of mass cases in each subtype was 29, 133 and 19 respectively,making no significant difference (χ 2 =4.136, P=0.126). As for the shape of basal-like lesions,8 were round,19 were lobular and 2 were irregular, while this distribution was 23, 58, 52 in luminal subtype and 1, 11, 7 in HER-2 overexpression subtype (χ 2 =13.391, P<0.05). The margin was also strikingly different among three groups (smooth, spiculate, irregular): 20, 5, 4 respectively in basal-like, 27, 53, 53 respectively in luminal, and 4, 7, 8 respectively in HER-2 overexpression (χ 2 =28.515, P<0.01). 52.6% (10/19) of HER-2 overexpression cases were multifocal, while only 6.9% (2/29) of luminal and 8.0% (24/133) of basal-like ones were multifocal (χ 2 =16.140, P<0.01). Characteristics in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI were statistically different, with homogeneous, heterogeneous, and rim enhancement 0, 13, 16 respectively in basal-like cases, 28, 93, 11 respectively in luminal cases and 2, 11, 6 respectively in HER-2 overexpression cases (P<0.01). However, the difference for enhancement curve did not reach significance (P =0.457). Histologic types were significantly different among molecular

  16. Integration of molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science for global precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akihiro; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Nishihara, Reiko; Tan, Andy S; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine concept and the unique disease principle imply that each patient has unique pathogenic processes resulting from heterogeneous cellular genetic and epigenetic alterations and interactions between cells (including immune cells) and exposures, including dietary, environmental, microbial and lifestyle factors. As a core method field in population health science and medicine, epidemiology is a growing scientific discipline that can analyze disease risk factors and develop statistical methodologies to maximize utilization of big data on populations and disease pathology. The evolving transdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) can advance biomedical and health research by linking exposures to molecular pathologic signatures, enhancing causal inference and identifying potential biomarkers for clinical impact. The MPE approach can be applied to any diseases, although it has been most commonly used in neoplastic diseases (including breast, lung and colorectal cancers) because of availability of various molecular diagnostic tests. However, use of state-of-the-art genomic, epigenomic and other omic technologies and expensive drugs in modern healthcare systems increases racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. To address this, we propose to integrate molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science. Social epidemiology integrates the latter two fields. The integrative social MPE model can embrace sociology, economics and precision medicine, address global health disparities and inequalities, and elucidate biological effects of social environments, behaviors and networks. We foresee advancements of molecular medicine, including molecular diagnostics, biomedical imaging and targeted therapeutics, which should benefit individuals in a global population, by means of an interdisciplinary approach of integrative MPE and social health science.

  17. Next generation diagnostic molecular pathology: critical appraisal of quality assurance in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Deans, Zandra C; Tops, Bastiaan B J; van Kemenade, Folkert J; Koljenović, S; van Krieken, Han J M; Blokx, Willeke A M; Dinjens, Winand N M; Groenen, Patricia J T A

    2014-06-01

    Tumor evaluation in pathology is more and more based on a combination of traditional histopathology and molecular analysis. Due to the rapid development of new cancer treatments that specifically target aberrant proteins present in tumor cells, treatment decisions are increasingly based on the molecular features of the tumor. Not only the number of patients eligible for targeted precision medicine, but also the number of molecular targets per patient and tumor type is rising. Diagnostic molecular pathology, the discipline that determines the molecular aberrations present in tumors for diagnostic, prognostic or predictive purposes, is faced with true challenges. The laboratories have to meet the need of comprehensive molecular testing using only limited amount of tumor tissue, mostly fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin (FFPE), in short turnaround time. Choices must be made for analytical methods that provide accurate, reliable and cost-effective results. Validation of the test procedures and results is essential. In addition, participation and good performance in internal (IQA) and external quality assurance (EQA) schemes is mandatory. In this review, we critically evaluate the validation procedure for comprehensive molecular tests as well as the organization of quality assurance and assessment of competence of diagnostic molecular pathology laboratories within Europe. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pitfalls in lung cancer molecular pathology: how to limit them in routine practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, M; Hofman, P

    2012-01-01

    New treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) targeting activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations and other genetic alterations demonstrated the clinical significance of the molecular features of specific subsets of tumors. Therefore, the development of personalized medicine has stimulated the routine integration into pathology departments of somatic mutation testing. However, clinical mutation testing must be optimized and standardized with regard to histological profile, type of samples, pre-analytical steps, methodology and result reporting. Routine molecular testing in NSCLC is currently moving beyond EGFR mutational analysis. Recent progress of targeted therapies will require molecular testing for a wide panel of mutations for a personalized molecular diagnosis. As a consequence, efficient testing of multiple molecular abnormalities is an urgent requirement in thoracic oncology. Moreover, increasingly limited tumor sample becomes a major challenge for molecular pathology. Continuous efforts should be made for safe, effective and specific molecular analyses. This must be based on close collaboration between the departments involved in the management of lung cancer. In this review we explored the practical issues and pitfalls surrounding the routine implementation of molecular testing in NSCLC in a pathology laboratory.

  19. Delayed contrast-enhanced MRI: use in myocardial viability assessment and other cardiac pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, J.; Dymarkowski, S.

    2005-01-01

    As in other organs, tissue characterization is important for many cardiac diseases. For example, in ischemic heart disease, differentiation between reversibly and irreversibly damaged myocardium in patients with a prior myocardial infarction is crucial in determining disease severity, functional recovery and patient outcome. With the recent advent of the single inversion-recovery contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence (delayed contrast-enhanced MRI), contrast between normal and abnormal tissues could be significantly enhanced compared with the conventional cardiac MRI sequences, enabling even subtle abnormalities to be visualized. Together with other advances in cardiac MRI (e.g. functional imaging, coronary artery imaging), MRI has become one of the preferred non-invasive modalities to study cardiac diseases. In this paper an overview of the versatility of delayed contrast-enhanced MRI for investigating cardiac diseases is given. (orig.)

  20. Pathological Bases for a Robust Application of Cancer Molecular Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Diaz-Cano

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Any robust classification system depends on its purpose and must refer to accepted standards, its strength relying on predictive values and a careful consideration of known factors that can affect its reliability. In this context, a molecular classification of human cancer must refer to the current gold standard (histological classification and try to improve it with key prognosticators for metastatic potential, staging and grading. Although organ-specific examples have been published based on proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics evaluations, the most popular approach uses gene expression analysis as a direct correlate of cellular differentiation, which represents the key feature of the histological classification. RNA is a labile molecule that varies significantly according with the preservation protocol, its transcription reflect the adaptation of the tumor cells to the microenvironment, it can be passed through mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes, and it is exposed to epigenetic modifications. More robust classifications should be based on stable molecules, at the genetic level represented by DNA to improve reliability, and its analysis must deal with the concept of intratumoral heterogeneity, which is at the origin of tumor progression and is the byproduct of the selection process during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The simultaneous analysis of multiple DNA targets and next generation sequencing offer the best practical approach for an analytical genomic classification of tumors.

  1. Molecular MRI using exogenous enzymatic sensors and endogenous chemical exchange contrast

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Alexander John

    2016-01-01

    Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods have the potential to provide detailed information regarding cellular and molecular processes at small scales within the human body. Nuclear signals from chemical samples can be probed using specialised MRI techniques, to highlight molecular contrast from particular enzymes or metabolites. The aim of the work described in this thesis is to investigate both exogenous and endogenous contrast mechanisms using fluorine MRI and chemical exchange s...

  2. New insights into molecular diagnostic pathology of primary liver cancer: Advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wen-Ming; Wu, Meng-Chao

    2015-11-01

    Primary liver cancer (PLC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with increasing incidence and accounts for the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Traditional morphopathology primarily emphasizes qualitative diagnosis of PLC, which is not sufficient to resolve the major concern of increasing the long-term treatment efficacy of PLC in clinical management for the modern era. Since the beginning of the 21st century, molecular pathology has played an active role in the investigation of the evaluation of the metastatic potential of PLC, detection of drug targets, prediction of recurrence risks, analysis of clonal origins, evaluation of the malignancy trend of precancerous lesions, and determination of clinical prognosis. As a result, many new progresses have been obtained, and new strategies of molecular-pathological diagnosis have been formed. Moreover, the new types of pathobiological diagnosis indicator systems for PLC have been preliminarily established. These achievements provide valuable molecular pathology-based guide for clinical formulation of individualized therapy programs for PLC. This review article briefly summarizes some relevant progresses of molecular-pathological diagnosis of PLC from the perspective of clinical translational application other than basic experimental studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. the contrasting attitudes of plant breeders and molecular biologists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Socialization into disciplinary cultures, organizational factors and individual anxieties seem to inhibit inter-disciplinary collaboration. The majority of rice breeders and a small group of molecular biologists emphasize the relative merits of marker-assisted selection (MAS) in the near term vis-à-vis the currently controversial ...

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents for molecular imaging in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Matthew

    2018-05-01

    For over twenty years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been developed for a number of medical applications ranging from bioseparations, magnetic drug targeting, hyperthermia and imaging. Recent studies have shown that they can be functionalized for in vivo biological targeting, potentially enabling nanoagents for molecular imaging and site-localized drug delivery. Here we review several imaging technologies developed using functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as targeted molecular agents. Several imaging modalities have exploited the large induced magnetic moment of SPIONs to create local mechanical force. Magnetic force microscopy can probe nanoparticle uptake in single cells. For in vivo applications, magnetomotive modulation of primary images in ultrasound (US), photoacoustics (PA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) can help identify very small concentrations of nanoagents while simultaneously suppressing intrinsic background signals from tissue.

  5. Molecular Diagnostics in Pathology: Time for a Next-Generation Pathologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassan, Matteo

    2018-03-01

    - Comprehensive molecular investigations of mainstream carcinogenic processes have led to the use of effective molecular targeted agents in most cases of solid tumors in clinical settings. - To update readers regarding the evolving role of the pathologist in the therapeutic decision-making process and the introduction of next-generation technologies into pathology practice. - Current literature on the topic, primarily sourced from the PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, Maryland) database, were reviewed. - Adequate evaluation of cytologic-based and tissue-based predictive diagnostic biomarkers largely depends on both proper pathologic characterization and customized processing of biospecimens. Moreover, increased requests for molecular testing have paralleled the recent, sharp decrease in tumor material to be analyzed-material that currently comprises cytology specimens or, at minimum, small biopsies in most cases of metastatic/advanced disease. Traditional diagnostic pathology has been completely revolutionized by the introduction of next-generation technologies, which provide multigene, targeted mutational profiling, even in the most complex of clinical cases. Combining traditional and molecular knowledge, pathologists integrate the morphological, clinical, and molecular dimensions of a disease, leading to a proper diagnosis and, therefore, the most-appropriate tailored therapy.

  6. Dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI for the detection of pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollub, M.J.; Gultekin, D.H.; Akin, O.; Do, R.K.; Fuqua, J.L.; Gonen, M.; Kuk, D.; Weiser, M.; Paty, P.; Guillem, J.; Nash, G.M.; Temple, L.; Saltz, L.; Schrag, D.; Goodman, K.; Shia, J.; Schwartz, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the ability of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI) to predict pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative chemotherapy for rectal cancer. In a prospective clinical trial, 23/34 enrolled patients underwent pre- and post-treatment DCE-MRI performed at 1.5T. Gadolinium 0.1 mmol/kg was injected at a rate of 2 mL/s. Using a two-compartmental model of vascular space and extravascular extracellular space, K trans , k ep , v e , AUC90, and AUC180 were calculated. Surgical specimens were the gold standard. Baseline, post-treatment and changes in these quantities were compared with clinico-pathological outcomes. For quantitative variable comparison, Spearman's Rank correlation was used. For categorical variable comparison, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. P ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Percentage of histological tumour response ranged from 10 to 100%. Six patients showed pCR. Post chemotherapy K trans (mean 0.5 min -1 vs. 0.2 min -1 , P = 0.04) differed significantly between non-pCR and pCR outcomes, respectively and also correlated with percent tumour response and pathological size. Post-treatment residual abnormal soft tissue noted in some cases of pCR prevented an MR impression of complete response based on morphology alone. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer, MR perfusional characteristics have been identified that can aid in the distinction between incomplete response and pCR. (orig.)

  7. Integration of Molecular Pathology, Epidemiology, and Social Science for Global Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akihiro; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Nishihara, Reiko; Tan, Andy S.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Summary The precision medicine concept and the unique disease principle imply that each patient has unique pathogenic processes resulting from heterogeneous cellular genetic and epigenetic alterations, and interactions between cells (including immune cells) and exposures, including dietary, environmental, microbial, and lifestyle factors. As a core method field in population health science and medicine, epidemiology is a growing scientific discipline that can analyze disease risk factors, and develop statistical methodologies to maximize utilization of big data on populations and disease pathology. The evolving transdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) can advance biomedical and health research by linking exposures to molecular pathologic signatures, enhancing causal inference, and identifying potential biomarkers for clinical impact. The MPE approach can be applied to any diseases, although it has been most commonly used in neoplastic diseases (including breast, lung and colorectal cancers) because of availability of various molecular diagnostic tests. However, use of state-of-the-art genomic, epigenomic and other omic technologies and expensive drugs in modern healthcare systems increases racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. To address this, we propose to integrate molecular pathology, epidemiology, and social science. Social epidemiology integrates the latter two fields. The integrative social MPE model can embrace sociology, economics and precision medicine, address global health disparities and inequalities, and elucidate biological effects of social environments, behaviors, and networks. We foresee advancements of molecular medicine, including molecular diagnostics, biomedical imaging, and targeted therapeutics, which should benefit individuals in a global population, by means of an interdisciplinary approach of integrative MPE and social health science. PMID:26636627

  8. Spiral CT and optimization of the modalities of the iodinated intravenous contrast material: Experimental studies in human pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaldi, V.

    1998-01-01

    Spiral (or helical) CT represents the most recent improvement in the field of computed assisted tomography (CAT scan). The capabilities of this new imaging modality are much superior to these of conventional CT scanning; then result from the rapid acquisition and from the volumetric nature of the derived data set. The short time of data acquisition had made mandatory the revision of protocols for intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. By the means of several studies, carried out on pathologic and healthy patients, we have attempted to improve knowledge in factors influencing CT attenuation values after injection of contrast material, in the aim of improving contrast administration performed during spiral CT scanning. Anatomical landmarks that we have studied till now have been liver, the pancreas, the kidney and the cervical spine. In addition, a paired based methodology has been used. The volumetric set of data derived from spiral CT scanning leads to optimal post-processing tasks, the most interesting being related to cine-display and multiplanar reformatting; both modalities have been evaluated, about the pancreas and the musculo-skeletal system respectively. Conversely, this new modality, as for other imaging modalities, is responsible for additional costs derived from restless increase in the number of images to be dealt with and from the occurrence of new tasks (in post-processing particularly). The place of spiral CT in diagnostic strategies among other modern imaging modalities should be assessed, especially with respect to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). (author)

  9. Pathology interface for the molecular analysis of tissue by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy L Norris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS generates molecular images directly from tissue sections to provide better diagnostic insights and expand the capabilities of clinical anatomic pathology. Although IMS technology has matured over recent years, the link between microscopy imaging currently used by pathologists and MS-based molecular imaging has not been established. Methods: We adapted the Vanderbilt University Tissue Core workflow for IMS into a web-based system that facilitates remote collaboration. The platform was designed to perform within acceptable web response times for viewing, annotating, and processing high resolution microscopy images. Results: We describe a microscopy-driven approach to tissue analysis by IMS. Conclusion: The Pathology Interface for Mass Spectrometry is designed to provide clinical access to IMS technology and deliver enhanced diagnostic value.

  10. Cutaneous Pythiosis in calves: An epidemiologic, pathologic, serologic and molecular characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Konradt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the epidemiological, pathological and mycological findings of cutaneous pythiosis in cattle in southern Brazil. 23 calves, that were kept next to a river with extensive marshy regions, presented ulcerated cutaneous lesions in thoracic and pelvic limbs, sometimes extending to the ventral thoracic region. Histopathological examination revealed multifocal pyogranulomas in the superficial and deep dermis. The Grocott-Methenamine silver, immunohistochemistry anti-Pythium insidiosum, ELISA serology and molecular characterization demonstrated the agent P. insidiosum in these cases.

  11. Molecular pathology of vertebral deformities in hyperthermic Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    OpenAIRE

    Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Baeverfjord, Grete; Torgersen, Jacob; Hjelde, Kirsti; Takle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Hyperthermia has been shown in a number of organisms to induce developmental defects as a result of changes in cell proliferation, differentiation and gene expression. In spite of this, salmon aquaculture commonly uses high water temperature to speed up developmental rate in intensive production systems, resulting in an increased frequency of skeletal deformities. In order to study the molecular pathology of vertebral deformities, Atlantic salmon was subjected to hyperther...

  12. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  13. Spatial Organization and Molecular Correlation of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes Using Deep Learning on Pathology Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Saltz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Beyond sample curation and basic pathologic characterization, the digitized H&E-stained images of TCGA samples remain underutilized. To highlight this resource, we present mappings of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs based on H&E images from 13 TCGA tumor types. These TIL maps are derived through computational staining using a convolutional neural network trained to classify patches of images. Affinity propagation revealed local spatial structure in TIL patterns and correlation with overall survival. TIL map structural patterns were grouped using standard histopathological parameters. These patterns are enriched in particular T cell subpopulations derived from molecular measures. TIL densities and spatial structure were differentially enriched among tumor types, immune subtypes, and tumor molecular subtypes, implying that spatial infiltrate state could reflect particular tumor cell aberration states. Obtaining spatial lymphocytic patterns linked to the rich genomic characterization of TCGA samples demonstrates one use for the TCGA image archives with insights into the tumor-immune microenvironment. : Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs were identified from standard pathology cancer images by a deep-learning-derived “computational stain” developed by Saltz et al. They processed 5,202 digital images from 13 cancer types. Resulting TIL maps were correlated with TCGA molecular data, relating TIL content to survival, tumor subtypes, and immune profiles. Keywords: digital pathology, immuno-oncology, machine learning, lymphocytes, tumor microenvironment, deep learning, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, computer vision

  14. Continuing role of a frozen-tissue bank in molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, S P

    1996-12-01

    The growth of molecular diagnostics and its application in various clinical laboratories have made it necessary to standardize the methods used to freeze and store tissues used in molecular testing. It may now be advantageous to preserve fresh tissues and other specimen types in a central frozen-tissue bank so that sample preparation and storage conditions are appropriate for molecular applications and so that the specimen inventory can be efficiently managed. The pathology laboratory is a logical site for the facility because the professional and technical expertise available is focused on the complex scientific and regulatory aspects of laboratory medicine. Organizationally, the tissue-bank program should be overseen by a surgical pathologist to integrate it into routine surgical pathology activities. A member of the laboratory technical staff can serve as the tissue-bank coordinator with responsibility for systematic storage and retrieval of specimens and routine maintenance of equipment and supplies. To facilitate the tissue-freezing procedure and efficient storage of multiple types of specimens, 2.0 ml cryogenic vials are used as the uniform storage container. All specimens are stored at -140 to -150 degrees C in the vapor phase of liquid nitrogen. The specimen inventory data are maintained with a computerized program specifically designed to manage complex specimen storage. A frozen-tissue bank is easily implemented in a pathology laboratory and is a valuable institutional asset for diagnostic and research purposes.

  15. Dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI for the detection of pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollub, M.J.; Gultekin, D.H.; Akin, O.; Do, R.K.; Fuqua, J.L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Gonen, M.; Kuk, D. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Weiser, M.; Paty, P.; Guillem, J.; Nash, G.M.; Temple, L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Saltz, L. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Schrag, D. [Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Goodman, K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Shia, J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, L.H. [Columbia University Medical Center/New York Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-04-15

    To determine the ability of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-MRI) to predict pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative chemotherapy for rectal cancer. In a prospective clinical trial, 23/34 enrolled patients underwent pre- and post-treatment DCE-MRI performed at 1.5T. Gadolinium 0.1 mmol/kg was injected at a rate of 2 mL/s. Using a two-compartmental model of vascular space and extravascular extracellular space, K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}, AUC90, and AUC180 were calculated. Surgical specimens were the gold standard. Baseline, post-treatment and changes in these quantities were compared with clinico-pathological outcomes. For quantitative variable comparison, Spearman's Rank correlation was used. For categorical variable comparison, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. P {<=} 0.05 was considered significant. Percentage of histological tumour response ranged from 10 to 100%. Six patients showed pCR. Post chemotherapy K{sup trans} (mean 0.5 min{sup -1} vs. 0.2 min{sup -1}, P = 0.04) differed significantly between non-pCR and pCR outcomes, respectively and also correlated with percent tumour response and pathological size. Post-treatment residual abnormal soft tissue noted in some cases of pCR prevented an MR impression of complete response based on morphology alone. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer, MR perfusional characteristics have been identified that can aid in the distinction between incomplete response and pCR. (orig.)

  16. Optical-based molecular imaging: contrast agents and potential medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, Christoph; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Weissleder, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    Laser- and sensitive charge-coupled device technology together with advanced mathematical modelling of photon propagation in tissue has prompted the development of novel optical imaging technologies. Fast surface-weighted imaging modalities, such as fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) and 3D quantitative fluorescence-mediated tomography have now become available [1, 2]. These technical advances are paralleled by a rapid development of a whole range of new optical contrasting strategies, which are designed to generate molecular contrast within a living organism. The combination of both, technical advances of light detection and the refinement of optical contrast media, finally yields a new spectrum of tools for in vivo molecular diagnostics. Whereas the technical aspects of optical imaging are covered in more detail in a previous review article in ''European Radiology'' [3], this article focuses on new developments in optical contrasting strategies and design of optical contrast agents for in vivo diagnostics. (orig.)

  17. Integration of pharmacology, molecular pathology, and population data science to support precision gastrointestinal oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shuji; Jhun, Iny; Mata, Douglas A; Soong, Thing Rinda; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Liu, Li; Nishihara, Reiko; Giannakis, Marios; Cao, Yin; Manson, JoAnn E; Nowak, Jonathan A; Chan, Andrew T

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine has a goal of customizing disease prevention and treatment strategies. Under the precision medicine paradigm, each patient has unique pathologic processes resulting from cellular genomic, epigenomic, proteomic, and metabolomic alterations, which are influenced by pharmacological, environmental, microbial, dietary, and lifestyle factors. Hence, to realize the promise of precision medicine, multi-level research methods that can comprehensively analyze many of these variables are needed. In order to address this gap, the integrative field of molecular pathology and population data science (i.e., molecular pathological epidemiology) has been developed to enable such multi-level analyses, especially in gastrointestinal cancer research. Further integration of pharmacology can improve our understanding of drug effects, and inform decision-making of drug use at both the individual and population levels. Such integrative research demonstrated potential benefits of aspirin in colorectal carcinoma with PIK3CA mutations, providing the basis for new clinical trials. Evidence also suggests that HPGD (15-PDGH) expression levels in normal colon and the germline rs6983267 polymorphism that relates to tumor CTNNB1 (β-catenin)/ WNT signaling status may predict the efficacy of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention. As immune checkpoint blockade targeting the CD274 (PD-L1)/ PDCD1 (PD-1) pathway for microsatellite instability-high (or mismatch repair-deficient) metastatic gastrointestinal or other tumors has become standard of care, potential modifying effects of dietary, lifestyle, microbial, and environmental factors on immunotherapy need to be studied to further optimize treatment strategies. With its broad applicability, our integrative approach can provide insights into the interactive role of medications, exposures, and molecular pathology, and guide the development of precision medicine.

  18. MOLECULAR BIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COMPLEX DIAGNOSIS OF AUXILLARY PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Rozhkova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A diversity of axillary pathologies was a prerequisite for the development of a new differential approach to diagnosing such conditions. There are new technologies (pre- and intraoperative radionuclide studies, molecular genetic techniques, that have shown themselves, along with classical methods (physical examination, mammography, X-ray and ultrasound studies.Materials and methods. The subject of the analysis is the results of a comprehensive examination of 502 women aged 22 to 84 years. Different groups were comprehensively examined using both X-ray, ultrasound, radionuclide, and molecular genetic (polymerase chain reaction studies.Results. The molecular genetic and cytological studies could provide the actual results in 95 and 84% of cases, respectively; but a com- prehensive clinical study and X-ray ultrasound computed tomography could yield them in marginal metastases in only 65.3%. Conclusion. The authors have proposed the optimal diagnostic algorithm for examination in the ambulatory-outpatient network and specialized institutions.

  19. Molecular pathological epidemiology: new developing frontiers of big data science to study etiologies and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Keum, NaNa; Nishihara, Reiko; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-03-01

    Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is an integrative field that utilizes molecular pathology to incorporate interpersonal heterogeneity of a disease process into epidemiology. In each individual, the development and progression of a disease are determined by a unique combination of exogenous and endogenous factors, resulting in different molecular and pathological subtypes of the disease. Based on "the unique disease principle," the primary aim of MPE is to uncover an interactive relationship between a specific environmental exposure and disease subtypes in determining disease incidence and mortality. This MPE approach can provide etiologic and pathogenic insights, potentially contributing to precision medicine for personalized prevention and treatment. Although breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers have been among the most commonly studied diseases, the MPE approach can be used to study any disease. In addition to molecular features, host immune status and microbiome profile likely affect a disease process, and thus serve as informative biomarkers. As such, further integration of several disciplines into MPE has been achieved (e.g., pharmaco-MPE, immuno-MPE, and microbial MPE), to provide novel insights into underlying etiologic mechanisms. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies, available genomic and epigenomic data have expanded dramatically. The MPE approach can also provide a specific risk estimate for each disease subgroup, thereby enhancing the impact of genome-wide association studies on public health. In this article, we present recent progress of MPE, and discuss the importance of accounting for the disease heterogeneity in the era of big-data health science and precision medicine.

  20. A retrospective of an unconventionally trained plant pathologist: plant diseases to molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Seiji

    2006-01-01

    Plant pathology evolved from its mycology-oriented origins into a science dealing with biochemical mechanisms of diseases, along with enhanced crop production through disease control. This retrospective describes first my personal experience from my introduction to plant pathology, to the establishment of the concept of accessibility as a model pertaining to genetically defined basic compatibility induced by pathogens. I then refer to the development of molecular plant pathology from physiological and biochemical plant pathology fostered by the growth in recombinant technology in the second half of the past century. This progress was best reflected by the U.S.-Japan Seminar Series held at 4-5-year intervals from 1966 to 2003 and documented by publications in major journals of our discipline. These seminars emphasized that progress in science has always been supported by the invention of novel techniques and that knowledge integrated from modern genomics and subsequent proteomics should contribute to the progress of basic life sciences and, more importantly, to the elaboration of rational measures for disease control.

  1. ADVANCES AND CHALLENGES IN SUGARCANE BIOTECHNOLOY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY: A REVIEW OF THE IX PLANT PATHOLOGY WORKSHOP AND VI MOLECULAR BIOLOGY WORKSHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    The IX Pathology Workshop and VI Molecular Biology Workshop of the International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT) were organised jointly and hosted by the Colombian Sugarcane Research Centre (CENICAÑA) from 23-27 June 2008 at the Radisson Royal Hotel in Cali, Colombia. The Workshop was we...

  2. Opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijver, Iris; Aziz, Nazneen; Farkas, Daniel H; Furtado, Manohar; Gonzalez, Andrea Ferreira; Greiner, Timothy C; Grody, Wayne W; Hambuch, Tina; Kalman, Lisa; Kant, Jeffrey A; Klein, Roger D; Leonard, Debra G B; Lubin, Ira M; Mao, Rong; Nagan, Narasimhan; Pratt, Victoria M; Sobel, Mark E; Voelkerding, Karl V; Gibson, Jane S

    2012-11-01

    This report of the Whole Genome Analysis group of the Association for Molecular Pathology illuminates the opportunities and challenges associated with clinical diagnostic genome sequencing. With the reality of clinical application of next-generation sequencing, technical aspects of molecular testing can be accomplished at greater speed and with higher volume, while much information is obtained. Although this testing is a next logical step for molecular pathology laboratories, the potential impact on the diagnostic process and clinical correlations is extraordinary and clinical interpretation will be challenging. We review the rapidly evolving technologies; provide application examples; discuss aspects of clinical utility, ethics, and consent; and address the analytic, postanalytic, and professional implications. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasound evaluation of pathological complete response in patients with locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Cai-Feng; Liu, Xue-Song; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Lu, Jin-Song; Li, Feng-Hua

    2018-06-01

    To clarify whether the quantitative parameters of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can be used to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Fifty-one patients with histologically proved locally advanced breast cancer scheduled for NAC were enrolled. The quantitative data for CEUS and the tumor diameter were collected at baseline and before surgery, and compared with the pathological response. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to examine quantitative parameters at CEUS and the tumor diameter to predict the pCR, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used as a summary statistic. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that PEAK (the maximum intensity of the time-intensity curve during bolus transit), PEAK%, TTP% (time to peak), and diameter% were significant independent predictors of pCR, and the area under the ROC curve was 0.932(Az 1 ), and the sensitivity and specificity to predict pCR were 93.7% and 80.0%. The area under the ROC curve for the quantitative parameters was 0.927(Az 2 ), and the sensitivity and specificity to predict pCR were 81.2% and 94.3%. For diameter%, the area under the ROC curve was 0.786 (Az 3 ), and the sensitivity and specificity to predict pCR were 93.8% and 54.3%. The values of Az 1 and Az 2 were significantly higher than that of Az 3 (P = 0.027 and P = 0.034, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between the values of Az 1 and Az 2 (P = 0.825). Quantitative analysis of tumor blood perfusion with CEUS is superior to diameter% to predict pCR, and can be used as a functional technique to evaluate tumor response to NAC. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Incidence of sarcoma histotypes and molecular subtypes in a prospective epidemiological study with central pathology review and molecular testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Ducimetière

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exact overall incidence of sarcoma and sarcoma subtypes is not known. The objective of the present population-based study was to determine this incidence in a European region (Rhone-Alpes of six million inhabitants, based on a central pathological review of the cases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From March 2005 to February 2007, pathology reports and tumor blocks were prospectively collected from the 158 pathologists of the Rhone-Alpes region. All diagnosed or suspected cases of sarcoma were collected, reviewed centrally, examined for molecular alterations and classified according to the 2002 World Health Organization classification. Of the 1287 patients screened during the study period, 748 met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The overall crude and world age-standardized incidence rates were respectively 6.2 and 4.8 per 100,000/year. Incidence rates for soft tissue, visceral and bone sarcomas were respectively 3.6, 2.0 and 0.6 per 100,000. The most frequent histological subtypes were gastrointestinal stromal tumor (18%; 1.1/100,000, unclassified sarcoma (16%; 1/100,000, liposarcoma (15%; 0.9/100,000 and leiomyosarcoma (11%; 0.7/100,000. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed incidence of sarcomas was higher than expected. This study is the first detailed investigation of the crude incidence of histological and molecular subtypes of sarcomas.

  5. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, ∼4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  6. New approaches to the treatment of orphan genetic disorders: Mitigating molecular pathologies using chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA V. VELHO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advance and popularization of molecular techniques, the identification of genetic mutations that cause diseases has increased dramatically. Thus, the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder and the number of subsequent diagnosis have increased over time. Although it is necessary to identify mutations and provide diagnosis, it is also critical to develop specific therapeutic approaches based on this information. This review aims to highlight recent advances in mutation-targeted therapies with chemicals that mitigate mutational pathology at the molecular level, for disorders that, for the most part, have no effective treatment. Currently, there are several strategies being used to correct different types of mutations, including the following: the identification and characterization of translational readthrough compounds; antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing redirection; mismatch repair; and exon skipping. These therapies and other approaches are reviewed in this paper.

  7. New approaches to the treatment of orphan genetic disorders: Mitigating molecular pathologies using chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velho, Renata V; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2015-08-01

    With the advance and popularization of molecular techniques, the identification of genetic mutations that cause diseases has increased dramatically. Thus, the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder and the number of subsequent diagnosis have increased over time. Although it is necessary to identify mutations and provide diagnosis, it is also critical to develop specific therapeutic approaches based on this information. This review aims to highlight recent advances in mutation-targeted therapies with chemicals that mitigate mutational pathology at the molecular level, for disorders that, for the most part, have no effective treatment. Currently, there are several strategies being used to correct different types of mutations, including the following: the identification and characterization of translational readthrough compounds; antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing redirection; mismatch repair; and exon skipping. These therapies and other approaches are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Current Understanding of Molecular Pathology and Treatment of Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirsa L. E. van Westering

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a genetic muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene resulting in the loss of the protein dystrophin. Patients do not only experience skeletal muscle degeneration, but also develop severe cardiomyopathy by their second decade, one of the main causes of death. The absence of dystrophin in the heart renders cardiomyocytes more sensitive to stretch-induced damage. Moreover, it pathologically alters intracellular calcium (Ca2+ concentration, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS localization and mitochondrial function and leads to inflammation and necrosis, all contributing to the development of cardiomyopathy. Current therapies only treat symptoms and therefore the need for targeting the genetic defect is immense. Several preclinical therapies are undergoing development, including utrophin up-regulation, stop codon read-through therapy, viral gene therapy, cell-based therapy and exon skipping. Some of these therapies are undergoing clinical trials, but these have predominantly focused on skeletal muscle correction. However, improving skeletal muscle function without addressing cardiac aspects of the disease may aggravate cardiomyopathy and therefore it is essential that preclinical and clinical focus include improving heart function. This review consolidates what is known regarding molecular pathology of the DMD heart, specifically focusing on intracellular Ca2+, nNOS and mitochondrial dysregulation. It briefly discusses the current treatment options and then elaborates on the preclinical therapeutic approaches currently under development to restore dystrophin thereby improving pathology, with a focus on the heart.

  9. Pathological and molecular studies of the renal trematode Paratanaisia bragai in Indian peafowls (Pavo cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asok Kumar, M; Kumar, Deepak; Palanivelu, Munuswamy; Annamalai, Latchumikanthan; Mathesh, Karikalan; Singh, Rajendra; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2018-03-26

    Endoparasitic diseases are commonly encountered in free-ranging birds. Although not all endoparasites cause disease, persistent infection with large numbers of parasites almost always affects normal physiological functions, leading to deleterious effects on the host. This paper describes the anatomopathological alterations caused by the renal trematode Paratanaisia bragai in Indian peafowl (n = 3) and examines the phylogeny of these and related parasites. Peafowl from forests in and around the Bareilly region, Uttar Pradesh, India, were necropsied, and microscopic and molecular investigations were performed. The peafowl were confirmed to be infected with P. bragai. Significant gross pathological lesions suggested nephrosis, and microscopic findings indicated a mild-to-moderate degree of nephrosis caused by the parasites in the tissue. The parasites were identified as P. bragai by histomorphological analysis of adult and eggs in the ureters, and the identification was confirmed by PCR and phylogenetic analysis. Nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products from the renal trematodes recovered from Indian peafowl revealed a close association with P. bragai from Columbiformes in the United Kingdom and Spain. The pathology and molecular epidemiology of parasitic diseases affecting peafowl is not well understood in India. This is the first report from India and the second report worldwide to document P. bragai infection in peafowl.

  10. Recent advances in molecular pathology of craniopharyngioma [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Larkin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas are rare epithelial tumours arising along the path of the craniopharyngeal duct. Two major histological subtypes have been recognised, the papillary and the adamantinomatous. Craniopharyngiomas remain challenging tumours to manage and are associated with significant morbidities and mortality. Recent advances in the molecular pathology of these neoplasms have identified BRAF mutations in the papillary variant, offering promising options for targeted pharmacological treatment. The involvement of β-catenin and the Wnt pathway in the tumorigenesis of the adamantinomatous subtype has been previously established with the identification of stabilising mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1. Further understanding of the pathogenesis of this subtype has been facilitated with the use of mouse models and xenograft experiments. It has been proposed that the clusters of cells with upregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling induce tumour formation in a paracrine manner; the complex interactions occurring between different cell populations need to be further clarified for further expansion of this hypothesis. This review outlines recent key advances in our understanding of the molecular pathology of craniopharyngiomas and discusses some of the challenges that need to be overcome for the development of targeted therapies that will hopefully improve the management and the outcomes of these patients.

  11. Lipid-based nanoparticles for contrast-enhanced MRI and molecular imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Willem J. M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; van Tilborg, Geralda A. F.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2006-01-01

    In the field of MR imaging and especially in the emerging field of cellular and molecular MR imaging, flexible strategies to synthesize contrast agents that can be manipulated in terms of size and composition and that can be easily conjugated with targeting ligands are required. Furthermore, the

  12. Tumor microvascular changes in antiangiogenic treatment : Assessment by magnetic resonance contrast media of different molecular weights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turetschek, K; Preda, A; Novikov, [No Value; Brasch, RC; Weinmann, HJ; Wunderbaldinger, P; Roberts, TPL

    Purpose: To test magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media of different molecular weights (MWs) for their potential to characterize noninvasively microvascular changes in an experimental tumor treatment model. Materials and Methods: MD-MBA-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was

  13. Potato agriculture, late blight science, and the molecularization of plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R Steven

    2008-01-01

    By the mid-1980s nucleic-acid based methods were penetrating the farthest reaches of biological science, triggering rivalries among practitioners, altering relationships among subfields, and transforming the research front. This article delivers a "bottom up" analysis of that transformation at work in one important area of biological science, plant pathology, by tracing the "molecularization" of efforts to understand and control one notorious plant disease -- the late blight of potatoes. It mobilizes the research literature of late blight science as a tool through which to trace the changing typography of the research front from 1983 to 2003. During these years molecularization intensified the traditional fragmentation of the late blight research community, even as it dramatically integrated study of the causal organism into broader areas of biology. In these decades the pathogen responsible for late blight, the oomycete "Phytophthora infestans," was discovered to be undergoing massive, frightening, and still largely unexplained genetic diversification -- a circumstance that lends the episode examined here an urgency that reinforces its historiographical significance as a case-study in the molecularization of the biological sciences.

  14. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma: a review of the clinical presentation, pathology, molecular biology, and management

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    Teixeira Mendes LS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Larissa Sena Teixeira Mendes,1 Ming-Qing Du,2 Estella Matutes,3 Andrew Wotherspoon11Histopathology Department, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK; 2Molecular Malignancy Laboratory and Department of Histopathology, University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust/Division of Molecular Histopathology, Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 3Hematopathology Unit, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona University, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Splenic marginal zone lymphoma is a distinct low grade B-cell lymphoma primarily occurring in the spleen and separate from nodal marginal zone lymphoma and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. It is characterized by a relative indolent course, splenomegaly, moderate lymphocytosis, and an intrasinusoidal pattern of involvement, especially in the bone marrow. It is postulated that the neoplastic clone originates from persistent antigenic stimulation of marginal zone B-cells. Molecular and cytogenetic studies have failed to show specific alterations. There is no standard criterion to initiate treatment, which may include a watch and wait policy, splenectomy, or chemo/immunotherapy. This review highlights the main features of this entity, reassessing the guidelines for diagnosis, prognostic factors, staging, and management published by the SMZL Working Group (2008. Keywords: splenectomy, villous lymphocytes, guidelines

  15. Molecular Imaging on the Cerebral Pathological Damage Target of Ketamine Dependence

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    YANG Hong-jie1,2;HU Shu1;JIA Shao-wei1;GAO Zhou1;WANG Tong3;ZHAO Zheng-qin1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the cerebral pathological damage target which result from abusing ketamine through molecular imaging techniques, 20 cases of ketamine dependent patients looking for treatment at the Peking University Shenzhen Hospital and 31 healthy volunteers were included in this study, all of them got brain SPECT DAT imaging. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0. The bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen of healthy volunteers were roughly equally large, and the radioactive distribution of DAT in healthy volunteers were uniform and symmetrical. The bilateral corpora striatum showed typical “panda eyes” pattern. But the bilateral corpora striatum of ketamine dependent patients got smaller in shape, got disorders in pattern, and the radioactive distribution of DAT reduced or defected or even got disturbance and with much more non-specific radioactive. The V, m and Ra of bilateral corpora striatum in ketamine dependent patients were (21.03±3.15) cm3, (22.08±3.31) g and (5.37±1.08) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than the healthy volunteers (p<0.01. The cerebral pathological damage target which resulted from abusing ketamine was similar to those of compound codeine phosphate antitussive solution dependence, heroin dependence and MDMA dependence, all of these psychoactive substances damaged the function of DAT.

  16. Molecular Viscosity Sensors with Two Rotators for Optimizing the Fluorescence Intensity-Contrast Trade-Off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Chul; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Heo, Jeongyun; Jeong, Chan-Uk; Lee, Gyeong-Hui; Kim, Sehoon; Yoon, Woojin; Yun, Hoseop; Park, Sung O; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Park, Sung-Ha; Kwon, O-Pil

    2018-02-26

    A series of fluorescent molecular rotors obtained by introducing two rotational groups ("rotators"), which exhibit different rotational and electron-donating abilities, are discussed. Whereas the control molecular rotor, PH, includes a single rotator (the widely used phenyl group), the PO molecular rotors consist of two rotators (a phenyl group and an alkoxy group), which exhibit simultaneous strongly electron-donating and easy rotational abilities. Compared with the control rotor PH, PO molecular rotors exhibited one order of magnitude higher quantum yield (fluorescence intensity) and simultaneously exhibited significantly higher fluorescence contrast. These properties are directly related to the strong electron-donating ability and low energy barrier of rotation of the alkoxy group, as confirmed by dynamic fluorescence experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The PO molecular rotors exhibited two fluorescence relaxation pathways, whereas the PH molecular rotor exhibited a single fluorescence relaxation pathway. Cellular fluorescence imaging with PO molecular rotors for mapping cellular viscosity was successfully demonstrated. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Molecular pathology of vertebral deformities in hyperthermic Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

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    Hjelde Kirsti

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia has been shown in a number of organisms to induce developmental defects as a result of changes in cell proliferation, differentiation and gene expression. In spite of this, salmon aquaculture commonly uses high water temperature to speed up developmental rate in intensive production systems, resulting in an increased frequency of skeletal deformities. In order to study the molecular pathology of vertebral deformities, Atlantic salmon was subjected to hyperthermic conditions from fertilization until after the juvenile stage. Results Fish exposed to the high temperature regime showed a markedly higher growth rate and a significant higher percentage of deformities in the spinal column than fish reared at low temperatures. By analyzing phenotypically normal spinal columns from the two temperature regimes, we found that the increased risk of developing vertebral deformities was linked to an altered gene transcription. In particular, down-regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM genes such as col1a1, osteocalcin, osteonectin and decorin, indicated that maturation and mineralization of osteoblasts were restrained. Moreover, histological staining and in situ hybridization visualized areas with distorted chondrocytes and an increased population of hypertrophic cells. These findings were further confirmed by an up-regulation of mef2c and col10a, genes involved in chondrocyte hypertrophy. Conclusion The presented data strongly indicates that temperature induced fast growth is severely affecting gene transcription in osteoblasts and chondrocytes; hence change in the vertebral tissue structure and composition. A disrupted bone and cartilage production was detected, which most likely is involved in the higher rate of deformities developed in the high intensive group. Our results are of basic interest for bone metabolism and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in development of temperature induced

  18. Molecular epidemiology and pathology of spirorchiid infection in green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas

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    Phoebe A. Chapman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Spirorchiid blood fluke infections affect endangered turtle populations globally, and are reported as a common cause of mortality in Queensland green sea turtles. Both the flukes and their ova are pathogenic and can contribute to the stranding or death of their host. Of particular interest are ova-associated brain lesions, which have been associated with host neurological deficits. Accurate estimations of disease frequency and the relative effect of infection relating to different spirorchiid species are made difficult by challenges in morphological identification of adults of some genera, and a lack of species-level identifying features for ova. A new specifically designed molecular assay was used to detect and identify cryptic spirorchiids and their ova in Queensland green sea turtle tissues collected from 2011 to 2014 in order to investigate epidemiology, tissue tropisms and pathology. Eight spirorchiid genotypes were detected in 14 distinct tissues, including multiple tissues for each. We found no evidence of a characteristic pathway of the eggs to the exterior; instead the results suggest that a high proportion of eggs become lost in dead-end tissues. The most common lesions observed were granulomas affecting most organs with varying severity, followed by arteritis and thrombi in the great vessels. The number of spirorchiid types detected increased with the presence and severity of granulomatous lesions. However, compared with other organs the brain showed relatively low levels of spirorchiid diversity. An inverse relationship between host age and spirorchiid diversity was evident for the liver and kidneys, but no such relationship was evident for other organs. Molecular data in this study, the first of its kind, provides the first species-level examination of spirorchiid ova and associated pathology, and paves the way for the future development of targeted ante-mortem diagnosis of spirorchiidiasis.

  19. Low molecular weight dextran provides similar optical coherence tomography coronary imaging compared to radiographic contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Kyle; Michael, Tesfaldet T; Alomar, Mohammed; Mohammed, Atif; Rangan, Bavana V; Abdullah, Shuaib; Grodin, Jerrold; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) coronary imaging requires displacement of red blood cells from the vessel lumen. This is usually accomplished using radiographic contrast. Low molecular weight dextran has low cost and is safe in low volumes. In the present study, we compared dextran with contrast for coronary OCT imaging. Fifty-one vessels in 26 patients were sequentially imaged using manual injection of radiographic contrast (iodixanol) and dextran. OCT images were analyzed at 1 mm intervals to determine the image clarity (defined as a visible lumen border > 270°) and to measure the lumen area and lumen diameter. To correct for the refractive index of dextran, the dextran area measurements were multiplied by 1.117 and the dextran length measurements were multiplied by 1.057. A total of 3,418 cross-sections (1,709 with contrast and 1,709 with dextran) were analyzed. There were no complications related to OCT imaging or to contrast or dextran administration. Clear image segments were observed in 97.0% vs. 96.7% of the cross-sections obtained with contrast and dextran, respectively (P = 0.45). The mean lumen areas were also similar: 6.69 ± 1.95 mm(2) with iodixanol vs. 7.06 ± 2.06 mm(2) with dextran (correlation coefficient 0.984). The image quality and measurements during OCT image acquisition are similar for dextran and contrast. Dextran could be used instead of contrast for OCT imaging, especially in patients in whom contrast load minimization is desired. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Basic pathologies of neurodegenerative dementias and their relevance for state-of-the-art molecular imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drzezga, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Rising life-expectancy in the modern society has resulted in a rapidly growing prevalence of dementia, particularly of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dementia turns into one of the most common age-related disorders with deleterious consequences for the concerned patients and their relatives, as well as worrying effects on the socio-economic systems. These facts justify strengthened scientific efforts to identify the pathologic origin of dementing disorders, to improve diagnosis, and to interfere therapeutically with the disease progression. In the recent years, remarkable progress has been made concerning the identification of molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders. Growing evidence indicates that a common basis of many neurodegenerative dementias can be found in increased production, misfolding and pathological aggregation of proteins, such as ss-amyloid, tau protein, a-synuclein, or the recently described ubiquitinated TDP-43. This progressive insight in pathological processes is paralleled by the development of new therapeutic approaches. However, the exact contribution or mechanism of different pathologies with regard to the development of disease is not yet sufficiently clear. Considerable overlap of pathologies has been documented in different types of clinically defined dementias post mortem, and it has been difficult to correlate post mortem histopathology data with disease-expression during life. Molecular imaging procedures may play a valuable role to circumvent this limitation. In general, methods of molecular imaging have recently experienced an impressive advance, with numerous new and improved technologies emerging. These exciting tools may play a key role in the future regarding the evaluation of pathomechanisms, preclinical evaluation of new diagnostic procedures in animal models, selection of patients for clinical trials, and therapy monitoring. In this overview, molecular key pathologies, which are currently

  1. Magnetosomes used as biogenic MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of glioblastoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of molecular imaging, which aims at tailoring medical treatments and therapies to the individual context by revealing molecular or cellular phenomenon of medical interest in the less invasive manner. In particular, it can be achieved with MRI molecular imaging using engineered iron-oxide contrast agent.This PhD thesis focuses on the study of a new class of iron-oxide contrast agent for high field MRI. Indeed, magnetosomes are natural iron-oxide vesicles produced by magneto-tactic bacteria. These bacteria synthesized such magnetic vesicles and ordered them like a nano-compass in order to facilitate their navigation in sediments. This explains why magnetosomes are awarded with tremendous magnetic properties: around 50 nm, mono-crystalline, single magnetic domain and high saturation magnetization. Furthermore, a wide variety of bacterial strains exist in nature and size and shape of magnetosomes are highly stable within strain and can be very different between strains. Finally, magnetosomes are naturally coated with a bi-lipidic membrane whose content is genetically determined. Lately, researchers have unravelled magnetosomes membrane protein contents, opening the way to create functionalized magnetosomes thanks to fusion of the gene coding for a protein of interest with the gene coding for an abundant protein at magnetosomes membrane.A new alternative path using living organisms to tackle the production of engineered high efficiency molecular imaging probes have been investigated with magneto-tactic bacteria in this PhD. The production and engineering of magnetosomes have been carried out by our partner, the Laboratoire de Bio-energetique Cellulaire (LBC, CEA Cadarache), and will be presented and discussed. We then characterized magnetosomes as contrast agent for high field MRI. We showed they present very promising contrasting properties in vitro, and assessed this observation in vivo by establishing they can be used as efficient

  2. Quality control in diagnostic molecular pathology in the Netherlands; proficiency testing for patient identification in tissue samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, F. B. J. M.; Tilanus, M. G. J.; Ligtenberg, M. J. L.; Nederlof, P. M.; Dinjens, W. N. M.; Meulemans, E.; van den Brule, A. J. C.; van Noesel, C. J. M.; de Leeuw, W. J. F.; Schuuring, E.

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To describe the evolution of proficiency testing for molecular diagnostic pathology with respect to determining unambiguously the patient identity of tissue samples by microsatellite analysis. Method: Four rounds of quality control exchanges of samples from different patients were sent with

  3. Immunohistochemical Expression of Survivin in Breast Carcinoma: Relationship with Clinico pathological Parameters, Proliferation and Molecular Classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YOUSSEF, N.S.; HEWEDI, I.H.; ABD RABOH, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objective: Survivin is a novel member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) gene family. It is associated with more aggressive behavior and parameters of poor prognosis in most human cancers including gastric, colorectal and bladder carcinomas. However, conflicting data exist on its prognostic effect in breast cancer. This current study is designed to assess survivin expression in breast carcinoma relating results with clinico pathological parameters, proliferation (MIB-1) and molecular classification. Material and Methods: Our retrospective study com- prised of 65 archived cases of breast carcinoma. Samples from the tumor and the adjacent normal breast tissue were immuno stained for survivin and MIB-1. Nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression was evaluated in normal breast tissue and carcinoma regarding both the intensity and the percentage of positive cells. ER, PR, HER2 were used as surrogate markers to classify the cases into four molecular subtypes. Results: Survivin expression was detected in 78.5% of breast carcinomas. The adjacent normal breast tissue was immuno negative. Survivin expression showed significant association with increased tumor size ( p <0.0001), high histologic grade ( p =0.04), lymph node metastases ( p <0.001), advanced tumor stage ( p <0.0001), MIB-1 expression ( p =0.02), negative estrogen receptor status ( p =0.01) and negative progesterone receptor status ( p <0.0001). The subcellular localization of survivin significantly related to histologic grade, stage and lymph node involvement. The percentage of TNP (triple negative phenotype) and HER2+/ER-PR- tumors expressing survivin were significantly higher compared to the Luminal subtypes ( p =0.01). Conclusion: Survivin expression was associated with parameters of poor prognosis in breast cancer. Moreover, the cancer-specific expression of survivin, coupled with its importance in inhibiting cell death and in regulating cell division, makes it a potential target for novel

  4. Contrasted patterns of molecular evolution in dominant and recessive self-incompatibility haplotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M Goubet

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility has been considered by geneticists a model system for reproductive biology and balancing selection, but our understanding of the genetic basis and evolution of this molecular lock-and-key system has remained limited by the extreme level of sequence divergence among haplotypes, resulting in a lack of appropriate genomic sequences. In this study, we report and analyze the full sequence of eleven distinct haplotypes of the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus in two closely related Arabidopsis species, obtained from individual BAC libraries. We use this extensive dataset to highlight sharply contrasted patterns of molecular evolution of each of the two genes controlling self-incompatibility themselves, as well as of the genomic region surrounding them. We find strong collinearity of the flanking regions among haplotypes on each side of the S-locus together with high levels of sequence similarity. In contrast, the S-locus region itself shows spectacularly deep gene genealogies, high variability in size and gene organization, as well as complete absence of sequence similarity in intergenic sequences and striking accumulation of transposable elements. Of particular interest, we demonstrate that dominant and recessive S-haplotypes experience sharply contrasted patterns of molecular evolution. Indeed, dominant haplotypes exhibit larger size and a much higher density of transposable elements, being matched only by that in the centromere. Overall, these properties highlight that the S-locus presents many striking similarities with other regions involved in the determination of mating-types, such as sex chromosomes in animals or in plants, or the mating-type locus in fungi and green algae.

  5. Physiological, Biochemical, Epigenetic and Molecular Analyses of Wheat (Triticum aestivum Genotypes with Contrasting Salt Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress exerts significant impact on plant’s growth, development, and productivity. Productivity of crop plants under salt stress is lagging behind because of our limited knowledge about physiological, biochemical, epigenetic, and molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in plants. This study aimed to investigate physio-biochemical, molecular indices and defense responses of selected wheat cultivars to identify the most contrasting salt-responsive genotypes and the mechanisms associated with their differential responses. Physio-biochemical traits specifically membrane stability index, antioxidant potential, osmoprotectants and chlorophyll contents, measured at vegetative stage, were used for multivariate analysis to identify the most contrasting genotypes. Genetic and epigenetic analyses indicated the possible mechanisms associated with differential response of the wheat genotypes under salt stress. Better antioxidant potential, membrane stability, increased accumulation of osmolytes/phytophenolics, and higher K+/Na+ ratio under 200 mM NaCl stress identified Kharchia-65 to be the most salt-tolerant cultivar. By contrast, increased MDA level, reduced soluble sugar, proline, total chlorophyll, total phenolics contents, and lower antioxidant potential in HD-2329 marked it to be sensitive to the stress. Genetic and bioinformatics analyses of HKT1;4 of contrasting genotypes (Kharchia-65 and HD-2329 revealed deletions, transitions, and transversions resulting into altered structure, loss of conserved motifs (Ser-Gly-Gly-Gly and Gly-Arg and function in salt-sensitive (HD-2329 genotype. Expression analysis of HKTs rationalized the observed responses. Epigenetic variations in cytosine methylation explained tissue- and genotype-specific differential expression of HKT2;1 and HKT2;3.

  6. Eulimdana clava (Nematoda: Filarioidea) infection in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica): Molecular characterization and pathological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šupić, Jovana; Alić, Alma Šeho; Hasanić, Melida; Goletić, Šejla; Duscher, Georg G; Hodžić, Adnan; Alić, Amer

    2018-02-15

    Filarial nematodes of the Eulimdana genus inhabit subcutaneous tissue of various avian species, mostly Charadriiforme birds. In domestic pigeons, E. clava is the only species recorded in the subcutaneous tissue in a number of isolated cases. In the present study, we discuss the morphology and histopathology of filarial nematodes recovered from subcutaneous tissue of domestic pigeons in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In total 110 pigeons were submitted to necropsy at the Department of Pathology of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Sarajevo. At necropsy, in four pigeons (3.6%) numerous thread-like 0.9-2.1 cm long nematode parasites were observed in the subcutaneous tissue, peritracheal and periesophageal connective tissue. In one pigeon, the parasites were also found free in the body cavity around the heart and lungs. In addition, several 80-90 μm long microfilariae were noted in the tissue cross-sections. No significant lesions were observed associated with adult parasites or microfilariae. Based on morphology, host species and localization detected parasites were identified as E. clava. Molecular analyses of the cox1 and 12S rRNA nucleotide sequences herein generated revealed the close genetic relationship to other filarioid nematodes. The importance of the nematodes in pigeons and the lack of sequences in genetic databases for comparison of avian filarial parasites are emphasized. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Positron emission tomography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Towards targeting of molecular pathological hallmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willekens, Stefanie M.A.; Weehaeghe, Donatienne van; Damme, Philip van; Laere, Koen van

    2017-01-01

    During the past decades, extensive efforts have been made to expand the knowledge of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, clinical translation of this research, in terms of earlier diagnosis and improved therapy, remains challenging. Since more than 30% of motor neurons are lost when symptoms become clinically apparent, techniques allowing non-invasive, in vivo detection of motor neuron degeneration are needed in the early, pre-symptomatic disease stage. Furthermore, it has become apparent that non-motor signs play an important role in the disease and there is an overlap with cognitive disorders, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Radionuclide imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), form an attractive approach to quantitatively monitor the ongoing neurodegenerative processes. Although ["1"8F]-FDG has been recently proposed as a potential biomarker for ALS, active targeting of the underlying pathologic molecular processes is likely to unravel further valuable disease information and may help to decipher the pathogenesis of ALS. In this review, we provide an overview of radiotracers that have already been applied in ALS and discuss possible novel targets for in vivo imaging of various pathogenic processes underlying ALS onset and progression. (orig.)

  8. Positron emission tomography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Towards targeting of molecular pathological hallmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willekens, Stefanie M.A.; Weehaeghe, Donatienne van [University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Damme, Philip van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Neurosciences, Experimental Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Research Institute for Neuroscience and Disease (LIND), Leuven (Belgium); VIB, Vesalius Research Center, Laboratory of Neurobiology, Leuven (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Research Institute for Neuroscience and Disease (LIND), Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    During the past decades, extensive efforts have been made to expand the knowledge of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, clinical translation of this research, in terms of earlier diagnosis and improved therapy, remains challenging. Since more than 30% of motor neurons are lost when symptoms become clinically apparent, techniques allowing non-invasive, in vivo detection of motor neuron degeneration are needed in the early, pre-symptomatic disease stage. Furthermore, it has become apparent that non-motor signs play an important role in the disease and there is an overlap with cognitive disorders, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Radionuclide imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), form an attractive approach to quantitatively monitor the ongoing neurodegenerative processes. Although [{sup 18}F]-FDG has been recently proposed as a potential biomarker for ALS, active targeting of the underlying pathologic molecular processes is likely to unravel further valuable disease information and may help to decipher the pathogenesis of ALS. In this review, we provide an overview of radiotracers that have already been applied in ALS and discuss possible novel targets for in vivo imaging of various pathogenic processes underlying ALS onset and progression. (orig.)

  9. Delayed brain radiation necrosis: pathological review and new molecular targets for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Motomasa; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Kawabata, Shinji; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Delayed radiation necrosis is a well-known adverse event following radiotherapy for brain diseases and has been studied since the 1930s. The primary pathogenesis is thought to be the direct damage to endothelial and glial cells, particularly oligodendrocytes, which causes vascular hyalinization and demyelination. This primary pathology leads to tissue inflammation and ischemia, inducing various tissue protective responses including angiogenesis. Macrophages and lymphocytes then infiltrate the surrounding areas of necrosis, releasing inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Microglia also express these inflammatory cytokines. Reactive astrocytes play an important role in angiogenesis, expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some chemokine networks, like the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis, are upregulated by tissue inflammation. Hypoxia may mediate the cell-cell interactions among reactive astrocytes, macrophages, and microglial cells around the necrotic core. Recently, bevacizumab, an anti-VEGF antibody, has demonstrated promising results as an alternative treatment for radiation necrosis. The importance of VEGF in the pathophysiology of brain radiation necrosis is being recognized. The discovery of new molecular targets could facilitate novel treatments for radiation necrosis. This literature review will focus on recent work characterizing delayed radiation necrosis in the brain.

  10. Trapped neutrophil syndrome in a Border Collie dog: clinical, clinico-pathologic, and molecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Shoubudani, Tomoaki; Nishimoto, Seira; Kawamura, Ryuta; Yabuki, Akira; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-06-01

    Trapped neutrophil syndrome (TNS) is an autosomal recessive inherited neutropenia known in Border Collies since the 1990's. Recently, the causative mutation has been identified in the canine VPS13B gene and a DNA-based diagnosis has now become available. The present paper describes clinical and clinico-pathologic findings in a Border Collie with TNS that was molecularly diagnosed for the first time in Japan. In a 10-week-old male Border Collie with microgenesis and symptoms related to recurrent infections, a hematological examination revealed severe leukopenia due to neutropenia, suggesting the dog to be affected by inherited neutropenic immunodeficiency. Direct DNA sequencing demonstrated that the dog was homozygous for the causative mutation of TNS and both its parents were heterozygous carriers. In addition, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction-based length polymorphism analysis coupled with microchip electrophoresis was developed for the genotyping of TNS. This assay could discriminate clearly all genotypes, suggesting that it was suitable for both individual diagnosis and large-scale surveys for prevention.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Glutamine Synthetase Mutations that Lead to Clinically Relevant Pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Frieg

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine synthetase (GS catalyzes ATP-dependent ligation of ammonia and glutamate to glutamine. Two mutations of human GS (R324C and R341C were connected to congenital glutamine deficiency with severe brain malformations resulting in neonatal death. Another GS mutation (R324S was identified in a neurologically compromised patient. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the impairment of GS activity by these mutations have remained elusive. Molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and rigidity analyses suggest that all three mutations influence the first step of GS catalytic cycle. The R324S and R324C mutations deteriorate GS catalytic activity due to loss of direct interactions with ATP. As to R324S, indirect, water-mediated interactions reduce this effect, which may explain the suggested higher GS residual activity. The R341C mutation weakens ATP binding by destabilizing the interacting residue R340 in the apo state of GS. Additionally, the mutation is predicted to result in a significant destabilization of helix H8, which should negatively affect glutamate binding. This prediction was tested in HEK293 cells overexpressing GS by dot-blot analysis: Structural stability of H8 was impaired through mutation of amino acids interacting with R341, as indicated by a loss of masking of an epitope in the glutamate binding pocket for a monoclonal anti-GS antibody by L-methionine-S-sulfoximine; in contrast, cells transfected with wild type GS showed the masking. Our analyses reveal complex molecular effects underlying impaired GS catalytic activity in three clinically relevant mutants. Our findings could stimulate the development of ATP binding-enhancing molecules by which the R324S mutant can be repaired extrinsically.

  12. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors containing areas of iso- or hypoattenuation in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: Spectrum of imaging findings and pathological grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Ryota; Suzuki, Kojiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Komada, Tomohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) features of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) containing areas of iso- or hypoattenuation and the relationship with pathological grading. Between June 2006 and March 2014, 61 PNETs in 58 consecutive patients (29 male, 29 female; median-age 55 years), which were surgically diagnosed, underwent preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced CT. PNETs were classified based on contrast enhancement patterns in the pancreatic phase: iso/hypo-PNETs were defined as tumors containing areas of iso- or hypoattenuation except for cystic components, and hyper-PNETs were tumors showing hyperattenuation over the whole area. CT findings and contrast-enhancement patterns of the tumors were evaluated retrospectively by two radiologists and compared with the pathological grading. Iso/hypo-PNETs comprised 26 tumors, and hyper-PNETs comprised 35 tumors. Not only hyper-PNETs but also most iso/hypo-PNETs showed peak enhancement in the pancreatic phase and a washout from the portal venous phase to the delayed phase. Iso/hypo-PNETs showed larger tumor size than the hyper-PNETs (mean, 3.7 cm vs. 1.6 cm; PIso/hypo-PNETs also showed significantly higher pathological grading (WHO 2010 classification; iso/hypo, G1=14, G2=11, G3=1; hyper, G1=34, G2=1; Piso/hypo-areas showed a rapid enhancement pattern as well as hyper-PNETs, various radiological features and higher malignant potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Safety assessment of nanoparamagnetic contrast agents with different coatings for molecular MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Gholamreza; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Haghgoo, Soheila; Saffari, Mojtaba; Zohdiaghdam, Reza; Gorji, Ensieh

    2013-04-01

    Despite the wide application of gadolinium as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there is a serious lack of information on its toxicity. Gadolinium and gadolinium oxide (Gd-oxide) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There are methods for reducing toxicity of these materials, such as core nanoparticles coating or conjugating. Therefore, for toxicity evaluation, we compared the viability of commercial contrast agents in MRI (Gd-DTPA) and three nanoparticles with the same core Gd2O3 and small particulate gadolinium oxide or SPGO (DTPA. The MTT and LDH assay results showed that Gd2O3-DEG nanoparticles were more toxic than Gd-DTPA and other nanoparticles. Also, SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 was more biocompatible than other nanoparticles. The obtained results did not show any significant increase in cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles and Gd-DTPA, neither dose-dependent nor time-dependent. Therefore, DEG and PEG, due to their considerable properties and irregular sizes (different molecular weights), were selected as the useful surface covering materials of nanomagnetic particles that could reveal noticeable relaxivity and biocompatibility characteristics.

  14. Bacterial pathogenesis of plants: future challenges from a microbial perspective: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Caly, Delphine L; Malone, Jacob G

    2016-10-01

    secretion systems (T3SSs) are important and well-studied contributors to bacterial disease. Several key unanswered questions will shape future investigations of these systems. We need to define the mechanism of hierarchical and temporal control of effector secretion. For successful infection, effectors need to interact with host components to exert their function. Advanced biochemical, proteomic and cell biological techniques will enable us to study the function of effectors inside the host cell in more detail and on a broader scale. Population genomics analyses provide insight into evolutionary adaptation processes of phytopathogens. The determination of the diversity and distribution of type III effectors (T3Es) and other virulence genes within and across pathogenic species, pathovars and strains will allow us to understand how pathogens adapt to specific hosts, the evolutionary pathways available to them, and the possible future directions of the evolutionary arms race between effectors and molecular plant targets. Although pathogenic bacteria employ a host of different virulence and proliferation strategies, as a result of the space constraints, this review focuses mainly on the hemibiotrophic pathogens. We discuss the process of plant infection from the perspective of these important phytopathogens, and highlight new approaches to address the outstanding challenges in this important and fast-moving field. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology Published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Association between glioma susceptibility loci and tumour pathology defines specific molecular etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Enciso-Mora, Victor; Marie, Yannick; Desestret, Virginie; Labussière, Marianne; Boisselier, Blandine; Mokhtari, Karima; Idbaih, Ahmed; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Houlston, Richard S; Sanson, Marc

    2013-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 7 loci influencing glioma risk: rs2736100 (TERT), rs11979158 and rs2252586 (EGFR), rs4295627 (CCDC26), rs4977756 (CDKN2A/CDKN2B), rs498872 (PHLDB1), and rs6010620 (RTEL1). We studied the relationship among these 7 glioma-risk SNPs and characteristics of tumors from 1374 patients, including grade, IDH (ie IDH1 or IDH2) mutation, EGFR amplification, CDKN2A-p16-INK4a homozygous deletion, 9p and 10q loss, and 1p-19q codeletion. rs2736100 (TERT) and rs6010620 (RTEL1) risk alleles were associated with high-grade disease, EGFR amplification, CDKN2A-p16-INK4a homozygous deletion, and 9p and 10q deletion; rs4295627 (CCDC26) and rs498872 (PHLDB1) were associated with low-grade disease, IDH mutation, and 1p-19q codeletion. In contrast, rs4977756 (CDKN2A/B), rs11979158 (EGFR), and to a lesser extent, rs2252586 (EGFR) risk alleles were independent of tumor grade and genetic profile. Adjusting for tumor grade showed a significant association between rs2736100 and IDH status (P = .01), 10q loss (P = .02); rs4295627 and 1p-19q codeletion (P = .04), rs498872 and IDH (P = .02), 9p loss (P = .04), and 10q loss (P = .02). Case-control analyses stratified into 4 molecular classes (defined by 1p-19q status, IDH mutation, and EGFR amplification) showed an association of rs4295627 and rs498872 with IDH-mutated gliomas (P RTEL1, CCDC26, and PHLDB1 variants were associated with different genetic profiles that annotate distinct molecular pathways. Our findings provide further insight into the biological basis of glioma etiology.

  16. Comparative results of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy and computerized tomography after contrast injection in cerebral pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporte, A.; Mazeaux, J.M.; Henry, P.; Renou, A.M.; Constant, P.; Caille, J.M.; Ducassou, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fifty-six patients presenting acute cerebral ischemia were investigated by means of 160 CT and 90 RN scans. CT was positive before contrast injection in 90% of cases. A total of 120 CTs were done before and after contrast injection. Only 31% of the ischemic areas were enhanced. Out of 90 RN scans, 50 showed localized uptake. The peak of scintigraphic detection was found on the 15th day of evolution, while enhancement at CT was more frequent between the 15th and 21st days. For the hematomas (13 cases) detection by RN scan depends on the size of the lesion. Among the 47 patients presenting cerebral tumor, the RN uptake depends above all on the intensity of the BBB lesion. RN uptake and CT enhancement both show the same blood-brain barrier disturbance. (orig.) [de

  17. Fatal toxoplasmosis in a southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides) from São Paulo state, Brazil: Pathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Stéfanie Vanessa; Pena, Hilda F J; Talebi, Mauricio G; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Diaz-Delgado, Josué; Gennari, Solange M; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2018-04-01

    We report the pathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of fatal acute systemic toxoplasmosis in an adult, female, free-living southern muriqui (Brachyteles arachnoides) from São Paulo state, Brazil. PCR-RFLP genotyping analysis identified the #21 genotype of Toxoplasma gondii. This represents the first report of acute toxoplasmosis involving this genotype in humans and animals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Current update on established and novel biomarkers in salivary gland carcinoma pathology and the molecular pathways involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Markus; Klussmann, J Peter

    2009-03-01

    This review aims to take stock of the new information that has accumulated over the past decade on the molecular pathology of salivary gland cancer. Emphasis will be placed on established and novel immunohistochemical markers, the pathways involved, and on findings of prognostic importance as well as new therapeutic concepts. Whenever reasonable, analogies to tumors of better explored, histologically related glandular organs such as pancreas and breast are established.

  19. Expression of Tau Pathology-Related Proteins in Different Brain Regions: A Molecular Basis of Tau Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Yanchong; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is hyperphosphorylated and aggregated in affected neurons in Alzheimer disease (AD) brains. The tau pathology starts from the entorhinal cortex (EC), spreads to the hippocampus and frontal and temporal cortices, and finally to all isocortex areas, but the cerebellum is spared from tau lesions. The molecular basis of differential vulnerability of different brain regions to tau pathology is not understood. In the present study, we analyzed brain regional expressions of tau and tau pathology-related proteins. We found that tau was hyperphosphorylated at multiple sites in the frontal cortex (FC), but not in the cerebellum, from AD brain. The level of tau expression in the cerebellum was about 1/4 of that seen in the frontal and temporal cortices in human brain. In the rat brain, the expression level of tau with three microtubule-binding repeats (3R-tau) was comparable in the hippocampus, EC, FC, parietal-temporal cortex (PTC), occipital-temporal cortex (OTC), striatum, thalamus, olfactory bulb (OB) and cerebellum. However, the expression level of 4R-tau was the highest in the EC and the lowest in the cerebellum. Tau phosphatases, kinases, microtubule-related proteins and other tau pathology-related proteins were also expressed in a region-specific manner in the rat brain. These results suggest that higher levels of tau and tau kinases in the EC and low levels of these proteins in the cerebellum may accounts for the vulnerability and resistance of these representative brain regions to the development of tau pathology, respectively. The present study provides the regional expression profiles of tau and tau pathology-related proteins in the brain, which may help understand the brain regional vulnerability to tau pathology in neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  20. Preservation of pathological tissue specimens by freeze-drying for immunohistochemical staining and various molecular biological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, S; Sugiyama, T; Okuyama, T; Yoshikawa, K; Honda, K; Takahashi, R; Maeda, S

    1999-05-01

    Conditions of preserving DNA, RNA and protein in pathological specimens are of great importance as degradation of such macromolecules would critically affect results of molecular biological analysis. The feasibility of freeze-drying as a means of preserving pathological tissue samples for molecular analysis has previously been shown. In the present study, further tests on long-term storage conditions and analyses of freeze-dried samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry are reported. Rat chromosomal DNA of freeze-dried samples stored for 4 years showed slight degradation while RNA degradation was more prominently seen at an earlier stage of storage. However, these 4 year DNA and RNA samples were still able to serve as a template for some PCR and RT-PCR analyses, respectively. Overexpression of c-erbB-2 and p53 protein was demonstrated by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining using freeze-dried human breast cancer tissues. Although macromolecules in freeze-dried samples degrade to some extent during the preservation period, they should still be of value for certain molecular biological analyses and morphological examination; hence, providing more convenient and inexpensive ways of pathological tissue storage.

  1. A Novel Polyacrylamide Magnetic Nanoparticle Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel Polyacrylamide superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle platform is described which has been synthetically prepared such that multiple crystals of iron oxide are encapsulated within a single Polyacrylamide matrix (PolyAcrylamide Magnetic [PAM] nanoparticles. This formulation provides for an extremely large T2 and T2* relaxivity of between 620 and 1140 sec−1 mM−1. Administration of PAM nanoparticles into rats bearing orthotopic 9L gliomas allowed quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of the uptake of nanoparticles in the vasculature, brain, and glioma. Addition of polyethylene glycol of varying sizes (0.6, 2, and 10 kDa to the surface of the PAM nanoparticles resulted in an increase in plasma half-life and affected tumor uptake and retention of the nanoparticles as quantified by changes in tissue contrast using MRI. The flexible formulation of these nanoparticles suggests that future modifications could be accomplished allowing for their use as a targeted molecular imaging contrast agent and/or therapeutic platform for multiple indications.

  2. Epithelial cell biocompatibility of silica nanospheres for contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriaco, Fernanda; Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Ernesto [Institute of Clinical Physiology, Bioengineering Division, National Research Council (Italy); Ragusa, Andrea [National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-NANO (Italy); Sbenaglia, Enzo Antonio; Dipaola, Lucia [Institute of Clinical Physiology, Bioengineering Division, National Research Council (Italy); Casciaro, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.casciaro@cnr.it [Istituto di Fisiologia Clinica (CNR-IFC) c/o Campus Universitario Ecotekne, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    Nanosized particles are receiving increasing attention as future contrast agents (CAs) for ultrasound (US) molecular imaging, possibly decorated on its surface with biological recognition agents for targeted delivery and deposition of therapeutics. In particular, silica nanospheres (SiNSs) have been demonstrated to be feasible in terms of contrast enhancement on conventional US systems. In this work, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of SiNSs on breast cancer (MCF-7) and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells employing NSs with sizes ranging from 160 to 330 nm and concentration range of 1.5-5 mg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated in terms of size, dose and time dependence, performing the MTT reduction assay with coated and uncoated SiNSs. Whereas uncoated SiNSs caused a variable significant decrease in cell viability on both cell lines mainly depending on size and exposure time, PEGylated SiNSs (SiNSs-PEG) exhibit a high level of biocompatibility. In fact, after 72-h incubation, viability of both cell types was above the cutoff value of 70 % at concentration up to 5 mg/mL. We also investigated the acoustical behavior of coated and uncoated SiNSs within conventional diagnostic US fields in order to determine a suitable configuration, in terms of particle size and concentration, for their employment as targetable CAs. Our results indicate that the employment of SiNSs with diameters around 240 nm assures the most effective contrast enhancement even at the lowest tested concentration, coupled with the possibility of targeting all tumor tissues, being the SiNSs still in a size range where reticuloendothelial system trapping effect is relatively low.

  3. Epithelial cell biocompatibility of silica nanospheres for contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriacò, Fernanda; Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Ernesto; Ragusa, Andrea; Sbenaglia, Enzo Antonio; Dipaola, Lucia; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Nanosized particles are receiving increasing attention as future contrast agents (CAs) for ultrasound (US) molecular imaging, possibly decorated on its surface with biological recognition agents for targeted delivery and deposition of therapeutics. In particular, silica nanospheres (SiNSs) have been demonstrated to be feasible in terms of contrast enhancement on conventional US systems. In this work, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of SiNSs on breast cancer (MCF-7) and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells employing NSs with sizes ranging from 160 to 330 nm and concentration range of 1.5–5 mg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated in terms of size, dose and time dependence, performing the MTT reduction assay with coated and uncoated SiNSs. Whereas uncoated SiNSs caused a variable significant decrease in cell viability on both cell lines mainly depending on size and exposure time, PEGylated SiNSs (SiNSs-PEG) exhibit a high level of biocompatibility. In fact, after 72-h incubation, viability of both cell types was above the cutoff value of 70 % at concentration up to 5 mg/mL. We also investigated the acoustical behavior of coated and uncoated SiNSs within conventional diagnostic US fields in order to determine a suitable configuration, in terms of particle size and concentration, for their employment as targetable CAs. Our results indicate that the employment of SiNSs with diameters around 240 nm assures the most effective contrast enhancement even at the lowest tested concentration, coupled with the possibility of targeting all tumor tissues, being the SiNSs still in a size range where reticuloendothelial system trapping effect is relatively low

  4. Gadolinium-conjugated PLA-PEG nanoparticles as liver targeted molecular MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijin; Yu, Dexin; Liu, Chunxi; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Na; Ma, Chunhong; Song, Jibin; Lu, Zaijun

    2011-09-01

    A nanoparticle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent targeted to liver was developed by conjugation of gadolinium (Gd) chelate groups onto the biocompatible poly(l-lactide)-block-poly (ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) nanoparticles. PLA-PEG conjugated with diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) was used to formulate PLA-PEG-DTPA nanoparticles by solvent diffusion method, and then Gd was loaded onto the nanoparticles by chelated with the unfolding DTPA on the surface of the PLA-PEG-DTPA nanoparticles. The mean size of the nanoparticles was 265.9 ± 6.7 nm. The relaxivity of the Gd-labeled nanoparticles was measured, and the distribution in vivo was evaluated in rats. Compared with conventional contrast agent (Magnevist), the Gd-labeled PLA-PEG nanoparticles showed significant enhancement both on liver targeting ability and imaging signal intensity. The T(1) and T(2) relaxivities per [Gd] of the Gd-labeled nanoparticles was 18.865 mM(-1) s(-1) and 24.863 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 T, respectively. In addition, the signal intensity in vivo was stronger comparing with the Gd-DTPA and the T(1) weight time was lasting for 4.5 h. The liver targeting efficiency of the Gd-labeled PLA-PEG nanoparticles in rats was 14.57 comparing with Magnevist injection. Therefore, the Gd-labeled nanoparticles showed the potential as targeting molecular MRI contrast agent for further clinical utilization.

  5. Crowdsourcing the General Public for Large Scale Molecular Pathology Studies in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Candido dos Reis

    2015-07-01

    Interpretation: Crowdsourcing of the general public to classify cancer pathology data for research is viable, engages the public and provides accurate ER data. Crowdsourced classification of research data may offer a valid solution to problems of throughput requiring human input.

  6. Comparing staging by positron emission tomography with contrast-enhanced computed tomography and by pathology in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualliotine, J R; Mydlarz, W K; Chan, J Y K; Zhou, X; Wang, H; Agrawal, N

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ability of positron emission tomography with contrast-enhanced computed tomography to correctly stage head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, in comparison with pathological staging. Positron emission tomography computed tomography was used to determine the tumour-node-metastasis classification and overall cancer stage in 85 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients who underwent pre-operative imaging using this modality and primary surgery between July 2010 and January 2013. Staging by positron emission tomography computed tomography was retrospectively compared with staging using pathological specimens. Agreement between imaging stage and pathological stage was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis both overall and for each primary tumour site. This imaging modality was 87.5 per cent sensitive and 44.8 per cent specific in identifying regional cervical metastases, and had false positive and false negative rates of 18.8 per cent and 8.2 per cent, respectively. The positive predictive and negative predictive values were 75.4 per cent and 65.0 per cent, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed a significant agreement between positron emission tomography computed tomography and pathological node classification in older patients and for the oral cavity primary tumour site. There was significant agreement between both methods in the overall classification only for tumours classified as T3 or greater. Positron emission tomography computed tomography should be used with caution for the pre-operative staging of head and neck cancers because of its high false positive and false negative rates.

  7. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J.M.; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J.B.; van Bemmel, Margaretha E.M.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Velders, Aldrik H.; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2017-01-01

    intracellular distribution. In vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) of the hybrid peptide were shown to be similar. Assessment of tracer distribution in excised tissues revealed the location of tracer uptake with both LA-ICP-MS-imaging and fluorescence imaging. Conclusion: Lanthanide-isotope chelation expands the scope of fluorescent/radioactive hybrid tracers to include MS-based analytical tools such as mass-cytometry, ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS imaging in molecular pathology. In contradiction to common expectations, MS detection using a single chelate imaging agent was shown to be feasible, enabling a direct link between nuclear medicine-based imaging and theranostic methods. PMID:28255355

  8. Insights into the Molecular Mechanisms of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Diseases with Molecular Simulations: Understanding the Roles of Artificial and Pathological Missense Mutations in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Related to Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkid Coskuner-Weber

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β and α-synuclein are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs, which are at the center of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease pathologies, respectively. These IDPs are extremely flexible and do not adopt stable structures. Furthermore, both amyloid-β and α-synuclein can form toxic oligomers, amyloid fibrils and other type of aggregates in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Experimentalists face challenges in investigating the structures and thermodynamic properties of these IDPs in their monomeric and oligomeric forms due to the rapid conformational changes, fast aggregation processes and strong solvent effects. Classical molecular dynamics simulations complement experiments and provide structural information at the atomic level with dynamics without facing the same experimental limitations. Artificial missense mutations are employed experimentally and computationally for providing insights into the structure-function relationships of amyloid-β and α-synuclein in relation to the pathologies of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Furthermore, there are several natural genetic variations that play a role in the pathogenesis of familial cases of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which are related to specific genetic defects inherited in dominant or recessive patterns. The present review summarizes the current understanding of monomeric and oligomeric forms of amyloid-β and α-synuclein, as well as the impacts of artificial and pathological missense mutations on the structural ensembles of these IDPs using molecular dynamics simulations. We also emphasize the recent investigations on residual secondary structure formation in dynamic conformational ensembles of amyloid-β and α-synuclein, such as β-structure linked to the oligomerization and fibrillation mechanisms related to the pathologies of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This information represents an important foundation for the successful and

  9. Next-Generation Sequencing for Infectious Disease Diagnosis and Management: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefterova, Martina I; Suarez, Carlos J; Banaei, Niaz; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are increasingly being used for diagnosis and monitoring of infectious diseases. Herein, we review the application of NGS in clinical microbiology, focusing on genotypic resistance testing, direct detection of unknown disease-associated pathogens in clinical specimens, investigation of microbial population diversity in the human host, and strain typing. We have organized the review into three main sections: i) applications in clinical virology, ii) applications in clinical bacteriology, mycobacteriology, and mycology, and iii) validation, quality control, and maintenance of proficiency. Although NGS holds enormous promise for clinical infectious disease testing, many challenges remain, including automation, standardizing technical protocols and bioinformatics pipelines, improving reference databases, establishing proficiency testing and quality control measures, and reducing cost and turnaround time, all of which would be necessary for widespread adoption of NGS in clinical microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intratumor partitioning and texture analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI identifies relevant tumor subregions to predict pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Gong, Guanghua; Cui, Yi; Li, Ruijiang

    2016-11-01

    To predict pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) based on quantitative, multiregion analysis of dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, 35 patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer were retrospectively investigated using 3T DCE-MR images acquired before and after the first cycle of NAC. First, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the DCE-MRI data with high temporal resolution. We then partitioned the whole tumor into multiple subregions using k-means clustering based on the PCA-defined eigenmaps. Within each tumor subregion, we extracted four quantitative Haralick texture features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The change in texture features in each tumor subregion between pre- and during-NAC was used to predict pathological complete response after NAC. Three tumor subregions were identified through clustering, each with distinct enhancement characteristics. In univariate analysis, all imaging predictors except one extracted from the tumor subregion associated with fast washout were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correcting for multiple testing, with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) or AUCs between 0.75 and 0.80. In multivariate analysis, the proposed imaging predictors achieved an AUC of 0.79 (P = 0.002) in leave-one-out cross-validation. This improved upon conventional imaging predictors such as tumor volume (AUC = 0.53) and texture features based on whole-tumor analysis (AUC = 0.65). The heterogeneity of the tumor subregion associated with fast washout on DCE-MRI predicted pathological response to NAC in breast cancer. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1107-1115. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a potato collection with contrasting tuber carotenoid content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sulli

    Full Text Available After wheat and rice, potato is the third most important staple food worldwide. A collection of ten tetraploid (Solanum tuberosum and diploid (S. phureja and S. chacoense genotypes with contrasting carotenoid content was subjected to molecular characterization with respect to candidate carotenoid loci and metabolic profiling using LC-HRMS. Irrespective of ploidy and taxonomy, tubers of these genotypes fell into three groups: yellow-fleshed, characterized by high levels of epoxy-xanthophylls and xanthophyll esters and by the presence of at least one copy of a dominant allele of the β-Carotene Hydroxylase 2 (CHY2 gene; white-fleshed, characterized by low carotenoid levels and by the presence of recessive chy2 alleles; and orange-fleshed, characterized by high levels of zeaxanthin but low levels of xanthophyll esters, and homozygosity for a Zeaxanthin Epoxidase (ZEP recessive allele. Novel CHY2 and ZEP alleles were identified in the collection. Multivariate analysis identified several groups of co-regulated non-polar compounds, and resulted in the grouping of the genotypes according to flesh color, suggesting that extensive cross-talk exists between the carotenoid pathway and other metabolite pathways in tubers. Postharvest traits like tuber dormancy and weight loss during storage showed little correlation with tuber carotenoid content, with the exception of zeaxanthin and its esters. Other tuber metabolites, such as glucose, monogalactosyldiacyglycerol (a glycolipid, or suberin precursors, showed instead significant correlations with both traits.

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a potato collection with contrasting tuber carotenoid content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulli, Maria; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Sturaro, Monica; Onofri, Chiara; Diretto, Gianfranco; Parisi, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    After wheat and rice, potato is the third most important staple food worldwide. A collection of ten tetraploid (Solanum tuberosum) and diploid (S. phureja and S. chacoense) genotypes with contrasting carotenoid content was subjected to molecular characterization with respect to candidate carotenoid loci and metabolic profiling using LC-HRMS. Irrespective of ploidy and taxonomy, tubers of these genotypes fell into three groups: yellow-fleshed, characterized by high levels of epoxy-xanthophylls and xanthophyll esters and by the presence of at least one copy of a dominant allele of the β-Carotene Hydroxylase 2 (CHY2) gene; white-fleshed, characterized by low carotenoid levels and by the presence of recessive chy2 alleles; and orange-fleshed, characterized by high levels of zeaxanthin but low levels of xanthophyll esters, and homozygosity for a Zeaxanthin Epoxidase (ZEP) recessive allele. Novel CHY2 and ZEP alleles were identified in the collection. Multivariate analysis identified several groups of co-regulated non-polar compounds, and resulted in the grouping of the genotypes according to flesh color, suggesting that extensive cross-talk exists between the carotenoid pathway and other metabolite pathways in tubers. Postharvest traits like tuber dormancy and weight loss during storage showed little correlation with tuber carotenoid content, with the exception of zeaxanthin and its esters. Other tuber metabolites, such as glucose, monogalactosyldiacyglycerol (a glycolipid), or suberin precursors, showed instead significant correlations with both traits. PMID:28898255

  13. MR imaging of postoperative change of dura mater of rabbits; Effect of contrast enhancement of dura mater and correlation with pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Fumiaki (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-01-01

    To explain the mechanism of benign postoperative dural enhancement, the author made experimental model of rabbit's subdual hematoma and performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). On plain T1-weighted images, infused blood or blood cells could not be detected immediately after surgery. On follow up plain T1-weighted images, the infused blood could be identified in only a case with 1 cc blood infusion. Marked dural enhancement could be seen immediately after surgery and continued three to fourteen days after 1 cc or 0.1 cc blood or 0.1 cc red blood cells infusion. To the contrary, no definite dural enhancement could be seen in the cases with plasma or saline infusion. Subdural red blood cells were required for dural enhancement immediately after surgery. Pathological findings revealed three types of reaction to infused blood: newly formed capillarization with fresh hemorrhage from the capillaries; subdural hematoma and no reaction. After vanishment of dural enhancement, pathological findings of the specimens were identical to that of normal dura. Dural enhancement may be induced by increased permeability of the dura associated with subdural hematoma and/or the extravasation of the contrast from newly formed capillaries. (author).

  14. Low-Molecular-Weight Iron Chelates May Be an Alternative to Gadolinium-based Contrast Agents for T1-weighted Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Haeckel, Akvile; Hauptmann, Ralf; Mueller, Susanne; Kuhl, Christiane K; Schellenberger, Eyk A

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To synthesize two low-molecular-weight iron chelates and compare their T1 contrast effects with those of a commercial gadolinium-based contrast agent for their applicability in dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods The animal experiments were approved by the local ethics committee. Two previously described iron (Fe) chelates of pentetic acid (Fe-DTPA) and of trans-cyclohexane diamine tetraacetic acid (Fe-tCDTA) were synthesized with stability constants several orders of magnitude higher than those of gadolinium-based contrast agents. The T1 contrast effects of the two chelates were compared with those of gadopentetate dimeglumine in blood serum phantoms at 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T. For in vivo studies, a human breast cancer cell line (MDA-231) was implanted in five mice per group. The dynamic contrast effects of the chelates were compared by performing DCE MR imaging with intravenous application of Fe-DTPA or Fe-tCDTA on day 1 and DCE MR imaging in the same tumors with gadopentetate dimeglumine on day 2. Quantitative DCE maps were generated with software and were compared by means of a one-tailed Pearson correlation test. Results Relaxivities in serum (0.94 T at room temperature) of Fe-tCDTA (r1 = 2.2 mmol -1 · sec -1 , r2 = 2.5 mmol -1 · sec -1 ) and Fe-DTPA (r1 = 0.9 mmol -1 · sec -1 , r2 = 0.9 mmol -1 · sec -1 ) were approximately twofold and fivefold lower, respectively, compared with those of gadopentetate dimeglumine (r1 = 4.1 mmol -1 · sec -1 , r2 = 4.8 mmol -1 · sec -1 ). Used at moderately higher concentrations, however, iron chelates generated similar contrast effects at T1-weighted MR imaging in vitro in serum, in vivo in blood, and for DCE MR imaging of breast cancer xenografts. The volume transfer constant values for Fe-DTPA and Fe-tCDTA in the same tumors correlated well with those observed for gadopentetate dimeglumine (Fe-tCDTA Pearson R, 0.99; P = .0003; Fe-DTPA Pearson R, 0.97; P

  15. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  16. A molecular network of the aging human brain provides insights into the pathology and cognitive decline of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sara; Gaiteri, Chris; Sullivan, Sarah E; White, Charles C; Tasaki, Shinya; Xu, Jishu; Taga, Mariko; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Patrick, Ellis; Komashko, Vitalina; McCabe, Cristin; Smith, Robert; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Root, David E; Regev, Aviv; Yu, Lei; Chibnik, Lori B; Schneider, Julie A; Young-Pearse, Tracy L; Bennett, David A; De Jager, Philip L

    2018-06-01

    There is a need for new therapeutic targets with which to prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD), a major contributor to aging-related cognitive decline. Here we report the construction and validation of a molecular network of the aging human frontal cortex. Using RNA sequence data from 478 individuals, we first build a molecular network using modules of coexpressed genes and then relate these modules to AD and its neuropathologic and cognitive endophenotypes. We confirm these associations in two independent AD datasets. We also illustrate the use of the network in prioritizing amyloid- and cognition-associated genes for in vitro validation in human neurons and astrocytes. These analyses based on unique cohorts enable us to resolve the role of distinct cortical modules that have a direct effect on the accumulation of AD pathology from those that have a direct effect on cognitive decline, exemplifying a network approach to complex diseases.

  17. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    as a vulnerable exon and used patient derived lymphoblast cell lines and PAH minigenes to study the molecular defect that impacted pre-mRNA processing. We showed that the c.1144T>C and c.1066-3C>T mutations cause exon 11 skipping, while the c.1139C>T mutation is neutral or slightly beneficial. The c.1144T......In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation...... molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11...

  18. A targeted nanoglobular contrast agent from host-guest self-assembly for MR cancer molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Han, Zhen; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    The clinical application of nanoparticular Gd(III) based contrast agents for tumor molecular MRI has been hindered by safety concerns associated with prolonged tissue retention, although they can produce strong tumor enhancement. In this study, a targeted well-defined cyclodextrin-based nanoglobular contrast agent was developed through self-assembly driven by host-guest interactions for safe and effective cancer molecular MRI. Multiple β-cyclodextrins attached POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane) nanoglobule was used as host molecule. Adamantane-modified macrocyclic Gd(III) contrast agent, cRGD (cyclic RGDfK peptide) targeting ligand and fluorescent probe was used as guest molecules. The targeted host-guest nanoglobular contrast agent cRGD-POSS-βCD-(DOTA-Gd) specifically bond to αvβ3 integrin in malignant 4T1 breast tumor and provided greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding non-targeted agent. The agent also provided significant fluorescence signal in tumor tissue. The histological analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed its specific and effective targeting to αvβ3 integrin. The targeted imaging agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular MR and fluorescent imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feline panleukopenia virus revisited : molecular characteristics and pathological lesions associated with three recent isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Van Vuuren

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The low incidence of clinical signs or pathological lesions compatible with feline panleukopenia in cats has created the perception among practitioners that the disease has disappeared since the emergence of canine parvovirus type 2 in the late 1970s.Three parvoviruses that were recently isolated from a domestic cat and 2 cheetahs in cell culture or detected by means of the polymerase chain reaction were shown to be typical feline parvoviruses. Phylogenetic comparison with other FPV isolates did not reveal a particular African cluster.

  20. Hsp90 molecular chaperone: structure, functions and participation in cardio-vascular pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kroupskaya I. V.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of structural and functional properties of molecular chaperon Hsp90. Hsp90 is a representative of highly widespread family of heat shock proteins. The protein is found in eubacteria and all branches of eukarya, but it is apparently absent in archaea. It is one of key regulators of numerous signalling pathways, cell growth and development, apoptosis, induction of autoimmunity, and progression of heart failure. The full functional activity of Hsp90 shows up in a complex with other molecular chaperones and co-chaperones. Molecular interactions between chaperones, different signalling proteins and protein-partners are highly crucial for the normal functioning of signalling pathways and their destruction causes an alteration in the cell physiology up to its death.

  1. Pathological and molecular based study of pneumonic pasteurellosis in cattle and buffalo (bubalus bubalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, R.

    2014-01-01

    In present study the clinico-pathological findings were recorded in naturally infected cattle and buffaloes due to pasteurella multocida during an outbreak at different livestock herds. There was no significant difference in mortality among various groups of buffaloes (p>0.78) and cattle (p>0.49). The infected animals showed clinical signs of moderate to acute anorexia, salivation, fever, depression, dysponea, submandibular edema, mucopurulent nasal discharge and respiratory grunts. Few of infected animals died due to septicemia. the necropsy of dead animals was performed and visceral organs lungs, kidneys, heart and lymph nodes were observed for gross and histopathological lesions. The tissue samples from these organs were fixed in formalin for pathological changes. Necropsy of dead animals revealed severe pneumonia, consolidation of lungs and intense pleural adhesions. serosanguinous fluid was accumulated in pericardium and peritoneal cavities. Histopathologically affected lungs exhibited severe congestion, mononuclear cell infiltration, thick interlobular septae punctuated with macrophages, plasma cells and peri-vascular cuffing. Liver, kidneys and lymph nodes had degenerative changes in histological sections. The specificity of p. multocida was determined by colony characteristics on macconkey's agar and morphological features with gram's iodine. The pcr product size approximately 511bp from lung tissues confirmed a total of 82% (19/23) bacterial isolates from dead animals. (author)

  2. Detailed imaging of the normal anatomy and pathologic conditions of the cavernous region at 3 Tesla using a contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Jennifer; Peters, Friederike; Lummel, Nina; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Yousry, Indra [University Hospital Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany); Schankin, Christoph [University Hospital Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Rachinger, Walter [University Hospital Munich, Department of Neurosurgery, Munich (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) at 3 Tesla for the delineation of the cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy both under normal and under pathological conditions. Fifteen patients without pathologies in the CS and ten patients with pituitary adenomas were included. The CE-MRA was performed on a 3-Tesla scanner and analyzed collaboratively by two readers. The cranial nerves (CNs) within the CS, namely CNIII, CNIV, CNV1, CNV2, and CNVI, were identified in both patient groups. In the adenoma patients it was also assessed whether and to which extend the adenoma invaded the CS and the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs was determined. In the patients with normal CS anatomy, CNIII could be identified in 100%, CNIV in 86.7%, and CNV1, CNV2, as well as CNVI in 100% of analyzed sides. Pituitary adenomas invaded the CS unilaterally (right side) in four patients, and bilaterally in six patients. In patients with adenomas, the CN could be identified and differentiated from the tumor in the following percentages: CNIII in 100%, CNIV in 70%, both CNV1 and CNV2 in 90%, and CNVI in 100%. In all these cases, the tumor-nerve spatial relationship could be visualized. 3-Tesla CE-MRA allows detailed imaging of the complex anatomy of the CS and its structures. In adenoma patients, it clearly visualizes the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs, and thus might be helpful to optimize presurgical planning. (orig.)

  3. Detailed imaging of the normal anatomy and pathologic conditions of the cavernous region at 3 Tesla using a contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Jennifer; Peters, Friederike; Lummel, Nina; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Yousry, Indra; Schankin, Christoph; Rachinger, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) at 3 Tesla for the delineation of the cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy both under normal and under pathological conditions. Fifteen patients without pathologies in the CS and ten patients with pituitary adenomas were included. The CE-MRA was performed on a 3-Tesla scanner and analyzed collaboratively by two readers. The cranial nerves (CNs) within the CS, namely CNIII, CNIV, CNV1, CNV2, and CNVI, were identified in both patient groups. In the adenoma patients it was also assessed whether and to which extend the adenoma invaded the CS and the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs was determined. In the patients with normal CS anatomy, CNIII could be identified in 100%, CNIV in 86.7%, and CNV1, CNV2, as well as CNVI in 100% of analyzed sides. Pituitary adenomas invaded the CS unilaterally (right side) in four patients, and bilaterally in six patients. In patients with adenomas, the CN could be identified and differentiated from the tumor in the following percentages: CNIII in 100%, CNIV in 70%, both CNV1 and CNV2 in 90%, and CNVI in 100%. In all these cases, the tumor-nerve spatial relationship could be visualized. 3-Tesla CE-MRA allows detailed imaging of the complex anatomy of the CS and its structures. In adenoma patients, it clearly visualizes the spatial relationship between tumor and CNs, and thus might be helpful to optimize presurgical planning. (orig.)

  4. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: prediction of pathologic response with PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging--prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Miyake, Mototaka; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kazunori; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2012-04-01

    To clarify whether fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) can be used to predict pathologic response in breast cancer. Institutional human research committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. Accuracy after two cycles of NAC for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR) was examined in 142 women (mean age, 57 years: range, 43-72 years) with histologically proved breast cancer between December 2005 and February 2009. Quantitative PET/CT and DCE MR imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of NAC. Parameters of PET/CT and of blood flow and microvascular permeability at DCE MR were compared with pathologic response. Patients were also evaluated after NAC by using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 based on DCE MR measurements and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 based on PET/CT measurements. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine continuous variables at PET/CT and DCE MR to predict pCR, and diagnostic accuracies were compared with the McNemar test. Significant decrease from baseline of all parameters at PET/CT and DCE MR was observed after NAC. Therapeutic response was obtained in 24 patients (17%) with pCR and 118 (83%) without pCR. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 45.5%, 85.5%, and 82.4%, respectively, with RECIST and 70.4%, 95.7%, and 90.8%, respectively, with EORTC and PERCIST. Multiple logistic regression revealed three significant independent predictors of pCR: percentage maximum standardized uptake value (%SUV(max)) (odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11, 1.34; P PET/CT is superior to DCE MR for the prediction of pCR (%SUV(max) [90.1%] vs %κ

  5. Mutations of different molecular origins exhibit contrasting patterns of regional substitution rate variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Elango

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Transitions at CpG dinucleotides, referred to as "CpG substitutions", are a major mutational input into vertebrate genomes and a leading cause of human genetic disease. The prevalence of CpG substitutions is due to their mutational origin, which is dependent on DNA methylation. In comparison, other single nucleotide substitutions (for example those occurring at GpC dinucleotides mainly arise from errors during DNA replication. Here we analyzed high quality BAC-based data from human, chimpanzee, and baboon to investigate regional variation of CpG substitution rates. We show that CpG substitutions occur approximately 15 times more frequently than other single nucleotide substitutions in primate genomes, and that they exhibit substantial regional variation. Patterns of CpG rate variation are consistent with differences in methylation level and susceptibility to subsequent deamination. In particular, we propose a "distance-decaying" hypothesis, positing that due to the molecular mechanism of a CpG substitution, rates are correlated with the stability of double-stranded DNA surrounding each CpG dinucleotide, and the effect of local DNA stability may decrease with distance from the CpG dinucleotide.Consistent with our "distance-decaying" hypothesis, rates of CpG substitution are strongly (negatively correlated with regional G+C content. The influence of G+C content decays as the distance from the target CpG site increases. We estimate that the influence of local G+C content extends up to 1,500 approximately 2,000 bps centered on each CpG site. We also show that the distance-decaying relationship persisted when we controlled for the effect of long-range homogeneity of nucleotide composition. GpC sites, in contrast, do not exhibit such "distance-decaying" relationship. Our results highlight an example of the distinctive properties of methylation-dependent substitutions versus substitutions mostly arising from errors during DNA replication. Furthermore

  6. System for Informatics in the Molecular Pathology Laboratory: An Open-Source End-to-End Solution for Next-Generation Sequencing Clinical Data Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wenjun; Kadri, Sabah; Puranik, Rutika; Wurst, Michelle N; Patil, Sushant A; Mujacic, Ibro; Benhamed, Sonia; Niu, Nifang; Zhen, Chao Jie; Ameti, Bekim; Long, Bradley C; Galbo, Filipo; Montes, David; Iracheta, Crystal; Gamboa, Venessa L; Lopez, Daisy; Yourshaw, Michael; Lawrence, Carolyn A; Aisner, Dara L; Fitzpatrick, Carrie; McNerney, Megan E; Wang, Y Lynn; Andrade, Jorge; Volchenboum, Samuel L; Furtado, Larissa V; Ritterhouse, Lauren L; Segal, Jeremy P

    2018-04-24

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) diagnostic assays increasingly are becoming the standard of care in oncology practice. As the scale of an NGS laboratory grows, management of these assays requires organizing large amounts of information, including patient data, laboratory processes, genomic data, as well as variant interpretation and reporting. Although several Laboratory Information Systems and/or Laboratory Information Management Systems are commercially available, they may not meet all of the needs of a given laboratory, in addition to being frequently cost-prohibitive. Herein, we present the System for Informatics in the Molecular Pathology Laboratory, a free and open-source Laboratory Information System/Laboratory Information Management System for academic and nonprofit molecular pathology NGS laboratories, developed at the Genomic and Molecular Pathology Division at the University of Chicago Medicine. The System for Informatics in the Molecular Pathology Laboratory was designed as a modular end-to-end information system to handle all stages of the NGS laboratory workload from test order to reporting. We describe the features of the system, its clinical validation at the Genomic and Molecular Pathology Division at the University of Chicago Medicine, and its installation and testing within a different academic center laboratory (University of Colorado), and we propose a platform for future community co-development and interlaboratory data sharing. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S.; Schreiber, Kathrin; Pröpper, Kevin; Becker, Stefan; Usón, Isabel; Sheldrick, George M.; Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph; Steinfeld, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder

  8. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S. [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schreiber, Kathrin [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Becker, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Usón, Isabel [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB–CSIC), Barcelona Science Park, Baldiri Reixach 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de; Steinfeld, Robert, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  9. Surgical Pathology of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Practical Implications of Morphologic and Molecular Heterogeneity for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charville, Gregory W; Longacre, Teri A

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract, exhibits diverse histologic and clinical manifestations. With its putative origin in the gastrointestinal pacemaker cell of Cajal, GIST can arise in association with any portion of the tubular gastrointestinal tract. Morphologically, GISTs are classified as spindled or epithelioid, though each of these subtypes encompasses a broad spectrum of microscopic appearances, many of which mimic other histologic entities. Despite this morphologic ambiguity, the diagnosis of GIST is aided in many cases by immunohistochemical detection of KIT (CD117) or DOG1 expression. The natural history of GIST ranges from that of a tumor cured by surgical resection to that of a locally advanced or even widely metastatic, and ultimately fatal, disease. This clinicopathologic heterogeneity is paralleled by an underlying molecular diversity: the majority of GISTs are associated with spontaneous activating mutations in KIT, PDGFRA, or BRAF, while additional subsets are driven by genetic lesions-often inherited-of NF1 or components of the succinate dehydrogenase enzymatic complex. Specific gene mutations correlate with particular anatomic or morphologic characteristics and, in turn, with distinct clinical behaviors. Therefore, prognostication and treatment are increasingly dictated not only by morphologic clues, but also by accompanying molecular genetic features. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of the heterogenous molecular underpinnings of GIST, including implications for the practicing pathologist with regard to morphologic identification, immunohistochemical diagnosis, and clinical management.

  10. Molecular Features of Humic Acids and Fulvic Acids from Contrasting Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Judith; Buurman, Peter; Kalbitz, Karsten; Zomeren, van Andre; Vidal-Torrado, Pablo; Cerli, Chiara; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2017-01-01

    Insight in the molecular structure of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) can contribute to identify relationships between their molecular properties, and further our quantitative abilities to model important organic matter functions such as metal complexation and association with mineral

  11. Emerging new tools to study and treat muscle pathologies: genetics and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in our body, is responsible for generating the force required for movement, and is also an important thermogenic organ. Skeletal muscle is an enigmatic tissue because while on the one hand, skeletal muscle regeneration after injury is arguably one of the best-studied stem cell-dependent regenerative processes, on the other hand, skeletal muscle is still subject to many degenerative disorders with few therapeutic options in the clinic. It is important to develop new regenerative medicine-based therapies for skeletal muscle. Future therapeutic strategies should take advantage of rapidly developing technologies enabling the differentiation of skeletal muscle from human pluripotent stem cells, along with precise genome editing, which will go hand in hand with a steady and focused approach to understanding underlying mechanisms of skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and disease. In this review, I focus on highlighting the recent advances that particularly have relied on developmental and molecular biology approaches to understanding muscle development and stem cell function. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Galaxy tools and workflows for sequence analysis with applications in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock, Peter J A; Grüning, Björn A; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Pritchard, Leighton

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy Project offers the popular web browser-based platform Galaxy for running bioinformatics tools and constructing simple workflows. Here, we present a broad collection of additional Galaxy tools for large scale analysis of gene and protein sequences. The motivating research theme is the identification of specific genes of interest in a range of non-model organisms, and our central example is the identification and prediction of "effector" proteins produced by plant pathogens in order to manipulate their host plant. This functional annotation of a pathogen's predicted capacity for virulence is a key step in translating sequence data into potential applications in plant pathology. This collection includes novel tools, and widely-used third-party tools such as NCBI BLAST+ wrapped for use within Galaxy. Individual bioinformatics software tools are typically available separately as standalone packages, or in online browser-based form. The Galaxy framework enables the user to combine these and other tools to automate organism scale analyses as workflows, without demanding familiarity with command line tools and scripting. Workflows created using Galaxy can be saved and are reusable, so may be distributed within and between research groups, facilitating the construction of a set of standardised, reusable bioinformatic protocols. The Galaxy tools and workflows described in this manuscript are open source and freely available from the Galaxy Tool Shed (http://usegalaxy.org/toolshed or http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu).

  13. Sarcoglycans in the normal and pathological breast tissue of humans: an immunohistochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arco, Alba; Favaloro, Angelo; Gioffrè, Mara; Santoro, Giuseppe; Speciale, Francesco; Vermiglio, Giovanna; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    The sarcoglycan complex, consisting of α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-sarcoglycans, is a multimember transmembrane system providing a mechanosignaling connection from the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Whereas the expression of α- and γ-sarcoglycan is restricted to striated muscle, other sarcoglycans are widely expressed. Although many studies have investigated sarcoglycans in all muscle types, insufficient data are available on the distribution of the sarcoglycan complex in nonmuscle tissue. On this basis, we used immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques to study preliminarily the sarcoglycans in normal glandular breast tissue (which has never been studied in the literature on these proteins) to verify the effective wider distribution of this complex. Moreover, to understand the role of sarcoglycans, we also tested samples obtained from patients affected by fibrocystic mastopathy and breast fibroadenoma. Our data showed, for the first time, that all sarcoglycans are always detectable in all normal samples both in epithelial and myoepithelial cells; in pathological breast tissue, all sarcoglycans appeared severely reduced. These data demonstrated that all sarcoglycans, not only β-, δ-, and ε-sarcoglycans, have a wider distribution, implying a new unknown role for these proteins. Moreover, in breast diseases, sarcoglycans containing cadherin domain homologs could provoke a loss of strong adhesion between epithelial cells, permitting and facilitating the degeneration of these benign breast tumors into malignant tumors. Consequently, sarcoglycans could play an important and intriguing role in many breast diseases and in particular in tumor progression from benign to malignant. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Translational analysis of mouse and human placental protein and mRNA reveals distinct molecular pathologies in human preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian; Sharma, Parveen; Evangelou, Andreas I; Whiteley, Kathie; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alex; Baczyk, Dora; Czikk, Marie; Kingdom, John; Rossant, Janet; Gramolini, Anthony O; Adamson, S Lee; Kislinger, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) adversely impacts ~5% of pregnancies. Despite extensive research, no consistent biomarkers or cures have emerged, suggesting that different molecular mechanisms may cause clinically similar disease. To address this, we undertook a proteomics study with three main goals: (1) to identify a panel of cell surface markers that distinguish the trophoblast and endothelial cells of the placenta in the mouse; (2) to translate this marker set to human via the Human Protein Atlas database; and (3) to utilize the validated human trophoblast markers to identify subgroups of human preeclampsia. To achieve these goals, plasma membrane proteins at the blood tissue interfaces were extracted from placentas using intravascular silica-bead perfusion, and then identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 1181 plasma membrane proteins, of which 171 were enriched at the maternal blood-trophoblast interface and 192 at the fetal endothelial interface with a 70% conservation of expression in humans. Three distinct molecular subgroups of human preeclampsia were identified in existing human microarray data by using expression patterns of trophoblast-enriched proteins. Analysis of all misexpressed genes revealed divergent dysfunctions including angiogenesis (subgroup 1), MAPK signaling (subgroup 2), and hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (subgroup 3). Subgroup 2 lacked expected changes in known preeclampsia markers (sFLT1, sENG) and uniquely overexpressed GNA12. In an independent set of 40 banked placental specimens, GNA12 was overexpressed during preeclampsia when co-incident with chronic hypertension. In the current study we used a novel translational analysis to integrate mouse and human trophoblast protein expression with human microarray data. This strategy identified distinct molecular pathologies in human preeclampsia. We conclude that clinically similar preeclampsia patients exhibit divergent placental gene expression profiles thus implicating divergent

  15. Identification and characterization of contrasting sunflower genotypes to early leaf senescence process combining molecular and physiological studies (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gialdi, A I; Moschen, S; Villán, C S; López Fernández, M P; Maldonado, S; Paniego, N; Heinz, R A; Fernandez, P

    2016-09-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex mechanism ruled by multiple genetic and environmental variables that affect crop yields. It is the last stage in leaf development, is characterized by an active decline in photosynthetic rate, nutrients recycling and cell death. The aim of this work was to identify contrasting sunflower inbred lines differing in leaf senescence and to deepen the study of this process in sunflower. Ten sunflower genotypes, previously selected by physiological analysis from 150 inbred genotypes, were evaluated under field conditions through physiological, cytological and molecular analysis. The physiological measurement allowed the identification of two contrasting senescence inbred lines, R453 and B481-6, with an increase in yield in the senescence delayed genotype. These findings were confirmed by cytological and molecular analysis using TUNEL, genomic DNA gel electrophoresis, flow sorting and gene expression analysis by qPCR. These results allowed the selection of the two most promising contrasting genotypes, which enables future studies and the identification of new biomarkers associated to early senescence in sunflower. In addition, they allowed the tuning of cytological techniques for a non-model species and its integration with molecular variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Profiling the extended phenotype of plant pathogens: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Gail M

    2017-04-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in plant pathology is what determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? This question is frequently studied in terms of the role of elicitors and pathogenicity factors in the triggering or overcoming of host defences. However, this focus fails to address the basic question of how the environment in host tissues acts to support or restrict pathogen growth. Efforts to understand this aspect of host-pathogen interactions are commonly confounded by several issues, including the complexity of the plant environment, the artificial nature of many experimental infection systems and the fact that the physiological properties of a pathogen growing in association with a plant can be very different from the properties of the pathogen in culture. It is also important to recognize that the phenotype and evolution of pathogen and host are inextricably linked through their interactions, such that the environment experienced by a pathogen within a host, and its phenotype within the host, is a product of both its interaction with its host and its evolutionary history, including its co-evolution with host plants. As the phenotypic properties of a pathogen within a host cannot be defined in isolation from the host, it may be appropriate to think of pathogens as having an 'extended phenotype' that is the product of their genotype, host interactions and population structure within the host environment. This article reflects on the challenge of defining and studying this extended phenotype, in relation to the questions posed below, and considers how knowledge of the phenotype of pathogens in the host environment could be used to improve disease control. What determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? What aspects of pathogen biology should be considered in describing the extended phenotype of a pathogen within a host? How can we study the extended phenotype in ways that provide insights into the phenotypic properties of pathogens

  17. Molecular MR Imaging of CD44 in Breast Cancer with Hyaluronan-Based Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    linear polysaccharide composed of alternating (β-1,4)-linked d- glucuronic acid and (β-1,3) N-acetyl-d-glucosamine residues with molecular weights as...enzymatic reactions in-vivo that generate polysaccharides of decreasing sizes, which in principle may facilitate the timely excretion of HA based...14CO2) or in urine (as low molecular weight HA or monosaccharide fragments). The same authors also reported that the total amount of excretion into

  18. Gene expression profiles give insight into the molecular pathology of bone in primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Sjur; Stilgren, Lis; Olstad, Ole K

    2006-01-01

    to bone and extra-cellular matrix, showed altered expression. Of these were 85 up- and 14 down-regulated before operation. The majority of regulated genes represented structural and adhesion proteins, but included also proteases and protease regulators which promote resorption. Increased expressions...... of collagen type 1 and osteocalcin mRNAs in disease reflecting the PTH anabolic action were paralleled by increased concentrations of these proteins in serum. In addition, genes encoding transcriptional factors and their regulators as well as cellular signal molecules were up-regulated during disease....... The identified genetic signature represents the first extensive description of the ensemble of bone and matrix related mRNAs, which are regulated by chronic PTH action. These results identify the molecular basis for this skeletal disease, and provide new insight into this clinical condition with potential...

  19. Defining the molecular pathologies in cloaca malformation: similarities between mouse and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Runck

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anorectal malformations are congenital anomalies that form a spectrum of disorders, from the most benign type with excellent functional prognosis, to very complex, such as cloaca malformation in females in which the rectum, vagina and urethra fail to develop separately and instead drain via a single common channel into the perineum. The severity of this phenotype suggests that the defect occurs in the early stages of embryonic development of the organs derived from the cloaca. Owing to the inability to directly investigate human embryonic cloaca development, current research has relied on the use of mouse models of anorectal malformations. However, even studies of mouse embryos lack analysis of the earliest stages of cloaca patterning and morphogenesis. Here we compared human and mouse cloaca development and retrospectively identified that early mis-patterning of the embryonic cloaca might underlie the most severe forms of anorectal malformation in humans. In mouse, we identified that defective sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling results in early dorsal-ventral epithelial abnormalities prior to the reported defects in septation. This is manifested by the absence of Sox2 and aberrant expression of keratins in the embryonic cloaca of Shh knockout mice. Shh knockout embryos additionally develop a hypervascular stroma, which is defective in BMP signaling. These epithelial and stromal defects persist later, creating an indeterminate epithelium with molecular alterations in the common channel. We then used these animals to perform a broad comparison with patients with mild-to-severe forms of anorectal malformations including cloaca malformation. We found striking parallels with the Shh mouse model, including nearly identical defective molecular identity of the epithelium and surrounding stroma. Our work strongly suggests that early embryonic cloacal epithelial differentiation defects might be the underlying cause of severe forms of anorectal malformations

  20. In vivo photoacoustic tumor tomography using a quinoline-annulated porphyrin as NIR molecular contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Michael; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhou, Feifei; Zhu, Hua; Bornhütter, Tobias; Röder, Beate; Zhu, Quing; Brückner, Christian

    2017-01-25

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of a tetra-PEG-modified and freely water-soluble quinoline-annulated porphyrin are described. We previously demonstrated the ability of quinoline-annulated porphyrins to act as an in vitro NIR photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contrast agent. The solubility of the quinoline-annulated porphyrin derivative in serum now allowed the assessment of the efficacy of the PEGylated derivative as an in vivo NIR contrast agent for the PAI of an implanted tumor in a mouse model. A multi-fold contrast enhancement when compared to the benchmark dye ICG could be shown, a finding that could be traced to its photophysical properties (short triplet lifetimes, low fluorescence and singlet oxygen sensitization quantum yields). A NIR excitation wavelength of 790 nm could be used, fully taking advantage of the optical window of tissue. Rapid renal clearance of the dye was observed. Its straight-forward synthesis, optical properties with the possibility for further optical fine-tuning, nontoxicity, favorable elimination rates, and contrast enhancement make this a promising PAI contrast agent. The ability to conjugate the PAI chromophore with a fluorescent tag using a facile and general conjugation strategy was also demonstrated.

  1. Crowdsourcing the General Public for Large Scale Molecular Pathology Studies in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido Dos Reis, Francisco J; Lynn, Stuart; Ali, H Raza; Eccles, Diana; Hanby, Andrew; Provenzano, Elena; Caldas, Carlos; Howat, William J; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Liu, Bin; Daley, Frances; Coulson, Penny; Vyas, Rupesh J; Harris, Leslie M; Owens, Joanna M; Carton, Amy F M; McQuillan, Janette P; Paterson, Andy M; Hirji, Zohra; Christie, Sarah K; Holmes, Amber R; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger L; Mannermaa, Arto; Couch, Fergus; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Blows, Fiona M; Sanders, Joyce; de Groot, Renate; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Hooning, Maartje; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Stegmaier, Christa; Lintott, Chris; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2015-07-01

    Citizen science, scientific research conducted by non-specialists, has the potential to facilitate biomedical research using available large-scale data, however validating the results is challenging. The Cell Slider is a citizen science project that intends to share images from tumors with the general public, enabling them to score tumor markers independently through an internet-based interface. From October 2012 to June 2014, 98,293 Citizen Scientists accessed the Cell Slider web page and scored 180,172 sub-images derived from images of 12,326 tissue microarray cores labeled for estrogen receptor (ER). We evaluated the accuracy of Citizen Scientist's ER classification, and the association between ER status and prognosis by comparing their test performance against trained pathologists. The area under ROC curve was 0.95 (95% CI 0.94 to 0.96) for cancer cell identification and 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.97) for ER status. ER positive tumors scored by Citizen Scientists were associated with survival in a similar way to that scored by trained pathologists. Survival probability at 15 years were 0.78 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.80) for ER-positive and 0.72 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.77) for ER-negative tumors based on Citizen Scientists classification. Based on pathologist classification, survival probability was 0.79 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.81) for ER-positive and 0.71 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.74) for ER-negative tumors. The hazard ratio for death was 0.26 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.37) at diagnosis and became greater than one after 6.5 years of follow-up for ER scored by Citizen Scientists, and 0.24 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.33) at diagnosis increasing thereafter to one after 6.7 (95% CI 4.1 to 10.9) years of follow-up for ER scored by pathologists. Crowdsourcing of the general public to classify cancer pathology data for research is viable, engages the public and provides accurate ER data. Crowdsourced classification of research data may offer a valid solution to problems of throughput requiring human input.

  2. [Soft tissue sarcomas: the role of histology and molecular pathology for differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poremba, C

    2006-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas include a wide spectrum of different entities. The so-called small round blue cell tumors and spindle cell tumors are difficult to classify based solely on conventional histology. To identify different subtypes of tumors special histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques are necessary. Analysis of protein expression by immunohistochemistry provides a helpful tool to investigate the histogenesis of tumors. A basic spectrum of antibodies should be included to study these tumors: Desmin and myogenin (or MyoD1) for skeletal differentiation; S-100, NSE, CD56, and synaptophysin for neural/neuroendocrine differentiation; CD3, CD20, and CD79 alpha for malignant lymphomas; CD34, sm-actin, and beta-catenin for spindle cell tumors; additional antigens, e. g. Ki-67 and p 53, for estimation of proliferation and tumor suppressor gene malfunctions. Nevertheless, the molecular analysis of soft tissue sarcomas is necessary for demonstration of specific translocations or gene defects to specify and proof a diagnosis. For this purpose, RT-PCR for RNA expression analysis of gene fusion transcripts and multi-color FISH for analysis of chromosomal rearrangements are used. Further investigations, using DNA microrrays may help to subclassify such tumors, with respect to prognosis or prediction of therapeutic response.

  3. MRI contrast agent for molecular imaging of the HER2/neu receptor using targeted magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasaneh, Samira; Rajabi, Hossein, E-mail: hrajabi@modares.ac.ir [Tarbiat Modares University, Department of Medical Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babaei, Mohammad Hossein [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Department of Radioisotope (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhlaghpoor, Shahram [Sina Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Noor Medical Imaging Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    In this study, Trastuzumab modified Magnetic Nanoparticles (TMNs) were prepared as a new contrast agent for detecting HER2 (Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2) expression tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TMNs were prepared based on iron oxide nanoparticles core and Trastuzumab modified dextran coating. The TMNs core and hydrodynamic size were determined by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. TMNs stability and cytotoxicity were investigated. The ability of TMNs for HER2 detection were evaluated in breast carcinoma cell lines (SKBr3 and MCF7 cells) and tumor-bearing mice by MRI and iron uptake determination. The particles core and hydrodynamic size were 9 {+-} 2.5 and 41 {+-} 15 nm (size range: 15-87 nm), respectively. The molar antibody/nanoparticle ratio was 3.1-3.5. TMNs were non-toxic to the cells below the 30 {mu}g (Fe)/mL concentration and good stable up to 8 weeks in PBS buffer. TMNs could detect HER2 oncogenes in the cells surface with imagable contrast by MRI. The invivo study in mice bearing tumors indicated that TMNs possessed a good diagnostic ability as HER2 specific contrast agent by MRI. TMNs were demonstrated to be able to selectively accumulate in the tumor cells, with a proper signal enhancement in MRI T2 images. So, the complex may be considered for further investigations as an MRI contrast agent for detection of HER2 expression tumors in human.

  4. Comparison between the diagnostic accuracy of clinico-pathological and molecular tests for feline infectious peritonitis (FIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Stranieri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy for feline infectious peritonitis (FIP of conventional clinic-pathological tests with that of molecular tests such as routine PCR and PCR followed by the sequencing of the Spike (S gene. Blood, effusion and tissues specimens were collected from 21 FIP suspected cats. In vivo examination consisted of CBC, serum protein electrophoresis, AGP measurement, cytological and biochemical examination and the evaluation of the ΔTNC on effusions, and of molecular tests such the screening PCR (target: 3’UTR region and the PCR directed towards the S gene followed by the amplification products sequencing in order to detect the aminoacidic substitution recently considered diagnostic for FIP1. These molecular techniques were applied to tissues collected during necropsy, which also allowed forming an FIP group (13 cats and a non-FIP group (5 cats based on histology and immunohistochemistry. The best test on tissues was immunohistochemistry (sens: 92.3%; spec: 100%, while the screening PCR suffered of low specificity (spec: 33.3% and the S gene sequencing showed low sensitivity (sens: 69.2%.On effusions, the best tests resulted screening PCR and cytology (sens and spec: 100% in comparison with the ΔTNC measurement (sens: 85.7 %; spec: 100% and the S gene sequencing (sens: 42.8%; spec: 100%.On blood, the best test resulted AGP measurement (sens: 81.8%; spec: 100%, while serum protein electrophoresis showed a surprisingly low sensitivity (sens: 41.7%. Screening PCR (sens: 55.6%; spec: 100% and S gene sequencing (sens: 33.3%; spec: 100% proved again low accuracy.

  5. Comparative molecular pathology of cadmium- and all-trans-retinoic acid-induced postaxial forelimb ectrodactyly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Xiaoyan; Lee, Grace S.; Shimizu, Hirohito; Collins, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 ) and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) induce postaxial forelimb ectrodactyly in C57BL/6N mice when administered during early limb development, and co-administration yields a synergistic response suggesting a common final pathway to the defect. In the current study, forelimb buds from embryos given high maternal teratogenic doses of CdCl 2 or RA, or the combination of both agents at low doses were collected at various time points after treatment on GD 9.5 and examined for cellular apoptosis, proliferation, and patterning genes. Some cellular perturbations detected in the developing limb bud were similar for both teratogens, whereas other alterations were unique to each agent. For example, at 12 and 18 h, CdCl 2 treatment increased apoptotic cells in the mesenchyme underneath the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), whereas RA caused apoptosis in the AER and proximal mesenchyme. Further, the combined low-dose treatment increased cell death synergistically in all three regions. CdCl 2 and the low-dose combined treatment inhibited mesenchymal proliferation at 12 h, which was associated with induction of p21 cip1 and inhibition of phospho-c-Jun. In contrast, RA did not inhibit mesenchymal proliferation and did not induce p21 cip1 expression or change c-Jun phosphorylation. All three treatment groups showed a delay in the patterning of distal chondrogenesis centers as indicated by Sox9 expression. There was also common inhibition in the expression of AER markers, Fgf8 and Fgf4, and the mesenchymal marker Msx1 involved in the maintenance of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Collectively, a model is hypothesized where limb patterning can be perturbed by insults to both ectoderm and mesoderm

  6. Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors in type I neurofibromatosis: a pathologic and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantiss, Rhonda K; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Sarran, Lisa; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2005-04-01

    Multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors typically occur in familial form associated with KIT receptor tyrosine kinase or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) germline mutations, but may also develop in the setting of type 1 neurofibromatosis. The molecular abnormalities of gastrointestinal stromal tumors arising in neurofibromatosis have not been extensively studied. We identified three patients with type 1 neuro-fibromatosis and multiple small intestinal stromal tumors. Immunostains for CD117, CD34, desmin, actins, S-100 protein, and keratins were performed on all of the tumors. DNA was extracted from representative paraffin blocks from separate tumor nodules in each case and subjected to a nested polymerase chain reaction, using primers for KIT exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA exons 12 and 18, followed by direct sequencing. The mean patient age was 56 years (range: 37-86 years, male/female ratio: 2/1). One patient had three tumors, one had five, and one had greater than 10 tumor nodules, all of which demonstrated histologic features characteristic of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and stained strongly for CD117 and CD34. One patient died of disease at 35 months, one was disease free at 12 months and one was lost to follow-up. DNA extracts from 10 gastrointestinal stromal tumors (three from each of two patients and four from one patient) were subjected to polymerase chain reactions and assessed for mutations. All of the tumors were wild type for KIT exons 9, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Three tumors from one patient had identical point mutations in KIT exon 11, whereas the other tumors were wild type at this locus. We conclude that, although most patients with type 1 neurofibromatosis and gastrointestinal stromal tumors do not have KIT or PDGFRA mutations, KIT germline mutations might be implicated in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in some patients.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of the microsomal mixed function oxidases and biological and pathological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur I. Cederbaum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cytochrome P450 mixed function oxidase enzymes play a major role in the metabolism of important endogenous substrates as well as in the biotransformation of xenobiotics. The liver P450 system is the most active in metabolism of exogenous substrates. This review briefly describes the liver P450 (CYP mixed function oxidase system with respect to its enzymatic components and functions. Electron transfer by the NADPH-P450 oxidoreductase is required for reduction of the heme of P450, necessary for binding of molecular oxygen. Binding of substrates to P450 produce substrate binding spectra. The P450 catalytic cycle is complex and rate-limiting steps are not clear. Many types of chemical reactions can be catalyzed by P450 enzymes, making this family among the most diverse catalysts known. There are multiple forms of P450s arranged into families based on structural homology. The major drug metabolizing CYPs are discussed with respect to typical substrates, inducers and inhibitors and their polymorphic forms. The composition of CYPs in humans varies considerably among individuals because of sex and age differences, the influence of diet, liver disease, presence of potential inducers and/or inhibitors. Because of such factors and CYP polymorphisms, and overlapping drug specificity, there is a large variability in the content and composition of P450 enzymes among individuals. This can result in large variations in drug metabolism by humans and often can contribute to drug–drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. Because of many of the above factors, especially CYP polymorphisms, there has been much interest in personalized medicine especially with respect to which CYPs and which of their polymorphic forms are present in order to attempt to determine what drug therapy and what dosage would reflect the best therapeutic strategy in treating individual patients.

  8. GM1-gangliosidosis in American black bears: clinical, pathological, biochemical and molecular genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Torres, Paola A; Wang, Betty C; Zeng, Bai Jin; Eaton, Samuel; Erdelyi, Ildiko; Ducore, Rebecca; Maganti, Rajanikarath; Keating, John; Perry, Bain J; Tseng, Florina S; Waliszewski, Nicole; Pokras, Mark; Causey, Robert; Seger, Rita; March, Philip; Tidwell, Amy; Pfannl, Rolf; Seyfried, Thomas; Kolodny, Edwin H; Alroy, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    G(M1)-gangliosidosis is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder due to an autosomal recessively inherited deficiency of lysosomal β-galactosidase. We have identified seven American black bears (Ursus americanus) found in the Northeast United States suffering from G(M1)-gangliosidosis. This report describes the clinical features, brain MRI, and morphologic, biochemical and molecular genetic findings in the affected bears. Brain lipids were compared with those in the brain of a G(M1)-mouse. The bears presented at ages 10-14 months in poor clinical condition, lethargic, tremulous and ataxic. They continued to decline and were humanely euthanized. The T(2)-weighted MR images of the brain of one bear disclosed white matter hyperintensity. Morphological studies of the brain from five of the bears revealed enlarged neurons with foamy cytoplasm containing granules. Axonal spheroids were present in white matter. Electron microscopic examination revealed lamellated membrane structures within neurons. Cytoplasmic vacuoles were found in the liver, kidneys and chondrocytes and foamy macrophages within the lungs. Acid β-galactosidase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was only 1-2% of control values. In the brain, ganglioside-bound sialic acid was increased more than 2-fold with G(M1)-ganglioside predominating. G(A1) content was also increased whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides were markedly decreased. The distribution of gangliosides was similar to that in the G(M1)-mouse brain, but the loss of myelin lipids was greater in the brain of the affected bear than in the brain of the G(M1) mouse. Isolated full-length cDNA of the black bear GLB1 gene revealed 86% homology to its human counterpart in nucleotide sequence and 82% in amino acid sequence. GLB1 cDNA from liver tissue of an affected bear contained a homozygous recessive T(1042) to C transition inducing a Tyr348 to His mutation (Y348H) within a highly conserved region of the GLB1 gene. The coincidence of several

  9. Molecular Pathology of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinomas: A Retrospective Study of 144 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Godbert, Yann; Perot, Gaelle; Al Ghuzlan, Abir; Bardet, Stéphane; Belleannée, Geneviève; Crinière, Lise; Do Cao, Christine; Fouilloux, Geneviève; Guyetant, Serge; Kelly, Antony; Leboulleux, Sophie; Buffet, Camille; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Michels, Jean-Jacques; Tissier, Frédérique; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Wassef, Michel; Pinard, Clémence; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle

    2017-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a rare tumor, with poorly defined oncogenic molecular mechanisms and limited therapeutic options contributing to its poor prognosis. The aims of this retrospective study were to determine the frequency of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations and to identify the mutational profile of ATC including TERT promoter mutations. One hundred and forty-four ATC cases were collected from 10 centers that are a part of the national French network for management of refractory thyroid tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis for ALK rearrangement was performed on tissue microarrays. A panel of 50 genes using next-generation sequencing and TERT promoter mutations using Sanger sequencing were also screened. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was interpretable for 90 (62.5%) cases. One (1.1%) case was positive for an ALK rearrangement with a borderline threshold (15% positive cells). Next-generation sequencing results were interpretable for 94 (65.3%) cases, and Sanger sequencing (TERT) for 98 (68.1%) cases. A total of 210 mutations (intronic and exonic) were identified. TP53 alterations were the most frequent (54.4%). Forty-three percent harbored a mutation in the (H-K-N)RAS genes, 13.8% a mutation in the BRAF gene (essentially p.V600E), 17% a PI3K-AKT pathway mutation, 6.4% both RAS and PI3K pathway mutations, and 4.3% both TP53 and PTEN mutations. Nearly 10% of the cases showed no mutations of the RAS, PI3K-AKT pathways, or TP53, with mutations of ALK, ATM, APC, CDKN2A, ERBB2, RET, or SMAD4, including mutations not yet described in thyroid tumors. Genes encoding potentially druggable targets included: mutations in the ATM gene in four (4.3%) cases, in ERBB2 in one (1.1%) case, in MET in one (1.1%) case, and in ALK in one (1.1%) case. A TERT promoter alteration was found in 53 (54.0%) cases, including 43 C228T and 10 C250T mutations. Three out of our cases did not harbor mutations in the panel of genes with therapeutic

  10. Screening and Monitoring Response to Treatment Using Subsecond Molecular Imaging and Hyperpolarized Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    DCE-MRI analysis typically involves the application of various pharmacokinetic equations to model the movement of contrast agent molecules between...position over a short time interval due to random, thermally-induced motion (ie, Brownian motion). DW-MRI exploits applied gradients of the main...intracel- lular organelles tend to restrict or hinder the free movement of water.47,48 Moreover, cancerous tissues often show sig- nificantly reduced ADC

  11. Diagnostic histochemistry and clinical-pathological testings as molecular pathways to pathogenesis and treatment of the ageing neuromuscular system: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, W King

    2015-04-01

    Ageing of the neuromuscular system in elderhood ingravescently contributes to slowness, weakness, falling and death, often accompanied by numbness and pain. This article is to put in perspective examples from a half-century of personal and team neuromuscular histochemical-pathological and clinical-pathological research, including a number of lucky and instructive accomplishments identifying new treatments and new diseases. A major focus currently is on some important, still enigmatic, aspects of the ageing neuromuscular system. It is also includes some of the newest references of others on various closely-related aspects of this ageing system. The article may help guide others in their molecular-based endeavors to identify paths leading to discovering new treatments and new pathogenic aspects. These are certainly needed - our ageing and unsteady constituents are steadily increasing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Molecular evaluation of thrombosis using X-ray phase contrast imaging with microbubbles targeted to P-selectin in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Chai, Wei-Min; Yan, Fuhua; Chen, Ke-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) provides excellent image contrast by utilizing the phase shift. The introduction of microbubbles into tissues can cause a phase shift to make microbubbles visibly identified on PCI. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of targeted microbubble-based PCI for the detection of thrombosis. The absorption and phase contrast images of P-selectin-targeted microbubbles (MB P ) were obtained and compared in vitro. MB P , control IgG-targeted microbubbles (MB C ), and unbound microbubbles (MB U ) were tested for binding specificity on thrombi expressing P-selectin. MB P were used as molecular PCI probes to evaluate P-selectin expression in a mouse model of arteriovenous shunt thrombosis that was created using PE tubes in the bypass outside of the mouse body. PCI clearly showed the microbubbles not viewable via absorption contrast imaging (ACI). In vitro attachment of MB P (91.60 ± 11.63) to thrombi was significantly higher than attachment of MB C (17.80 ± 4.02, P < 0.001) or MB U (9.80 ± 2.59, P < 0.001). In the mouse model of arteriovenous shunt thrombosis, the binding affinity of MB P (15.50 ± 6.25) was significantly greater than that of MB C (0.50 ± 0.84, P < 0.001) or MB U (0.33 ± 0.52, P < 0.001). Our results indicate that molecular PCI may be considered as a novel and promising imaging modality for the investigation of thrombosis. (orig.)

  13. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  14. Controlled intracellular self-assembly of gadolinium nanoparticles as smart molecular MR contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun-Yan; Shen, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jian-Dong; Li, Li; Liang, Gao-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Herein we developed a new "smart" Gd-based MR contrast agent (i.e., 1) which is susceptive to furin, a protease overexpressed in tumor. Under the action of furin, 1 condenses to form dimers (1-Ds) and the latter self-assemble into gadolinium nanparticles (Gd-NPs). Relaxivity of 1-D is more than 2 folds of those of 1 and magnevist at 1.5 T, and 1.4 folds of that of 1 at 3 T. Intracellular condensation of 1 in furin-overexpressed MDA-MB-468 cells was proven with direct two-photon laser microscopy (TPLM) fluorescence imaging of the cells incubated with the europium analog of 1 (i.e., 2). Intracellular Gd-NPs of 1 were uncovered and characterized for the first time. MRI of MDA-MB-468 tumors showed that 1 has enhanced MR contrast within the tumors than that of its scrambled control 1-Scr.

  15. First-in-Human Ultrasound Molecular Imaging With a VEGFR2-Specific Ultrasound Molecular Contrast Agent (BR55) in Prostate Cancer: A Safety and Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenge, Martijn; Tranquart, François; Mannaerts, Christophe K; de Reijke, Theo M; van de Vijver, Marc J; Laguna, M Pilar; Pochon, Sibylle; de la Rosette, Jean J M C H; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2017-07-01

    BR55, a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-specific ultrasound molecular contrast agent (MCA), has shown promising results in multiple preclinical models regarding cancer imaging. In this first-in-human, phase 0, exploratory study, we investigated the feasibility and safety of the MCA for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) in men using clinical standard technology. Imaging with the MCA was performed in 24 patients with biopsy-proven PCa scheduled for radical prostatectomy using a clinical ultrasound scanner at low acoustic power. Safety monitoring was done by physical examination, blood pressure and heart rate measurements, electrocardiogram, and blood sampling. As first-in-human study, MCA dosing and imaging protocol were necessarily fine-tuned along the enrollment to improve visualization. Imaging data were correlated with radical prostatectomy histopathology to analyze the detection rate of ultrasound molecular imaging with the MCA. Imaging with MCA doses of 0.03 and 0.05 mL/kg was adequate to obtain contrast enhancement images up to 30 minutes after administration. No serious adverse events or clinically meaningful changes in safety monitoring data were identified during or after administration. BR55 dosing and imaging were fine-tuned in the first 12 patients leading to 12 subsequent patients with an improved MCA dosing and imaging protocol. Twenty-three patients underwent radical prostatectomy. A total of 52 lesions were determined to be malignant by histopathology with 26 (50%) of them seen during BR55 imaging. In the 11 patients that were scanned with the improved protocol and underwent radical prostatectomy, a total of 28 malignant lesions were determined: 19 (68%) were seen during BR55 ultrasound molecular imaging, whereas 9 (32%) were not identified. Ultrasound molecular imaging with BR55 is feasible with clinical standard technology and demonstrated a good safety profile. Detectable levels of the MCA can be reached in patients

  16. Molecular phylogeny and phylogeography of genus Pseudois (Bovidae, Cetartiodactyla): New insights into the contrasting phylogeographic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuai; Wang, Zhihong; Jiang, Lichun; Peng, Rui; Zhang, Tao; Peng, Quekun; Zou, Fangdong

    2017-09-01

    Blue sheep, Pseudois nayaur , is endemic to the Tibetan Plateau and the surrounding mountains, which are the highest-elevation areas in the world. Classical morphological taxonomy suggests that there are two subspecies in genus Pseudois (Bovidae, Artiodactyla), namely Pseudois nayaur nayaur and Pseudois nayaur szechuanensis . However, the validity and geographic characteristics of these subspecies have never been carefully discussed and analyzed. This may be partially because previous studies have mainly focused on the vague taxonomic status of Pseudois schaeferi (dwarf blue sheep). Thus, there is an urgent need to investigate the evolutionary relationship and taxonomy system of this genus. This study enriches a previous dataset by providing a large number of new samples, based on a total of 225 samples covering almost the entire distribution of blue sheep. Molecular data from cytochrome b and the mitochondrial control region sequences were used to reconstruct the phylogeny of this species. The phylogenetic inferences show that vicariance plays an important role in diversification within this genus. In terms of molecular dating results and biogeographic analyses, the striking biogeographic pattern coincides significantly with major geophysical events. Although the results raise doubt about the present recognized distribution range of blue sheep, they have corroborated the validity of the identified subspecies in genus Pseudois . Meanwhile, these results demonstrate that the two geographically distinct populations, the Helan Mountains and Pamir Plateau populations, have been significantly differentiated from the identified subspecies, a finding that challenges the conventional taxonomy of blue sheep.

  17. Contrasting impacts of ocean acidification and warming on the molecular responses of CO2-resilient oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Priscila; Thompson, Emma L; Raftos, David A

    2017-06-02

    This study characterises the molecular processes altered by both elevated CO 2 and increasing temperature in oysters. Differences in resilience of marine organisms against the environmental stressors associated with climate change will have significant implications for the sustainability of coastal ecosystems worldwide. Some evidence suggests that climate change resilience can differ between populations within a species. B2 oysters represent a unique genetic resource because of their capacity to better withstand the impacts of elevated CO 2 at the physiological level, compared to non-selected oysters from the same species (Saccostrea glomerata). Here, we used proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of gill tissue to evaluate whether the differential response of B2 oysters to elevated CO 2 also extends to increased temperature. Substantial and distinctive effects on protein concentrations and gene expression were evident among B2 oysters responding to elevated CO 2 or elevated temperature. The combination of both stressors also altered oyster gill proteomes and gene expression. However, the impacts of elevated CO 2 and temperature were not additive or synergistic, and may be antagonistic. The data suggest that the simultaneous exposure of CO 2 -resilient oysters to near-future projected ocean pH and temperature results in complex changes in molecular processes in order to prevent stress-induced cellular damage. The differential response of B2 oysters to the combined stressors also indicates that the addition of thermal stress may impair the resilience of these oysters to decreased pH. Overall, this study reveals the intracellular mechanisms that might enable marine calcifiers to endure the emergent, adverse seawater conditions resulting from climate change.

  18. DCE-MRI using small-molecular and albumin-binding contrast agents in experimental carcinomas with different stromal content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Fiorini, Silvia; Nicolato, Elena; Tambalo, Stefano; Daducci, Alessandro [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences Institute, Milan (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Rubello, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Services of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Viale Tre Martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy); Marzola, Pasquina [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Objectives: To compare DCE-MRI experiments performed using a standard small-molecular (Gd-DTPA) and an albumin-binding (MS-325) contrast agent in two carcinoma models with different stromal content. Materials and methods: DU-145 or BXPC-3 cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. DCE-MRI was performed by a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA or MS-325 about 2 weeks after inoculation. For quantitative analysis a volume of interest was manually drawn over each tumor. To address the heterogeneous enhancement, each tumor volume was then divided into the 20% most-enhancing and the remaining 80% least-enhancing fractions. Mean tumor enhancement was calculated over these selected tumor volumes and compared between tumor groups and contrast agents. Maps of differential enhancement, peak enhancement and time-to-peak were used for visual evaluation. CD31 and VEGF immunohistochemistry were performed in excised tumors. Results: In the 80% least-enhancing volume, at late time points of the dynamic scan, the mean enhancement elicited by MS-325 was higher in BXPC-3 than in DU-145 tumors. In the 20% most-enhancing volume, using either contrast agents, significant difference between the two tumors types were observed only early, while at later time points of the dynamic scan the difference were obscured by the faster washout observed in the BXPC-3 tumors. Enhancement maps confirmed that BXPC-3 tumors were characterized by marked washout rate using either contrast agent, particularly in the higher enhancing peripheral rim. With MS-325 this washout pattern appeared to be specific to the BXPC-3 carcinomas, since it was not observed in the DU-145 tumors. Finally, in both tumor types, MS-325 produced significantly higher enhancement than Gd-DTPA in the late phase of the dynamic scan. Ex vivo analysis confirmed the marked presence of aberrant infiltrative stroma in BXPC-3 tumors, in which tumor vessels were embedded. In all tumors the central portion was less viable and less

  19. DCE-MRI using small-molecular and albumin-binding contrast agents in experimental carcinomas with different stromal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Fiorini, Silvia; Nicolato, Elena; Tambalo, Stefano; Daducci, Alessandro; Degrassi, Anna; Sbarbati, Andrea; Rubello, Domenico; Marzola, Pasquina

    2011-04-01

    To compare DCE-MRI experiments performed using a standard small-molecular (Gd-DTPA) and an albumin-binding (MS-325) contrast agent in two carcinoma models with different stromal content. DU-145 or BXPC-3 cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. DCE-MRI was performed by a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA or MS-325 about 2 weeks after inoculation. For quantitative analysis a volume of interest was manually drawn over each tumor. To address the heterogeneous enhancement, each tumor volume was then divided into the 20% most-enhancing and the remaining 80% least-enhancing fractions. Mean tumor enhancement was calculated over these selected tumor volumes and compared between tumor groups and contrast agents. Maps of differential enhancement, peak enhancement and time-to-peak were used for visual evaluation. CD31 and VEGF immunohistochemistry were performed in excised tumors. In the 80% least-enhancing volume, at late time points of the dynamic scan, the mean enhancement elicited by MS-325 was higher in BXPC-3 than in DU-145 tumors. In the 20% most-enhancing volume, using either contrast agents, significant difference between the two tumors types were observed only early, while at later time points of the dynamic scan the difference were obscured by the faster washout observed in the BXPC-3 tumors. Enhancement maps confirmed that BXPC-3 tumors were characterized by marked washout rate using either contrast agent, particularly in the higher enhancing peripheral rim. With MS-325 this washout pattern appeared to be specific to the BXPC-3 carcinomas, since it was not observed in the DU-145 tumors. Finally, in both tumor types, MS-325 produced significantly higher enhancement than Gd-DTPA in the late phase of the dynamic scan. Ex vivo analysis confirmed the marked presence of aberrant infiltrative stroma in BXPC-3 tumors, in which tumor vessels were embedded. In all tumors the central portion was less viable and less infiltrated by stromal tissue then the peripheral

  20. DCE-MRI using small-molecular and albumin-binding contrast agents in experimental carcinomas with different stromal content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Fiorini, Silvia; Nicolato, Elena; Tambalo, Stefano; Daducci, Alessandro [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences Institute, Milan (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Services of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Viale Tre Martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy); Marzola, Pasquina [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Objectives: To compare DCE-MRI experiments performed using a standard small-molecular (Gd-DTPA) and an albumin-binding (MS-325) contrast agent in two carcinoma models with different stromal content. Materials and methods: DU-145 or BXPC-3 cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. DCE-MRI was performed by a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA or MS-325 about 2 weeks after inoculation. For quantitative analysis a volume of interest was manually drawn over each tumor. To address the heterogeneous enhancement, each tumor volume was then divided into the 20% most-enhancing and the remaining 80% least-enhancing fractions. Mean tumor enhancement was calculated over these selected tumor volumes and compared between tumor groups and contrast agents. Maps of differential enhancement, peak enhancement and time-to-peak were used for visual evaluation. CD31 and VEGF immunohistochemistry were performed in excised tumors. Results: In the 80% least-enhancing volume, at late time points of the dynamic scan, the mean enhancement elicited by MS-325 was higher in BXPC-3 than in DU-145 tumors. In the 20% most-enhancing volume, using either contrast agents, significant difference between the two tumors types were observed only early, while at later time points of the dynamic scan the difference were obscured by the faster washout observed in the BXPC-3 tumors. Enhancement maps confirmed that BXPC-3 tumors were characterized by marked washout rate using either contrast agent, particularly in the higher enhancing peripheral rim. With MS-325 this washout pattern appeared to be specific to the BXPC-3 carcinomas, since it was not observed in the DU-145 tumors. Finally, in both tumor types, MS-325 produced significantly higher enhancement than Gd-DTPA in the late phase of the dynamic scan. Ex vivo analysis confirmed the marked presence of aberrant infiltrative stroma in BXPC-3 tumors, in which tumor vessels were embedded. In all tumors the central portion was less viable and less

  1. DCE-MRI using small-molecular and albumin-binding contrast agents in experimental carcinomas with different stromal content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Fiorini, Silvia; Nicolato, Elena; Tambalo, Stefano; Daducci, Alessandro; Degrassi, Anna; Sbarbati, Andrea; Rubello, Domenico; Marzola, Pasquina

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare DCE-MRI experiments performed using a standard small-molecular (Gd-DTPA) and an albumin-binding (MS-325) contrast agent in two carcinoma models with different stromal content. Materials and methods: DU-145 or BXPC-3 cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. DCE-MRI was performed by a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA or MS-325 about 2 weeks after inoculation. For quantitative analysis a volume of interest was manually drawn over each tumor. To address the heterogeneous enhancement, each tumor volume was then divided into the 20% most-enhancing and the remaining 80% least-enhancing fractions. Mean tumor enhancement was calculated over these selected tumor volumes and compared between tumor groups and contrast agents. Maps of differential enhancement, peak enhancement and time-to-peak were used for visual evaluation. CD31 and VEGF immunohistochemistry were performed in excised tumors. Results: In the 80% least-enhancing volume, at late time points of the dynamic scan, the mean enhancement elicited by MS-325 was higher in BXPC-3 than in DU-145 tumors. In the 20% most-enhancing volume, using either contrast agents, significant difference between the two tumors types were observed only early, while at later time points of the dynamic scan the difference were obscured by the faster washout observed in the BXPC-3 tumors. Enhancement maps confirmed that BXPC-3 tumors were characterized by marked washout rate using either contrast agent, particularly in the higher enhancing peripheral rim. With MS-325 this washout pattern appeared to be specific to the BXPC-3 carcinomas, since it was not observed in the DU-145 tumors. Finally, in both tumor types, MS-325 produced significantly higher enhancement than Gd-DTPA in the late phase of the dynamic scan. Ex vivo analysis confirmed the marked presence of aberrant infiltrative stroma in BXPC-3 tumors, in which tumor vessels were embedded. In all tumors the central portion was less viable and less

  2. Molecular imaging of a cell-penetrating peptide labeled fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and MR contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Guo Youmin; Duan Xiaoyi; Guo Xiaojuan; Yang Junle; Xu Min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of a new intracellular contrast agent--cell penetrating peptide labeled Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) and MRI contrast agent, Gadopentetate dimeglumine in molecular imaging. Methods: A new cell penetration peptides (CPPs)sequence LAGRRRRRRRRRK were synthesized in solid phase on the base of arginine (9) and were labelled with FITC (CPP 13 -FITC) and Gd - DTPA (CPP 13 -DTPA-Gd). Hepatic carcinoma cell line-HEPG 2 and mouse bone marrow stem cell was respectively stained by CPP 13 -FITC for different time intervals for observing the uptake and intracellular distribution. HEPG 2 in three l00 mm 2 culture plates was respectively incubated with CPP 13 -DTPA-Gd, Gd- DTPA and Dulbecco minimum essential medium for 30 min and imaged by 1.5 T MRI for studying the intracellular uptake and T 1 WI signal characteristics. Results: The peptide was synthesized by the manual solid-phase method successfully. The calculated molecular weight was 1792.78 and the chemical purity was over 95%. By inverted fluorescence microscope, HEPG 2 and mouse stem cell could transport CPP-FITC in cytoplasm and nuclear in 10 min. By MR imaging, CPP-DTPA-Gd could be uptake by HEPG 2 in 30 min and had a short T 1 short T 2 signal, furthermore. T 1 WI signal intensity ratio between in-tube (Ii) and out-tube (Io) in three groups of three scan slices were shown below: Iil/Io of group 1 (Group 1 was the cell incubated by CPP 13 -DTPA-Gd ) respectively was 2.84, 2.60, 2. 48; Iil/Io of group 2 (Group 2 was the cell incubated by DTPA-Gd) respectively is 1.15, 1.11, 1.12; Iil/Io of group 3 (Group 3 was the controled cell ) respectively was 1.15, 1.11, 1.11. By ANVOA analysis, the signal intensity among group 1, group 2 and group 3 had significant difference(F (1,2) = 201.88 P (1,3) =206.37 P (2,3) =0.529 P=0.507). Conclusion: The new constructed cell penetration peptide on the base of the polyargnine can translocate cell by carting FITC and MRI contrast agent-DTPA-Gd and the

  3. Synthesis of a novel iron oxide contrast agent as a platform for multimodal molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borny, R.

    2014-01-01

    hairy layer” was visualized by electron tomography and provided additional information about the architecture of iron oxide particles. Biological targets can be easily addressed by further functionalization of the available attachment sites. In future, the particles will be adapted to serve as a platform for multimodal molecular imaging and targeted radiation therapy. (author) [de

  4. 9Å structure of the COPI coat reveals that the Arf1 GTPase occupies two contrasting molecular environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonova, Svetlana O; Aderhold, Patrick; Kopp, Juergen; Ganeva, Iva; Röhling, Simone; Hagen, Wim J H; Sinning, Irmgard; Wieland, Felix; Briggs, John A G

    2017-06-16

    COPI coated vesicles mediate trafficking within the Golgi apparatus and between the Golgi and the endoplasmic reticulum. Assembly of a COPI coated vesicle is initiated by the small GTPase Arf1 that recruits the coatomer complex to the membrane, triggering polymerization and budding. The vesicle uncoats before fusion with a target membrane. Coat components are structurally conserved between COPI and clathrin/adaptor proteins. Using cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging, we determined the structure of the COPI coat assembled on membranes in vitro at 9 Å resolution. We also obtained a 2.57 Å resolution crystal structure of βδ-COP. By combining these structures we built a molecular model of the coat. We additionally determined the coat structure in the presence of ArfGAP proteins that regulate coat dissociation. We found that Arf1 occupies contrasting molecular environments within the coat, leading us to hypothesize that some Arf1 molecules may regulate vesicle assembly while others regulate coat disassembly.

  5. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  6. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deocaris, Custer C

    2000-04-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  7. Angio-RM morphologique et dynamique sans injection de contraste dans l’exploration des pathologies neurovasculaires à l’étage cervical et encéphalique

    OpenAIRE

    Raoult , Hélène

    2014-01-01

    ProblématiqueL’angio-IRM (ARM) est devenue incontournable dans la prise en charge des pathologies neurovasculaires. Elle permet en effet d’évaluer les pathologies modifiant la dynamique circulatoire, telles les sténoses artérielles, plus fréquentes à l’étage cervical et générant des flux sanguins accélérés voire turbulents en amont et ralentis en aval; ou bien les shunts artério-veineux, telles les malformations artério-veineuses encéphaliques, caractérisés par des flux accélérés et complexes...

  8. Radiologic-pathologic analysis of quantitative 3D tumour enhancement on contrast-enhanced MR imaging: a study of ROI placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockalingam, Arun; Duran, Rafael; Sohn, Jae Ho; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Chapiro, Julius; Lee, Howard; Sahu, Sonia; Nguyen, Sonny; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Lin, MingDe

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the influence of region-of-interest (ROI) placement on 3D tumour enhancement [Quantitative European Association for the Study of the Liver (qEASL)] in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients treated with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Phase 1: 40 HCC patients had nine ROIs placed by one reader using systematic techniques (3 ipsilateral to the lesion, 3 contralateral to the lesion, and 3 dispersed throughout the liver) and qEASL variance was measured. Intra-class correlations were computed. Phase 2: 15 HCC patients with histosegmentation were selected. Six ROIs were systematically placed by AC (3 ROIs ipsilateral and 3 ROIs contralateral to the lesion). Three ROIs were placed by 2 radiologists. qEASL values were compared to histopathology by Pearson's correlation, linear regression, and median difference. Phase 1: The dispersed method (abandoned in phase 2) had low consistency and high variance. Phase 2: qEASL correlated strongly with pathology in systematic methods [Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.886 (ipsilateral) and 0.727 (contralateral)] and in clinical methods (0.625 and 0.879). However, ipsilateral placement matched best with pathology (median difference: 5.4 %; correlation: 0.89; regression CI: [0.904, 0.1409]). qEASL is a robust method with comparable values among tested placements. Ipsilateral placement showed high consistency and better pathological correlation. (orig.)

  9. EGFR and KRAS quality assurance schemes in pathology : generating normative data for molecular predictive marker analysis in targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, Erik; Bovée, Judith V M G; Bruinsma, Hans; van den Brule, Adriaan J C; Dinjens, Winand; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Meulemans, Els; Nederlof, Petra; van Noesel, Carel; Prinsen, Clemens F M; Scheidel, Karen; van de Ven, Peter M; de Weger, Roel; Schuuring, Ed; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the reproducibility of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) immunohistochemistry (IHC), EGFR gene amplification analysis, and EGFR and KRAS mutation analysis among different laboratories performing routine diagnostic analyses in pathology in The

  10. Review Article: The Role of Molecular Pathological Epidemiology in the Study of Neoplastic and Non-neoplastic Diseases in the Era of Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Shuji; Nishihara, Reiko; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Wang, Molin; Nishi, Akihiro; Lochhead, Paul; Qian, Zhi Rong; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Nan, Hongmei; Yoshida, Kazuki; Milner, Danny A; Chan, Andrew T; Field, Alison E; Camargo, Carlos A; Williams, Michelle A; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-07-01

    Molecular pathology diagnostics to subclassify diseases based on pathogenesis are increasingly common in clinical translational medicine. Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) is an integrative transdisciplinary science based on the unique disease principle and the disease continuum theory. While it has been most commonly applied to research on breast, lung, and colorectal cancers, MPE can investigate etiologic heterogeneity in non-neoplastic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, drug toxicity, and immunity-related and infectious diseases. This science can enhance causal inference by linking putative etiologic factors to specific molecular biomarkers as outcomes. Technological advances increasingly enable analyses of various -omics, including genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, metagenomics, microbiome, immunomics, interactomics, etc. Challenges in MPE include sample size limitations (depending on availability of biospecimens or biomedical/radiological imaging), need for rigorous validation of molecular assays and study findings, and paucities of interdisciplinary experts, education programs, international forums, and standardized guidelines. To address these challenges, there are ongoing efforts such as multidisciplinary consortium pooling projects, the International Molecular Pathological Epidemiology Meeting Series, and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-MPE guideline project. Efforts should be made to build biorepository and biobank networks, and worldwide population-based MPE databases. These activities match with the purposes of the Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K), Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON), and Precision Medicine Initiatives of the United States National Institute of Health. Given advances in biotechnology, bioinformatics, and computational/systems biology, there are wide open opportunities in MPE to contribute to public

  11. The benefits of molecular pathology in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal disease. Part I of a two-part review: soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Delaney, David; O'Donnell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue metabolic and neoplastic diseases are increasingly characterized by their molecular signatures. This has resulted from increased knowledge of the human genome, which has contributed to the unraveling of molecular pathways in health and disease. Exploitation of this information has allowed it to be used for practical diagnostic purposes. The aim of the first part of this two-part review is to provide an up-to-date review of molecular genetic investigations that are available and routinely used by specialist musculoskeletal histopathologists in the diagnosis of neoplastic disease. Herein we focus on the benefits of employing well characterized somatic mutations in soft tissue lesions that are commonly employed in diagnostic pathology today. The second part highlights the known somatic and germline mutations implicated in osteoclast-rich lesions of bone, and the genetic changes that disturb phosphate metabolism and result in a variety of musculoskeletal phenotypes. Finally, a brief practical guide of how to use and provide a molecular pathology service is given. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: radiologic-pathologic correlation of the response and disease-free survival depending on molecular subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Ciria, S; Jiménez Aragón, F; García Mur, C; Esteban Cuesta, H; Gros Bañeres, B

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic and pathologic responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their correlation in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer and to analyze their impact in disease-free survival. We included 205 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We evaluated the radiologic response by comparing MRI images acquired before and after chemotherapy. The pathologic response was classified on the Miller and Payne scale. For each subtype (HER2+, TN, luminal A, luminal B HER2-, and luminal B HER2+), we used the χ(2) test, Student's t-test, ANOVA, and Kendall's Tau-b to evaluate the radiologic response and the pathologic response, the radiologic-pathologic correlation, and the disease-free survival. The subtypes HER2+ (62.1%) and TN (45.2%) had higher rates of complete radiologic response. The pathologic response was 65.5% in the HER2+ subtype, 38.1% in the TN subtype, 2.6% in the luminal A subtype, 8.2% in the luminal B HER2- subtype, and 31% in the luminal B HER2+ subtype. The rate of radiologic-pathologic correlation was significant in all subtypes, higher in TN and HER2 (Tau-b coefficients 0.805 and 0.717, respectively). Disease-free survival was higher in HER2+ (91.9±3.3 months) and lower in TN (69.5±6.3 months), with significant differences between the cases with poor and good radiologic responses (P=.040). Survival was greater in cases with good radiologic response, except in cases with luminal A subtype. MRI can be a useful tool that provides information about the evolution of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which varies with the immunohistochemical subtype. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Double agents and secret agents: the emerging fields of exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer and T2-exchange magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryaei, Iman; Pagel, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Two relatively new types of exogenous magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents may provide greater impact for molecular imaging by providing greater specificity for detecting molecular imaging biomarkers. Exogenous chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents rely on the selective saturation of the magnetization of a proton on an agent, followed by chemical exchange of a proton from the agent to water. The selective detection of a biomarker-responsive CEST signal and an unresponsive CEST signal, followed by the ratiometric comparison of these signals, can improve biomarker specificity. We refer to this improvement as a "double-agent" approach to molecular imaging. Exogenous T 2 -exchange agents also rely on chemical exchange of protons between the agent and water, especially with an intermediate rate that lies between the slow exchange rates of CEST agents and the fast exchange rates of traditional T 1 and T 2 agents. Because of this intermediate exchange rate, these agents have been relatively unknown and have acted as "secret agents" in the contrast agent research field. This review exposes these secret agents and describes the merits of double agents through examples of exogenous agents that detect enzyme activity, nucleic acids and gene expression, metabolites, ions, redox state, temperature, and pH. Future directions are also provided for improving both types of contrast agents for improved molecular imaging and clinical translation. Therefore, this review provides an overview of two new types of exogenous contrast agents that are becoming useful tools within the armamentarium of molecular imaging.

  14. Laboratory practice guidelines for detecting and reporting JAK2 and MPL mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms: a report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jerald Z; Cook, James R; Greiner, Timothy C; Hedvat, Cyrus; Hill, Charles E; Lim, Megan S; Longtine, Janina A; Sabath, Daniel; Wang, Y Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Recurrent mutations in JAK2 and MPL genes are genetic hallmarks of BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Detection of JAK2 and MPL mutations has been incorporated into routine diagnostic algorithms for these diseases. This Special Article summarizes results from a nationwide laboratory survey of JAK2 and MPL mutation analysis. Based on the current practice pattern and the literature, this Special Article provides recommendations and guidelines for laboratory practice for detection of mutations in the JAK2 and MPL genes, including clinical manifestations for prompting the mutation analysis, current and recommended methodologies for testing the mutations, and standardization for reporting the test results. This Special Article also points to future directions for genomic testing in BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ParaCEST Agents Encapsulated in Reverse Nano-Assembled Capsules (RACs): How Slow Molecular Tumbling Can Quench CEST Contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashishiko, Annah; Slack, Jacqueline R; Botta, Mauro; Woods, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Although paraCEST is a method with immense scope for generating image contrast in MRI, it suffers from the serious drawback of high detection limits. For a typical discrete paraCEST agent the detection limit is roughly an order of magnitude higher than that of a clinically used relaxation agent. One solution to this problem may be the incorporation of a large payload of paraCEST agents into a single macromolecular agent. Here we report a new synthetic method for accomplishing this goal: incorporating a large payload of the paraCEST agent DyDOTAM 3+ into a Reverse Assembled nano-Capsule. An aggregate can be generated between this chelate and polyacrylic acid (PAA) after the addition of ethylene diamine. Subsequent addition of polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH) followed by silica nanoparticles generated a robust encapsulating shell and afforded capsule with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 650 ± 250 nm. Unfortunately this encapsulation did not have the effect of amplifying the CEST effect per agent, but quenched the CEST altogether. The quenching effect of encapsulation could be attributed to the effect of slowing molecular tumbling, which is inevitable when the chelate is incorporated into a nano-scale material. This increases the transverse relaxation rate of chelate protons and a theoretical examination using Solomon Bloembergen Morgan theory and the Bloch equations shows that the increase in the transverse relaxation rate constant for the amide protons, in even modestly sized nano-materials, is sufficient to significantly quench CEST.

  16. ParaCEST Agents Encapsulated in Reverse Nano-Assembled Capsules (RACs: How Slow Molecular Tumbling Can Quench CEST Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annah Farashishiko

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Although paraCEST is a method with immense scope for generating image contrast in MRI, it suffers from the serious drawback of high detection limits. For a typical discrete paraCEST agent the detection limit is roughly an order of magnitude higher than that of a clinically used relaxation agent. One solution to this problem may be the incorporation of a large payload of paraCEST agents into a single macromolecular agent. Here we report a new synthetic method for accomplishing this goal: incorporating a large payload of the paraCEST agent DyDOTAM3+ into a Reverse Assembled nano-Capsule. An aggregate can be generated between this chelate and polyacrylic acid (PAA after the addition of ethylene diamine. Subsequent addition of polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH followed by silica nanoparticles generated a robust encapsulating shell and afforded capsule with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 650 ± 250 nm. Unfortunately this encapsulation did not have the effect of amplifying the CEST effect per agent, but quenched the CEST altogether. The quenching effect of encapsulation could be attributed to the effect of slowing molecular tumbling, which is inevitable when the chelate is incorporated into a nano-scale material. This increases the transverse relaxation rate of chelate protons and a theoretical examination using Solomon Bloembergen Morgan theory and the Bloch equations shows that the increase in the transverse relaxation rate constant for the amide protons, in even modestly sized nano-materials, is sufficient to significantly quench CEST.

  17. Investigating tumor perfusion by hyperpolarized (13) C MRI with comparison to conventional gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI and pathology in orthotopic human GBM xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Ilwoo; von Morze, Cornelius; Lupo, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    glioblastoma (GBM) model for the characterization of tumor perfusion and compared with standard Gd-based dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI data and immunohistochemical analysis from resected brains. Distinct HMCP perfusion characteristics were observed within the GBM tumors compared with contralateral...... for tumor that exhibited high levels of hyperpolarized HMCP signal. The results from this study have demonstrated that hyperpolarized HMCP data can be used as an indicator of tumor perfusion in an orthotopic xenograft model for GBM. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  18. Evidence-Based Diagnostic Algorithm for Glioma: Analysis of the Results of Pathology Panel Review and Molecular Parameters of EORTC 26951 and 26882 Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kros, Johan M; Huizer, Karin; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Marucci, Gianluca; Michotte, Alex; Pollo, Bianca; Rushing, Elisabeth J; Ribalta, Teresa; French, Pim; Jaminé, David; Bekka, Nawal; Lacombe, Denis; van den Bent, Martin J; Gorlia, Thierry

    2015-06-10

    With the rapid discovery of prognostic and predictive molecular parameters for glioma, the status of histopathology in the diagnostic process should be scrutinized. Our project aimed to construct a diagnostic algorithm for gliomas based on molecular and histologic parameters with independent prognostic values. The pathology slides of 636 patients with gliomas who had been included in EORTC 26951 and 26882 trials were reviewed using virtual microscopy by a panel of six neuropathologists who independently scored 18 histologic features and provided an overall diagnosis. The molecular data for IDH1, 1p/19q loss, EGFR amplification, loss of chromosome 10 and chromosome arm 10q, gain of chromosome 7, and hypermethylation of the promoter of MGMT were available for some of the cases. The slides were divided in discovery (n = 426) and validation sets (n = 210). The diagnostic algorithm resulting from analysis of the discovery set was validated in the latter. In 66% of cases, consensus of overall diagnosis was present. A diagnostic algorithm consisting of two molecular markers and one consensus histologic feature was created by conditional inference tree analysis. The order of prognostic significance was: 1p/19q loss, EGFR amplification, and astrocytic morphology, which resulted in the identification of four diagnostic nodes. Validation of the nodes in the validation set confirmed the prognostic value (P diagnostic algorithm for anaplastic glioma based on multivariable analysis of consensus histopathology and molecular parameters. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Molecular Pathology and Personalized Medicine: The Dawn of a New Era in Companion Diagnostics-Practical Considerations about Companion Diagnostics for Non-Small-Cell-Lung-Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plönes, Till; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Stoelben, Erich; Limmroth, Christina; Schildgen, Oliver; Schildgen, Verena

    2016-01-15

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) have become a major tool in molecular pathology and assist in therapy decisions in an increasing number of various cancers. Particularly, the developments in lung cancer have been most impressing in the last decade and consequently lung cancer mutation testing and molecular profiling has become a major business of diagnostic laboratories. However, it has become difficult to decide which biomarkers are currently relevant for therapy decisions, as many of the new biomarkers are not yet approved as therapy targets, remain in the status of clinical studies, or still have not left the experimental phase. The current review is focussed on those markers that do have current therapy implications, practical implications arising from the respective companion diagnostics, and thus is focused on daily practice.

  20. Molecular Pathology and Personalized Medicine: The Dawn of a New Era in Companion Diagnostics—Practical Considerations about Companion Diagnostics for Non-Small-Cell-Lung-Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Plönes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Companion diagnostics (CDx have become a major tool in molecular pathology and assist in therapy decisions in an increasing number of various cancers. Particularly, the developments in lung cancer have been most impressing in the last decade and consequently lung cancer mutation testing and molecular profiling has become a major business of diagnostic laboratories. However, it has become difficult to decide which biomarkers are currently relevant for therapy decisions, as many of the new biomarkers are not yet approved as therapy targets, remain in the status of clinical studies, or still have not left the experimental phase. The current review is focussed on those markers that do have current therapy implications, practical implications arising from the respective companion diagnostics, and thus is focused on daily practice.

  1. Molecular Regulation of the Mitochondrial F1Fo-ATPsynthase: Physiological and Pathological Significance of the Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Faccenda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, the mitochondrial F1Fo-ATPsynthase sets out the energy homeostasis by producing the bulk of cellular ATP. As for every enzyme, the laws of thermodynamics command it; however, it is privileged to have a dedicated molecular regulator that controls its rotation. This is the so-called ATPase Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF1 that blocks its reversal to avoid the consumption of cellular ATP when the enzyme acts as an ATP hydrolase. Recent evidence has also demonstrated that IF1 may control the alignment of the enzyme along the mitochondrial inner membrane, thus increasing the interest for the molecule. We conceived this review to outline the fundamental knowledge of the F1Fo-ATPsynthase and link it to the molecular mechanisms by which IF1 regulates its way of function, with the ultimate goal to highlight this as an important and possibly unique means to control this indispensable enzyme in both physiological and pathological settings.

  2. HER2 testing of gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma: a commentary and guidance document from the Association of Clinical Pathologists Molecular Pathology and Diagnostics Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Newton A C S; Amary, Fernanda; Butler, Rachel; Byers, Richard; Gonzalez, David; Haynes, Harry R; Ilyas, Mohammad; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Taniere, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    The use of biologics targeted to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein is the latest addition to the armamentarium used to fight advanced gastric or gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. The decision to treat with the biologic trastuzumab is completely dependent on HER2 testing of tumour tissue. In 2017, the College of American Pathologists, American Society for Clinical Pathology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology jointly published guidelines for HER2 testing and clinical decision making in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The Association of Clinical Pathologists Molecular Pathology and Diagnostics Committee has issued the following document as a commentary of these guidelines and, in parallel, to provide guidance on HER2 testing in National Health Service pathology departments within the UK. This guidance covers issues related to case selection, preanalytical aspects, analysis and interpretation of such HER2 testing. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Phenotypic, Molecular, and Pathological Characterization of Colletotrichum acutatum Associated with Andean Lupine and Tamarillo in the Ecuadorian Andes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falconi, C.; Visser, R.G.F.; Heusden, van A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracnose is a serious problem of both Andean lupine and tamarillo in Ecuador. Morphological features, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, and host specificity were used to characterize Colletotrichum isolates from lupine and tamarillo. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization,

  4. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Improves the Pathological Outcomes of US-Guided Core Needle Biopsy That Targets the Viable Area of Anterior Mediastinal Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the option that ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB of the enhanced portion of anterior mediastinal masses (AMMs identified by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS would harvest viable tissue and benefit the histological diagnoses, a retrospective study was performed to elucidate the correlation between the prebiopsy CEUS and diagnostic yield of AMMs and found that CEUS potentially improved the diagnostic yield of AMMs compared with conventional US with a significant increase in the cellularity of samples. Furthermore, the marginal blood flow signals and absence of necrosis can predict the diagnostic yield of AMM. It was concluded that US-CNB of the viable part of AMMs, as verified by CEUS, was able to harvest sufficient tissue with more cellularity that could be used for ancillary studies and improve the diagnostic yield. And CEUS was recommended to those patients with AMMs undergoing repeated US-CNB, with the absence of marginal blood signals or presence of necrosis.

  5. Deregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is the predominant molecular pathology in OPMD animal models and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anvar, Seyed Yahya; hoen, Peter Ac; Venema, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset progressive muscle disorder caused by a poly-alanine expansion mutation in the Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1). The molecular mechanisms that regulate disease onset and progression are largely unknown. In order to identify...... molecular pathways that are consistently associated with OPMD, we performed an integrated high-throughput transcriptome study in affected muscles of OPMD animal models and patients. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) was found to be the most consistently and significantly OPMD-deregulated pathway across...

  6. Deregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is the predominant molecular pathology in OPMD animal models and patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anvar, Seyed Yahya; hoen, Peter Ac; Venema, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    molecular pathways that are consistently associated with OPMD, we performed an integrated high-throughput transcriptome study in affected muscles of OPMD animal models and patients. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) was found to be the most consistently and significantly OPMD-deregulated pathway across...

  7. The Henry Ford production system: LEAN process redesign improves service in the molecular diagnostic laboratory: a paper from the 2008 William Beaumont hospital symposium on molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankovic, Milena; Varney, Ruan C; Whiteley, Lisa; Brown, Ron; D'Angelo, Rita; Chitale, Dhananjay; Zarbo, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    Accurate and timely molecular test results play an important role in patient management; consequently, there is a customer expectation of short testing turnaround times. Baseline data analysis revealed that the greatest challenge to timely result generation occurred in the preanalytic phase of specimen collection and transport. Here, we describe our efforts to improve molecular testing turnaround times by focusing primarily on redesign of preanalytic processes using the principles of LEAN production. Our goal was to complete greater than 90% of the molecular tests in less than 3 days. The project required cooperation from different laboratory disciplines as well as individuals outside of the laboratory. The redesigned processes involved defining and standardizing the protocols and approaching blood and tissue specimens as analytes for molecular testing. The LEAN process resulted in fewer steps, approaching the ideal of a one-piece flow for specimens through collection/retrieval, transport, and different aspects of the testing process. The outcome of introducing the LEAN process has been a 44% reduction in molecular test turnaround time for tissue specimens, from an average of 2.7 to 1.5 days. In addition, extending LEAN work principles to the clinician suppliers has resulted in a markedly increased number of properly collected and shipped blood specimens (from 50 to 87%). These continuous quality improvements were accomplished by empowered workers in a blame-free environment and are now being sustained with minimal management involvement.

  8. Computational Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N.; Feldman, Michael; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Pfeifer, John D.; Bry, Lynn; Almeida, Jonas S.; Saltz, Joel; Braun, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Gilbertson, John R.; Sinard, John H.; Gerber, Georg K.; Galli, Stephen J.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Context We define the scope and needs within the new discipline of computational pathology, a discipline critical to the future of both the practice of pathology and, more broadly, medical practice in general. Objective To define the scope and needs of computational pathology. Data Sources A meeting was convened in Boston, Massachusetts, in July 2014 prior to the annual Association of Pathology Chairs meeting, and it was attended by a variety of pathologists, including individuals highly invested in pathology informatics as well as chairs of pathology departments. Conclusions The meeting made recommendations to promote computational pathology, including clearly defining the field and articulating its value propositions; asserting that the value propositions for health care systems must include means to incorporate robust computational approaches to implement data-driven methods that aid in guiding individual and population health care; leveraging computational pathology as a center for data interpretation in modern health care systems; stating that realizing the value proposition will require working with institutional administrations, other departments, and pathology colleagues; declaring that a robust pipeline should be fostered that trains and develops future computational pathologists, for those with both pathology and non-pathology backgrounds; and deciding that computational pathology should serve as a hub for data-related research in health care systems. The dissemination of these recommendations to pathology and bioinformatics departments should help facilitate the development of computational pathology. PMID:26098131

  9. Molecular-scale noncontact atomic force microscopy contrasts in topography and energy dissipation on c(4x2) superlattice structures of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Ichii, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2004-01-01

    Alkanethiol self-assembledmonolayers formed on Au(111) surfaces were investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM). Dodecanethiol monolayers prepared at 78 °C were imaged by NC-AFM, which revealed that the film is composed predominantly of two different phases of c(4×2)superlattice structures. The obtained molecular-scale NC-AFM contrasts are discussed in comparison with previously reported scanning tunneling microscopy images. We found that the energy dissipation image exhibits...

  10. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...... at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement on three of these areas: NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, the treatment of first-line...

  11. PATHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR GENETIC STUDIES ON SOME SOYBEAN MUTANTS INDUCED BY GAMMA RAYS IN RELATION TO CHARCOAL ROT DISEASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ASHRY, N.A.; EL-DEMERDASH, H.M.; ABD EL-RAHMAN, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Egyptian soybean cultivar Giza-22 was used to induce resistant mutants for charcoal rot disease using gamma rays. Sixteen mutants and their parental cultivar were evaluated in M3 generation for their agronomic traits and for resistance to charcoal rot disease. Four mutants showed superiority in their agronomic traits as compared with their parental cultivar. Three mutants were significantly resistant to the disease than their parental cultivar (Giza-22). These three resistant mutants showed non-significant improvement in their agronomic traits as compared with Giza-22 cultivar. DNA extractions from the three resistant mutants and their parent were used to test the differences on the molecular level. Seven random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers were used to detect RAPD markers related to charcoal rot resistance in soybean, and to differentiate these mutants. Six RAPD-primers showed molecular markers associated with resistance to charcoal rot in soybean, where five RAPD-primers could differentiate each of the three mutants from each other and from their parental cultivar

  12. Meta-analysis of cancer transcriptomes: A new approach to uncover molecular pathological events in different cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundus Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To explore secrets of metastatic cancers, individual expression of true sets of respective genes must spread across the tissue. In this study, meta-analysis for transcriptional profiles of oncogenes was carried out to hunt critical genes or networks helping in metastasizing cancers. For this, transcriptomic analysis of different cancerous tissues causing leukemia, lung, liver, spleen, colorectal, colon, breast, bladder, and kidney cancers was performed by extracting microarray expression data from online resource; Gene Expression Omnibus. A newly developed bioinformatics technique; Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA was applied for enrichment analysis of transcriptional profiles using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. Furthermore, oPOSSUM (v. 2.0 and Cytoscape (v. 2.8.2 were used for in-depth analysis of transcription factors and regulatory gene networks respectively. DAVID analysis uncovered the most significantly enriched pathways in molecular functions that were 'Ubiquitin thiolesterase activity' up regulated in blood, breast, bladder, colorectal, lung, spleen, prostrate cancer. 'Transforming growth factor beta receptor activity' was inhibited in all cancers except leukemia, colon and liver cancer. oPOSSUM further revealed highly over-represented Transcription Factors (TFs; Broad-complex_3, Broad-complex_4, and Foxd3 except for leukemia and bladder cancer. From these findings, it is possible to target genes and networks, play a crucial role in the development of cancer. In the future, these transcription factors can serve as potential candidates for the therapeutic drug targets which can impede the deadly spread.

  13. Pittsburgh Compound B and AV-1451 positron emission tomography assessment of molecular pathologies of Alzheimer's disease in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Ahlskog, J Eric; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Senjem, Matthew L; Spychalla, Anthony J; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Lowe, Val J; Josephs, Keith A

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about Alzheimer's disease molecular proteins, beta-amyloid and paired helical filament (PHF) tau, in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Recent techniques have been developed to allow for investigations of these proteins in PSP. We determined the frequency of beta-amyloid deposition in PSP, and whether beta-amyloid deposition in PSP is associated with PHF-tau deposition pattern, or clinical features. Thirty probable PSP participants underwent MRI, [ 18 F]AV-1451 PET and Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET. Apolipoprotein (APOE) genotyping was also performed. A global PiB standard-uptake value ratio (SUVR) was calculated. AV-1451 SUVRs were calculated for a set of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related regions and a set of PSP-related regions. Voxel-level analyses were conducted to assess for differences in AV-1451 uptake patterns and MRI atrophy between PiB(+) and PiB(-) cases compared to 60 normal PiB(-) controls. Statistical testing for correlations and associations between variables of interest were also performed. Twelve subjects (40%) showed beta-amyloid deposition. Higher PiB SUVR correlated with older age but not with AV-1451 SUVR in the AD- or PSP-related regions. Higher AV-1451 SUVR in AD-related regions was associated with higher AV-1451 SUVR in PSP-related regions. We found little evidence for beta-amyloid related differences in clinical metrics, proportion of APOE e4 carriers, pattern of AV-1451 uptake, or pattern of atrophy. Beta-amyloid deposition occurs in a relatively high proportion of PSP subjects. Unlike in Alzheimer's disease, however, there is little evidence that beta-amyloid, and PHF-tau, play a significant role in neurodegeneration in PSP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Aspectos patológicos, imunológicos e propriedades moleculares do TT vírus Pathological and immunological aspects and molecular properties of TT virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angelica Ehara Watanabe

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O TT vírus (TTV foi primeiramente descrito no Japão, em 1997, por T. Nishizawa, no soro de pacientes com hepatite, pós-transfusão, não-A-G. Tem sido intensivamente investigado, desde então, como uma possível adição à lista dos vírus indutores de hepatite. O TTV é um vírus DNA não-envelopado, de fita simples. Uma considerável variabilidade genética tem sido demonstrada por parte do TTV, o que tem levado pesquisadores a agrupar isolados do vírus em inúmeros genótipos e subtipos. No entanto a significância clínica da infecção por TTV permanece desconhecida. Ele é freqüentemente detectado em fluidos corporais e seu componente mais bem elucidado atualmente é o genoma. Conhecimentos relacionados ao TTV têm aumentado constantemente, porém vários aspectos fundamentais permanecem obscuros. Esta revisão apresenta algumas das propriedades moleculares do TT vírus.TT virus (TTV was first reported in Japan in 1997 by T. Nishizawa in sera from non-A to non-G post-transfusion hepatitis patients. It has been intensively investigated, ever since, as a possible addition to the list of hepatitis-inducing viruses. The TTV is an unenveloped, single-stranded DNA virus. Considerable genetic variability of TTV has been demonstrated and has led investigators to group its isolates into numerous genotypes and subtypes. However, the clinical significance of TTV infection remains unknown. It is frequently detected in the serum and in other body fluids of humans. The component of TTV currently best understood is its genome. Knowledge related to TTV has increased rapidly, but many fundamental aspects remain unclear. This review shows some of the molecular properties of TT virus.

  15. The synthesis of a D-glucosamine contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, and its application in cancer molecular imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Chen Yue; Guo Dajing; Huang Zhanwen; Cai Liang; He Ling

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to describe the synthesis of Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-deoxyglucosamine (Gd-DTPA-DG) which is a D-glucosamine metabolic MR imaging contrast agent. We will also discuss its use in a pilot MRI study using a xenograft mouse model of human adenocarcinoma. Methods: This novel contrast agent was specifically studied because of its ability to 'target' metabolically active tumor tissues. In this study Gd-DTPA-DG is used to investigate how tumor tissues would react to a dose of 0.2 mmol Gd/kg over a 120 min exposure in a xenograft mouse model. These experiments used athymic mice implanted with human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) as demonstrated by dynamic MRI. Alternately, another contrast agent that is not specific for targeting, Gd-DTPA, was used as the control at a similar dose of gadolinium. Efficacy of the targeted contrast agent was assessed by measuring relaxation rate in vitro and signal intensity (SI) in vivo. Statistical differences were calculated using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The synthesized Gd-DTPA-DG was shown to improve the contrast of tumor tissue in this model. Gd-DTPA-DG was also shown to have a similar pharmacokinetic rate but generated a higher relaxation rate in tumor tissues relative to the control contrast Gd-DTPA. In comparison to the pre-contrast imaging, the SI of tumor tissue in the experimental group was shown to be significantly increased at 15 min after injection of Gd-DTPA-DG (p < 0.001). The enhanced signal intensity spread from the edge of the tumor to the center and seemed to strengthen the idea that MRI performance would be useful in different tumor tissues. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that this new chelated contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-DG, can be specifically targeted to accumulation in tumor tissue as compared to normal tissues. This targeted paramagnetic contrast agent has potential for specific cancer molecular imaging with MRI.

  16. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the confer...

  17. Molecular response to water stress in two contrasting Mediterranean pines (Pinus pinaster and Pinus pinea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdiguero, Pedro; Barbero, María Del Carmen; Cervera, María Teresa; Collada, Carmen; Soto, Alvaro

    2013-06-01

    Adaptation to water stress has determined the evolution and diversification of vascular plants. Water stress is forecasted to increase drastically in the next decades in certain regions, such as in the Mediterranean basin. Consequently, a proper knowledge of the response and adaptations to drought stress is essential for the correct management of plant genetic resources. However, most of the advances in the understanding of the molecular response to water stress have been attained in angiosperms, and are not always applicable to gymnosperms. In this work we analyse the transcriptional response of two emblematic Mediterranean pines, Pinus pinaster and Pinus pinea, which show noticeable differences in their performance under water stress. Using microarray analysis, up to 113 genes have been detected as significantly induced by drought in both species. Reliability of expression patterns has been confirmed by RT-PCR. While induced genes with similar profiles in both species can be considered as general candidate genes for the study of drought response in conifers, genes with diverging expression patterns can underpin the differences displayed by these species under water stress. Most promising candidate genes for drought stress response include genes related to carbohydrate metabolism, such as glycosyltransferases or galactosidases, sugar transporters, dehydrins and transcription factors. Additionally, differences in the molecular response to drought and polyethylene-glycol-induced water stress are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular, Pathological, Radiological, and Immune Profiling of Non-brainstem Pediatric High-Grade Glioma from the HERBY Phase II Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Alan; Burford, Anna; Molinari, Valeria; Jones, David T W; Izquierdo, Elisa; Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Giangaspero, Felice; Haberler, Christine; Pietsch, Torsten; Jacques, Thomas S; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Rodriguez, Daniel; Morgan, Paul S; Raman, Pichai; Waanders, Angela J; Resnick, Adam C; Massimino, Maura; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Smith, Helen; Capper, David; Pfister, Stefan M; Würdinger, Thomas; Tam, Rachel; Garcia, Josep; Thakur, Meghna Das; Vassal, Gilles; Grill, Jacques; Jaspan, Tim; Varlet, Pascale; Jones, Chris

    2018-05-14

    The HERBY trial was a phase II open-label, randomized, multicenter trial evaluating bevacizumab (BEV) in addition to temozolomide/radiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed non-brainstem high-grade glioma (HGG) between the ages of 3 and 18 years. We carried out comprehensive molecular analysis integrated with pathology, radiology, and immune profiling. In post-hoc subgroup analysis, hypermutator tumors (mismatch repair deficiency and somatic POLE/POLD1 mutations) and those biologically resembling pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma ([PXA]-like, driven by BRAF_V600E or NF1 mutation) had significantly more CD8 + tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and longer survival with the addition of BEV. Histone H3 subgroups (hemispheric G34R/V and midline K27M) had a worse outcome and were immune cold. Future clinical trials will need to take into account the diversity represented by the term "HGG" in the pediatric population. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of the pathological V72I, D109N and T190M missense mutations on the molecular structure of α-dystroglycan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Covaceuszach

    Full Text Available Dystroglycan (DG is a highly glycosylated protein complex that links the cytoskeleton with the extracellular matrix, mediating fundamental physiological functions such as mechanical stability of tissues, matrix organization and cell polarity. A crucial role in the glycosylation of the DG α subunit is played by its own N-terminal region that is required by the glycosyltransferase LARGE. Alteration in this O-glycosylation deeply impairs the high affinity binding to other extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins. Recently, three missense mutations in the gene encoding DG, mapped in the α-DG N-terminal region, were found to be responsible for hypoglycosylated states, causing congenital diseases of different severity referred as primary dystroglycanopaties.To gain insight on the molecular basis of these disorders, we investigated the crystallographic and solution structures of these pathological point mutants, namely V72I, D109N and T190M. Small Angle X-ray Scattering analysis reveals that these mutations affect the structures in solution, altering the distribution between compact and more elongated conformations. These results, supported by biochemical and biophysical assays, point to an altered structural flexibility of the mutant α-DG N-terminal region that may have repercussions on its interaction with LARGE and/or other DG-modifying enzymes, eventually reducing their catalytic efficiency.

  20. Molecular pathology of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yuko

    2010-12-15

    Skin-wound healing is an orchestrated biological phenomena consisting of three sequential phases, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Many biological substances are involved in the process of wound repair, and this short and simplified overview of wound healing can be adopted to determine wound vitality or wound age in forensic medicine. With the development of genetically engineered animals, essential molecules for skin-wound healing have been identified. Especially, cytokines, and growth factors are useful candidates and markers for the determination of wound vitality or age. Moreover, bone marrow-derived progenitor cells would give significant information to wound age determination. In this review article, some interesting observations are presented, possibly contributing to the future practice of forensic pathologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the antioxidative system of Coffea sp. under cold conditions in genotypes with contrasting tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Ana S; Lidon, Fernando C; Batista-Santos, Paula; Leitão, António Eduardo; Pais, Isabel P; Ribeiro, Ana I; Ramalho, José Cochicho

    2010-03-15

    Low positive temperature (chilling) is frequently linked to the promotion of oxidative stress conditions, and is of particular importance in the coffee plant due to its severe impact on growth, development, photosynthesis and production. Nevertheless, some acclimation ability has been reported within the Coffea genus, and is possibly related to oxidative stress control. Using an integrated biochemical and molecular approach, the characterization of the antioxidative system of genotypes with different cold acclimation abilities was performed. Experiments were carried out using 1.5-year-old coffee seedlings of Coffea canephora cv. Apoatã, C. arabica cv. Catuaí, C. dewevrei and 2 hybrids, Icatu (C. arabicaxC. canephora) and Piatã (C. dewevreixC. arabica) subjected to a gradual cold treatment and a recovery period. Icatu showed the greatest ability to control oxidative stress, as reflected by the enhancement of several antioxidative components (Cu,Zn-SOD and APX activities; ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and chlorogenic acids (CGAs) contents) and lower reactive oxygen species contents (H(2)O(2) and OH). Gene expression studies show that GRed, DHAR and class III and IV chitinases might also be involved in the cold acclimation ability of Icatu. Catuaí showed intermediate acclimation ability through the reinforcement of some antioxidative molecules, usually to a lesser extent than that observed in Icatu. On the other hand, C. dewevrei showed the poorest response in terms of antioxidant accumulation, and also showed the greatest increase in OH values. The difference in the triggering of antioxidative traits supports the hypothesis of its importance to cold (and photoinhibition) tolerance in Coffea sp. and could provide a useful probe to identify tolerant genotypes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis route and three different core-shell impacts on magnetic characterization of gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticles as new contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Gholamreza; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Haghgoo, Soheila; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Zohdiaghdam, Reza; Rafiei, Behrooz; Gorji, Ensieh

    2012-10-01

    Despite its good resolution, magnetic resonance imaging intrinsically has low sensitivity. Recently, contrast agent nanoparticles have been used as sensitivity and contrast enhancer. The aim of this study was to investigate a new controlled synthesis method for gadolinium oxide-based nanoparticle preparation. For this purpose, diethyleneglycol coating of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3-DEG) was performed using new supervised polyol route, and small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) PEGylation was obtained with methoxy-polyethylene-glycol-silane (550 and 2,000 Da) coatings as SPGO-mPEG-silane550 and 2,000, respectively. Physicochemical characterization and magnetic properties of these three contrast agents in comparison with conventional Gd-DTPA were verified by dynamic light scattering transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and the signal intensity and relaxivity measurements were performed using 1.5-T MRI scanner. As a result, the nanoparticle sizes of Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000 could be reached to 5.9, 51.3, 194.2 nm, respectively. The image signal intensity and longitudinal ( r 1) and transverse relaxivity ( r 2) measurements in different concentrations (0.3 to approximately 2.5 mM), revealed the r 2/ r 1 ratios of 1.13, 0.89, 33.34, and 33.72 for Gd-DTPA, Gd2O3-DEG, SPGO-mPEG-silane550, and SPGO-mPEG-silane2000, respectively. The achievement of new synthesis route of Gd2O3-DEG resulted in lower r 2/ r 1 ratio for Gd2O3-DEG than Gd-DTPA and other previous synthesized methods by this and other groups. The smaller r 2/ r 1 ratios of two PEGylated-SPGO contrast agents in our study in comparison with r 2/ r 1 ratio of previous PEGylation ( r 2/ r 1 = 81.9 for mPEG-silane 6,000 MW) showed that these new three introduced contrast agents could potentially be proper contrast enhancers for cellular and molecular MR imaging.

  3. Origin of the reverse optical-contrast change of Ga-Sb phase-change materials—An ab initio molecular-dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, J. A.; Elliott, S. R., E-mail: sre1@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-07

    A large number of phase-change materials (PCMs) have been developed experimentally; however, only Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}-based PCMs have been significantly explored using ab initio molecular-dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We present an AIMD study of the full melt/quench/anneal PC cycle for Ga-Sb materials, namely, the stoichiometric composition, GaSb, and the near-eutectic alloy, Ga{sub 16}Sb{sub 84}. The calculated electronic densities of states and optical reflectivities are compared between the amorphous and crystalline phases for both compositions, and it is shown that the contrasting opto-electronic properties of each crystalline material can be attributed to different structural transformations of Ga and Sb on crystallization from the amorphous state.

  4. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    OpenAIRE

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-01-01

    Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world) and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  5. [Pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinsky, Yael; Iancu, Iulian; Dannon, Pinhas

    2007-10-01

    Gambling behaviour is well-known for many centuries and is growing in popularity and frequency. Its etiology is multi-factorial and in this paper we review new developments in the field of pathological gambling, both regarding etiology and treatment progress. The aim of this review is to increase the physicians' awareness towards this entity.

  6. [Dual pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, A

    2008-05-01

    Dual pathology is defined as the association of two potentially epileptogenic lesions, hippocampal (sclerosis, neuronal loss) and extrahippocampal (temporal or extratemporal). Epileptic activity may be generated by either lesion and the relative importance of every lesion's epileptogenicity conditions the surgical strategy adopted. Most frequently associated with hippocampal sclerosis are cortical dysplasias. The common physiopathology of the two lesions is not clearly established. Extrahippocampal lesions may be undetectable on MRI (microdysgenesis, for example) and ictal discharge patterns may vary among dual pathology patients. The surgical strategy depends on the location of the extrahippocampal lesion and its relative role in seizure generation; however, reported surgical results suggest that simultaneous resection of mesial temporal structures along with the extrahippocampal lesion should be performed.

  7. Microglial pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan; Tischer, Jasmin; Bechmann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes pathological changes that affect microglial cells in the human brain during aging and in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, primarily Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It also provides examples of microglial changes that have been observed in laboratory animals during aging and in some experimentally induced lesions and disease models. Dissimilarities and similarities between humans and rodents are discussed in an attempt to generate a current understanding of microglial ...

  8. [Detection of RAS genes mutation using the Cobas® method in a private laboratory of pathology: Medical and economical study in comparison to a public platform of molecular biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Anne-Flore; Raoux, Delphine; Neumann, Frédéric; Rossat, Stéphane; Tabet, Farid; Pedeutour, Florence; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Kubiniek, Valérie; Vire, Olivier; Weinbreck, Nicolas

    In France, determination of the mutation status of RAS genes for predictive response to anti-EGFR targeted treatments is carried out by public platforms of molecular biology of cancer created by the French National Cancer Institute. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of these analyses by a private pathology laboratory (MEDIPATH) as per the requirements of accreditation. We retrospectively studied the mutation status of KRAS and NRAS genes in 163 cases of colorectal metastatic cancer using the Cobas ® technique. We compared our results to those prospectively obtained through pyrosequencing and allelic discrimination by the genetic laboratory of solid tumors at the Nice University Hospital (PACA-EST regional platform). The results of both series were identical: 98.7% positive correlation; negative correlation of 93.1%; overall correlation of 95.7% (Kappa=0.92). This study demonstrates the feasibility of molecular analysis in a private pathology laboratory. As this practice requires a high level of guarantee, its accreditation, according to the NF-EN-ISO15189 quality compliance French standard, is essential. Conducting molecular analysis in this context avoids the steps of routing the sample and the result between the pathology laboratory and the platform, which reduces the overall time of rendering the result. In conclusion, the transfer of some analysis from these platforms to private pathology laboratories would allow the platforms to be discharged from a part of routine testing and therefore concentrate their efforts to the development of new analyses constantly required to access personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Environmental pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottet, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 selections. Some of the titles are: Injury by Ionizing Radiations; Urinary System; Immune System; Chemical Carcinogenesis; The Molecular Basis of Environmental Mutagenesis; and Reproductive Toxicity

  10. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is mixed with water before administration liquid paste tablet When iodine-based and barium-sulfate contrast materials ... for patients with kidney failure or allergies to MRI and/or computed tomography (CT) contrast material. Microbubble ...

  11. Gene expression reaction norms unravel the molecular and cellular processes underpinning the plastic phenotypes of Alternanthera philoxeroides in contrasting hydrological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexuan eGao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternanthera philoxeroides is an amphibious invasive weed that can colonize both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Individuals growing in different habitats exhibit extensive phenotypic variation but little genetic differentiation. Little is known about the molecular basis underlying environment-induced phenotypic changes. Variation in transcript abundance in A. philoxeroides was characterized throughout the time-courses of pond and upland treatments using RNA-Sequencing. 7,805 genes demonstrated variable expression in response to different treatments,forming 11 transcriptionally coordinated gene groups. Functional enrichment analysis of plastically expressed genes revealed pathway changes in hormone-mediated signaling, osmotic adjustment, cell wall remodeling and programmed cell death, providing a mechanistic understanding of the biological processes underlying the phenotypic changes in A. philoxeroides. Both transcriptional modulation of environmentally sensitive loci and environmentally dependent control of regulatory loci influenced the plastic responses to the environment. Phenotypic responses and gene expression patterns to contrasting hydrological conditions were compared between A. philoxeroides and its alien congener A. pungens. The terricolous A. pungens displayed limited phenotypic plasticity to different treatments. It was postulated based on gene expression comparison that the interspecific variation in plasticity between A. philoxeroides and A. pungens was not due to environmentally-mediated changes in hormone levels but to variations in the type and relative abundance of different signal transducers and receptors expressed in the target tissue.

  12. Exploring the Interactions of the Dietary Plant Flavonoids Fisetin and Naringenin with G-Quadruplex and Duplex DNA, Showing Contrasting Binding Behavior: Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Snehasish; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K; Bhowmik, Sudipta

    2016-09-01

    Guanine-rich sequences have the propensity to fold into a four-stranded DNA structure known as a G-quadruplex (G4). G4 forming sequences are abundant in the promoter region of several oncogenes and become a key target for anticancer drug binding. Here we have studied the interactions of two structurally similar dietary plant flavonoids fisetin and naringenin with G4 as well as double stranded (duplex) DNA by using different spectroscopic and modeling techniques. Our study demonstrates the differential binding ability of the two flavonoids with G4 and duplex DNA. Fisetin more strongly interacts with parallel G4 structure than duplex DNA, whereas naringenin shows stronger binding affinity to duplex rather than G4 DNA. Molecular docking results also corroborate our spectroscopic results, and it was found that both of the ligands are stacked externally in the G4 DNA structure. C-ring planarity of the flavonoid structure appears to be a crucial factor for preferential G4 DNA recognition of flavonoids. The goal of this study is to explore the critical effects of small differences in the structure of closely similar chemical classes of such small molecules (flavonoids) which lead to the contrasting binding properties with the two different forms of DNA. The resulting insights may be expected to facilitate the designing of the highly selective G4 DNA binders based on flavonoid scaffolds.

  13. Contrasting behavior of covalent and molecular carbon allotropes exposed to extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufarová, M.; Hájková, V.; Chalupský, J.; Burian, T.; Vacík, J.; Vorlíček, V.; Vyšín, L.; Gaudin, J.; Medvedev, N.; Ziaja, B.; Nagasono, M.; Yabashi, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Sinn, H.; Störmer, M.; Koláček, K.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Juha, L.

    2017-12-01

    All carbon materials, e.g., amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings and C60 fullerene thin films, play an important role in short-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL) research motivated by FEL optics development and prospective nanotechnology applications. Responses of a-C and C60 layers to the extreme ultraviolet (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source in Japan) and soft x-ray (free-electron laser in Hamburg) free-electron laser radiation are investigated by Raman spectroscopy, differential interference contrast, and atomic force microscopy. A remarkable difference in the behavior of covalent (a-C) and molecular (C60) carbonaceous solids is demonstrated under these irradiation conditions. Low thresholds for ablation of a fullerene crystal (estimated to be around 0.15 eV/atom for C60 vs 0.9 eV/atom for a-C in terms of the absorbed dose) are caused by a low cohesive energy of fullerene crystals. An efficient mechanism of the removal of intact C60 molecules from the irradiated crystal due to Coulomb repulsion of fullerene-cage cation radicals formed by the ionizing radiation is revealed by a detailed modeling.

  14. Emerging and Future Applications of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) Mass Spectrometry in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: A Report of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, Christopher D; Butler-Wu, Susan M

    2016-11-01

    The performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) for routine bacterial and yeast identification as well as direct-from-blood culture bottle identification has been thoroughly evaluated in the peer-reviewed literature. Microbiologists are now moving beyond these methods to apply MS to other areas of the diagnostic process. This review discusses the emergence of advanced matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight MS applications, including the identification of filamentous fungi and mycobacteria and the current and future state of antimicrobial resistance testing. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microglial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Wolfgang J; Xue, Qing-Shan; Tischer, Jasmin; Bechmann, Ingo

    2014-09-26

    This paper summarizes pathological changes that affect microglial cells in the human brain during aging and in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, primarily Alzheimer's disease (AD). It also provides examples of microglial changes that have been observed in laboratory animals during aging and in some experimentally induced lesions and disease models. Dissimilarities and similarities between humans and rodents are discussed in an attempt to generate a current understanding of microglial pathology and its significance during aging and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer dementia (AD). The identification of dystrophic (senescent) microglia has created an ostensible conflict with prior work claiming a role for activated microglia and neuroinflammation during normal aging and in AD, and this has raised a basic question: does the brain's immune system become hyperactive (inflamed) or does it become weakened (senescent) in elderly and demented people, and what is the impact on neuronal function and cognition? Here we strive to reconcile these seemingly contradictory notions by arguing that both low-grade neuroinflammation and microglial senescence are the result of aging-associated free radical injury. Both processes are damaging for microglia as they synergistically exhaust this essential cell population to the point where the brain's immune system is effete and unable to support neuronal function.

  16. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncica, Ana Maria; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...

  17. High-resolution CISS MR imaging with and without contrast for evaluation of the upper cranial nerves: segmental anatomy and selected pathologic conditions of the cisternal through extraforaminal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ari M; Macedo, Leonardo L; Chonka, Zachary D; Ilica, Ahmet T; Choudhri, Asim F; Gallia, Gary L; Aygun, Nafi

    2014-02-01

    The authors review the course and appearance of the major segments of the upper cranial nerves from their apparent origin at the brainstem through the proximal extraforaminal region, focusing on the imaging and anatomic features of particular relevance to high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Selected pathologic entities are included in the discussion of the corresponding cranial nerve segments for illustrative purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Pathologic gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespor, K

    1996-01-31

    The author presents a review on pathological gambling. Similarly as in other addictive diseases, early therapeutic intervention is important. The latter may include: 1: Evaluation of the problem 2. Recommendation that the subject should avoid places where the gambling is pursued. He should not have larger financial sums on him. 3. Recommendations pertaining to lifestyle and prevention of excessive stress. 4. Handling of printed material (the author mentions the text issued to his patients). In the paper therapeutic procedures are described, incl. the author's experience such as the foundation of the group of Gamblers anonymous. Prevention is also considered. It is important that gambling should be less readily available and the demand for it should be smaller.

  19. Smart Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-01-01

    By visualizing bioactive molecules or biological parameters in vivo, molecular imaging is searching for information at the molecular level in living organisms. In addition to contributing to earlier and more personalized diagnosis in medicine, it also helps understand and rationalize the molecular factors underlying physiological and pathological processes. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), complexes of paramagnetic metal ions, mostly lanthanides, are commonly used to enhance the intrinsic image contrast. They rely either on the relaxation effect of these metal chelates (T(1) agents), or on the phenomenon of paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST agents). In both cases, responsive molecular magnetic resonance imaging probes can be designed to report on various biomarkers of biological interest. In this context, we review recent work in the literature and from our group on responsive T(1) and PARACEST MRI agents for the detection of biogenic metal ions (such as calcium or zinc), enzymatic activities, or neurotransmitter release. These examples illustrate the general strategies that can be applied to create molecular imaging agents with an MRI detectable response to biologically relevant parameters.

  20. Investigation of a calcium-responsive contrast agent in cellular model systems: feasibility for use as a smart molecular probe in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovski, Goran; Gottschalk, Sven; Milošević, Milena; Engelmann, Jörn; Hagberg, Gisela E; Kadjane, Pascal; Andjus, Pavle; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2014-05-21

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca(2+) may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca(2+)-sensitive, Gd(3+)-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca(2+) level, transport of Ca(2+) through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca(2+)-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca(2+) level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca(2+) concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1-6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

  1. [Medulloblastoma. Pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, A; Delisle, M-B

    2018-04-24

    Medulloblastomas, embryonal neuroepithelial tumors developed in the cerebellum or brain stem, are mainly observed in childhood. The treatment of WHO-Grade IV tumors depends on stratifications that are usually based on postoperative data, histopathological subtype, tumor extension and presence of MYC or NMYC amplifications. Recently, molecular biology studies, based on new technologies (i.e. sequencing, transcriptomic, methylomic) have introduced genetic subtypes integrated into the latest WHO-2016 neuropathological classification. According to this classification, the three genetic groups WNT, SHH, with or without mutated TP53 gene, and non-WNT/non-SHH, comprising subgroups 3 and 4, are recalled in this review. The contribution of immunohistochemistry to define these groups is specified. The four histopathological groups are detailed in comparison to the WHO-2007 classification and the molecular data: classic medulloblastoma, desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma, medulloblastoma with extensive nodularity, and large cell/anaplastic medulloblastoma. The groups defined on genetic and histopathological grounds are not strictly concordant. Depending on the age of the patients, their correlations are different, as well as their role in the management and prognosis of these tumors. Other embryonal tumors, for which new classifications are in progress and gliomas may be confused with a medulloblastoma and the elements of the differential diagnosis of these entities are discussed. This evolution in classification fully justifies ongoing structuring procedures such as histopathological review (RENOCLIP) and the organization of molecular biology platforms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  4. Molecular and parametric imaging with iron oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszewski, L.; Bremer, C.; Tombach, B.; Heindel, W.

    2007-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) contrast agents, clinically established for high resolution magnetic resonance imaging of reticuloendothelial system containing anatomical structures, can additionally be exploited for the non-invasive characterization and quantification of pathology down to the molecular level. In this context, SPIOs can be applied for non-invasive cell tracking, quantification of tissue perfusion and target specific imaging, as well as for the detection of gene expression. This article provides an overview of new applications for clinically approved iron oxides as well of new, modified SPIO contrast agents for parametric and molecular imaging. (orig.) [de

  5. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Webb, Judith A.W.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  6. Spiritual Pathology: The Case of Adolf Hitler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. George Scarlett

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hitler had a noble purpose (to save the world and a strong faith in the laws of Nature as he understood Nature. He was, then, a spiritual person, though his spirituality was pathological and destructive. Here, the example of Hitler, his faith, and his spiritual pathology is given to both understand spiritual pathology in general and, through contrast, to understand positive spiritual development.

  7. Integration of next-generation sequencing in clinical diagnostic molecular pathology laboratories for analysis of solid tumours; an expert opinion on behalf of IQN Path ASBL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deans, Zandra C.; Costa, Jose Luis; Cree, Ian; Dequeker, Els; Edsjo, Anders; Henderson, Shirley; Hummel, Michael; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Loddo, Marco; Machado, Jose Carlos; Marchetti, Antonio; Marquis, Katherine; Mason, Joanne; Normanno, Nicola; Rouleau, Etienne; Schuuring, Ed; Snelson, Keeda-Marie; Thunnissen, Erik; Tops, Bastiaan; Williams, Gareth; van Krieken, Han; Hall, Jacqueline A.

    The clinical demand for mutation detection within multiple genes from a single tumour sample requires molecular diagnostic laboratories to develop rapid, high-throughput, highly sensitive, accurate and parallel testing within tight budget constraints. To meet this demand, many laboratories employ

  8. Integration of next-generation sequencing in clinical diagnostic molecular pathology laboratories for analysis of solid tumours; an expert opinion on behalf of IQN Path ASBL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deans, Z.C.; Costa, J.L.; Cree, I.; Dequeker, E.; Edsjo, A.; Henderson, S.; Hummel, M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Loddo, M.; Machado, J.C.; Marchetti, A.; Marquis, K.; Mason, J.; Normanno, N.; Rouleau, E.; Schuuring, E.; Snelson, K.M.; Thunnissen, E.; Tops, B.B.; Williams, G.; Krieken, H. van; Hall, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The clinical demand for mutation detection within multiple genes from a single tumour sample requires molecular diagnostic laboratories to develop rapid, high-throughput, highly sensitive, accurate and parallel testing within tight budget constraints. To meet this demand, many laboratories employ

  9. Ultrasonic Analysis of Peptide- and Antibody-Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of αvβ3-Expressing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dayton

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of targeted ultrasound contrast agents is to significantly and selectively enhance the detection of a targeted vascular site. In this manuscript, three distinct contrast agents targeted to the αvβ3 integrin are examined. The αvβ3 integrin has been shown to be highly expressed on metastatic tumors and endothelial cells during neovascularization, and its expression has been shown to correlate with tumor grade. Specific adhesion of these contrast agents to αvβ3-expressing cell monolayers is demonstrated in vitro, and compared with that of nontargeted agents. Acoustic studies illustrate a backscatter amplitude increase from monolayers exposed to the targeted contrast agents of up to 13-fold (22 dB relative to enhancement due to control bubbles. A linear dependence between the echo amplitude and bubble concentration was observed for bound agents. The decorrelation of the echo from adherent targeted agents is observed over successive pulses as a function of acoustic pressure and bubble density. Frequency–domain analysis demonstrates that adherent targeted bubbles exhibit high-amplitude narrowband echo components, in contrast to the primarily wideband response from free microbubbles. Results suggest that adherent targeted contrast agents are differentiable from free-floating microbubbles, that targeted contrast agents provide higher sensitivity in the detection of angiogenesis, and that conventional ultrasound imaging techniques such as signal subtraction or decorrelation detection can be used to detect integrin-expressing vasculature with sufficient signal-to-noise.

  10. Pathology as the enabler of human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, James M; Tykocinski, Mark L

    2005-09-01

    Academic Pathology is a key player in human molecular science and in the powerful initiatives of the National Institutes of Health. Pathologists generate data crucial to virtually every molecular study of human tissue, and have the necessary skills and authority to oversee processing of human tissues for research analysis. We advocate that Academic Pathology is optimally positioned to drive the molecular revolution in study of human disease, through human tissue collection, analysis, and databasing. This can be achieved through playing a major role in human tissue procurement and management; establishing high-quality 'Pathology Resource Laboratories'; providing the scientific expertise for pathology data sharing; and recruiting and training physician scientists. Pathology should position itself to be the local institutional driver of technology implementation and development, by operating the resource laboratories, providing the expertise for technical and conceptual design of research projects, maintaining the databases that link molecular and morphological information on human tissues with the requisite clinical databases, providing education and mentorship of technology users, and nurturing new research through the development of preliminary data. We also consider that outstanding pathology journals are available for the publication of research emanating from such studies, to the benefit of the pathology profession as an academic enterprise. It is our earnest hope that Academic Pathology can play a leading role in the remarkable advances to be made as the 21st century unfolds.

  11. Ultrasound molecular imaging of breast cancer in MCF-7 orthotopic mice using gold nanoshelled poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanocapsules: a novel dual-targeted ultrasound contrast agent

    OpenAIRE

    Xu,Li; Du,Jing; Wan,Caifeng; Zhang,Yu; Xie,Shaowei; Li,Hongli; Yang,Hong; Li,Fenghua

    2018-01-01

    Li Xu,1,* Jing Du,1,* Caifeng Wan,1 Yu Zhang,1 Shaowei Xie,1 Hongli Li,1 Hong Yang,2 Fenghua Li1 1Department of Ultrasound, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Chemistry, College of Life and Environmental Science, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The development of nanoscale molecularly targeted ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) with high affinity and specif...

  12. Curriculum Guidelines for Pathology and Oral Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for dental school pathology courses describe the interrelationships of general, systemic, and oral pathology; primary educational goals; prerequisites; a core curriculum outline and behavioral objectives for each type of pathology. Notes on sequencing, faculty, facilities, and occupational hazards are included. (MSE)

  13. Using T2-Exchange from Ln3+DOTA-Based Chelates for Contrast-Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer with MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    thereby performing disease staging entirely non-invasively. Also, in contrast to PET/CT or SPECT/CT, disease diagnostics and therapy monitoring would...2011;6.e27370. 11. Zhang SR, Sherry AD. Physical characteristics of lanthanide com- plexes that act as magnetization transfer (MT) contrast agents. J...reper- fused and nonreperfused myocardial infarctions - MR imaging with dysprosium-DTPA-BMA in the pig. Acta Radiol 1996;37:18–26. 28. Nilsson S

  14. Contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decazes, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    The Guerbet firm, which holds 69% of the capital on the contrast media for medical imagery, could sale about 20% of this capital in order to accelerate its development in the United States, one of its next market with the Japan. (O.M.)

  15. Multislice ct in gut related pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, A.; Shaukat, A.; Ahmad, M.W.; Amin, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Multislice CT in Gut related pathologies. 50 consecutive patients, referred from surgical and medical departments, with gut pathology suspicion were scanned in this respect on Toshiba MSCT 4 slice Aquilion. Patients were. 100 ml iodinated non ionic IV contrast was given. Preferably water was used as oral contrast and oral iodinated contrast was used only in selective cases. As a result, 33 patients showed positive response and 17 were normal; 23 were females and 10 were males. We found following pathologies Acute Appendicitis 10, Diverticulitis 02, Inflammatory Bowel Disease 03, Small Bowel Obstruction 04, Malignant Gut masses 08, Omental Implants 05, Perforation (Duodenal) 01. It is thus concluded that MDCT has a definite role in gut pathologies especially when the ultrasound is negative. (author)

  16. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botnar, R.M.; Ebersberger, H.; Noerenberg, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  17. The Danish Pathology Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Beth; Larsen, Ole B

    2011-01-01

    The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established.......The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established....

  18. Communication skills in diagnostic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bosman, Fred T

    2016-01-01

    Communication is an essential element of good medical practice also in pathology. In contrast to technical or diagnostic skills, communication skills are not easy to define, teach, or assess. Rules almost do not exist. In this paper, which has a rather personal character and cannot be taken as a set of guidelines, important aspects of communication in pathology are explored. This includes what should be communicated to the pathologist on the pathology request form, communication between pathologists during internal (interpathologist) consultation, communication around frozen section diagnoses, modalities of communication of a final diagnosis, with whom and how critical and unexpected findings should be communicated, (in-)adequate routes of communication for pathology diagnoses, who will (or might) receive pathology reports, and what should be communicated and how in case of an error or a technical problem. An earlier more formal description of what the responsibilities are of a pathologist as communicator and as collaborator in a medical team is added in separate tables. The intention of the paper is to stimulate reflection and discussion rather than to formulate strict rules.

  19. Heavy Metal Accumulation is Associated with Molecular and Pathological Perturbations in Liver of Variola louti from the Jeddah Coast of Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of waste water are discharged daily from the Jeddah Metropolitan Area into the Red Sea. Sewage draining into the Red Sea causes widespread chemical pollution that is toxic to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of pollution and assess the presence of heavy metals in fish tissue and study their association with biological and biochemical alterations. The average concentrations of heavy metals found in hepatic tissues of Variola louti fish from the polluted area, namely Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe and Zn, were 1.74, 9.69, 47.48, 4020.01 and 229.47 µg/g liver, respectively, that were significantly higher than that of samples taken from reference area (0.24, 1.98, 20.12, 721.93, 129.21 µg/g liver, respectively. The fold change of heavy metals in fish from the polluted area with respect of that of the reference area followed the order Cd > Fe > Cr > Cu > Zn. Analysis of nuclear DNA revealed that hepatic tissues of fish samples from the polluted area showed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as detected by flow cytometry and formation DNA-ladder. In addition, hepatic sections from polluted area fishes showed more fibrotic changes and collagen deposition by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson’s trichrome staining, respectively, compared to samples taken from the reference area. Moreover, the electrophoretic patterns of proteins of liver of fishes caught at the polluted area showed different patterns of proteins from that of the reference with bands at 42, 130 and 140 kDa, which is in a good agreement with the molecular weight of collagen type III. In conclusion, there were significant changes in the tissues of fishes in the polluted area at the cellular and the molecular levels that may be associated with an accumulation of heavy metals. Assessment of fishes as a sensitive biomonitor for the pollution of surface waters that may affect general health of human and wild life is conceivable.

  20. Heavy Metal Accumulation is Associated with Molecular and Pathological Perturbations in Liver of Variola louti from the Jeddah Coast of Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Elshal, Mohamed F; Kumosani, Taha A; Mal, Ahmad O; Ahmed, Youssri M; Almulaiky, Yaaser Q; Asseri, Amer H; Zamzami, Mazin A

    2016-03-21

    Large amounts of waste water are discharged daily from the Jeddah Metropolitan Area into the Red Sea. Sewage draining into the Red Sea causes widespread chemical pollution that is toxic to aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of pollution and assess the presence of heavy metals in fish tissue and study their association with biological and biochemical alterations. The average concentrations of heavy metals found in hepatic tissues of Variola louti fish from the polluted area, namely Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe and Zn, were 1.74, 9.69, 47.48, 4020.01 and 229.47 µg/g liver, respectively, that were significantly higher than that of samples taken from reference area (0.24, 1.98, 20.12, 721.93, 129.21 µg/g liver, respectively). The fold change of heavy metals in fish from the polluted area with respect of that of the reference area followed the order Cd > Fe > Cr > Cu > Zn. Analysis of nuclear DNA revealed that hepatic tissues of fish samples from the polluted area showed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as detected by flow cytometry and formation DNA-ladder. In addition, hepatic sections from polluted area fishes showed more fibrotic changes and collagen deposition by hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining, respectively, compared to samples taken from the reference area. Moreover, the electrophoretic patterns of proteins of liver of fishes caught at the polluted area showed different patterns of proteins from that of the reference with bands at 42, 130 and 140 kDa, which is in a good agreement with the molecular weight of collagen type III. In conclusion, there were significant changes in the tissues of fishes in the polluted area at the cellular and the molecular levels that may be associated with an accumulation of heavy metals. Assessment of fishes as a sensitive biomonitor for the pollution of surface waters that may affect general health of human and wild life is conceivable.

  1. Acid/Base and H2PO4(-) Controllable High-Contrast Optical Molecular Switches with a Novel BODIPY Functionalized [2]Rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugaperumal, Reguram; Srinivasadesikan, Venkatesan; Ramakrishnam Raju, Mandapati V; Lin, Ming-Chang; Shukla, Tarun; Singh, Ravinder; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    2015-12-09

    A novel multifunctional mechanically interlocked switchable [2]rotaxane R4 containing two molecular stations and rotaxane arms terminated with boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophores and its derivatives were synthesized for the first time by CuAAC click reaction. The shuttling motion of macrocycle between the dibenzylammonium and triazolium recognition sites and the distance dependent photoinduced electron transfer process of R4 is demonstrated by utilizing external chemical stimuli (acid/base). Interestingly, the reversible self-assembly process of R4 was recognized by the acid-base molecular switch strategy. Notably, two symmetrical triazolium groups acted as molecular stations, H2PO4(-) receptors, and H-bonded donors. Both [2]rotaxane R4 and thread R2 demonstrated excellent optical responses and high selectivity toward H2PO4(-) ion. The specific motion and guest-host interactions of mechanically interlocked machines (MIMs) were also further explored by quantum mechanical calculations. The thread R2 also demonstrated to enable the detection of H2PO4(-) in RAW 264.7 cells successfully.

  2. On the Use of Molecular Weight Cutoff Cassettes to Measure Dynamic Relaxivity of Novel Gadolinium Contrast Agents: Example Using Hyaluronic Acid Polymer Complexes in Phosphate-Buffered Saline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kasraie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether standard extracellular contrast agents of Gd(III ions in combination with a polymeric entity susceptible to hydrolytic degradation over a finite period of time, such as Hyaluronic Acid (HA, have sufficient vascular residence time to obtain comparable vascular imaging to current conventional compounds and to obtain sufficient data to show proof of concept that HA with Gd-DTPA ligands could be useful as vascular imaging agents. We assessed the dynamic relaxivity of the HA bound DTPA compounds using a custom-made phantom, as well as relaxation rates at 10.72 MHz with concentrations ranging between 0.09 and 7.96 mM in phosphate-buffered saline. Linear dependences of static longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 on concentration were found for most measured samples, and the HA samples continued to produce high signal strength after 24 hours after injection into a dialysis cassette at 3T, showing superior dynamic relaxivity values compared to conventional contrast media such as Gd-DTPA-BMA.

  3. Reprogramming somatic cell differentiation and the Hayflick Limit: contrasting two modern molecular bioengineering aims and their impact on the future of mankind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E S; Takeuchi, T; Rosenwaks, Z; Palermo, G D

    2001-08-01

    The molecular biology of human cloning and aging research depend on the closely related laboratory techniques supported by a thorough understanding of cell-signaling processes. Unfortunately, the link between these two research fields has received only marginal attention in the lay press. Cloning is possible when somatic cell differentiation is successfully reprogrammed, and clinical control of cellular senescence depends on a proper reconfiguration of the predetermined number of divisions permitted during the cell life-cycle (the so-called "Hayflick Limit"). In this paper, we discuss these two concepts and compare the impact likely to be associated with bioengineering studies that facilitate both human cloning and longevity therapy.

  4. MRI and pathology in persistent postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Jensen, Karl-Erik; Fiirgaard, Bente

    2009-01-01

    -free unoperated groins scanned. Two blinded observers separately assessed groins using a predefined list of possible MRI pathology and anatomic landmarks. Primary outcomes included interobserver agreement assessed by calculating kappa-coefficients. Secondary outcomes included frequency of MRI pathology in painful...... groins versus unoperated and pain-free groins. RESULTS: Interobserver agreement was poor, ranging from kappa = 0.24 to 0.55 ("fair" to "moderate") except for "contrast enhancement in groin" (kappa = 0.69, substantial). Pathologic changes in the form of "contrast enhancement in groin," "edema......," and "spermatic cord caliber increased" were significantly more often seen in painful versus unoperated groins (p pathologic finding was specific or seen in all painful groins. CONCLUSIONS...

  5. Digital pathology in nephrology clinical trials, research, and pathology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisoni, Laura; Hodgin, Jeffrey B

    2017-11-01

    In this review, we will discuss (i) how the recent advancements in digital technology and computational engineering are currently applied to nephropathology in the setting of clinical research, trials, and practice; (ii) the benefits of the new digital environment; (iii) how recognizing its challenges provides opportunities for transformation; and (iv) nephropathology in the upcoming era of kidney precision and predictive medicine. Recent studies highlighted how new standardized protocols facilitate the harmonization of digital pathology database infrastructure and morphologic, morphometric, and computer-aided quantitative analyses. Digital pathology enables robust protocols for clinical trials and research, with the potential to identify previously underused or unrecognized clinically useful parameters. The integration of digital pathology with molecular signatures is leading the way to establishing clinically relevant morpho-omic taxonomies of renal diseases. The introduction of digital pathology in clinical research and trials, and the progressive implementation of the modern software ecosystem, opens opportunities for the development of new predictive diagnostic paradigms and computer-aided algorithms, transforming the practice of renal disease into a modern computational science.

  6. VEGF-A, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the pathological vascular phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Janice A.; Senger, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    Normal angiogenesis is a complex process involving the organization of proliferating and migrating endothelial cells (ECs) into a well-ordered and highly functional vascular network. In contrast, pathological angiogenesis, which is a conspicuous feature of tumor growth, ischemic diseases, and chronic inflammation, is characterized by vessels with aberrant angioarchitecture and compromised barrier function. Herein we review the subject of pathological angiogenesis, particularly that driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), from a new perspective. We propose that the serious structural and functional anomalies associated with VEGF-A-elicited neovessels, reflect, at least in part, imbalances in the internal molecular cues that govern the ordered assembly of ECs into three dimensional vascular networks and preserve vessel barrier function. Adopting such a viewpoint widens the focus from solely on specific pro-angiogenic stimuli such as VEGF-A to include a key set of cytoskeletal regulatory molecules, the Rho GTPases, which are known to direct multiple aspects of vascular morphogenesis including EC motility, alignment, multi-cellular organization, as well as intercellular junction integrity. We offer this perspective to draw attention to the importance of endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics for proper neovascularization and to suggest new therapeutic strategies with the potential to improve the pathological vascular phenotype

  7. Contrasting behavior of covalent and molecular carbon allotropes exposed to extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray free-electron laser radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Toufarová, Martina; Hájková, Věra; Chalupský, Jaromír; Burian, Tomáš; Vacík, Jiří; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Vyšín, Luděk; Gaudin, J.; Medvedev, Nikita; Ziaja, B.; Nagasono, M.; Yabashi, M.; Sobierajski, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Sinn, H.; Störmer, M.; Koláček, Karel; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Juha, Libor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 21 (2017), s. 1-11, č. článku 214101. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15013; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29772S; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_013/0001552; GA MŠk EF16_013/0001552; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015083 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : solid C-60 * reflection * pulses Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (UJF-V) OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics); Nuclear physics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  8. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncică, Ana Maria; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...... cancers and visualization of the portal venous system and esophageal varices. In addition, contrast agents can be used to differentiate pancreatic lesions. The use of color Doppler further increases the ability to diagnose and differentiate various pancreatic malignancies. The sensitivity of power Doppler...

  9. Rotator cuff pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigeau, I.; Doursounian, L.; Maigne, J.Y.; Guinet, C.; Meary, E.; Buy, J.N.; Touzard, R.C.; Vadrot, D.; Laval-Jeantet, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen volunteers and 73 patients with suspected rotator cuff lesions were examined at 0.5 T with T2 * -weighted gradient-echo (GE) MR imaging (700/33/30 degrees) (oblique coronal and sagittal 3 mm thick, surface coil). Results were compared with those of arthrography (all cases), T1-weighted GE imaging (400/20/90 degrees) (35 cases), surgery (28 cases), and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images (2,000/60-120) (17 cases). GE images demonstrated all tears (complete, 32, partial, 12) and was superior to arthrography in determining site and size and in displaying muscles (critical point in surgical planning). In 20 cases without tears on arthrography, GE imaging demonstrated five cases of tendinitis, five cases of bursitis, and six probable intratendinous or superficial partial tears. T2 * -weighted GE imaging was superior to T2-weighted SE and T1-weighted GE imaging, with higher fluid contrast and a low fat signal. Therefore, it might replace arthrography in the diagnosis and surgical approach to this pathology

  10. The benefits of folic acid-modified gold nanoparticles in CT-based molecular imaging: radiation dose reduction and image contrast enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beik, Jaber; Jafariyan, Maryam; Montazerabadi, Alireza; Ghadimi-Daresajini, Ali; Tarighi, Parastoo; Mahmoudabadi, Alireza; Ghaznavi, Habib; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali

    2017-12-12

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) requires an optimal compromise between image quality and patient dose. While high image quality is an important requirement in CT, the radiation dose must be kept minimal to protect the patients from ionizing radiation-associated risks. The use of probes based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) along with active targeting ligands for specific recognition of cancer cells may be one of the balanced solutions. Herein, we report the effect of folic acid (FA)-modified AuNP as a targeted nanoprobe on the contrast enhancement of CT images as well as its potential for patient dose reduction. For this purpose, nasopharyngeal KB cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors were incubated with AuNPs with and without FA modification and imaged in a CT scanner with the following X-ray tube parameters: peak tube voltage of 130 KVp, and tube current-time products of 60, 90, 120, 160 and 250 mAs. Moreover, in order to estimate the radiation dose to which the patient was exposed during a head CT protocol, the CT dose index (CTDI) value was measured by an X-ray electrometer by changing the tube current-time product. Raising the tube current-time product from 60 to 250 mAs significantly increased the absorbed dose from 18 mGy to 75 mGy. This increase was not associated with a significant enhancement of the image quality of the KB cells. However, an obvious increase in image brightness and CT signal intensity (quantified by Hounsfield units [HU]) were observed in cells exposed to nanoparticles without any increase in the mAs product or radiation dose. Under the same Au concentration, KB cells exposed to FA-modified AuNPs had significantly higher HU and brighter CT images than those of the cells exposed to AuNPs without FA modification. In conclusion, FA-modified AuNP can be considered as a targeted CT nanoprobe with the potential for dose reduction by keeping the required mAs product as low as possible while enhancing image contrast.

  11. Pathology Assistant (C - Gamechanger Of Pathology Diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asel Kudaybergenova

    2016-06-01

    When the competition ended, we received many favor- able reviews and we decided to start another project a little bit similar to the competition. Every month we show three interesting and difficult to diagnose cases provided by the leading Russian pathologists. The participants can look through the clinical data and digitized histological slides, and then discuss what they see among their professional society. There are 400  specialists  from  post  USSR countries.  Moreover, we get a few proposal of partnership to start a similar project in EU. And the last product in line is Pathology Assistant. It is a game changer. Pathology Assistant is a Digital Pathology©technology driven application for pathology diagnostics, tool to innovate pathology diagnostics in more simple, proven by analytical algo- rithm, automatically delivering anticipated support way. The service provides vast and structured database of validated cases, intuitive interface, fast and convenient system of analytical search. Pathology Assistant will streamline and simplify pathologist’s way to the right decision. Pathologists from Memorial Sloan Catering and biggest EU labs are working on preparing the con- tent for the project.  

  12. Estructura genética e historia demográfica del Jaguar ( Panthera onca en Colombia: Contraste entre marcadores moleculares y datos craneométricos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ruíz-García

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudio la estructura genética de los jaguares en Colombia (n=49, e igualmente, se com-pararon los resultados moleculares obtenidos con otros 16 jaguares procedentes de Guatemala,Perú, Bolivia y zona central de la Amazonía brasileña. Para ello se emplearon 18 marcadores microsatélites (STRPs diseñados para gato doméstico. Estos marcadores fueron Fca 01, 08, 24,43, 45, 70, 94, 96, 126, 136, 176, 200, 225, 251, 290, 294, 391 y 506, localizados en losdiferentes cromosomas felinos. Mediante tests exactos utilizando cadenas de Markov y elmétodo de Fisher se determinó un fuerte exceso de homocigotos en todos los niveles jerárquicosanalizados, lo cual pone en evidencia la posible importancia del efecto Wahlund en esta especiey la no existencia de correspondencia con las subespecies morfológicamente propuestas en elpasado. Se calculó también el asignamiento poblacional de los jaguares analizados, a las dossubespecies de jaguares presentes en Colombia mediante el método de verosimilitud y con elmétodo basado en distancias con los procedimientos “as is” y “leave one out”.

  13. Surgical and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A; Brosens, Lodewijk A A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histologic characteristics have proven to be very useful for classifying different types of tumors of the pancreas. As a result, the major tumor types in the pancreas have long been classified based on their microscopic appearance. MAIN BODY: Recent advances in whole exome sequencing,

  14. Surgical and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackeng, Wenzel M; Hruban, Ralph H; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Brosens, Lodewijk A A

    2016-06-07

    Histologic characteristics have proven to be very useful for classifying different types of tumors of the pancreas. As a result, the major tumor types in the pancreas have long been classified based on their microscopic appearance. Recent advances in whole exome sequencing, gene expression profiling, and knowledge of tumorigenic pathways have deepened our understanding of the underlying biology of pancreatic neoplasia. These advances have not only confirmed the traditional histologic classification system, but also opened new doors to early diagnosis and targeted treatment. This review discusses the histopathology, genetic and epigenetic alterations and potential treatment targets of the five major malignant pancreatic tumors - pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, acinar cell carcinoma and pancreatoblastoma.

  15. Pathological buying and partnership status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Mitchell, James E; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2016-05-30

    This pilot study investigated the partnership status and the level of pathological buying (PB) in 157 female patients with PB and 1153 women from a German population-based sample. Slightly more than half of both samples were currently living with a partner. The results suggest a protective effect of being in a couple relationship in the representative sample. In contrast, having a partner was not related to the severity of PB among patients. Future studies should address the question of whether the characteristics and quality of partnership have an impact on the severity and course of PB, and vice versa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Current state of molecular imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, J.; Wunder, A.

    2005-01-01

    The recent years have seen significant advances in both molecular biology, allowing the identification of genes and pathways related to disease, and imaging technologies that allow for improved spatial and temporal resolution, enhanced sensitivity, better depth penetration, improved image processing, and beneficial combinations of different imaging modalities. These advances have led to a paradigm shift in the scope of diagnostic imaging. The traditional role of radiological diagnostic imaging is to define gross anatomy and structure in order to detect pathological abnormalities. Available contrast agents are mostly non-specific and can be used to image physiological processes such as changes in blood volume, flow, and perfusion but not to demonstrate pathological alterations at molecular levels. However, alterations at the anatomical-morphological level are relatively late manifestations of underlying molecular changes. Using molecular probes or markers that bind specifically to molecular targets allows for the non-invasive visualization and quantitation of biological processes such as gene expression, apoptosis, or angiogenesis at the molecular level within intact living organisms. This rapidly evolving, multidisciplinary approach, referred to as molecular imaging, promises to enable early diagnosis, can provide improved classification of stage and severity of disease, an objective assessment of treatment efficacy, and a reliable prognosis. Furthermore, molecular imaging is an important tool for the evaluation of physiological and pathophysiological processes, and for the development of new therapies. This article comprises a review of current technologies of molecular imaging, describes the development of contrast agents and various imaging modalities, new applications in specific disease models, and potential future developments. (orig.)

  17. Endocrine pathology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, Sylvia L; Mete, Ozgur

    2018-01-01

    Endocrine pathology is the subspecialty of diagnostic pathology which deals with the diagnosis and characterisation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the endocrine system. This relatively young subspecialty was initially focused mainly on thyroid and parathyroid pathology, with some participants also involved in studies of the pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, and the adrenal glands. However, the endocrine system involves much more than these traditional endocrine organs and the discipline has grown to encompass lesions of the dispersed neuroendocrine cells, including neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, thymus, breast and prostate, as well as paraganglia throughout the body, not just in the adrenals. Indeed, the production of hormones is the hallmark of the endocrine system, and some aspects of gynecological/testicular, bone and liver pathology also fall into the realm of this specialty. Many of the lesions that are the focus of this discipline are increasing in incidence and their pathology is becoming more complex with increased understanding of molecular pathology and a high incidence of familial disease. The future of endocrine pathology will demand a depth of understanding of structure, function, prognosis and prediction as pathologists play a key role in the multidisciplinary care team of patients with endocrine diseases. It is anticipated that new technologies will allow increased subspecialisation in pathology and growth of this important area of expertise. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathology in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, S; Patsouris, E

    2015-11-01

    Pathology is the field of medicine that studies diseases. Ancient Greece hosted some of the earliest societies that laid the structural foundations of pathology. Initially, knowledge was based on observations but later on the key elements of pathology were established based on the dissection of animals and the autopsy of human cadavers. Christianized Greece under Ottoman rule (1453-1821) was not conducive to the development of pathology. After liberation, however, a series of events took place that paved the way for the establishment and further development of the specialty. The appointment in 1849 of two Professors of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens for didactical purposes proved to be the most important step in fostering the field of pathology in modern Greece. Presently in Greece there are seven university departments and 74 pathology laboratories in public hospitals, employing 415 specialized pathologists and 90 residents. The First Department of Pathology at the Medical School of Athens University is the oldest (1849) and largest in Greece, encompassing most pathology subspecialties.

  19. Multiwalled carbon nanotube hybrids as MRI contrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikodem Kuźnik

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most commonly used tomography techniques in medical diagnosis due to the non-invasive character, the high spatial resolution and the possibility of soft tissue imaging. Contrast agents, such as gadolinium complexes and superparamagnetic iron oxides, are administered to spotlight certain organs and their pathologies. Many new models have been proposed that reduce side effects and required doses of these already clinically approved contrast agents. These new candidates often possess additional functionalities, e.g., the possibility of bioactivation upon action of particular stimuli, thus serving as smart molecular probes, or the coupling with therapeutic agents and therefore combining both a diagnostic and therapeutic role. Nanomaterials have been found to be an excellent scaffold for contrast agents, among which carbon nanotubes offer vast possibilities. The morphology of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, their magnetic and electronic properties, the possibility of different functionalization and the potential to penetrate cell membranes result in a unique and very attractive candidate for a new MRI contrast agent. In this review we describe the different issues connected with MWCNT hybrids designed for MRI contrast agents, i.e., their synthesis and magnetic and dispersion properties, as well as both in vitro and in vivo behavior, which is important for diagnostic purposes. An introduction to MRI contrast agent theory is elaborated here in order to point to the specific expectations regarding nanomaterials. Finally, we propose a promising, general model of MWCNTs as MRI contrast agent candidates based on the studies presented here and supported by appropriate theories.

  20. Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubble Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvelde, M.L.J.; Vos, Henk; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Paradossi, Gaio; Pellegretti, Paolo; Trucco, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are traditionally used in ultrasound-assisted organ perfusion imaging. Recently the use of coated microbubbles has been proposed for molecular imaging applications where the bubbles are covered with a layer of targeting ligands to bind specifically to their target cells.

  1. Pathological gambling and criminality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folino, Jorge Oscar; Abait, Patricia Estela

    2009-09-01

    To review research results on the relationship between pathological gambling and criminality, published in 2007 and 2008, in English and in Spanish. An important association between pathological gambling and criminality was confirmed in populations of anonymous gamblers, helpline callers and substance abusers. Helplines provide a timely service to gamblers who have not reached the maximum stages in the development of a pathological gambling pattern. Pathological gambling is associated with violence in couples and dysfunctional families. Inversely, violence is also an antecedent promoting vulnerability toward pathological gambling. Impulsiveness shows diverse relationships with pathological gambling and violence as well. A pathological gambler's involvement in crime is exceptionally considered without responsibility by justice, but it may be an indicator of the disorder severity and the need for special therapeutic tactics. While reviewing the present study, research work was published that contributed to a better understanding of the association between pathological gambling and criminality and went further into their complex relationship and the formulation of explanatory models related to impulsiveness.

  2. Radiographic pathology for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mace, J.D.; Kowalczyk, N.

    1988-01-01

    This book explains the fundamentals of disease mechanisms and relates this to the practice of radiologic science. Each chapter begins with a discussion of normal anatomy and physiology, then covers pathology and demonstrates how the pathology appears on film. Imaging modalities such as computed tomography, MRI, and ultrasound are also discussed. Clinical case studies are included

  3. Pathology annual. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. Some of the titles are: Applications of in situ DNA hybridization technology to diagnostic surgical pathology; Neoplasms associated with immune deficiencies; Chronic gastritis: The pathologists's role; Necrosis in lymph nodes; Pathologic changes of osteochondrodysplasia in infancy: A review; and Immunoglobulin light chain nephropathies

  4. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for perfusion quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, during bolus passage of a paramagnetic contrast agent, is used world-wide to obtain parameters that reflect the pathological state of tissue. Abnormal perfusion occurs in diseases such as stoke and tumour. Consequently, perfusion quantication could have signi cant...... clinical value both in diagnosis and treatment of such pathologies. One approach for perfusion quanti cation involves using the contrast mechanism that a ects the transverse relaxation rates of the magnetization, R2 or R 2 , since this provides the most pronounced effect. However, the linearity between...

  5. Method of radiodiagnosis of pathological changes. Sposob rentgenodiagnostiki patologicheskikh izmenenij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossovoj, A P

    1985-04-10

    Method for increasing the accuracy of radiodiagnosis of pathological changes by making an imprint and its matching with the original and turning the matched picture at different angles which do not exceed 45 deg up to contrast segregation of the object under investigation, is proposed. The method is tested when investigating 215 patients with different pathology.

  6. Digitotalar dysmorphism: Molecular elucidation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obtained for molecular studies. Since the distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are genetically heterogeneous, an unbiased approach to mutation ... Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa, with an interest in molecular genetics of connective ...

  7. Your Pathology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pathology Tests Breast Cancer News February 20, 2013 Star-gazing software helps fight breast cancer See More ... Phone: (855) 807-6386 email Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Contact Us Privacy Policy Site Credits Terms of ...

  8. Stem Cell Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dah-Jiun; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa L; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Ellenson, Lora H; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2018-01-24

    Rapid advances in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine have opened new opportunities for better understanding disease pathogenesis and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment approaches. Many stem cell niches are well defined anatomically, thereby allowing their routine pathological evaluation during disease initiation and progression. Evaluation of the consequences of genetic manipulations in stem cells and investigation of the roles of stem cells in regenerative medicine and pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer require significant expertise in pathology for accurate interpretation of novel findings. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing stem cell pathology as a discipline to facilitate stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This review provides examples of anatomically defined niches suitable for evaluation by diagnostic pathologists, describes neoplastic lesions associated with them, and discusses further directions of stem cell pathology.

  9. Recent application of PET in the pathological mechanisms of PD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jiyu

    2003-01-01

    PET is the best method in the investigation of molecular pathology at present. In this review, the value of positron emission computed tomography for providing insight into the role of pathology mechanism, early diagnosis, differential diagnosis, mechanisms of motor fluctuations in Parkinson disease is reviewed. Especially it can be used for the early diagnosis of PD, thus being beneficial to the therapy of it

  10. Pathology of pulmonary aspergillomas

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Rajeev; Vaideeswar Pradeep; Pandit Shobhana

    2008-01-01

    Aspergilloma refers to a fungal ball formed by saprophytic overgrowth of Aspergillus species and is seen secondary to cavitatory/cystic respiratory diseases. Paucity of clinical and pathological data of aspergilloma in India prompted us to analyze cases of aspergilloma over 15 years. The clinical features were recorded in all and correlated with detailed pathological examination. Aspergillomas were identified in 41 surgical excisions or at autopsy. There was male predominance; half the patien...

  11. Disrupted sensory gating in pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanov, Wendy; Karayanidis, Frini; Johnston, Patrick; Bailey, Andrew; Carr, Vaughan; Schall, Ulrich

    2003-08-15

    Some neurochemical evidence as well as recent studies on molecular genetics suggest that pathologic gambling may be related to dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission. The current study examined sensory (motor) gating in pathologic gamblers as a putative measure of endogenous brain dopamine activity with prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle eye-blink response and the auditory P300 event-related potential. Seventeen pathologic gamblers and 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects were assessed. Both prepulse inhibition measures were recorded under passive listening and two-tone prepulse discrimination conditions. Compared to the control group, pathologic gamblers exhibited disrupted sensory (motor) gating on all measures of prepulse inhibition. Sensory motor gating deficits of eye-blink responses were most profound at 120-millisecond prepulse lead intervals in the passive listening task and at 240-millisecond prepulse lead intervals in the two-tone prepulse discrimination task. Sensory gating of P300 was also impaired in pathologic gamblers, particularly at 500-millisecond lead intervals, when performing the discrimination task on the prepulse. In the context of preclinical studies on the disruptive effects of dopamine agonists on prepulse inhibition, our findings suggest increased endogenous brain dopamine activity in pathologic gambling in line with previous neurobiological findings.

  12. Development of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.

    1993-01-01

    Description of all contrast media (ionic and nonionic monomers, ionic and nonionic dimers) was presented. Chemotoxicity, osmolality and viscosity of some contrast agents were analyzed. The main adverse reactions to ionic and nonionic contrast media were described

  13. [Adolescent pathological gambling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, A; Karila, L; Lejoyeux, M

    2015-05-01

    Although experts have long thought that the problems of gambling involved only adults, recent studies tend to show that teenagers are also affected. The objective of this paper is to show the characteristics of pathological gambling in adolescents. This review focuses on the clinical features, prevalence, psychopathology, prevention and treatment of this disorder. A review of the medical literature was conducted, using PubMed, using the following keywords alone or combined: pathological gambling, dependence, addiction and adolescents. We selected 12 English articles from 1997 to 2014. Recent work estimate that between 4 and 8% of adolescents suffer from problem gambling, and the prevalence of pathological gambling is 2-4 times higher in adolescents than in adults. The term adolescent pathological gambler starts early around the age of 10-12 years, with a quick change of status from casual to that of problem gambler and player. Complications appear quickly and comorbidities are common. There is no curative pharmacological treatment approved by health authorities. Pathological gambling among adolescents has grown significantly in recent years and should be promptly taken care of. Further studies must be performed to improve our understanding of this problem among adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathologic conditions in pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beomonte Zobel, B.; Tella, S.; Innacoli, M.; D'Archivio, C.; Cardone, G.; Masciocchi, C.; Gallucci, M.; Passariello, R.; Cappa, F.

    1991-01-01

    Soma authors suggested that MR imaging could rapresent an effective diagnostic alternative in the study of pathologic conditions of mother and fetus during pregnancy. To verify the actual role of MR imaging, we examined 20 patients in the 2nd and 3rd trimester of gestation, after a preliminary US examination. Fifteen patients presented fetal or placental pathologies; in 4 patients the onset of the pathologic condition occurred during pregnancy; in 1 case of US diagnosis of fetal ascites, MR findings were nornal and the newborn was healty. As for placental pathologies, our series included a case of placental cyst, two hematomas between placenta and uterine wall, and two cases of partial placenta previa. As for fetal malformation, we evaluated a case of omphalocele, one of Prune-Belly syndrome, a case of femoral asimmetry, one of thanatophoric dwarfism, a case of thoracopagus twins with cardiovascular abnormalities, two fetal hydrocephali, and three cases of pyelo-ureteral stenosis. As for maternal pathologies during pregnancy, we observed a case of subserous uterine fibromyoma, one of of right hydronephrosis, one of protrusion of lumbar invertebral disk, and a large ovarian cyst. In our experience, MR imaging exhibited high sensitivity and a large field of view, which were both useful in the investigation of the different conditions occurring during pregnancy. In the evaluation of fetal and placental abnormalities, especially during the 3rd trimester, the diagnostic yieldof MR imaging suggested it as a complementary technique to US for the evaluation of fetal malformation and of intrauterine growth retardation

  15. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to interobserver variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literature. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation.

  16. Audit in forensic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M P; Opeskin, K

    2000-09-01

    Autopsy numbers in Australian hospitals have declined markedly during the past decade despite evidence of a relatively static rate of demonstrable clinical misdiagnosis during this time. The reason for this decrease in autopsy numbers is multifactorial and may include a general lack of clinical and pathologic interest in the autopsy with a possible decline in autopsy standard, a lack of clinicopathologic correlation after autopsies, and an increased emphasis on surgical biopsy reporting within hospital pathology departments. Although forensic autopsies are currently maintaining their numbers, it is incumbent on forensic pathologists to demonstrate the wealth of important information a carefully performed postmortem examination can reveal. To this end, the Pathology Division of the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine has instituted a program of minimum standards in varied types of coroner cases and commenced a system of internal and external audit. The minimum standard for a routine, sudden, presumed natural death is presented and the audit system is discussed.

  17. Radiographic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golman, K.; Holtz, E.; Almen, T.

    1987-01-01

    Contrast media are used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the X-ray attenuation between a body structure of interest and the surrounding tissue. A detail becomes perceptible on a roentgenogram only when its contrast exceeds a minimum value in relation to the background. Small areas of interest must have higher contrast than the background. The contrast effect depends on concentration of the contrast media with the body. A high contrast media concentration difference thus gives rise to more morphological details in the radiographs. Contrast media can be divided into negative contrast media such as air and gas which attenuate X-rays less than the body tissues, and positive contrast materials which attenuate X-rays more than the body tissues. The positive contrast media all contain either iodine (atomic number 53) or barium (atomic number 56) and can be divided into water-insoluble and water-soluble contrast media

  18. Dual Pathology of Mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajurkar, Suday G; Deshpande, Mohan D; Kazi, Noaman; Jadhav, Dhanashree; Ranadive, Pallavi; Ingole, Snehal

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysmal Bone cyst (ABC)is a rare benign lesion of the bone which is infrequent in craniofacial region (12%). Rapid growth pattern causing bone expansion and facial asymmetry is a characteristic feature of ABC. Giant cell lesion is another distinct pathological entity. Here we present to you a rare case of dual pathology in an 11 year old female patient who presented with a large expansile lesion in the left hemimandible. All radiographic investigations were suggestive of ABC, aspiration of the lesion resulted in blood aspirate. However only after a histologic examination the dual nature of the lesion was revealed.

  19. Hip joint pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tijssen, M; van Cingel, R E H; de Visser, E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18......-65 years) were included if they were referred to a physical therapist to gather pre-operative data and were then diagnosed during arthroscopy. Results of pre-operative patient history and physical tests were collected and compared to arthroscopy. Data of 77 active patients (mean age: 37 years) were...

  20. Otosclerosis: Temporal Bone Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Ishai, Reuven; McKenna, Michael J

    2018-04-01

    Otosclerosis is pathologically characterized by abnormal bony remodeling, which includes bone resorption, new bone deposition, and vascular proliferation in the temporal bone. Sensorineural hearing loss in otosclerosis is associated with extension of otosclerosis to the cochlear endosteum and deposition of collagen throughout the spiral ligament. Persistent or recurrent conductive hearing loss after stapedectomy has been associated with incomplete footplate fenestration, poor incus-prosthesis connection, and incus resorption in temporal bone specimens. Human temporal bone pathology has helped to define the role of computed tomography imaging for otosclerosis, confirming that computed tomography is highly sensitive for diagnosis, yet limited in assessing cochlear endosteal involvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. "Life-bearing molecules" versus "life-embodying systems": Two contrasting views on the what-is-life (WIL) problem persisting from the early days of molecular biology to the post-genomic cell- and organism-level biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoki

    2018-05-01

    "What is life?" is an ultimate biological quest for the principle that makes organisms alive. This 'WIL problem' is not, however, a simple one that we have a straightforward strategy to attack. From the beginning, molecular biology tried to identify molecules that bear the essence of life: the double helical DNA represented replication, and enzymes were micro-actuators of biological activities. A dominating idea behind these mainstream biological studies relies on the identification of life-bearing molecules, which themselves are models of life. Another, prevalent idea emphasizes that life resides in the whole system of an organism, but not in some particular molecules. The behavior of a complex system may be considered to embody the essence of life. The thermodynamic view of life system in the early 20th century was remodeled as physics of complex systems and systems biology. The two views contrast with each other, but they are no longer heritage of the historical dualism in biology, such as mechanism/materialism versus vitalism, or reductionism versus holism. These two views are both materialistic and mechanistic, and act as driving forces of modern biology. In reality, molecules function in a context of systems, whereas systems presuppose functional molecules. A key notion to reconcile this conflict is that subjects of biological studies are given before we start to study them. Cell- or organism-level biology is destined to the dialectic of molecules and systems, but this antagonism can be resolved by dynamic thinking involving biological evolution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  3. TC pathological Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Fontes, M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT, RNM, PET-CT. These techniques permit to detect head and neck tumors, breast and digestive pathologies as well as congenital diseases and glandular tumor in the thyroid, parathyroid, muscles, lymphatic, nerves and vessels

  4. Pathological fractures in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  5. Next-Generation Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Harrison, David J

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology is rapidly transforming from a semiquantitative and empirical science toward a big data discipline. Large data sets from across multiple omics fields may now be extracted from a patient's tissue sample. Tissue is, however, complex, heterogeneous, and prone to artifact. A reductionist view of tissue and disease progression, which does not take this complexity into account, may lead to single biomarkers failing in clinical trials. The integration of standardized multi-omics big data and the retention of valuable information on spatial heterogeneity are imperative to model complex disease mechanisms. Mathematical modeling through systems pathology approaches is the ideal medium to distill the significant information from these large, multi-parametric, and hierarchical data sets. Systems pathology may also predict the dynamical response of disease progression or response to therapy regimens from a static tissue sample. Next-generation pathology will incorporate big data with systems medicine in order to personalize clinical practice for both prognostic and predictive patient care.

  6. Forms of pathologization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    disorder, and similar figures are found for many other mental disorders. These figures are striking, but are hard to interpret. This presentation argues in favour of the pathologization thesis, which claims that it cannot be argued in a straightforward manner that we are simply more ill and disordered than...

  7. The Transcriptional Coactivator Bob1 Is Associated With Pathologic B Cell Responses in Autoimmune Tissue Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levels, Maria J.; Van Tok, Melissa N.; Cantaert, Tineke; Canete, Juan D.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Germar, Kristine; Spits, Hergen; Baeten, Dominique L. P.; Yeremenko, Nataliya G.

    Objective. The molecular mechanisms steering abnormal B cell responses in autoimmune diseases remain poorly understood. We undertook this study to identify molecular switches controlling pathologic B cell responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Candidate molecules were identified by gene

  8. Macromolecular contrast media. A new approach for characterising breast tumors with MR-mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup, H.E.; Gossmann, A.; Koeln Univ.; Wendland, M.; Brasch, R.C.; Rosenau, W.

    1997-01-01

    The value of macromolecular contrast agents (MMCM) for the characterization of benign and malignant breast tumors will be demonstrated in this review. Animal studies suggest a high potential of MMCM to increase the specificity of MR-mammography. The concept of tumor differentiation is based on the pathological hyperpermeability of microvessels in malignant tumors. MMCM show a leak into the interstitium of carcinomas, whereas they are confined to the intravascular space in benign tumors. Capabilities and limitations of the MMCM-prototype. Albumin-Gd-DTPA, for breast tumor characterization will be summarized and compared to the standard low molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA. Initial experience with new MMCM, such as Dendrimers, Gd-DTPA-Polylysine and MS-325 will be outlined. The potential of 'blood-pool'-iron oxides, such as AMI-227 for the evaluation of tumor microvascular permeabilities will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Targeted nanodiamonds as phenotype-specific photoacoustic contrast agents for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M Laird

    2015-03-01

    The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly targeted contrast agent for high-resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with PEG to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-HER2 peptide with a final nanoparticle size of approximately 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2-positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near-infrared laser. PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 h. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are nontoxic. PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high-resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype-specific monitoring of cancer growth.

  10. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Allison; Barker, Jocelyn; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline

  11. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Allison [Stanford Institutes of Medical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Barker, Jocelyn [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Rubin, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline.

  12. Male breast pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puebla, C.; Sainz, J.M.; Pujala, M.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    To review the specific radiological signs of male breast pathology observed in our center over the past five years, as well as the pertinent medical literature. A retrospective study was carried out of the 47 mammographic studies performed in 41 men. Oblique mediolateral and craniocaudal views were employed. The distribution of different types of male breast pathology among our patients was as follows: gynecomastia was detected in 30 cases (73.1%), pseudogynectomastia in 4 (9.7%), carcinoma in 3(7.3%), abscess in 2 (4.9%), lipoma in 1 (2.5%) and epidermoid cyst in the remaining patient (2.5%). The results obtained agree with those reported in the literature reviewed. The most significant findings were the low incidence of carcinoma and the high rate of gynecomastia. (Author) 26 refs

  13. Pathology of pulmonary aspergillomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajeev; Vaideeswar, Pradeep; Pandit, Shobhana P

    2008-01-01

    Aspergilloma refers to a fungal ball formed by saprophytic overgrowth of Aspergillus species and is seen secondary to cavitatory/cystic respiratory diseases. Paucity of clinical and pathological data of aspergilloma in India prompted us to analyze cases of aspergilloma over 15 years. The clinical features were recorded in all and correlated with detailed pathological examination. Aspergillomas were identified in 41 surgical excisions or at autopsy. There was male predominance; half the patients were in their fourth decade. Episodic hemoptysis was the commonest mode of presentation (85.4%). Forty aspergillomas were complex, occurring in cavitatory lesions (82.9%) or in bronchiectasis (14.6%). Simple aspergilloma was seen as an incidental finding in only one. Tuberculosis was the etiological factor in 31 patients, producing cavitatory or bronchiectatic lesions; other causes were chronic lung abscess and bronchiectasis (unrelated to tuberculosis). Surgical resections are endorsed in view of high risk of unpredictable, life-threatening hemoptysis.

  14. Pathology of pulmonary aspergillomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Rajeev

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aspergilloma refers to a fungal ball formed by saprophytic overgrowth of Aspergillus species and is seen secondary to cavitatory/cystic respiratory diseases. Paucity of clinical and pathological data of aspergilloma in India prompted us to analyze cases of aspergilloma over 15 years. The clinical features were recorded in all and correlated with detailed pathological examination. Aspergillomas were identified in 41 surgical excisions or at autopsy. There was male predominance; half the patients were in their fourth decade. Episodic hemoptysis was the commonest mode of presentation (85.4%. Forty aspergillomas were complex, occurring in cavitatory lesions (82.9% or in bronchiectasis (14.6%. Simple aspergilloma was seen as an incidental finding in only one. Tuberculosis was the etiological factor in 31 patients, producing cavitatory or bronchiectatic lesions; other causes were chronic lung abscess and bronchiectasis (unrelated to tuberculosis. Surgical resections are endorsed in view of high risk of unpredictable, life-threatening hemoptysis.

  15. [Pathological gambling: risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouju, G; Grall-Bronnec, M; Landreat-Guillou, M; Venisse, J-L

    2011-09-01

    In France, consumption of gambling games increased by 148% between 1960 and 2005. In 2004, gamblers lost approximately 0.9% of household income, compared to 0.4% in 1960. This represents approximately 134 Euros per year and per head. In spite of this important increase, the level remains lower than the European average (1%). However, gambling practices may continue to escalate in France in the next few years, particularly with the recent announce of the legalisation of online games and sports betting. With the spread of legalised gambling, pathological gambling rates may increase in France in the next years, in response to more widely available and more attractive gambling opportunities. In this context, there is a need for better understanding of the risk factors that are implicated in the development and maintenance of pathological gambling. This paper briefly describes the major risk factors for pathological gambling by examining the recent published literature available during the first quarter of 2008. This documentary basis was collected by Inserm for the collective expert report procedure on Gambling (contexts and addictions). Seventy-two articles focusing on risk factors for pathological gambling were considered in this review. Only 47 of them were taken into account for analysis. The selection of these 47 publications was based on the guide on literature analysis established by the French National Agency for Accreditation and Assessment in Health (ANAES, 2000). Some publications from more recent literature have also been added, mostly about Internet gambling. We identify three major types of risk factors implicated in gambling problems: some of them are related to the subject (individual factors), others are related to the object of the addiction, here the gambling activity by itself (structural factors), and the last are related to environment (contextual or situational factors). Thus, the development and maintenance of pathological gambling seems to be

  16. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping: Contrast Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunlei; Wei, Hongjiang; Gong, Nan-Jie; Cronin, Matthew; Dibb, Russel; Decker, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a recently developed MRI technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of magnetic susceptibility within biological tissues. It first uses the frequency shift in the MRI signal to map the magnetic field profile within the tissue. The resulting field map is then used to determine the spatial distribution of the underlying magnetic susceptibility by solving an inverse problem. The solution is achieved by deconvolving the field map with a dipole field, under the assumption that the magnetic field is a result of the superposition of the dipole fields generated by all voxels and that each voxel has its unique magnetic susceptibility. QSM provides improved contrast to noise ratio for certain tissues and structures compared to its magnitude counterpart. More importantly, magnetic susceptibility is a direct reflection of the molecular composition and cellular architecture of the tissue. Consequently, by quantifying magnetic susceptibility, QSM is becoming a quantitative imaging approach for characterizing normal and pathological tissue properties. This article reviews the mechanism generating susceptibility contrast within tissues and some associated applications. PMID:26844301

  17. Integrated Pathology Informatics Enables High-Quality Personalized and Precision Medicine: Digital Pathology and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volynskaya, Zoya; Chow, Hung; Evans, Andrew; Wolff, Alan; Lagmay-Traya, Cecilia; Asa, Sylvia L

    2018-03-01

    - The critical role of pathology in diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction demands high-quality subspecialty diagnostics that integrates information from multiple laboratories. - To identify key requirements and to establish a systematic approach to providing high-quality pathology in a health care system that is responsible for services across a large geographic area. - This report focuses on the development of a multisite pathology informatics platform to support high-quality surgical pathology and hematopathology using a sophisticated laboratory information system and whole slide imaging for histology and immunohistochemistry, integrated with ancillary tools, including electron microscopy, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and molecular diagnostics. - These tools enable patients in numerous geographic locations access to a model of subspecialty pathology that allows reporting of every specimen by the right pathologist at the right time. The use of whole slide imaging for multidisciplinary case conferences enables better communication among members of patient care teams. The system encourages data collection using a discrete data synoptic reporting module, has implemented documentation of quality assurance activities, and allows workload measurement, providing examples of additional benefits that can be gained by this electronic approach to pathology. - This approach builds the foundation for accurate big data collection and high-quality personalized and precision medicine.

  18. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me...

  19. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...

  20. Pathology in Undergraduate Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Raj K.C.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pathology is a study of disease which deals with etiology, pathogenesis and morphological features and the associated clinical features. Pathology acts as a bridge that fills the gap between basic sciences and clinical medicine. With proper understanding of pathological processes, one can understand the disease process. In Nepal, since the beginning of medical school teaching, Pathology as a basic science discipline and is a component of the preclinical medical school curriculum.Pathology teaching in 19th century was vague, disorganized and very little, though precious. The lectures used to be conducted by surgeons. At Barts, surgeon Sir James Paget had taught surgical pathology. The real revolution in pathology teaching began in the early 1900s when, spurred on by increasing understanding of disease mechanisms, pathology began to be accepted as a specialty in its own right.During the early and mid of 20th century, pathology teaching was a part of clinical teaching with daily, autopsy demonstration. By the late 1980s, significant change had taken place. In many medical schools, debate started regarding relevance of vigorous preclinical teaching. Then system-based approach was incorporated and traditional preclinical course had been abandoned. With this pathology teaching also began to change with pathologists being involved in teaching histology, often alongside pathology to highlight its clinical relevance. In medical schools the pathology teaching time was cut. Autopsy demonstrations, which had been so popular with generations of medical students, were becoming irregular and less well attended.Though teaching of pathology in blocks to ‘avoid fragmentation’ has disappeared in western countries; it is still practice in Nepal. In western countries there was traditional practice of teaching general pathology in the first two years and systemic pathology in the clinical years. Now pathology teaching is integrated throughout the course. A

  1. Clinical applications of contrast echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Leon Galindo

    2005-01-01

    The echocardiography is the technique more used for the diagnosis and pursuit of the cardiovascular illnesses; therefore, their diagnostic precision has acquired a vital importance in the handling of the patients with cardiovascular pathologies. However, with relative frequency, the diagnostic capacity of the echocardiography exam is diminished by limitations of the acoustic window, mainly in-patient with obesity, lung illnesses and alterations of the thoracic wall. This can be obviated with the use of the intra-esophagus echocardiography, although this it is a procedure semi-invasive and not very practical of carrying out in all the patients with problems of acoustic window. In this article the clinical applications are revised more common of the contrast echocardiography

  2. Pathology of oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Autor, Anne Pomeroy

    1982-01-01

    .... The book is divided into three general sections. The first and smallest section of the book explains the molecular and biochemical basis of our current understanding of oxygen radical toxicity as well as the means by which normal aerobic cells...

  3. Assessment of female pelvic pathology by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, M.; Sanchez, A.; Narvaez, J.A.; Valls, C.; Guma, A.; Andia, E.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the imaging technique of choice for the detection and characterization of pelvic pathology. Its multiplanar capability, excellent soft tissue contrast, use of nonionizing radiations and noninvasive nature make MRI the ideal technique for assessing the female pelvis. The purpose of this study is to describe the normal pelvic anatomy as it appears in MRI and to asses the radiologic features of the different pelvic pathologies. (Author) 21 refs

  4. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Thom, M; Ellison, DW; Wilkins, P; Barnes, D; Thompson, PD; Brown, P

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. Background: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  5. Cortical myoclonus and cerebellar pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Thom, M.; Ellison, D. W.; Wilkins, P.; Barnes, D.; Thompson, P. D.; Brown, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the electrophysiologic and pathologic findings in three patients with cortical myoclonus. In two patients the myoclonic ataxic syndrome was associated with proven celiac disease. BACKGROUND: The pathologic findings in conditions associated with cortical myoclonus commonly involve

  6. Perforations during contrast enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Steinkamp, U.; Grabbe, E.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Ochsenzoll, Hamburg

    1983-01-01

    During contrast enema, perforation into the retroperitoneal space can be differentiated from perforation into the peritoneum and perforation into the intestinal wall associated with formation of barium granulomas or submucosal spreading of the contrast medium. Other special forms are perforation with contrast medium embolism of diverticula; of the processus vermiformis; penetration of contrast medium into fistulous systems and from the operated areas. Risk factors are: balloon catheter, intestinal tubes with a hard tip, preternatural anus, excessive enema pressure, contrast medium additions, preceding manipulations, intestinal diseases, advanced age and delegation of manipulations to assistants and unskilled staff. Children are particularly at risk. (orig.) [de

  7. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  8. Dual Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (DC-MRF): A Platform for Simultaneous Quantification of Multiple MRI Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christian E; Donnola, Shannon B; Jiang, Yun; Batesole, Joshua; Darrah, Rebecca; Drumm, Mitchell L; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Yu, Xin; Griswold, Mark A; Flask, Chris A

    2017-08-16

    Injectable Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents have been widely used to provide critical assessments of disease for both clinical and basic science imaging research studies. The scope of available MRI contrast agents has expanded over the years with the emergence of molecular imaging contrast agents specifically targeted to biological markers. Unfortunately, synergistic application of more than a single molecular contrast agent has been limited by MRI's ability to only dynamically measure a single agent at a time. In this study, a new Dual Contrast - Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (DC - MRF) methodology is described that can detect and independently quantify the local concentration of multiple MRI contrast agents following simultaneous administration. This "multi-color" MRI methodology provides the opportunity to monitor multiple molecular species simultaneously and provides a practical, quantitative imaging framework for the eventual clinical translation of molecular imaging contrast agents.

  9. Genetic basis of endocrine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the review was analysis of literature data relating to the molecular genetic basis and diagnosis of endocrine pathology. We searched for published and unpublished researches using Pubmed as the search engine by the keywords: ‘genes’, ‘endocrine diseases’, ‘molecular diagnostics’, ‘prohormones’, ‘nuclear receptors and transcription factors’, taking into consideration studies conducted over the last 10 years, citation review of relevant primary and review articles, conference abstracts, personal files, and contact with expert informants. The criterion for the selection of articles for the study was based on their close relevance to the topic, thus out of 144 analyzed articles, the findings of the researchers covered in 32 articles were crucial. The described nosologies presented various heredi­tary forms of hypopituitarism, disturbances of steroid hormone biosynthesis, abnormal gender formation, monogenic forms of diabetes mellitus, endocrine tumors, etc. Pathology is identified that is associated with a mutation of genes encoding protein prohormones, receptors, steroid biosynthesis enzymes, intracellular signaling molecules, transport proteins, ion channels, and transcription factors. Among the endocrine diseases associated with defects in genes encoding protein prohormones, the defects of the GH1 gene are most common, the defects in the gene CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase are among diseases associated with defects in genes encoding enzymes. More often mutations of genes encoding proteins belong to the class of G-protein coupled receptors. Most of the mutations associated with MEN-2A are concentrated in the rich cysteine region of the Ret receptor. More than 70 monogenic syndromes are known, in which there is a marked tolerance to glucose and some form of diabetes mellitus is diagnosed, diabetes mellitus caused by mutation of the mitochondrial gene (mutation tRNALeu, UUR is also detected. Of all the monogenic forms of

  10. Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology investigates the organization, compartmentalization, and biochemistry of eukaryotic cells and the pathology associated...

  11. Pathology Gross Photography: The Beginning of Digital Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, B Alan; Glassy, Eric F

    2015-06-01

    The underutilized practice of photographing anatomic pathology specimens from surgical pathology and autopsies is an invaluable benefit to patients, clinicians, pathologists, and students. Photographic documentation of clinical specimens is essential for the effective practice of pathology. When considering what specimens to photograph, all grossly evident pathology, absent yet expected pathologic features, and gross-only specimens should be thoroughly documented. Specimen preparation prior to photography includes proper lighting and background, wiping surfaces of blood, removing material such as tubes or bandages, orienting the specimen in a logical fashion, framing the specimen to fill the screen, positioning of probes, and using the right-sized scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain pathologies in extreme old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neltner, Janna H; Abner, Erin L; Jicha, Gregory A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Patel, Ela; Poon, Leonard W; Marla, Gearing; Green, Robert C; Davey, Adam; Johnson, Mary Ann; Jazwinski, S Michal; Kim, Sangkyu; Davis, Daron; Woodard, John L; Kryscio, Richard J; Van Eldik, Linda J; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    With an emphasis on evolving concepts in the field, we evaluated neuropathologic data from very old research volunteers whose brain autopsies were performed at the University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center, incorporating data from the Georgia Centenarian Study (n = 49 cases included), Nun Study (n = 17), and University of Kentucky Alzheimer's Disease Center (n = 11) cohorts. Average age of death was 102.0 (range: 98-107) years overall. Alzheimer's disease pathology was not universal (62% with "moderate" or "frequent" neuritic amyloid plaque densities), whereas frontotemporal lobar degeneration was absent. By contrast, some hippocampal neurofibrillary tangles (including primary age-related tauopathy) were observed in every case. Lewy body pathology was seen in 16.9% of subjects and hippocampal sclerosis of aging in 20.8%. We describe anatomic distributions of pigment-laden macrophages, expanded Virchow-Robin spaces, and arteriolosclerosis among Georgia Centenarians. Moderate or severe arteriolosclerosis pathology, throughout the brain, was associated with both hippocampal sclerosis of aging pathology and an ABCC9 gene variant. These results provide fresh insights into the complex cerebral multimorbidity, and a novel genetic risk factor, at the far end of the human aging spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. New developments in digital pathology: from telepathology to virtual pathology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Klaus; Kayser, Gian; Radziszowski, Dominik; Oehmann, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    To analyse the present status and future development of computerized diagnostic pathology in terms of work-flow integrative telepathology and virtual laboratory. Telepathology has left its childhood. The technical development of telepathology is mature, in contrast to that of virtual pathology. Two kinds of virtual pathology laboratories are emerging: a) those with distributed pathologists and distributed (>=1) laboratories associated to individual biopsy stations/surgical theatres, and b) distributed pathologists working in a centralized laboratory. Both are under technical development. Telepathology can be used for e-learning and e-training in pathology, as exemplarily demonstrated on Digital Lung Pathology Pathology (www.pathology-online.org). A virtual pathology institution (mode a) accepts a complete case with the patient's history, clinical findings, and (pre-selected) images for first diagnosis. The diagnostic responsibility is that of a conventional institution. The internet serves as platform for information transfer, and an open server such as the iPATH (http://telepath.patho.unibas.ch) for coordination and performance of the diagnostic procedure. The size of images has to be limited, and usual different magnifications have to be used. A group of pathologists is "on duty", or selects one member for a predefined duty period. The diagnostic statement of the pathologist(s) on duty is retransmitted to the sender with full responsibility. First experiences of a virtual pathology institution group working with the iPATH server (Dr. L. Banach, Dr. G. Haroske, Dr. I. Hurwitz, Dr. K. Kayser, Dr. K.D. Kunze, Dr. M. Oberholzer,) working with a small hospital of the Salomon islands are promising. A centralized virtual pathology institution (mode b) depends upon the digitalisation of a complete slide, and the transfer of large sized images to different pathologists working in one institution. The technical performance of complete slide digitalisation is still under

  14. Pathological gambling: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gambling activities are popular as a form of recreation and have been a source of income for many people worldwide. Although gambling has been common across continents and time, and a subset of individuals experience problems with gambling. This review attempts to provide an overview of problem gambling for clinicians who are likely to encounter such patients in their practice. The review discusses the relevance, nosology, and epidemiology of gambling. We also discuss the associated comorbidities and principles of management of pathological gambling.

  15. [Apoptosis and pathological process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Mukhammed Salim Iusef

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) occurs normally for maitenance of tissue homeostasis and play an important role in morphogenesis, embriogenesis and tissue growth. On the other hand, apoptosis may be involved in different pathological processes such as malignancy, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders. Apoptosis is regulated by various mediators. Caspases, death receptors, mitochondria, Bcl-2 protoncogenes and tumor supressor genes are considered to be the most important of them. Advance in apoptosis regulation research suggests enormouse facilities for therapy of wide range of human illnesses.

  16. Marketing the pathology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, E N

    1995-07-01

    Effective marketing of the pathology practice is essential in the face of an increasingly competitive market. Successful marketing begins with a market-driven planning process. As opposed to the traditional planning process used in health care organizations, a market-driven approach is externally driven. Implementing a market-driven plan also requires recognition of the definition of the service. Each market to which pathologists direct their service defines the service differently. Recognition of these different service definitions and creation of a product to meet these needs could lead to competitive advantages in the marketplace.

  17. Trends and developments in MRI contrast agent research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavagna, F.M.; Dapra, M.; Castelli, P.M.; Maggioni, F.; Kirchin, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The currently prevailing trends in industrial contrast agent research for MRI are discussed. Specific mention is made of contrast agents for liver imaging using both static and delayed procedures, of the potential for blood pool agents and the form such agents may take, and of the ultimate challenge for contrast agent R and D: tissue-targeting in a wider sense to both normal and pathologic tissues. (orig.)

  18. The use of contrast media in computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanski, M.; Cramer, B.M.; Drewes, G.

    1980-01-01

    There are a variety of applications for contrast media in CT. They can be used for better anatomic demonstration or for showing pathological processes. Nearly all available contrast media may be found useful. Intravenously injected renographic contrast media are most commonly employed. In addition to their inherent contrast, specific pharmaco-kinetic changes may be of diagnostic value. This adds some knowledge of function to the purely morphological information obtained by computer tomography. For this purpose, contrast has to be injected rapidly and a fast scanner must be used (so-called angio-CT). (orig.) [de

  19. Fetal MRI of pathological brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, P.C.; Prayer, D.

    2006-01-01

    Because of the superior tissue contrast, high spatial resolution, and multiplanar capabilities, fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict fetal brain pathologies with high accuracy. Pathological fetal brain development may result from malformations or acquired conditions. Differentiation of these etiologies is important with respect to managing the actual pregnancy or counseling future pregnancies. As a widened ventricular system is a common hallmark of both maldevelopment and acquired conditions, it may cause problems in the differential diagnosis. Fetal MRI can provide detailed morphological information, which allows refinement of the diagnosis of ventricular enlargement in a large number of cases. Systematic work-up of morphological details that may be recognized on MR images provides an approach for achieving a correct diagnosis in cases of ventricle enlargement. (orig.) [de

  20. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  1. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  2. Anesthesia and Tau Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Robert A.; Bretteville, Alexis; Dickler, Maya F.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and remains a growing worldwide health problem. As life expectancy continues to increase, the number of AD patients presenting for surgery and anesthesia will steadily rise. The etiology of sporadic AD is thought to be multifactorial, with environmental, biological and genetic factors interacting together to influence AD pathogenesis. Recent reports suggest that general anesthetics may be such a factor and may contribute to the development and exacerbation of this neurodegenerative disorder. Intra-neuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), composed of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau protein are one of the main neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Tau pathology is important in AD as it correlates very well with cognitive dysfunction. Lately, several studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which anesthetic exposure might affect the phosphorylation, aggregation and function of this microtubule-associated protein. Here, we specifically review the literature detailing the impact of anesthetic administration on aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation as well as the subsequent development of neurofibrillary pathology and degeneration. PMID:23535147

  3. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  4. Loss of translation elongation factor (eEF1A2) expression in vivo differentiates between Wallerian degeneration and dying-back neuronal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lyndsay M; Thomson, Derek; Conklin, Annalijn; Wishart, Thomas M; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2008-12-01

    Wallerian degeneration and dying-back pathology are two well-known cellular pathways capable of regulating the breakdown and loss of axonal and synaptic compartments of neurons in vivo. However, the underlying mechanisms and molecular triggers of these pathways remain elusive. Here, we show that loss of translation elongation factor eEF1A2 expression in lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle fibres in homozygous Wasted mice triggered a dying-back neuropathy. Synaptic loss at the neuromuscular junction occurred in advance of axonal pathology and by a mechanism morphologically distinct from Wallerian degeneration. Dying-back pathology in Wasted mice was accompanied by reduced expression levels of the zinc finger protein ZPR1, as found in other dying-back neuropathies such as spinal muscular atrophy. Surprisingly, experimental nerve lesion revealed that Wallerian degeneration was significantly delayed in homozygous Wasted mice; morphological assessment revealed that approximately 80% of neuromuscular junctions in deep lumbrical muscles at 24 h and approximately 50% at 48 h had retained motor nerve terminals following tibial nerve lesion. This was in contrast to wild-type and heterozygous Wasted mice where < 5% of neuromuscular junctions had retained motor nerve terminals at 24 h post-lesion. These data show that eEF1A2 expression is required to prevent the initiation of dying-back pathology at the neuromuscular junction in vivo. In contrast, loss of eEF1A2 expression significantly inhibited the initiation and progression of Wallerian degeneration in vivo. We conclude that loss of eEF1A2 expression distinguishes mechanisms underlying dying-back pathology from those responsible for Wallerian degeneration in vivo and suggest that eEF1A2-dependent cascades may provide novel molecular targets to manipulate neurodegenerative pathways in lower motor neurons.

  5. Coronarography in pathologic morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg, V.D.; Nepomnyashchikh, L.M.; Borodin, Yu.I.

    1987-01-01

    Of many years experience of the authors and data in world literature on post mortal coronarography during the most important general pathological processes in heart have been generalized in the monograph. Problems of radioanatomy of coronary artery were considered and data on use of postmortal coronarography in terms of correlation together with selective in-life coronarography are given. Much place takes the description of main coronarography semiotics of obstructive atherosclerosis injuries of the heart coronal system, compensation and decompensation processes of broken coronary circulation. Results of coronarography investigations in geronitogenesis as well as in sudden death are presented. Electrocardiographic-coronarographic and pathomorphologic parallels, clinical-anatomical diagnostical symptomocomplex - syndrom of menocoronary ''robbing'' are elucidated in detail. Technology of different techniques of postmortal coronarography in order to investigate macro-, microhemocirculation heart bed are described in detail as well as techniques of coronarogramm analysis which permits to use the monograph as a manual

  6. Abdominal and pelvic CT: is positive enteric contrast still necessary? Results of a retrospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammerer, S.; Hoeink, A.J.; Wessling, J.; Schuelke, C.; Heindel, W.; Buerke, B. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Heinzow, H. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases, Muenster (Germany); Koch, R. [University Muenster, Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT depending on the type of enteric contrast agent. Multislice CTs of 2,008 patients with different types of oral preparation (positive with barium, n = 576; neutral with water, n = 716; and no enteric contrast, n = 716) were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists including delineation of intestinal segments and influence on diagnosis and diagnostic reliability exerted by the enteric contrast, using a three-point scale. Furthermore, diagnostic reliability of the delineation of selected enteric pathologies was noted. CT data were assigned into groups: oncology, inflammation, vascular, pathology, trauma and gastrointestinal pathology. Delineation of the bowel was clearly practicable across all segments irrespective of the type of enteric contrast, though a slight impairment was observed without enteric contrast. Although delineation of intestinal pathologies was mostly classified ''clearly delimitable'' more difficulties occurred without oral contrast (neutral/positive/no contrast, 0.8 %/3.8 %/6.5 %). Compared to examinations without enteric contrast, there was a significant improvement in diagnosis that was even increased regarding the reader's diagnostic reliability. Positive opacification impaired detection of mucosal enhancement or intestinal bleeding. Water can replace positive enteric contrast agents in abdominal CTs. However, selected clinical questions require individual enteric contrast preparations. Pathology detection is noticeably impaired without any enteric contrast. circle Neutral oral contrast ensures an equivalent delineation of the bowel. (orig.)

  7. Pathological responses to terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bryant, Richard; Marmar, Charles; Zohar, Joseph

    2005-10-01

    Many important gains have been made in understanding PTSD and other responses to trauma as a result of neuroscience-based observations. Yet there are many gaps in our knowledge that currently impede our ability to predict those who will develop pathologic responses. Such knowledge is essential for developing appropriate strategies for mounting a mental health response in the aftermath of terrorism and for facilitating the recovery of individuals and society. This paper reviews clinical and biological studies that have led to an identification of pathologic responses following psychological trauma, including terrorism, and highlights areas of future-research. It is important to not only determine risk factors for the development of short- and long-term mental health responses to terrorism, but also apply these risk factors to the prediction of such responses on an individual level. It is also critical to consider the full spectrum of responses to terrorism, as well as the interplay between biological and psychological variables that contribute to these responses. Finally, it is essential to remove the barriers to collecting data in the aftermath of trauma by creating a culture of education in which the academic community can communicate to the public what is and is not known so that survivors of trauma and terrorism will understand the value of their participation in research to the generation of useful knowledge, and by maintaining the acquisition of knowledge as a priority for the government and those involved in the immediate delivery of services in the aftermath of large-scale disaster or trauma.

  8. Contrast analysis : A tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.

    2018-01-01

    Contrast analysis is a relatively simple but effective statistical method for testing theoretical predictions about differences between group means against the empirical data. Despite its advantages, contrast analysis is hardly used to date, perhaps because it is not implemented in a convenient

  9. Recommendations for processing cardiovascular surgical pathology specimens: a consensus statement from the Standards and Definitions Committee of the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, James R.; Basso, Cristina; Baandrup, Ulrik T.; Bruneval, Patrick; Butany, Jagdish; Gallagher, Patrick J.; Halushka, Marc K.; Miller, Dylan V.; Padera, Robert F.; Radio, Stanley J.; Sheppard, Mary N.; Suvarna, Kim; Tan, Carmela D.; Thiene, Gaetano; van der Wal, Allard C.; Veinot, John P.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of molecular subclassification of diseases, much consideration should be given to the proper processing of cardiovascular surgical pathology specimens to maximize patient care. Such specimens include endomyocardial biopsies, cardiac myectomy specimens, cardiac apical core segments,

  10. The influence of DNA sequence on epigenome-induced pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagher Richard B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clear cause-and-effect relationships are commonly established between genotype and the inherited risk of acquiring human and plant diseases and aberrant phenotypes. By contrast, few such cause-and-effect relationships are established linking a chromatin structure (that is, the epitype with the transgenerational risk of acquiring a disease or abnormal phenotype. It is not entirely clear how epitypes are inherited from parent to offspring as populations evolve, even though epigenetics is proposed to be fundamental to evolution and the likelihood of acquiring many diseases. This article explores the hypothesis that, for transgenerationally inherited chromatin structures, “genotype predisposes epitype”, and that epitype functions as a modifier of gene expression within the classical central dogma of molecular biology. Evidence for the causal contribution of genotype to inherited epitypes and epigenetic risk comes primarily from two different kinds of studies discussed herein. The first and direct method of research proceeds by the examination of the transgenerational inheritance of epitype and the penetrance of phenotype among genetically related individuals. The second approach identifies epitypes that are duplicated (as DNA sequences are duplicated and evolutionarily conserved among repeated patterns in the DNA sequence. The body of this article summarizes particularly robust examples of these studies from humans, mice, Arabidopsis, and other organisms. The bulk of the data from both areas of research support the hypothesis that genotypes predispose the likelihood of displaying various epitypes, but for only a few classes of epitype. This analysis suggests that renewed efforts are needed in identifying polymorphic DNA sequences that determine variable nucleosome positioning and DNA methylation as the primary cause of inherited epigenome-induced pathologies. By contrast, there is very little evidence that DNA sequence directly

  11. Expectations and essentials for the community practice of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Richard E

    2006-08-01

    In 3 surveys during the past 10 years, community hospital pathologists were asked what they want, need, or look for when employing a pathologist and, more specifically, what skills and knowledge a newly minted pathologist should have to be successful in the community practice of pathology. The most recent survey, done in spring of 2005, cited surgical pathology diagnosis, frozen section diagnosis, gross dissection, cytology, and fine-needle aspiration as essentials in anatomic pathology. For clinical pathology, knowledge of clinical medicine and test strategies that use the laboratory for clinical problem solving was paramount. New expectations in the latest survey were knowledge of molecular pathology and experience in quality assurance procedures. New pathologists generally meet the expectations of the community hospital workplace; however, there were some deficiencies: they were not proficient in gross pathology or autopsy pathology, they were slow, and many lack the clinical knowledge and experience to be effective consultants. The principal attribute that determines success in the practice of pathology, however, is skill in communication and interpersonal relations, and this remains the major deficiency of the fledgling pathologist.

  12. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinck, P.A.; Muller, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r 1 and r 2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T 1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R 1 = 1/T 1 and R 2 = 1/T 2 ) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields. (orig.)

  13. Salivary gland masses. Dynamic MR imaging and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinho; Inoue, Shingo; Ishizuka, Yasuhito; Shindo, Hiroaki; Kawanishi, Masayuki; Kakizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Ebihara, Yoshiro

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of salivary gland masses. We retrospectively examined 19 salivary gland masses that were pathologically diagnosed by surgical operation or biopsy. We obtained T1- and T2-weighted images on MRI, performed dynamic studies on each mass and examined the correlation between enhancement patterns and pathological findings. Four enhancement patterns were recognized on contrast-enhanced MRI: type 1 showed marked, homogeneous enhancement; type 2 slights, homogeneous enhancement; type 3 marginal enhancement; and type 4 poor enhancement of the mass. Most pleomorphic adenomas had a type 1 enhancement pattern, but two had a type 2 pattern. Pathologically, each mass enhancement pattern had different tumor cell and matrix components. Warthin's tumor generally showed the type 4 pattern. Primary malignant tumors of the salivary gland all showed the type 3 pattern, and pathological specimens showed many tumor cells along the marginal portion of the tumor. One inflammatory cyst and one Warthin's tumor also showed the type 3 pattern. Except for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the enhancement patterns of late phase images and dynamic study images were the same. Dynamic MRI added little diagnostic information about salivary gland masses, but the contrast-enhanced MR features correlated well with the pathological findings. (author)

  14. Social cost of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladouceur, R; Boisvert, J M; Pépin, M; Loranger, M; Sylvain, C

    1994-12-01

    Pathological gambling creates enormous problems for the afflicted individuals, their families, employers, and society, and has numerous disastrous financial consequences. The present study evaluates the financial burdens of pathological gambling by questioning pathological gamblers in treatment in Gamblers Anonymous (n=60; 56 males, 4 females; mean age = 40 years old) about personal debts, loss of productivity at work, illegal activities, medical costs and the presence of other dependencies. Results show that important debts, loss of productivity at work and legal problems are associated with pathological gambling. Discussion is formulated in terms of the social cost of adopting a liberal attitude toward the legalization of various gambling activities.

  15. Contrast agents for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemain, B.

    1994-01-01

    Contrast agents MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) have been developed to improve the diagnostic information obtained by this technic. They mainly interact on T1 and T2 parameters and increase consequently normal to abnormal tissues contrast. The paramagnetic agents which mainly act on longitudinal relaxation rate (T1) are gadolinium complexes for which stability is the main parameter to avoid any release of free gadolinium. The superparamagnetic agents that decrease signal intensity by an effect on transversal relaxation rate (T2) are developed for liver, digestive and lymph node imaging. Many area of research are now opened for optimal use of present and future contrast agents in MRI. (author). 28 refs., 4 tabs

  16. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  17. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  18. Abdominal and pelvic CT: is positive enteric contrast still necessary? Results of a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, S; Höink, A J; Wessling, J; Heinzow, H; Koch, R; Schuelke, C; Heindel, W; Buerke, B

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT depending on the type of enteric contrast agent. Multislice CTs of 2,008 patients with different types of oral preparation (positive with barium, n = 576; neutral with water, n = 716; and no enteric contrast, n = 716) were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists including delineation of intestinal segments and influence on diagnosis and diagnostic reliability exerted by the enteric contrast, using a three-point scale. Furthermore, diagnostic reliability of the delineation of selected enteric pathologies was noted. CT data were assigned into groups: oncology, inflammation, vascular, pathology, trauma and gastrointestinal pathology. Delineation of the bowel was clearly practicable across all segments irrespective of the type of enteric contrast, though a slight impairment was observed without enteric contrast. Although delineation of intestinal pathologies was mostly classified "clearly delimitable" more difficulties occurred without oral contrast (neutral/positive/no contrast, 0.8 %/3.8 %/6.5 %). Compared to examinations without enteric contrast, there was a significant improvement in diagnosis that was even increased regarding the reader's diagnostic reliability. Positive opacification impaired detection of mucosal enhancement or intestinal bleeding. Water can replace positive enteric contrast agents in abdominal CTs. However, selected clinical questions require individual enteric contrast preparations. Pathology detection is noticeably impaired without any enteric contrast.

  19. The failed postoperative shoulder: Role of double contrast CT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singson, R.D.; Feldman, F.; Bigliani, L.

    1986-01-01

    Various types of reparative and corrective operations on the shoulder joint are being increasingly undertaken. Defining residual, new, or acutely acquired pathology in the postoperative period is exceedingly difficult because of extensive surgical alterations. Since patients may be symptomatic or recurrently symptomatic postoperatively, judgments must be made regarding the failure of the initial repair, or new superimposed insults. CT double-contrast arthrography, performed in a series of symptomatic patients after shoulder arthroplasty for instability, successfully demonstrated responsible residual or recurrent pathologic processes, including persistent Bankart lesions, glenoid rim fractures, improper hardware placement, and migration of metallic hardware. These and other examples of pathology are illustrated and discussed

  20. Bile cystadenocarcinoma: MRI findings with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Ye Huiyi; Cai Youquan; Ma Lin; Guo Xinggao; Yu Guo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the MRI features and pathologic findings of biliary cystadenocarcinoma (BCAC) and to assess the diagnostic value of MRI in those tumors. Methods: Five cases of BCAC were collected. All cases were proved by pathology. Non-enhanced and multiphase-enhanced MRI were performed in all cases. MRCP were performed in two cases. The MRI features of the five cases were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with pathologic findings. Results: Histological evidence demonstrated five cases of BCAC. Four cases were solitary, whereas the other case was multif0cal. All cases were solid and cystic lesions. Two cases were unilocular, whereas the other three cases were multilocular. Multiple mural nodules and irregular thickening cystic walls were presented in all cases. The cystic parts of the lesions were homogeneous in signal intensity and showed no enhancement after contrast administration in the five BCAC. Septa were present in three BCAC with multilocular cyst. On MRCP the bile duct dilatation was found in two BCAC. Conclusion: MRI can reveal the characteristic findings of BCAC and accurate preoperative diagnosis can be made. (authors)

  1. Forest pathology in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Native Hawaiian forests are characterised by a high degree of endemism, including pathogens as well as their hosts. With the exceptions of koa (Acacia koa Gray), possibly maile (Alyxia oliviformis Gaud.), and, in the past, sandalwood (Santalum spp.), forest species are of little commercial value. On the other hand, these forests are immensely important from a cultural, ecological, and evolutionary standpoint. Forest disease research was lacking during the mid-twentieth century, but increased markedly with the recognition of ohia (Metrosideros polymorpha Gaud.) decline in the 1970s. Because many pathogens are themselves endemic, or are assumed to be, having evolved with their hosts, research emphasis in natural areas is on understanding host-parasite interactions and evolutionary influences, rather than disease control. Aside from management of native forests, attempts at establishing a commercial forest industry have included importation of several species of pine, Araucaria, and Eucalyptus as timber crops, and of numerous ornamentals. Diseases of these species have been introduced with their hosts. The attacking of native species by introduced pathogens is problematic - for example, Armillaria mellea (Vahl ex Fr.) Que??l. on koa and mamane (Sophora chrysophylla (Salisb.) Seem.). Much work remains to be done in both native and commercial aspects of Hawaiian forest pathology.

  2. Generalized Phase Contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  3. Mamografia Espectral de Contraste

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Inês Santiago; Pereira, Inês; Pacheco, Hugo Pisco; Moutinho, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    A mamografia de contraste é uma aplicação recente possível com a mamografia digital directa, que utiliza contraste iodado endovenoso tendo como princípio a neovascularização induzida no cancro da mama, permitindo obter informação morfológica e funcional. Na mamografia espectral de contraste realiza-se uma aquisição simultânea com alta e baixa energia para cada incidência após administração de contraste iodado endovenoso. É depois feita uma imagem recombinada em que são realçadas as áreas que ...

  4. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient’s medical fil...

  5. Indication-related dosing for magnetic resonance contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Parker, J.R.; Carvlin, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews the issue of contrast media dosing and imaging protocols for the optimal MR imaging detection and characterization of pathology. The cumulative clinical experience gained in performing contrast-enhanced MR examinations with gadolinium chelates indicates that a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight provides safe and effective enhancement of most CNS pathology. Doses lower than 0.1 mmol/kg have been shown to be inadequate for delineating all but selected types of CNS pathology, such as masses with a high lesion to background ratio on post-contrast images (acoustic neuromas) or lesions located in areas in which the normal tissue very rapidly takes up contrast agent (e. g. microadenomas in the pituitary gland). Recent clinical studies have suggested a role for high dose gadolinium administration (up to 0.3 mmol/kg) for the optimal detection and delineation of cerebral metastases or other small or poorly enhancing lesions. Differences in the histopathologic characteristics (capillary permeability, vascularity, location, size) of specific diseased tissues may require varying doses or even a different contrast agent to be used for optimal imaging results. As new MR contrast agents and new scanning techniques are introduced, the specific diagnostic question posed will likely determine the choice of pulse sequence, contrast agent and dose used. (orig.)

  6. An experimental study on renal damage induced by ionic contrast media in relation to iodine concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon; Yang, Moon Ho

    1990-01-01

    Renal injury caused by iodinated contrast media has been widely known, but there has been few papers regarding the pathological change. A series of kidneys after injection of iodinated contrast media was examined to document pathological change. A total of 80 rats was divided into two groups; those given Urografin-60% by 5ml/kg; those given Urografin-76% by 5ml/kg. The kidneys were removed out 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 and 21 days after injection of contrast media and microscopically examined. The resulted were as follows: 1. Pathological changes induced by ionic contrast media were deposition of proteinaceous materials in the proximal convoluted tubules, congestion of interstitial vessels, and vasa rectae, and epithelial degeneration of collecting ducts. There was no detectable pathological changes in the glomerulus, loop of Henle, and distal convoluted tubules. 2. All pathological changes were severe, as the concentration of contrast media increased. 3. These pathologic changes appeared 1 day after injection of contrast media and persisted at least 3 weeks without improvement. Author concludes that the renal damage induced by ionic contrast media becomes severe with increase in concentration, and pathologic changes are not influence with time interval

  7. Teaching forensic pathology to undergraduates at Zhongshan School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Wu, Qiu-Ping; Su, Terry; Zhao, Qian-Hao; Yin, Kun; Zheng, Da; Zheng, Jing-Jing; Huang, Lei; Cheng, Jian-Ding

    2018-04-01

    Producing qualified forensic pathological practitioners is a common difficulty around the world. In China, forensic pathology is one of the required major subspecialties for undergraduates majoring in forensic medicine, in contrast to forensic education in Western countries where forensic pathology is often optional. The enduring predicament is that the professional qualities and abilities of forensic students from different institutions vary due to the lack of an efficient forensic pedagogical model. The purpose of this article is to describe the new pedagogical model of forensic pathology at Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, which is characterised by: (a) imparting a broad view of forensic pathology and basic knowledge of duties and tasks in future careers to students; (b) educating students in primary skills on legal and medical issues, as well as advanced forensic pathological techniques; (c) providing students with resources to broaden their professional minds, and opportunities to improve their professional qualities and abilities; and (d) mentoring students on occupational preparation and further forensic education. In the past few years, this model has resulted in numerous notable forensic students accomplishing achievements in forensic practice and forensic scientific research. We therefore expect this pedagogical model to establish the foundation for forensic pathological education and other subspecialties of forensic medicine in China and abroad.

  8. FROM PHYSIOLOGICAL TO PATHOLOGICAL METEOSENSITIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Yabluchanskiy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to the problem of physiological and pathological meteosensitivity (meteodependency or meteopathy.We introduce and discuss the definition for individual meteodependency, define factors, mechanisms, clinical signs, diagnosis, and approaches to prophylaxy and treatment of individual pathological meteosensitivity.

  9. NMR imaging of osteoarticular pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; Gagey, N.

    1987-01-01

    NMR imaging is assuming an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of osteo-articular disorders. Semiological descriptions of the mean pathological disorders of the locomotor system are presented. Some investigation strategies are proposed to compare NMR imaging with other imaging techniques in various pathological states [fr

  10. Podocyte Pathology and Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eMerscher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are components of the lipid rafts in plasma membranes, which are important for proper function of podocytes, a key element of the glomerular filtration barrier. Research revealed an essential role of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites in glomerular disorders of genetic and non-genetic origin. The discovery that glucocerebrosides accumulate in Gaucher disease in glomerular cells and are associated with clinical proteinuria initiated intensive research into the function of other sphingolipids in glomerular disorders. The accumulation of sphingolipids in other genetic diseases including Tay-Sachs, Sandhoff, Fabry, hereditary inclusion body myopathy 2, Niemann-Pick and nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type and its implications with respect to glomerular pathology will be discussed. Similarily, sphingolipid accumulation occurs in glomerular diseases of non-genetic origin including diabetic kidney disease (DKD, HIV-associated nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS and lupus nephritis. Sphingomyelin metabolites, such as ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate have also gained tremendous interest. We recently described that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL3b is expressed in podocytes where it modulates acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase activity and acts as a master modulator of danger signaling. Decreased SMPDL3b expression in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies from transplant recipients with idiopathic FSGS correlates with the recurrence of proteinuria in patients and in experimental models of xenotransplantation. Increased SMPDL3b expression is associated with DKD. The consequences of differential SMPDL3b expression in podocytes in these diseases with respect to their pathogenesis will be discussed. Finally, the role of sphingolipids in the formation of lipid rafts in podocytes and their contribution to the maintenance of a functional slit diaphragm in the glomerulus will be discussed.

  11. Bioinformatics Education in Pathology Training: Current Scope and Future Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Clay

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Training anatomic and clinical pathology residents in the principles of bioinformatics is a challenging endeavor. Most residents receive little to no formal exposure to bioinformatics during medical education, and most of the pathology training is spent interpreting histopathology slides using light microscopy or focused on laboratory regulation, management, and interpretation of discrete laboratory data. At a minimum, residents should be familiar with data structure, data pipelines, data manipulation, and data regulations within clinical laboratories. Fellowship-level training should incorporate advanced principles unique to each subspecialty. Barriers to bioinformatics education include the clinical apprenticeship training model, ill-defined educational milestones, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited exposure during medical training. Online educational resources, case-based learning, and incorporation into molecular genomics education could serve as effective educational strategies. Overall, pathology bioinformatics training can be incorporated into pathology resident curricula, provided there is motivation to incorporate, institutional support, educational resources, and adequate faculty expertise.

  12. Factors involved in cardiac physiological and pathological remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demkes, C.J.

    2018-01-01

    During life, the heart is exposed to different types of stresses. In response to changing demands or stimuli the heart can cope by growing in size. In this thesis, molecular changes underlying cardiac physiological and pathological adaptations are investigated. First, we validated physiological

  13. Overview of silkworm pathology in China | Guo-Ping | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we elaborated the history and progress of studies on silkworm diseases in China through summarizing and reviewing the achievements on silkworm pathology, pathogenic molecular biology, epidemiology, pathogen detection and diagnostic techniques, damage from non-infectious silkworm diseases and ...

  14. Survival benefit with proapoptotic molecular and pathologic responses from dual targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin and epidermal growth factor receptor in a preclinical model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christopher W; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-10-10

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), although rare, often metastasize, such that surgery, the only potentially curative therapy, is not possible. There is no effective systemic therapy for patients with advanced PNETs. Therefore, new strategies are needed. Toward that end, we investigated the potential benefit of dual therapeutic targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases, using a preclinical mouse model of PNET. Rapamycin and erlotinib, inhibitors of mTOR and EGFR, respectively, were used to treat RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice bearing advanced multifocal PNET. Tumor growth and survival were monitored, and tumors were surveyed for potential biomarkers of response to the therapeutics. Rapamycin monotherapy was notably efficacious, prolonging survival concomitant with tumor stasis (stable disease). However, the tumors developed resistance, as evidenced by eventual relapse to progressive tumor growth. Erlotinib monotherapy slowed tumor growth and elicited a marginal survival benefit. In combination, there was an unprecedented survival benefit in the face of this aggressive multifocal cancer and, in contrast to either monotherapy, the development of adaptive resistance was not apparent. Additionally, the antiapoptotic protein survivin was implicated as a biomarker of sensitivity and beneficial responses to the dual targeted therapy. Preclinical trials in a mouse model of endogenous PNET suggest that combined targeting of the mTOR and EGFR signaling pathways could have potential clinical benefit in treating PNET. These results have encouraged development of an ongoing phase II clinical trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment regimen in human neuroendocrine tumors.

  15. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Fuentes Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient’s medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test.

  16. Molecular partners of hNOT/ALG3, the human counterpart of the Drosophila NOT and yeast ALG3 gene, suggest its involvement in distinct cellular processes relevant to congenital disorders of glycosylation, cancer, neurodegeneration and a variety of further pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Benedikt; Schultheiß, Christoph; Döring, Michael; Kurzik-Dumke, Ursula

    2018-06-01

    This study provides first insights into the involvement of hNOT/ALG3, the human counterpart of the Drosophila Neighbour of TID and yeast ALG3 gene, in various putative molecular networks. HNOT/ALG3 encodes two translated transcripts encoding precursor proteins differing in their N-terminus and showing 33% identity with the yeast asparagine-linked glycosylation 3 (ALG3) protein. Experimental evidence for the functional homology of the proteins of fly and man in the N-glycosylation has still to be provided. In this study, using the yeast two-hybrid technique we identify 17 molecular partners of hNOT-1/ALG3-1. We disclose the building of hNOT/ALG3 homodimers and provide experimental evidence for its in vivo interaction with the functionally linked proteins OSBP, OSBPL9 and LRP1, the SYPL1 protein and the transcription factor CREB3. Regarding the latter, we show that the 55 kDa N-glycosylated hNOT-1/ALG3-1 molecule binds the N-glycosylated CREB3 precursor but does not interact with CREB3's proteolytic products specific to the endoplasmic reticulum and to the nucleus. The interaction between the two partners is a prerequisite for the proteolytic activation of CREB3. In case of the further binding partners, our data suggest that hNOT-1/ALG3-1 interacts with both OSBPs and with their direct targets LRP1 and VAMP/VAP-A. Moreover, our results show that various partners of hNOT-1/ALG3-1 interact with its diverse post translationally processed products destined to distinct cellular compartments. Generally, our data suggest the involvement of hNOT-1/ALG3-1 in various molecular contexts determining essential processes associated with distinct cellular machineries and related to various pathologies, such as cancer, viral infections, neuronal and immunological disorders and CDG.

  17. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management. © 2013.

  18. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvatico, Rosana; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Yanez, Paulina; Romero, Carlos; Trejo, Mariano; Lambre, Hector

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author) [es

  19. Contrast media: future aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinmann, H.J.; Platzek, J.; Schirmer, H.; Pietsch, H.; Carretero, J.; Harto, J.; Medina, J.; Riefke, B.; Martin, J.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of the dramatic development in CT, there was no major breakthrough in the iodinated contrast media development. New agents based on hybrid between MRI and CT compounds may be a new innovative alternative. This new approach may also open new indications such as radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Roentgen contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamborski, C.

    1989-01-01

    The patent deals with a roentgen contrast medium containing a perfluorinebrominealkylether of the formula C m F 2m+1 OC n F 2n Br dispersed in water, preferentially in the presence of a non-ionic dispersing agent such as a fluorinated amidoaminoxide. 2 tabs

  1. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 μmol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author)

  2. Slot Machine Response Frequency Predicts Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnet, Jakob; Rømer Thomsen, Kristine; Møller, Arne

    2013-01-01

    . This study tested the hypothesis that response frequency is associated with symptom severity in pathological gambling. We tested response frequency among twenty-two pathological gambling sufferers and twenty-one non-problem gamblers on a commercially available slot machine, and screened for pathological...... in individuals with exacerbated pathological gambling symptoms. These findings may have important implications for detecting behaviors underlying pathological gambling....

  3. Systems pathology: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jose

    2012-02-01

    The technological advances of the last twenty years together with the dramatic increase in computational power have injected new life into systems-level thinking in Medicine. This review emphasizes the close relationship of Systems Pathology to Systems Biology and delineates the differences between Systems Pathology and Clinical Systems Pathology. It also suggests an algorithm to support the application of systems-level thinking to clinical research, proposes applying systems-level thinking to the health care systems and forecasts an acceleration of preventive medicine as a result of the coupling of personal genomics with systems pathology. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral Pathology in Forensic Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2018-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the subdiscipline of dentistry which analyses dental evidence in the interest of justice. Oral pathology is the subdiscipline of dentistry that deals with the pathology affecting the oral and maxillofacial regions. This subdiscipline is utilized for identification through oral and maxillofacial pathologies with associated syndromes, enamel rod patterns, sex determination using exfoliative cytology, identification from occlusal morphology of teeth, and deoxyribonucleic acid profiling from teeth. This subdiscipline is also utilized for age estimation studies which include Gustafson's method, incremental lines of Retzius, perikymata, natal line formation in teeth, neonatal line, racemization of collagen in dentin, cemental incremental lines, thickness of the cementum, and translucency of dentin. Even though the expertise of an oral pathologist is not taken in forensic investigations, this paper aims to discuss the role of oral pathology in forensic investigation.

  5. The Geropathology Research Network: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Integrating Pathology Into Research on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiges, Warren; Ikeno, Yuji; Niedernhofer, Laura; McIndoe, Richard A; Ciol, Marcia A; Ritchey, Jerry; Liggitt, Denny

    2016-04-01

    Geropathology is the study of aging and age-related lesions and diseases in the form of whole necropsies/autopsies, surgical biopsies, histology, and molecular biomarkers. It encompasses multiple subspecialties of geriatrics, anatomic pathology, molecular pathology, clinical pathology, and gerontology. In order to increase the consistency and scope of communication in the histologic and molecular pathology assessment of tissues from preclinical and clinical aging studies, a Geropathology Research Network has been established consisting of pathologists and scientists with expertise in the comparative pathology of aging, the design of aging research studies, biostatistical methods for analysis of aging data, and bioinformatics for compiling and annotating large sets of data generated from aging studies. The network provides an environment to promote learning and exchange of scientific information and ideas for the aging research community through a series of symposia, the development of uniform ways of integrating pathology into aging studies, and the statistical analysis of pathology data. The efforts of the network are ultimately expected to lead to a refined set of sentinel biomarkers of molecular and anatomic pathology that could be incorporated into preclinical and clinical aging intervention studies to increase the relevance and productivity of these types of investigations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Stroop performance in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzman, Semion; Lowengrub, Katherine; Aizer, Anat; Nahum, Zeev Ben; Kotler, Moshe; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2006-05-30

    Pathological gambling is a relatively prevalent psychiatric disorder that typically leads to severe family, social, legal, and occupational problems and is associated with a high rate of suicide attempts. Understanding the neurobiological basis of pathological gambling is a current focus of research, and emerging data have demonstrated that pathological gamblers may have impaired decision-making because of an inability to inhibit irrelevant information. In this study, we examined pathological gamblers by using the Stroop Color-Word Test, a neurocognitive task used to assess interference control. The "reverse" variant of the Stroop Color-Word Test was administered to a cohort of medication-free pathological gamblers (n=62) and a cohort of age-matched controls (n=83). In the reverse variant of the Stroop task, subjects are asked to read the meaning of the word rather than name the ink color. The reverse Stroop task was chosen because it highly discriminates ability to inhibit interference in a population of psychiatric patients. In our study, performance on the reverse Stroop task in the pathological gamblers was significantly slower and less accurate than in the healthy subjects. A new finding in our study was that for pathological gamblers, the average reaction time in the neutral condition (where the color names are displayed in black letters) was slower than the average reaction time in the incongruent condition (where the meaning of the color name and the color of the printed letters are different). This controlled study extends previous findings by showing that performance on the Stroop task is impaired in a sample of medication-free pathological gamblers.

  7. Profile of the pathological gambler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, R L

    1984-12-01

    Pathological (compulsive) gambling is a serious emotional and social problem that has existed for centuries but has only recently been recognized as a distinct diagnostic entity that can be effectively treated. The development and progression of pathological gambling are outlined. The progression of the disorder through three identifiable phases leads to predictable complications. The treatment of the gambler within the framework of Gamblers Anonymous and/or by mental health professionals is described.

  8. Late radiation pathology of mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, S N

    1982-01-01

    The comprehensive monograph on delayed radiation effects in mammals including man comprises 3 main chapters dealing with non-neoplastic as well as neoplastic manifestations of late radiation pathology, with the prophylaxis of delayed radiation effects, and with the therapy of radiation injuries. Alterations induced by whole-body irradiation and delayed radiation effects caused by partial body irradiation are described in detail. The developmental mechanisms and pathogenesis of non-neoplastic pathological changes and of radiation-induced neoplasms are elaborated.

  9. Imaging of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Ngan, Bo Yee; Gundogan, Munire; Daneman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging findings for congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN) and two main pathological variants: classic and cellular. To determine whether imaging findings in children can predict the likely pathological variant. We reviewed imaging in children with pathology-proven CMN. Imaging findings correlated with gross and histological appearance. In 15 boys and 15 girls with CMN, US was performed in 27, CT in 19, and MRI in 7. Cystic components were readily identified on US; central hemorrhage was better differentiated on CT. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for both. Histology confirmed classic CMN in 13 children, cellular CMN in 14 and ''mixed'' CMN in 3. Age at presentation was significantly higher in children with the cellular variant. Of 15 solid or predominantly solid tumors and 10 lesions with a hypoechoic ring, 12 and 7, respectively, had pathology consistent with classic CMN. In contrast, five of seven with intratumoral hemorrhage and all with a large cystic/necrotic component had pathology consistent with the cellular variant. The imaging appearance of CMN is often determined by the pathological type of tumor. Findings suggestive of the classic variant include a peripheral hypoechoic ring or large solid component. In comparison, cystic/necrotic change and hemorrhage is much more common in cellular CMN. (orig.)

  10. Prolonged retainment of contrast media in renal tumours by oily X-ray contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzkov, V.K.; Anisimov, V.N.

    1990-01-01

    In 194 patients with renal tumours an angiographic investigation with the oily X-ray contrast medium Iodolipol was carried out. A selective tropism of oily X-ray contrast media was found in the malignant zones only. The application of the preparation caused no complications. The oily X-ray contrast medium persisted in the tumours over several weeks or months. After embolization of the renal arteria a moderate size reduction of malign tumours in the first 10-14 d was seen. The ability of Iodolipol for a lasting retainment in malign tumour tissue allows a follow-up of the involution of the pathologic focus after arterial embolization of the tumour vessels. (author)

  11. Mamografia com contraste

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Rita; Silva, Carina; Reis, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    O estudo pretendeu apresentar as indicações clínicas, vantagens e princípios da mamografia com contraste, identificar as evoluyções tecnológicas para a mamografia com contraste e caracterizar as práticas e os desafios dos técnicos de radiologia do Hospital de Santarém (único no país a utilizar esta técnica). O cancro da mama é uma das principais causas de morte nas mulheres, em todo o mundo, mas principalmente nos Estados Unidos da América, Canadá, Europa Ocidental e Austrália. Em Portugal, e...

  12. Current iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.

    2001-01-01

    The number of scientific papers on iodinated contrast media is declining. Indeed, comparative trials between high-osmolality and low-osmolality agents largely showed the higher safety and tolerability of the latter, and this is no longer a matter of discussion. Only financial constraints could prevent a total conversion to low-osmolality agents. Research comparing low-osmolality (nonionic monomers, ionic dimer) and iso-osmolality contrast media (nonionic dimers) are still ongoing. Both classes of nonionic compounds proved safer than the ionic dimer. The relative merits of nonionic monomers and nonionic dimers are a matter for debate, and criteria for a selective use of different agents for different procedures could be discussed. (orig.)

  13. The contrasting roles of inflammasomes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qin; Fu, Yu; Tian, Dean; Yan, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a decisive role at different stages of cancer development. Inflammasomes are oligomeric protein complexes activated in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). PAMPs and DAMPs are released from infected cells, tumors and damaged tissues. Inflammasomes activate and release inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18. The various inflammasomes and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines play contrasting roles in cancer development and progression. In this review, we describe the roles of different inflammasomes in lung, breast, gastric, liver, colon, and prostate cancers and in glioblastomas.

  14. Genetics and pathological mechanisms of Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Denise; Liu, Xue Z

    2010-06-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) comprises a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by a dual sensory impairment of the audiovestibular and visual systems. Three major clinical subtypes (USH type I, USH type II and USH type III) are distinguished on the basis of the severity of the hearing loss, the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Since the cloning of the first USH gene (MYO7A) in 1995, there have been remarkable advances in elucidating the genetic basis for this disorder, as evidence for 11 distinct loci have been obtained and genes for 9 of them have been identified. The USH genes encode proteins of different classes and families, including motor proteins, scaffold proteins, cell adhesion molecules and transmembrane receptor proteins. Extensive information has emerged from mouse models and molecular studies regarding pathogenesis of this disorder and the wide phenotypic variation in both audiovestibular and/or visual function. A unifying hypothesis is that the USH proteins are integrated into a protein network that regulates hair bundle morphogenesis in the inner ear. This review addresses genetics and pathological mechanisms of USH. Understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic variation and pathogenesis of USH is important toward discovery of new molecular targets for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of this debilitating disorder.

  15. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm 2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  16. Diagnostic value of delayed washout rate of contrast-enhanced multi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rania Essameldein Mohamed

    2013-12-18

    Dec 18, 2013 ... On the other hand, CT contrast washout rate tests are more useful ..... with multidetector CT: pathologic conditions, pearls, and pitfalls. RadioGraphics 2009 ... advances in genetics, diagnosis, localization and treatment.

  17. Phase-contrast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momose, Atsushi [Hitachi Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Advanced Research Laboratory; Takeda, Tohoru; Itai, Yuji

    1995-12-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) enabling the observation of biological soft tissues without contrast enhancement has been developed. The X-ray phase shift caused by an object is measured and input to a standard CT reconstruction algorithm. A thousand times increase in the image sensitivity to soft tissues is achieved compared with the conventional CT using absorption contrast. This is because the X-ray phase shift cross section of light elements is about a thousand times larger than the absorption cross section. The phase shift is detected using an X-ray interferometer and computer analyses of interference patterns. Experiments were performed using a synchrotron X-ray source. Excellent image sensitivity is demonstrated in the observation of cancerous rabbit liver. The CT images distinguish cancer lesion from normal liver tissue and, moreover, visualize the pathological condition in the lesion. Although the X-ray energy employed and the present observation area size are not suitable for medical applications as they are, phase-contrast X-ray CT is promising for investigating the internal structure of soft tissue which is almost transparent for X-rays. The high sensitivity also provides the advantage of reducing X-ray doses. (author).

  18. The pathology and pathophysiology of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Raj N

    2017-12-19

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is widely recognised as the second most common type of dementia. Consensus and accurate diagnosis of clinically suspected VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures in life but more importantly pathological confirmation. Factors defining subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes as well as time after the initial vascular event. Atherosclerotic and cardioembolic diseases combined appear the most common subtypes of vascular brain injury. In recent years, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) has gained prominence worldwide as an important substrate of cognitive impairment. SVD is characterised by arteriolosclerosis, lacunar infarcts and cortical and subcortical microinfarcts and diffuse white matter changes, which involve myelin loss and axonal abnormalities. Global brain atrophy and focal degeneration of the cerebrum including medial temporal lobe atrophy are also features of VaD similar to Alzheimer's disease. Hereditary arteriopathies have provided insights into the mechanisms of dementia particularly how arteriolosclerosis, a major contributor of SVD promotes cognitive impairment. Recently developed and validated neuropathology guidelines indicated that the best predictors of vascular cognitive impairment were small or lacunar infarcts, microinfarcts, perivascular space dilation, myelin loss, arteriolosclerosis and leptomeningeal cerebral amyloid angiopathy. While these substrates do not suggest high specificity, VaD is likely defined by key neuronal and dendro-synaptic changes resulting in executive dysfunction and related cognitive deficits. Greater understanding of the molecular pathology is needed to clearly define microvascular disease and vascular substrates of dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pathological gambling: a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Larry L; Boehlke, Karmen K

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the course of history, gambling has been a popular activity across most cultures. In the United States, gambling has transitioned from early acceptance to prohibition to widespread proliferation. For most, gambling is a relaxing and recreational activity; however, for some individuals gambling becomes more than harmless fun. The most severe form of gambling, pathological gambling, is recognized as a mental health disorder. Pathological gambling is currently classified as an impulse control disorder in the DSM-IV-TR, but it shares many important features with substance use disorders, especially in terms of diagnostic criteria, clinical course, and treatment. Consequently, the DSM-V Task Force has suggested that pathological gambling be reclassified and included in a new category entitled "Addiction and Related Disorders." The category would include both substance-related and non-substance/behavioral addictions. This article provides a general overview of some of the available literature regarding pathological gambling and includes the presentation of a number of relevant topics including etiology, risk factors, comorbidity, prevention, and treatment. However, as with most complex, multifaceted, and multidimensional phenomena, more research is needed in order to improve both prevention and treatment efforts for pathological gambling.

  20. Contrast Invariant SNR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Pierre; Escande, Paul; Dong, Yiqiu

    We design an image quality measure independent of local contrast changes, which constitute simple models of illumination changes. Given two images, the algorithm provides the image closest to the first one with the component tree of the second. This problem can be cast as a specific convex progra...... algorithms based on interior point methods. The algorithm has potential applications in change detection, color image processing or image fusion. A Matlab implementation is available at http://www.math.univ-toulouse.fr/_weiss/PageCodes.html....

  1. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurelien; Docagne, Fabian; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric; Macrez, Richard; Defer, Gilles; Raynaud, Jean-Sebastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  2. [Role of contemporary pathological diagnostics in the personalized treatment of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tímár, József

    2013-03-01

    Due to the developments of pathology in the past decades (immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology) classification of cancers changed fundamentally, laying a ground for personalized management of cancer patients. Our picture of cancer is more complex today, identifying the genetic basis of the morphological variants. On the other hand, this picture has a much higher resolution enabling us to subclassify similar histological cancer types based on molecular markers. This redefined classification of cancers helps us to better predict the possible biological behavior of the disease and/or the therapeutic sensitivity, opening the way toward a more personalized treatment of this disease. The redefined molecular classification of cancer may affect the universal application of treatment protocols. To achieve this goal molecular diagnostics must be an integral and reimbursed part of the routine pathological diagnostics. On the other hand, it is time to extend the multidisciplinary team with molecular pathologist to improve the decision making process of the management of cancer patients.

  3. Protection by neuroglobin expression in brain pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Baez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play an important role in physiological, metabolic and structural functions and, when impaired, they can be involved in various pathologies including Alzheimer, focal ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. These disorders involve an imbalance in the blood flow and nutrients such as glucose and lactacte, leading to biochemical and molecular changes that cause neuronal damage, which is followed by loss of cognitive and motor functions. Previous studies have shown that astrocytes are more resilient than neurons during brain insults as a consequence of their more effective antioxidant systems, transporters and enzymes, which made them less susceptible to excitotoxicity. In addition, astrocytes synthesize and release different protective molecules for neurons, including neuroglobin, a member of the globin family of proteins. After brain injury neuroglobin expression is induced in astrocytes. Since neuroglobin promotes neuronal survival, its increased expression in astrocytes after brain injury may represent an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Here, we review the role of neuroglobin in the CNS, its relationship with different pathologies, and the role of different factors that regulate its expression in astrocytes.

  4. Update on pathology of ocular parasitic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Ramachandra, Varsha; Islam, Saidul; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Koul, Akanksha; Deka, Panna; Deka, Apurba

    2016-11-01

    Parasites are a group of eukaryotic organisms that may be free-living or form a symbiotic or parasitic relationship with the hosts. Consisting of over 800,000 recognized species, parasites may be unicellular (Protozoa) or multicellular (helminths and arthropods). The association of parasites with human population started long before the emergence of civilization. Parasitic zoonotic diseases are prevalent worldwide including India. Appropriate epidemiological data are lacking on existing zoonotic parasitic diseases, and newer diseases are emerging in our scenario. Systemic diseases such as cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, hydatidosis, and toxoplasmosis are fairly common. Acquired Toxoplasma infections are rising in immune-deficient individuals. Amongst the ocular parasitic diseases, various protozoas such as Cystoidea, trematodes, tissue flagellates, sporozoas etc. affect humans in general and eyes in particular, in different parts of the world. These zoonoses seem to be a real health related problem globally. Recent intensification of research throughout the world has led to specialization in biological fields, creating a conducive situation for researchers interested in this subject. The basics of parasitology lie in morphology, pathology, and with recent updates in molecular parasitology, the scope has extended further. The current review is to address the recent update in ophthalmic parasites with special reference to pathology and give a glimpse of further research in this field.

  5. Update on pathology of ocular parasitic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are a group of eukaryotic organisms that may be free-living or form a symbiotic or parasitic relationship with the hosts. Consisting of over 800,000 recognized species, parasites may be unicellular (Protozoa or multicellular (helminths and arthropods. The association of parasites with human population started long before the emergence of civilization. Parasitic zoonotic diseases are prevalent worldwide including India. Appropriate epidemiological data are lacking on existing zoonotic parasitic diseases, and newer diseases are emerging in our scenario. Systemic diseases such as cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, hydatidosis, and toxoplasmosis are fairly common. Acquired Toxoplasma infections are rising in immune-deficient individuals. Amongst the ocular parasitic diseases, various protozoas such as Cystoidea, trematodes, tissue flagellates, sporozoas etc. affect humans in general and eyes in particular, in different parts of the world. These zoonoses seem to be a real health related problem globally. Recent intensification of research throughout the world has led to specialization in biological fields, creating a conducive situation for researchers interested in this subject. The basics of parasitology lie in morphology, pathology, and with recent updates in molecular parasitology, the scope has extended further. The current review is to address the recent update in ophthalmic parasites with special reference to pathology and give a glimpse of further research in this field.

  6. Practicing pathology in the era of big data and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiang; Taylor, Clive R

    2014-01-01

    The traditional task of the pathologist is to assist physicians in making the correct diagnosis of diseases at the earliest possible stage to effectuate the optimal treatment strategy for each individual patient. In this respect surgical pathology (the traditional tissue diagnosis) is but a tool. It is not, of itself, the purpose of pathology practice; and change is in the air. This January 2014 issue of Applied Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Morphology (AIMM) embraces that change by the incorporation of the agenda and content of the journal Diagnostic Molecular Morphology (DMP). Over a decade ago AIMM introduced and promoted the concept of "molecular morphology," and has sought to publish molecular studies that correlate with the morphologic features that continue to define cancer and many diseases. That intent is now reinforced and extended by the merger with DMP, as a logical and timely response to the growing impact of a wide range of genetic and molecular technologies that are beginning to reshape the way in which pathology is practiced. The use of molecular and genomic techniques already demonstrates clear value in the diagnosis of disease, with treatment tailored specifically to individual patients. Personalized medicine is the future, and personalized medicine demands personalized pathology. The need for integration of the flood of new molecular data, with surgical pathology, digital pathology, and the full range of pathology data in the electronic medical record has never been greater. This review describes the possible impact of these pressures upon the discipline of pathology, and examines possible outcomes. There is a sense of excitement and adventure. Active adaption and innovation are required. The new AIMM, incorporating DMP, seeks to position itself for a central role in this process.

  7. Molecular diversity of α-gliadin expressed genes in genetically contrasted spelt (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta) accessions and comparison with bread wheat (T. aestivum ssp. aestivum) and related diploid Triticum and Aegilops species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Benjamin; Bertin, Pierre; Mingeot, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The gluten proteins of cereals such as bread wheat ( Triticum aestivum ssp. aestivum ) and spelt ( T. aestivum ssp. spelta ) are responsible for celiac disease (CD). The α-gliadins constitute the most immunogenic class of gluten proteins as they include four main T-cell stimulatory epitopes that affect CD patients. Spelt has been less studied than bread wheat and could constitute a source of valuable diversity. The objective of this work was to study the genetic diversity of spelt α-gliadin transcripts and to compare it with those of bread wheat. Genotyping data from 85 spelt accessions obtained with 19 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to select 11 contrasted accessions, from which 446 full open reading frame α-gliadin genes were cloned and sequenced, which revealed a high allelic diversity. High variations among the accessions were highlighted, in terms of the proportion of α-gliadin sequences from each of the three genomes (A, B and D), and their composition in the four T-cell stimulatory epitopes. An accession from Tajikistan stood out, having a particularly high proportion of α-gliadins from the B genome and a low immunogenic content. Even if no clear separation between spelt and bread wheat sequences was shown, spelt α-gliadins displayed specific features concerning e.g. the frequencies of some amino acid substitutions. Given this observation and the variations in toxicity revealed in the spelt accessions in this study, the high genetic diversity held in spelt germplasm collections could be a valuable resource in the development of safer varieties for CD patients.

  8. The forgotten organ: Contrast enhanced sonography of the spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerg, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Ultrasound contrast agents in conjunction with contrast specific imaging techniques, are increasingly accepted in clinical use for diagnostic imaging in several organs. Contrast enhanced sonography (CES) of second-generation contrast media have shown a spleen-specific uptake of the microbubble contrast agent. The aim of this review is to illustrate indications for the use of CES in patients with suspected (peri-)splenic pathology. Methods: This review based on the experience of transcutaneous CES in 200 patients with (peri-)splenic pathology diagnosed by B-mode sonography at an internal medicine center. CES studies were performed with a contrast-devoted unit (Acuson, Sequoia, Siemens medical solution) that had contrast-specific, continuous-mode software. A low mechanical index was used. A sulfur hexafluoride-based microbubble contrast medium (Sonovue, Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy) was injected. Results: On our experience, there are several clinical conditions which may show an diagnostic advantage of CES in comparison to B-mode US. CES should be performed to investigate: (1) the perisplenic tumor to diagnose or exclude accessory spleen, (2) the small-sized spleen to diagnose functional asplenia/hyposplenia, (3) the inhomogenous spleen of unknown cause to diagnose focal lesions within the spleen, (4) the incidentally found hypoechoic splenic tumor to diagnose high vascular splenic hemangioma, (5) focal lesions suspect for splenic abscess, hematoma, infarction to confirme diagnosis, and (6) patients with abdominal trauma to diagnose or exclude splenic injuriy. Conclusion: CES is of diagnostic value in several clinical circumstances to diagnose accessory spleen, functional asplenia, small-sized splenic involvement, high vascular splenic hemangioma, and vascular splenic pathology like splenic infarction, splenic abscess, and splenic laceration

  9. The forgotten organ: Contrast enhanced sonography of the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerg, Christian [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg/Lahn (Germany)], E-mail: goergc@med.uni-marburg.de

    2007-11-15

    Objective: Ultrasound contrast agents in conjunction with contrast specific imaging techniques, are increasingly accepted in clinical use for diagnostic imaging in several organs. Contrast enhanced sonography (CES) of second-generation contrast media have shown a spleen-specific uptake of the microbubble contrast agent. The aim of this review is to illustrate indications for the use of CES in patients with suspected (peri-)splenic pathology. Methods: This review based on the experience of transcutaneous CES in 200 patients with (peri-)splenic pathology diagnosed by B-mode sonography at an internal medicine center. CES studies were performed with a contrast-devoted unit (Acuson, Sequoia, Siemens medical solution) that had contrast-specific, continuous-mode software. A low mechanical index was used. A sulfur hexafluoride-based microbubble contrast medium (Sonovue, Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy) was injected. Results: On our experience, there are several clinical conditions which may show an diagnostic advantage of CES in comparison to B-mode US. CES should be performed to investigate: (1) the perisplenic tumor to diagnose or exclude accessory spleen, (2) the small-sized spleen to diagnose functional asplenia/hyposplenia, (3) the inhomogenous spleen of unknown cause to diagnose focal lesions within the spleen, (4) the incidentally found hypoechoic splenic tumor to diagnose high vascular splenic hemangioma, (5) focal lesions suspect for splenic abscess, hematoma, infarction to confirme diagnosis, and (6) patients with abdominal trauma to diagnose or exclude splenic injuriy. Conclusion: CES is of diagnostic value in several clinical circumstances to diagnose accessory spleen, functional asplenia, small-sized splenic involvement, high vascular splenic hemangioma, and vascular splenic pathology like splenic infarction, splenic abscess, and splenic laceration.

  10. Robust Nucleus/Cell Detection and Segmentation in Digital Pathology and Microscopy Images: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fuyong; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Digital pathology and microscopy image analysis is widely used for comprehensive studies of cell morphology or tissue structure. Manual assessment is labor intensive and prone to inter-observer variations. Computer-aided methods, which can significantly improve the objectivity and reproducibility, have attracted a great deal of interest in recent literatures. Among the pipeline of building a computer-aided diagnosis system, nucleus or cell detection and segmentation play a very important role to describe the molecular morphological information. In the past few decades, many efforts have been devoted to automated nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the recent state-of-the-art nucleus/cell segmentation approaches on different types of microscopy images including bright-field, phase-contrast, differential interference contrast (DIC), fluorescence, and electron microscopies. In addition, we discuss the challenges for the current methods and the potential future work of nucleus/cell detection and segmentation. PMID:26742143

  11. Laboratory Information Systems in Molecular Diagnostics: Why Molecular Diagnostics Data are Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roy E; Henricks, Walter H; Sirintrapun, Sahussapont J

    2016-03-01

    Molecular diagnostic testing presents new challenges to information management that are yet to be sufficiently addressed by currently available information systems for the molecular laboratory. These challenges relate to unique aspects of molecular genetic testing: molecular test ordering, informed consent issues, diverse specimen types that encompass the full breadth of specimens handled by traditional anatomic and clinical pathology information systems, data structures and data elements specific to molecular testing, varied testing workflows and protocols, diverse instrument outputs, unique needs and requirements of molecular test reporting, and nuances related to the dissemination of molecular pathology test reports. By satisfactorily addressing these needs in molecular test data management, a laboratory information system designed for the unique needs of molecular diagnostics presents a compelling reason to migrate away from the current paper and spreadsheet information management that many molecular laboratories currently use. This paper reviews the issues and challenges of information management in the molecular diagnostics laboratory.

  12. Pathological Gambling in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Mette Buhl; Linnet, Jakob; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer

    Pathological Gambling in Parkinson’s Disease Mette Buhl Callesen, Jakob Linnet, Kristine Rømer Thomsen, Albert Gjedde, Arne Møller PET Center, Aarhus University Hospital and Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University.   The neurotransmitter dopamine is central to many...... aspects of human functioning, e.g., reward, learning, and addiction, including Pathological Gambling (PG), and its loss is key to Parkinson’s Disease (PD). PD is a neurodegenrative disorder caused by progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the midbrain [1]. One type of treatment of PD symptoms...

  13. Prokaryotic degradation of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter in the deep-sea waters of NW Mediterranean Sea under in situ temperature and pressure conditions during contrasted hydrological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, C.; Boutrif, M.; Garel, M.; Sempéré, R.; Repeta, D.; Charriere, B.; Nerini, D.; Panagiotopoulos, C.

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of the semi-labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the global prokaryotic production has been assessed in very few previous studies. Some experiments show rapid utilization of semi-reactive DOC by prokaryotes, while other experiments show almost no utilization at all. However, all these studies did not take into account the role of hydrostatic pressure for the degradation of organic matter. In this study, we investigate (1) the degradation of "natural" high molecular weight DOM HMW-DOM (obtained after ultrafiltration) and (2) the uptake of labeled extracellular polymeric substances (3H-EPS) incubated with deep-sea water samples (2000 m-depth, NW Mediterranean Sea) under in situ pressure conditions (HP) and under atmospheric compression after decompression of the deep samples (ATM) during stratified and mixed water conditions (deep sea convection). Our results indicated that during HP incubations DOC exhibited the highest degradation rates (kHP DOC = 0.82 d-1) compared to the ATM conditions were no or few degradation was observed (kATM DOC= 0.007 d-1). An opposite trend was observed for the HP incubations from mixed deep water masses. HP incubation measurements displayed the lowest DOC degradation (kHP DOC=0.031 d-1) compared to the ATM conditions (kATM DOC=0.62 d-1). These results imply the presence of allochthonous prokaryotic cells in deep-sea samples after a winter water mass convection. Same trends were found using 3H-EPS uptake rates which were higher at HP than at ATM conditions during stratified period conditions whereas the opposite patterns were observed during deep-sea convection event. Moreover, we found than Euryarchaea were the main contributors to 3H-EPS assimilation at 2000m-depth, representing 58% of the total cells actively assimilating 3H-EPS. This study demonstrates that remineralization rates of semi-labile DOC in deep NW Med. Sea are controlled by the prokaryotic communities, which are influenced by the hydrological

  14. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...... phasors attain predetermined values for predetermined spatial frequencies, and the phasor value of the specific resolution element of the spatial phase mask corresponds to a distinct intensity level of the image of the resolution element in the intensity pattern, and a spatial phase filter for phase...... shifting of a part of the electromagntic radiation, in combination with an imaging system for generation of the intensity pattern by interference in the image plane of the imaging system between the part of the electromagnetic raidation that has been phase shifted by the phase filter and the remaining part...

  15. Paramagnetic contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Paramagnetic contrast materials have certainly demonstrated clinical utility in a variety of organ systems for improved detection of various neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and physiologic abnormalities. Although the more commonly employed extracellular agents, such as Gd-DTPA, have been quite safe and useful, particularly in the CNS, it is almost certain that other substances will achieve more success in various other organs, such as iron oxides in the reticuloendothelial system and persisting extracellular agents in the cardiovascular system. Finally, as MRI technology continues to evolve, producing such exciting new sequences as gradient-echo fast scans, the roles of currently existing and newly discovered paramagnetic pharmaceuticals must be continuously reevaluated both to obtain maximum clinical benefit and to guide the search for newer agents that may further optimize the diagnostic efficacy of MRI

  16. New MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, C.D.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.; Szeverenyi, N.E.; Rosenbaum, A.M.; Gagne, G.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Berlin, R.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.; Yu, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates an MR contrast agent-meglumine tris-(2,6-dicarboxypyridine) gadolinium (III) or gadolinium dipicolinate (Gd-DPC)-produced in-house. Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital. For renal imaging, bowel motion artifact was minimized with glucagon (0.014 mg/kg, intravenous (IV)). Enhanced images were generated on a 2-T chemical shift imaging system with a 31-cm horizontal bore magnet after IV injection of Gd-DPC (100 μM/kg). Coronal sections of the kidneys and sagittal sections of the brain, 2 mm thick, were made. Six to eight excitations and 128 or 356 phase-encoding steps were used for each image. Control animals were injected with equivalent doses of gadopentetate dimeglumine

  17. Cellular and molecular pathology of HTS: basis for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis; Scott, Paul G; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar and keloids are fibroproliferative disorders of the skin which occur often unpredictably, following trauma and inflammation that compromise cosmesis and function and commonly recur following surgical attempts for improvement. Despite decades of research in these fibrotic conditions, current non-surgical methods of treatment are slow, inconvenient and often only partially effective. Fibroblasts from these conditions are activated to produce extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen I and III, proteoglycans such as versican and biglycan and growth factors, including transforming growth factor-beta and insulin like growth factor I. However, more consistently these cells produce less remodeling enzymes including collagenase and other matrix metalloproteinases, as well as the small proteoglycan decorin which is important for normal collagen fibrillogenesis. Recently, the systemic response to injury appears to influence the local healing process whereby increases in Th2 and possibly Th3 cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 and TGF-beta are present in the circulating lymphocytes in these fibrotic conditions. Finally, unique bone marrow derived cells including mesenchymal and endothelial stem cells as well as fibrocytes appear to traffic into healing wounds and influence the healing tissue. On this background, clinicians are faced with patients who require treatment and the pathophysiologic basis as currently understood is reviewed for a number of emerging modalities.

  18. Molecular Plant Pathology: Develop tools and resources for crop protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, rice blast disease and sheath blight disease are the two major destructive fungal diseases worldwide. Both diseases are controlled by precise deployment of major and minor genes integrated with effective cultural practices worldwide. Continued evolution and adaptation of the pathogen hav...

  19. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoun, Sophien; Furzer, Oliver; Jones, Jonathan D G; Judelson, Howard S; Ali, Gul Shad; Dalio, Ronaldo J D; Roy, Sanjoy Guha; Schena, Leonardo; Zambounis, Antonios; Panabières, Franck; Cahill, David; Ruocco, Michelina; Figueiredo, Andreia; Chen, Xiao-Ren; Hulvey, Jon; Stam, Remco; Lamour, Kurt; Gijzen, Mark; Tyler, Brett M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Tomé, Daniel F A; Tör, Mahmut; Van Den Ackerveken, Guido; McDowell, John; Daayf, Fouad; Fry, William E; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele; Meijer, Harold J G; Petre, Benjamin; Ristaino, Jean; Yoshida, Kentaro; Birch, Paul R J; Govers, Francine

    2015-05-01

    Oomycetes form a deep lineage of eukaryotic organisms that includes a large number of plant pathogens which threaten natural and managed ecosystems. We undertook a survey to query the community for their ranking of plant-pathogenic oomycete species based on scientific and economic importance. In total, we received 263 votes from 62 scientists in 15 countries for a total of 33 species. The Top 10 species and their ranking are: (1) Phytophthora infestans; (2, tied) Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis; (2, tied) Phytophthora ramorum; (4) Phytophthora sojae; (5) Phytophthora capsici; (6) Plasmopara viticola; (7) Phytophthora cinnamomi; (8, tied) Phytophthora parasitica; (8, tied) Pythium ultimum; and (10) Albugo candida. This article provides an introduction to these 10 taxa and a snapshot of current research. We hope that the list will serve as a benchmark for future trends in oomycete research. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  20. Plant Disease Control Based on the Molecular Plant Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    奥, 八郎

    1993-01-01

    作物を病害から護るため,長年にわたって病原菌に対する毒物(殺菌剤)が用いられてきた.これが,農薬による公害の原因の一つとして世界中で関心を集めている.このような状況下にあって,多くの植物病理学者,植物生化学者の関心は植物の病気に対する抵抗性の機構の研究に向けられてきた.このような研究が実際の病害防除の新しい方法の開発に役立つものと考えられるからである.事実,幾つかのウィルス病の防除に有効な,誘導抵抗性を利用した方法が実用化されている. 一方,病原微生物の病原性の仕組みを分子レベルで明らかにすることは,さらに有効な病害防除方法を見いだす基礎となる.このような考えのもとに筆者は二十数年間病原菌の病原性の機構の研究に没頭してきた. この総説は,その研究成果をおもに,また現在の世界のこの方面の研究の現状を紹介し,このような基礎研究の面からみた,将来の病害防除のあり方を考察したものである。...

  1. Pathologic and molecular characterization of histomoniasis in peafowl ( Pavo cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lorelei L; Beckstead, Robert B; Hayes, Jeffrey R; Rissi, Daniel R

    2017-03-01

    Histomonas meleagridis is a flagellate protozoan organism that can cause severe necrotizing typhlitis and hepatitis in gallinaceous birds. Peafowl ( Pavo spp.) have been shown to be susceptible to histomoniasis in experimental settings, but there are few reports of natural histomoniasis in this species. A retrospective study of the archived cases at 2 veterinary diagnostic laboratories in the United States yielded 5 cases of peafowl with gross and histologic findings characteristic of histomoniasis. Lesions included bilateral, transmural fibrinonecrotic typhlitis and multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with associated trophozoites morphologically consistent with H. meleagridis. There was no evidence of Heterakis gallinarum infestation in the studied cases. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver and ceca from all 5 cases and was analyzed using multiple sets of primers with subsequent sequencing and genotyping. Four samples were positive for H. meleagridis, and 1 sample was positive for both H. meleagridis and Tetratrichomonas gallinarum. These results confirm that peafowl develop clinical disease similar to that described previously in other gallinaceous birds infected by H. meleagridis. The role of T. gallinarum remains unknown and further research is necessary to elucidate its role, if any, in the pathogenesis of the observed lesions.

  2. Molecular pathology of systemic lupus erythematosus in Asians

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Hwa Chia

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease affecting various parts of the body. Polymorphisms in genes involved in toll-like receptor (TLR)/interferon (IFN) signalling pathways have been reported previously to be associated with SLE in many populations. This study aimed to investigate the role of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within TNFAIP3 (rs2230936 and rs3757173), STAT4 (rs7574865, rs10168266, and rs7601754), and IRF5 (rs4728142 and rs729302), that...

  3. Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John T; Haegeman, Annelies; Danchin, Etienne G J; Gaur, Hari S; Helder, Johannes; Jones, Michael G K; Kikuchi, Taisei; Manzanilla-López, Rosa; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Wesemael, Wim M L; Perry, Roland N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a 'top 10' list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region of the world in which a researcher is based. However, care was taken to include researchers from as many parts of the world as possible when carrying out the survey. The top 10 list emerging from the survey is composed of: (1) root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.); (2) cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.); (3) root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.); (4) the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis; (5) Ditylenchus dipsaci; (6) the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; (7) the reniform nematode Rotylenchulus reniformis; (8) Xiphinema index (the only virus vector nematode to make the list); (9) Nacobbus aberrans; and (10) Aphelenchoides besseyi. The biology of each nematode (or nematode group) is reviewed briefly. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  4. [Molecular mechanisms in sex determination: from gene regulation to pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Chantot-Bastaraud, S; Siffroi, J-P

    2004-01-01

    Testis determination is the complex process by which the bipotential gonad becomes a normal testis during embryo development. As a consequence, this process leads to sexual differentiation corresponding to the masculinization of both genital track and external genitalia. The whole phenomenon is under genetic control and is particularly driven by the presence of the Y chromosome and by the SRY gene, which acts as the key initiator of the early steps of testis determination. However, many other autosomal genes, present in both males and females, are expressed during testis formation in a gene activation pathway, which is far to be totally elucidated. All these genes act in a dosage-sensitive manner by which quantitative gene abnormalities, due to chromosomal deletions, duplications or mosaicism, may lead to testis determination failure and sex reversal.

  5. Hereditary breast cancer: from molecular pathology to tailored therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, D S P; Marchiò, C; Reis-Filho, J S

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for up to 5-10% of all breast carcinomas. Recent studies have demonstrated that mutations in two high-penetrance genes, namely BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for about 16% of the familial risk of breast cancer. Even though subsequent studies have failed to find another high-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene, several genes that confer a moderate to low risk of breast cancer development have been identified; moreover, hereditary breast cancer can be part of multiple cancer syndromes. In this review we will focus on the hereditary breast carcinomas caused by mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, Fanconi anaemia (FANC) genes, CHK2 and ATM tumour suppressor genes. We describe the hallmark histological features of these carcinomas compared with non-hereditary breast cancers and show how an accurate histopathological diagnosis may help improve the identification of patients to be screened for mutations. Finally, novel therapeutic approaches to treat patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ line mutations, including cross-linking agents and PARP inhibitors, are discussed.

  6. Pathological and Molecular Based Study of Naturally Occurring Lentivirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Mahmood*, Ahrar Khan, Muhammad Zargham Khan, Riaz Hussain1, Shafia Tehseen Gul and Abu Baker Siddique2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the multicentric lymphosarcoma associated with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia in indigenous breeds of sheep and goats in Pakistan. Serum samples from sheep (n=93 and goats (n=129 were screened for ovine lentivirus using agar gel immunodiffusion test. Overall, 7.52 and 3.87% seroprevalence was recorded in sheep and goat, respectively. During necropsy of sheep (n=3 and goats (n=4, gross lesions including dark color liver with multifocal whitish areas, unilaterally lungs consolidation with granular appearance of cut surface were observed. Mediastinal lymph nodes were swollen and arranged in chain like fashion. Histopathologically, liver parenchyma exhibited extensive proliferation of neoplastic cells of lymphocytic series. Metastatic cells in the form of follicular pattern in the lungs, spleen and mediastinal lymph nodes were also observed. Brain tissue exhibited degenerative changes in the neuron and perivascular cuffing. The PCR product size approximately 300 bp from lung tissue confirmed viral infection.

  7. Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, J.T.; Haegeman, A.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Gaur, H.S.; Helder, J.; Jones, M.G.K.; Kikuchi, T.; Manzanilla-López, R.; Palomares-Rius, J.E.; Wesemael, W.M.L.; Perry, R.N.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a ‘top 10’ list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region

  8. Molecular Pathology of Neuro-AIDS (CNS-HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Masliah

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive deficits in patients with HIV profoundly affect the quality of life of people living with this disease and have often been linked to the neuro-inflammatory condition known as HIV encephalitis (HIVE. With the advent of more effective anti-retroviral therapies, HIVE has shifted from a sub-acute to a chronic condition. The neurodegenerative process in patients with HIVE is characterized by synaptic and dendritic damage to pyramidal neurons, loss of calbindin-immunoreactive interneurons and myelin loss. The mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in HIVE might involve a variety of pathways, and several lines of investigation have found that interference with signaling factors mediating neuroprotection might play an important role. These signaling pathways include, among others, the GSK3b, CDK5, ERK, Pyk2, p38 and JNK cascades. Of these, GSK3b has been a primary focus of many previous studies showing that in infected patients, HIV proteins and neurotoxins secreted by immune-activated cells in the brain abnormally activate this pathway, which is otherwise regulated by growth factors such as FGF. Interestingly, modulation of the GSK3b signaling pathway by FGF1 or GSK3b inhibitors (lithium, valproic acid is protective against HIV neurotoxicity, and several pilot clinical trials have demonstrated cognitive improvements in HIV patients treated with GSK3b inhibitors. In addition to the GSK3b pathway, the CDK5 pathway has recently been implicated as a mediator of neurotoxicity in HIV, and HIV proteins might activate this pathway and subsequently disrupt the diverse processes that CDK5 regulates, including synapse formation and plasticity and neurogenesis. Taken together, the GSK3b and CDK5 signaling pathways are important regulators of neurotoxicity in HIV, and modulation of these factors might have therapeutic potential in the treatment of patients suffering from HIVE. In this context, the subsequent sections will focus on reviewing the involvement of the GSK3b and CDK5 pathways in neurodegeneration in HIV.

  9. Molecular pathology and embryology of Hoxd13 associated limb malformations

    OpenAIRE

    Kuss, Pia

    2010-01-01

    Patients with inherited synpolydactyly (SPD) show limb malformations characterized by one ore more additional digits and toes and fusions of those. A mutation within Hoxd13 comprising an expansion of a polyalanine repeat is the cause for SPD. The length of the expansion is correlated to the severity of the phenotype. Hoxd13 belongs to the hox-gene family, transcription factors which play a crucial role in axis formation during embryonic development. In this work the mutant mouse model spd...

  10. Esophagographic findings of early esophageal cancer : comparison with pathologic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Choong Bai; Kim, Ho Guen; Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the esophagographic findings of early esophageal cancer (EEC), and to compare these with the pathologic results, and to thus determine the most useful method of esophagography for detection of EEC. We examined 18 patients (M:F=16:2) with pathologically proven EEC; 17 cases were squamous cell carcinoma and one was adenocarcinoma. Tumor size, shape and location were evaluated by esophagography and the findings were compared with the pathologic results. The tumors were 0.5 - 7 cm in size; all except two were smaller than 4 cm. Twelve were located in the middle esophagus, five cases in the lower esophagus and one case in the upper esophagus; in ten cases, the margin was ill-defined. Esophagography showed that eight cases were of the superficial depressed type, seven were the superficial elevated type, and three were the tumorous type. All 18 cases were detected by double contrast study, but mucosal relief study and barium filling study revealed only ten and eight cases, respectively; for the detection of EEC double contrast study was thus the most useful. EEC was commonly demonstrated in the middle esophagus with an ill-defined margin; it was of the superficial depressed or elevated type. For the detection of EEC, double contrast study was the most useful. (author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  11. The psychic life of freedom: Social pathology and its symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the relationship between Axel Honneth’s intersubjective theory of recognition and his political theory of democratic ethical life by addressing the potentials and difficulties attached to the notion of social pathology. Taking into account the diverse uses of this concept throughout Honneth’s oeuvre, it focuses initially on two of its formulations: first, the more recent discussions presented in “The Diseases of Society”, some of which can be read in continuity with arguments presented in Freedom’s Right; second, an implicit conception of social pathology that can be found in Struggle for Recognition. These formulations involve contrastingly different premises with regard to phenomenological, methodological, social-ontological and etiological matters. I argue that such differences can be better grasped if one bears in mind two distinctive ways of understanding the fundamental intuition at the basis of the notion of social pathology: either as an analogy or as a homology. By disclosing the actual or potential discrepancies between both conceptions, the aim is to outline the grounds on which they could be brought together within the framework of a comprehensive concept. With this purpose, I then critically examine a third conception of social pathology which was first presented in Suffering from Indeterminacy and later developed, with some restrictions, in Freedom’s Right. Finally, a definition of social pathology is suggested which can bring together the different contributions of each conception while avoiding their pitfalls.

  12. Functionalized Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Selectively Binds to Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on Activated Human Platelets under Flow Conditions and Is Detectable at Clinically Relevant Field Strengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin von zur Mühlen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides the opportunity to image cells and cellular receptors using microparticles of iron oxide (MPIOs. However, imaging targets on vessel walls remains challenging owing to the quantity of contrast agents delivered to areas of interest under shear stress conditions. We evaluated ex vivo binding characteristics of a functional MRI contrast agent to ligand-induced binding sites (LIBSs on activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptors of human platelets, which were lining rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques and could therefore facilitate detection of platelet-mediated pathology in atherothrombotic disease. MPIOs were conjugated to anti-LIBS single-chain antibodies (LIBS-MPIO or control antibodies (control MPIO. Ex vivo binding to human platelet-rich clots in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed on a 3 T clinical MRI scanner and by histology (p < .05 for LIBS-MPIO vs control MPIO. By using a flow chamber setup, significant binding of LIBS-MPIO to a platelet matrix was observed under venous and arterial flow conditions, but not for control MPIO (p < .001. A newly generated MRI contrast agent detects activated human platelets at clinically relevant magnetic field strengths and binds to platelets under venous and arterial flow conditions, conveying high payloads of contrast to specific molecular targets. This may provide the opportunity to identify vulnerable, rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques via noninvasive MRI.

  13. Learning Biology with Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Juliet E.

    This monograph contains 10 plant pathology experiments that were written to correspond to portions of a biology curriculum. Each experiment is suitable to a biology topic and designed to encourage exploration of those biological concepts being taught. Experiments include: (1) The Symptoms and Signs of Disease; (2) Koch's Postulates; (3)…

  14. CT features of jejunal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyland, R.; Chalmers, A.

    2007-01-01

    The imaging of duodenal and ileal diseases is well documented in radiological literature but the jejunum has been relatively neglected. The aim of this review is to outline the current methods of investigation of the jejunum, and provide a comprehensive review of common pathologies affecting the jejunum, with particular emphasis on investigation by computed tomography

  15. Surgical pathology of urologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadpour, N.; Barsky, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    This text details recent advances in methods for detecting, diagnosing, and managing genitourinary diseases. Included are chapters on imaging techniques (including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and ultrasound; tumor markers (such as alphafetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, prostatic specific antigen, and T-antigens); immunocytochemistry; pediatric urologic pathology; and other key topics

  16. Quantum Dot-based Immunohistochemistry for Pathological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are novel light emitting semiconductor nanocrystals with diameter ranging from 2 to 20 nm. In comparison with traditional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, QDs possess unique optical properties including extremely high fluorescence efficiency and minimal photobleaching which make them emerge as a new class of fluorescent labels for molecular imaging and biomedical analysis. Herein, recent advances in fundamental mechanisms and pathological applications of QD were reviewed.

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura presenting with pathologic fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Unlu, Serkan; Ertem, Kadir; Nizam, Ilknur

    2014-08-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is an acute syndrome with abnormalities in multiple organ systems, which becomes manifest with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The hereditary or acquired deficiency of ADAMTS-13 activity leads to an excess of high molecular weight von Willebrand factor multimers in plasma, leading to platelet aggregation and diffuse intravascular thrombus formation, resulting in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Thrombotic lesions occurring in TTP leads to ischemia and convulsion. Depending on the properties of the bony tissue, fractures are divided into three groups as traumatic, pathological, and stress fractures. A pathologic fracture is a broken bone caused by disease leading to weakness of the bone. This process is most commonly due to osteoporosis, but may also be due to other pathologies such as cancer, infections, inherited bone disorders, or a bone cyst. We herein report a case with a pathologic fracture due to convulsion secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic pupura. Thrombotic lesions occurring in TTP may lead to ischemia and convulsion, as in our patient and pathological fractures presented in our case report may occur as a result of severe muscle contractions associated with convulsive activity. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic pupura is a disease that involves many organ systems and thus may have a very wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. One fungus, one name promotes progressive plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Michael J; De Beer, Z Wilhelm; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Brenda D; Groenewald, Johannes Z; Lombard, Lorenzo; Crous, Pedro W

    2012-08-01

    The robust and reliable identification of fungi underpins virtually every element of plant pathology, from disease diagnosis to studies of biology, management/control, quarantine and, even more recently, comparative genomics. Most plant diseases are caused by fungi, typically pleomorphic organisms, for which the taxonomy and, in particular, a dual nomenclature system have frustrated and confused practitioners of plant pathology. The emergence of DNA sequencing has revealed cryptic taxa and revolutionized our understanding of relationships in the fungi. The impacts on plant pathology at every level are already immense and will continue to grow rapidly as new DNA sequencing technologies continue to emerge. DNA sequence comparisons, used to resolve a dual nomenclature problem for the first time only 19 years ago, have made it possible to approach a natural classification for the fungi and to abandon the confusing dual nomenclature system. The journey to a one fungus, one name taxonomic reality has been long and arduous, but its time has come. This will inevitably have a positive impact on plant pathology, plant pathologists and future students of this hugely important discipline on which the world depends for food security and plant health in general. This contemporary review highlights the problems of a dual nomenclature, especially its impact on plant pathogenic fungi, and charts the road to a one fungus, one name system that is rapidly drawing near. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Blood-based biomarkers of microvascular pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) is a genetically complex and chronically progressive neurodegenerative disorder with molecular mechanisms and neuropathologies centering around the amyloidogenic pathway, hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein, and neurofibrillary degeneration. While cerebrovascular changes have not been traditionally considered to be a central part of AD pathology, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that they may, in fact, be a characteristic feature of the AD brain as well. In particular, microvascular abnormalities within the brain have been associated with pathological AD hallmarks and may precede neurodegeneration. In vivo assessment of microvascular pathology provides a promising approach to develop useful biological markers for early detection and pathological characterization of AD. This review focuses on established blood-based biological marker candidates of microvascular pathology in AD. These candidates include plasma concentration of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) that are increased in AD. Measures of endothelial vasodilatory function including endothelin (ET-1), adrenomedullin (ADM), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), as well as sphingolipids are significantly altered in mild AD or during the predementia stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), suggesting sensitivity of these biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis. In conclusion, the emerging clinical diagnostic evidence for the value of blood-based microvascular biomarkers in AD is promising, however, still requires validation in phase II and III diagnostic trials. Moreover, it is still unclear whether the described protein dysbalances are early or downstream pathological events and how the detected systemic microvascular alterations relate to cerebrovascular and neuronal pathologies in the AD brain.

  20. Saline Contrast Echocardiography in the Era of Multimodality Imaging--Importance of "Bubbling It Right".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Shetkar, Sudhir S; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S

    2015-11-01

    Saline contrast echocardiography is an established imaging modality. Logical interpretation of a carefully performed study is vital to realize its diagnostic potential. In this review, we discuss utility of saline contrast echocardiography in evaluation of various pathologies within and outside the heart other than a patent foramen ovale. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina

    2013-01-01

    -contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study...

  2. Epinephrine inhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesions and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtainable and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine inhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine(+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine(-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologists. The results were as follows: 1. The difference of mean score of quality between epinephrine(+) group and epinephrine(-) group was statistically significant at every time interval (ρ value < 0.01 at 2 minutes, ρ < 0.001 at all other time intervals). Epinephrine(+) group was superior to the epinephrine(-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine(+) group than epinephrine(-) group at every time interval. And the difference between two groups was highly significant statistically (ρ < 0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine(-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine(+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times in epinephrine(+) group

  3. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  4. Phase Contrast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift φ directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient ∇ φ , or the Laplacian ∇ 2 φ. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1,000-10,000 in the energy

  5. Innovations in teaching plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, G L

    2003-01-01

    The teaching environment for plant pathology is changing in both positive and negative ways. Teaching expectations are increasing and resources are decreasing, but recent educational research and instructional technology offer new approaches to meet these challenges. Plant pathologists are teaching courses that may attract new students to the discipline or at least improve agricultural awareness. The Internet offers rapid access to information and images for both students and instructors. Instructional technology provides new tools for classroom presentations, communication with students, reaching new audiences, and distance learning, but using these new tools to enhance learning requires skilled and creative instructors. In the past, many plant pathology instructors worked in relative isolation, but new communication technologies and publishing opportunities for teaching scholarship should improve the sharing of instructional resources and methods.

  6. Radioisotope studies under pathologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeRossi; Salvatori, M.; Valenza, V.

    1987-01-01

    This article presents a general discussion on salivary pathology, before dealing with the various salivary gland diseases which can draw real advantage from radioisotope studies. Clinical problems related to the salivary glands first concern diffuse or focal glandular swelling. Focal swelling includes inflammatory or metastatic deposits in preauricular or submandibular lymph nodes, cysts, abscesses, foci of inflammation, benign and malignant neoplasms of the salivary glands themselves or of surrounding blood or lymph vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and oral mucosa. Primary tumors of the salivary glands are rare and usually benign. The combination of a systemic disease with dry mouth and dry eyes due to inflamed conjunctiva and cornea because of decreased fluid production, forms Sjogren syndrome. It may also cause diffuse glandular swelling. Chronic alcoholism, cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipoproteinemia, and malnutrition are other pathologic conditions sometimes associated with diffuse salivary gland swelling

  7. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment.

  8. Interleukin-22: immunobiology and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a recently described IL-10 family cytokine that is produced by T-helper (Th)-17 cells, γδ T cells, NKT cells and newly described innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). Knowledge of IL-22 biology has rapidly evolved since its discovery in 2000, and a role for IL-22 has been identified in numerous tissues including the intestines, lung, liver, kidney, thymus, pancreas and skin. IL-22 primarily targets non-hematopoietic epithelial and stromal cells where it can promote proliferation and play a role in tissue regeneration. In addition, IL-22 regulates host defense at barrier surfaces. However, IL-22 has also been linked to several conditions involving inflammatory tissue pathology. In this review, we will assess the current understanding of this cytokine, including its physiologic and pathologic effects on epithelial cell function. PMID:25706098

  9. Pharmacological Treatments in Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Pathological gambling (PG) is a relatively common and often disabling psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive urges to engage in deleterious gambling behavior. Although common and financially devastating to individuals and families, there currently exist no formally approved...... pharmacotherapeutic interventions for this disorder. This review seeks to examine the history of medication treatments for PG. METHODS: A systematic review of the 18 double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies conducted for the treatment of pathological gambling was conducted. Study outcome and the mean...... demonstrated mixed results in controlled clinical trials. Although limited information is available, opioid antagonists and glutamatergic agents have demonstrated efficacious outcomes, especially for individuals with PG suffering from intense urges to engage in the behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Given that several...

  10. Dendrimer-based Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents: Characteristics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Kobayashi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous macromolecular MRI contrast agents prepared employing relatively simple chemistry may be readily available that can provide sufficient enhancement for multiple applications. These agents operate using a ~100-fold lower concentration of gadolinium ions in comparison to the necessary concentration of iodine employed in CT imaging. Herein, we describe some of the general potential directions of macromolecular MRI contrast agents using our recently reported families of dendrimer-based agents as examples. Changes in molecular size altered the route of excretion. Smaller-sized contrast agents less than 60 kDa molecular weight were excreted through the kidney resulting in these agents being potentially suitable as functional renal contrast agents. Hydrophilic and larger-sized contrast agents were found better suited for use as blood pool contrast agents. Hydrophobic variants formed with polypropylenimine diaminobutane dendrimer cores created liver contrast agents. Larger hydrophilic agents are useful for lymphatic imaging. Finally, contrast agents conjugated with either monoclonal antibodies or with avidin are able to function as tumor-specific contrast agents, which also might be employed as therapeutic drugs for either gadolinium neutron capture therapy or in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  11. The normal and pathological language

    OpenAIRE

    Espejo, Luis D.

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary development of normal and pathological psychology has achieved in recent decades, thanks to the dual method of objective observation and oral survey enabled the researcher spirit of neuro-psychiatrist penetrate the intimate mechanism of the nervous system whose supreme manifestation is thought. It is normal psychology explaining the complicated game of perceptions: their methods of transmission, their centers of projection, its transformations and its synthesis to construct ...

  12. Informational pathologies and interest bubbles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    This article contends that certain configurations of information networks facilitate specific cognitive states that are instrumental for decision and action on social media. Group-related knowledge and belief states—in particular common knowledge and pluralistic ignorance—may enable strong public...... signals. Indeed, some network configurations and attitude states foster informational pathologies that may fuel interest bubbles affecting agenda-setting and the generation of narratives in public spheres....

  13. Pathological features of glutaminase toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, A.; Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    In an investigation of the toxicity of the anti-tumour enzyme glutaminase Rhesus monkeys, marmosets, rabbits and mice were given various doses of chemically modified glutaminase parenterally. The enzyme induced diarrhoea and dysentery and at all but the lowest doses caused illness which was fatal within 10 days. Pathological lesions produced were hepatic lipidosis and glycogen accumulation, and, in the primates, acute necrotizing colitis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6775661

  14. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura eEl Khoury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF. NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD.Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99% is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease.Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM and type 2 diabetes (T2DM are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting on Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia.

  15. Pathological Jealousy: An Interactive Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the psychopathology, antecedents, and current management of pathological jealousy from an interpersonal perspective. The Google Scholar database was searched with the following terms: delusional jealousy; morbid jealousy; paranoid jealousy; pathological jealousy; Othello syndrome; delusional disorder-jealous type; conjugal paranoia. From a total of 600 articles, 40 were selected based on their currency and pertinence to the interpersonal aspects of jealousy. Findings were that delusional jealousy is equally prevalent among men and women, with a greater prevalence in the elderly. Antecedents to this condition can be neurologic, drug related, and/or psychological, most often preceded by low self-esteem and excessive dependence on a romantic partner. Pathological jealousy can be triggered by the behavior of the partner and maintained by reasoning biases and by the psychological benefits that it initially bestows on the relationship. In the long run, however, it poses dangerous risks to the patient, the partner, and the imagined rival so that involuntary hospitalization is sometimes required. Treatment recommendations include couple therapy, a strong cognitive focus, antipsychotic medication, and interventions which enhance self-esteem of both partners and which address the solidarity of the existing relationship. Treatment effectiveness does not yet have a firm evidence base.

  16. The Value of Contrast Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon C. Treiber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is much evidence-based research proving the effectiveness of contrast echocardiography, but there are still questions and concerns about its specific uses. This study tested the effectiveness of contrast echocardiography in defining the left ventricular endocardial border. Methods: From 30 patients, a total of 60 echocardiograms –– 30 with and 30 without use of contrast –– were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded cardiologists with advanced training in echocardiography. No single cardiologist reviewed contrast and noncontrast images of the same patient. Each set of 30 echocardiograms was then studied for wall-motion scoring. Visualization of left ventricular wall segments and a global visualization confidence level of interpretation were recorded. Results: Of all wall segments (N = 510, 91% were visualized in echocardiograms with use of contrast, whereas 75% of the walls were visualized in echocardiograms without contrast (P < 0.001. Of 30 examinations, 17 contrast echocardiograms were read with high confidence compared to 6 without contrast use (P = 0.004. The number of walls visualized with contrast was increased in 18 patients (60%, whereas noncontrast echocardiograms yielded more visualized walls in 6 patients (20%, P = 0.002. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that contrast is valuable to echocardiographic imaging. Its use should be supported throughout echocardiography clinics and encouraged in certain patients for whom resting and stress echocardiography results without contrast often prove uninterpretable.

  17. Microcomputer simulation of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging contrasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.

    1985-01-01

    The high information content of magnetic resonance images is due to the multiplicity of its parameters. However, this advantage introduces a difficulty in the interpretation of the contrast: an image is strongly modified according to the visualised parameters. The author proposes a micro-computer simulation program. After recalling the main intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, he shows how the program works and its interest as a pedagogic tool and as an aid for contrast optimisation of images as a function of the suspected pathology [fr

  18. Contrast media osmolality and plasma volume changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, A.L.; Lui, D.; Dawson, P.; Middlesex Hospital, London

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the plasma volume expansion consequent on the hyperosmolality of contrast media is presented. In the case of the ratio 1.5 media theory and experiment coincide closely but in the case of the ratio 3 media the observed changes exceed the predicted. It is proposed that this is due partly to the slower diffusion of the ratio 3 media out of the intravascular space and partly due to the fact that the osmotic load presented by these media is greater than would be expected from a study of their commercial solutions in which osmolality is reduced by molecular aggregation. The implications for the relative haemodynamic effects of different contrast media are discussed. The osmotic effects of contrast media also play a part in determining the image quality achievable in intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IV-DSA). It is predicted that ratio 3 contrast media will give better quality images in IV-DSA than ratio 1.5 media. (orig.)

  19. Extensive renovation the pathology of heritage building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures.......The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures....

  20. Extensive renovation the pathology of heritage buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures.......The pathology of heritage buildings is often related to renovation initiatives typically initiated by implementing energy savings measures....

  1. Personality dimensions and disorders in pathological gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N; Grant, Jon E

    2013-01-01

    This review presents the most current research in personality dimensions and disorders with respect to pathological gambling.......This review presents the most current research in personality dimensions and disorders with respect to pathological gambling....

  2. Congruence Couple Therapy for Pathological Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bonnie K.

    2009-01-01

    Couple therapy models for pathological gambling are limited. Congruence Couple Therapy is an integrative, humanistic, systems model that addresses intrapsychic, interpersonal, intergenerational, and universal-spiritual disconnections of pathological gamblers and their spouses to shift towards congruence. Specifically, CCT's theoretical…

  3. Subclinical primary retinal pathology in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In Hye; Kim, Ho Jin; Kim, Nam-Hee; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Park, Choul Yong

    2016-07-01

    Foveal thickness may be a more sensitive indicator of primary retinal pathology than retinal nerve fiber layer thickness since the fovea contains no or sparse retinal nerve fiber layer, which coalesces into axons of the optic nerve. To our knowledge, few quantitative in vivo studies have investigated foveal thickness. By using optical coherence tomography, we measured foveal thickness to evaluate intrinsic retinal pathology. Seventy-two neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder patients (99 eyes with optic neuritis and 45 eyes without optic neuritis) and 34 age-matched controls were included. Foveal thinning was observed both in eyes with non-optic neuritis (185.1 µm, p optica spectrum disorder, foveal thickness correlated with 2.5 % low contrast visual acuity, while retinal nerve fiber layer thickness correlated with high or low contrast visual acuity, extended disability status scale, and disease duration. In this study, we observed foveal thinning irrespective of optic neuritis; thus, we believe that subclinical primary retinal pathology, prior to retinal nerve fiber layer thinning, may exist in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

  4. MRI contrast agents from molecules to particles

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri; Boutry, Sébastien; Lipani, Estelle; Belaid, Sarah; Muller, Robert N; Vander Elst, Luce

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the multiple aspects of (i) preparation of the magnetic core, (ii) the stabilization with different coatings, (iii) the physico-chemical characterization and (iv) the vectorization to obtain specific nanosystems. Several bio-applications are also presented in this book. In the early days of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), paramagnetic ions were proposed as contrast agents to enhance the diagnostic quality of MR images. Since then, academic and industrial efforts have been devoted to the development of new and more efficient molecular, supramolecular and nanoparticular systems. Old concepts and theories, like paramagnetic relaxation, were revisited and exploited, leading to new scientific tracks. With their high relaxivity payload, the superparamagnetic nanoparticles are very appealing in the context of molecular imaging but challenges are still numerous: absence of toxicity, specificity, ability to cross the biological barriers, etc. .

  5. Effects of computed tomography contrast medium factors on contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasawa, Kazuaki; Hatcho, Atsushi; Okuda, Itsuko

    2011-01-01

    The various nonionic iodinated contrast media used in contrast computed tomography (CT) studies differ in terms of their composition, characteristics, and iodine concentration (mgI/ml), as well as the volume injected (ml). Compared with ionic iodinated contrast media, nonionic iodinated contrast media are low-osmolar agents, with different agents having different osmotic pressures. Using a custom-made phantom incorporating a semipermeable membrane, the osmotic flow rate (hounsfield unit (HU)/s) could easily be measured based on the observed increase in CT numbers, and the relationship between the osmotic pressure and the osmotic flow rate could be obtained (r 2 =0.84). In addition, taking the effects of patient size into consideration, the levels of contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta (AA) and inferior vena cava (IVC) were compared among four types of CT contrast medium. The results showed differences in contrast enhancement in the IVC during the equilibrium phase depending on the type of contrast medium used. It was found that the factors responsible for the differences observed in enhancement in the IVC were the osmotic flow rate and the volume of the blood flow pathways in the circulatory system. It is therefore considered that the reproducibility of contrast enhancement is likely to be reduced in the examination of parenchymal organs, in which scanning must be performed during the equilibrium phase, even if the amount of iodine injected per unit body weight (mgI/kg) is maintained at a specified level. (author)

  6. Distinctive Roles of D-Amino Acids in the Homochiral World: Chirality of Amino Acids Modulates Mammalian Physiology and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Masataka

    2018-05-22

    Living organisms enantioselectively employ L-amino acids as the molecular architecture of protein synthesized in the ribosome. Although L-amino acids are dominantly utilized in most biological processes, accumulating evidence points to the distinctive roles of D-amino acids in non-ribosomal physiology. Among the three domains of life, bacteria have the greatest capacity to produce a wide variety of D-amino acids. In contrast, archaea and eukaryotes are thought generally to synthesize only two kinds of D-amino acids: D-serine and D-aspartate. In mammals, D-serine is critical for neurotransmission as an endogenous coagonist of N-methyl D-aspartate receptors. Additionally, D-aspartate is associated with neurogenesis and endocrine systems. Furthermore, recognition of D-amino acids originating in bacteria is linked to systemic and mucosal innate immunity. Among the roles played by D-amino acids in human pathology, the dysfunction of neurotransmission mediated by D-serine is implicated in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Non-enzymatic conversion of L-aspartate or L-serine residues to their D-configurations is involved in age-associated protein degeneration. Moreover, the measurement of plasma or urinary D-/L-serine or D-/L-aspartate levels may have diagnostic or prognostic value in the treatment of kidney diseases. This review aims to summarize current understanding of D-amino-acid-associated biology with a major focus on mammalian physiology and pathology.

  7. Evaluation of residual hepatocellular carcinoma after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization: Comparison between contrast-enhanced helical CT and contrast-enhanced power doppler ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Won Jae

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced helical CT and contrast-enhanced power doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) in assessing the therapeutic effect of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). The follow-up contrast-enhanced helical CT and contrast-enhanced PDUS were performed for twenty-nine nodular HCCs from twelve patients previously treated with TACE. We defined the residual HCCs as intratumoral enhancing area on contrast-enhanced helical CT and color signal on contrast-enhanced PDUS. The interval between two examinations was less than 2 weeks (mean, 9 days). Two radiologists evaluated two examinations by consensus, and the results of these two examination were compared with the findings of other examinations including CT, angiography, and/or pathology to calculate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of two examinations. Of the 29 HCCs, 20 had residual HCCs whereas no residual HCCs in 9 HCCs on pathologic examination and/or follow-up radiologic study. The sensitivity, sensitivity and accuracy of contrast-enhanced helical CT were 65 (13/20), 89 (8/9), and 72% (21/29) while those of contrast-enhanced PDUS were 100 (20/20), 89 (8/9) and 97% (28/29), respectively. A microbubble contrast-enhanced PDUS was more effective in the detection of residual tumor in HCCs following TACE than contrast-enhanced helical CT.

  8. Pilomatricomas in children: imaging characteristics with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah; Lim, Gye-Yeon; Park, Hyun Jin; Lee, Heejeong; Sung, Mi Sook; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Jee Young

    2007-01-01

    Although pilomatricoma commonly occurs in children, there is still a poor understanding of the imaging characteristics of pilomatricoma and lack of agreement regarding its imaging findings and histopathologic features. To characterize the radiologic appearance of pilomatricomas on US, CT, and MR and to correlate the imaging findings with histopathologic features. The imaging findings of 47 pilomatricomas on US (n = 17), CT (n = 31), and MR (n = 5) were retrospectively evaluated. Pathologic specimens of all cases were reviewed and compared with imaging findings. All lesions were well-circumscribed, subcutaneous nodules with partial attachment to the overlying skin. On US, the lesions were mostly hyperechoic with posterior acoustic shadowing and hypoechoic rim. On CT, they appeared as enhancing soft-tissue masses with varying amounts of calcification. MR findings were internal reticulations and patchy areas on T2-weighted images and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, corresponding to edematous stroma on pathology. Peritumoral inflammatory changes and connective capsule on pathology were well correlated with imaging findings. Pilomatricoma should be considered when US or CT shows a well-defined hyperechoic or calcific nodule in subcutaneous fat attached to the skin in children. MR images may be helpful in diagnosis. Pathologic findings are well correlated with imaging findings. (orig.)

  9. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: correlation between MSCT features and pathological classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yanji; Dong, Zhi; Li, Zi-Ping; Feng, Shi-Ting [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Chen, Jie [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Gastroenterology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Chan, Tao; Chen, Minhu [Union Hospital, Hong Kong, Medical Imaging Department, Shatin, N.T. (China); Lin, Yuan [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Pathology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-11-15

    We aimed to evaluate the multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) features of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (P-NENs) and analyse the correlation between the MSCT features and pathological classification of P-NENs. Forty-one patients, preoperatively investigated by MSCT and subsequently operated on with a histological diagnosis of P-NENs, were included. Various MSCT features of the primary tumour, lymph node, and distant metastasis were analysed. The relationship between MSCT features and pathologic classification of P-NENs was analysed with univariate and multivariate models. Contrast-enhanced images showed significant differences among the three grades of tumours in the absolute enhancement (P = 0.013) and relative enhancement (P = 0.025) at the arterial phase. Univariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences among the tumours of different grades (based on World Health Organization [WHO] 2010 classification) in tumour size (P = 0.001), tumour contour (P < 0.001), cystic necrosis (P = 0.001), tumour boundary (P = 0.003), dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (P = 0.001), peripancreatic tissue or vascular invasion (P < 0.001), lymphadenopathy (P = 0.011), and distant metastasis (P = 0.012). Multivariate analysis suggested that only peripancreatic tissue or vascular invasion (HR 3.934, 95 % CI, 0.426-7.442, P = 0.028) was significantly associated with WHO 2010 pathological classification. MSCT is helpful in evaluating the pathological classification of P-NENs. (orig.)

  10. 42 CFR 493.853 - Condition: Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Pathology. 493.853 Section 493.853 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.853 Condition: Pathology. The specialty of pathology includes, for purposes of...

  11. Ethics and Professionalism in Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Baral

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathologists spend most of their professional lives beyond direct view of the public, mostly inside the four walls of the lab. It is the clinicians who face the wrath of the public when something goes wrong. However, with the growing awareness of the public into the decisive role played by the Pathologists in the definitive diagnosis of the disease, the pathologists will soon be the target of the aggrieved patients and relatives.1 The issue of ethics can be dealt when professionalism comes before profession. "Professionalism in medicine requires that physician serve the interests of the patient above his or her own selfinterest." Professionalism aspires to philanthropy, answerability, excellence, duty, service and respect for others. "Professionalism in Pathology is based on the same tenets, but has additional dimensions."The qualities of professionalism for pathologists include 1. Communication with the patients and the clinicians. A small phone call with the clinician will solve most of the clinical mysteries not written in the lab requisition forms; 2. Empathy and Compassion towards patients', colleagues', and laboratory personnel's culture, age, gender, and disabilities; 3. Demonstration of passion, respect and understanding towards the patients; 4. Adherence to guidelines and regulations of the regulatory and accrediting bodies; and 5.Profeciency and knowledge in one's work is valued by the patients more than the credentials, which also enables one to identify deficiencies in peer performance. The basic competencies of professionalism are vital to every pathology report, which in turn is the mirror of the ethics practiced by the pathologist. Evaluating oneself is perhaps the most important tool in maintaining professionalism in the practice of pathology. One colleague recently defined professionalism as “all the things one does when no one is watching,” thus placing personal integrity at the top of the list.

  12. Microprobe analysis in human pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.; Kupke, K.G.; Ingram, P.; Roggli, V.L.; Shelburne, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    This tutorial paper reviews the literature on the application of microprobe analysis to practical problems in diagnostic human pathology. The goal is to allow the reader ready access to the literature on specific clinical problems. Specimen preparation and commonly encountered artifacts are also considered. It is concluded that energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis and back-scattered electron imaging are at present the most generally useful microprobe techniques for clinical work, and are no longer solely research tools. The findings often have diagnostic, therapeutic, and/or legal implications. 332 references

  13. Neuroimaging: do we really need new contrast agents for MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.P.L.; Chuang, N.; Roberts, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The use of exogenous contrast media in magnetic resonance imaging of the brain has brought dramatic improvement in the sensitivity of detection and delineation of pathological structures, such as primary and metastatic brain tumors, inflammation and ischemia. Disruption of the blood brain barrier leads to accumulation of the intravenously injected contrast material in the extravascular space, leading to signal enhancement. Magnetic resonance angiography benefits from T 1 -shortening effects of contrast agent, improving small vessel depiction and providing vascular visualization even in situations of slow flow. High speed dynamic MRI after bolus injection of contrast media allows tracer kinetic modeling of cerebral perfusion. Progressive enhancement over serial post-contrast imaging allows modeling of vascular permeability and thus quantitative estimation of the severity of blood brain barrier disruption. With such an array of capabilities and ever improving technical abilities, it seems that the role of contrast agents in MR neuroimaging is established and the development of new agents may be superfluous. However, new agents are being developed with prolonged intravascular residence times, and with in-vivo binding of ever-increasing specificity. Intravascular, or blood pool, agents are likely to benefit magnetic resonance angiography of the carotid and cerebral vessels; future agents may allow the visualization of therapeutic drug delivery, the monitoring of, for example, gene expression, and the imaging evaluation of treatment efficacy. So while there is a substantial body of work that can be performed with currently available contrast agents, especially in conjunction with optimized image acquisition strategies, post processing, and mathematical analysis, there are still unrealized opportunities for novel contrast agent introduction, particularly those exploiting biological specificity. This article reviews the current use of contrast media in magnetic resonance

  14. Computational chemical imaging for cardiovascular pathology: chemical microscopic imaging accurately determines cardiac transplant rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Tiwari

    Full Text Available Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients' biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures.

  15. Osteoblastic Metastases Mimickers on Contrast Enhanced CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al-Lhedan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary osseous involvement in lymphoma is more common compared to primary bone lymphoma. The finding of osseous lesion can be incidentally discovered during the course of the disease. However, osseous metastases are infrequently silent. Detection of osseous metastases is crucial for accurate staging and optimal treatment planning of lymphoma. The aim of imaging is to identify the presence and extent of osseous disease and to assess for possible complications such as pathological fracture of the load-bearing bones and cord compression if the lesion is spinal. We are presenting two patients with treated lymphoma who were in complete remission. On routine follow-up contrast enhanced CT, there were new osteoblastic lesions in the spine worrisome for metastases. Additional studies were performed for further evaluation of both of them which did not demonstrate any corresponding suspicious osseous lesion. The patients have a prior history of chronic venous occlusive thrombosis that resulted in collaterals formation. Contrast enhancement of the vertebral body marrow secondary to collaterals formation and venous flow through the vertebral venous plexus can mimic the appearance of spinal osteoblastic metastases.

  16. Adaptive multiscale processing for contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Shuwu; Fan, Jian; Huda, Walter; Honeyman, Janice C.; Steinbach, Barbara G.

    1993-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach for accomplishing mammographic feature analysis through overcomplete multiresolution representations. We show that efficient representations may be identified from digital mammograms within a continuum of scale space and used to enhance features of importance to mammography. Choosing analyzing functions that are well localized in both space and frequency, results in a powerful methodology for image analysis. We describe methods of contrast enhancement based on two overcomplete (redundant) multiscale representations: (1) Dyadic wavelet transform (2) (phi) -transform. Mammograms are reconstructed from transform coefficients modified at one or more levels by non-linear, logarithmic and constant scale-space weight functions. Multiscale edges identified within distinct levels of transform space provide a local support for enhancement throughout each decomposition. We demonstrate that features extracted from wavelet spaces can provide an adaptive mechanism for accomplishing local contrast enhancement. We suggest that multiscale detection and local enhancement of singularities may be effectively employed for the visualization of breast pathology without excessive noise amplification.

  17. The pathological status of exercise dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, D.; Cockerill, I.; Carroll, D.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—This study was concerned with the concept of exercise dependence. Levels of psychological morbidity, personality profiles, and exercise beliefs were compared among subjects screened for exercise dependence and eating disorders. Method—Adult female exercisers were allocated on the basis of questionnaire screening to one of the following groups: primary exercise dependence (n = 43); secondary exercise dependence, where there was the coincidence of exercise dependence and an eating disorder (n = 27); eating disorder (n =14); control, where there was no evidence of either exercise dependence or eating disorder (n = 110). Questionnaire assessment was undertaken of psychological morbidity, self esteem, weight and body shape dissatisfaction, personality, and exercise beliefs. Results—Aside from a higher incidence of reported menstrual abnormalities, the primary exercise dependence group was largely indistinguishable from the controls. In stark contrast, the secondary exercise dependence group reported higher levels of psychological morbidity, neuroticism, dispositional addictiveness, and impulsiveness, lower self esteem, greater concern with body shape and weight, as well as with the social, psychological, and aesthetic costs of not exercising than the controls, but differed little from the eating disorder group. Conclusions—In the absence of an eating disorder, women identified as being exercise dependent do not exhibit the sorts of personality characteristics and levels of psychological distress that warrant the construction of primary exercise dependence as a widespread pathology. Key Words: exercise dependence; eating disorders; personality; self esteem; neuroticism; psychological morbidity PMID:10786869

  18. Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Diane G O

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous pathogens pose a substantial threat to global food security. One central question in plant pathology is how pathogens cause infection and manage to evade or suppress plant immunity to promote disease. With many technological advances over the past decade, including DNA sequencing technology, an array of new tools has become embedded within the toolbox of next-generation plant pathologists. By employing a multidisciplinary approach plant pathologists can fully leverage these technical advances to answer key questions in plant pathology, aimed at achieving global food security. This review discusses the impact of: cell biology and genetics on progressing our understanding of infection structure formation on the leaf surface; biochemical and molecular analysis to study how pathogens subdue plant immunity and manipulate plant processes through effectors; genomics and DNA sequencing technologies on all areas of plant pathology; and new forms of collaboration on accelerating exploitation of big data. As we embark on the next phase in plant pathology, the integration of systems biology promises to provide a holistic perspective of plant–pathogen interactions from big data and only once we fully appreciate these complexities can we design truly sustainable solutions to preserve our resources.

  19. SHP2 sails from physiology to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajan, Mylène; de Rocca Serra, Audrey; Valet, Philippe; Edouard, Thomas; Yart, Armelle

    2015-10-01

    Over the two past decades, mutations of the PTPN11 gene, encoding the ubiquitous protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 2), have been identified as the causal factor of several developmental diseases (Noonan syndrome (NS), Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NS-ML), and metachondromatosis), and malignancies (juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia). SHP2 plays essential physiological functions in organism development and homeostasis maintenance by regulating fundamental intracellular signaling pathways in response to a wide range of growth factors and hormones, notably the pleiotropic Ras/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and the Phosphoinositide-3 Kinase (PI3K)/AKT cascades. Analysis of the biochemical impacts of PTPN11 mutations first identified both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations, as well as more subtle defects, highlighting the major pathophysiological consequences of SHP2 dysregulation. Then, functional genetic studies provided insights into the molecular dysregulations that link SHP2 mutants to the development of specific traits of the diseases, paving the way for the design of specific therapies for affected patients. In this review, we first provide an overview of SHP2's structure and regulation, then describe its molecular roles, notably its functions in modulating the Ras/MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, and its physiological roles in organism development and homeostasis. In the second part, we describe the different PTPN11 mutation-associated pathologies and their clinical manifestations, with particular focus on the biochemical and signaling outcomes of NS and NS-ML-associated mutations, and on the recent advances regarding the pathophysiology of these diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Properties of conventional contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muetzel, W.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive overview is given of the properties of contrast media currently used in computed tomography (CT). The chemical structure of the compounds and the physicochemical properties derived therefrom are described. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the physicochemical properties of contrast media for tolerance and the pharmacokinetic behavior of compounds in the body. An outline is given of the basic ideas governing rational use of contrast media in CT, which result from complex, time-dependent distribution of contrast media in different tissue spaces. (Auth.)